2008 07 ENG3 Unit 3 by XZX8QW

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									                                                                                                                                                          English III: Unit 3
                                                     Ascension Parish Comprehensive Curriculum
                                                                  Concept Correlation
                                                   Unit 3: The National Period in American Literature
                                                      Time Frame: Regular 6 weeks: Block 3 weeks
Big Picture: (Taken from Unit Description and Student Understanding)
    The literature of the National Period, including Romanticism and Transcendentalism, is interpreted and analyzed.
    The authors’ attitudes toward nature in their works are recognized.
    Compositions that analyze the effects of the literary elements and devices are developed.
    Events in the literature are related to real-life experiences.
    The life of a Modern and Contemporary author is analyzed for influences to his/her writing.
                       Essential Ongoing Activities                                                        GLEs
Independent Reading                                                                        03a, 07e, 09a
Vocabulary Study                                                                           01a, 01b, 01c, 21, 23d, 24
Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess
                                                                                           05, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09f, 20a, 30b
Understanding
Grammar Study                                                                             21, 22a, 22b, 23d
                  Guiding Questions                                                     Activities                                           GLE’s
                                                                      Essential activities are denoted with an asterisk
Concept 1: National Period and the Early                          *Activity 22: Background to the National Period:
                                                                                                                   05, 09e, 09f, 25, 37c, 37d, 41
Romantics                                                        GQ15
15. Can students identify the primary                                                                              07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e,
characteristics of the national period and how they              *Activity 23: Washington Irving: GQ17             16f, 16g, 18, 25, 26c, 27a, 27b, 27c, 27d,
are reflected in the literature of the period?                                                                     30a, 30b, 30c, 31b
16. Can students identify the qualities of Romantic
writing in a poem by William Cullen Bryant?
17. Can students demonstrate how the basic
elements of short stories by writers like
Washington Irving and Nathaniel Hawthorne
contribute to discovery of meaning in their works?               *Activity 24: William Cullen Bryant’s                    03b, 06, 07c, 09a, 09d, 25, 26c, 31b, 33a.
                                                                 Thanatopsis: GQ16                                        33b, 33c




English III: Unit 3 The National Period in American Literature
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Concept 2: Gothic Tradition and the Dark                         *Activity 25: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Short
                                                                                                                 03a, 08d, 09a, 09d, 26c
Romantics                                                        Stories: GQ17

17. Can students demonstrate how the basic                       *Activity 26: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe: GQ18   03b, 07c, 09d, 13c, 13e, 18, 25
elements of short stories by writers like
Washington Irving and Nathaniel Hawthorne
contribute to discovery of meaning in their works?               *Activity 27: Edgar Allan Poe and Gothic        03a, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 11, 14c,
18. Can students show how Edgar Allan Poe uses                   Tradition: GQ18                                 14d
imagery and figurative language to create suspense
in his poems and short stories?
Concept 3: Transcendentalism
                                                                 *Activity 28: Transcendentalism: GQ19           05, 11, 12, 23e, 23f, 25, 26c
19. Can students list the characteristics of                     *Activity 29: Emerson and                       03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 11, 18,
transcendentalism and explain how Thoreau and                    Transcendentalism:GQ19                          20a, 25, 26a
Emerson’s views of nature and mankind reflect                    *Activity 30: Henry David Thoreau and Walden    03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 11, 12, 14a, 14b,
transcendental ideas?                                            Pond:GQ19                                       14c, 14d, 15a, 15b, 15d, 20a
20. Can students analyze Henry David Thoreau’s                   *Activity 31: Henry David Thoreau’s Of Civil    03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 11, 12, 17c, 25,
essay Of Civil Disobedience and demonstrate what                 Disobedience: GQ20                              26c, 35a, 35b, 35c, 37d, 39c, 40a, 40b
it reveals about his views of government and what
                                                                                                                 03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 09e, 11, 12, 14a,
it reveals about Thoreau?                                         Activity 32: Henry David Thoreau’s Of Civil
                                                                                                                 14b, 14c, 14d, 15a, 15b, 15d 17c, 18, 20a,
                                                                 Disobedience, Walden Pond and Emerson’s
                                                                                                                 20b, 25, 26a, 26c, 35a, 35b, 35c, 37d, 39c,
                                                                 “Self-Reliance”:GQ20
                                                                                                                 40a, 40b




English III: Unit 3 The National Period in American Literature
                                                                                                                                               English III: Unit 3
Concept 4: Novel-The Scarlet Letter ``                                                                         3a, 05, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 13b, 13d,
                                                                                                               14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e,
                                                                 Activity 33: Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter
                                                                                                               16f, 16g, 17a, 17b, 17d, 17e, 17f, 18, 21,
                                                                                                               22a, 22b, 23a, 23d, 25, 26c, 39c, 40a
Concept 5: American Author Research Project *Activity 34: American Author Research Project-
                                                                                                               03a, 06, 07e, 09a, 09d, 11, 12, 14a
GQs TAKEN FROM UNIT 7                             Choosing an Author GQ 21, 22
21.Can students explain how works by
contemporary American writers of various cultures
convey their perceptions of American life?
   22. Can students describe how the experiences  Activity 35: Starting the Research GQ 21, 22                 14a, 24, 34a, 34b, 35a, 35b, 35c,36
       of contemporary authors are expressed in
       their works?




English III: Unit 3 The National Period in American Literature
                                                                                                                           English III – Unit 3


                                                                    Documented GLEs
  GLE #s                                                 GLEs                                   Bloom’s     Date and Method of
                                                                                                 Level          Assessment
01      Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a variety of strategies, including:
        a      analysis of an author’s word choice                                            Application
        b      use of related forms of words                                                  Application
        c      analysis of analogous statements                                               Application
03      Draw conclusions and make inferences about ideas and information in complex
        texts in oral and written responses, including:
        a      fiction/nonfiction                                                             Evaluation
        b      drama/poetry                                                                   Evaluation
05      Analyze and critique the impact of historical periods, diverse ethnic groups, and
        major influences (e.g., philosophical, political, religious, ethical, social) on      Analysis
        American, British, or world literature in oral and written responses
06      Analyze and explain the significance of literary forms, techniques,
        characteristics, and recurrent themes of major literary periods in ancient,           Analysis
        American, British, or world literature
07      Analyze and synthesize in oral and written responses distinctive elements (e.g.,
        structure) of a variety of literary forms and types, including:
        a       essays and memoirs by early and modern essay writers                          Synthesis
                forms of lyric and narrative poetry such as the ballad, sonnets, pastorals,
        c                                                                                     Synthesis
                elegies, and the dramatic monologue
        e       short stories, novellas, and novels                                           Synthesis
08      Analyze in oral and written responses the ways in which works of ancient,
        American, British, or world literature represent views or comments on life, for
        example:
        d       an allegory uses fictional figures to express truths about human
                                                                                              Analysis
                experiences
09      Demonstrate understanding of information in American, British, and world
        literature using a variety of strategies, for example:
        a       interpreting and evaluating presentation of events and information            Synthesis
        c       making inferences and drawing conclusions                                     Synthesis




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
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                      evaluating the author’s use of complex literary elements, (e.g.,
        d                                                                                      Synthesis
                                symbolism, themes, characterization, ideas)
                   comparing and contrasting major periods, themes, styles, and trends
        e                                                                                      Analysis
                                           within and across texts
        f          making predictions and generalizations about ideas and information          Synthesis
11      Analyze and evaluate the philosophical arguments presented in literary works,
                                                                                               Evaluation
        including American, British, or world literature
12      Analyze and evaluate works of American, British, or world literature in terms of
                                                                                               Evaluation
        an author’s life, culture, and philosophical assumptions
13      Analyze information within and across grade-appropriate print and non-print
        texts using various reasoning skills, including:
        c       reasoning inductively and deductively                                          Analysis
        d       generating a theory or hypothesis                                              Analysis
        e       skimming/scanning                                                              Analysis
14      Develop complex compositions, essays, and reports that include the following:
        a      a clearly stated central idea/thesis statement                                  Synthesis
        b      a clear, overall structure (e.g., introduction, body, appropriate conclusion)   Synthesis
               supporting paragraphs organized in a logical sequence (e.g., spatial order,
        c      order of importance, ascending/descending order, chronological order,           Synthesis
               parallel construction)
        d      transitional words, phrases, and devices that unify throughout                  Synthesis
15      Develop complex compositions on student- or teacher-selected topics that are
        suited to an identified audience and purpose and that include the following:
        a       word choices appropriate to the identified audience and/or purpose             Synthesis
        b       vocabulary selected to clarify meaning, create images, and set a tone          Synthesis
        d       clear voice (individual personality)                                           Evaluation
16      Develop complex compositions using writing processes such as the following:
        a       selecting topic and form (e.g., determining a purpose and audience)            Application
                prewriting (e.g., brainstorming, clustering, outlining, generating main
        b                                                                                      Application
                idea/thesis statements)
        c       drafting                                                                       Application
        d       conferencing with peers and teachers                                           Application




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
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        e      revising for content and structure based on feedback                            Application
        f      proofreading/editing to improve conventions of language                         Application
        g      publishing using available technology                                           Application
18      Develop writing/compositions using a variety of complex literary and rhetorical
                                                                                               Analysis
        devices
20      Write for various purposes, including:
               interpretations/explanations that connect life experiences to works of
        a                                                                                      Synthesis
               American, British, and world literature
        b      functional documents (e.g., resumes, memos, proposals)                          Synthesis
21      Apply standard rules of sentence formation                                             Application
22      Standard rules of usage
        a. avoid split infinitives                                                             Application
        b.      use subjunctive mood                                                           Application
23      Apply standard rules of mechanics and punctuation, including:
        d.     Commas after clauses                                                            Application
        e      quotation marks for secondary quotations                                        Application
        f.     internal capitalization                                                         Application
24      Use a variety of resources (e.g., dictionaries, thesauruses, glossaries, technology)
        and textual features, (e.g., definitional footnotes, sidebars) to verify word          Application
        spellings
25      Use standard English grammar, diction, and syntax when speaking in formal
                                                                                               Application
        presentations and informal group discussions
26      Select language appropriate to specific purposes and audiences for speaking,
        including:
        a.     delivering informational/book reports in class                                  Application
        c.     participating in class discussions                                              Application
27      Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex
        procedures, including:
        a.     reading and questioning                                                         Analysis
        b      writing responses                                                               Analysis
        c.     Forming groups                                                                  Comprehension
        d.     taking accurate, detailed notes                                                 Comprehension
30      Use active listening strategies, including:



English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
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        a.      monitoring messages for clarity                                             Application
        b.      Selecting and organizing information                                        Application
31      Deliver oral presentations, including:
        b.      responses that analyze information in texts and media                       Analysis
33      Participate in group and panel discussions, including:
        a.      identifying the strengths and talents of other participants                 Evaluation
        b.      acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, listener, or mediator              Application
        c.      evaluating the effectiveness of participants’ performance                   Evaluation
34      Select and critique relevant information for a research project using the
        organizational features of a variety resources, including:
                electronic texts (e.g., database keyword searches, search engines, e-mail
        b.                                                                                  Evaluation
                addresses)
35      Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a variety of complex resources,
        including:
                multiple print texts (e.g., encyclopedias, atlases, library catalogs,
        a.      specialized dictionaries, almanacs, technical encyclopedias, and            Synthesis
                periodicals)
        b.      electronic sources (e.g., Web sites or databases)                           Synthesis
                other media (e.g., community and government data, television and radio
        c.                                                                                  Synthesis
                resources, and audio and visual materials)
36      Analyze the usefulness and accuracy of sources by determining their validity
        (e.g. authority, accuracy, objectivity, publication date, coverage)
37      Access information and conduct research using various grade-appropriate
        data-gathering strategies/tools, including:
        a.      formulating clear research questions                                        Synthesis
                evaluating the validity and/or reliability of primary and/or secondary
        b.                                                                                  Synthesis
                sources
        c.      using graphic organizers (e.g., outlining, charts, timelines, webs)         Evaluation
                compiling and organizing information to support the central ideas,
        d.                                                                                  Evaluation
                concepts, and themes of a formal paper or presentation
        e.      preparing annotated bibliographies and anecdotal scripts                    Evaluation
39      Use word processing and/or technology to draft, revise, and publish various
        works, including:



English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
                                                                                                         English III – Unit 3
        c.     research reports on high-interest and literary topics                        Evaluation
41      Analyze and synthesize information found in various complex graphic
        organizers, including detailed maps, comparative charts, extended tables, graphs,   Synthesis
        diagrams, cutaways, overlays, and sidebars




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
                                                                    English III – Unit 3




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature
                                                                                     English III – Unit 3
        Unit 3 - Concept 1: National Period and the Early Romantics

Purpose/Guiding Questions:                            Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Identify the primary characteristics                 Background of National Period
       of the national period and how they                Fireside poets
       are reflected in the literature of that            Folklore
       period.                                            Short Story Elements
    Demonstrate how the basic and                        Romantic Characteristics
       distinctive elements of Washington
       Irving’s short stories contribute to
       discovery of meaning and exhibit
       characteristics of the folk tale.
    Identify the qualities of Romantic
       writing in a poem by William
       Cullen Bryant.
Assessment Ideas:                                     Resources:
        Rubrics                                             Textbook and additional
        Journal                                                selections
        Graphic Organizer                                   Computer with Internet Access
Activity-Specific Assessments:
   Activity B, 23, 24

                                    Instructional Activities
   Note: Essential Activities are denoted by an asterisk (*) and are key to the development of
student understandings of each concept. Any activities that are substituted for essential activities
                     must cover the same GLEs to the same Bloom’s level.

Activity A: Ongoing Independent Reading (GLEs: 03a, 07e, 09a)

Materials List: teacher-provided independent reading lists

Throughout each of these units, students should explore a wide range of authors and texts with a
focus on American authors, in addition to the readings required in the whole-class activities. To
encourage students to be independent and thoughtful readers, they should investigate subjects and
ideas that matter to them through their own choices in independent reading activities. This will
show them that reading can be useful, enjoyable, and relevant in their everyday lives. This
practice may be especially important if students are reluctant readers or are not accustomed to
reading independently. The teacher should monitor this reading, making sure to incorporate both
oral and written responses to the text.


Activity B: Ongoing Vocabulary Study (GLEs: 01a, 01b, 01c, 21, 23d, 24)

Materials List: student vocabulary logs, Checklist of Common Errors BLM (see Unit 1)

To extend basic and technical vocabulary, students will record both student- and teacher- selected
new and unfamiliar vocabulary in an ongoing vocabulary log. This log should include a
definition, the part of speech, and a sentence for each word. Sentences should contain appropriate
context and enough detail to convey the meaning of the word. Students should refer to the
English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                27
                                                                                    English III – Unit 3
Checklist of Common Errors BLM to apply the standard rules of mechanics and punctuation,
including parallel structure, no split infinitives, commas after introductory adverb clauses, and
commas after long introductory phrases.

 Activity-Specific Assessment
     Activity B: Students’ ongoing vocabulary logs may be assessed or evaluated based on any of the
        following:

             The vocabulary log contains a pre-approved number of unfamiliar words with definition, part
                of speech, and sentence from the readings in this unit.
             Students choose ten of their sentences to be assessed for proper context and mechanics.
 Students choose ten of their words and create a study guide for another student that might include definitions
 along with a word search, a fill-in-the-blank exercise with their original sentences, or an objective quiz.
 Students then switch papers and complete the task.




Activity C: Ongoing Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess
Understanding (GLEs: 05, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09f, 20a, 30b)

Materials List: prompts, note cards

Students will use writing-for-understanding strategies such as the following:
      entrance cards as a lesson initiation activity
      “Stop and Writes” as a comprehension, reflection, or prediction activity during reading
      annotated text as a during-reading activity
      exit cards as a lesson closure activity
Prompts should address comprehension, higher-order thinking, and connections between text and
real-life experiences. Prompts can be used to begin discussions or for assessments. During
discussion, students will use active listening strategies, including monitoring messages for clarity
and selecting and organizing essential information.


Activity D: Ongoing Grammar Study (GLEs: 21, 22a, 22b, 23d)

Materials List: mini-lesson activities, student writing samples, practice exercises, Checklist of
Common Errors BLM (see Unit 1)

The teacher will facilitate a classroom discussion during the drafting/revising process of any
composition on sentence formation problems (i.e., fragments, run-ons, or syntax problems,) or
standard rules of usage or mechanics (i.e., subject/verb agreement, appropriate verb tense,
pronoun/antecedent agreement, appropriate pronoun case, comparative forms of adjectives,
avoidance of double negatives, and appropriate punctuation/capitalization). Discussion will be
based on the common errors in student writing samples using the Checklist of Common Errors
BLM. Mini-lesson activities will be from student-generated examples and will be ongoing and
skill specific. Ideally, the mini-lessons will become differentiated for students’ specific needs and
will be integrated within student writing assignments and not taught in isolation.


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                                                                                      English III – Unit 3


*Activity 22: Background to The National Period (CC Activity 2)
(GLEs: 05, 09e, 09f, 25, 37c, 37d, 41)


The students will note characteristics of the national period through teacher-facilitated mini-
lessons (walk throughs, PowerPoint, or webquest) and discussion. The overview should include
the following information:
     historical background of 1800-1850, including westward expansion and population
        growth
     characteristics of the dominant philosophy and literature of the age and its contrast with
        that of the earlier Puritans and Rationalists

Information can be found at http://classicauthors.net or:
     Irving       http://www.hudsonvalley.org/education/Links/links.html
     Bryant       http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/brady/gallery/70gal.html;
     Poe          http://www.poemuseum.org/
     Emerson       http://www.cas.sc.edu/engl/emerson/
     Thoreau       http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/authors/thoreau/
     Hawthorne http://hawthorneinsalem.org/Introduction.html

*Activity 23: Washington Irving (CC)
 (GLEs: 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e, 16f, 16g, 18, 25, 26c, 27a, 27b, 27c, 27d,
30a, 30b, 30c, 31b)

Materials List: posted list of folktale characteristics, copy of “The Devil and Tom Walker,”
Analysis of a Folktale BLM

Before a reading of any one of Washington Irving’s short stories, students will examine facts
about his life and writing style. They will then discuss the characteristics of a folk tale including:
     oral tradition
     stereotypical characters
     humorous tone
     unrealistic or unlikely situations
     lesson of a general truth about life
The teacher should then demonstrate the use of a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy
descriptions) that will help students connect characters and events to the elements of a traditional
folk tale.

The teacher should distribute copies of the Analysis of a Folktale BLM, read the first paragraph
of the story aloud, and demonstrate how to summarize briefly the description in the box labeled
“Unrealistic Situations.” Students should then continue reading the story, filling in the boxes with
examples for each category. Next, support from the chart should be used by students in
developing a brief composition that explains how the author uses these elements to develop a
general truth about life. These might be shared in whole-class discussion.

The class should then work in small groups to modernize the story, rewriting it with the same
general plot and a similar theme adapted to a contemporary setting and characters. After an oral
reading by each group, the class might discuss the nature of greed both past and present. As
English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                 29
                                                                                  English III – Unit 3
closure, students should reflect on this topic in a journal or learning log (view literacy strategy
descriptions).
 Activity-Specific Assessment
 Activity 23: After reading Washington Irving’s story “The Devil and Tom Walker” and participating
 in a class discussion of the story’s basic elements, the students will form cooperative groups to create
 a modernized version of the story. The groups should work together to create the basic elements of the
 story and may divide themselves into separate functions for finishing and sharing with the whole
 class. The work may be evaluated on the following elements:
                  prewriting activities involving the basic elements of their modernized version of the
                     story
                  use of a writing process to draft and publish the work
                  work that displays a similarity to characters and themes of the original story
                  full participation by all group members, either by division of assignments or
                     collaboration
                  oral sharing of the story


*Activity 24: William Cullen Bryant’s Thanatopsis: (CC)
(GLEs: 03b, 06, 07c, 09a, 09d, 25, 26c, 31b, 33a. 33b, 33c)


In a journal entry, students will describe the most beautiful place they have ever been and the way
it made them feel to be there. The discussion will include a detailed description of the time and
how it soothed or inspired. An alternate topic might be the place you would most like to go and
how you think it would make you feel to be there.

In a mini-lesson, the teacher will introduce and discuss the life and work of William Cullen
Bryant with an introduction to the poem Thanatopsis. Focus will be placed on the following
information:
     age at which he wrote the poem
     reason for writing the poem
     definition of the word Thanatopsis
     definition of the word elegy
     definition and example of blank verse
     explanation of the Romantic view of nature as a soothing, nurturing force

Students will participate in a close oral reading of Bryant’s poem. Then working in cooperative
groups, students will use a teacher-provided worksheet to identify prominent images and themes
in the poem and provide an interpretation of each.




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                                                                                         English III – Unit 3
          Activity-Specific Assessment
          Activity 24: Students will use a writing process to develop a multi-paragraph
          composition, poster, or presentation that analyzes the qualities of Romantic writing in
          the poem “Thanatopsis.” The assessment should include:
                 general description of Romanticism
                 specific examples of support
                 proper documentation for quotes
                 theme analysis
                 personal reaction

Assessment
In a multi-paragraph essay, poster, or presentation the students will paraphrase the passage,
interpret its meaning, discuss its significance and relation to the poems theme, and explain
whether or not they agree with its message.

Students will evaluate group member’s performance.



Unit 3 - Concept 2: Gothic Tradition and the Dark Romantics

Purpose/Guiding Questions:                                 Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Demonstrate how the basic elements of                     Nathaniel Hawthorne Life
      short stories by writers, such as                        Short story elements
      Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan                      Mood/tone
      Poe, contribute to discovery of meaning                  Life of Edgar Allan Poe
      in their works using imagery, figurative                 Dark Romantics
      language and/or creating suspense in                     Gothic Literature
      their poems and short stories.

Assessment Ideas:                                          Resources:
    Rubrics                                               Textbook and additional selections
    Graphic organizers
Activity-Specific Assessments:



                                    Instructional Activities
   Note: Essential Activities are denoted by an asterisk (*) and are key to the development of
student understandings of each concept. Any activities that are substituted for essential activities
                     must cover the same GLEs to the same Bloom’s level.

*Activity 25: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Short Stories (CC)
(GLEs: 03a, 08d, 09a, 09d, 26c)

Materials List: Opinionnaire for Hawthorne’s Fiction BLM, copies of a short story by
Hawthorne or the novel The Scarlet Letter, selected vocabulary for log, guided-reading questions,
topics for journal entries or RAFT writing, portfolio research topics, graphic organizer materials
to analyze story elements

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                                                                                      English III – Unit 3


Students will explore background on the life and work of National Hawthorne in a teacher-
facilitated overview and read a short story by Hawthorne, such as The Minister’s Black Veil or
Dr. Heidigger’s Experiment. Students will then complete an analysis of the story’s elements (i.e.,
setting, characterization, plot, theme, symbolism) in a graphic organizer and participate in a
review of these elements in class discussion.

Working with a partner or individually, the student will write a brief journal entry or create a
visual, such as a collage of pictures or a shadow box that displays the theme of the story. Students
will present these to the class with a brief explanation of their representation.

An introduction to Hawthorne’s work should begin with the opinionnaire (view literacy strategy
descriptions ) BLM that involves the students with the concept of keeping secrets. The teacher
should provide small groups with a list of modern situations that illustrate the concept. An
example of this would be: You and a best friend cheat on a test. However, only your friend is
caught by the teacher and receives a failing grade for both the test and the course. He or she does
not mention your involvement. Should you mention it now? Groups should discuss/debate each
statement, survey members, and record an explanation for their choices. Each group should then
explain the results to the class. This should lead to a class discussion about when it is justifiable to
keep a secret and the possible results of such a situation. The teacher will then connect students’
discussion to a general overview of Hawthorne’s writing.

Before working with one of Hawthorne’s short stories, such as “The Minister’s Black Veil” or
another short story, the class should note a description of the work of the author in a teacher-
facilitated overview.

Students should then read the short story or novel and complete any of the following activities. In
the case of the novel, these activities may be used as an ongoing portfolio to be checked during
and after reading:
     ongoing vocabulary log of new or unfamiliar words
     guided reading questions
     artwork depicting dramatic scenes
     RAFT (view literacy strategy descriptions) writing from the viewpoint of various
        characters
     graphic organizers (view literacy strategy descriptions), such as word webs or charts to
        analyze story elements such as characters, theme, symbolism, and irony (e.g., a word web
        that contains the word hypocrisy at the center)
     split note-taking (view literacy strategy descriptions) to analyze quotes that express the
        author’s views on human nature
     character descriptions
     a composition that discusses any of the major themes

As a closing activity, students should write a journal entry in which they discuss what they have
learned about the American identity from this unit overall and how it compares and/or contrasts
with our society today.

*Activity 26: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe (CC)
(GLEs: 03b, 07c, 09d, 13c, 13e, 18, 25)


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                                                                                      English III – Unit 3
Students will explore details of the life and work of Edgar Allan Poe in a teacher-facilitated
overview. They will read several well-known poems by Poe (e.g., The Raven or Annabel Lee).

Working in cooperative groups, students will analyze ways in which selected literary elements
and devices affect meaning and convey tone in each poem. They will then write a paragraph
describing the overall mood of each poem.

Finally, students will select three favorite images from a Poe poem, illustrate each on a poster,
and provide a written explanation of the significance of the images. Students will make brief class
presentations of their work.

*Activity 27: Edgar Allan Poe and Gothic Tradition (CC Activity 12)
(GLEs: 03a, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 11, 14c, 14d)

The students will brainstorm a list of what they consider to be Gothic. Volunteers will then offer
their responses, and the teacher will chart these on the board. The list will generate a discussion of
the Gothic effect achieved in Poe’s short stories.

Teachers can then choose one of the following activities:
            Students will then select a short story by E.A. Poe to read from copies provided
               by the teacher. Titles might include The Fall of the House of Usher or The Mask
               of the Red Death. They will complete a graphic organizer that analyzes the story
               elements, the imagery, and the figurative language in terms of how they contribute
               to suspense. Students will also illustrate the Poe elements in each story.

                 Students will choose one Poe story, either detective or horror to read in a group of
                  alone. After reading the story, create a story board to explain the events within the
                  story. After, write a paragraph identifying the Gothic elements or detective
                  elements found in the story. After all groups are finished, the story boards will be
                  displayed around the room for the class to view so they may get a summary of all
                  of the stories.

                  Students should reflect further on how the story connects to the author’s life by
                   using the literacy strategy of SPAWN writing (view literacy strategy descriptions).
                  After reading, the teacher should have the students use the S- Special Powers
                  aspect of SPAWN writing to focus on the concept of whether or not a person who
                  might regret serious mistakes has the power to change. The teacher should
                  provide the class with the following prompt:
                  You now have the power to change actions of a character in the story you have
                  just read so that the outcome of the situation will change. Start by briefly
                  summarizing the plot and explaining how you believe it relates to Poe’s life. Then
                  describe what choices or actions of the character you would change, the reasons
                  for these changes, and how you believe this would change the outcome.
                  When students have completed their writing, they should share their responses in
                  small group or whole-class discussion. The compositions can be assessed further
                  as an informal writing that has obvious connections to the text.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                 33
                                                                                       English III – Unit 3
Unit 3 - Concept 3: Transcendentalism

Purpose/ Guiding Questions:                               Concepts and Vocabulary:
    List the characteristics of                              Transcendentalism
       transcendentalism and explain how                      Thoreau and Emerson
       Emerson’s views of nature and                          Civil disobedience
       mankind reflect transcendental ideas.                  Non-conformity
    Analyze Henry David Thoreau’s
       Walden Pond and Of Civil
       Disobedience and demonstrate what
       they reveal about the Thoreau and his
       views of the government.
Assessment Ideas:                                         Resources:
        Rubric                                                  Textbook and additional selections
Activity-Specific Assessments:                                   Computer with internet access
       Activity 30

                                    Instructional Activities
   Note: Essential Activities are denoted by an asterisk (*) and are key to the development of
student understandings of each concept. Any activities that are substituted for essential activities
                     must cover the same GLEs to the same Bloom’s level.

*Activity 28: Transcendentalism (CC)
(GLEs: 05, 11, 12, 23e, 23f, 25, 26c)

Materials List: varied news articles on modern innovators, Contemporary Nonconformists and
Transcendentalism BLM, notes on Transcendentalism

Using available technology or print resources, students will research information about the origin
and philosophy of transcendentalism through the use of web quests, discovery walks, videos, or
teacher-led discussions.

To introduce the concept of Transcendentalism, students should work in small groups with a
variety of news articles that describe contemporary inventors, scientists, political activists, artists,
or business innovators who are modern nonconformists. Possible sources are
http://www.time.com/time/ or http://www.ted.com/. TED (Technology, Entertainment, and
Design) is an annual conference where presenters make 18-minute talks pitching their innovative
ideas. After reviewing an article, each group should complete Section One of the Contemporary
Nonconformists and Transcendentalism BLM.

The teacher should then facilitate a discussion of how these contemporary innovators have relied
on their own instincts and intuition in their accomplishments. Students should then note the
characteristics of Transcendentalism. Information can be found at
http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism. After a class discussion of these characteristics,
students should fill in Section Two of the BLM. Each group should then present their findings to
the class.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                  34
                                                                                            English III – Unit 3
*Activity 29: Emerson and Transcendentalism (CC Activity 6)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 11, 18, 20a, 25, 26a)

Materials List: excerpt from “Self Reliance”, list of quotes from “Self Reliance”

In a whole-group setting, students will read several of Emerson’s significant essays and poems
that discuss the role of nature in man’s life, and they will analyze each in terms of how the
author’s descriptions of nature and mankind reflect transcendental ideas. Working in cooperative
groups, students will create a chart that compares and contrasts the attitudes of transcendentalists
toward nature with contemporary attitudes. These should then be offered for whole-class
discussion.

Next students will participate in an oral reading of an excerpt from Self Reliance by Emerson with
teacher-facilitated discussion of the text. Students will then use a double entry format to analyze
several of Emerson’s quotes from the essay that give advice or observation. The quotes should be
meaning in their own words and give a personal reaction. The following is an example of the
entry format:

The teacher should facilitate an oral reading and discussion of an excerpt from Emerson’s essay
“Self Reliance.” Students will then use split page note-taking (view literacy strategy descriptions
) to analyze several of Emerson’s quotes from the essay that give insight or advice. These quotes
may be teacher- or student-selected. The quotes should be recorded on the left side of the page.
On the right side, students should discuss their meaning and relevance to contemporary life. The
following is an example of the entry format:

              Quote                                                  Student Response
        “We are always getting ready                 This means that people have great ideas
        to live but never living.”                   but never seem to follow through with them.
                                                     They always think that they will get to it
                                                     later. Many want to take time for travel
                                                     or writing or playing music, but they
                                                     just don’t get started, or they let other things
                                                     get in the way.

Volunteers will then read their responses, and the teacher will facilitate a class discussion of each.
Students should next choose one quote from the entry and use it in a journal learning log (view
literacy strategy descriptions), explaining why they think it is meaningful to their lives, with
examples from personal experiences.

As an additional activities one of the following can be done:
    Students can write a dialogue between a teenager and a parent or other authority figure
       that concerns a disagreement over some issue such as grades, curfews, friends, clothes,
       music, or a job. The dialogue should contain several quotes from Emerson included in the
       teen’s responses.
    Write a letter to Emerson agreeing or disagreeing with one of his views expressed.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                       35
                                                                                    English III – Unit 3
*Activity 30: Henry David Thoreau and Walden Pond (CC Activity 7)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 15a, 15b, 15d, 20a)

Materials List: excerpt from Walden, Using QtA to Analyze Thoreau BLM

As an introduction, teachers can show Great Books: Walden Pond on United Streaming. Students
will first note details of the life of Henry David Thoreau that includes the influences of Emerson,
transcendentalism, and his “experiment” at Walden Pond. They will then participate in the oral
reading of an excerpt from Walden with teacher-led explanation and class discussion at key
points.

Students will use a sheet with 7-10 quotes from Thoreau’s writing such as “The mass of men lead
lives of quiet desperation” for their consideration. They should first comment on whether or not
they agree or disagree with the statement with a brief statement of why. Next they should choose
one of the quotes with which they agree and develop a multi-paragraph essay that introduces the
quote, explains why they agree with it, applies it to modern-day life, and gives examples of
situations where they could apply it to their own lives.
Students will first review a biography of Henry David Thoreau including the influences of
Emerson, Transcendentalism, and his “experiment” at Walden Pond.
To help students reflect on the ideas in Thoreau’s Walden, the teacher should involve the class in
the QtA (view literacy strategy descriptions) collaborative process of building understanding
during reading.

In an introduction to an excerpt from Walden, the teacher should make the students aware of the
idea that the reading process should involve close questioning of the author’s ideas. The teacher
should then display the Using QtA to Analyze Thoreau BLM and discuss the list of questions that
can be used in this process.

Students should then participate in an oral reading of the entire excerpt from Walden to become
accustomed to Thoreau’s structure and tone. Then the teacher should reread the first paragraph
and demonstrate the questioning technique by involving the class in a discussion of these
questions:
     What is Thoreau talking about here?
     Does this idea make sense to you?
     Does Thoreau make his reasons clear to you? Why or why not?
The students should record one question and a personal response in their notebooks for paragraph
one. The response should include the students’ reasons as support. This process of one question
and a response for each paragraph should continue as students work in pairs to engage in the QtA
process throughout the rest of the excerpt. When pairs have completed this, students should come
together in larger groups of 6-8 to discuss their questions and responses. Group members should
participate in this session by adding one new question and response to their notes for each
paragraph. The teacher should move around to monitor and help facilitate the discussion in each
group.

Finally, each student should choose a significant quote from the excerpt and develop a journal or
learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) entry that introduces the quote and applies it to
contemporary life and their own personal situations.



English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                               36
                                                                                   English III – Unit 3
Assessment
After reading an excerpt from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden Pond and recording responses to a
list of quotes from the piece, students will choose one of his quotes as a prompt for an essay of
personal reflection. The essay should include a portion of the quote, reasons why the student
agrees with it, an application to modern-day life in general, and then a specific discussion of how
the student could apply the thought to his or her own life. The essay should also include the
following elements:
                  clear introduction that establishes voice and tone
                  use of transitional words and phrases to connect ideas
                  cohesive paragraphs with clear main ideas and thorough elaboration
                  strong closing


*Activity 31: Henry David Thoreau’s Of Civil Disobedience (CC)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 11, 12, 17c, 25, 26c, 35a, 35b, 35c, 37d, 39c, 40a, 40b)

Materials List: photographs of contemporary civil disobedience, essay describing the civil
disobedience of Dr. Martin Luther King, teacher’s notes on Thoreau’s night in jail, excerpt from
Thoreau’s “Of Civil Disobedience”

The teacher should display photographs of contemporary examples of civil disobedience, such as
a sit-in or a protest walk (http://www.history.com/ ), and encourage the class to discuss the
purpose of civil disobedience and the differences between violent and peaceful protest.

Students should next read and annotate an essay that describes the civil disobedience of Dr.
Martin Luther King. Examples might be:
    “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”
    “Choice: A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” (Alice Walker)

The teacher should then give students an overview of Thoreau’s night in jail that prompted his
essay “Of Civil Disobedience.” After reading an excerpt from his essay, students should complete
one or more of the following:
     Identify two of Thoreau’s topics and list his supporting reasons or evidence for each.
     Choose one quote or position from the piece and take a stand for or against it in an
       editorial.
     Write an “unsent letter” to a government official or political candidate that uses one of
       Thoreau’s statements in a request or discussion of advice.
     Write a short composition explaining how the essay displays the philosophy of
       Transcendentalism, using specific support from the excerpt.
     Explore in a small group discussion what Thoreau would have thought about
       contemporary issues such as government deficits, modern taxes, or the Internet.
As closure, students should write a journal entry discussing any situations where civil
disobedience might be necessary. Volunteers might read their journals for class discussion.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                              37
                                                                                   English III – Unit 3
Activity 32: Henry David Thoreau’s Of Civil Disobedience, Walden Pond, and Emerson’s
“Self-Reliance” (Combination of 3 previous activities CC Activities 6, 7, & 8)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07a, 09a, 09c, 09e, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 15a, 15b, 15d 17c, 18, 20a,
20b, 25, 26a, 26c, 35a, 35b, 35c, 37d,38c,38d,39c, 40a, 40b)
To extend the study of this concept, students will be allowed to choose one of the following
activities:
      Research other famous proponents of civil disobedience such as Martin Luther King or
         Mahatma Gandhi. Students should locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a
         variety of complex resources, including multiple print texts and electronic sources (e.g.,
         web sites or databases). Students will then use available word processing and/or
         technology to draft, revise, and publish the information in a multi-paragraph composition
         that compares their research subject with the activity of Thoreau. The published drafts
         will include a selected style guide to include credit for sources and standard formatting
         for source acknowledgment.
      Research the life of a person who has exhibited nonconformity and/or civil disobedience.
         Locate quotes from transcendentalists, Emerson, or Thoreau, and relate them to the
         quotes of your person of interest. Prepare a brief biography of your person that shows
         how he or she represents nonconformity or civil disobedience.

     OR

While reading “Self Reliance,” Of Civil Disobedience, and Walden, students will complete a
multitasked assignment of creating a utopia. The utopia project will include the following:
         A name of the utopia with an explanation
         Laws based on Emerson and Thoreau quotes with explanations and punishments
         A pledge which illustrates transcendentalist beliefs
         A flag,
         A presidential candidate with an explanation of how he/she followed civil
           disobedience
         A brochure
         A letter inviting people to the society.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                              38
                                                                                      English III – Unit 3
Unit 3 - Concept 4: Novel—The Scarlet Letter

Purpose/Guiding Questions:                                Concepts and Vocabulary:
Students demonstrate how the basic elements                   Setting
of short stories by writers like Washington                   Characterization
Irving and Nathaniel Hawthorne contribute to                  Symbolism
discovery of meaning in their works                           Irony
                                                              Theme
Assessment Ideas:                                         Resources:
    Rubrics                                              The Scarlet Letter
Activity-Specific Activities:
   Activity 33

                                     Instructional Activities
Note: Essential Activities are denoted by an asterisk (*) and are key to the development of
student understandings of each concept. Any activities that are substituted for essential activities
must cover the same GLEs to the same Bloom’s level.

Activity 33: Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter: (CC)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 13b, 13d, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e,
16f, 16g, 17a, 17b, 17d, 17e, 17f, 18, 21, 22a, 22b, 23a, 23d, 25, 26c 39c, 40a)

In cooperative groups, students will discuss a modern scenario that deals with keeping secrets. An
example would be: You and a best friend cheat on a test, but only your friend is caught by the
teacher and receives a failing grade for the test and the course. He or she does not mention your
involvement. Should you mention it now? Groups will discuss, survey, record, and then report
their results to the whole-class. This should facilitate a class discussion about when it is justifiable
to keep a secret and how it affects people’s lives. The teacher will then connect students’
discussion to a general overview of Hawthorne’s novel, The Scarlet Letter.

Based on the student’s knowledge of the plot, theme, and characterization of The Scarlet Letter,
students will complete any of the following activities:
     ongoing vocabulary log of new or unfamiliar words
     guided reading questions
     double-entry reading logs for each chapter
     research on topics of interest such as methods of public humiliation common to the 1600’s
     journal entries from the viewpoint of various characters (e.g., Chillingworth describes his
       observation of the incident at Bellingham’s with Hester, Pearl, and Dimmesdale)
     graphic organizers such as word webs or flow charts to analyze story elements such as
       characters, theme, symbolism, and irony
     analysis of quotes that express the author’s views on human nature, such as “It is to the
       credit of human nature, that, except where its selfishness is brought into play, it loves
       more readily than it hates.” (Ch. 13)
     artwork depicting various scenes in the novel
     create a letter or symbol that symbolizes a sin the student has committed in his/her life.
       Students will wear the symbol all day. The following day, students will compose a
       cause/effect essay that explains what caused them to make the letter/ symbol and how
       having to wear it affected him/her.

English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                 39
                                                                                    English III – Unit 3


Finally, students will select a topic related to the study of Hawthorne’s novel and an appropriate
essay type (e.g., definition, problem/solution, process analysis, cause-effect, or literary analysis
incorporating research) and develop a multi-paragraph composition that uses a writing process to
develop coherent organization and sufficient support with elaboration.
Students will use:
     peer grouping or conferencing with the teacher for revision of drafts
     proper conventions for source documentation, including parenthetical documentation for
        textual references
     editing techniques to apply the standard rules of sentence formation, including use of
        parallel structure
     editing techniques to apply standard rules of usage, such as avoiding split infinitives and
        using subjunctive mood appropriately
     editing techniques to apply standard rules of mechanics and punctuation, including use of
        parentheses and commas after introductory clauses and phrases
        available technology to publish the essay.



  Assessment
  Students will choose a topic from their study of the novel The Scarlet Letter and an
  appropriate essay type. The work should be evaluated on the following components:
                  evidence of the use of a writing process
                  coherent organization
                  evidence of all aspects of the writing mode
                  sufficient use of support from the novel
                  correct form in documenting the source, including parenthetical citations
                  correct use of the conventions of grammar, usage, and mechanics
                  publication by use of available technology




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                               40
                                                                                       English III – Unit 3
Unit 3 - Concept 5: American Author Research Project

Purpose/Guiding Questions :                                Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Students will be able to choose a                         Steps to gathering information through
      research topic from a provided list.                       research
    Students will conduct research on their
      assigned topic.

Assessment Ideas:                                          Resources:
    Notes/note cards/outline                                  Print and web-based sources
Activity-Specific Assessment:
   Vocabulary Activity


                                     Instructional Activities
Note: Essential Activities are denoted by an asterisk (*) and are key to the development of
student understandings of each concept. Any activities that are substituted for essential activities
must cover the same GLEs to the same Bloom’s level.

*Activity 34: American Author Research Project—Choosing an Author (Teacher-made
Activity) (GLEs: 03a, 06, 07e, 09a, 09d, 11, 12, 14a,36)

Students will choose a Modern or Contemporary American author from a teacher provided list to
research and write a formal research paper. In addition, the students need to read another work by
their chosen author. They may read short stories, poems, or a novel. This reading is due on a
teacher-assigned due date.

Activity 35: Starting the Research (Teacher-Made Activity)
(GLEs: 14a, 23b, 24, 34a, 34b, 35a, 35b, 35c,36, 38b, 39b)
Students will research their chosen author in class or outside of class. They should have a
minimum of 3 sources exploring the influences on the writer, which may include:
    Time period he/she lived and wrote
    Reasons he/she wrote what they did
    The author’s life
    The writing of other authors

                                          Suggested Plan of Action


Students should first research the author’s life to determine what influenced him/her. From this research,
do further research on one of the above sub-topics, and write a short essay on the influences on the
author from an outline.
The next phase of the research would be the choosing and reading of a novel or several other minor
works by the chosen author, and taking notes, researching critical views, and making connections as
they read. Finally, students will write a research paper and a speech, making the connections between
the influences of the writer and his/her work(s). The speeches will be presented to the class as part of the
Contemporary Period Unit.



English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                  41
                                                                                   English III – Unit 3
                                   General Assessments for Unit 3
       Students will create an ongoing vocabulary log of new and unfamiliar words.
       Students will develop a multi-paragraph composition from one of the following topics:
        Compare/contrast Poe’s Gothic horror story to a contemporary horror story or identify and
        analyze your interpretation of one of the themes of the story, providing evidence from the
        story as support.
       Students will draft a paragraph that summarizes the tenets of transcendentalism and the
        main individuals associated with it, editing and revising with a focus on using the standard
        rules of mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, and parallel structure.
       Students will write a journal entry in which they explore any situations where civil
        disobedience might be necessary in their view after reading Thoreau’s essay called Civil
        Disobedience. Volunteers may read their journals for class discussion.
       Students will write a journal entry or create a visual such as a collage of pictures or a
        shadow box that displays the theme of a short story by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Students
        will present these to the class with a brief explanation of their representation.




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                              42
                                                                                                                       English III – Unit 3
Name/School_________________________________                                              Unit No.:______________

Grade           ________________________________                                   Unit Name:________________


                                                    Feedback Form
              This form should be filled out as the unit is being taught and turned in to your teacher coach upon completion.



Concern and/or Activity                                      Changes needed*                                        Justification for changes
       Number




* If you suggest an activity substitution, please attach a copy of the activity narrative formatted
like the activities in the APCC (i.e. GLEs, guiding questions, etc.).




English III – Unit 3 – The National Period in American Literature                                                                  43

								
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