handbookmajors by WSrw9z

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									STUDENT HANDBOOK
 Social Work Majors
     Revised Spring 2010




               The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                           The Social Work Department
                       PO Box 173362 Campus Box 70
                                Central Classroom 207
                                     Denver, CO 80217
              Phone: 303-556-3474 Fax: 303-556-5362
                                          Table of Contents
The Metropolitan State College of Denver
Admission to the College………………………………………………………………….…………..Page 3
MetroConnect………………...……………………………………………………………………..…Page 4
The College Catalog……………………………………………………………………..…………….Page 4
Transfer Students…………………………………………………………………….……………….Page 5
Declaration of Major Upon College Acceptance…………………………………………………….Page 5
Financial Aid……………………………………………………………………………..……..…….Page 7
International Students…………………………………………………………………………………..Page 7
The Social Work Department.
Advanced Standing in Graduate School…………………………………………………………………Page 7
Statement of Rationale and Mission……………………………………………………….…………….Page 7
Accreditation…………………………………………………………………………….……………….Page 8
Goals of the Social Work Department………………………………………………………..…….……Page 8
Computer Technology Requirements…………………………………………………………………...Page 8
Advising Appointments………………………………………………………………………………….Page 9
APA Style…………………………………………………………………………………….………….Page 9
Transfer Equivalency Policy………………………………………………………………….…………Page 9
Equal Opportunity Education
Minority Recruitment………………………………………………………………………..………….Page 10
Americans with Disabilities Act…………………………………………………………….………….Page 10
International Students………………………………………………………………………...………….Page 10
Admission to the Social Work Program
Liberal Arts and Perspective Courses…………………………………………………………..……….Page 10
Introductory Social Work Courses……………………………………………………………..………Page 11
Admission to the Social Work Department………………………………………………..……………Page 11
Admission Requirements and Procedures…………………………………………………………………Page 11
Acceptance into the Social Work Department……………………………………………………………Page 13
Admissions of Junior Level Transfer Students……………………………………………………………Page 13
The Social Work Department Curriculum
Liberal Arts Perspective Prerequisites……………………………………………………………….……Page 13
Social Work Prerequisites…………………………………………………………………..….…………Page 14
Multicultural Requirement. …………………………………………………………………….…………Page 14
Social Work Required Courses………………………………………………………………..…………Page 14
Areas of Emphasis…………………………………………………………………………………….…Page 15
Sequencing of Courses………………………………………………………………………………..…Page 17
Academic Credit for Previous Life Experience………………………………………………….………Page 18
A Grade of D or F in a Social Work Course………………………………………………….…………Page 18
Professional Field Experience………………………………………………………………….…………Page 18
 Social Work Department Policies and Procedures
The Attendance Policy…………………………………………………………………………....…………Page 19
Writing Expectations in Social Work Courses…………………………………………………….…………Page 19
The Social Work Departmental Listserv……………………………………………………………………Page 19
Student Performance Review Summary……………………………………………………………………Page 19
The Problem Resolution Procedure……………………………………………………………..…………Page 20
Student, Faculty and Administration Rights and Responsibilities.................................................………..Page 20
Standards of Conduct…………………………………………………………………………….....………Page 23
Academic Resources and Student Services
The Auraria Library…………………………………………………………………………………..……Page 23
The Auraria Bookstore…………………………………………………………………………..….……Page 24
Disabilities Service Office…………………………………………………………………….…………Page 24
Student Health Center……………………………………………………………………………..………Page 24
Student Clubs and Organizations………………………………………………………………..………Page 24
Academic Assessment and Support Center……………………………………………………….………Page 24
Institute for Women’s Studies and Services………………………………………………………………Page 25
Office of Gay, Lesbian, Transgender and Bisexual Student Ser…………..……………………….…….Page 25
Auraria Child Care Center…………………………………………………….…………………….. ...Page 25
Career Services……………………………..……………………………...……………………….……Page 26
Counseling Center………………… ……………………………………………………………..………Page 26
Appendices……………………………………………………………….…..…………………………Page 27


                                          The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                                    Student Handbook
                                                        Page 2 of 61
This handbook does not reflect all policies and procedures on the Metropolitan State College of Denver.
This handbook outlines important information about the college and defines Social Work Departmental
policies and procedures. The Social Work department does also adhere to polices and procedures of The
Metropolitan State College of Denver. To make sure you have access to all information, familiarize
yourself with www.mscd.edu, www.mscd.eud/~socwrk, the Metropolitan State College of Denver Catalog
and the Metropolitan State College of Denver Student Handbook. Policies and procedures are subject to
change.

                                The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                            www.mscd.edu

Metro State provides a more relevant, enriching and individualized education. As the preeminent
public, urban baccalaureate college in the nation, Metropolitan State College of Denver offers motivated
and aspiring students access to a more rewarding and personalized academic experience upon which to
succeed in school, career and life. Metro State’s unique ability to offer a challenging and empowering
urban educational experience makes both teaching and learning at Metro State more relevant to today’s
multicultural and evolving world. By providing more access to diverse learning opportunities, resources,
connections and people—all within a highly supported, collaborative, student-centered learning
environment—students have more opportunity to create the type of education that best meets their unique
needs, while better preparing themselves to meet the changing needs of an increasingly global and
technological society.

The MSCD Student Handbook is located online at http://handbook.mscd.edu/

Admission to the College

Students must first be admitted to Metropolitan State College of Denver. Admission information, including
the application to MSCD may be obtained from the website at
https://www.mscd.edu/admissions/application/
MSCD Admissions can also be contacted at 303-556-3058

MetroConnect

Every student enrolled at Metro State is given a MetroConnect portal account. This account provides
students with access to e-mail, registration, grades, transcripts, calendars, campus announcements, course
tools and more. It is
important for students to access their portal account on a regular basis to check for important information
from faculty and College departments. Students will retain their MetroConnect account as long as they
remain
enrolled in at least one class per academic year. It is each student’s responsibility to know when their
account will expire and to download any e-mail or data before an account is disabled. MetroConnect is a
web-based portal that can be accessed through the Internet using a standard Web browser. For those
students without Internet access, the College has open computer labs available. For lab locations and hours
of operation, please visit www.mscd.edu/~complabs.
To access MetroConnect, visit Metro State’s home page at www.mscd.edu and click on the
―MetroConnect‖ icon or go directly to http://metroconnect.mscd.edu. A username and password are
required to log in to the system.
Students can look up their username and initial password by clicking on the link titled ―Look up your initial
MetroConnect username/password.‖ Students will be forced to change their password after initial login.

MetroConnect is the primary means of communication at the college and in the Social Work Department.

The College Catalog




                                    The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                              Student Handbook
                                                  Page 3 of 61
College catalogs which include course descriptions and college policies are issued to all new students at
Metro State orientation. The Catalog may also be viewed online at http://www.mscd.edu/academic/catalog/
Catalogs may also be purchased from the Auraria Book Center for a nominal fee. MSCD catalogs are also
available as references in many high school guidance offices and in advising centers at Colorado
community and junior colleges.

Transfer Students


The Transfer Services Office http://www.mscd.edu/admissions/transfer/about_transfer.shtml is here
to give you special attention to facilitate a smooth transition to Metro. Our counselors are available for
walk-ins and by appointments and will:

        Assist you with admission requirements and the application process
        Guide you in choosing appropriate courses while you are attending another college or university
        Meet with you at your local community college
        Provide preliminary evaluation of transfer credit so you’ll know what courses will transfer (for a
         preliminary evaluation of transcripts, email unofficial transcripts to transferquestions@mscd.edu)
        Connect you with an academic advisor or your major department so you can complete your degree
         as efficiently as possible.
        Serve as a liaison for transfer students

Location: Central Classroom, room 106
Telephone: 303-556-3774, Fax: 303-352-4329
Hours: Monday 8:00 -6:00 and Tuesday through Friday 8:00 -5:00
Staff Members: Dave Cisneros; Katherine Goldberg; Lindy Cartrite; Vaughn Toland
Email Address: For transfer questions, send an email to transferquestions@mscd.edu

Students should request that official transcripts from previous colleges/universities be sent to the following
address:

Metropolitan State College of Denver
Office of Admissions
Campus Box 44, P.O. Box 173362
Denver, CO 80217

Declaration of Major Upon College Acceptance

When students enter MSCD, they should declare Social Work as their major on the Declaration of Major
form. Students interested in pursing a major in Social Work should consult with the Social Work
Department Chair or with an assigned social work faculty advisor before declaring their major. Declaration
of major forms may be obtained from Academic Advising or the Social Work Department.

Financial Aid

To begin the Financial Aid process or to see information about financial aid at Metro State visit
http://www.mscd.edu/financialaid/ You may contact the Financial Aid department at 303-556-4741 or by
visiting their office in Central Classroom 116.



International Students



                                    The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                              Student Handbook
                                                  Page 4 of 61
Detailed information regarding all requirements and admission procedures of international students can be
obtained from the Office of Admissions and on the http://www.mscd.edu/prospective/international.shtml




                                      The Social Work Department
                                        www.mscd.edu/~socwrk

The Social Work Department at Metropolitan State College of Denver has trained undergraduate social
work professionals for the last fifteen years. We are proud of the accomplishments of our students and
graduates who now serve the metropolitan Denver community in many key positions.

Metropolitan State College of Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national or
ethnic origin, handicapping conditions, gender or sexual orientation. The Social Work Department
encourages ethnic and other minority students to apply.

Advanced Standing in Graduate School

Students who graduate with a B.S. in S.W. from an accredited undergraduate social work department may
apply for advanced standing (where available) in social work graduate programs (M.S.W.). This often
means that students may complete their M.S.W. degree in one year instead of two years.

Statement of the Rationale and Mission – The Social Work Major

Major for Bachelor of Science
Social work is a professional practice. The primary educational goal of the major is preparation for
generalist social work practice in social agencies. Through professional foundation courses and electives,
students acquire skills, knowledge, values and ethics required for beginning BSW social work practice.

Statement of the Rationale and Mission – The Social Work Major
The Social Work Program at Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to educating and training
B.S.S.W Social Work professionals in Generalist Social Work practice so that they may provide direct and
indirect services to minority and majority clients. The focus of the program is on urban problems, which often
affect oppressed minorities representing people of color (African-American, Hispanic, Native-American, Asian-
American) and other diverse populations (women and children, gays and lesbians, the developmentally delayed
and the aging). The program is committed to helping individuals in need and to working toward leadership in
the social, economic and political context, which often fosters painful and socially unjust human conditions.

The needs of metropolitan Denver and other urban areas warrant a generalist perspective in which students are
able to identify the destructive impact of negative interactions between individuals and systems in their
environment. Such interactions often have detrimental effects upon the social functioning of individuals,
families, groups, organizations, communities and larger systems. Through professional foundation courses and
electives, students acquire skills, knowledge, values and ethics required for beginning Social Work practice.
Clients are seen as partners in the process of working toward mutually agreed upon goals rooted in generalist
practice. Using problem-solving methods aimed at individual and group empowerment, the impact of historic
and current negative valuations of diverse, populations at risk may slowly be mitigated.

Accreditation

The Social Work Major is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The Social Work Major
received initial accreditation in February 1997.




                                    The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                              Student Handbook
                                                  Page 5 of 61
Goals of the Social Work Department

The goals of the Social Work Department reflect the mission of MSCD and the purposes of the social work
profession:
         1. Prepare students for generalist social work practice with diverse populations at risk including
         individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities and larger systems.

         2. Prepare students to be competent and effective professional social workers providing leadership
         and service in service delivery systems that address the needs of diverse populations.

         3. Provide students with the knowledge and skills for understanding the dynamic nature of social
         problems, social policies, social agencies and social change in the context of the environment as an
         evolving ecological system

         4. To provide an ethical foundation to guide students’ professional social work practice in keeping
         with social work knowledge, skills and values.

         5. Prepare graduates to further develop their potential for life-long learning and continued
         professional growth and development.

Objectives of the Social Work Department

    1.   Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional Social Work practice.

    2.   Demonstrate the values of the Social Work profession with an understanding of and respect for the
         positive value of diversity including ethnic minorities, gays/lesbians, the aging, women/children
         and the developmentally disabled.


    3.   Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge and skills related to clients’ age, class,
         color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race,
         religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

    4.   Integrate practice, research and policy skills and utilize the strategies of advocacy and social change
         to ameliorate the distress of diverse populations who often experience(d) social and economic
         injustice.


    5.   Understand and interpret the history of the Social Work profession and contemporary structures and
         issues.

    6.   Begin generalist practice with the theoretical knowledge and skills essential for social work with
         diverse client systems of all sizes.


    7.   Apply the theoretical and conceptual knowledge base of the four sources of human behavior
         (biological, psychological, sociological and cultural) across the life span to their understanding of
         the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations and
         communities

    8.   Formulate, influence, and analyze the impact of social policies on diverse populations, workers and
         agencies.


    9.   Evaluate research studies, apply findings to practice, and evaluate their own practice interventions
         and those of other relevant systems.

                                    The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                              Student Handbook
                                                  Page 6 of 61
   10. Use communication skills differentially with a variety of client populations, colleagues, and
       community.


   11. Utilize supervision and consultation when applying generalist social work knowledge and skills on
       behalf of all client systems.

   12. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems, and under supervision,
       seek necessary organizational change.

Computer Technology Requirements

   Social Work Department web site [http://www.mscd.edu/~socwrk]

   The Social Work Department values computer technology for the enhancement and delivery of its
   courses. This will require student ability to utilize computer-mediated courses, databases, assignments,
   and interaction with peers and instructors.

   Therefore,

   1.   As a student at Metropolitan State College of Denver, you will have an opportunity to explore the
        use of information technology in our ever-changing world. Each student has a free email account
        with the college. Social Work students are required to activate their MSCD email accounts and
        provide the email address to the student list serve at the time of application into the department.
        For more information about activating your account, forwarding your MSCD email to your
        personal ISP email account, or accessing WebMail as a web browser-based e-mail application,
        please refer to ―Technology‖ from the MSCD homepage [www.mscd.edu].

   2.   The department requires completion of the ―Information Literacy Permit‖ portion of the driver’s
        license to be included as part of the general admission packet. The student must score at least 80%
        in order to be a valid Permit. Please refer to the ―Distance Education‖ link from the department
        web site for more specific details regarding the ―Permit.‖

   3.   Distance education course opportunities are available. The social work department is developing
        courses for delivery online and/or videobroadcast. Please contact the department for more specific
        details regarding course availability and structure.

        However, distance education courses require a different set of skills and role demands for
        the learner. Students in online courses become seekers of knowledge, not just receptacles.
        The “luxury” of lectures are replaced with the student’s own effort to make logical
        connections, interpret facts, devise arguments, and synthesize knowledge. Distance education
        learners will write more often, which can be more challenging than oral discussion. In
        addition, students will need organization, time management, and intrinsic motivation to
        progress through courses.

   Therefore, the Social Work Department requires students who intend to take any social work core
   curriculum course via a distance learning format (i.e., online or videobroadcast) to successfully
   complete the social work department’s ―Distance Education Driver’s License‖ before enrolling in
   certificate or upper-division social work distance education courses. Please refer to the ―Distance
   Education‖ link from the department web site for more specific details regarding the ―Distance
   Education Driver’s License.‖




                                  The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                            Student Handbook
                                                Page 7 of 61
Advising Appointments

MSCD Freshman and Sophomore students and transfer students may make peer advising appointments.
Junior and Senior Students who have been accepted into the Social Work Program may make appointments
with their faculty advisor. Transfer students with Sophomore. Junior, or Senior standing may make
appointments with the Chair. To make any of the appointments, call 303-556-3474.

APA Style

In the social sciences, the APA style is recommended when writing a term paper. Students must only use
this style when writing a paper for any Social Work class. There are many resources offering help with
this writing style, such as books and web sites. The Social Work home page has links to several useful
websites as well. Your Social Work instructors will consistently expect APA referencing on all written
work.

MetroConnect

MetroConnect email is the official means of communication at MSCD and within the Social Work
Department. Students are responsible for the information sent to their MSCD email account.

Departmental Student Listserv

At time of written acceptance to Social Work major students are added to the departmental student listserv
with their MetroConnect MSCD email account. It is your responsibility to ask for assistance if you notice
you are not receiving these emails and to contact the MSCD helpdesk if you are having technical problems
accessing your email.

Criminal Background

A student who has a criminal record should be aware that he/she may not be able to obtain a field
placement and may not be able to be licensed as a social worker in the state of Colorado.

Social Work Department Transfer Equivalency Policy

All students (transfer and non-transfer students) who intend to major in social work must meet the same
admission criteria that includes; completion of the non-social work liberal arts courses and the social work
introductory courses. All students who are accepted into MSCD must immediately request a transfer
evaluation through the MSCD Admissions Office.

Junior level transfer students need to meet with the Chair of the Social Work Department to be evaluated
on an individual basis and receive their application packets immediately upon entering Metropolitan State
College of Denver. Completion of the non-Social Work Prerequisite Courses is required prior to admission
into the Social Work Department. Junior level transfer students must complete the admission packet.
Acceptance into the Social Work Department is not guaranteed.

For any social work course(s) substitutions from accredited or non-accredited social work programs,
students must submit transfer course syllabi and supporting documentation to the Chair or designated social
work faculty member for approval. Any social work course substitution disputes between the student and
Chair or designated social work faculty member will be channeled to the Social Work Admission
Committee for review.

The only social work course(s) substitutions from non-accredited programs that will be considered for
transfer are those social work professional foundation courses in the junior year, i.e., SWK3050- Human
Behavior and the Social Environment I, SWK3060- Human Behavior and the Social Environment II,

                                   The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                             Student Handbook
                                                 Page 8 of 61
SWK3410- Introduction to Generalist Practice, SWK3780- Social Welfare Policy, SWK3790- Research in
Social Work and equivalent social work elective courses. No senior level social work professional
foundation courses including Field will be considered for transfer into the Social Work Department.

For social work professional foundation courses (excluding Field), review of syllabi, including course
objectives, content outline, learning activities, theoretical frames of reference, and bibliographies will
provide the major basis for determining equivalency. The student must have received a grade of C or better
in the course. If syllabi omit content that is relevant to MSCD Social Work Department’s course content,
students may be asked to retake the course, enroll in an independent study to cover the omitted content, or
test out of the omitted content.

Any course substitutions other than social work courses must be approved by the Chair. If a student has
taken a course at another college that has similar content to a non-social work prerequisite course, this
course must be accepted for transfer credit by MSCD. If this course is not accepted for transfer credit by
MSCD, the student must appeal the transfer through the college’s Admissions and Records Office. The
Social Work Department will abide by the college’s decision.


                                       Equal Opportunity Education


Office of Diversity http://www.mscd.edu/president/diversity/

Metropolitan State College of Denver values diversity and has identified diversity as one of its strategic
planning goals. The Office of Institutional Diversity works to uphold the values of the college mission and
serves as a resource to the Metro State community by providing leadership and oversight on issues related
to diversity. Our goal is to support and promote diversity in all aspects of campus life to include the design
and development of initiatives that embrace and support diversity.

To this end, the college takes a pro-active and balanced approach to diversity. It supports and values
diversity in all forms* in a teaching and learning community marked by mutual respect, inclusion, and
cooperation. Diversity is reflected in the curriculum, in activities of the college, and in the composition of
faculty, staff, and students.

*Diversity embraces age, race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, disabilities, sexual orientation, religion, as
well as intellectual differences.

Please feel free to contact The Office of Institutional Diversity at 303-556-3022 or mscd-
diversity@mscd.edu

American with Disabilities Act http://www.mscd.edu/~access/

The Metropolitan State College of Denver is committed to making reasonable accommodations to assist
individuals with disabilities in reaching their academic potential. If you have a disability which may impact
your performance, attendance, or grades in this class and are requesting accommodations, then you must
first register with the Access Center, located in the Auraria Library, Suite 116, 303-556-8387.

The Access Center is the designated department responsible for coordinating accommodations and services
for students with disabilities. Accommodations will not be granted prior to my receipt of your faculty
notification letter from the Access Center. Please note that accommodations are never provided
retroactively (i.e., prior to the receipt of your faculty notification letter.) Once I am in receipt of your
official Access Center faculty notification letter, I would be happy to meet with you to discuss your
accommodations. All discussions will remain confidential. Further information is available by visiting the
Access center website www.mscd.edu/~access.


                                     The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                               Student Handbook
                                                   Page 9 of 61
International Students http://www.mscd.edu/admissions/international/

Metropolitan State College of Denver and the Social Work Department understands that it must prepare its
students to compete in a globally interdependent society. The curriculum of the Social Work Department
reflects a commitment to this understanding and prepares its students for opportunities outside of the
United States.

In addition, the MSCD Social Work Department desires to provide a quality program of study to those
nationals outside of the United States who need to know and understand the social service structure of this
country.


                                     Admission to the Social Work Department



Liberal Arts Perspective Prerequisite Courses

Social Work majors are required to take the following courses outside the Social Work Department in
preparation for the major. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students must have
completed or must indicate at the time of admission, the plain to complete these courses prior to the fall
semester for which students have been accepted.

        ENG        1010       Freshman Composition: The Essay                                                        3
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ --------------
        ENG        1020       Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research & Documentation                               3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        SPE        1010       Public Speaking                                                                        3
        -or-       SPE        1710       Interpersonal Communication                                                 3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        ANT        1310       Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                                                  3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        PSC        1010       American National Government                                                           3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        PSY        1001       Introductory Psychology                                                                3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        SOC        1010       Introduction to Sociology                                                              3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        BIO        1000       Human Biology for non-majors                                                           3
        -or-       BIO        2310       Human Anatomy and Physiology                                                3
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        MTH 1210              Introduction to Statistics*                                                            4
        -or- MTH1230 (1 credit) Into to Prob & Descriptive Statistics*
        -or- PSY2310 (3 credits) Intro to Stats for Behav Sci*
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Many of the above courses will also fulfill general studies requirements for graduation.

* Students with difficulty completing MTH1210 should contact the SWK Department for advising.
Statistics MUST be completed prior to taking SWK3790. ALL Math classes at Metro State require
Accuplacer or appropriate prerequisite classes as described by the Math Department. PSY2310 and
MTH1230 do not count towards general studies math credit for graduation.


                                          The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                                    Student Handbook
                                                       Page 10 of 61
Introductory Social Work Prerequisite Courses

In addition to the prerequisite courses listed above, the following Social Work prerequisites must be
completed with a ―C‖ or better prior to the Fall semester in which the student begins the Social Work
major.

         SWK 1010              Intro to Social Work and Social Welfare                                               3
         -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
         SWK 1020              Intro to Agency Experience                                                            1

Admission to the Social Work Department

Incoming college students should declare social work as their major on the Declaration of Major form
when they apply to Metropolitan State College. This form is available in Admissions, Central Classroom
Building, or the Social Work Department’s office in Central Classroom, Room 207 (CN-207).

Beginning February 1 of the Sophomore year (Spring Semester), Students may pick up admissions packets
to the Social Work Department in CN-207. The application may also be obtained from the department’s
web page at http://www.mscd.edu/~socwrk/. Application deadline in March 1st, or the preceding Friday if
March 1st falls on a weekend. Students will be notified of their acceptance prior to registration for the next
summer and fall sessions.

Junior transfer students may apply in February and may complete the first four hours of social work classes
(SWK1010 and SWK 1020) in the summer of the year in which they apply. Junior transfers entering
MSCD should contact the Social work Department as soon as possible. Special Admission consideration
(fall semesters) will be given to those students transferring who have not met the Spring Application
Deadline if there is room for further enrollments in the department. Admission to the Social Work
Department is not guaranteed.

Admissions Requirements and Procedures

Acceptance into the Social Work Department will be based on the student’s capability to achieve academic
success, the possession of a value base consistent with professional social work values and ethics, and the
student’s interest in, and commitment to, rendering effective assistance to those in need.

The Social Work Admission Committee has the responsibility to review student admission packets for
acceptance into the department. Evaluations of the following are used:


**       1. Completion of the SWK1010, SWK1020 with a minimum grade of C. The requirements
         for a B.S. in Social Work specify a minimum grade of C or better in all social work courses
         and an overall 2.5 grade point average in all social work courses.

**       2. A minimum grade of C in all Non Social Work Prerequisite Courses listed above under
         Liberal Arts and Perspective Courses.

         3. An overall minimum grade point of 2.0 in all college courses. An overall minimum grade point
         of 2.5 in all college courses is preferred. Students have the option of calculating their overall grade
         point average in one of two of two ways:
                   -         all college courses
                   -         all college courses taken in the last three years

         4. Completion of the Social Work Department Application. Usually consists of 21 questions.



                                         The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                                   Student Handbook
                                                      Page 11 of 61
         5. Completion of a minimum of 60 hours of volunteer experience in a social work setting. Of
         these, a minimum of 30 hours must be completed in conjunction with SWK1020. Certification of
         Completion Forms for non-SWK1020 is provided in the application packet. Final Evaluation
         Forms form SWK1020 will be provided in SWK1020.

         If you are in the process of completing SWK1020 in the semester in which you apply, a copy of
         your SWK1020 – Learning Contract must be submitted at the time of application. Learning
         Contract Forms will be provided in SWK1020 a copy of the Final Evaluation must be submitted.

         6. Two Statements of Reference form persons other than Students, relatives and MSCD social
         work faculty.

         7. Completion of Admission Application Personal Statement/Writing Sample. The Admission
         Application Personal Statement must be typed and must reflect good writing skills. It is expected
         that all students produce written assignments at the college level. Students should reflect
         commitment to learning, values and ethics of the social work profession, personal awareness and
         realistic career goals.

         8. A signed Agreement of Completion between the student and the department indicating the
         sequencing of courses by semester. Students must list the required social work courses by specific
         semester and must follow this agreed upon plan for completion. If the student needs to amend this
         plan after acceptance, they must submit a revised agreement, which must be approved by their
         faculty advisor. A copy of this approved amendment must be turned into the department’s
         Administrative Assistant for the Student’s file.

         9. In some cases, a personal interview may be requested by the Admission Committee.

**        Students who have not completed one or more of these courses at the time of application must
clearly state their plan for completing the remaining prerequisites or introductory social work courses by
Fall Semester, by carefully completing the Agreement of Completion Form. Such students will be
considered for admission into the Social Work Department provisionally. Students must complete these
course(s) with a grade of C or better, as indicated on the Agreement of Completion Form, or their entrance
into the Social Work Department will be delayed one year. If these courses are taken at another college
they must be transferred into MSCD and evidence of completion provided to the social work Department.

Students should be aware that one of the roles of a social worker is to be a ―Gate Keeper‖ for the
Profession. It is our duty and responsibility as social worker faculty members to ensure that all students
accepted in the Social Work Department are suitable for the profession, according to the NASW Code of
Ethics, (Appendix A.).


Acceptance into The Social Work Department

The Admission Committee will make the final decision. There are three options when making acceptance
recommendations:

         1. Admit to the department without conditions.

         2. Admit with conditions – used at the discretion of the Committee when other questions exist.

         3. Deny admission.

All Students will be notified in writing of the Committee action in time to register for the following
semester. In the case of ―denial,‖ the student may petition for a second additional review as discussed in the
Admission packet.


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Admissions of Junior Level Transfer Students

Junior level transfer students need to meet with the Chair of the Social Work Department or designated
person to be evaluated on an individual basis and receive their application packets immediately upon
entering Metropolitan State College of Denver. Certain prerequisite courses (see Liberal Arts and
Perspective Courses) are required prior to admission into the Social Work Department. For any social work
course(s) substitutions, students must submit a written petition to the Chair for approval. Any course
substitutions other than social work courses must be approved by the Chair and accepted as transfer credit
by MSCD.

Any social work or prerequisites course substitution disputes between the student and Chair of the Social
Work Department will be channeled to the Admissions Committee for review.


                                                       Curriculum


Liberal Arts Perspective Prerequisite Coursework

Students are required to complete the following Liberal Arts perspective courses prior to admission to the
Social Work Department: (Many of these courses will also fulfill the MSCD General Studies college
requirements.)

         ENG        1010       Freshman Composition: The Essay                                                       3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         ENG        1020       Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research & Documentation                              3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         SPE        1010       Public Speaking                                                                       3
         -or-       SPE        1710       Interpersonal Communication                                                3
         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----
         ANT        1310       Introduction to Cultural Anthropology                                                 3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         PSC        1010       American National Government                                                          3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         PSY        1001       Introductory Psychology                                                               3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         SOC        1010       Introduction to Sociology                                                             3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         BIO        1000       Human Biology for non-majors                                                          3
         -or-       BIO        2310       Human Anatomy and Physiology                                               3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         MTH 1210              Introduction to Statistics*                                                           4
         -or- MTH1230 Into to Prob & Descriptive Statistics*                                                         1
         -or- PSY2310          Intro to Stats for Behav Sci*                                                          3
         --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Students with difficulty completing MTH1210 should contact the SWK Department for advising.
Statistics MUST be completed prior to taking SWK3790. ALL Math classes at Metro State require
Accuplacer or appropriate prerequisite classes as described by the Math Department. PSY2310 and
MTH1230 do not count towards general studies math credit for graduation.

To fulfill Metro’s General Studies Requirements for graduation, students will still need an additional 3
credits in History, 6 credits in Arts and Letters and 3 credits in National Science.. It is not required students
have this portion of their general studies completed prior to entering the Social Work Department, but is
recommended to ensure timely graduation.


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The Social Work major does not require a minor; however students must still reach 120 credits by
graduation. Often students need approximately 9-15 credits of general electives to ensure they will have
120 credits. It is not required students have this portion completed prior to entering the Social Work
Department, but is recommended to ensure timely graduation.

Social Work Prerequisite Coursework

In addition to the prerequisite courses listed above, the following Social Work prerequisites must be
completed with a ―C‖ or better prior to the Fall semester in which the student begins the Social Work
major.

         SWK 1010              Intro to Social Work and Social Welfare                                               3
         -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
         SWK 1020              Intro to Agency Experience                                                            1
         -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Multicultural Requirement

Students are required to complete two approved non-social work multicultural courses prior to enrolling in
SWK4790 – Professional Field Experience I. These two multicultural courses do not need to be completed
before applying to the Social Work Department for admission, but it is recommended to have at least the
lower division course completed. Students may choose on of the following sequences:

         AAS1010 followed by AAS3300 or AAS3550
         CHS1000 followed by CHS3100 or CHS3210, or
         NAS1000 followed by NAS3200

Exceptions to these recommended courses must be approved by the Chair of the Department prior to
enrolling in a substitute course.

If Students follow one of the above multicultural sequences, they will fulfill their multicultural requirement
for Metro’s general studies requirement for graduation as well as the Social Work requirement.

Social Work Required Courses

Social Work majors must have written acceptance into the Social Work program and fulfilled any
provisional requirements before taking any of the classes below. Failure to follow the correct sequence of
course will result in an administrative withdraw from Social Work courses as well as a revoke of
acceptance status.




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Junior Year
                                                                Semester Six
Semester Five                                                   Social Work3060              (3)
Social Work3050              (3)                                Social Work3780              (3)
Social Work3790              (4)                                Social Work3410              (4)
Social Work Elective         (3/4)                              SWK/College Elective         (3/5)
SWK/College Elective         (3/4)                                                            13/15
                              13/15

Senior Year                                                     Semester Eight
                                                                Social Work 4850             (3)
Semester Seven                                                  Social Work 4810             (5)
Social Work4010              (4)                                Social Work 4410             (4)
Social Work4790              (5)                                College Electives
Social Work 4250             (3)                                         If required          (3)
College Electives,                                                                            15
         If required         (3)
                             15

Areas of Emphasis

Social Work majors take a total of 9 credit hours of Social Work electives plus 10 credit hours of
Professional Field Experience to fulfill an area of emphasis. Students may choose an area of emphasis and
complete specific electives in that area, or they may choose a No Area of Emphasis. In that case, students
select any 3000 level Social Work elective offered, but still must complete 9 credit hours in Social Work
electives. Social Work electives are open to non-Social Work majors as well. It is imperative students
seek advising as some Social Work electives are only offered once per year. The nine credits of Social
Work electives must be completed prior to a Social Work major’s senior year or prior to enrolling in
Professional Field Experience I. In Professional Field Experience I and II, the student will have a Field
Placement in the specified area of emphasis. If the student has a No Area of Emphasis, the student is not
required to complete their Field Placement in a specified area. All Field Placements must be approved by
the Social Work Department Field Coordinator.

No Area

Students may take a total of 9 credit hours of upper division Social Work electives of their choice.

          SWK     4790     Professional Field Experience I                                             5
          SWK     4810     Professional Field Experience II                                            5


Child Welfare Area of Emphasis

          SWK     3100     Child Welfare and the Law                                                   3
          SWK     3150     Child Maltreatment                                                          3
          SWK     3200     Urban Families                                                              3

          SWK     479A     Professional Field Experience I                                             5
          SWK     481A     Professional Field Experience II                                            5

Developmental Disabilities

          SWK     3000     Applied Legal Issues in Social Work *                                       1

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        SWK      3020     Case Management *                                   4
                          OR
        SWK      3400     Social Work Marco Practice*                         4
                          OR
        SWK      3450     Mutual Aide Groups in Social Work                   4
        SWK      3250     Social Work and Developmental Disabilities          3
        SWK      3300     Parents with Developmental Disabilities             1

*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

        SWK      479B     Professional Field Experience I                     5
        SWK      481B     Professional Field Experience II                    5


Early Intervention: Birth Through Five

        SWK      3000     Applied Legal Issues in Social Work *               1
        SWK      3020     Case Management            *                        4
                          OR
        SWK 3400          Social Work Macro Practice*                         4
                          OR
        SWK 3450          Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work *                  4
        SWK 3700          Social Work and Early Intervention: Birth
                          Through Five                                        4
*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

        SWK      479C     Professional Field Experience I                     5
        SWK      481C     Professional Field Experience II                    5


Children and Adolescent Mental Health

        SWK      3000     Applied Legal Issues in Social Work          *      1
        SWK      3010     Social Work with Children and Adolescents           4
        SWK      3020     Case Management *                                   4
                          OR
        SWK 3400          Social Work Macro Practice*                         4
                          OR
        SWK 3450          Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work*                   4
*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

        SWK      479D     Professional Field Experience I                     5
        SWK      481D     Professional Field Experience II                    5


Gay and Lesbian

        SWK      3000     Applied Legal Issues in Social Work             *   1
        SWK      3020     Case Management                   *                 4
                          OR
        SWK      3400     Social Work Macro Practice        *                 4
                          OR
        SWK      3450     Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work *                  4
        SWK      3500     Social Work with Gays and Lesbians                  4
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                                             Student Handbook
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*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

         SWK      479E     Professional Field Experience I                                          5
         SWK      481E     Professional Field Experience II                                         5

Women

         SWK      3000    Applied Legal Issues in Social Work*                                      1
         SWK      3020    Case Management *                                                         4
                          OR
        SWK 3400          Social Work Macro Practice           *                                    4
                          OR
        SWK 3450          Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work*                                         4
        SWK 3600          Social Work with Women                                                    4
*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

         SWK      479F     Professional Field Experience I                                          5
         SWK      481F     Professional Field Experience II                                         5


Aging

         SWK      3000    Applied Legal Issues in Social Work*                                      1
         SWK      3020    Case Management                      *                                    4
                          OR
        SWK 3400          Social Work Macro Practice           *                                    4
                          OR
        SWK 3450          Mutual Aid Groups in Social Work*                                         4
        SWK 3030          Social Work with the Aging                                                4
*Major papers and or assignments will reflect student’s area of emphasis

         SWK      479G     Professional Field Experience I                                          5
         SWK      481G     Professional Field Experience II                                         5



Sequencing of Courses

There will be adherence to the prerequisites for the social work courses. The basis for the sequencing of
courses, will be to insure necessary preparation for students to successfully complete courses throughout
the program. It is very important that students be aware of the sequencing of courses. Students who fail to
familiarize themselves with the sequencing of courses may delay their graduation up to one year by missing
required courses in the appropriate semester.


Academic Credit for Previous Life Experience

No credit shall be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of the professional field experience or for any courses
with a SWK preface.

A Grade of D or F in a Social Work Course

A student receiving a grade of D or F must see their social work advisor immediately to discuss their plan
for improving their grade. Students must receive a C or better in all social work courses. Students are

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allowed to repeat a social work course once. Students who fail to obtain a C or better after two attempts
will automatically be suspended from the Social Work Department.

                                     Professional Field Experience



The Professional Field Experience takes place during the fall and spring semesters of the senior year. The
student is placed in an approved social work agency for 8 hours a week in order to integrate classroom
knowledge with practice and to experience the role and requirements of a professional Social Worker. The
student remains in the same agency for both semesters, progressing from orientation to beginning
professional competence. Field Instruction is provided to the student while in the agency by an agency
employee who is a professional social worker, and who has agreed to serve as a Field Instructor for the
Social Work Department.

The placement process begins during spring semester of the Junior year. Students will receive notice on
the SWK Department Student listserv in February, asking them to fill out applications for placement and
providing further information about the placement process. Each student will have an individual interview
with a member of the faculty, during which the placement process will be fully explained, questions
answered and help provided to identify their interests and a potential focus for the Field Experience. Each
student will be referred to several agencies as possible placement sites. The student is responsible for
setting up interviews and obtaining a placement at an approved agency during spring semester of the junior
year. Faculty will be available to help the student with this process. Students are to have a placement
secured and to have completed the placement confirmation form prior to the end of the spring semester of
the junior year. Students wishing to volunteer at their agencies during the summer may do so, but will not
receive course credit for this time. The Field Manual will be provided to students entering Professional
Field Experience prior to the start of the Fall semester. The Professional Field Experience begins fall
semester of the senior year. Anyone wishing to discuss the Professional Field Experience may phone the
Filed Coordinator, Lynn Kearsvang, at 556-4663 or appointment by calling 556-3474.


                                         Policies and Procedures


Please Note: These policies and procedures are consistent with institutional policies and procedures. They
were approved by the Dean of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the college attorney before being
implemented in Spring 95. The Social Work Department also adheres to the standards and polices in the
MSCD Student Handbook, which is published annually by the Office of Student Publications. You can
also view the handbook online at http://www.mscd.edu/%7Estudlife/

The Attendance Policy

The Attendance Policy is expected to be adhered to in all Social Work courses and is available at
http://www.mscd.edu/~socwrk/field/rtf/attendance.doc


Writing Expectations in Social Work Courses

The Social Work Department expects all students to write at a college level and requires papers to be in
APA format. Students are expected to seek improvement skills for their writing if needed. Students may
go to MSCD’s Writing Center or their instructor for assistance in writing. Students also may be referred to
the Writing Center by SWK faculty.

MSCD Writing Center       King Center Bldg. Room 310            303-556-6070


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Official APA Style Website          www.apastyle.org

The Social Work Departmental Listserv

At time of written acceptance to Social Work major students are added to the departmental student listserv
with their MetroConnect MSCD email account. It is your responsibility to ask for assistance if you notice
you are not receiving these emails and to contact the MSCD helpdesk if you are having technical problems
accessing your email.

Student Performance Review Summary

         All students are admitted and retained in The Social Work Department on the assumption that they
have the potential academic ability and personal suitability for completing the professional Social Work
Program. All students admitted to The Social Work Department at The Metropolitan State College of
Denver are expected to maintain the standards established by the Social Work Department, the Social Work
profession and the College.

         During the course of study a student may not perform at the required level. When problematic
situations are identified, the Performance Review Committee will conduct a review to determine whether it
is appropriate for the student to continue in the Social Work Department, and if so, under what conditions.
Such conditions could include a requirement to complete study skills or writing skills development,
completion of psychological counseling or other treatment, or other appropriate activities to resolve
academic or personal problems.

         The Performance Review Committee shall be responsible for monitoring and reviewing student
performance issues for all majors in the Social Work Department. Membership shall include: A Social
Work faculty member who will serve as the chair of the committee, the student's advisor or an advocate
selected by the student, a representative from the Dean's office and others, such as the agency field
instructor, as appropriate to the particular situation.

Reviews may be automatic, student, or faculty initiated. Policies and procedures are described in a separate
document available in Appendix B of this handbook, in the Social Work Department office, and on the
department’s website www.mscd.edu/~socwrk




The Problem Resolution Procedure

Students begin the application process for Field during spring semester of their Junior year. For many
students, this is their first experience as a professional in the community, and almost certainly their first
experience as a social work professional. The Field environment is complex and demanding. Even
students who have done exceptionally well in their coursework may find the multiple demands of the
practice environment confusing and, at times, overwhelming. It is to be expected that difficulties will arise
occasionally for the student, field instructor, agency or school. Students may feel unable to raise an issue
because they may be concerned that it will effect their grades. When problems do occur, it is in the best
interest of all concerned that they be resolved as expeditiously as possible in order to avoid any
unnecessary escalation. For each student in placement, there is an educational partnership, or team,
consisting of the student, the field instructor, in some cases a task supervisor, and the faculty liaison. The
following procedure has been developed so that all of the members of this educational team will know how
to proceed if for any reason the placement raises concerns.

Step 1.
         Someone becomes aware of an area of concern. This may be the field instructor, task supervisor,
student or field liaison.
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Step 2.
          The concerned person addresses the issue directly with the person about whom they have the
concern. or, alternatively, the concerned person discusses the situation informally with the third or forth
member of the team in order to get perspective or support and then addresses the person about whom they
have the concern. (i.e. The field instructor may bring up an issue directly with the student, or may choose
to discuss it with the field liaison for some input on how best to proceed before talking with the student.
Or, the student may ask the field liaison for help in talking with the field instructor.) It is anticipated that
most concerns will be resolved at this step or at step 3. Team members may wish to take informal notes
about the issue and resolutions discussed. The issue and resolution should be reflected in the student's
weekly journal. If the situation is not resolved proceed to step 3.

Step 3.
          A meeting is called, by any of the involved people, with the student, field instructor, (and task
supervisor) and field liaison. The issue is discussed and a plan made for resolution. Notes are taken for
future reference. The field coordinator or director is informed of the situation. If the situation is not
resolved proceed to step 4.

Step 4.
         A meeting is held with the field coordinator or Director. Again, a plan is developed and notes are
taken. If the situation is not resolved, or as part of the plan for resolution, the student may be removed
from the field agency. If there is concern about the student's functioning, the student may be referred for a
Student Performance Review through the Social Work Department.


Student, Faculty and Administration Rights and Responsibilities

                                                 Introduction

The purpose of this section in the handbook is to inform students, faculty and administrators of their rights
and responsibilities. The Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) requires all participants in the
Metropolitan State College (MSCD) Social Work Program to be aware of the following guidelines.

These rights and responsibilities are to be used in conjunction with and in support of the National
Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics (Appendix A) and the MSCD student handbook.

                                                    Student
The following outlines a student's responsibilities and rights towards fellow students, faculty and
administration:

Respect:

Students will display courtesy and sensitivity to issues of gender, race, disabling conditions, national origin
or ethnicity, religious preference and sexual orientation towards all people.

Students will value and consider others' opinions with an open, unbiased and unprejudiced attitude.

Responsibilities:

Students are responsible for knowing and abiding by the NASW Code of Ethics.

Students are responsible for conducting themselves in a professional manner.

Students are responsible for their own work and education.

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Students are responsible for attending classes regularly and minimizing class interruptions, i.e. leaving
class early, or arriving to class late.

Students are responsible for any clarification of assignments from faculty to include: course readings,
term papers, group assignments, and their due dates.

Students are responsible for completion of all course requirements at their designated times.

Students are responsible to insure they have not plagiarized, whether it is the work of another student or
the work of another.

Students are responsible for stopping any malicious gossip aimed at other students, faculty or
administration. Students are responsible for handling differences of opinion between students, faculty or
administration, in a mature, professional manner adhering to the grievance procedure as set for in the
MSCD student handbook.

Rights:

Students have the right to be free from any type of physical harassment by other students faculty or
administration.

Students have the right to be free from the use of degrading, abusive language or gestures by other
students, faculty, or administrations.

Students with disabling conditions, upon notifying their instructors, have the right to appropriate special
consideration (see the MSCD guidelines). These considerations should be worked out between the student
and faculty at the beginning of the semester.

                                                 Faculty
The following outlines the faculty responsibilities and rights towards students, other faculty and
administration:

Respect:

The faculty will show courtesy and sensitivity to issues of gender, race, disabling conditions, national
origin or ethnicity, religious preference, and sexual orientation towards all people.

Faculty members will value and consider others' opinions with an open, unbiased and unprejudiced
attitude.

Faculty members will show respect for students' ideas and thoughts.


Responsibilities:

Faculty members are responsible for adhering to the NASW Code of Ethics.

Faculty members are responsible to conduct themselves in a fair and professional manner towards
students.

Faculty members are responsible to inform students through the syllabus of course expectations, and
requirements, test dates, specific test material and a breakdown of the grading scale.

Faculty members are responsible to grade individual academic performance fairly.
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Faculty members are responsible to encourage individual and classroom participation.

Faculty members are responsible to thoroughly teach methodology.

Faculty members are responsible to advise those students who are part of their advising assignment.

Faculty members are responsible for advisement during their posted office hours or scheduled appointment
times.

Faculty members are responsible to promote an unbiased, unprejudiced attitude in teaching.

Rights:

Faculty members have the right to be free from any type of physical harassment by students, other faculty
and administration.

Faculty members have the right to be free from the use of degrading abusive language or gestures by
students, other faculty and administration.

                                               Administration

The following outlines the administrations responsibilities and rights toward students, faculty and other
administrators.

Respect:

The administration will show courtesy and sensitivity to issues of gender, race, disabling conditions,
national origin or ethnicity, religious preference, and sexual orientation towards all people.

The administration will value and consider others' opinions with an open, unbiased and unprejudiced
attitude.

Responsibilities:

The administration is responsible to adhere to the NASW Code of Ethics.

The administration is responsible for program content and overall consistency

The administration is responsible to inform faculty of the guidelines, learning expectations for course
content, as required by CSWE.

The administration is responsible to advocate for the Social Work program with the MSCD administration,
and others as appropriate, to best meet the needs of the program as a whole.

Rights:

The administration has the right to be free from any type of physical harassment by students, faculty and
other administrators.

The administration has the right to be free from the use of degrading, abusive language or gestures by
students, faculty and other administrators.




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                                                 Conclusion

These guidelines are not ALL inclusive. It is realized that all possible situations and scenarios are not
addressed, however, these guidelines serve as a foundation to enhance and optimize the educational
experience of all participants.



Department of Social Work Standards of Professional and Ethical Behavior

The Department of Social Work at the Metropolitan State College of Denver is mandated by the Council on
Social Work Education (CSWE) to foster and evaluate professional behavioral development for all students
in the social work program. The Department of Social Work also bears a responsibility to the community at
large to produce fully trained professional social workers who consciously exhibit the competencies,
values, and skills of the profession of social work. The values of the profession are codified in the National
Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the Council on Social Work Education has ten
core educational competencies that social workers must master. Given this context, the Social work
Department has identified behaviors for the social work student to exhibit in the classroom, the online
classroom, field placement, in the Social Work office, through email/phone conversations, and any other
interaction in a professional/academic setting. This document does not include the complete NASW Code
of Ethics or the CSWE Educational Policies, however it highlights particular ethics and competencies to
serve as a framework of professional and ethical behaviors to abide by while a social work student at
MSCD. Other aspects of the NASW Code of Ethics or the CSWE Educational Policies are evaluated
academically throughout the program's curriculum.

Please visit the entire policy at www.mscd.edu/socialwork/about/policies


Standards of Conduct

In conjunction with the standards listed above, the Social Work Department adheres to the Metropolitan
State College of Denver’s Standard of Conduct listed in the MSCD Student Handbook. Please see a
description of these standards in Appendix C.


                                Academic Resources and Student Services



The Auraria Library http://library.auraria.edu/

The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of
Metropolitan State College of Denver. The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books, microforms, and
bound periodicals in addition to more than 1,900 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. As a
member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), the Auraria Library has access to
2,500,000 volumes from Colorado member libraries and, through a national network, to an additional 15
million volumes available through inter-library loan.


The Auraria Book Store

To learn more about the Auraria Book Store visit www.aurariabooks.com or call 303-556-3230

The Access Center http://www.mscd.edu/~access/

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                                              Student Handbook
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The Metropolitan State College of Denver is an educational institution that welcomes and supports a
diverse student body. The ACCESS CENTER is the designated office that maintains disability-related
documents, determines eligibility for academic accommodations, determines reasonable accommodations
and develops plans for the provision of such accommodations for students attending Metro State.

Our staff encourages academically qualified students with disabilities to utilize all the appropriate
accommodations. It is Metro State's institutional policy not to discriminate against persons with disabilities
in its admissions policies and procedures or its educational programs, services and activities.


Student Health Center http://www.mscd.edu/student/resources/health/

The Health Center at Auraria is a tri-institutional entity that provides medical and health education services
to the students, faculty and staff of the Auraria Campus. The medical staff provides high quality care at an
affordable cost. "Healthy Moves" is a program that provides year-round health education services to the
campus community. Our goal at the Health Center is to keep you well, but also to help you become active
in creating your own optimal health. The Health Center welcomes feed back from students, faculty and
staff. Please let us know what services and programs may be of interest to you in the future.


Student Clubs and Organizations

Metropolitan State College of Denver has a variety of student clubs and organizations which represent the
spirit and cultural diversity of the school. These clubs contribute to the education of the students who
belong to them by providing extra-curricular experience which enhances their educational process.


The Student Association of Social Workers (SASW) serves as a social, activist and leadership organization
for students in the Professional Social Work Curriculum at Metropolitan State College of Denver. The
association sponsors activities which are responsible for raising students' consciousness about their role in
the community and involving students in community service activities. In addition, the group serves as a
liaison between students and faculty, working with the formulation and implementation of strategies,
policies and standards to make the Professional Social Work Department more relevant and competitive
among U.S. Colleges and Universities. Visit the SASW website at http://www.mscd.edu/~socwrk/ then
click on SASW.


The Social Work Student Advisory Committee is open to any Social Work major who can make a year-long
commitment. This committee is student led and is actively involved in many Social Work Department
policy decisions. The Social Work Student Advisory Committee is chaired by a junior who also serves on
The Social Work Department Advisory Board. Its membership includes an officer of The Student
Association of Social Workers Club. The remaining membership is comprised of students who are
committed to applying to the Social Work Department and those who have been admitted to the program.
The committee has the option of asking alumni to participate as well. The faculty liaison is the Field
Coordinator who attends meetings when invited by the membership. This committee meets once a month
during the academic year.

Phi Alpha Honor Society
Social Work students who have declared Social Work as their major, been accepted to the Social Work
program, who have completed at least eight credit hours of required Social Work course work, have
achieved a minimum overall grade point average of 3.25 and who have achieved a minimum grade point
average of 3.5 in required social work courses are eligible for Phi Alpha Honor Society. Eligible students
are inducted into the honor society at a ceremony in the spring semester.

Phi Alpha Honor Society Committee

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This committee was established in Spring 2004 and organizes the Phi Alpha Ceremony in the Spring. The
committee developed a Professor of the Year Award, which will be rewarded at the Spring induction
ceremony in years to come. The Phi Alpha Committee is still in its developing stages. Students who are
interested in joining the committee may contact the Social Work office or SASW for more information.

Social Work Alumni Association
The Social Work Alumni Association was established in Spring of 2004 as is still in its development stage.
The Alumni Association hopes to bring resources and contact information to the alumni of the Social Work
Program. Currently social work alumni communicate on the Alumni Student Listserv. As the Social Work
Alumni Association develops, information will be provided on the Social Work Student Listserv and at
SASW Meetings.


Student Support Services http://www.mscd.edu/~sas/sss/


Student Support Services is one of five federal TRIO programs funded by the U.S. Department of
Education to provide academic support for low-income, first-generation students and students with
disabilities.

The program is designed to help students overcome social and cultural barriers to higher education.

Central Classroom Building Room 101 (CN 101)
Hours: M-F 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM MST
Phone: 303.556.4722


Institute for Women’s Studies and Services http://www.mscd.edu/~women/

The Institute for Women's Studies and Services is committed to the empowerment of women through
education. In order to assist women with a positive college experience, Women's Services provides
referrals to campus and community resources, scholarship information, programs and events with a focus
on women's issues., assistance to community women with the process of entering MSCD, and harassment
and discrimination advocacy services. For additional information call (303) 556-8441.

Office of Gay, Lesbian, Transgender and Bisexual Student Services http://www.mscd.edu/~glbtss/



GLBT Student Services is a tri-institutional office on the Auraria Campus serving the students, faculty and
staff of Metropolitan State College of Denver, Community College of Denver and University of Colorado
at Denver and Health Sciences Center. We are available to all Auraria students as a resource for exploring
issues of sexual orientation and gender identity.

This program offers a variety of support, education and advocacy services for the entire campus community
including:

        support for those who may have questions about sexual orientation and gender identity
        advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived gay,
         lesbian, bisexual or transgender identity
        speakers bureau for classes and events on various aspects of sexual orientation, gender identity
         and related issues
        training programs and workshops bout combating homophobia & transphobia, working with
         GLBT individuals, and sensitivity considerations

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        library of books, videos and resource files available for research and leisure
        sponsored events; educational, academic, and social; such as National Coming Out Day
         Celebration, GLBT Awareness Month keynote speaker, World AIDS Day, Transgender Day of
         Remembrance and many others, providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues

The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 213, and is staffed by a
director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire
campus community are welcomed.


Auraria Child Care Center

Children from 12 months to six years old may be enrolled in the Auraria Child Care Center. The program
is based on the High/Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum, which emphasizes discovery learning and
active involvement by children. Programs are offered at the Auraria Child Care Center located on the
southwest corner of campus.

All programs are fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services and the kindergarten
teachers are fully certified The center offers programs for toddlers (12 months to three years old),
preschoolers (two and a half years to five years old), and kindergartners, as well as special programs for all
children.

Facilities are available to students, staff, and faculty of the Auraria campus. For further information call
(303) 556-3188.

Career Services    http://www.mscd.edu/~career/


                                       OVERVIEW OF SERVICES

     CAREER COUNSELING - Detailed information on Career Counseling can be found on the
     Career Services website or in the office, Tivoli.

     Customized Individual Appointments: Schedule in advance by calling 303-556-3664 or come
     into the office, Tivoli.

     Walk-In Appointments: Available Mondays 5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.; Tuesdays 11:00 a.m.-12:00
     p.m.; Wednesdays 3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.; Thursdays 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. and Fridays from 9:00
     a.m.-10:00 a.m. 20 minute appointments. NOTE: These appointments provide a great
     opportunity to speak with a Career Specialist if you are unable to schedule an Individual
     Appointment and need some quick advice or answers to career related questions.

     CAREER LIBRARY

     Print Resources
                                                    Electronic Resources
     Job Vacancy Listings, Employment
                                                    eCampusRecruiter.com, eChoices, United Way
     Research Resources, Resume, Cover
                                                    Database (Directory of Health & Human Service
     Letter & Interviewing Information, Salary
                                                    Organizations), Microsoft Word for resume and
     Surveys, Employer Profiles and career
                                                    cover letter development.
     reference material.

     ASSESSMENTS - Detailed information on the Career Assessments can be found on the Career
     Services website or in the office, Tivoli.



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     Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)             Strong Interest Inventory (SII)

     Career Assessments are offered online, and included in the cost is an interpretation workshop
     for each assessment.
     The two assessments are $30 or $20 for one for current students. Call 303-556-3664 or come
     by the office, Tivoli, for other pricing, additional information or to purchase the assessments.

     EMPLOYMENT SERVICES - Detailed information on Employment Services can be found
     on the Career Services website or in the office, Tivoli.

     eCampusRecruiter.com: A customized online employment services for Metro State students
     and alumni. Post resumes and other crucial job search documents, and search through current
     full-time, part-time and internship positions posted by employers specifically targeting Metro
     State.

     CAREER EVENTS - Detailed information on current events can be found on the Career
     Services website under the Events section or in the office, Tivoli.

     Career Fairs: A variety of fairs are offered during the Spring and Fall semesters.

     On-Campus Recruiting: Get connected to employers by participating in On-Campus
     Recruiting! Sign up for interviews on campus with employers; RSVP to attend Employer
     Information Sessions; review job postings; get email messages from our job agent regarding
     current postings that match your qualifications; make your resume available to employers, and
     stay updated with the current employer events. To participate in On-Campus Recruiting, you'll
     need to register with our office by logging on to www.eCampusRecruiter.com/mscd.

     Employer Forums: Also offered in the Spring and Fall semesters, these forums are designed to
     provide information on resumes, cover letters, interviewing, job search strategies, employment
     trends and current opportunities. A panel of employers representing a variety of fields will be
     present.

     Employment Workshops: Four workshops available free to current students & 1st year alumni
     on Resumes, Interviewing, Job Search Strategies and a Videotaped Mock Interview.




Counseling Center       http://www.mscd.edu/~counsel/

Realize your potential...

Are you feeling stuck? Overwhelmed? Depressed?

Balancing the demands of college life can be difficult. In addition to academic requirements, there are
financial pressures, relationship issues, and job stressors that can leave you feeling beat up and worn out.
The Counseling Center staff can help you find ways to manage difficult times and provide you with a
comforting place to examine your life and learn more about yourself so you can realize your potential.

The Counseling Center is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Suite 651. You will need to take the tower
elevator, across from the Cimarron Cafe to get to our offices.




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If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call
303-556-3132. You may also call us if you have any questions that are not answered in our Frequently
Asked Question page.

In addition to our many services, you can also visit our Self Help Library, which includes information
about a variety of mental health topics linking you with a site on topics like depression, anxiety,
relationships, test anxiety, time management, and more...


                                                Appendices




Appendix A                 Problem Resolution Procedure                          Page 28

Appendix B                 NASW Code of Ethics                                   Page 33

Appendix C                 Standards of Conduct from MSCD Handbook               Page 51




                                      Problem Resolution Procedure
                                              Appendix A

                                Student Performance Review Summary


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         All students are admitted and retained in The Social Work Department on the assumption that they
have the potential academic ability and personal suitability for completing the professional Social Work
Program. All students admitted to The Social Work Department at The Metropolitan State College of
Denver are expected to maintain the standards established by the Social Work Department, the Social Work
profession and the College.

         During the course of study a student may not perform at the required level. When problematic
situations are identified, the Performance Review Committee will conduct a review to determine whether it
is appropriate for the student to continue in the Social Work Department, and if so, under what conditions.
Such conditions could include a requirement to complete study skills or writing skills development,
completion of psychological counseling or other treatment, or other appropriate activities to resolve
academic or personal problems.

         The Performance Review Committee shall be responsible for monitoring and reviewing student
performance issues for all majors in the Social Work Department. Membership shall include: A Social
Work faculty member who will serve as the chair of the committee, the student's advisor or an advocate
selected by the student, a representative from the Dean's office and others, such as the agency field
instructor, as appropriate to the particular situation.

Automatic Reviews:

Students will be reviewed when:

•   The student has engaged in cheating or fraud (e.g., presenting someone else's work
    as their own); any instances of academic dishonesty must be reported to the Review
    Committee if they can not be resolved between Social Work faculty and student.

•   The student fails to obtain or maintain an agency field placement for his/her Professional Field
    Experience, or such placement is at risk due to student behaviors or concerns.

   The student’s behavior or interactions raise concerns about his/her ability to function in the Social
    Work Department or as a professional social worker, and such concerns are not resolved among the
    student, his/her advisor, and any other concerned parties.




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Faculty Initiated Reviews:

         Any Social Work faculty member who believes that the student majoring in Social Work does not
meet the non-academic performance standards has a duty to report such significant performance
concerns/problems and request a review by the committee. Such requests must include documentation,
which describes the specifics of the student's performance problem(s). These requests must be in writing on
the Performance Committee Review Request Form and must be sent to the student's advisor as well as to
the committee chair. Documentation should include records of meetings with the student to discuss the
performance problem(s) and any written feedback about the problem(s), which has been given to the
student.

Student Initiated Reviews:

         Any student who believes that a student's performance does not meet the Social Work Program's
performance standards may report such concerns to his/her Social Work faculty advisor. If deemed
significant, the advisor will discuss the concern with the Social Work faculty advisor of the student in
question. If no remedy is achieved after the advisors confer, the Social Work advisors may request a
performance review by the committee. Such requests must be in writing and include the students'
documentation, which describes the specific performance problem(s).

Performance Committee Review Process

         After the committee chair has received a request for a review, a performance review meeting will
be scheduled. All committee members and the student's advisor must be present at the meeting. The
student may select a Social Work faculty member to function as advisor, though it is anticipated that the
regularly assigned advisor will normally fill this role.

Role of the Advisor or Designated Social Work Faculty Member:

         The Performance Review Committee shall identify the Social Work faculty member who has the
most knowledge about the student and his/her overall performance. In many cases this will be the faculty
advisor. At the review hearing, the designated Social Work faculty member shall present brief background
information about the student. This faculty member will also secure evaluations from instructors during the
previous semester regarding the student's performance in his/her course. This faculty member will present
information obtained from these instructors and provide his/her assessment of the student's overall
performance. The advisor will give the committee any recommendations, which might resolve the student's
performance problems.

Those who may appear before the committee include:

        .        The student whose performance is to be reviewed
                 may attend during the fact-finding part of the meeting. The student
                 must leave prior to the committee's deliberation. The student may also
                 present information to the review committee. Prior to the meeting, the
                 student must inform the committee chair of intent to attend the meeting
                 and/or speak to the committee.

        .        The student may ask as many as two persons who are
                 knowledgeable about his/her performance to present information to the
                 committee. Such persons may make brief statements and are permitted
                 to be present in the committee meeting only to make their presentation
                 to the committee. The committee chair must be informed in advance
                 about those persons who will appear on behalf of the student as well as
                 the general nature of the information which each will present.

        .        If the review was requested by a faculty member,

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                   that person shall present his/her information to the committee and
                   respond to questions from committee members. This faculty member's
                   presence at the committee meeting is limited to his/her presentation.

         .         Other faculty members may contribute information regarding the student's performance.
                   These members are to be identified by the student's advisor, and may include the agency
                   field faculty where appropriate.

Confidentiality:

         All procedures related to the performance review must be carried out in a manner that assures
protection of the student's right to privacy regarding information about his/her academic records,
performance, or any of his/her personal affairs. The student has the right to review all written information,
which is presented to the committee. Members of the committee and other persons who appear at the
review hearing are expected to maintain confidentiality with regard to all aspects of the hearing. Actions of
the committee are to remain confidential and are to be shared only with those persons involved with the
student in an educational capacity.

Meeting Agenda:

1. Fact Finding
a. Review of committee procedures and of facts that led to performance review - Chair.
b. Presentation of background information about student - Advisor or designated Social Work faculty
     member.
c. When a hearing resulted from a faculty request, presentation by that person.
d. Presentation of information by student and/or those selected by the student.
e. Presentation of information by other faculty members.
f. Some preliminary problem solving discussion may take place at this point, depending on the nature of the
     situation and the possibility of having the student participate in such a discussion.
g. Summary of main points and facts - Chair.


2. Deliberation and Action
For this part of the meeting, only the committee members and the student's advisor or designated Social
Work faculty member shall be present. The advisor or designated Social Work faculty member will not
participate in the voting.

a. Consideration of relevant factors in present and past performance of the student.
b. Discussion of alternative plans to address the performance problem(s).
c. Decision on plan to be completed by student to resolve the performance problem or decision to dismiss
        the student from the Social Work Program.

The committee's decision must reflect a unanimous view.

It is the responsibility of the Performance Review Committee Chair to write a statement, which describes
the nature of the performance problem as well as the committee's action. This is to be placed in the
student's file. Within one week after the review hearing, this written summary statement reflecting the
committee's decision will be sent in writing/email to:

         The student
         The student's Social Work faculty advisor and/or designated
         Social Work faculty member
         The Social Work Department Chair.




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Appeal Process:

        Within a period of two weeks from receipt of the committee’s decision, the student may appeal the
Performance Review Committee's decision. Such appeal should be filed with the Chair of the Performance
Review Committee, or the Department Chair. The Chair of the Committee may then:

•   Ratify the Performance Review Committee's decision
•   May alter the course of action, which the student is to take to remedy the performance problem(s)
•   May decide to allow the student to remain in the Social Work Program with certain stipulations.

       Such action must be completed within three weeks of the date of the appeal. The Chair must write
a summary of the decision, which shall be placed in the student's file and sent to:

•   The student
•   The student's Social Work faculty advisor and/or designated Social Work faculty member
•   The Social Work Department Chair


Further Appeal:

If the student is not satisfied with the decision, he/she will then follow the appeal procedures as outlined in
The Metropolitan State College of Denver Student Handbook.

          The Social Work Appeal Committee will be comprised of the Department Chair, two members of
the Advisory Board or Field Advisory Board, and the Associate Dean. The Department Chair will not vote
but will provide information and summarize the process up to this point.




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Review Criteria:

    1.   Academic cheating, serious lying or fraud.

    2.   Behavior in significant violation of the NASW Code of Ethics. This includes attitudes
         and actions in the student's professional field work agency and/or in the academic setting
         which do not conform to the profession's ethical code.

    3.   Evidence of chemical or alcohol usage that interferes in the performance of the role of a
         Social Work student.

    4.   Demonstrate a pattern of inappropriate or immature behavior and/or inability to develop
         or demonstrate the appropriate interpersonal skills and sound judgment necessary for
         academic success and effective Social Work practice. This would include failure to seek
         professional help for physical illnesses or emotional problems, which interfere with
         effective functioning.

    5.   Physical illness or emotional problems that, in the professional judgment of one or more
         of the Social Work faculty, could impair effective quality provision of services to future
         clients, acceptance of supervision, appearance and general demeanor.

    6.   Lack of personal awareness of unresolved personal issues, in the professional judgment
         of one or more of the Social Work faculty, which could interfere with effective Social
         Work practice.

    7.   Documented evidence of serious criminal activity occurring during the course of study or
         which occurred prior to admission to the program but became known after admission.
         Exception to this may be granted by the Social Work faculty advisor if the situation
         appears to be resolved.

    8.   Professional goals are not matched to those of the Social Work profession and generalist Social
         Work practice.

    9.   Failure of a Social Work student to obtain or maintain and field agency placement for the
         Professional Field Experience.

*Request forms for both faculty and student initiated Student Performance Review are available on the
department’s website and in the SWK Office.




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                                           NASW Code of Ethics
                                              Appendix B



Code of Ethics
of the National Association of Social Workers

Approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate Assembly and revised by the 1999 NASW Delegate Assembly

Preamble

The primary mission of the social work profession is to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic
human needs of all people, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are
vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty. A historic and defining feature of social work is the
profession's focus on individual well-being in a social context and the well-being of society. Fundamental
to social work is attention to the environmental forces that create, contribute to, and address problems in
living.

Social workers promote social justice and social change with and on behalf of clients. "Clients" is used
inclusively to refer to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are
sensitive to cultural and ethnic diversity and strive to end discrimination, oppression, poverty, and other
forms of social injustice. These activities may be in the form of direct practice, community organizing,
supervision, consultation, administration, advocacy, social and political action, policy development and
implementation, education, and research and evaluation. Social workers seek to enhance the capacity of
people to address their own needs. Social workers also seek to promote the responsiveness of organizations,
communities, and other social institutions to individuals' needs and social problems.

The mission of the social work profession is rooted in a set of core values. These core values, embraced by
social workers throughout the profession's history, are the foundation of social work's unique purpose and
perspective:

        service
        social justice
        dignity and worth of the person
        importance of human relationships
        integrity
        competence.

This constellation of core values reflects what is unique to the social work profession. Core values, and the
principles that flow from them, must be balanced within the context and complexity of the human
experience.

Purpose of the NASW Code of Ethics

Professional ethics are at the core of social work. The profession has an obligation to articulate its basic
values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. The NASW Code of Ethics sets forth these values,
principles, and standards to guide social workers' conduct. The Code is relevant to all social workers and
social work students, regardless of their professional functions, the settings in which they work, or the
populations they serve.

The NASW Code of Ethics serves six purposes:



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    1.   The Code identifies core values on which social work's mission is based.
    2.   The Code summarizes broad ethical principles that reflect the profession's core values and
         establishes a set of specific ethical standards that should be used to guide social work practice.
    3.   The Code is designed to help social workers identify relevant considerations when professional
         obligations conflict or ethical uncertainties arise.
    4.   The Code provides ethical standards to which the general public can hold the social work
         profession accountable.
    5.   The Code socializes practitioners new to the field to social work's mission, values, ethical
         principles, and ethical standards.
    6.   The Code articulates standards that the social work profession itself can use to assess whether
         social workers have engaged in unethical conduct. NASW has formal procedures to adjudicate
         ethics complaints filed against its members.* In subscribing to this Code, social workers are
         required to cooperate in its implementation, participate in NASW adjudication proceedings, and
         abide by any NASW disciplinary rulings or sanctions based on it.

*For information on NASW adjudication procedures, see NASW Procedures for the Adjudication of
Grievances.

The Code offers a set of values, principles, and standards to guide decision making and conduct when
ethical issues arise. It does not provide a set of rules that prescribe how social workers should act in all
situations. Specific applications of the Code must take into account the context in which it is being
considered and the possibility of conflicts among the Code's values, principles, and standards. Ethical
responsibilities flow from all human relationships, from the personal and familial to the social and
professional.

Further, the NASW Code of Ethics does not specify which values, principles, and standards are most
important and ought to outweigh others in instances when they conflict. Reasonable differences of opinion
can and do exist among social workers with respect to the ways in which values, ethical principles, and
ethical standards should be rank ordered when they conflict. Ethical decision making in a given situation
must apply the informed judgment of the individual social worker and should also consider how the issues
would be judged in a peer review process where the ethical standards of the profession would be applied.

Ethical decision making is a process. There are many instances in social work where simple answers are
not available to resolve complex ethical issues. Social workers should take into consideration all the values,
principles, and standards in this Code that are relevant to any situation in which ethical judgment is
warranted. Social workers' decisions and actions should be consistent with the spirit as well as the letter of
this Code.

In addition to this Code, there are many other sources of information about ethical thinking that may be
useful. Social workers should consider ethical theory and principles generally, social work theory and
research, laws, regulations, agency policies, and other relevant codes of ethics, recognizing that among
codes of ethics social workers should consider the NASW Code of Ethics as their primary source. Social
workers also should be aware of the impact on ethical decision making of their clients' and their own
personal values and cultural and religious beliefs and practices. They should be aware of any conflicts
between personal and professional values and deal with them responsibly. For additional guidance social
workers should consult the relevant literature on professional ethics and ethical decision making and seek
appropriate consultation when faced with ethical dilemmas. This may involve consultation with an agency-
based or social work organization's ethics committee, a regulatory body, knowledgeable colleagues,
supervisors, or legal counsel.

Instances may arise when social workers' ethical obligations conflict with agency policies or relevant laws
or regulations. When such conflicts occur, social workers must make a responsible effort to resolve the
conflict in a manner that is consistent with the values, principles, and standards expressed in this Code. If a
reasonable resolution of the conflict does not appear possible, social workers should seek proper
consultation before making a decision.
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The NASW Code of Ethics is to be used by NASW and by individuals, agencies, organizations, and bodies
(such as licensing and regulatory boards, professional liability insurance providers, courts of law, agency
boards of directors, government agencies, and other professional groups) that choose to adopt it or use it as
a frame of reference. Violation of standards in this Code does not automatically imply legal liability or
violation of the law. Such determination can only be made in the context of legal and judicial proceedings.
Alleged violations of the Code would be subject to a peer review process. Such processes are generally
separate from legal or administrative procedures and insulated from legal review or proceedings to allow
the profession to counsel and discipline its own members.

A code of ethics cannot guarantee ethical behavior. Moreover, a code of ethics cannot resolve all ethical
issues or disputes or capture the richness and complexity involved in striving to make responsible choices
within a moral community. Rather, a code of ethics sets forth values, ethical principles, and ethical
standards to which professionals aspire and by which their actions can be judged. Social workers' ethical
behavior should result from their personal commitment to engage in ethical practice. The NASW Code of
Ethics reflects the commitment of all social workers to uphold the profession's values and to act ethically.
Principles and standards must be applied by individuals of good character who discern moral questions and,
in good faith, seek to make reliable ethical judgments.

Ethical Principles

 The following broad ethical principles are based on social work's core values of service, social justice,
dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. These
principles set forth ideals to which all social workers should aspire.

Value: Service

Ethical Principle: Social workers' primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.

Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their knowledge,
values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers are encouraged to
volunteer some portion of their professional skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro
bono service).

Value: Social Justice

Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.

Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed
individuals and groups of people. Social workers' social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of
poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to
promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers
strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and
meaningful participation in decision making for all people.

Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person

Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.

Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and
cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients' socially responsible self-determination. Social
workers seek to enhance clients' capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social
workers are cognizant of their dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society. They seek to resolve


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conflicts between clients' interests and the broader society's interests in a socially responsible manner
consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession.

Value: Importance of Human Relationships

Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.

Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for
change. Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social workers seek to strengthen
relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being
of individuals, families, social groups, organizations, and communities.

Value: Integrity

Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.

Social workers are continually aware of the profession's mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical
standards and practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers act honestly and responsibly and
promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

Value: Competence

Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their
professional expertise.

Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in
practice. Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession.

Ethical Standards

The following ethical standards are relevant to the professional activities of all social workers. These
standards concern (1) social workers' ethical responsibilities to clients, (2) social workers' ethical
responsibilities to colleagues, (3) social workers' ethical responsibilities in practice settings, (4) social
workers' ethical responsibilities as professionals, (5) social workers' ethical responsibilities to the social
work profession, and (6) social workers' ethical responsibilities to the broader society.

Some of the standards that follow are enforceable guidelines for professional conduct, and some are
aspirational. The extent to which each standard is enforceable is a matter of professional judgment to be
exercised by those responsible for reviewing alleged violations of ethical standards.

1. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities to Clients

1.01 Commitment to Clients

Social workers' primary responsibility is to promote the well-being of clients. In general, clients' interests
are primary. However, social workers' responsibility to the larger society or specific legal obligations may
on limited occasions supersede the loyalty owed clients, and clients should be so advised. (Examples
include when a social worker is required by law to report that a client has abused a child or has threatened
to harm self or others.)

1.02 Self-Determination



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Social workers respect and promote the right of clients to self-determination and assist clients in their
efforts to identify and clarify their goals. Social workers may limit clients' right to self-determination when,
in the social workers' professional judgment, clients' actions or potential actions pose a serious, foreseeable,
and imminent risk to themselves or others.

1.03 Informed Consent

(a) Social workers should provide services to clients only in the context of a professional relationship
based, when appropriate, on valid informed consent. Social workers should use clear and understandable
language to inform clients of the purpose of the services, risks related to the services, limits to services
because of the requirements of a third-party payer, relevant costs, reasonable alternatives, clients' right to
refuse or withdraw consent, and the time frame covered by the consent. Social workers should provide
clients with an opportunity to ask questions.

(b) In instances when clients are not literate or have difficulty understanding the primary language used in
the practice setting, social workers should take steps to ensure clients' comprehension. This may include
providing clients with a detailed verbal explanation or arranging for a qualified interpreter or translator
whenever possible.

(c) In instances when clients lack the capacity to provide informed consent, social workers should protect
clients' interests by seeking permission from an appropriate third party, informing clients consistent with
the clients' level of understanding. In such instances social workers should seek to ensure that the third
party acts in a manner consistent with clients' wishes and interests. Social workers should take reasonable
steps to enhance such clients' ability to give informed consent.

(d) In instances when clients are receiving services involuntarily, social workers should provide
information about the nature and extent of services and about the extent of clients' right to refuse service.

(e) Social workers who provide services via electronic media (such as computer, telephone, radio, and
television) should inform recipients of the limitations and risks associated with such services.

(f) Social workers should obtain clients' informed consent before audiotaping or videotaping clients or
permitting observation of services to clients by a third party.

1.04 Competence

(a) Social workers should provide services and represent themselves as competent only within the
boundaries of their education, training, license, certification, consultation received, supervised experience,
or other relevant professional experience.

(b) Social workers should provide services in substantive areas or use intervention techniques or
approaches that are new to them only after engaging in appropriate study, training, consultation, and
supervision from people who are competent in those interventions or techniques.

(c) When generally recognized standards do not exist with respect to an emerging area of practice, social
workers should exercise careful judgment and take responsible steps (including appropriate education,
research, training, consultation, and supervision) to ensure the competence of their work and to protect
clients from harm.

1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity

(a) Social workers should understand culture and its function in human behavior and society, recognizing
the strengths that exist in all cultures.

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(b) Social workers should have a knowledge base of their clients' cultures and be able to demonstrate
competence in the provision of services that are sensitive to clients' cultures and to differences among
people and cultural groups.

(c) Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and
oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status,
political belief, religion, and mental or physical disability.

1.06 Conflicts of Interest

(a) Social workers should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest that interfere with the exercise of
professional discretion and impartial judgment. Social workers should inform clients when a real or
potential conflict of interest arises and take reasonable steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes the
clients' interests primary and protects clients' interests to the greatest extent possible. In some cases,
protecting clients' interests may require termination of the professional relationship with proper referral of
the client.

(b) Social workers should not take unfair advantage of any professional relationship or exploit others to
further their personal, religious, political, or business interests.

(c) Social workers should not engage in dual or multiple relationships with clients or former clients in
which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client. In instances when dual or multiple
relationships are unavoidable, social workers should take steps to protect clients and are responsible for
setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries. (Dual or multiple relationships occur when
social workers relate to clients in more than one relationship, whether professional, social, or business.
Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively.)

(d) When social workers provide services to two or more people who have a relationship with each other
(for example, couples, family members), social workers should clarify with all parties which individuals
will be considered clients and the nature of social workers' professional obligations to the various
individuals who are receiving services. Social workers who anticipate a conflict of interest among the
individuals receiving services or who anticipate having to perform in potentially conflicting roles (for
example, when a social worker is asked to testify in a child custody dispute or divorce proceedings
involving clients) should clarify their role with the parties involved and take appropriate action to minimize
any conflict of interest.

1.07 Privacy and Confidentiality

(a) Social workers should respect clients' right to privacy. Social workers should not solicit private
information from clients unless it is essential to providing services or conducting social work evaluation or
research. Once private information is shared, standards of confidentiality apply.

(b) Social workers may disclose confidential information when appropriate with valid consent from a client
or a person legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client.

(c) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of all information obtained in the course of
professional service, except for compelling professional reasons. The general expectation that social
workers will keep information confidential does not apply when disclosure is necessary to prevent serious,
foreseeable, and imminent harm to a client or other identifiable person. In all instances, social workers
should disclose the least amount of confidential information necessary to achieve the desired purpose; only
information that is directly relevant to the purpose for which the disclosure is made should be revealed.




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(d) Social workers should inform clients, to the extent possible, about the disclosure of confidential
information and the potential consequences, when feasible before the disclosure is made. This applies
whether social workers disclose confidential information on the basis of a legal requirement or client
consent.

(e) Social workers should discuss with clients and other interested parties the nature of confidentiality and
limitations of clients' right to confidentiality. Social workers should review with clients circumstances
where confidential information may be requested and where disclosure of confidential information may be
legally required. This discussion should occur as soon as possible in the social worker-client relationship
and as needed throughout the course of the relationship.

(f) When social workers provide counseling services to families, couples, or groups, social workers should
seek agreement among the parties involved concerning each individual's right to confidentiality and
obligation to preserve the confidentiality of information shared by others. Social workers should inform
participants in family, couples, or group counseling that social workers cannot guarantee that all
participants will honor such agreements.

(g) Social workers should inform clients involved in family, couples, marital, or group counseling of the
social worker's, employer's, and agency's policy concerning the social worker's disclosure of confidential
information among the parties involved in the counseling.

(h) Social workers should not disclose confidential information to third-party payers unless clients have
authorized such disclosure.

(i) Social workers should not discuss confidential information in any setting unless privacy can be ensured.
Social workers should not discuss confidential information in public or semipublic areas such as hallways,
waiting rooms, elevators, and restaurants.

(j) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients during legal proceedings to the extent
permitted by law. When a court of law or other legally authorized body orders social workers to disclose
confidential or privileged information without a client's consent and such disclosure could cause harm to
the client, social workers should request that the court withdraw the order or limit the order as narrowly as
possible or maintain the records under seal, unavailable for public inspection.

(k) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients when responding to requests from members
of the media.

(l) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients' written and electronic records and other
sensitive information. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that clients' records are stored
in a secure location and that clients' records are not available to others who are not authorized to have
access.

(m) Social workers should take precautions to ensure and maintain the confidentiality of information
transmitted to other parties through the use of computers, electronic mail, facsimile machines, telephones
and telephone answering machines, and other electronic or computer technology. Disclosure of identifying
information should be avoided whenever possible.

(n) Social workers should transfer or dispose of clients' records in a manner that protects clients'
confidentiality and is consistent with state statutes governing records and social work licensure.

(o) Social workers should take reasonable precautions to protect client confidentiality in the event of the
social worker's termination of practice, incapacitation, or death.



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(p) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients for teaching or
training purposes unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information.

(q) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients with consultants
unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information or there is a compelling need for
such disclosure.

(r) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of deceased clients consistent with the preceding
standards.

1.08 Access to Records

(a) Social workers should provide clients with reasonable access to records concerning the clients. Social
workers who are concerned that clients' access to their records could cause serious misunderstanding or
harm to the client should provide assistance in interpreting the records and consultation with the client
regarding the records. Social workers should limit clients' access to their records, or portions of their
records, only in exceptional circumstances when there is compelling evidence that such access would cause
serious harm to the client. Both clients' requests and the rationale for withholding some or all of the record
should be documented in clients' files.

(b) When providing clients with access to their records, social workers should take steps to protect the
confidentiality of other individuals identified or discussed in such records.

1.09 Sexual Relationships

(a) Social workers should under no circumstances engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with current
clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.

(b) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with clients' relatives or other
individuals with whom clients maintain a close personal relationship when there is a risk of exploitation or
potential harm to the client. Sexual activity or sexual contact with clients' relatives or other individuals with
whom clients maintain a personal relationship has the potential to be harmful to the client and may make it
difficult for the social worker and client to maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Social workers--
not their clients, their clients' relatives, or other individuals with whom the client maintains a personal
relationship--assume the full burden for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with former clients because of
the potential for harm to the client. If social workers engage in conduct contrary to this prohibition or claim
that an exception to this prohibition is warranted because of extraordinary circumstances, it is social
workers--not their clients--who assume the full burden of demonstrating that the former client has not been
exploited, coerced, or manipulated, intentionally or unintentionally.

(d) Social workers should not provide clinical services to individuals with whom they have had a prior
sexual relationship. Providing clinical services to a former sexual partner has the potential to be harmful to
the individual and is likely to make it difficult for the social worker and individual to maintain appropriate
professional boundaries.

1.10 Physical Contact

Social workers should not engage in physical contact with clients when there is a possibility of
psychological harm to the client as a result of the contact (such as cradling or caressing clients). Social
workers who engage in appropriate physical contact with clients are responsible for setting clear,
appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such physical contact.

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1.11 Sexual Harassment

Social workers should not sexually harass clients. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual
solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

1.12 Derogatory Language

Social workers should not use derogatory language in their written or verbal communications to or about
clients. Social workers should use accurate and respectful language in all communications to and about
clients.

1.13 Payment for Services

(a) When setting fees, social workers should ensure that the fees are fair, reasonable, and commensurate
with the services performed. Consideration should be given to clients' ability to pay.

(b) Social workers should avoid accepting goods or services from clients as payment for professional
services. Bartering arrangements, particularly involving services, create the potential for conflicts of
interest, exploitation, and inappropriate boundaries in social workers' relationships with clients. Social
workers should explore and may participate in bartering only in very limited circumstances when it can be
demonstrated that such arrangements are an accepted practice among professionals in the local community,
considered to be essential for the provision of services, negotiated without coercion, and entered into at the
client's initiative and with the client's informed consent. Social workers who accept goods or services from
clients as payment for professional services assume the full burden of demonstrating that this arrangement
will not be detrimental to the client or the professional relationship.

(c) Social workers should not solicit a private fee or other remuneration for providing services to clients
who are entitled to such available services through the social workers' employer or agency.

1.14 Clients Who Lack Decision-Making Capacity

When social workers act on behalf of clients who lack the capacity to make informed decisions, social
workers should take reasonable steps to safeguard the interests and rights of those clients.

1.15 Interruption of Services

Social workers should make reasonable efforts to ensure continuity of services in the event that services are
interrupted by factors such as unavailability, relocation, illness, disability, or death.

1.16 Termination of Services

(a) Social workers should terminate services to clients and professional relationships with them when such
services and relationships are no longer required or no longer serve the clients' needs or interests.

(b) Social workers should take reasonable steps to avoid abandoning clients who are still in need of
services. Social workers should withdraw services precipitously only under unusual circumstances, giving
careful consideration to all factors in the situation and taking care to minimize possible adverse effects.
Social workers should assist in making appropriate arrangements for continuation of services when
necessary.

(c) Social workers in fee-for-service settings may terminate services to clients who are not paying an
overdue balance if the financial contractual arrangements have been made clear to the client, if the client


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does not pose an imminent danger to self or others, and if the clinical and other consequences of the current
nonpayment have been addressed and discussed with the client.

(d) Social workers should not terminate services to pursue a social, financial, or sexual relationship with a
client.

(e) Social workers who anticipate the termination or interruption of services to clients should notify clients
promptly and seek the transfer, referral, or continuation of services in relation to the clients' needs and
preferences.

(f) Social workers who are leaving an employment setting should inform clients of appropriate options for
the continuation of services and of the benefits and risks of the options.

2. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities to Colleagues

2.01 Respect

(a) Social workers should treat colleagues with respect and should represent accurately and fairly the
qualifications, views, and obligations of colleagues.

(b) Social workers should avoid unwarranted negative criticism of colleagues in communications with
clients or with other professionals. Unwarranted negative criticism may include demeaning comments that
refer to colleagues' level of competence or to indi-viduals' attributes such as race, ethnicity, national origin,
color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, and mental or physical disability.

(c) Social workers should cooperate with social work colleagues and with colleagues of other professions
when such cooperation serves the well-being of clients.

2.02 Confidentiality

Social workers should respect confidential information shared by colleagues in the course of their
professional relationships and transactions. Social workers should ensure that such colleagues understand
social workers' obligation to respect confidentiality and any exceptions related to it.

2.03 Interdisciplinary Collaboration

(a) Social workers who are members of an interdisciplinary team should participate in and contribute to
decisions that affect the well-being of clients by drawing on the perspectives, values, and experiences of the
social work profession. Professional and ethical obligations of the interdisciplinary team as a whole and of
its individual members should be clearly established.

(b) Social workers for whom a team decision raises ethical concerns should attempt to resolve the
disagreement through appropriate channels. If the disagreement cannot be resolved, social workers should
pursue other avenues to address their concerns consistent with client well-being.

2.04 Disputes Involving Colleagues

(a) Social workers should not take advantage of a dispute between a colleague and an employer to obtain a
position or otherwise advance the social workers' own interests.

(b) Social workers should not exploit clients in disputes with colleagues or engage clients in any
inappropriate discussion of conflicts between social workers and their colleagues.


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2.05 Consultation

(a) Social workers should seek the advice and counsel of colleagues whenever such consultation is in the
best interests of clients.

(b) Social workers should keep themselves informed about colleagues' areas of expertise and competencies.
Social workers should seek consultation only from colleagues who have demonstrated knowledge,
expertise, and competence related to the subject of the consultation.

(c) When consulting with colleagues about clients, social workers should disclose the least amount of
information necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation.

2.06 Referral for Services

(a) Social workers should refer clients to other professionals when the other professionals' specialized
knowledge or expertise is needed to serve clients fully or when social workers believe that they are not
being effective or making reasonable progress with clients and that additional service is required.

(b) Social workers who refer clients to other professionals should take appropriate steps to facilitate an
orderly transfer of responsibility. Social workers who refer clients to other professionals should disclose,
with clients' consent, all pertinent information to the new service providers.

(c) Social workers are prohibited from giving or receiving payment for a referral when no professional
service is provided by the referring social worker.

2.07 Sexual Relationships

(a) Social workers who function as supervisors or educators should not engage in sexual activities or
contact with supervisees, students, trainees, or other colleagues over whom they exercise professional
authority.

(b) Social workers should avoid engaging in sexual relationships with colleagues when there is potential for
a conflict of interest. Social workers who become involved in, or anticipate becoming involved in, a sexual
relationship with a colleague have a duty to transfer professional responsibilities, when necessary, to avoid
a conflict of interest.

2.08 Sexual Harassment

Social workers should not sexually harass supervisees, students, trainees, or colleagues. Sexual harassment
includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical
conduct of a sexual nature.

2.09 Impairment of Colleagues

(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague's impairment that is due to
personal problems, psychosocial distress, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties and that interferes
with practice effectiveness should consult with that colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in
taking remedial action.

(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague's impairment interferes with practice
effectiveness and that the colleague has not taken adequate steps to address the impairment should take
action through appropriate channels established by employers, agencies, NASW, licensing and regulatory
bodies, and other professional organizations.
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2.10 Incompetence of Colleagues

(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague's incompetence should consult
with that colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in taking remedial action.

(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague is incompetent and has not taken adequate
steps to address the incompetence should take action through appropriate channels established by
employers, agencies, NASW, licensing and regulatory bodies, and other professional organizations.

2.11 Unethical Conduct of Colleagues

(a) Social workers should take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, expose, and correct the unethical
conduct of colleagues.

(b) Social workers should be knowledgeable about established policies and procedures for handling
concerns about colleagues' unethical behavior. Social workers should be familiar with national, state, and
local procedures for handling ethics complaints. These include policies and procedures created by NASW,
licensing and regulatory bodies, employers, agencies, and other professional organizations.

(c) Social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should seek resolution by discussing
their concerns with the colleague when feasible and when such discussion is likely to be productive.

(d) When necessary, social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should take action
through appropriate formal channels (such as contacting a state licensing board or regulatory body, an
NASW committee on inquiry, or other professional ethics committees).

(e) Social workers should defend and assist colleagues who are unjustly charged with unethical conduct.

3. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities in Practice Settings

3.01 Supervision and Consultation

(a) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation should have the necessary knowledge and skill
to supervise or consult appropriately and should do so only within their areas of knowledge and
competence.

(b) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation are responsible for setting clear, appropriate,
and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) Social workers should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with supervisees in which there
is a risk of exploitation of or potential harm to the supervisee.

(d) Social workers who provide supervision should evaluate supervisees' performance in a manner that is
fair and respectful.

3.02 Education and Training

(a) Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should provide
instruction only within their areas of knowledge and competence and should provide instruction based on
the most current information and knowledge available in the profession.




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(b) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should evaluate students'
performance in a manner that is fair and respectful.

(c) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should take reasonable steps
to ensure that clients are routinely informed when services are being provided by students.

(d) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should not engage in any dual
or multiple relationships with students in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the
student. Social work educators and field instructors are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and
culturally sensitive boundaries.

3.03 Performance Evaluation

Social workers who have responsibility for evaluating the performance of others should fulfill such
responsibility in a fair and considerate manner and on the basis of clearly stated criteria.

3.04 Client Records

(a) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that documentation in records is accurate and
reflects the services provided.

(b) Social workers should include sufficient and timely documentation in records to facilitate the delivery
of services and to ensure continuity of services provided to clients in the future.

(c) Social workers' documentation should protect clients' privacy to the extent that is possible and
appropriate and should include only information that is directly relevant to the delivery of services.

(d) Social workers should store records following the termination of services to ensure reasonable future
access. Records should be maintained for the number of years required by state statutes or relevant
contracts.

3.05 Billing

Social workers should establish and maintain billing practices that accurately reflect the nature and extent
of services provided and that identify who provided the service in the practice setting.

3.06 Client Transfer

(a) When an individual who is receiving services from another agency or colleague contacts a social worker
for services, the social worker should carefully consider the client's needs before agreeing to provide
services. To minimize possible confusion and conflict, social workers should discuss with potential clients
the nature of the clients' current relationship with other service providers and the implications, including
possible benefits or risks, of entering into a relationship with a new service provider.

(b) If a new client has been served by another agency or colleague, social workers should discuss with the
client whether consultation with the previous service provider is in the client's best interest.

3.07 Administration

(a) Social work administrators should advocate within and outside their agencies for adequate resources to
meet clients' needs.


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(b) Social workers should advocate for resource allocation procedures that are open and fair. When not all
clients' needs can be met, an allocation procedure should be developed that is nondiscriminatory and based
on appropriate and consistently applied principles.

(c) Social workers who are administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that adequate agency or
organizational resources are available to provide appropriate staff supervision.

(d) Social work administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that the working environment for
which they are responsible is consistent with and encourages compliance with the NASW Code of Ethics.
Social work administrators should take reasonable steps to eliminate any conditions in their organizations
that violate, interfere with, or discourage compliance with the Code.

3.08 Continuing Education and Staff Development

Social work administrators and supervisors should take reasonable steps to provide or arrange for
continuing education and staff development for all staff for whom they are responsible. Continuing
education and staff development should address current knowledge and emerging developments related to
social work practice and ethics.

3.09 Commitments to Employers

(a) Social workers generally should adhere to commitments made to employers and employing
organizations.

(b) Social workers should work to improve employing agencies' policies and procedures and the efficiency
and effectiveness of their services.

(c) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that employers are aware of social workers'
ethical obligations as set forth in the NASW Code of Ethics and of the implications of those obligations for
social work practice.

(d) Social workers should not allow an employing organization's policies, procedures, regulations, or
administrative orders to interfere with their ethical practice of social work. Social workers should take
reasonable steps to ensure that their employing organizations' practices are consistent with the NASW Code
of Ethics.

(e) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate discrimination in the employing organization's work
assignments and in its employment policies and practices.

(f) Social workers should accept employment or arrange student field placements only in organizations that
exercise fair personnel practices.

(g) Social workers should be diligent stewards of the resources of their employing organizations, wisely
conserving funds where appropriate and never misappropriating funds or using them for unintended
purposes.

3.10 Labor-Management Disputes

(a) Social workers may engage in organized action, including the formation of and participation in labor
unions, to improve services to clients and working conditions.

(b) The actions of social workers who are involved in labor-management disputes, job actions, or labor
strikes should be guided by the profession's values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. Reasonable
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differences of opinion exist among social workers concerning their primary obligation as professionals
during an actual or threatened labor strike or job action. Social workers should carefully examine relevant
issues and their possible impact on clients before deciding on a course of action.

4. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities as Professionals

4.01 Competence

(a) Social workers should accept responsibility or employment only on the basis of existing competence or
the intention to acquire the necessary competence.

(b) Social workers should strive to become and remain proficient in professional practice and the
performance of professional functions. Social workers should critically examine and keep current with
emerging knowledge relevant to social work. Social workers should routinely review the professional
literature and participate in continuing education relevant to social work practice and social work ethics.

(c) Social workers should base practice on recognized knowledge, including empirically based knowledge,
relevant to social work and social work ethics.

4.02 Discrimination

Social workers should not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination on
the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief,
religion, or mental or physical disability.

4.03 Private Conduct

Social workers should not permit their private conduct to interfere with their ability to fulfill their
professional responsibilities.

4.04 Dishonesty, Fraud, and Deception

Social workers should not participate in, condone, or be associated with dishonesty, fraud, or deception.

4.05 Impairment

(a) Social workers should not allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems,
substance abuse, or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance
or to jeopardize the best interests of people for whom they have a professional responsibility.

(b) Social workers whose personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or
mental health difficulties interfere with their professional judgment and performance should immediately
seek consultation and take appropriate remedial action by seeking professional help, making adjustments in
workload, terminating practice, or taking any other steps necessary to protect clients and others.

4.06 Misrepresentation

(a) Social workers should make clear distinctions between statements made and actions engaged in as a
private individual and as a representative of the social work profession, a professional social work
organization, or the social worker's employing agency.




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(b) Social workers who speak on behalf of professional social work organizations should accurately
represent the official and authorized positions of the organizations.

(c) Social workers should ensure that their representations to clients, agencies, and the public of
professional qualifications, credentials, education, competence, affiliations, services provided, or results to
be achieved are accurate. Social workers should claim only those relevant professional credentials they
actually possess and take steps to correct any inaccuracies or misrepresentations of their credentials by
others.

4.07 Solicitations

(a) Social workers should not engage in uninvited solicitation of potential clients who, because of their
circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence, manipulation, or coercion.

(b) Social workers should not engage in solicitation of testimonial endorsements (including solicitation of
consent to use a client's prior statement as a testimonial endorsement) from current clients or from other
people who, because of their particular circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence.

4.08 Acknowledging Credit

(a) Social workers should take responsibility and credit, including authorship credit, only for work they
have actually performed and to which they have contributed.

(b) Social workers should honestly acknowledge the work of and the contributions made by others.

5. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities to the Social Work Profession

5.01 Integrity of the Profession

(a) Social workers should work toward the maintenance and promotion of high standards of practice.

(b) Social workers should uphold and advance the values, ethics, knowledge, and mission of the profession.
Social workers should protect, enhance, and improve the integrity of the profession through appropriate
study and research, active discussion, and responsible criticism of the profession.

(c) Social workers should contribute time and professional expertise to activities that promote respect for
the value, integrity, and competence of the social work profession. These activities may include teaching,
research, consultation, service, legislative testimony, presentations in the community, and participation in
their professional organizations.

(d) Social workers should contribute to the knowledge base of social work and share with colleagues their
knowledge related to practice, research, and ethics. Social workers should seek to con-tribute to the
profession's literature and to share their knowledge at professional meetings and conferences.

(e) Social workers should act to prevent the unauthorized and unqualified practice of social work.

5.02 Evaluation and Research

(a) Social workers should monitor and evaluate policies, the implementation of programs, and practice
interventions.




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(b) Social workers should promote and facilitate evaluation and research to contribute to the development
of knowledge.

(c) Social workers should critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to social
work and fully use evaluation and research evidence in their professional practice.

(d) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should carefully consider possible consequences and
should follow guidelines developed for the protection of evaluation and research participants. Appropriate
institutional review boards should be consulted.

(e) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should obtain voluntary and written informed consent
from participants, when appropriate, without any implied or actual deprivation or penalty for refusal to
participate; without undue inducement to participate; and with due regard for participants' well-being,
privacy, and dignity. Informed consent should include information about the nature, extent, and duration of
the participation requested and disclosure of the risks and benefits of participation in the research.

(f) When evaluation or research participants are incapable of giving informed consent, social workers
should provide an appropriate explanation to the participants, obtain the participants' assent to the extent
they are able, and obtain written consent from an appropriate proxy.

(g) Social workers should never design or conduct evaluation or research that does not use consent
procedures, such as certain forms of naturalistic observation and archival research, unless rigorous and
responsible review of the research has found it to be justified because of its prospective scientific,
educational, or applied value and unless equally effective alternative procedures that do not involve waiver
of consent are not feasible.

(h) Social workers should inform participants of their right to withdraw from evaluation and research at any
time without penalty.

(i) Social workers should take appropriate steps to ensure that participants in evaluation and research have
access to appropriate supportive services.

(j) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should protect participants from unwarranted physical
or mental distress, harm, danger, or deprivation.

(k) Social workers engaged in the evaluation of services should discuss collected information only for
professional purposes and only with people professionally concerned with this information.

(l) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should ensure the anonymity or confidentiality of
participants and of the data obtained from them. Social workers should inform participants of any limits of
confidentiality, the measures that will be taken to ensure confidentiality, and when any records containing
research data will be destroyed.

(m) Social workers who report evaluation and research results should protect participants' confidentiality by
omitting identifying information unless proper consent has been obtained authorizing disclosure.

(n) Social workers should report evaluation and research findings accurately. They should not fabricate or
falsify results and should take steps to correct any errors later found in published data using standard
publication methods.

(o) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest and
dual relationships with participants, should inform participants when a real or potential conflict of interest
arises, and should take steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes participants' interests primary.

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(p) Social workers should educate themselves, their students, and their colleagues about responsible
research practices.

6. Social Workers' Ethical Responsibilities to the Broader Society

6.01 Social Welfare

Social workers should promote the general welfare of society, from local to global levels, and the
development of people, their communities, and their environments. Social workers should advocate for
living conditions conducive to the fulfillment of basic human needs and should promote social, economic,
political, and cultural values and institutions that are compatible with the realization of social justice.

6.02 Public Participation

Social workers should facilitate informed participation by the public in shaping social policies and
institutions.

6.03 Public Emergencies

Social workers should provide appropriate professional services in public emergencies to the greatest extent
possible.

6.04 Social and Political Action

(a) Social workers should engage in social and political action that seeks to ensure that all people have
equal access to the resources, employment, services, and opportunities they require to meet their basic
human needs and to develop fully. Social workers should be aware of the impact of the political arena on
practice and should advocate for changes in policy and legislation to improve social conditions in order to
meet basic human needs and promote social justice.

(b) Social workers should act to expand choice and opportunity for all people, with special regard for
vulnerable, disadvantaged, oppressed, and exploited people and groups.

(c) Social workers should promote conditions that encourage respect for cultural and social diversity within
the United States and globally. Social workers should promote policies and practices that demonstrate
respect for difference, support the expansion of cultural knowledge and resources, advocate for programs
and institutions that demonstrate cultural competence, and promote policies that safeguard the rights of and
confirm equity and social justice for all people.

(d) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate domination of, exploitation of, and discrimination
against any person, group, or class on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual
orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, or mental or physical disability.




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                                            Standards of Conduct
                                                Appendix C


Standards of Conduct
Please Note: The procedures and/or policies contained in this section of the handbook are
subject to change as the College deems necessary. If you have a problem, please check the
appropriate office to confirm the policies and/or procedures you need to follow.
Respect for Rights of Others
The student assumes certain obligations of performance and behavior while attending MSCD.
Based on this premise, reasonable policies, procedures, and regulations have been developed to
guarantee each student’s opportunity to learn and to protect the fundamental rights of others.
MSCD students neither gain nor lose any of the rights and responsibilities of other citizens by
virtue of their student status.
As members of an academic community, students are expected to conduct themselves in a
mature and responsible manner. Students should try at all times to promote a sense of
cooperation and civility within the College, and work to build an atmosphere which will be most
conducive to the goals of higher education within the institution.
Students, while within College facilities or while participating in College-sponsored activities
(on-campus and/or off-campus), are expected to comply with College rules and regulations and
with the regulations of off-campus sites.
Freedom of Speech
Students shall have the right to assemble, to select speakers and guests, and to discuss issues of
their choice. An invitation to a speaker shall not imply endorsement of the speaker’s views by
either the student organizations or the College.
Information about student views, beliefs, and political associations shall not be used to the
detriment of students and their institutional standing.
The right of peaceful protest is granted within the College community. The College retains the
right to assure the safety of individuals, the protection of property, and the continuity of the
educational process.
The student press shall be free of censorship and shall provide editorial freedom. The editors and
managers shall not be arbitrarily suspended because of the student, faculty, administration,
alumni, or community disapproval of editorial policy or content.
All student communications shall explicitly state on the editorial page or in broadcast that the
opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the College and/or members of the College.
Academic Rights
Students have the right to:
1. be informed of course expectations and requirements.
2. be evaluated fairly on the basis of academic performance.
3. participate in free and open discussion, inquiry, and expression, both in the classroom and
in conference.
4. receive competent instruction and advisement.
5. expect protection against professors’ improper disclosure of students’ personal
information, views, beliefs, and political associations when such information has become
known as a result of professors’ instructions, advisement, or counsel.
6. expect protection, through established procedures, against prejudicial or capricious
evaluation.
7. assess the value of a course to make suggestions as to its direction and to evaluate both
the instructor and the instruction they have received.
8. have input in College policy-making which may include, but shall not be limited to,
course scheduling, distribution of night and day classes, calendar arrangements, library
policy and development, grading systems, course development, and curriculum.
9. expect instructors to conduct themselves professionally in the classroom in accordance
with College policies and directives.
10. expect instructors to maintain office hours as required by College policy.
11. expect reasonable academic assistance from the appropriate department.

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12. be informed of academic standards expected of them in the classroom through a printed
syllabus and course outline. Academic standards shall include, but not be limited to, class
attendance requirements, objectives to be achieved, and the grading criteria that will be
applied to a particular course of study.
Academic Responsibilities
Students have the responsibility to:
1. inquire about course or degree requirements if they do not understand them or are in
doubt about them.
2. maintain the standards of academic performance established for individual courses and
for programs of study.
3. learn the content of any course study.
4. act in accordance with commonly accepted standards of academic conduct. If disruptive
behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has authority to ask the student to leave the
classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should
report the matter to Auraria Campus Police and/or the Dean of Student life.
5. maintain academic ethics and academic honesty.
6. pay the tuition and fees and be officially registered in order to attend a class.
7. initiate an investigation by contacting the department chair if they believe their academic
rights have been violated.
Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty is a serious offense at the College because it diminishes the quality of
scholarship and the learning experience for everyone on campus. An act of academic dishonesty
may lead to such penalties as reduction of grade, probation, suspension, or expulsion. Examples
of academic dishonesty include:
Cheating: The term ―cheating‖ includes, but is not limited to: 1) use of any unauthorized
assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; 2) dependence upon the aid or sources
beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems,
or carrying out other assignments; or 3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other
academic material belonging to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students.
Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information, data, or
citation in an academic exercise.
Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help
another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
Plagiarism: The term ―plagiarism‖ includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct
quotations, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear
acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another
person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic
materials.
Submitting the same work for different classes: Students are expected to turn in original work for
each of their classes. Submitting substantive portions of the same work in more than one class is
considered academic dishonesty.
Procedures
Academic dishonesty may result in institutional sanctions. Institutional sanctions, however, do
not limit the individual faculty member’s academic freedom and the right to maintain academic
integrity in the learning environment by assigning a grade or grade notation for an assignment,
exercise, test, and for the course.
In all cases of academic dishonesty, the instructor shall make an initial academic judgment about
the student’s grade on that work in that course and shall report such incidents within fifteen (15)
working days to the student and to the judicial officer responsible for the administration of the
College judicial system. The judicial officer has the discretion to consult with the faculty
member and the Office of Academic Affairs to determine whether or not institutional sanctions
should be invoked. In addition to institutional sanctions listed in the College Judicial Policies, a
failing course grade assigned as a result of academic dishonesty is considered a permanent ―F‖
and is not subject to the College’s ―Last Grade Stands‖ policy unless it is altered pursuant to the
College grade appeal procedures.
College judicial policies pertaining to academic dishonesty are part of the Student Conduct Code

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published below. Members of the faculty have the right and responsibility, when they report acts
of academic dishonesty to the College judicial officer, to file charges against such student(s) and
ask that institutional sanctions be applied. At his or her discretion, the judicial officer may
recommend and impose sanctions in any reported case of academic misconduct against a student.
Should institutional sanctions be recommended in cases of academic dishonesty, the judicial
officer shall check with the Office of Academic Affairs to determine if the student has any record
of prior offenses involving academic misconduct. Students accused of academic dishonesty have
the right, under the judicial policies of the Student Conduct Code, to request a hearing to
consider the charges made against them.
Student Conduct Code
The code is not intended to replace existing procedures related to:
1. discrimination or sexual harassment
2. grade appeals
3. requests for exceptions to academic policies
4. appeals for tuition and fee reduction
5. disputes relative to financial aid awards
6. in-state tuition classification
For any other matters that are not included above, contact the Office of Student Life. It is a
resource for accurate information and advocacy on behalf of the students at the College. Student
Life personnel can advise and assist students with unusual circumstances, or with problems not
addressed in the Student Handbook or College Catalog.
Article I: Definitions
1. The term ―College‖ means Metropolitan State College of Denver.
2. The term ―student‖ includes all persons taking courses at the College, both full-time and
part-time, pursuing undergraduate or professional studies.
3. The term ―faculty member‖ means any person hired by the College to conduct classroom
activities.
4. The term ―College official‖ includes any person employed by the College performing
assigned administrative or professional responsibilities.
5. The term ―member of the College‖ includes any person who is a student, faculty member,
College official, or any other person employed by the College.
6. The term ―College or campus premises‖ includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other
property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the Auraria Higher
Education Center, including the adjacent streets and sidewalks, and also includes MSCD
Extended Campus locations.
7. The term ―organization‖ means any number of persons who have complied with the
formal requirements for College recognition.
8. The title of ―judicial officer‖ is that person designated by the College President to be
responsible for the administration of the Student Conduct Code.
9. The term ―judicial advisor‖ means a College official authorized on a case-by-case basis
by the judicial officer to impose sanctions upon students found to have violated the
Student Conduct Code. The judicial officer may authorize a judicial advisor to serve
simultaneously as a judicial advisor and the sole member or one of the members of a
judicial body. Nothing shall prevent the judicial officer from authorizing the same
judicial advisor to impose sanctions in all cases.
10. The term ―judicial body‖ means any person or persons authorized and identified by the
judicial officer to determine whether a student has violated the Student Conduct Code
and to recommend imposition of sanctions.
11. The term ―shall‖ is used in the imperative sense.
12. The term ―may‖ is used in the permissive sense.
13. The term ―policy‖ is defined as the written regulations of the College as found in, but not
limited to, the Student Conduct Code, Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook, and
MSCD Catalogs and Class Schedules.
14. The term ―cheating‖ includes, but is not limited to:
a) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations;
b) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in

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writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other
assignments; or
c) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic materials belonging
to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students.
15. The term ―fabrication‖ is the intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of
any information, data, or citation in an academic exercise.
16. ―Facilitating academic dishonesty‖ means intentionally or knowingly helping or
attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
17. The term ―plagiarism‖ includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct
quotations, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear
acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by
another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or
other academic materials.
18. The phrase ―Submitting the same work for different classes‖ means submitting
substantive portions of the same work in more than one class. Students are expected to
turn in original work for each of their classes.
19. The term ―working days‖ refers to the number of days specified for each step of the
procedure and does not include Saturdays, Sundays, holidays, or days when the College
is not in session and holding classes.
Article II: Judicial Authority
1. The judicial officer shall determine the composition of judicial bodies and determine
which judicial body or judicial advisor shall be authorized to hear each case.
2. The judicial officer shall appoint a chair to the judicial body for each case.
3. The judicial officer may develop policies for the administration of the judicial program
and procedural rules for the conduct of hearings that are not inconsistent with provisions
of the Student Conduct Code.
4. Decisions made by a judicial body, judicial officer, and judicial advisor shall be final,
pending the normal appeal process.
5. The judicial officer may extend time limits for good cause demonstrated in writing.
Article III: Proscribed Conduct
A. Jurisdiction of the College
Generally, College jurisdiction and discipline shall be limited to conduct which occurs on
College or campus premises, while a student is participating in College-sponsored
activities, or which adversely affects the College community and/or the pursuit of its
objectives.
B. Conduct – Rules and Regulations
Any student found to have committed the following misconduct is subject to the disciplinary
sanctions outlines in Article IV:
1. Acts of dishonesty including, but not limited to, the following:
a) cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty;
b) furnishing false information to any College or campus official, faculty
member, or office;
c) forgery, alteration, or misuse of College document, record, or instrument
of identification.
d) tampering with the election of any College recognized student
organization, or
e) assisting anyone in the commission of any acts stated above.
2. Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary
proceedings, other College activities including its public service functions on and
off campus, or other authorized non-College activities when the act occurs on
College premises.
3. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion, and/or
other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person.
4. Attempted or actual theft of and/or damage to property of the College or property
of a member of the College community or AHEC or other personal or public
property.

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5. Hazing, defined as an act which endangers the mental or physical health or safety
of a student or which destroys or removes public or private property for the
purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for
continued membership in a group or organization. Hazing can be further defined
as any action that produces physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or
ridicule. Activities including the following are defined as hazing and are strictly
forbidden:
a) paddling,
b) causing excessive fatigue,
c) physical shock,
d) morally degrading/humiliating game,
e) public stunts,
f) activities which interfere with academic work/success,
g) dangerous, offensive behavior,
h) activities which interfere with the policies and regulations of the Office of
Student Activities, MSCD, UCD, CCD, or AHEC,
i) activities that engage in discrimination, whether racial or gender based,
j) stranding pledges far from campus, ―road tripping‖,
k) forced calisthenics,
l) forced consumption of food, beverages, or alcohol, or
m) exposure to extreme weather conditions.
Organizations engaging in such activities may be subject to the withdrawal of College
recognition, and thus privileges and services, by the Office of Student Activities.
Questions concerning this policy should be referred to the Director of Student Activities.
6. Failure to comply with directions of College officials or the Auraria Campus
Police acting in performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to
these persons when requested to do so.
7. Unauthorized possession, duplication, or use of keys to any campus premises or
unauthorized entry to, or use of campus premises.
8. Violation of published College policies, rules, or regulations.
9. Violation of federal, state, or local law on College premises or at Collegesponsored
or supervised activities.
10. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics or other controlled substances except
as expressly permitted by the law.
11. Use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages except as expressly
permitted by the law and College regulation, or
public intoxication.
12. Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives, other weapons, or
dangerous chemicals on College premises.
13. Participation in campus demonstrations which disrupt the normal operations of
the College (or other parts of the campus) or infringes on the rights of other
members of the Campus community; leading or inciting others or disrupt
scheduled and/or normal activities within any campus building or area; intentional
obstruction which unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement on campus,
either pedestrian or vehicular.
14. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises
or at College sponsored or supervised functions.
15. Abetting or procuring another person to breach the peace on College premises or
at functions sponsored by or participated in by the College.
16. Any activity involving MSCD’s computing facilities which knowingly interferes
with someone else’s academic freedom or the institution’s goals or policies.
17. Abuse of the judicial system including, but not limited to:
a) failure to obey the summons of a judicial body or College official,
b) falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a
judicial body or College official,
c) disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a judicial

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proceeding,
d) institution of a judicial proceeding knowingly without cause,
e) attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of,
the judicial system,
f) attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body
prior to, and/or during the course of the judicial proceeding,
g) harassment – verbal or physical – and/or intimidation of a member of a
judicial body prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding,
h) failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Student Conduct
Code, or
i) influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse
of the judicial system.
18. Intentionally obstructing or delaying a police officer, fire fighter, security officer,
or College official in performance of his/her duty.
19. Turning in a false bomb alarm or fire alarm, or misusing fire safety equipment.
20. Leaving children unattended or unsupervised on campus grounds. This can
constitute child abuse or child neglect (as outlined in the State of Colorado Child
Protection Act of 1975). Children may be permitted in the classroom with the
instructor’s permission and the understanding that the child’s presence is not
disruptive.
21. Influencing or attempting to influence the academic process through explicit or
implied sexual behavior, bribery, or threats.
22. Failing to comply with contractual obligations with the College.
23. Furnishing false information or academic credentials with the intent to deceive or
mislead when applying for admission to the College or for any of its programs
and services.
Violation of Law and Student Code of Conduct
Students who exhibit unusual and/or unacceptable forms of behavior on campus premises can be
requested to leave by Auraria Campus Police. A faculty member may also remove a student from
the classroom one time and shall immediately contact the judicial officer to file an incident
report. Permanent removal from a class is handled through the judicial process of the college. In
addition to or in lieu of that, faculty members may refer students to the Counseling Center. The
Dean of Student Life or judicial officer may administratively withdraw students exhibiting
severe behavioral problems.
College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with violation of a
law which is also a violation of this Student Conduct Code. For example, if both violations result
from the same factual situation without regard to the pendency of civil litigation in court or
criminal arrest and prosecution, proceedings under this Student Conduct Code may be carried out
prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.
Article IV: Judicial Processes
A. Charges and Hearings
1. Any person may file charges against any student for misconduct. Charges shall be
prepared in writing and directed to the judicial officer responsible for the
administration of the College judicial system. Any charge shall be submitted
within fifteen (15) working days after discovering that the event has taken place.
2. The judicial officer may notify the student of the charges.
3. The judicial officer may conduct an investigation to determine if the charges have
merit and/or if they can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the
parties involved on a basis acceptable to the judicial advisor. Such disposition
shall be final and there shall be no subsequent proceedings. If the charges cannot
be disposed of by mutual consent, the judicial officer may refer the matter to a
judicial body for a formal hearing.
4. In the event of a formal judicial hearing, the judicial officer shall present to the
accused student in writing a statement of the allegations, the charges they would
support, and the potential consequences in the event that the judicial body finds
the allegations to be true. A time shall be set for a hearing, generally not less than

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five (5) nor more than fifteen (15) working days after the student has been
notified. Maximum time limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the
discretion of the judicial advisor.
5. A judicial body, according to the following guidelines, shall conduct hearings:
a) Hearings shall be conducted in private.
b) Admissions of any person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the
judicial body and/or its judicial advisor.
c) In hearings involving more than one accused student, the chairperson of
the judicial body, in his/her discretion may permit the hearings concerning
each student to be conducted separately.
d) The complainant and the accused have the right to be assisted by any
advisor they choose, at their own expense. The advisor may be an
attorney. However the complainant and/or the accused is responsible for
presenting his/her own case and, therefore, advisors are not permitted to
participate in any hearing before a judicial body unless the College legal
counsel specifically advises otherwise. The complainant will notify the
judicial officer before the hearing of the name, address, and telephone
number of the advisor.
e) The complainant, the accused, and the judicial body shall have the
privilege of presenting witnesses, subject to right of cross examination by
the judicial body.
f) Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements may be accepted as
evidence for consideration by a judicial body at the discretion of the
chairperson.
g) All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the
chairperson of the judicial body.
h) After the hearing, the judicial body shall determine – by majority vote if
the judicial body consists of more than one person – whether the student
has violated the Student Conduct Code.
i) The judicial body’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it
is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student
Conduct Code.
j) College legal counsel shall serve as legal advisor to the judicial officer
and/or judicial body.
6. There shall be a single verbatim record – such as a tape recording – of all hearings
before a judicial body. The record shall be the property of the College.
7. Except in the case of a student charged with failing to obey the summons of a
judicial body or College official, no student may be found to have violated the
Student Conduct Code solely because the student failed to appear before a judicial
body. In all cases, the evidence in support of the charges shall be presented and
considered.
B. Sanctions
1. The following sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated
the Student Conduct Code:
a) Warning - A notice in writing to the student that the student is violating or
has violated institutional regulations.
b) Probation - A written reprimand for violation of specified regulations.
Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of
more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating
any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period.
c) Loss of Privileges - Denial of specified privileges for a designated period
of time.
d) Fines - Previously established and published fines may be imposed.
e) Restitution - Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the
form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.
f) Discretionary Sanctions - Work assignments, service to the College, or

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other related discretionary assignments that have the prior approval of the
judicial advisor.
g) College Suspension - Separation of the student from the College for a
definite period of time, after which the student is eligible to return.
Conditions for readmission may be specified.
h) College Expulsion - Permanent separation of the student from College.
2. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single
violation.
3. Other than College expulsion, disciplinary sanctions shall not be made part of the
student’s permanent academic record, but shall become part of the student’s
confidential record. Upon graduation, the student’s confidential record may be
expunged of disciplinary actions - other than the College suspension or expulsion.
Note: A permanent grade, ―F‖ issued as a result of academic dishonesty, is not a ―sanction‖ for
purposes of this Student Conduct Code.
4. The following sanctions may be imposed upon groups or organizations:
a) Those sanctions listed above in Section B1, a through e.
b) Deactivation - Loss of all privileges, including College recognition, for a
specified period of time.
5. In each case in which a judicial body determines that a student has violated the
Student Conduct Code, the sanction(s) shall be determined and imposed by the
judicial officer. In cases in which persons other than the judicial officer have been
authorized to serve as the judicial body, the judicial officer in determining and
imposing sanctions shall consider the recommendation of all members of the
judicial body. The judicial officer is not limited to sanctions recommended by
members of the judicial body. Following the hearing, the judicial body and the
judicial officer shall advise the accused in writing – within five (5) working days
– of its determination and the sanctions(s) imposed, if any.
C. Interim Suspension
In certain circumstances, the Dean of Student Life, or judicial officer, may impose a College
suspension prior to the hearing before a judicial body.
1. Interim suspension may be imposed only:
a) to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the campus community
or preservation of campus property;
b) to ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being;
or
c) if the student poses a definite threat of disruption of, or interference with,
the normal operation of the College.
2. During the interim suspension, students shall be denied access to the
campus – including classes – and/or all other College activities or
privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the Dean
of Student Life or judicial officer may determine to be appropriate.
D. Appeals
1. A decision reached by the judicial body or a sanction imposed by the judicial
officer may be appealed by accused students or complainants within five (5)
working days of the decision. Such appeals shall be in writing and shall be
delivered to the Vice President of Student Services as the College President’s
designee.
2. Except as required to explain the basis of new evidence, an appeal shall be limited
to review of the verbatim record of the initial hearing and supporting documents
for one or more of the following purposes:
a) To determine whether the original hearing was conducted fairly in light of
the charges and evidence presented and in conformity with prescribed
procedures giving the complaining party a reasonable opportunity to
prepare and to present a rebuttal of those allegations.
b) To determine whether the decision reached regarding the accused student
was based on substantial evidence; that is, whether the facts in the case

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were sufficient to establish that violation of the Student Conduct Code
occurred.
c) To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed were appropriate for the
violation of the Student Conduct Code which the student was found to
have committed.
d) To consider new evidence sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant
facts not brought out in the original hearing because the person appealing
did not know such evidence and/or facts at the time of the original hearing.
3. If an appeal is upheld, the matter shall be remanded to the original judicial body
and the judicial advisor for reopening of the hearing to allow reconsideration of
the original determination and/or sanction(s).
4. In cases involving appeals by students accused of violating the Student Conduct
Code, review of the sanction(s) by the Vice President may not result in more
severe sanction(s) for the accused student. Instead, following an appeal, the
judicial officer may, upon review of the case, reduce, but not increase the
sanction(s) imposed by the judicial body.
Article V: Interpretation and Revision
A. Any question of interpretation regarding the Student Conduct Code shall be referred to
the Dean of Student Life or designee for final determination.
B. The Student Conduct Code shall be reviewed every five (5) years under the direction of
the Dean of Student Life or designee.
Release of Disciplinary Information
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions
of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those
College officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have
access to the files. All other inquiries including, but not limited to, employers, governmental
agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police must have a written release from the student to
gain access to College disciplinary matters. No record may be made in relation to any of the
following matters except upon express written consent of the student or in accordance with
existing local, state, and/or federal statutes:
1. race
2. religion
3. political or social views
4. membership in any organization other than honorary and professional organizations
directly related to the educational process.
Discrimination Matters
Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in the private sector, in state and
local government, in public accommodations and services, including transportation provided by
public and private entities. Students with a disability who are qualified to pursue an academic
program should contact the Auraria Disability Services Office at (303) 556-8387, or Kelly
Espinoza, ADA Coordinator, at (303) 556-3908.
MSCD complies with all federal laws, executive orders, and regulations regarding affirmative
action and equal opportunity, as well as all civil rights laws of the State of Colorado. MSCD,
therefore, employs every means to eliminate discrimination on the basis of race, color, disability,
religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or status, such as Vietnam-era or disabled
veteran, in all matters of education and employment opportunity provided by the College.
The responsibility for ensuring that discrimination does not occur rests with all members of the
College community. Allegations of discrimination should be reported to the College Office of
Equal Opportunity at (303) 556-2939, CN 315. Corrective actions or sanctions shall be applied
accordingly.
Sexual Harassment
Sexual Harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex. It is prohibited by law and College
policy. In the educational context, sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual
advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
(a) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an
individual’s status in a course, program, activity, or educational evaluation; or (b) submission to

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or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for educational decisions affecting that
individual; or (c) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s academic performance or educational experience, or of creating an intimidating,
hostile, or offensive educational environment.
Charges of sexual harassment can be based on a wide variety of behaviors, such as repeated
derogatory sexual remarks, negotiation for sexual favors as a quid pro quo for grades or
recommendations, or threatened or actual sexual assault. These and similar behaviors seriously
undermine the teaching and learning environment and can be grounds for disciplinary action.
Sexual harassment should be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity at (303) 556-4746.
Sexual assaults should be reported to the Auraria Campus Police at (303) 556-3271. Written
policies addressing these issues in greater detail are available.
Amorous Relationships Involving Students and College Employees
College policy strongly discourages employees of the College from becoming involved in
relationships of a romantic nature with students they supervise, either in a faculty-student or
supervisor-subordinate situation. If such relationships exist, they must be disclosed to the
College and the conflicts of interest that result must be avoided. For example, an instructor is not
allowed to issue a grade to someone with whom s/he is involved in an amorous relationship, and
a supervisor can not hire or evaluate someone s/he is dating. Because of the professional
difficulties associated with amorous relationships, faculty and staff should avoid them entirely.
Students are strongly discouraged from seeking relationships of a romantic nature with College
faculty or staff. Also, students who persist in making unwelcome sexual advances to a faculty
member or college employee risk violation of College policy prohibiting sexual harassment.




                                    The Metropolitan State College of Denver
                                              Student Handbook
                                                 Page 61 of 61

								
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