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International Relations of East Asia

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					International Relations of East Asia

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to provoke your thinking about East Asia as a regional
subsystem in the international system. For the purposes of this course, East Asia is defined as
the region encompassing the Russian Far East, China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Southeast
Asia. Since it has been extensively involved in the region since the 1850s, we will also focus
on the role of the United States as well as Europe in the region.

Learning objectives of this course are:
         to facilitate students’ broad understanding of the factors that shape national and
          international relations in East Asia and the interaction between the two.
         to enhance student capabilities for articulating this understanding in both a written
          and verbal context, and
         to broaden students for their insight on the regional politics in East Asia from a
          global perspective.

In addition to building students’ familiarity with international relations of East Asia, this
course intends to expose the students to theoretical and empirical inquiry of the international
relations literature. One of our jobs is to decide how useful this theoretical literature is for the
analysis of East Asia and, in turn, whether the analysis of East Asia adds anything to the
theoretical literature. Through carefully reading and evaluating the course materials, the
students are expected to enhance their ability to make use of social scientific reasoning and to
present their own opinions in a logically consistent way.

Some of the questions that run through this course include: Are there distinctive patterns in
East Asia’s international relations? This course examines the nature of international relations
in East Asia. Topics will include:

    (1)   the historical context of international relations in East Asia,
    (2)   theories in international relations
    (3)   domestic institutions and regional politics,
    (4)   regional security issues,
    (5)   economic relations in the region,
    (6)   cultural, human rights and democracy issues in the region,
    (7)   the implications of these issues to prospective regional cooperation and tension for a
          global perspective.

Performance Evaluation
         Participation: General Participation and discussion section 25%
         In-class short-answer mid-term exam 25%
         Take-home essay 50%

The class is a lecture course with discussion sections. Students’ grades will be based on their
level of participation in discussion sections (25 percent); an in-class short-answer mid-term
exam (25); and a take-home essay exam of 10 pages due near the end of the term (50). The
final will cover material only from the second half of the term.


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Students’ participation is highly encouraged. Clarification questions are always welcome.
Thought-provocative questions are highly appreciated. Two-time term papers are expected to
be about 4 to 5 pages long. Students will answer a specific set of questions by writing an
essay. Final paper will be about 10 pages long. Each student will choose his or her research
topic, will address a causal hypothesis, and will test it against empirical reality. Guidelines for
the take-home essay will be informed in the third week.

Class Resources
      Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
       Mscmillan. 272 pages.
      Steans, Jill, Pettiford, Lloyd, Diexz, Thomas, and El-Anis, Imad. 2010. An
       Introduction to International Relations Theory: Perspectives and themes. Third
       edition. 274 pages
      Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
       Pearson Longman. 416 pages
      Additional class materials will be provided in the blackboard system.


CLASS SCHEDULE

Part I: Understanding East Asia in a Globalized World
The readings for this part are on some of the theoretical literature on regional international
relations. The key questions are: What is the 'dependent variable' in the study of East Asian
IR? What constitutes a region, that is, what are the defining characteristics of a regional
subsystem? On what basis can East Asia be characterized as a regional subsystem having its
own international relations? Do different characteristics have different implications for levels
of conflict and cooperation? What hypotheses about regional interaction, and about the
relationship between global and local systems come out of this literature?

Session 1: International relations in East Asia from the Global Perspective
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 1 & 2
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 1 & 10
   Beeson, Mark. 2005. “Rethinking regionalism: Europe and East Asia in comparative
      historical Perspective”. Journal of European Public Policy 12:6 December, 969–985.
   Beeson, Mark. 2009. “Geopolitics and the Making of Regions: The Fall and Rise of
      East Asia”. Political Studies. 2009. Vol 57. 498–516

Session 2: Theories in International Relations
   Steans, Jill, Pettiford, Lloyd, Diexz, Thomas, and El-Anis, Imad. 2010. An
      Introduction to International Relations Theory: Perspectives and themes. Third
      edition. Chapter 2-4

Session 3: Alternative Perspectives
   Steans, Jill, Pettiford, Lloyd, Diexz, Thomas, and El-Anis, Imad. 2010. An
      Introduction to International Relations Theory: Perspectives and themes. Third
      edition. Chapter 5-8




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Part II: States, Institutions, and Development
In this section the focus is on political institutions and development within states in East Asia
and the implications for international economic and political relations in the region. Do the
democratization processes in a number of regional actors matter for regional conflict and
cooperation? How does nationalism constrain cooperation? What constraints are placed on
inter-state bargaining by domestic political reform and/or upheaval? Does regime type matter
for the analysis of East Asian international relations? Is there a relationship between political
reform, development strategies, and patterns of regional inter-state relations?


Session 4: Government, Legislatures and Judiciaries
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 3

Session 5: The Politics of Bureaucracy
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 4

Session 6: The state and Economy
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 5

Session 7: Parties and Election
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 6

Session 8: Participation and Power
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 7

Session 9: Ideologies, Identities and Political Communication
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 8

Session 10: Modernization, Human Right and Democracy
   Huang, Xiaoming. 2009. Politics in Pacific Asia: An Introduction. London: Palgrave
      Mscmillan. Introduction, Chapter 9
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 3
   Karima, Syahirah Abdul, Terje A. Eikemob, Clare Bambra, 2010. “Welfare state
      regimes and population health: Integrating the East Asian welfare states”. Health
      Policy Vol. 94, 45–53
   Stephan Haggard. 2004. “Institutions and Growth in East Asia”. Studies in
      Comparative International Development, Winter, Vol. 38, No. 4, 53-81.


Part III: Topic-oriented Regional Politics in East Asia
In this section the focus is on how diverse global issues make impacts on the international
economic and political relations in the region. Do the global terrorism, trade and epidemic



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disease matter for domestic as well as regional tensions in East Asia? What are national and
regional options for such global issues?

Session 11: Global Terrorism and East Asia
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 5
   Bitzinger, Richard A. and Barry Desker. 2009. “Why East Asian War is Unlikely”.
      Survival. Vol. 50 No. 6, 105–128
   Berger, Thomas. Set for stability? Prospects for conflict and cooperation in East Asia.
      2000. Review of International Studies. 26, 405–428.

Session 12: Global Trade and East Asia
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 6

Session 13: Globalization of Disease and East Asia
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 11

Session 14: Environmental Issues and East Asia
   Payne, Richard J. 2007. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York:
      Pearson Longman. Chapter 8

Session 15: Historical Legacy and Territorial Disputes
      Kimura, Masato, and David A. Welch. 1998. "Specifying "Interests": Japan's Claim to the
       Northern Territories and Its Implications for International Relations Theory" International Studies
       Quarterly 42 (2):213-43.
      Dreyer, June Teufel. 2006. "Sino-Japanese Rivalry and Its Implications for Developing Nations."
       Asian Survey 46 (4):538-57.



Part VI: Facing New Challenges
Session 16: Tensions and Development in East Asia
   Cook, Malcolm and Craig Heer. 2005. Balancing Act: Taiwan's Cross-Straits
      Challenge. Sydney: The Lowy Institute. Available at:
      http://www.lowyinstitute.org/Publication.asp?pid=251
   Goh, Evelyn. 2005. "The US-China Relationship and Asia-Pacific Security:
      Negotiating Change". Asian Security 1(3):216-244.
   Hughes, Christopher and Ellisa S. Krauss. 2007. "Japan's New Security Agenda",
      Survival, 49(2):157-176.
   Stossel, Scott. 2005. "North Korea: The War Game". The Atlantic Monthly, Jul/Aug,
      296(1):97-108. Available at: http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200507/stossel
   Final discussion and term paper submission


PROF. CHOE’S CLASS RULES

1. MISSED MID-TERM EXAM: You should notify me before the midterm if, for some
reason, you will not be able to make it on that date. Permission will only be given in

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exceptional cases, and make-ups will be scheduled either before or after the regularly
scheduled date.

2. LATE PAPERS: The final grade on the paper will be docked one letter (e.g. a B+ would be
marked down to a C+) for every day it is late unless the delay has been approved by me,
based on a very good reason, known at least a week before the due date. Last minute
computer problems are not an excuse!!! Back-up your work on disks to avoid losing it, and
leave time for you to deal with last minute hitches (like a broken printer, a line in the
computer lab) by aiming to finish well before the deadline.

3. PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING: Taking the words and ideas of another and presenting
them as your own (without proper use of quotation marks and citation) constitutes
“plagiarism” and is considered grounds for trial and expulsion from the university through the
Honor process. In the past year, I have seen one of my students expelled for this reason and
another failed for attempting to cheat on a final exam. I take all cases of this type seriously
and urge students to uphold the honor code.




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