Gold_Seal_Lesson_Before_and_After

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					Middle School Mathematics Initiative




                Linda Lucey, Ph.D
                 Senior Associate
 International Center for Leadership in Education
      Gold Seal Lesson Agenda
•   1. Creating a Gold Seal Lesson
•   2. Process of Editing a Gold Seal Lesson
•   3. Performance Task
•   4. You become the content editor!
•   5. Review your lessons
    Steps to Create a Gold Seal Lesson

•   Review the Rigor/Relevance Framework
•   Begin with a Big Idea
•   Find an idea
•   Brainstorm real-world situations
•   Research the idea
•   Develop the lesson
       A
GOLD-SEAL LESSON
      HAS:

     RIGOR
      AND

   RELEVANCE
     THAT SOUNDS
 INTERESTING, BUT MY
STUDENTS NEED TO PASS
      THE FCAT!!
MY KIDS TAKE SO MUCH
 CLASS TIME JUST TO
 MASTER THE BASIC
     CONCEPTS!!
IF I MAKE MY LESSONS
 MORE RIGOROUS, MY
  STUDENTS WILL ALL
        FAIL!!
BESIDES, MAKING GOLD-
SEAL LESSONS SOUNDS
        HARD!!
USING THE TEXTBOOK IS
       EASIER.
PRESSURES:
 •TIME
 •DIVERSE LEARNERS
 •EMPHASIS ON TESTING
 •REMEDIATION
 •LITERACY
 •NUMERACY
BENEFITS:
•INCREASE UNDERSTANDING


•MAXIMIZE TIME ON TASK


•MINIMIZE RE-TEACHING
RIGOR       EVALUATION
MEANS
              SYNTHESIS
FRAMING
LESSONS AT    ANALYSIS
THE HIGH
END OF THE   APPLICATION
KNOWLEDGE
TAXONOMY.  COMPREHENSION

            KNOWLEDGE
A LESSON WITH RIGOR ASKS
STUDENTS TO:
  EXAMINE     PRODUCE
 CLASSIFY      DEDUCE
 GENERATE      ASSESS
  CREATE      PRIORITIZE
 SCRUTINIZE    DECIDE
    Math Teachers Beware!


Evaluate
• Let x= 4 and y = 3
     10x – 2xy
RELEVANCE IS THE
PURPOSE OF THE LEARNING:

ACQUIRE KNOWLEDGE
APPLY KNOWLEDGE
INTERDISCIPLINARY
 REAL WORLD PREDICTABLE
 REAL WORLD UNPREDICTABLE
A LESSON WITH RELEVANCE
ASKS STUDENTS TO:
  USE THEIR KNOWLEDGE
        TO TACKLE
  REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS
        THAT HAVE
 MORE THAN ONE SOLUTION.
     A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
     GOLD-SEAL LESSON
PERFORMANCE TASK —
Overview
1.a. Plot the following points on your coordinate system. Remember
    that the first coordinate of the pair names a position going right or
    left in the horizontal direction, and the second coordinate names a
    position going up or down in the vertical direction.
           (1,1), (5,1),(6,2),(7.2),(7,1)(8,1),(9,2)
           (9,4),(7,4),(6,5),(5,5),(1,3),(0,3),(1,1)
b. Connect the points in the order they are shown in 1a. What is the
    result?
c. Add -10 to the first coordinate of each point. What happens?
Add 2 to the first coordinate and add -5 to the second coordinate of each
    point. What happens?
e. What should you do to the coordinates if you want to move the
    drawing up three units and to the right five units?
  A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
   GOLD-SEAL LESSON
  REVIEW THE LESSON IDEA –
Plot a picture with given coordinates.
   Add the same number to the x-
  coordinate and re-plot the figure.
   Observe the translation effect.
 A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
 GOLD-SEAL LESSON
  BRAINSTORM REAL-LIFE
   SITUATIONS THAT USE
TRANSLATION. SEARCH THE
   INTERNET FOR IDEAS.
  Marching band formations?
  Flip book animation?
What Is Cartoon Rendering?
Cartoon rendering (sometimes referred to as cel-shading) has two
major constituents: painting and inking. In the traditional sense,
painting is filling a cartoon object with areas of color. A simple
cartoon will use solid colors for different objects (flat-shading), but
more complex cartoons use two or even three colors for each
material. This is often called stepped-shading because the color
"steps" dramatically from the shadow color to the highlight color.
The stepped-shading effect looks quite different from realistic
rendering techniques as there isn't a smooth gradient between the
shadowed and highlighted areas of an object.
Game Programming Beginners Guide
by Dave Astle
I often get asked how someone with little or no
programming experience can get started in game
development.
I will walk you through the things you need to do to
get to the point that you can make your own games.
The first thing you will need to do is to choose a
language to program in. You have a lot of choices,
including Basic, Pascal, C, C++, Java, etc. I'm going
to recommend starting with C and C++. Some
people will say that those languages are too
advanced for beginners, but because I started with
C++ myself, I tend to disagree. In addition, C/C++ is
the most widely used language today, so you will be

able to find a wealth of resources and help   .
  A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
  GOLD-SEAL LESSON
  USE THE VERB LIST TO
FRAME AN ACTIVITY THAT IS
     HIGH IN RIGOR.
Create, judge, evaluate, generate,
examine, decide, produce,
assess, prioritize, classify . . .
 A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
 GOLD-SEAL LESSON
THINK OF AN ACTIVITY THAT
 IS INTERDISCIPLINARY OR
BASED ON THE REAL WORLD
  AND HAS MORE THAN A
     SINGLE SOLUTION.
   Make sure it relates to the
     learning standard!!
 A PROCESS FOR EDITING A
 GOLD-SEAL LESSON
  USE AN ASSESSMENT
METHOD THAT IS BASED ON
 EVIDENCE OF STUDENT
       LEARNING.
 Often, this means to create a
             rubric.
OPERATIONS & COORDINATES
  Plot the following points on your coordinate system. Remember that the
 first coordinate of the pair names a position going right or left in the
 horizontal direction, and the second coordinate names a position going
 up or down in the vertical direction. Connect the points in the order
 shown. You should see a picture of a wooden shoe.

             (1,1) (5,1) (6,2) (7,2) (7,1) (8,1) (9,2) (9,4) (7,4)
                      (6,5) (5,5) (1,3) (0,3) (1,1)

 6

 5
                                                    Add -10 to the first coordinate of
 4
                                                    each point in the list shown in a.
 3                                                  Write the coordinates, then plot
 2                                                  the figure on the same set of
 1                                                  axes as used for “a”. Use a
 0                                                  different colored pencil.
     0   1     2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
FLIP BOOKS
       FLIP BOOK ANIMATION
              Learn how mathematics can be used to animate
              cartoon figures – it’s all about translation!



1. First you must learn a little about the mathematics involved. On a sheet
   of graph paper, draw a large set of coordinate axes. Label the x and y-
   axes and label some points.

a) Plot the following points on your coordinate system. Remember that the
   first coordinate of the pair names a position going right or left in the
   horizontal direction, and the second coordinate names a position going
   up or down in the vertical direction. Connect the points in the order
   shown. You should see a picture of a wooden shoe.

         (1,1) (5,1) (6,2) (7,2) (7,1) (8,1) (9,2) (9,4) (7,4)
                  (6,5) (5,5) (1,3) (0,3) (1,1)
        FLIP BOOK ANIMATION
               Learn how mathematics can be used to animate
               cartoon figures – it’s all about translation!

                       6

                       5

                       4

                       3

                       2

                       1

                       0
                           0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


b) Add -10 to the first coordinate of each point in the list shown in a. Write
the coordinates, then plot the figure on the same set of axes as used for “a”.
Use a different colored pencil.

Write a sentence or two to describe what happened to
the wooden shoe image:
        FLIP BOOK ANIMATION
               Learn how mathematics can be used to animate
               cartoon figures – it’s all about translation!

                      6

                      5

                      4

                      3

                      2

                      1

                      0
                          0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


c) Add 2 to the first coordinate and add -5 to the second coordinate of each
   point. Write the new coordinates on the lines below, then plot the points on
   the same set of axes, using a third colored pencil.

   Write a sentence or two to describe what happened to the original wooden
   shoe image:
     FLIP BOOK ANIMATION
          Learn how mathematics can be used to animate
          cartoon figures – it’s all about translation!

                6

                5

                4

                3

                2

                1

                0
                    0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10



d) How should the coordinates be changed if you
  want to move the drawing up three units and to the
  right five units?
        FLIP BOOK ANIMATION
             Learn how mathematics can be used to animate
             cartoon figures – it’s all about translation!

                   6

                   5

                   4

                   3

                   2

                   1

                   0
                       0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




e)   Work with a partner to clearly write a set of just
     three rules that a person could use to translate a
     figure vertically, horizontally or diagonally.
  Integrate the web


Lesson 1: The Infernal Bouncing Ball.

NOTE: I wrote this tutorial in 2000, and intended it for students learning traditional,
hand-drawn animation. Nevertheless, the principles can be adapted to Flash or 3D
animation. The main tutorial page is here (there's a walk cycle tutorial, and I'll be
adding Flash lessons soon).

This exercise will teach you the most important principles of animation, namely:
Arcs.
Timing/Spacing.
Squash and Stretch.
Volume.
This is the first lesson taught to any animation student. You can pay through the
nose to learn it at a school, but I am giving it to you for free, so behold! Look at the
bouncing ball scene below:

 Florida Middle School Mathematics Initiative | International Center for Leadership in Education
2a) Now you will be making a FLIP BOOK to animate a point. The point
will look like it is rolling across a table and falling off of the edge onto the
floor. Once you learn how to animate a simple shape like a point, you
will be able to use this technique to animate more complicated figures.
There are two websites that do a good job of explaining the first lesson
that a beginning animator is taught. Visit these websites before you
begin your own animation experiment in 2b:

http://www.idleworm.com/how/anm/01b/bball.shtml

http://www.cartoonster.com/

We will be using translation to animate our ―ball‖.
The websites referenced above did not use our
strict mathematical definition of translation to
animate their balls.

Write two reasons why the previous
sentence is a true statement.
   (7, 0)     (7, 0)    (6, 1)




  (5.5, 0)   (5.5, 1)   (5.5, 1.8)




GIVE STUDENTS A WORKSHEET
ABOUT ANIMATING A BALL USING
GIVEN COORDINATES.
ASSIGNMENT:
a)Create a flip book that uses one or
  more transformations to animate an
  object.
b)Show your flip book to your group.
  Explain the transformations used.
c)The group judges whether the
  animation actually used that
  transformation.
     ASSESSMENT: RUBRIC

Score each of the following
characteristics on a scale of 4 to 0, where

    4 = surpasses expectations;
    3 = high quality performance;
    2 = satisfactory performance;
    1 = minimum quality performance;
    0 = does not meet expectations.
     ASSESSMENT: RUBRIC
The student is able to accurately plot
points in the coordinate plane.

  •Evidence shows that the first wooden
  shoe was plotted correctly.

  •Evidence shows that the second and
  third wooden shoes were plotted
  correctly.
     ASSESSMENT: RUBRIC
The student can describe the relationship
between translating a point and the
changing coordinates of the point.

  •Evidence of this is provided in the
  answer to 1d.

  •Evidence of this is provided in the
  answer to 1e
     ASSESSMENT: RUBRIC
The student can apply transformation
concepts to animate a shape using a flip
book.

  •The flip book is complete and done on
  time.

  •The flip book actually does animate a
  figure using transformation.
           Performance Task
• Includes an overview and a description.
• The overview is a description of how a student
  is expected to demonstrate learning
  (understanding, knowledge and skills). The task
  may be a product, performance of extended
  writing that requires rigorous thinking and
  relevant application. It is usually written in the
  third person describing the learning to other
  educators.
• The description is the teacher procedures,
  including instructional strategies, and literacy
  strategies.
• The overview includes:
  – Student work that will be produced or performed
  – Specific learning context
  – Whether group or individual
  – Resources students will be provided or have to
    acquire
  – Setting where students will complete the work
  – Conditions (often real-world) under which the work
    will be done
• The overview does not include:
  –   Assessment. It implies but does not specify
  –   Specific direction to the student
  –   Specific equipment list
  –   Homework or reading assignments
                       Sample Overview
        Students will create a flip book
        animation. Students will work
        individually and in pairs to search the
        internet for animation instructions,
        use graph paper and a teacher
        generated template. Flip book
        animations will include the translation
        of images on a coordinate plane.


Florida Middle School Mathematics Initiative | International Center for Leadership in Education
                               Student Work




Students will create a flip book
animation. Students will work
individually and in pairs to search the
internet for animation instructions,
use graph paper and a teacher
generated template. Flip book
animations will include the translation
of images on a coordinate plane.
                                  Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will create a flip book
   animation. Students will work
   individually and in pairs to search the
   internet for animation instructions,
   use graph paper and a teacher
   generated template. Flip book
   animations will include the translation
   of images on a coordinate plane.
                                  Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will create a flip book
   animation. Students will work
   individually and in pairs to search the
   internet for animation instructions,
   use graph paper and a teacher
   generated template. Flip book
   animations will include the translation
   of images on a coordinate plane.

            How
                                    Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will create a flip book
   animation. Students will work
   individually and in pairs to search the
   internet for animation instructions,
   use graph paper and a teacher
   generated template. Flip book
   animations will include the translation
   of images on a coordinate plane.

            How         Resources
                                    Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will create a flip book
   animation. Students will work
   individually and in pairs to search the
   internet for animation instructions,
   use graph paper and a teacher
   generated template. Flip book
   animations will include the translation
   of images on a coordinate plane.

            How         Resources        Conditions
        Lesson Components
• 1. Instructional Focus Statements
• 2. Student Learning: what students will be
  doing during the lesson (the math)
• 3. Essential Skills (from International
  Center List)
• 4. Scoring Guide
• 5. Handouts
• 6. Standards
Performance Task Handout
      Sample Overview
Students will write a report describing
how automobiles have been
improved to prevent accidents.
Students will work in pairs to collect
reaction time data and use Internet
resources. The report will include
sample reaction times, explanations
for stopping distances, and
calculations using formulas.
                               Student Work




Students will write a report describing
how automobiles have been
improved to prevent accidents.
Students will work in pairs to collect
reaction time data and use Internet
resources. The report will include
sample reaction times, explanations
for stopping distances, and
calculations using formulas.
                                  Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will write a report describing
   how automobiles have been
   improved to prevent accidents.
   Students will work in pairs to collect
   reaction time data and use Internet
   resources. The report will include
   sample reaction times, explanations
   for stopping distances, and
   calculations using formulas.
                                  Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will write a report describing
   how automobiles have been
   improved to prevent accidents.
   Students will work in pairs to collect
   reaction time data and use Internet
   resources. The report will include
   sample reaction times, explanations
   for stopping distances, and
   calculations using formulas.
            How
                                    Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will write a report describing
   how automobiles have been
   improved to prevent accidents.
   Students will work in pairs to collect
   reaction time data and use Internet
   resources. The report will include
   sample reaction times, explanations
   for stopping distances, and
   calculations using formulas.
            How         Resources
                                    Student Work
Specific Context



   Students will write a report describing
   how automobiles have been
   improved to prevent accidents.
   Students will work in pairs to collect
   reaction time data and use Internet
   resources. The report will include
   sample reaction times, explanations
   for stopping distances, and
   calculations using formulas.
            How         Resources        Conditions
                    Activity
        Student work                Context

  Students will design a poster of a circle graph on the
  topic of ―Healthy Snacks in Snack Machines‖ based on
  a survey of at least 100 students regarding which
  snacks they prefer. Make recommendations to the
  principal about which snacks should be put into school
  machines, using data and graph.



How they will         Resources            Conditions
   work
     Activity: Healthy Snack
        Student work                Context

  Students will design a poster of a circle graph on the
  topic of ―Healthy Snacks in Snack Machines‖ based on
  a survey of at least 100 students regarding which
  snacks they prefer. Make recommendations to the
  principal about which snacks should be put into school
  machines, using data and graph.



How they will         Resources            Conditions
   work
                     Activity
         Student work                 Context

  Student pairs will use the playground’s seesaw to
  determine where they each need to sit in order to make
  it balanced. They will use scales to measure their
  weights and rulers to measure distances. Using the
  data collected, students will make predictions for where
  they would need to sit if a different student sat across
  from them.


How they will          Resources            Conditions
   work
 Activity: Gold Seal Lesson Editing
• Read the lesson.
• Review Rigor/Relevance Framework
  – Knowledge taxonomy verb list
  – Relevance level
• Write a performance task
 Contact Information

     Linda Lucey
  Linda@SPnet.us
518-399-2776 ext. 224
1587 Route 146, Rexford, NY 12148   Phone (518) 399-2776
E-mail - info@LeaderEd.com          Fax   (518) 399-7607
www.LeaderEd.com

				
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