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									                 Johnson C. Smith University




          Faculty Development Opportunities Manual




                        Revised 2005-2006




               Faculty Development Steering Committee:
       Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Director of Faculty Development

                         Members 2005-2006:
                     College of Arts and Sciences:
                           Harriett Richard
                           Eugene Hermitte
                    College of Professional Studies:
                              Linette Fox
                                Vacant
                           Honors College:
                         Maria Papanikaloau

  Resource Faculty: Frank Parker, Director, Educational Technologies,
    Brenda Froneberger, Coordinator, Freshman Academy/Learning
Communities Team Leaders, Donald Mager, Center for Integrated Studies,
   Phil Jeter, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Shannon
                   Benjamin, Director, Honors College,
                              Johnson C. Smith University

                             Faculty Development Program


Mission of the University
The mission of the Johnson C. Smith University is to provide an outstanding education
for a diverse group of talented and highly motivated students from various ethnic,
socioeconomic, and geographical backgrounds.

Goal of the Institution

Regarding teaching effectiveness as paramount in its educational enterprise, Johnson C.
Smith University has a commitment to the recruitment and retention of an outstanding
faculty. To this end, the University promotes faculty development, encourages faculty
involvement in research and other creative activities, and endorses the principle of
academic freedom.

                     Mission of the Faculty Development Program

The mission of the Faculty Development Program is to provide professional development
activities to a diverse group of talented faculty by equipping them with the skills and
knowledge to be successful teachers, scholars, and practitioners in their discipline and
courses and with their students.

Goals

The goal of the Faculty Development Program is plan, implement and assess three major
components: faculty development, instructional development, and resources and
communication.

Objectives

The objectives of the Faculty Development Programs are to promote:

   1.   good teaching and learning
   2.   instructional development for the student, the course and the curriculum
   3.   educational uses of technology in the classroom
   4.   faculty dialogue and discourse
   5.   research endeavors
   6.   formative classroom assessment strategies
Activities

The program offers professional, instructional and organizational development activities
to support teaching and learning, research and grantsmanship under the following main
program emphasis:
     Faculty Development Program (Campus-Based Activities)
     Faculty Development Grants Committee (On and Off Campus)
     Faculty Development Opportunities (Off Campus)
     Learning Communities and the Freshman Academy
     Other Faculty Development Programs
     Government Sponsored Programs and Research
     Sabbatical Leave Program

Faculty Development Programs (Campus Based)

The campus-based activities of the Faculty Development Program are offered by the
Faculty Development Steering Committee and the Office of Faculty Development.
Within the last five years, the following grant and non-grant program activities have been
offered:
     Bush Hewlett Foundation Faculty Development Grants Program (1998-2004)
           o Department Technology Mini-Grants
           o Individual Technology Mini-Grants
           o Learning Communities Mini-Grants
           o Learning Across the Curriculum and Technology Integration Training
               Program
           o Assessment and Evaluation
     UNCF Faculty Advancement Program in Technology Grant (2003-2005
     UNCF/HBCU Learning Communities Grant (2002-2004)
     Institutional Faculty Development Program (1989 – Present)
           o New Faculty Orientation Training Program
                     Mentoring
           o New Department Chair Orientation
           o Teacher Training Program (Instructional Technology and Pedagogy)
                     Fall Semester Workshops
                     Spring Semester Workshops
                     Post-School Workshops
                     Pre-School Workshops
           o Discussion Series
           o Teaching Consultation

In addition to administering grant programs for teaching and research, the Faculty
Development Program also conducts ongoing training and development workshops and
programs for faculty, which consist of the following:

      New Faculty Orientation Workshops
       During the fall and spring semesters, new faculty are required to attend New
    Faculty Orientation Workshops, held by the Faculty Development Program and
    the Office of Academic Affairs. During the Orientation Program, new faculty are
    introduced to the resources, to training and development programs in support of
    teaching and research, and to University policies and practices. Basically, during
    the fall semester the workshops focuses on academic preparation which supports
    teaching, and during the spring semester the focus is on professional development
    which supports research and grantsmanship.
   Department Chair Orientation Workshop
    New Department chairs are provided a general orientation to administration by
    Deans or Vice President for Academic Affairs.
   Discussion Series
    Each semester, faculty have an opportunity to participate in monthly discussions
    about a book, video, and presentations by faculty in the field of music, art, or
    from experiences gained at local, national, and international conferences or
    workshops.
   Teacher Training Institutes
    Each year a series of workshops are held under strands of Instructional
    technology, Pedagogy, Discussion Series, and New Faculty Orientation. These
    workshops were delivered during the following seasons of the year.
        o Fall Semester Teacher Training Institute Workshops
        o Spring Semester Institute Workshops
        o Post-School Institute Workshops
        o Pre-School Institute Workshops
   Teaching Consultation Each faculty member can seek one-on-one confidential
    support to enhance the delivery of effective teaching and classroom management.
    Upon request, a survey is administered to students, a SGID is administered to the
    faculty, classroom observations are made, students are interviewed and
    confidential reports are provided to the individual instructor to improve teaching
    and learning.
   Service Learning Workshops
    The FDP works with the Service Learning Center to schedule service learning
    workshops for faculty during the summer and prior to teaching in the program.
   Learning Across the Curriculum Workshops
    Twice per year, Learning across the Curriculum Workshops are provided to
    promote the integrated learning of reading, writing, speaking, and quantitative
    reasoning in classroom across the campus to promote effective teaching and
    learning.
   Online Workshops and Teleconference Series
    Featuring nationally known experts and commentary from practitioners around
    the country, the FDP has provided teleconference presentations on important
    topics such as Learning Communities and online workshops sponsored by The
    Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning, AAC&U and the TLT
    Group (Teaching and Learning with Technology Group)
   Faculty Conference on Teaching, Research, and Creativity
    During the last five or more years, the FDP has sponsored or co-sponsored
    conferences on Learning Communities with the HBCU Faculty Development
    Network, UNCF, and the National Learning Communities Project in 2002, the
       Joint Conference of the HBCU Symposium and the Association for General and
       Liberal Studies Conference in 2003, a Teaching and Learning with Technology
       Seminar with UNCF in 1999, a Faculty Development Conference in 1997. In
       October 2004, the University hosted the Association for Integrated Studies
       Conference.
      One-on-one Technology Tutorial Assistance
       The Center provides one-on-one assistance for faculty in all issues regarding
       teaching and learning with technology. Committee members and faculty
       technology assistants (FTAs) are available to assist in preparation of course
       materials and presentation materials. They are also available to help faculty with
       the numerous software applications available for faculty use in the classroom,
       including applications for scanning, image and audio editing, word processing,
       web authoring, video capture, and slide show presentations.
      Equipment Check-Out
       The Faculty Center of the Faculty Development Program provides equipment for
       faculty use in the classroom or other related functions. Available equipment
       includes digital cameras, camcorders, video cameras, laptop computers, data
       projectors, printers, and CD burners. Other resources available for check-out
       includes videos, books, handouts, materials, journals, newsletters, The Chronicle,
       Black Issues in Higher Education, etc.

A description of the mini-grants program are described below:
   Individual Faculty Mini-Grants Program
    Individual faculty may submit an application to solve a teaching and learning
    problem in their class through the use of technology. Grantees will be encouraged
    to consider such technologies as interactive learning websites, enhanced multimedia
    infusion, student web pages, interactive classroom applications, collaborative
    technology projects, and other modern technologies. Results of these projects will
    be made accessible to other faculty through electronic portfolios (e-portfolios).
   Department Technology Mini-Grants Program
    Individual departments may submit an application for a mini grant to bring in a
    consultant for the development or revision of courses or curricula which infuse
    discipline specific technology and pedagogy into the majors. Departments may
    request additional funds for resources and stipends to support the implementation of
    a revised program.
   Learning Communities Mini Grants Program
    The purpose of these grants are to strengthen the use of technology and pedagogy as
    teaching tools to support more in-depth cross course and linked instruction that
    enhance the teaching and learning process of Learning Communities. The program
    seeks to strengthen and advance the design and structure of current Learning
    Communities. Furthermore, the program promotes the use of technology as a tool
    to enhance communication, collaboration, teaching, and learning in the program
   UNCF/Faculty Advancement Program in Technology (FAPT) Grants
    The purpose of this grant is to develop, strengthen, and advance faculty and student
    use of technology to improve student learning outcomes through team immigrants.
          Travel Grants Program for Dissemination
          The purpose of these travel grants for dissemination is to provide the opportunity for
          faculty members to gain new knowledge of technology and pedagogy and to
          participate in the dissemination of lessons learned through professional
          conferences, workshops, meetings, collaborations and partnerships.

In addition, the Office of Faculty Development assists other disciplines/departments on
campus to design faculty development models to serve different initiatives, such as
learning communities and technology integration.

Faculty Development Grants Committee (On and Off Campus)

In addition to the Campus Based Faculty Development Program, there is a Faculty
Development Grants Committee, which is endowed by an Andrew Mellon Foundation
Endowed Grant (1989-Present) that also serves the professional development needs of
faculty across the University. It is also composed of representatives from the colleges of
the institution, who serve as liaisons between their College and the Program. The faculty
elect the members of the Grants Committee each year. As indicated in its guidelines, the
teaching and research grant program funds disbursed through the Faculty Development
Grants Committee are available to the majority of the faculty and it supports the
following strands:
     Travel to Professional Conferences, Workshops, Meetings, etc.
     Summer Institutes
     Curriculum Development
     Graduate School Support
     Summer Research Projects

A description of each strand is provided.

           Travel to Professional Conferences, Workshops, Meetings, etc. This grant
            permits a faculty member to travel to a conference, workshop, or professional
            meeting to present a paper or work and participate in activities that are of interest
            and beneficial to the department or University.
           Summer Institutes
            this grants program provides summer financial support to attend a summer
            institute or to engage in similar activities for professional growth.
           Curriculum Development
            This grants program provides summer or academic year support financial support
            to engage in curriculum workshops for professional growth and development of
            programs.
           Graduate School Support
            The purpose of this grant is to provide assistance for graduate study and post
            doctoral assistance for full time study or summer study.
           Summer Research Projects
            this grants program provides summer financial support to conduct general and
            dissertation research.
Faculty Development Opportunities Off-Campus

In addition to the faculty development opportunities offered by campus programs and
grants, faculty are recruited to participate in other professional development activities
such as those sponsored by the:

       Faculty Resource Network of NYU
       Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning
       Council on Independent Colleges
       Council on Undergraduate Research
       Teaching and Learning with Technology Group
       CIEE International Faculty Seminars
       National Summer Institute on Learning Communities of the Washington Center
       Campus Compact
       Others

Because we have membership in many of these organizations, they support travel
expenses for faculty participating in a wide variety of program offerings.

Learning Communities and the Freshman Academy

Since 1998, we have been doing Learning Communities. However, for the 2005-2006
academic year, the Learning the Communities Program expanded across the campus to
include all freshmen under the umbrella of the Freshman Academy. Basically, the
overall goals of the program are to improve learning, increase retention and build a sense
of community. The freshman class has been placed into 17 cohorts of Freshman
Academy Learning Community Blocks (FALC) for a course load of 16 hours that are
linked by a theme. The features of the faculty development and teaching components of
the program include:
 Cross-course integrated/interdisciplinary assignments (problem-based learning)
 Co-curricular activities
 Active learning strategies (cooperative and collaborative learning techniques)
 Classroom assessment activities
 Seminar
 Online formative assessments (Flashlight Online)
 Technology integration
 Service learning
 Reflection and Assessment and evaluation

See Appendix for additional guidelines.

Other Faculty Development Grants Programs

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Presidential Faculty Career Enhancement
    Program
  This grant provides release time for research during the academic year. The Research
  Initiative provides research, travel, and equipment/supply support.
 The UNCF/Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Program
  This teaching enhancement activities grant provides workshops and development
  activities to address the challenges facing new faculty as classroom teachers,
  strengthens support for faculty research and publication, strengthens faculty leadership
  and strengthens the New Faculty Orientation Program with retreats and peer
  mentoring
 Andrew Mellon Grant on Learning Through Interdisciplinary Studies Program
  The grant supports the expansion of the University’s Interdisciplinary Program in the
  core curricula of Liberal Studies and the Honors College during the freshman and
  sophomore years; the development and enhancement of the skills of faculty for
  Interdisciplinarity in Liberal Arts, Liberal Studies, the Honors College and Learning
  Communities; the design of a comprehensive review/evaluation/assessment model for
  core courses and integrative program; and the development of a variety of means to
  disseminate information about the University’s program and interdisciplinarity.
 FRESP (Faculty Research Enhancement Support Program)
   JCSU offers mini grant opportunities through a grant it received from the National
   Institutes of Health Extramural Associates Faculty Research Enhancement Support
   Program ( FRESP II ). This program solicits proposals for expenditures related to
   pilot studies about health research and biomedical and behavioral research training
   activities among faculty and students.

Government Sponsored Programs and Research Opportunities

The Office of Government Sponsored Programs and Research (GSPR) works with
faculty, staff, and students to promote externally funded research, instruction, public
service, academic and institutional support, and scholarship/fellowship projects at
Johnson C. Smith University. External funding supports strategic priorities of the
University’s Strategic Plan and the mission of the University. GSPR is a central source of
information on major government agencies, foundations, and corporations that support
research and scholarship.

A wide range of services to faculty, administrators, staff, and students are available,
including:
 identifying potential external funding sources;
 assisting in development of proposal narratives and project budgets, and in
    preparation of standardized application forms;
 assisting in the electronic submission of proposals and electronic administration of
    funded projects;
 assuring compliance with federal and state regulations and university policies and
    procedures;
 assuring compliance with federal and state regulations and university policies and
    procedures;
   assisting in the completion of internal requirements for proposal submission,
    including coordination of review of research protocols involving human participants
    and animal subjects;
   reviewing and approving proposals for submission to sponsors;
   negotiating grant awards and contracts;
   coordinating activities with the grants accounting section of the Business Office as
    required;
   processing forms for grant administration

There are several faculty and staff development offerings during the year.

Sabbatical Leave Program

Johnson C. Smith University offers the opportunity for full-time faculty members to take
sabbatical leave for professional development. As stated in the Faculty Handbook, the
express purpose of sabbatical leave is ―to promote the professional growth and
effectiveness of a faculty member by affording him/her intellectual stimulation in the
form of study, research, travel, or other creative intellectual activities. These leaves are
used to bring on-going projects to fruition and to establish new directions of scholarship.‖
Eligibility and application guidelines are specified in the Faculty Handbook. According
to the terms of the University's sabbatical leave policy, faculty members taking sabbatical
leave must complete a specific project during the leave period (either an academic year or
semester) to further their professional development. Upon return to the University, the
faculty member is required to submit documentation of work to the Office of Academic
Affairs.

Expected Outcomes

Seventy percent of the faculty participating in the program are expected to demonstrate
knowledge and skills for effective teaching and learning of:
   1. educational technologies
   2. pedagogical strategies
   3. research and grantsmanship
   4. classroom assessment activities

Assessment Planning

The Faculty Development Steering Committee is responsible for the management,
planning, implementation and assessment of the program. Data will be collected with
assessment tools created, adopted or adapted by the Committee. Below is a sample list of
data gathering tools that may be used:

    1.   Attendance records
    2.   Workshop evaluations
    3.   Teaching or course portfolios
    4.   Rubrics
    5. Flashlight surveys
    6. Checklists
    7. Other tools
    8.

All data will be gathered, put into a database management tool such as Microsoft Access,
analyzed and used to strengthen existing programs and plan for future programs.

Program Evaluation

      An Assessment and Evaluation Committee, composed of the Project Director,
coordinators (from the Faculty Development Steering Committee) of the training
programs, the Director of Institutional Research, Assessment and Effectiveness, and the
Director of Information Services, will be responsible for designing and implementing the
Assessment and Evaluation Plan through the following steps:

         1.    Reviewing project goal, objectives, activities and outcomes of the grant
         2.    Identifying specific criteria for measuring performance indicators
         3.    Developing assessment tools and data collection approaches
         4.    Establishing assessment schedule
         5.    Conducting assessments
         6.    Analyzing the data
         7.    Providing annual recommendations to strengthen the program
         8.    Preparing reports for the grant

        The project evaluation focuses on developing information for assessing the
faculty development efforts on the technology proficiency of faculty and their students.
This project emphasizes professional development activities that support instructional
improvement in the teaching and learning process.

    Program activities have been selected to impact the quality of the learning activities provided by these professionals on the
    technology proficiencies and learning outcomes of their students. In addition, outcome data will be collected to study the
    development of technology skills and proficiencies.



The following is a description of the evaluation activities:

   Assessments such as pre- and post-surveys of students and using the Flashlight
    Assessment Tools as well as project developed surveys;

   Application of rubrics developed by project participants to evaluate revised
    curricula and electronic portfolios created during the mini-grants and technology
    improvement projects;

   Observation of faculty modeling the integration of technology into instruction; and

   Focus groups to discuss faculty development training activities.
  Appendix A
Assessment Tools
            Johnson C. Smith University
     Faculty Development Workshop Evaluation
Please evaluate the faculty development activity which you have just completed as
honestly and candidly as you can. Your comments will guide future presentation
and may be shared with the presenter.

Workshop Title
Presenter                                                   Date

1. How clearly were the objectives of this activity explained to you by the presenter
   and/or facilitator?

   Very               Clearly        Somewhat        Not Very       Not Clear
   Clearly                           Clearly         Clearly        At All
   5                    4               3               2             1

2. Considering your won needs, how appropriate was this workshop session?

   Extremely          Very           Helpful         Not Very        A Waste Of
    Helpful           Helpful                        Helpful         My Time
   5                   4                 3             2              1

3. Were the objectives of this activity as presented me in your opinion?

   Entirely           Somewhat        I Can’t        Basically        Clearly
    Met               Met             Determine      Not Met          Not Met
     5                 4                3              2              1


4. Was adequate time allotted for the session's objectives to be attained?

                      Yes                No

BE AS SPECIFIC AS YOU CAN IN YOUR RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING
OPEN-ENDED QUESTION, CITING EXAMPLES WHERE APPROPRIATE.

5. Were there points made in this presentation which you plan to implement in one or
more of your classes?


6. What changes, if any, in this workshop would have made it more valuable for you?
7. If you would be interested in follow-up activities related to this presentation, what
type of follow-up would be most helpful to you?

8. Additional Comments
                                Learning Communities
                                 Faculty Activity Log
Make responses brief. Fill out and turn in at the end of the semester during which you teach a

     Learning Communities course. Report information for all sections of your learning course only.

Name:           _                   ________Date: __________                           ______
Course and Section(s):                            Team Name:             __________________

1. Did you engage in TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES (Use of
   technology to support learning community practices)? YES      NO ______
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing ___Assessing ______
   Briefly describe the activity:
        ____________________________________________________________
   Comments:                                                                 ______
2. Did you engage in CROSS COURSE ACTIVITIES? YES                NO ______
   Type of engagement: Inter-course coordination and integration of content (course
   coordinated assignments) __Planning __Administering/Implementing ___Assessing
   ___Collaboration
   Briefly describe the activity: _____________________________________________
        __________________________________________________________________
   Comments:                                                         ______
3. Did you engage in OUT OF CLASS ACTIVITIES? YES                NO ______
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing ___Assessing ______
   Collaboration______ Briefly describe the activity:
                ____________________________________________________________
   Comments:                                                         _____
4. Did you engage in ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES? YES       NO ______
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing ___Assessing ______
   Briefly describe the activity:
      ____________________________________________________________
    Comments:                                                      ______
5. Did you engage in Learning Communities related SELF-DEVELOPMENT? YES___NO____
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing ___Assessing ______
   Briefly describe the activity:
      ____________________________________________________________
    Comments:                                                           ______
          If you need more space use the reverse side or additional sheets.
CROSS-COURSE ACTIVITIES refers to assignments, papers, presentations, etc. for which credit is
received in more than one learning community course. For instance, a science paper for LS 133 might be
the end product of a series of writing process activities in RHC 191, where the LS grade is for the paper as
a product, but the RHC instructor grades the sequence of tasks assigned as writing process. SELF-
DEVELOPMENT refers to attending faculty development training workshops, utilizing a technology
mini-grant, or attending a technology conference.
                               Technology Assessment
                                Faculty Activity Log
Make responses brief. Fill out and turn in at the end of the semester during which you teach a
technology course.

Name:                                                                   Date:

Course and Section(s):                                         Team Name:


Department__________________________________________

1. Did you engage in TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES? YES                                      NO
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing Assessing
    Briefly describe the activity:
    Comments:


2.   Date of attending and completing SEVEN STEP WORKSHOP. ____________________________
     Did you implement or demonstrate proficiency in using the SEVEN STEP PLAN? YES NO
     Type of engagement: Planning __ Administering/Implementing     Assessing
      Briefly describe the activity:                                                ______
     Comments:


3. Did you incorporate technology in support of LAC SKILLS? YES NO

   Which skill did you incorporate technology: Writing____ Thinking____ Reading____
Planning____

   Quantitative Reasoning_____ Administering/Implementing____ Teaching
Assessing_______
   Briefly describe the activity:
   Comments:


4. Did you engage in TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES? YES NO_____
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing    Assessing Flashlight
Tool____
   Assignment/Test Grade_____ Grade Distribution Report______
    Briefly describe the activity:
  Comments:

5. Did you engage in technology workshops, conferences, etc., or related SELF-DEVELOPMENT?
   YES NO         .
   Type of engagement: Planning Administering/Implementing            Assessing
   Briefly describe the activity:
   Comments :
6. Did you redesign your course to INCORPORATE TECHNOLOGY appropriate to emerging
   curriculum standards in the discipline?
      Type of engagement: Planning_____ Administering/Implementing_____ Assessing_____
Briefly describe the activity:________________________________________________________
Which did you redesign: Syllabus ____Group Assignments ____ Internet ____ CD ROM _____
E-Books ______ Programs _______ Writing Assignments _____Presentations_____ Others ____
Comments:
___________________________________________________________________
        If you need more space use the reverse side or additional sheets.
Exhibit Four

                  Learning Communities Mini-Grant Courses
                  Quality of Teaching and Learning Checklist

Instructions: First review your course syllabus, Pre-Semester plan, monthly logs,
semester report and reflection, linked assignment reports and the results of the
Flashlight survey, then, fill out this checklist.

1.       How many inter-course activities and/or assignments were required? _______
List and rate them:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
2.       How many group or team assignments were required? _____
List and rate them:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
3.       How many out-of-class activities were required? _____
List and rate them:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
4.       How many assignments that infused technology were assigned? ______
List and rate them:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                    ___ Did not work well   ___ Needs improvement   ___ Worked well
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                                            Exhibit Five
       Technology Infusion: Directed Reflective Narrative

Please reflect on your semester’s work with the Technology Mini-grants
program and prepare a narrative. In this narrative, please consider the
following: What were the learning needs initially identified and addressed with
the technology infusion? What technology was chosen to address the need?
Briefly describe the activities facilitated by the technology? Describe how you
assessed desired outcomes. What were the barriers, if any? What were the
successes? Will you use this technology in the future for the same course or
different course? Are you willing to share your experiences with colleagues?
Please provide the results of your flashlight assessment and any additional
information and documentation to support this narrative.
Exhibit Six

                   Three Required Global Technology Use Questions

Rate your abilities in using technology for multiple learning tasks such as research,
writing, email, quantitative work, composing music, laboratory projects, discussion sites,
video, audio and/or course resources (web-based or cds).

Weak           Needs improvement                Adequate      Good      Highly competent


When you receive an assignment that requires a new technology skill, what is your
typical reaction?

Procrastination       Confusion       Neutral         Challenged      Excited


How strongly does technology support your learning?

A lot          Somewhat               Neutral         Only a little         None

                            Technology Mini-Grant Courses

                                  Three Global Questions

 1. Rate your abilities in using technology for multiple learning tasks. (Examples of
     learning tasks are research, writing, email, quantitative work, composing music,
laboratory projects, discussion sites, video, audio and/or course resources (web-based or
                                            cds)).
       Weak                  Needs            Adequate          Good            Highly
                         improvement                                          competent
  2. When you receive an assignment that requires a new technology skill, what is your
                                      typical reaction?

  Procrastination        Confusion          Neutral      Challenged             Excited
                 3. How strongly does technology support your learning?
      None              Only a little       Neutral       Somewhat               A lot
                                  Learning Communities

                                  Three Global Questions

   1. Think about the out-of-class activities that you participated in with your Learning
Community. Compared to non-Learning Communities courses that you have taken, did
            these activities support your success as a student in this course?
    Strongly           Somewhat            Not much        Somewhat agree         Strongly
    disagree            disagree            support                                 agree
   2. Think about the collaborative and group projects that you took did in this course.
Compared to non-Learning Communities courses that you have taken, did this activities
                    support your success as a student in this course?
    Strongly           Somewhat            Not much        Somewhat agree         Strongly
    disagree            disagree            support                                 agree
 3. Think about your interaction with the instructor (in class, at out-of-class activities, in
conferences). Compared to non-Learning Communities courses that you have taken, did
          these interactions support your success as a student in this course?
    Strongly           Somewhat            Not much        Somewhat agree         Strongly
    disagree            disagree            support                                 agree
            Appendix A
Faculty Development Grants Program
       FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAM
      GUIDELINES FOR SUMMER GRANTS AND SUMMER
                      WORKSHOPS

I.      PURPOSE

The Faculty Development Research Grants provides summer financial support to conduct
research, to attend a summer institute or to engage in similar activities for professional
growth. Additionally dissertation research may be supported. Consideration will be
given for non-stipend expenses (e.g., materials, subject payment, postage) for research
during the academic year. Curriculum development projects can be supported during the
academic year or summer.


II.     BUDGET

Summer research grants will provide a stipend of $200 per week for a maximum of six
(6) weeks. Funds may be requested for travel, supplies, printing, etc. However, the total
amount of the award cannot exceed $1,500. Half of the money will be awarded at the
beginning of the summer and the second half will be paid upon receipt and acceptance of
the follow-up report (see VI. Below).

Other budget request for summer institutes, dissertation support and curriculum
development projects will be reviewed individually. Stipends for participants in
curriculum workshop should not exceed $200 for each week of full-time work. Summer
projects will be limited to a one-year period and will not be renewable.

III.    SUBMISSION PROCEDURE

The following procedure should be observed in submitting applications. All required
documents must be submitted in five (5) copies plus original to the chair of the Faculty
Development Grants Committee. All requests must be submitted to the Faculty
Development Grants Committee by Friday of the last week of April.

A.      Submit a grant proposal along with the FDGC cover sheet. This ―cover sheet,‖
        which gives a detailed explanation of the format for the proposal, can be obtained
        from the Office of Academic Affairs.

B.      The deadline for the summer research grants will be announced each spring.
        Requests for non-stipend support during the regular academic year must be
        submitted three weeks before the start of the research project.

C.      Projects involving human subjects must receive approval of the Human Subjects
        Committee prior to the submissions to the FDGC.
Specific submission requirements for each grant category are listed below:

1.     Summer Research Grant

       a.     Proposal and budget
       b.     Curriculum vita
       c.     Budget for non-stipend support, if pertinent

2.     Summer Institute or other similar activity

       a.     Proposal which includes a description of the activity, its relationship to the
              applicant’s current work and his/her professional development and its
              value to the University community
       b.     Curriculum vita
       c.     Proposed budget

3.     Dissertation Research

       a.     Proposal and budget
       b.     Curriculum vita
       c.     Letter from the major advisor supporting the proposed research plan and
              indicating the applicant’s current status in the graduate program (e.g.,
              preliminary examination, dissertation proposal, course work)

4.     Non-Stipend Support

       a.     Proposal and itemized budget
       b.     Narrative justification for costs
       c.     Curriculum vita

5.     Curriculum Development Project

       a.     Proposal and budget with justifications
       b.     Written approval from the Department Head and College Dean

IV.    ELIGIBILITY

1.     Applicant must be a full-time faculty member and employed for a minimum of
       one (1) year
2.     Awardees must sign the ―Faculty Development Form of Intent‖ signifying intent
       to return to the University the subsequent academic year or repay the research
       funds with interest.
3.     Approval of the Human Subjects Committee where applicable. Research support
       will not be given for projects already supported by private or federal sources.
V.     REVIEW CRITERIA

All applications will be reviewed by the FDGC and will be evaluated on an overall
quality and appropriateness of the proposed project, and the value of the project to the
academic community and to the professional development of the applicant. The criteria
for review include:

1.     Clarity of purpose of the research and coherence of the proposal.
2.     Adequacy of research methodology.
3.     Feasibility of project (e.g., availability of needed facilities).
4.     Appropriateness of the proposed budget.
5.     Qualifications and experience of the researcher.
6.     Appropriateness, quality, and value of the summer institute, curriculum
       development project, or other activity.
7.     Consideration of the distribution of requests by College and Department.
8.     Budgetary considerations.

VI.    FOLLOW-UP REPORT

Recipients will be required to submit two (2) copies of a follow-up report to the FDGC
by the end of the second week of October (for summer grants) or within six (6) weeks for
the conclusion of curriculum development projects that occurred during the academic
year. Faculty member may be asked to participate in the JCSU discussion series.
      FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAM
    SUMMER GRANTS AND WORKSHOPS COVER SHEET

Name of Applicant

Position or Title

Department

Starting Date of Project

[    ]       Research      [   ]     Dissertation Support   [   ]     Summer Institute

[    ]      Non-Stipend Support      [    ]    Curriculum Development Project

[    ]      Other (please specify)




1.      The Proposal for the summer research grant or dissertation support should
include: (1) Statement of Purpose, (2) Significance of the research, (3) research plan
which should include methodology and the research site, (4) expected results, (5) value of
research for applicant’s development and for the improvement of the academic
community. The proposal should provide an itemized budget for the research allowance
(if any) and provide a narrative justification for the costs.

2.       If applying for the summer institute or other activity, include a description of the
activity, its relation to your current responsibilities, and the value of the activity for the
academic community and your professional development.

3.      a.     If applying for funds for a curriculum development workshop, the
proposal should include (1) a description of the project, (2) when and where the project
will take place, (3) who you anticipate as your audience and what efforts will be made to
insure that they will attend, (4) a list of names and affiliation of other speakers, planners
and coordinators, and (6) an estimated budget.

b.      Other curriculum development projects would include, for example, the purchase
of equipment (for up to $1,000), services, or materials to enhance instruction in an
existing class, sequence, or program. Curriculum development grants can also be used to
revise and/or develop a course or a curriculum. Proposals may be submitted by
individual faculty members, or by groups such as Departments. A letter should be
written stating in detail what is being requested and the class or classes which may
benefit. When appropriate, a copy of the course syllabus should be attached. There
should also be included statements regarding the merits of the request from the
Department Chairs and College Deans. If money is being requested to revise or develop
a course or curriculum, the letter should document the purpose and significant of the
proposal. When appropriate, the documentation should have the approval of the
Educational Policies Committee. In the interest of not duplicating funds, monies of
support from other sources must be identified.

THIS PROJECT IS APPROVED:

                (To be signed by Department Head and College Dean)
                            Budget Planning Sheet


Description                                         Amount


Salaries




Stipends for Speakers




Stipends for Participants




Supplies and Equipment




Travel




Rental of Facilities




Printing and Duplicating
Other (please itemize)


                         TOTAL COST
            REQUEST FOR FACULTY TRAVEL GRANT
                      APPLICATION




Name

Date


                                Request for Faculty Travel
                          1.    Grant Form

                          2.    Leave of Absence Form

                          3.    Travel Authorization Form

                          4.    Documentation for Request



Approved

Pending

Comments:
        FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAM
       GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY ASSISTANCE
I.           APPLICANT’S NAME:

Position/Department

Area of Proposed Study

Name and Address of University to attend


                                            Degree Sought

Full Time                   Part Time                Post Doctorate

or Summer                   Full Time                Part Time
Single Course                      Dates:                                             Thru
Signature:                                                                             Date


II.         DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSON:

Request is       Approved       [       ]     Disapproved            [           ]
Comments:



Signature:                                                                            Date


III.        COLLEGE DEAN:

Request is       Approved       [       ]    Disapproved         [           ]
Comments:



Signature:                                                                           Date


IV.         FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANTS COMMITTED:

Request is       Approved       [    ]       Disapproved     [           ]
Comments:



Signature:                                                                   Date
      FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAM
     GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY ASSISTANCE

USES

1.     Graduate study and post doctoral assistance may be requested for full-time study
       or summer study. If approved, applicants must reapply each year for subsequent
       assistance. The committee will consider subsequent assistance with documented
       and official proof of satisfactory progress.

2.     Assistance is designed for any financial needs due to graduate study (tuition
       expenses), room and board, child care, books and basic living expenses.

3.     Applicants may be considered for a maximum of $5,000 per request for full-time
       study. Amounts for part-time or summer study will be reviewed on an individual
       basis.

4.     Consideration is given to individuals interested in studying a single course during
       the year.

ELIGIBILITY

1.     Applicant must be a full-time faculty member.

2.     Applicant must receive Department and College approval.

3.     Applicant may not apply for this assistance until the end of his or her second year
       of employment at Johnson C. Smith University.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

1.     Applicant must submit a completed ―Request for Graduate Study Assistance‖
       form, statement of purpose, an itemized budget, and a statement of the other
       sources of financial support to the Department Chairperson. The Department
       Chairperson will, in turn, submit the request to the College Dean. After obtaining
       these signatures, the applicant will submit the original and five copies of the
       following to the chairperson of the Faculty Development Grants Committee:

       a.     the request form with the proper signatures
       b.     the statement of purpose
       c.     the itemized budget
       d.     letter(s) of notification documenting other sources of financial support
       e.     statement of financial resources
       f.     statement of admission
       g.     curriculum vita
       h.     the form of intent

2.     Applicants must submit request forms and other information by April 1st.

3.     Applicants may apply for additional years of funding by following the above
       application procedure.

DECISION CRITERIA

1.     Preference will generally be given to full-time graduate study.

2.     An effort will be made to get a wide distribution of applicants from all
       departments.

3.     Consideration is given to the application package (comments on the application
       from administrators, and statement of purpose) submitted by applicant.

4.     The number of faculty members approved is contingent upon the availability of
       funds.

5.     If the applicant is reapplying, consideration is given to those who show proof (an
       official transcript) of satisfactory work in previous study.

6.     The amount awarded will be based upon the FDG Committee’s assessment of the
       applicants need.

FOLLOW-UP

1.     Recipients of the graduate study assistance will be required to submit a transcript,
       certificate, or any other appropriate credential to the chairperson of the Faculty
       Development Grants Committee immediately following the study.

2.     Recipients will also be required to teach at Johnson C. Smith University one year
       per year of funding immediately following the graduate study. If the individual
       does not return, he/she will be required to pay back the amount of the award plus
       10% interest.

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

Please type a narrative describing your area of proposed study. Discuss your professional
goals, and how they may apply to your departmental goals, and to the University. Submit
a current curriculum vita and a list of University activities.
                                                                                                                                                             Revised: 2/2006

                                              REQUEST FOR FACULTY TRAVEL GRANT


Applicant's Name                                                                                                                  Position and Department

I.     CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION OR OTHER ACTIVITY

       Title of Conference:
       Conference Sponsor(s):
       Location:                                                                                                                     Dates:

II.    ESTIMATED EXPENSES
       Transportation (mode & cost)
       Lodging:                          nights @                          a night
       Food:                             days @                            a day
       Conference Fees:                  -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       Other Costs: (Specify)

                                                                                                                                              TOTAL          $         -
III.   PURPOSE OF TRAVEL
                 ( ) Present paper               (     ) Program Discussant                        (      ) Attend Conference Sessions            (     ) Other
       (Specify)


       Rationale (Please provide further explanation of your role/interest in the conference and the expected benefits. Be as specific as possible.)




       Department Chair
       ( ) I do      recommend approval of this request.
       ( ) I do not recommend approval of this request for the following reasons:




                                 Signature                                                                                                            Date
       Dean
       ( ) I do        recommend approval of this request.
       ( ) I do not    recommend approval of this request for the following reasons:




                              Signature                                                                                                               Date
       Faculty Development Grants Committee:                                        (     ) Approved in the amount of $______________         (   )          Disapproved


                                Chairperson                                                                                                           Date

       Budget Code:________________                      Comments:



       (     ) Approved                  (      ) Disapproved
                                                                                        Vice President for Academic Affairs                              Date

       (     ) Approved                  (      ) Disapproved
                                                                                         Executive Vice President/Provost                                Date

       (     ) Approved                  (      ) Disapproved
                                                                                        Vice President for Financial Affairs                             Date
                  Appendix C
Learning Across the Curriculum Program Training
          Johnson C. Smith University


    The Learning Across the Curriculum
                 Program

   (Thinking, Reading, Writing, Speaking
        and Quantitative Reasoning)




             Effective Spring Semester 1996




    The Task Force on Learning Across the Curriculum

                          And

The Writing and Speaking Across the Curriculum Committee
                       LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

Goals and Objectives of the Program



Goals of the Program

To enable students to:

1. think effectively

2. communicate effectively



Objectives of the Program

Before graduating from the University, students will be able to:

Think Effectively:

1.     use critical thinking processes to make well founded decisions and to find the
       best solution(s) to problems,

2.     read, understand, analyze, and evaluate a variety of texts,

3.     find the "best" solution(s) to quantitative problems,

Communicate Effectively:

4.     create and self-evaluate their written communication,

5.     create and self-evaluate their oral communication, and

6.     incorporate and express quantitative information appropriately in
       written and oral communication.
                        GOAL I: Think Effectively – Critical Thinking



OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

1. use critical thinking processes to make well rounded decisions and to find the best
   solution(s) to problems.

Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #1, the student will acquire the following knowledge and skills:

                                                                           Year Taught
                                                                 Across the Curriculum

Skill 1. Clarification, understanding and retention                       Freshman
(LS)

       Strategies:

       a.      analyzing (classifying/defining)
       b.      applying part/whole relationships
       c.      comparing and contrasting
       d.      elaborating (Preview, Question, Read, Reflect, Recite, and Review
               (PQ4R),
               note taking, mnemonic devices)
       e.      organizing (graphic organizers, outlining)

Skill 2. Identifying sources and determining their reliability            Sophomore

       Strategy: using a model

Skill 3. Causal explanation                                               Junior

       Strategy: using a model

Skill 4. Prediction                                                       Junior

       Strategy: using a model

Skill 5. Decision Making                                                  Senior

       Strategy: using a model
Additional Strategies

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies or methods may be
utilized:

        a.     simplifying as much as possible
        b.     using metacognition
        c.     applying or transferring skills to other experiences
        d.     generating alternative ideas
        e.     responding to verbal prompts and use graphic maps
        f.     collaborating
        g.     producing visual products
        h.     role playing
        i.     apply skills to personal life


Evaluation

Students will be able to:

1.   demonstrate the ability to describe and implement thinking skills
2.   respond effectively to written and oral assignments
3.   successfully pass problem solving/decision making examinations
4.   generate an examination question that will demonstrate understanding of problem
     solving/decision making
                     GOAL I: Think Effectively – Analytical Reading


OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

2. read, understand, analyze and evaluate a variety of texts.

Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #2, the student will acquire the following knowledge and skills:

                                                                           Year Taught
                                                                 Across the Curriculum

Skill 1. Vocabulary development                                              Sophomore

       Strategies:

       a.   recognizing uncomfortable problem words;
       b.   using context clues to determine meanings of unknown words;
       c.   looking up words in dictionary
       d.   determining which meaning is most appropriate for the context;
       e.   using the dictionary pronunciation key


Skill 2. The TEXT                                                            Sophomore

       Strategies:

       a. knowing and using the parts of a book
       b. reading for the main idea
       c. interpreting quantitative information

Skill 3: Reading Styles and Study Skills                                     Sophomore,
Junior

       Strategies:

       a. adjusting reading according to purpose
       b. skimming to get the gist
       c. scanning for information
       d.   close or study–type reading
       e.   note taking
       f.   underlining and outlining
       g.   summarizing


Skill 4. Reading for Understanding                                          Junior, Senior

       Strategies:

       a. literal comprehension (reading for the main idea and supporting detail)
       b. critical reading (analysis, interpretation, evaluation)
       c. synthesizing (note taking, paraphrasing, summarizing, making connections
          with reading assignments and outside information)


Additional Strategies

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies or methods may be
utilized:

1. writing vocabulary terms first, without a dictionary; then re-writing terms after
    looking at the dictionary for corrections; then discussing each definition
2. looking at art slides, noting color, line and texture; then write down comments
3. giving an overview of art work as to style and content
4. identifying words and phrases
5. writing important themes or ideas from the reading or essay
6. determining the reliability of sources
7. looking for cause and effect
8. building vocabulary through studying – roots, prefixes, suffixes
9. analyzing texts for stylistic features
10. finding the main idea
11. distinguishing between fact and opinions


Evaluation

The student will be able to:

1. use the dictionary to determine the meaning which is most appropriate for the
   context of an unknown word
2. use the dictionary to determine the recommended pronunciation of unknown words
3. use clues from the context and analysis of the structure of some words to determine
   meanings of some unknown words in a text
4. underline, highlight, and make marginal notations as aids to understanding what they
   read                                                                              and
   as study aids
5. write outline notes or accurate but brief summary notes of readings (esp. theoretical
   ideas and concepts or difficult concepts) as aids to comprehension

Foundation Courses:

The student will be initially grounded in all of the reading skills in the following courses:

Freshman Year:         Rhetoric 191 and 192 – Freshman Rhetoric
                       Liberal Studies 130 – Identity: Citizen and Self: African
                                                     American Culture
                       Math 132 – Basic Mathematics II
                            GOAL I: Think Effectively – Quantitative Reasoning


OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

3. find the ―best‖ solution(s) to quantitative problems.


Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #3, the student will achieve the following knowledge and skills:

                                                                            Year Taught
                                                                  Across the Curriculum

Skill 1. Problem Solving                                                    Sophomore

       Strategies:

       a.   recognizing various ways to solve a quantitative problem
       b.   identifying, completing, or analyzing a procedure
       c.   discovering patterns in a procedure
       d.   interpreting or solving problems involving ratio, proportion, and percent

Skill 2. Estimation, Approximation, Reasonableness of Answers               Sophomore
               (Sons 1992 and MAA, 1995)

       Strategies:

       a. estimating the result of a calculation
       b. determining the reasonableness of an estimate
       c. assigning probability to an outcome

Skill 3: Graphs, Tables, Charts                                             Junior –
Senior

       Strategies:

       a. reading and interpreting visual displays of quantitative information,
          such as simple tables, charts, graphs, diagrams, or plots
       b. using quantitative technology effectively
Skill 4: Statistics                                                           Junior –
Senior

        Strategies:

        a. calculating and interpreting basic statistical measures such as
           mean, median, mode and range
        b. determining variance and standard deviation
        c. using appropriate quantitative technology


Additional Strategies

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies or methods may be
utilized:

1.   using physical examples to visualize data
2.   summarizing the data from a review of literature
3.   writing in sentence form the differences in a set of graphs
4.   practicing linear regression using current software


Evaluation

The student will be able to:

1. given a set of data, compute the mean, medium and mode
2. given a set of data, compute the frequency
3. given a partial research study, interpret data and derive conclusions, and then
   compare results

Foundation Courses:

The student will be initially grounded in all of the quantitative reasoning skills in the
following courses:

Freshman Year:                 Math 131 – Basic Mathematics I
                               Math 132/137 – Basic Mathematics II/Pre-calculus I
                      GOAL II: Communicate Effectively - Writing


OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

4. create and self evaluate their written communication.


Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #4, the student will acquire the following knowledge and skills:

                                                                           Year Taught
                                                                 Across the Curriculum

Skill 1. Invention                                                         Sophomore-
Senior

       Strategies:

       a.   gathering information
       b.   researching for the main idea
       c.   creating a thesis statement
       d.   developing ―maps‖
       e.   using secondary materials


Skill 2. Organizing                                                        Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:

       a. presenting in coherent fashion
       b. arranging ideas
       c. developing vocabulary within the discipline

Skill 3: Drafting                                                          Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:

       a. utilizing structural components of writing (i.e. introduction, body, conclusion,
          topic sentences of paragraphs)
       b. utilizing appropriate software writing tools
Skill 4. Revising                                                         Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:
       a. revising and making connections in the writing process
       b. recognizing and performing to appropriate settings
       c. using appropriate technology within the discipline

Skill 5: Editing

       Strategies:

       a. editing (spelling, revising, proofreading, subject and verb agreement,
          punctuation)
       b. using correct grammar
       c. using appropriate technology within the discipline


Additional Strategies

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies or methods may be
utilized:

1. determining meaning of unknown words by using contextual clue
2. engaging in peer editing
3. using appropriate grammar handbook to correct or learn grammatical errors
4. reviewing course (grammar)
5. requiring more intensive writing/rewriting exercises
6. using The Holt Handbook as a reference, as well as for class
7. rejecting poor work
8. using the dictionary consistently
9. learning from good/bad models of writing given by the instructor
10. using flashcards, crosswords, word origins, etc.
11. summarizing or critiquing articles
12. using journals or essay exams
13. using reading or response sheets
14. marking down or penalizing for incorrect grammar
15. developing a dictionary related to a course
16. engaging in process writing and emphasize correct grammar
17. reviewing the components of an essay
18. writing about a moment in your life or some other form of personal writing.
Evaluation

The student will be able to:

1. write a short essay in class, and revise it in the same setting
2. write an essay, paragraph, summary (anything) outside of class – revise it for
   teacher’s editing – submit all corrected draft copies
3. write a reflection paper on a collection of papers from a writing portfolio
4. successfully complete the Senior Investigative Paper using appropriate technology

Foundation Courses:

The student will be initially grounded in all of the written communication skills in the
following courses:

Freshman Year:         Rhetoric 191 and 192 – Freshman Rhetoric
      GOAL II: Communicate Effectively - Speaking/Communication Orally


OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

5. To create and self evaluate their oral communication.


Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #5, the student will acquire the following knowledge and skills:

                                                                           Year Taught
                                                                 Across the Curriculum

Skill 1. Vocal                                                            Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:

       a. using fluency and clarity (volume, tempo)
       b. using proper pronunciation, articulation and grammar

Skill 2. Message                                                          Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:

       a.   preparing
       b.   organizing subject matter appropriately
       c.   achieving purpose when informing and persuading
       d.   selecting appropriate words
       e.   identifying credible sources
       f.   developing vocabulary for the discipline
       g.   listening for comprehension

Skill 3. Delivery                                                         Sophomore -
Senior

       Strategies:

       a. introducing properly
       b. concluding properly
       c. making eye contact
        d.   using appropriate body language
        e.   maintaining audience control (attention, audience analysis and relationship)
        f.   becoming comfortable in speaking
        g.   recognizing of and performing appropriately in different settings
        h.   working effectively in discussion groups
        i.   facilitating discussion sessions

Skill 4. Technology                                                  Sophomore - Senior

        Strategies:

        a.      using appropriate technology / presentation aids
        b.      utilizing quality visual aids
        c.      using handouts

Additional Strategies:

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies may be utilized:

1. developing a list of alternative words to replace frequently used key word
2. applying the words of the discipline appropriately
3. using formal and informal exercises to provide the different settings and audiences in
   which student may find themselves
4. engaging in peer evaluation
5. participating in an echo game
6. reciting
7. using videotaped presentations to improve skills


Evaluation

Students will be able to:

1.   plan and present a speech to an audience
2.   successfully participate in mock interviews
3.   work with others in a debate format; and
4.   successfully complete the Senior Investigative Paper defense

Foundation Courses:

The student will be initially grounded in all of the speech communication skills in the
following course:

Freshman Year:        Speech 130 – Fundamentals of Speech
            GOAL II: Communicate Effectively – Quantitative Reasoning

OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to:

6. incorporate and express quantitative information appropriately in written and oral
   communication.


Knowledge and Skills

To achieve objective #6, the student will achieve the following knowledge and skills:


                                                                          Year Taught
                                                                             Across the
                                                                            Curriculum
Skill 1. Problem Solving                                                  Sophomore

        Strategies:

        a. demonstrating the use of a procedure
        b. presenting problems involving ratio, proportion, and percent


Skill 2. Estimation, Approximation, Reasonableness of Answers             Sophomore
        (Sons 1992 and MAA, 1995)

        Strategies:

        a. integrating the result of a calculation into a report
        b. presenting the reasonableness of an estimate
        c. assigning probability to an outcome

Skill 3. Graphs, Tables, Charts                                           Junior –
Senior

        Strategies:

        a. producing visual displays of quantitative information,
           such as simple tables, charts, graphs, diagrams, or plots
        b. presenting technical data using appropriate technology

Skill 4. Statistics                                                       Junior - Senior
       Strategies:

       a. integrating basic statistical measures
          such as mean, median, mode and range into a report/presentation
       b. incorporating variance and standard deviation into a report/presentation
       c. presenting technical data using appropriate technology

Additional Strategies:

To obtain the knowledge and skills, the following teaching strategies or methods may be
utilized.

1. developing a neutral survey, presenting the data in several different formats, and
   evaluating the most effective format
2. presenting laboratory data in several formats and evaluating the most effective format
3. presenting exemplars and non-exemplars
4. peer evaluating data presentations
5. using the style book of the discipline for citing documentation
6. applying simple business math (payments, compounding interest and principles, etc.)


Evaluation

Students will be able to complete the following:

1.     given a set of data, choose the most appropriate technique and style to present to a
       given audience.
2.     given a set of numbers, percentages, fractions, decimals, scientific notation, etc.,
       write
       them out in words.
3.     given a set of data, present it in an appropriate format:
       a) written
       b) oral
                 LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM (LAC)

                        EVALUATION OF THE PROGRAM


Evaluation Tools

The results of the following tools or instruments will be used to measure the effectiveness
of the Learning Across the Curriculum Program:

1.     results from course evaluations of ―W‖ versus "non-W" courses
2.     Academic Profile (sophomore level competency examination) – thinking, writing,
       reading
3.     Praxis examination scores (N.C. cut-off scores) in the areas of reading, writing
       and mathematics
4.     Senior exit examination scores on such tests as the GRE (quantitative reasoning
       area), specialty area assessments on the Praxis, etc.
5.     successful completion of the Senior Investigative Paper.

Suggestions:

1. Explore use of SAT scores as pre-test and Senior exit examinations as post-tests.
2. Send document to Coordinator of Institutional Planning, Assessment, Effectiveness
   and Research for review of evaluation components.




       6/99
                      Appendix D
Freshman Academy/Learning Communities-Common Activities
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities

                          Course Retention Strategies
                (Collaborative Role of Teacher & Case Manager)
 1. Record the number of students at the end of the last day to add
  a course (keep roster)

 2. Complete non-attendance and academic progress reports and
 submit on the requested form each week by Friday.

 3. Pass the report information on to the case manager and other
 team faculty for follow-up

 4. Encourage students to return to class by contacting them through email, phone
 calls, or conducting residential hall visits.

 5. Schedule individual conferences with students as needed

 6. Refer students to academic support, tutorial centers, and counseling

 7. Record course retention at the end of the semester by recording the
 number of students in class on the last day of class.

        Role of the Director of the Freshman-Senior Year Experience
 1. Confirm student cohorts after the last day to add a course

 2. Request print out from Registers Office for all blocked courses with student
 names after the last day to add a course

 3. Request print out from Registers Office for all blocked courses with student
 names on the last day of classes

 4. Request non-attendance and academic progress report forms on Wednesday to
 be executed and returned by Friday noon.

 5. Track retention between semesters and from year to year.

 5. Disseminate retention results to appropriate personnel.
Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)
                Learning Communities Common Activities

                                 Academic Progress
                                  Role of Teacher
 1. Report in weekly (initially) meetings the names of students who are not
 progressing or attending class.

 2. Pass progress report to the case manager, Director of FSYE and other team
 faculty to monitor (email, phone calls, or residential hall visits) students’ progress
 in class

 5. Schedule individual conferences with students as needed

 6. Refer students to the academic support and tutorial centers

 7. Report course progress at midterm and at the end of the semester

 8. Insert in syllabus course requirements for support centers

 9. Beginning in September, set aside one meeting per month to
 meet with all students and all teachers to discuss academics

 10. Record the number and percent of students passing CCIIA assignments

 11. Record the number and percent of students passing the course.


              Role of the Freshman-Senior Experience Director
 1. Distribute to teams instructions on how to utilize the support centers.

 2. Assign Peer Mentors to Orientation classes

 3. Define Peer Mentors role

 4. Monitor Peer Mentors

 5. Request non-attendance and academic progress report forms on Wednesday
 to be executed and returned by Friday noon.
Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities

                             Co-Curricular Activities
               (Collaborative Role of Faculty, Student Affairs Staff,
                             and/or Case Managers)

 1. Faculty not involved in CCIIA should coordinate and plan with either a
 Student Affairs or Case Manager staff member.

 2. Research and recommend activities (2-3) to team

 3. Apply for funds if needed. Each team can apply up to 250.00 per semester.
 The request should include the name of the activity, justification, needs and
 budget amount. (See budget request form and send form to the Coordinator of
 Team Leaders)

 4. Make all arrangements by completing forms from Student Affairs to take
 students off campus

 5. Publicize events via common website or through email distribution list.

 6. Coordinate service learning activities with the Office of Community Service

 7. Collect and report number of student, faculty and staff attendees at
 co-curricular activities for end of semester portfolios and provide a copy to FSYE
 director. (See report form)

 ( See LC Sample Calendar)

Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                                 Freshman Academy

                      Budget Plan for Co-Curricular Activities

Block #_____Faculty Preparing /Overseeing Budget for Block___________________
Title of Co-curricular Activity:_______________________________________________
Course(s)________________________________________________________________

Each Block will be allocated $250.00 per month to fund their co-curricular activities.
As a team you are to prepare a budget for the activities you are planning. Submit the
request at least 2 weeks prior to the event to the Team Leader Coordinator.

Justification for the Request (Explain how this activity connects to the CCIIA):



                             Estimated Activity Budget:

Line Item             Amount                Cost

Driver                _______               ___________________

Bus Passes            _______               ___________________

Consultants           _______               ___________________

Coupons               _______               ___________________

Certificates          _______               ___________________

Supplies              _______               ___________________

*Refreshments         _______               ___________________

Videos                _______               ___________________

                                       Approval

Team Leader __________________________________________________Date______

Team Leader Coordinator ___________________________________Date______

Associate/Vice President for Academic Affairs ______________________Date______

Provost_______________________________________________________Date______
                                   Freshman Academy

                          Co-Curricular Activity Report
Block #_____Faculty Preparing /Overseeing Budget for Block___________________
Title of Co-curricular Activity:_______________________________________________
Course(s)________________________________________________________________
Number of Participants: Students _________ Faculty________ Case Manager(s)_______
(ATTACH SIGN IN SHEET)

Please provide a brief description of how the funds you received were spent and how the
co-curricular activity was beneficial to the CCIIA plan. Please attach reimbursement to
budget report and insert in course portfolio.

Title:

Brief Reflective Description of the Event (purpose, activity, impact, etc.):
                                      Freshman Academy

                           Budget Plan for Co-Curricular Activities

                                        Summary Sheet

Block #_____________________

Faculty Preparing /Overseeing Budget for Block___________________

Each Block will be allocated $250.00 per semester to fund their co-curricular activities for the
first semester. As a team you are to prepare a budget for the activities you are planning for
Fall’05/Spring‘05


Activity                         Justification      Needs                   Amount Spent
Transportation to Levine         To explore the     Bus and driver          $75.
Museum to see” Skyscrapers       Beginnings of
to Cotton fields”                Low Wage
                                 Economics in                              $40.
Tickets/Levine Museum            Appalachia--To     Tickets @ 2.00 per
                                 Enhance CC         student for 20
                                 Assignment for     students
Examples                         Nickel and
                                 Dimed




                                                    Total Spent
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities

                             Instructional Technology Support
                                      Role of Teacher

  1. Create email distribution list to increase communication only through jcsu
  email accounts, and not through hotmail or any other accounts.

  2. Develop and maintain course management site to enhance communication

  3. Post Cross-Course Interdisciplinary/Integrated Assignments on the website

  4. Set-up discussion forums to enhance classroom discussions

  5. Publicize Co-Curricular Activities via website and distribution list

 See Sample Forum




Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities


                     Team Meeting Agenda: Bi-monthly
          Collaborative Meeting with Faculty Learning Communities
                             and Case Managers

 1. Exchange office hours per week for team meetings.

 2. Discuss students with attendance and academic problems and strategize ways
 to assist them.

 3. Discuss issues brought up by students.

 4. Plan for CCIIA

 5. Strategize for Academic Progress (Teacher)

 6. Strategize for Course Retention Progress

 7. Plan for Co-Curricular Activities

 Faculty Covenant
 See Program Pact Handout


 Role of Case Manager
 See Case Manager Responsibilities




Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities


                                     Collaborative Syllabi
                                       Role of Faculty

 Insert in Syllabus:

     1. Course Numbers for Courses in the Block

     2. Team Faculty Learning Communities Team and Case Manager

     3. Freshman Academy Theme

     4. Sub-Theme

     5. Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integrated Assignment

     6. Co-Curricular Activities

     7. Integrated Course Calendar for all freshman and individual team

     8. Statement on Collaborative Grading of CCIIA

     9. Consistency with classroom management policies
     (See Sample Syllabi)

Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                  Johnson C. Smith University
Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

            Learning Communities Common Activities


                     Active Learning Strategies
                           Role of Faculty

1. Use Collaborative Learning Techniques , by Elizabeth F. Barkley, K.
   Patricia Cross and Clair: In your team, form one page of active learning
   strategies from the group below. Assign each team member to select one
   to integrate in your CCIIA.
       a. Forming Collaborative Groups p. 43 – Select one technique
       b. Discussion, p. 169 – Select one technique
       c. Problem Solving p. 10 – Select one technique
       d. Graphic Organizers p. 205 – Select one technique
       e. Writing p. 236 – Select one technique

2. Use the handouts on Classroom Assessment Techniques, Tom
   Angelo and K. Patricia Cross (Presented Charles Walker, St.
   Bonaventure University, May 2005, JCSU): Select one or more strategies
   to integrate in your plan
       a. Course Goal Setting
       b. The Muddiest Point
       c. The 1 Minute Paper
       d. Mid-Semester Feedback on Learning
       e. Collective Effort Classroom Assessment Technique
                       Johnson C. Smith University
     Cross Course Interdisciplinary/Integration Assignments (CCIIA)

                     Learning Communities Common Activities


                        Formative and Summative Assessment
                                   Role of Faculty

 Formative
    1. Use the handouts on Classroom Assessment Techniques, Tom
       Angelo and K. Patricia Cross (Presented Charles Walker, St.
       Bonaventure University, May 2005, JCSU): Select one or more strategies
       to integrate in your plan
           f. Course Goal Setting
           g. The Muddiest Point
           h. The 1 Minute Paper
           i. Mid-Semester Feedback on Learning
           j. Collective Effort Classroom Assessment Technique
    2. Formative Collection Tools
       a. Faculty Activity Logs (3)
       b. Directed Reflective Narrative
       c. Flashlight Survey (Insert 3 Global Questions)
       d. Checklist of the Quality of Teaching and Learning
       e. Course/Teaching Electronic Portfolio Artifacts

 Summative Program Data

         a. Course Retention Report
         b. Grades on CCIIA Assignment and in the Course
         c. Rubric for Assessing Learning Outcomes Portfolio – Students
         d. Rubric for Assessing Learning Outcomes Portfolio – Faculty
         e. Common Assessment Activities (Attendance and participation reports,
         e.g. Co-Curricular, Workshops, Team Meetings, etc.)
         f. Data on the Impact of Case Managers

Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Brenda Froneberger, Gail Summerskill, Marilyn Sutton-Haywood, Johnson C.
Smith University, August 8, 2005.
                   Johnson C. Smith University
                 Faculty/Student Attendance Form

Title of Workshop/Activity____________________________
Presenter_________________________      Date__________

Attendees(Last, First)           Dept/Block        In/Out
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
     Appendix E

   Faculty Tips for
Designing and Teaching
  eLearning Courses
  Johnson C. Smith University




   Faculty Tips for
Designing and Teaching
  eLearning Courses

    September 9, 2004




             Submitted by:
       Phyllis Worthy Dawkins,
Director, Faculty Development Program
                            Table of Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………3

Mission…………………………………………………………………………………...3

Purpose and
Goals………………………………………………………………………..3

Readiness of
Faculty……………………………………………………………………...4

Faculty
Support…………………………………………………………………………...4
Instructional Design and Production Support
Release Time
Infrastructure and Technical Support
Library Support
Other Support Services
Faculty Load
Class Size
Students with Disabilities

Faculty Training or
Development…………………………………………………………5

Designing Your
Course……………………………………………………………………6

Responsibilities of Faculty
Members……………………………………………………...8
Administrative Guidelines
Course Guidelines

Copyright Permission……………………………………………………………………..8

Intellectual Property Rights……………………………………………………………….8

References…………………………………………………………………………………9

Appendices……………………………………………………………………………….10
      Worksheet for Planning and Envisioning Courses on the Web (Boettcher and
      Conrad, 1999)
Course Redesign Guide (Boettcher and Conrad, 1999)
Course Planning Form
Johnson C. Smith University
                  Faculty Tips for Teaching eLearning Courses

Introduction

The eLearning Program at Johnson C. Smith University began initially with web-
enhanced courses in 1998 with a Bush-Hewlett Grant and expanded to full-time web
courses in the summer of 2004 through a C3-eLt Grant, directed by Ms. Angela Jeter.
The first course taught full-time online was a teacher education course, EDU 296. The
design team for the course was Dr. Bessie Gage, Coordinator, Jeffrey Ford and Roland
Sparks as Instructional Designers, and Phyllis Worthy Dawkins as the Faculty Developer.
Frank Parker was the Educational Technologist who provided 24-hour support. Dr.
Dorothy Cowser Yancy acquired the FIPSE Grant that supported this campus initiative.

The first eLearning course was offered to mainly Teacher Assistants from Union County
Public Schools and to campus students pursuing the teacher education track. The plan is
to attract more Division of Lifelong Learning (DLL) students and traditional
undergraduate students. Initially, the goal is to develop eLearning courses for business,
education, and physical education majors. It is also a goal to develop at least one section
of each of the Liberal Studies courses online.

Mission

The mission of Johnson C. Smith University is to provide an outstanding education for a
diverse group of talented and highly motivated students from various ethnic,
socioeconomic, and geographic backgrounds. The University endeavors to produce
gradates who are able to communicate effectively, think critically, learn independently, as
well as collaboratively, and demonstrate competence in their chosen fields.‖ An
institutional strategic goal that supports the eLearning initiative is:

       Institutional Strategic Goal II: Produce high quality graduates by improving
       student-learning outcomes—We will develop future leaders who are well
       rounded, competent, adaptive, highly competitive, and prepared to compete in a
       global society

Purpose and Goals

The purpose of the eLearning Program is to promote high quality academic
programs or courses equal to the campus-based programs and to conform to Best
Practices for Electronically Offered Degree and Certificate Programs of SACS. The
goals of the eLearning Program at JCSU are to:

    1. Provide skills, knowledge and attitudes
    2. Provide instruction to students who cannot or prefer not to attend campus
       classes
      3. Increase communication between student and faculty, and student and
         student
      4. Support the development of online learning communities
      5. Offer programs and courses using multiple media technologies

Readiness of Faculty

Faculty who have knowledge and training in the following technology tools stand
more ready to teach an eLearning course.

      Microsoft Office (especially Word and PowerPoint)
      Web Browser (Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator)
      Email applications
      Course management tool

Furthermore faculty should be in possession of a laptop or mobile technology, or a
desktop computer at home and in the office. Other characteristics to consider
should be the willingness, flexibility, personality and openness of faculty to offer
these courses.

Faculty Support

Instructional Design and Production Support. The infrastructure on campus is very
important to the success of the eLearning Program. Basically, administration
should provide support to faculty and students in three primary areas for eLearning
courses:

      Planning and budgeting
      Designing and developing
      Managing the delivery

In each of these areas, faculty should be able to seek support from a team of
individuals from the Technology Center, Educational Technologists, Instructional
Designers, Faculty Developer, Library Media Services and Student Technology
Assistants (STAs).

Release Time. For planning, designing, and developing the course, consideration
should be given to providing release time during the year or summer stipends.

Infrastructure and Technical Support. During the implementation of the course, a
reliable infrastructure with appropriate networks, Internet access, email services,
hardware and software, and videoconferencing facilities should be available.
Furthermore, 24-hour technical assistance with reliable phone numbers should be
basic to the delivery process for faculty and students.
Library Support. The JCSU Library has many resources available for eLearning
Support at: http://www.jcsu.edu/current/library/library.htm. These electronic
resources include:

         Access Science                             Lexis-Nexis Statistical
         Encyclopedia Britannica                    NC Live
         Eric Documents Online                      ProQuest Psychological Journals
         JSTOR                                             Wilson General Science
         Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe

Other Support Areas. On the JCSU website at www.jcsu.edu , there are a host of
other support areas for faculty and students that include:
 On-line Admission Application http://www.jcsu.edu/admissions.htm
 Registration http://www.jcsu.edu/admissions/registrar.htm
 Academic Programs http://www.jcsu.edu/academics.htm
 Student Affairs, Student Services, and Student Activities
   http://www.jcsu.edu/current.htm

Faculty Load. Faculty teaching an eLearning course will be credited with one course
assignment for a two, three, or four credit hour course. Policies governing course
credit load will be decided by the Office of Academic Affairs

Class Size. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will consult with deans, chairs,
and instructors to determine class size for an eLearning course.

Students with Disabilities. During the training phase, faculty will be trained to
accommodate students with disabilities and learning needs to ensure accessibility to
all University programs, services, and activities. The University complies with
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American Disability Act.
Faculty can contact the Office of Disability Services to obtain assistance and
teaching strategies for students who may need special accommodations.

Faculty Training or Development

Research shows that it takes more time to develop and teach an online course than a face-
to-face course on campus. Prior to receiving training, all faculty will complete a Course
Planning Form (IUPUI) and Worksheet for Planning and Envisioning Courses on the
Web (Boettcher and Conrad, 1999). These forms can be found in the attached Appendix.
and follow course approval procedures. Once approval has been attained, faculty must
complete a campus based training program. The training will occur in the summer or
during the year to assist in the development and design of the following categories for
teaching and learning.

   I.       Designing the course
   II.      Developing the syllabus
            a. Textbook selection and technology support from textbook companies
             b. Goals, objectives, and activities
             c. Units or modules
             d. Activities
             e. Calendar
   III.      Allocating Time for Course Management
             a. Time on task for students
             b. Time on task for faculty (including office hours)
   IV.       Developing a Course using a Course Management Tool
   V.        Teaching an Online Course
             a. Lecturing online
             b. Engaging students
             c. Designing project based assignments
             d. Administering quizzes and exams
                     i. Proctoring exams
             e. Building an online learning community
   VI.       Evaluating a course

Designing Your Course

All faculty teaching an eLearning courses should complete the Teaching in Support of
Student Success (developed by IUPUI), an online faculty development module series,
designed to provide basic information about effective teaching strategies that faculty can
use to support student learning in your classroom. The url for this site is:
http://www.opd.iupui.edu/tsss/ . The following six modules of TSSS provide a
comprehensive overview of teaching and learning issues.

          Learning Theory
          In the Understanding Learning Theory Module, you will consider how the work
          of cognitive scientists can help you design more effective instruction for your
          students. You will do this by applying general principles of learning to
          instructional design, examining how learning changes over the college years, and
          exploring individual differences in how people learn.
              I.      Learning Theory and Research
              II.     Changes in Learning
              III.    Learning Style

          Course Design
          Enhance your course by aligning objectives, assessment strategies, and course
          activities in the Course Design Module. It will assist you in implementing the
          course design process into your professional practice without feeling
          overwhelmed. Whether you are redesigning or refining an existing course or
          developing a new course, this module should help.
              I.       Knowing Your Learner
              II.      Objectives
              III.     Strategies
              IV.      Activities
Inclusive Teaching
The Inclusive Teaching Module offers strategies for integrating multicultural
content into your course as well as highlighting the process of engaging all
students through diverse content and instruction. This module's structure is
loosely based on Kitano's (1997) paradigm for multicultural course change. The
paradigm follows curriculum through stages: from an exclusive environment to
an inclusive classroom until arriving at a truly transformed curriculum.
    I.      Pre-Assessment
    II.     Teaching Philosophy
    III.    First Day of Class
    IV.     Inclusive Teaching
    V.      Behavioral Management
    VI.     Post Assessment

Active Learning
Explore strategies that help students process and retain course content.
There are many options for more involved active learning activities to promote
deeper levels of learning. The Active Learning Module introduces you to low-
risk, quick and simple forms of active learning.
    I.      Active Learning
    II.     Interactive Lectures
    III.    Collaborative Learning
    IV.     PBL

Assessment Strategies
Develop more efficient, accurate, and consistent course grading procedures by
working through this module. You will learn ways to help students understand
what you want them to learn and to design instruction to facilitate their learning.
   I.     Principles
   II.    Methods
   III.   Rubrics
   IV.    Classroom Assessment
   V.     Classroom Research

Classroom Management
Reflect on the impact of instructor attitude on classroom management decisions in
this module. Time will be spent discussing how to maintain a positive learning
climate for a diverse population. Also, you will be introduced to conflict
management techniques and Disruptive Student Conduct and Academic
Misconduct Procedures.
    I.      Online Course Design
    II.     E-Mentoring
    III.    Online Learning Activities
In addition, faculty will use the Course Redesign Guide (Boettcher and Conrad, 1999) in
the Appendix to guide the learning process about what students need to be able to know,
do and think.

Responsibilities of Faculty Members

Faculty members are responsible for ensuring the integrity of the course by:

Administrative Guidelines
  Seeking approval for offering an eLearning course
  Maintaining the same standards and requirements offered in the traditional face-to-
   face courses
  Meeting all accreditation standards
  Completing faculty development training
  Submitting a proposed schedule of the course to the department chair

Course Guidelines
  Preparing an introductory letter to your students
  Establishing and maintaining student logs
  Ordering textbooks for students
  Making sure students receive all course related materials and resources
  Publishing and maintaining online office hours
  Checking and responding to all email and voice mail from students
  Maintaining reliability and honesty when offering examinations
  Assigning grades for the course
  Administering course evaluations
  Maintain the confidentiality of students

Copyright Permission

Faculty Members are responsible for securing advance written copyright permission for
using any protected materials used in their classes. Faculty should send a written request
to the author or publisher’s Copyright and Permissions Department. In the request, give
information about how and what part of the work that will be used, the course title and
section, the number of students, and the number of copies to be placed on reserve or
copied. Remember to mention that the permission is for library or instructional use.
Please inform students that they must adhere to the Student Handbook Polices regarding
copyright and plagiarism. Listed below are useful websites on copyright guidelines:

   1. Copyright and Fair Use: http://fairuse.standford.edu
   2. Fair Use Guidelines for Educational Multimedia:
      http://www.libraries.psu.edu/avs/fairuse/guidelineoc.html
   3. US Copyright Office: http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/

Intellectual Property Rights
The University’s policy on intellectual property rights is in the process of being
developed and approved, and it will be placed in the Faculty Handbook.
                                      References


Boettcher, J.V. & Conrad, R. (1999). Faculty guide for moving teaching and learning to
       the web. League for Innovation in the Community College.

Boettcher, J.V. & Conrad, R. (2001). Issues in Online/Distance Learning: Programs and
       Curricula on the Web. Presented at Syllabus 2001.

Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2003). E-Learning and the science of Instruction. San
       Francisco: Jossey-Bass. ISBN: 0-7879-6051-9

Conrad, R. & Donaldson, J. A. (2004). Engaging the online learner: Activities and
      resources for creative instruction. Jossey-Bass: A Wiley Imprint: San
      Francisco.

Distance Education Task Force (2000). Faculty Guidebook: Distance Education
       Classes. University of South Carolina at Spartanburg.

Fisher, M. (2003). Designing courses and teaching on the web: A “how-to” guide to
        proven, innovative strategies. Scarecrow Education: Lanham, Maryland.

Hanna, D.E., Glowacki-Dudka, M. & Conceicao-Runlee, S (2000). 147 Practical tips for
       teaching online groups: Essentials of web-based education. Atwood Publishing:
       Madison, Wisconsin.

IUPUI. Teaching in Support of Student Success. url: http://www.opd.iupui.edu/tsss/

Palloff, R.M. & Pratt, K. (1999). Building learning communities in cyberspace:
        Effective strategies for the online classroom. Jossey-Bass Publishers: San
        Francisco.

Palloff, M.P. & Pratt, K. (2001). Lessons from the cyberspace classroom: The realities
        of online teaching. Jossey-Bass Publishers: San Francisco.

Johnson, J.L. (2003). Distance education: The complete guide to design, delivery, and
      Improvement. Teachers College Press: New York.

Northern Virginia Community College (2003). Extended Learning Institute Guide for
       Faculty Teaching a Course.
        APPENDIX F
Sample Semester of Workshops
                                      Johnson C. Smith University

                                        Fall Semester 2005
                                     Teacher Training Institute
                              Sponsored by the Faculty Development Program
                                      P. Worthy Dawkins, Director
                                           mailto:pdawkins@jcsu.edu


                              Instructional Technology Workshops
                                      Eugene Hermitte, Coordinator




                                       Hands-On Technology Training
  Workshop             Date           Time         Location      Limitations and            Presenters
   Title                                                          Requirements
 Teaching and       October 5th    4:00 – 5:00       SHA 201                 17            Phyllis Worthy
 Learning with                                                                               Dawkins
  Technology
   Resources
     AS400          October 17th    4:00-6:00        SHA 201          For New Faculty       Moses Jones
 Training: An                                                         Passwords will be
advisement and                                                          distributed at
registration tool                                                        Workshop
  Geographic         November      4:00 – 6:00       SHA 201                  12          Frank Parker and
  Information          2nd                                                                 Deborah Carter
    Systems
 TrueOutcomes        November       9:00 -4:00         TBA               All Deans,            Doug –
                       1/3rd                                            Department         TrueOutcomes
                                                                        Chairs and          Incorporated
                                                                      Degree Program
                                                                       Coordinators
Moodle Course        January 6,    1:00 – 3:00       SHA 201                 12            Frank Parker
Management              2006
   System
                                General Pedagogy Workshops
                                  Maria Papanikolaou, Coordinator
                                         Fall Semester 2005




  Workshop           Date           Time          Location       Limitations and          Presenters
   Title                                                          Requirements
 Book: Active      October 18     4:00-5:00        SHA 201       First 25 faculty      Maria Papanikolaou
Learning, by Mel                                                 will receive a book
   Silberman
   Graduate        November       4:00 – 5:00    Faculty House           30            Maria Papanikolaou
    Record           15th                                        Free Book to First
 Examination                                                      10 Faculty Who
 GRE Training                                                         Sign-Up

Learning Across    January 6,     8:30 - 4:30     Center for             30             Dawkins, Ford,
the Curriculum        2006                        Integrated                           DeForrest, Mager,
  Workshop                                          Studies      For Faculty Who       Hermitte, Purgason
                                                                 Are Not Trained
                                                                  to Teach “W”
                                                                     Courses
  Learning         January 6,    10:00 – 12:00   Faculty House   New Faculty and           Dawkins,
 Communities          2006                                         Upper Level          Froneberger, and
                                                                     Learning             Summerskill
                                                                  Communities
                                 Department Workshops
                                   Fall Semester 2005
                          Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Coordinator




Workshop Title         Date            Time         Location          Limitations and          Presenters
                                                                       Requirements
   Writing         Call Ms.       TBA           In the               Allow at least two   Frank Parker,
    Performance     Smith (1286)                 Department           hours per topic      Bessie Gage, Phyllis
    Objectives      to                                                                     Worthy Dawkins,
    and Learning    Coordinate                                                             and FTAs
    Outcomes        Requests
 Developing        from
    Rubrics for     Department
    Evaluation      s for the
 Creating          choice of
    Departmental    topic(s)
    Web Portals
 Developing
    Electronic
    Portfolios
 Coordinating
    Pedagogy and
    Technology
 Designing
    Evaluation
    Studies
     Academic       October 6,     3:00 – 5:00   Center for           All New              Sutton-Haywood,
    Leadership      2005                         Integrated Studies   Department           Phillip Jeter, Deans
    (Leaming):                                                        Chairs since
                                                                                           Harriett Richard
 Department Chair                                                     January 2005
  Orientation &
Mentor Assignment
                                  Discussion Series
                                Linette Fox, Coordinator




Workshop Title       Date            Time         Location     Limitations    Presenters
                                                                  and
                                                               Requiremen
                                                                   ts
Video: Declining    October        4:00 – 6:00     Faculty      All Faculty   Linette Fox,
by Degress           24th                          House        Popcorn &     Coordinator
                                                                  Snacks
                                                                  Served
Book Discussion:   November        12:30 p.m.      Faculty           30       Linette Fox,
Nickel & Dimed,       9th                          House                         Gail
  by Barbara                                                                  Summerskill,
  Ehrenreich                                                                   & Brenda
                                                                              Froneberger




                     Faculty Development Steering Committee
        Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Director of Faculty Development, Presiding
                              Calendars of Meetings
                                  Faculty House
                                Fall Semester 2005

                   August         September        October      November
                    16th              8th            7th           4th
                    4:00            10:00           12:00         12:00



                                Reserve Your Space with:
                            Bobby Smith, Administrative Assistant
                                   Voice: 704-378-1286
                                    Fax: 704-378-1281
                                  Email: bsmith@jcsu.edu
         New Faculty & Department Chair Orientation Workshops
                     (Faculty Learning Community)

                                   Fall Semester 2005
                             Harriett Richard, Coordinator




                                   Academic Preparation

Workshop Title              Date                   Location                Presenters
New Faculty Orientation     Monday August 15th        Faculty House           Marilyn Sutton-
Retreat: Part 1             9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.                               Haywood, Vice
    o Greetings                                                            President for Academic
    o JCSU History                                                                 Affairs
    o Faculty Handbook
                                                                           Phillip Jeter, Associate
    o Policies and
                                                                             Vice President for
        Procedures
                                                                             Academic Affairs
    o Catalog
    o Roll Book                                                            Linette Fox, President
    o Professional                                                         of the Faculty Senate
        Development Plan
                                                                               Phyllis Worthy
    o Campus
                                                                              Dawkins, Dean,
        Technologies
    o Human Resources                                                      College of Professional
    o Teaching Students                                                           Studies
        with Disabilities                                                  Donald Mager, Dean,
    o Mentors Program                                                       College of Arts and
    o Course Syllabus                                                            Sciences
        Development
Classroom Management        Monday, October 6th       Faculty House           Harriett Richards
& Mentor Assignment             12:30 p.m.
                                                                               Phyllis Worthy
                                                                                 Dawkins
New Faculty Leadership        November 30th        Center for Integrated            TBA
                                                          Studies
                            Monday and Tuesday,    9:30 a.m. – 5:00 a.m.            TBA
JCSU Cares                   December 15 & 16,
                                   2003               Location: TBA
Learning Across the           January 6, 2006           8:30 - 4:30           Dawkins, Ford,
Curriculum                                         Center for Integrated    DeForrest, Mager,
                                                          Studies          Hermitte, Purgason &
                                                                                 Adeyeye
*All new faculty are encouraged to attend all workshops.
                             Freshman Academy
                   Faculty Learning Community Workshops
            Coordinators: Brenda Froneberger & Phyllis Worthy Dawkins




  Workshop Title              Date             Location            Presenters
 Faculty Learning        September 27th,     Faculty House          Brenda
Communities Team          *October 25th,                          Froneberger
    Meetings             November 15th
                           10:00 a.m.
    Learning             September 15th      Faculty House      Phyllis Worthy
Communities for New        1:00 – 3:00                           Dawkins and
     Faculty                                                       Brenda
                                                                 Froneberger
 Excel Spread Sheet      September 21st        SHA 201            Matthew
for Managing Course         3:00-4:30                             DeForrest
         Data
      Moodle for           September           SHA 201           Frank Parker
      Enhancing
   Communications
 Flashlight Training      October 6th          SHA 201          Frank Parker &
     for Program          4:00 – 6:00                           Phyllis Worthy
       Feedback                                                    Dawkins
 Electronic Portfolios   *October 25th         SHA 201           Frank Parker,
  for Storing Course      4:00 – 6:00                               Brenda
     Artifacts and                                              Froneberger, &
   Assessment Data                                              Phyllis Worthy
                                                                   Dawkins
                        New Faculty Orientation
                           Reading Materials
Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment
      Barbara Walvoord, Virginia Anderson, Jossey Bass Publishing, 1998

First-Order Principles for College Teachers: Ten Basic Ways To Improve
Teaching
       Robert Voice, Anker Publishing Company, 1996.

Good Start: A Guidebook for New faculty in Liberal Arts Colleges
      Gerald W. Gibson, Anker Publishing Company, 1992

The Craft of Teaching
      Kenneth E. Eble, Jossey Bass 1988

Teaching Tips
      Wilbert J. McKeachie, D.C. Health & Company, 1986

Preparing For Promotion and Tenure Review
       Robert M. Diamond, Anker Publishing Company, 1999

Teaching as the Learning Profession
      Hammond, Sykes, Jossey Bass Publishing, 1999

The Course Syllabus: A learning Centered Approach
      Robert M. Diamond, Anker Publishing Company, 1997

The New Professor’s Handbook: Teaching and Research in Engineering and Science
      Cliff I. Davidson, Susan A. Ambrose, Anker Publishing Company, 1994

Tools for Teaching
       Barbara Davis, Jossey Bass Publishers, 1993

Dealing with Problems: Vignettes to Stimulate Difficult Classroom Situations
      Syracuse University, Anker Publishing Company, Video Workbook

								
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