4 Presentation srm_v2 - MetroGIS

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					   Devising and Deploying SafeRoadMaps:
Communicating Public Health Issues Related to
 Rural and Urban Road Transportation Safety
        Through GIS-based Mashups


                                  Brian N. Hilton, Ph.D.
                                     Research Professor
          School of Information Systems and Technology
                         Claremont Graduate University

                               Thomas A. Horan, Ph.D.
                              Benjamin Schooley, Ph.D.
                    Agenda


• Introduction
• Brief Overview of SafeRoadMap System
• Launch at the CERS Summer Institute
• Interactive Demonstration
• Next Steps – SRM Version 2
                          Introduction

Road traffic injuries are a major but neglected public health
  challenge that requires concerted efforts for effective and
  sustainable prevention.

    In 2006, in the United States, there were:
                    38,588 accidents, which resulted in
                    42,642 fatalities, involved
                    57,943 vehicles and
                    98,040 people.


Consequently, there is a need for a visual information system that can
  raise public awareness to increase and sustain action to prevent
  motor vehicle injuries.
                        Introduction

This presentation reports on the development and deployment of
  SafeRoadMaps (www.saferoadmaps.org), an innovative GIS-
  mashup that visually communicates traffic fatalities from the
  national to the local level.

These mashups integrate a range of spatial data regarding motor
  vehicle crashes, transportation policy legislation, and driver
  behavioral data and present a visual representation of traffic
  safety across the United States.

It was anticipated that these mashups, and related website, would
    help raise awareness and change fundamental perceptions
    regarding the magnitude, risk factors, and impacts of motor
    vehicle crashes and bring both increased safety and awareness to
    transportation policy makers and private citizens.
                    System Overview

SafeRoadMaps interface elements include:

Map – functionalities include: zoom-in and zoom-out, panning,
  geocoding, toggling various basemap layers, and an overview map
Safety Policy – functionalities include: toggling various safety policy
   layers currently Aggressive Driving Law, Administrative License
   Suspension Law (i.e., driving under the influence of alcohol), and
   Primary Seat Belt Enforcement Law
Safety Profile – predefined, illustrative, queries such as: “Minnesota,
   Rural Road, Speeding, Alcohol Involved, No Restraint Used,
   Driver, Age 17 - 21, Male”
                   System Overview

SafeRoadMaps interface elements (continued):

Safety Statistics – ad-hoc queries utilizing:
• State
• Road Types (Rural, Urban)
• Date (Summer, Non-Summer)
• Speed Types (Speeding, Not Speeding)
• Drinking Types (Alcohol Involved, Alcohol Not Involved, Not
   Reported, Unknown)
• Restraint Types (No Restraint Used, Restraint Used, Unknown)
• Person Types (Driver, Not a Driver)
• Ages (Age 0 - 16, Age 17 - 21, Age 22 and Above, Age Unknown)
• Sex (Male, Female, Unknown)
KML File – download static safety policy layers and/or dynamically
generated layers from Safety Profile or Safety Statistics queries
                     System Overview

The interactive, traffic fatality GIS-based mashups were developed
  using recently available Internet technologies; specifically, Web 2.0
  technologies :

    Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) – Allows developers to
      create very responsive end-user interfaces and facilitates the creation
      of mashups and community pages.

    Mashups – Incorporate data and services from different websites in
      novel and innovative ways.

    Community Pages – Allow contributors to collaborate and share
      information easily.
                   System Overview
System Architecture:




Mapping Mashup Platforms:
This system is utilizing Google’s “Google Maps” API and Microsoft’s
  “Virtual Earth” API.
                    System Overview
Data:

The mission of the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) is to
  make vehicle crash information accessible and useful so that
  traffic safety can be improved.
Fatality information derived from FARS includes motor vehicle
   traffic crashes that result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle
   or a non-motorist within 30 days of the crash.
FARS contains data on all fatal traffic crashes within the 50 states, the
  District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
These mashups are utilizing FARS data from 2006; the most currently
  available.
                       The Launch
The launch at the CERS Summer Institute on 28 July 2008, which
  generated over 3 million hits in the first three days, as well as
  media coverage from around the world suggests that indeed there
  is a strong traveler interest in this type of information.
                   The Launch

This usage paralleled the media coverage which included:
    • over 150 reports in newspapers (GoogleNews),
    • television news (KARE11),
    • radio, and
    • related new-media outlets (Google).
Interactive Demonstration



   www.saferoadmaps.org
          Next Steps – SRM Version 2

Preliminary feedback has been useful in outlining directions for
   future system development efforts :
• Provide Multi-year Fatality and Crash Data - There is a need and
  interest in upgrading and expanding data availability to include
  multiyear FARS and State-level crash data. SRM Version 1 only
  includes one year of FARS data and does not include severe
  crashes (where there are no fatalities). Particularly for rural areas,
  it is important to have multiyear data in order to detect spatial
  patterns in crashes.
• Expanded User Friendly Interface Options - A major value of
  SRM is its intuitive approach to accessing traffic safety data.
  There is a continuing need to refine the interface to allow for a
  greater range of inquiries (e.g. pedestrian fatalities) and easier
  means for stakeholders to receive/provide safety data feeds and
  content via SRM.
          Next Steps – SRM Version 2

Preliminary feedback has been useful in outlining directions for
   future system development efforts :
• Provide Local and Regional Connections - There have been several
  expressions of interest to create state and regional level SRM
  versions as a means to interact with various state planning and
  community processes – e.g., State of Minnesota version.
• Injury Prevention and Control - SRM Version 2 would identify, foe
  example, the "100 Most Dangerous Traffic Fatality Crash Zones"
  through the use of "Hot Spot" Analysis and display these locations
  via "Heat Maps".
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., Minnesota, Rural
   Areas, Summer Months




                                              7th June 2001, 20:44, 3 Persons, 2 Fatalities
                                              27th June 2002, 13:46, 5 Persons, 1 Fatality
                                              19th July 2002, 16:00, 10 Persons, 1 Fatality

                                              US 52 and 160th Street East (CR 42)
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., Minnesota, Rural
   Areas, Summer Months




                                               7th June 2001, 20:44, 3 Persons, 2 Fatalities
                                               27th June 2002, 13:46, 5 Persons, 1 Fatality
                                               19th July 2002, 16:00, 10 Persons, 1 Fatality

                                               US 52 and 160th Street East (CR 42)
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., Minnesota, Rural
   Areas, Summer Months




                                               7th June 2001, 20:44, 3 Persons, 2 Fatalities
                                               27th June 2002, 13:46, 5 Persons, 1 Fatality
                                               19th July 2002, 16:00, 10 Persons, 1 Fatality

                                               US 52 and 160th Street East (CR 42)
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., California, Urban
   Areas – Downtown Los Angeles and Interstate 10 and 15


                                                    Interstate 10 and 15
                         Downtown Los Angeles
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., California, Urban
   Areas – Downtown Los Angeles and Interstate 10 and 15
                                            Downtown Los Angeles
                   Hot Spot Analysis

Preliminary analysis of fatality “hot spots” – e.g., California, Urban
   Areas – Downtown Los Angeles and Interstate 10 and 15


                                         Interstate 10 and 15

				
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