Library_Lesson_Plans by 14bz5m6

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 57

									Student Name: Claudia Luntsford

Library Media Specialist Name: Flo Ingle

Title of Lesson: Locating Library Books Using the Alphabet

Grade Level(s): 1-2

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson, as is, can be done shortly after the
beginning of a school year. This lesson can also be incorporated with learning how to
alphabetize to the third letter. If you chose to incorporate alphabetizing to the third letter,
collaborate with the classroom teacher to do this lesson after the students have been
introduced to alphabetizing words.

Time Allotted: 45 minutes

Objectives:

        1. Students will correctly recite the alphabet in proper sequence.
        2. Students will be able to identify an author as a person who writes books.
        3. When called upon, every student will correctly state his/her last name and the
           first letter of his/her last name.
        4. Students will locate a picture book and identify the author’s last name as
           having the same beginning letter as their own.

Show-Me State Standards: Goals 1.1, 1.4, 1.10; Communication Arts 1

Supplies Needed:

       Dr. Seuss’ ABCs
       Access to picture books available for check-out

Anticipatory Set:

Have you ever wondered how your librarian knows where to find the books that you or
your teacher wants to check out? What would it be like if the librarian could never find a
book that you needed? Explain to the class that the library books are filed by alphabetical
order, grouped by the author’s last name.

Teaching/Presentation:

Begin by reading Dr. Seuss’ ABCs to the class. Then lead the children in a group oral
recitation of the alphabet.




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Modeling:

Model finding a book by an author whose last name begins with the same letter as yours.
Ask students to choose a book for checkout, explaining that they are to find a book from
the shelves written by an author whose last name begins with the same letter as their own
last name.

Checking for Understanding:

To check for understanding (before checkout), slowly recite the alphabet and ask each
student to stand up when the first letter of their last name is mentioned. When the letter
corresponding to the first letter of each student’s last name is recited, the student will
stand and wait quietly to be recognized. As soon as each child stands, ask him/her to say
their last name and then the first letter of their last name.

Guided Practice:

Begin normal check-out procedures having students choose a book written by an author
who last name begins with the same letter as their own last name. For example, if a
child’s last name is ―Smith‖ then that child will go to the shelf that holds all books whose
author’s last name begins with ―S‖.

Evaluation:

In a short one-on-one session (easily done at book check-out time) with the librarian, the
student will state his/her own last name; point to or say the author’s last name; and
correctly identify the letter as the beginning letter of the student and author’s last name.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                            2
Student Name: Claudia Luntsford

Library Media Specialist Name: Flo Ingle

Title of Lesson: Understanding Idioms

Grade Level(s): 2 – 3

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: The second grade teachers at my school do a unit
on Amelia Bedelia. Find out when they will be introducing the unit and collaborate with
the teachers for the best time to implement your lesson on Amelia Bedelia.

Objectives: Students will be able to:

   1. Recall and list information from the book Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish.
   2. Introduce idioms.
   3. Demonstrate an understanding of the meaning of the story by interpreting the
      actual meaning of the direction given by Mrs. Rogers
   4. Apply their understanding of the story by rewriting directions that Amelia Bedelia
      will understand.

Time Allotted: Approximately 1 1/2 hours or 2 – 45 minute periods

Show-Me State Standards: Goals 1.6, 1.8, 2.2, 3.1, 3.3, 3.6; Communication Arts 1, 2,
4

Supplies Needed:

      White board/chalkboard/chart paper
      Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish
      Worksheets with categories written
      Paper
      Pencils

Anticipatory Set:

Introduce the idea of an ―idiom‖ as a phrase that has two different meanings: a literal
―word-for-word‖ meaning and a figurative ―what we really mean‖ meaning.

Brainstorm a list of idioms on the whiteboard. Give a couple examples to get started. For
each, ask students to explain the literal and figurative meaning.

Sample list of idioms:
      You’re in hot water.                                   They’re going to tie the knot.


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         Who spilled the beans?                                You look like a million
bucks!
         Someone let the cat out of the bag.                   He’s in the doghouse.
         They can sure cut a rug!                              It’s raining cats and dogs.
         They’re going to tie the knot.

Introduce Amelia Bedelia by telling students they will be hearing a story about someone
who always thinks of the word-for-word meaning of idioms. Explain that students should
see that this sometimes causes trouble.


Teaching/Presentation:

Read the story, Amelia Bedelia, to the students, making sure that each can see the
pictures. In each picture of Amelia Bedelia doing the job wrong, ask the children what it
looks like she’s doing. Ask the children what Mrs. Rogers really wanted her to do for
each task.

After finishing the story, as a class, make a list on the whiteboard of all the jobs that Mrs.
Rogers asked Amelia Bedelia to do. Add the idioms from the story to our list.

Dust the furniture                             Change the towels
Draw the drapes                                Trim the fat on the steak
Put out the lights                             Dress the chicken
Measure two cups of rice

Next write the four categories on the whiteboard. These titles should also be written on a
worksheet. Make a copy of the worksheet for each student for later use. Go over the titles
of the four categories. (Mrs. Rogers’ Directions, What Amelia Bedelia Does, What
Amelia Bedelia should have done, and Mrs. Roger’s New Directions).

Explain to the students that they will fill in each of these categories based on what
happened in the story.

Modeling:

Go over the first example that the teacher has already done on the storyboard:

        The first category will say ―Dust the furniture.‖
        The second category will say ―Amelia put dust on a dresser.‖
        The third category will say ―Amelia uses a duster to take the dust off of the
         dresser.‖
        The fourth category will be blank. Ask the children to recall the new directions
         that Mrs. Rogers has to say to Amelia Bedelia which was given in the book.




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Check for Understanding:

Ask the class if there are any questions about what they are going to do.

Guided Practice:

Hand out a worksheet with the same categories on it to each child. Ask the children to
independently do two more examples (two of the jobs from the story). Do not allow
children to use the same job that the teacher has already done on the whiteboard. Collect
the worksheets for evaluation.

Closure:

From the list of idioms that we created before reading Amelia Bedelia, have the students
chose one (i.e. ―You look like a million bucks!‖) and describe how Amelia would
interpret its meaning. Students can share their ideas with other students. Students should
also write a statement that will help Amelia understand the meaning of the idiom better
(i.e. ―You look beautiful!‖)

Encourage the children to read other Amelia Bedelia books. Have these books on hand.

Evaluation:

Evaluate the worksheet each student completed.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                           5
Student Name: Claudia Luntsford

Library Media Specialist Name: Flo Ingle

Title of Lesson: Story Elements

Grade Level: 2-3

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaboration Effort: Meet with teachers and let them know that their
students’ will be reviewing different story elements. This can be a stand alone unit that
you chose to do at the beginning of the beginning of the school year or if the classroom
teacher is doing a lesson on story elements you can incorporate this into a
collaborative effort.

Objectives:

Students will be able to recognize different story elements and write a story using each
story element.

Time Allotted: Approximately 1 hour

Show-Me State Standards: Goals 1.6, 1.8, 2.1 Communication Arts 1, 2, 3, 4,

Supplies Needed:

The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush by Tomie De Paola
Apron
Mixing bowl and spoon
3 recipe or index cards with each story element written it
Blank index cards (enough for each student plus extras)
Photocopy of the cover of The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush
Paper
Pencil

Anticipatory Set:

To begin, the teacher puts on an apron and produces a mixing bowl and spoon and tells
the students that in the mixing bowl are the ingredients for a ―dump cake.‖ Explain that a
good story is like dump cake – it has lots of ingredients.

Teaching/Presentation:

Reach into the bowl and pull out an index card on which you have written ―characters.‖
Explain that characters are ―Who the story is about?‖ Mention familiar stories and ask



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students to tell you who the characters are. Reach into the bowl and pull out another
index card on which you have written ―setting.‖ Explain to students that the setting is
―When and where the story happens.‖ Mention familiar stories and ask students to
identify the setting. Reach into the bowl and pull out a final index card on which you
have written ―plot.‖ Explain that plot is ―What happens in the story.‖ Mention familiar
stories and ask students to briefly explain the plot.

Modeling:

Model by reading The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush by Tomie De Paola. After reading
the story, ask the students to identify the characters. Write them on an index or recipe
card and drop it into the mixing bowl. Stir it up. Then ask the students to identify the
setting and the plot in the same manner. After stirring up the ―ingredients,‖ reach into the
bowl and produce a photocopy of the cover of the story you just read.

Checking for Understanding:

Ask the students if there is anything they do not understand about story elements.

Guided Practice:

Ask students to create their own ―dump cake‖ by having them make up
characters, a setting, a brief plot description and writing it on a recipe card. Then
have them develop a story using their elements.

Or, for a center idea, provide recipe cards with story elements written on them and let
students choose one to write a story.

Evaluation:

Assess students by their own ―dump cake‖ they have created on recipe cards. Also, assess
understanding by stories written using their story elements.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       7
Student: Dana Lynde                              LMS: Ladonna Meusche

Title: Care of Books

Grade: Kindergarten

Degree of collaboration: none

Objectives: Students will identify the proper way to handle and take care of library

books.

Time allotted: 15-30 min.

Show-Me Standards: Goal 3.1, 3.3

Supplies: Mr. Wiggle’s Book, flash cards made from pictures downloaded from

http://www.columbia.k12.mo.us/dre/bookcare.html, letter home to parents downloaded

from same web site (one per student)

Anticipatory Set: Read Mr. Wiggle’s Book aloud to students

Presentation: Discuss with students proper book handling and book care rules. Discuss

problematic book handling and how to avoid damaging library books.

Modeling: Show student samples of library books that have been ruined by students in

the past and discuss how to prevent that damage from happening.

Checking for understanding: Show the flash cards one at a time and have students

figure out what rule is being illustrated.

Closure: Have each student take the letter about book care home to parents.




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Student: Dana Lynde                                LMS: Ladonna Meusche

Title: Illustrators

Grade: 1st grade

Degree of collaboration: none

Objectives:

Students will understand the role of a book illustrator. Students will recognize the names
of some popular children’s book illustrators. Students will identify common artistic
techniques used to illustrate books.

Time allotted: 2-3 library class periods

Show-Me Standards: Goal 2.4, CA 5, FA 1

Supplies: Books illustrated by the illustrators that I am focusing on

Anticipatory Set: Ask students questions about the book making process, what an

illustrator is, and what an illustrator does (basically find out how much previous

knowledge the students have about illustrators and go from there)

Presentation: One illustrator at a time, I present biographical information about the

illustrator and discuss the artistic techniques used by him or her.

Modeling: I show several books illustrated by that illustrator and look at examples of

his/her artistic style or technique.

Closure: I read a book illustrated by an illustrator that we have learned about.

Evaluation: Periodically throughout the year as I read books aloud, I see if the students

recognize work done by illustrators that we studied.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                          9
Student: Dana Lynde                                 LMS: Ladonna Meusche

Title: Fiction or Nonfiction

Grade: 1-2

Degree of collaboration: none

Objectives: Students will define fiction and nonfiction. Students will compare and

contrast fiction and nonfiction books. Students will evaluate passages from books and

determine whether the book is fiction of nonfiction.

Time allotted: 15-30 min. (I may do this several different times in the school year)

Show-Me Standards: Goal 1.5, CA 2, 3

Supplies: Several fiction and several nonfiction books

Anticipatory Set: Read Kick, Pass, and Run and My Football Book then ask the kids to

vote on which book was fiction and which one was nonfiction.

Presentation: We then review the definition of fiction and nonfiction and I let them

change their original vote if they want to.

Modeling: I show them examples of several books of each type and we discuss how they

are alike and how they are different.

Checking for understanding: I read passages from books and they determine whether it

is fiction or nonfiction and we vote. Sometimes I call on individuals to justify their votes.

Closure: I show students the fiction and nonfiction sections in the library and encourage

them to check out one book from each section during check out time.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       10
Student: Kelly Krause          LMS: Diane Ringen, library media specialist Whiteman Air
                               Force Base Elementary School

Title of Lesson: Using the Children’s Magazine Guide

Grade Levels: 4-5th

Degree of collaboration: beginning

Description of collaborative effort: Because the library schedule is fixed, Ringen does not
always get to teach this skill in connection with a research project, but students at her
school have to use magazines to research a topic at least once during their fourth and fifth
grade years.

Objectives: Students should be able to use the Children’s Magazine Guide to find an
article they would be able to use for a report.

Show-Me Standards: Goals 1.2 and 1.4 are addressed by this lesson.

Time allotted: two or three library sessions of 30 minutes each

Supplies needed: Each student needs a copy of the Children’s Magazine Guide. Ringen
also uses a worksheet a video to teach this skill (I will provide the sources for these later.)

Anticipatory set/Teaching: Ringen allows students to simply leaf through a Children’s
Magazine Guide to see how it is organized. They spend the first period seeing which
magazines her library carries that are mentioned in the CMG and learning about where
the periodicals are located in her library.

Further teaching: The second session is spent watching the video and completing a
worksheet which shows them more clearly how to use the guide to find information.

Modeling: Ringen has the students brainstorm about a topic, see how many articles they
can find on the topic, and talk about how they are listed. She tells them to come in for
their next library time ready with a topic they want to research about.

Checking for Understanding: In the final library session, students come with a topic and
look up an article in the CMG, trying to find it themselves. They read through the
magazine and discuss whether the article would help them learn about their topic. Since
the article may or may not pertain to something the students are actually researching in
class, Ringen’s main concern is that they are able to take a citation from the CMG and
actually find what they are looking for on her library’s shelves. She helps them as they
are searching and leads the discussion on what they have found.




Library Lesson Plans                     Spring 2004                                        11
Student: Kelly Krause          LMS: Diane Ringen, library media specialist Whiteman Air
                               Force Base Elementary School


Title of Lesson: Introducing the Show-Me Books

Grade level: 1st-3rd grades

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative effort: Ringen discusses the Show-Me books with her
students and reads one aloud to interest them in checking them out for themselves. She
tries to choose one that goes along with a theme the students are studying in class if
possible.

Objective: Students will be aware of the Show-Me books and how to participate in the
program.

Time allotted: 15-30 minutes

Show-Me Standards: CA 2 and CA 6

Supplies needed: Current list and copies of the Show-Me books

Anticipatory set: Ringen sets the Show-Me books out on the tables and gives students a
few minutes to leaf through a ―special‖ set of books she is going to tell them about. The
older students have already experienced the program, so many of them already start
making cursory judgments as they leaf through the books.

Teaching presentation: Ringen explains the voting system of the Show-Me books and
how books get nominated for the program. She then reads one of the Show-Me books,
trying to choose one that fits with a current theme the students are studying.

Modeling: After reading the book and discussing it, Ringen talks to the students about
whether that is a book they would vote for and why.

Checking for Understanding/Guided practice: Students are free to check out the books
throughout the year. Ringen maintains a reserve list since many students want to read the
books. This gives her an informal record of which books seem to be the most popular as
well as affords her an opportunity to individually discuss the books in the program as the
students check them out and turn them back in. At the end of the program year, eligible
students vote on their favorites, and, when the winners are announced, Ringen makes sure
she lets the students know.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       12
Student: Kelly Krause           LMS: Diane Ringen, library media specialist Whiteman Air
                                Force Base Elementary School


Title of Lesson: Adoring the Almanac

Grade level: 4th – 5th grades

Degree of collaboration: beginning

Description of collaborative effort: The school’s curriculum requires students to be able
to use various reference books, so this lesson addresses that requirement. However,
students do not often have a specific research topic assigned when she teaches this lesson.

Objectives: Students will be able to use the current World Almanac for Kids to find
answers to various information questions.

Time allotted: Two library class periods

Show-Me Standards: Goals 1.2 and 1.4

Supplies needed: one almanac per child and a worksheet

Anticipatory set: The books themselves are an immediate attention-getter for the students
because they are full of color pictures, current information and interesting topics, so
Ringen spends the first class period simply letting students leaf through the books and
becoming familiar with their organization and the type of information that can be found
in them. She leads a discussion about the various ways the information is organized and
students together look up information based on her or other students’ suggestions.

Teaching/presentation: The second library class period, students are given a worksheet
they must complete by the end of the period using information they looked up in the
almanacs.

Modeling: Ringen and the children do the first entry together and then students work in
pairs to find the rest of the information. She then circulates and answers questions while
the students work.

Checking for Understanding: Ringen collects the papers, corrects any errors, and hands
them back to the students at the next library session. She answers any questions the
students may have about the assignment and goes over any problems they may have. She
then allows students to check out almanacs whenever they have their library time, and
she says almanacs are one of the most popular check-out items she has in the library.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                      13
Student: Claudia Kimrey                                     Librarian: Carol Staley

Title: Ownership of Literacy

Grade Levels: K-2

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Librarian prepares and teaches the lesson. She will

read a book and have other books on the same subject displayed and available for check

out.

Objectives:

      Select and read books for fun and information

      Listening skills

Time: 30 minutes

Show-Me State Standard: 2.3, 2.5, and 4.1

Supplies:

      Paper

      Crayons

      Pencils

      Scissors

      Glitter

      Candy Kisses

      Book: Arthur’s Valentine by Marc Brown

      Chart Paper and marker, White Board, or Smart Board

Anticipatory Set: The librarian will present several Valentines’ books to the class, then

she will ask the students: How many of you like kisses?



Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                      14
Teaching: Read Arthur’s Valentine, before reading the ending, have the students make

predictions on whom is the secret admire. Use ―Accountable Talk‖, have the students

justify their answers/predictions.

Modeling: Show how to fold a paper to make a card, write words on the board to help

with spelling. Have the students observe while you decorate one Valentine card.

Checking for Understanding: Walk around the tables making sure the students area

using the right materials, spelling words correctly, and folding the card on the right

direction.

Guided Practice: Help students use glitter, fold the card and spell words.

Closure: Finish the lesson telling the students that they also may have a secret admire.

Then ask them: ―Do you want a Kiss?‖ After a few seconds hand each child a Hershey’s

Kiss candy.

Evaluation: The final product, Valentine’s card, appearance and the students’

explanations on their predictions will let the librarian know what the students learned

from this activity.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                        15
Student: Claudia Kimrey                                     Librarian: Carol Staley

Title: Dewey Decimal System Bingo

Grade Levels: 3, 4, and 5

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Librarian prepares and teaches the lesson. The

bingo cards and

Objectives: Locate non-fiction books using the Dewey Decimal System

Time: 45 – 50min

Show-Me State Standards: 1.1, 1.2 and 1.4

Supplies: Blank bingo cards, markers, pencils and Dewey Decimal list

Anticipatory Set: Refresh students’ memories on what they have previously learned

about the Dewey Decimal System.

Teaching/Presentation: Hand out blank bingo cards, pencils and markers. Explain how

to play bingo. Read the list of Dewey Decimal numbers and have the students write them

down on the squares of their choice.

Modeling: Using a marker, mark a bingo card and show the class how a winning card

should look like.

Checking for Understanding: As you call the Dewey Decimal numbers, walk around

the tables making sure the students are using the markers to place a dot or an ―X‖ on the

correct place.

Closure: At the end of the game, announce to the class: ―Today we reviewed the Dewey

Decimal System,‖ this will help them be familiar with the proper library terminology.




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Have them take the cards and Dewey Decimal list to class where they may play again

under the teacher’s supervision.

Evaluation: The game itself is an evaluation the librarian will see how well they follow

directions by the outcome of the game. On a future library visit, the librarian will ask the

class what is the Dewey Decimal System; the students’ answers will demonstrate if they

need further bingo games.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       17
Student: Claudia Kimrey                                       Librarian: Carol Staley

Title: Honest Abe

Grade Levels: 3, 4, and 5

Degree of Collaboration: Moderate

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson may be used when the classroom

teacher is teaching a social studies unit involving Abraham Lincoln or biographies.

Objectives: Locate and differentiate between biography and autobiography

Time Allotted: Two sessions of 45 – 50 minutes each.

Show-Me State Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 1.8, 2.1, and 4.1

Supplies: Paper, pencils, and copy of text: Honest Abe. I have attached a copy of the text

provided by Ms. Carol Staley, retrieved from www.edHelper.com

Anticipatory Set: Show a picture book of Abraham Lincoln and highlight his honesty.

Talk about plagiarism; explain that it is not honest to copy somebody else’s work without

permission or to call it your own.

Teaching/Presentation: Hand out a copy of the text to each student. Allow three to five

minutes for them to read it alone and have an idea of the content. Shares read; read a

paragraph and then have the students take turns reading the text out loud. The students

will then rewrite the text in their own words. Collect the students, work. This first half of

the lesson ends here. On the next class return the papers to the students, have them edit it

and write a final copy. This final copy may be typed using a computer.

Modeling: After reading the first paragraph, explain in your own words what you just

read.




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Checking for understanding: After a student reads the second paragraph call on several

students and ask them to tell the class what they understood from what they read. Repeat

with third paragraph if necessary.

Guided Practice: Some students may need extra help writing their version; the

classroom teacher could help with this step also.

Closure: Students, divided in groups, read their paper to each other.

Evaluation: Evaluation can be done on the first copy of the paper. The idea is to retell a

story using ones own words.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       19
Libby Burr                    In conjunction with Patti Woods, LMS Heber Hunt

Exploring the Middle School Library
6th grade – Beginning

Mrs. Woods and I discussed the needs of the 5th grade students who will be coming to the
Middle School next year.

Objective: To identify the organization and policies of the Library Media Center.

Time Allotted: 1- 2 class periods.

Show-Me Standards: 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 1.10, 5.3, 5.4, 5.7

Supplies Needed: 1. Map of the library
                   2. Treasure Hunt map and questions

Anticipatory Set: Welcome to your Library Media Center. I’m Mrs. Burr, your
Librarian, and Mrs. Rea is your Librarian Assistant. We are going to introduce all to the
library, and will make using the library as easy as possible.

Presentation: 1. Introduce librarians, Media Center, organization, and policies.
               2. Tour the Library Media Center on-site. Look at each section and
                  what each section represents.
               3. Review online card catalog and how to use it.
               4. Explain scavenger hunt of the Library Media Center.

Modeling: Librarian will demonstrate online card catalog, check-out, and check-in
procedures.

Guided Practice: The scavenger hunt questions will be passed out along with a map of
the library. Students will work through the activity. Librarian will be available for
assistance.

Closure: Librarian will offer question and answer time. This will help evaluate if
students have absorbed information.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                      20
Libby Burr             In conjunction with Patti Woods (Heber Hunt)

Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction
6th Grade- Beginning

Discussed why students have difficulty understanding the difference between fiction and
nonfiction. Books will be pulled for this lesson that will show a distinct difference
between the two.

Objectives: The student will understand the arrangement of the library and the
differences between fiction and nonfiction about the same topic.
Time Allotted: 50 minutes

Show-Me State Standards: 1.5, 1.6

Supplies Needed: Several books from fiction and nonfiction

Anticipatory Set: Our lesson is the difference between a fiction book and nonfiction
book. What is a fiction book? What are nonfiction books?

Teaching: Show students a book about Trees. Discuss why it is nonfiction. Show a few
pictures in the book. Write the call number on the chalkboard. Explain what a
constellation is. Have a student walk to the 500’s to show where this book is shelved.
Show students the book The Great Kapok Tree.
Again, discuss why this book is fiction. Show a few pictures of the book. Write the call
number on the board. (Have several books with the same theme that can be demonstrated
as examples.)

Activity: Have students get into pairs. Out of the fiction and nonfiction books pulled
from the shelves have the teams pick out 5 fiction and 5 nonfiction books. Each team
will be able to tell how they know whether the book is fiction or nonfiction.

This is a simple activity. Students usually know the difference but still get somewhat
confused at the difference.

Closure: Remind students that will continue to review the differences throughout the
year.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       21
Libby Burr                     In conjunction with Patti Woods (Heber Hunt)

Meet someone new…read a Biography
6th-Intermediate
This lesson will be a continuation of the fiction and nonfiction lesson. During the next
several visits to the library different genres will be introduced. This lesson will be about
biographies.

Objectives: The students will know how to use various sources to obtain information
about the author you are interested in.

Time Allotted: 50 minutes
Show-Me Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2.7, 3.5 4.1, 4.4, 4.6

Supplies Needed: Computer
                   Encyclopedias
                   Biography books

Anticipatory Set: As a genre, biographies have the following characteristics: tells about
a real person, shows that the writer knows a lot about this person, describes the person’s
environment, provides anecdotes or details that show the person in action, shows how the
person affects other people, and states or implies how the writer feels about the person. I
will ask students if they’ve ever researched information about a person, researched
information about an author. I will ask students where they think the best place to start
would be in order to find 5 facts about their author. I will ask them if they’ve ever
searched for just a picture on the Internet, and where would be the best place to start
would be in order to find a picture of their author from the Internet.

Modeling: I will demonstrate to students how to find a picture of their author from
google.com. and show them the best ways to search for information about their author
from the Internet.

Checking for Understanding: I will check for understanding by going around and
making sure students are on the right track, and I will check their progress by making
sure they have found their 5 facts and picture of their author.



Focus Activity

Directions: Answer the following questions:

   1. Have you ever researched information about a person before?

   2. Have you ever researched information about an author before?




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       22
   3. Where do you think is the best place to start in order to find facts about your
      author?

   4. Have you ever searched for just a picture on the internet?

   5. Where do you think is the best place to start in order to find a picture of your
      author?




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       23
Title of Lesson: Reference Station Merry-Go-Round

Patsy Svarvari         LMS: Charlee Shipps

Grade Level: 5 or 6

Degree of Collaboration: Initial—scheduling library time, perhaps classroom review of

       previous library lessons on different reference resources

Objective: Students will demonstrate basic understanding and use of 12 reference

       resources by completing a simple worksheet using each resource.

Time Allotted: Approximately 10-15 minutes per station (depending on students’

       abilities and past experience) plus ten minutes for activity introduction and 30

       minutes for review after completion

Show-Me Standards: 1:2, 1:4, 1:7, 1:10, 2:3, 3:2, 3:3, 3:4, 3:5, 3:7, 4:1, 4:4, 4:5, 4:6,

       CA:1, CA:3, CA:4, CA:6, SS:7

Anticipatory Set: Review the various reference resources (from previous lessons) and

       discuss how they might be of use—or not—in upcoming research project.

Materials: Guinness’ Book of World Records, Famous First Facts, computer terminal

       with online catalog, Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, dictionary, biographical

       dictionary, atlas, almanac, geographical dictionary, author reference book,

       thesaurus, encyclopedia, worksheets for each station, label and hint sign for each

       station, group list

Teaching:

       1) Divide class members into 12 groups—may be pre-determined, self-selected,

or random selection (names from hat, etc.)




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                         24
         2) Explain that each group will have __ minutes to complete the sheet at their

starting station. When a signal is given, they will turn in that worksheet and move to the

next numbered station. From Station 12 they go to Station 1.

       3) Ask 1 student to review the procedure.

       4) Assign each group to one of the 12 resource stations. Worksheets should be

available at each station.

       5) Begin station rotation.

       6) Continue in later meetings depending on schedule set during collaboration.

       7) After all groups have finished all stations and all papers have been collected,

review answers and have students report on how they found them. Discuss again use of

resources during research project to come. Use drawn names for 1st chance to answer to

avoid domination by a few students.

Evaluation: 1) Check papers. 2) Personal communication with students during following

research project.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                          25
Title of lesson: Back in the Good Old Days

Patsy Svarvari         LMS: Charlee Shipps

Grade: any—adapt presentation to age of students

Degree of Collaboration: As extensive as you wish to make it—costumes, classroom

readings or activities; help in collecting and soliciting donations of trunk and artifacts

Objectives: Students will better understand everyday life of people in the past.

Time allotted: 2 library visits, can be adjusted to age of class

Show-Me Standards: SS:2, SS:6, SS:7; lesson could be expanded to cover any number of

others

Supplies needed: appropriate level historical fiction story, pioneer or other historical

costume for librarian and/or presenter, old trunk filled with artifacts of childhood in

1800’s (toys, school books and pails, slates, household items, pictures, tools, clothes, etc.)

Anticipatory set: How was life different for children who lived 150 years ago? Would

you like to have lived at that time?

Teaching:

1st class visit—Read historical fiction story. Discuss things in story that are the same as

today and those that are different.

2nd class visit—Presenter, dressed in period clothing, presents items from trunk and

discusses them with children. Let them guess how the more mysterious were used, what

we use instead now, etc.

This theme could be expanded as much as you want in collaboration with many other

staff members—research work, writing own historical fiction, learning songs sung in

Missouri in 1800’s, making papier mache dolls and dressing them in period costume,




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                          26
hand sewing or mending, and so on. Or it can stand alone. The school where I found it

uses it in celebration of Kansas Day, the day Kansas was admitted to the Union. Is there

a Missouri Day?

Closure: Ask students again if they would like to have lived during the time period

presented.

Evaluation: Perhaps show students some of the items later in the year and see if they

remember anything about them.




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                                       27
Title: What Am I?

Patsy Svarvari         LMS: Barbara Bollinger

Grade: 3

Degree of Collaboration: None

Objective: Students will become aware of usefulness of an encyclopedia for finding basic

information and will learn how to locate articles in an encyclopedia.

Time allotted: 2-3 class periods

Show-Me Standards: 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, 1:7, 1:8, 1:10, 2:1, 2:2, 2:3, 3:3, 3:5, 3:7, 4:1, 4:4,

4:5, CA:1, CA:3, CA:4, CA:5, CA:6, S:3, S:4, SS:7

Supplies: standard encyclopedia set/possibly animal encyclopedia (LMS uses World

Book.), answer sheets with the drawing box covered with a paper flap.), list of possible

animals for students who have trouble thinking of one, pencils, erasers

Anticipatory Set: What kind of animal would you be if you could change into one? How

much do you know about that animal? We’re going to play a guessing game in which

you get to pick an animal to be and then give the class clues so they can guess who you

are. The idea is to give them enough good clues so they will be able to guess who you

are by the time you finish all your clues without actually saying your kind of animal or

giving it away with the first clue.

Teaching: 1) Read non-fiction descriptive animal book and model completing form from

information in book. 2) Explain how articles are arranged in encyclopedia and give an

example. 3) Have student decide on their animal (not domestic dog or cat) and whisper it

to you to avoid duplication. 4) Students get the volume they need, find article and fill out

worksheet. 5) Students draw picture and label it at top of box in small print. 6) Review




Library Lesson Plans                     Spring 2004                                        28
completed papers, select a few with good clues, have student read and class guess. 7)

Discuss what worked in clues and what didn’t? How could clues be improved? 8) Allow

class to revise their 1st animal clues or select a second one.

Closure: Everyone gets chance to read revised or 2nd set of clues for guessing.

Evaluation: How well were students able to describe animal in clues without naming it?

Could students guess the animal by the end of the clues?

LMS gives endangered species bookmarks to first set of clue-givers and guessers. She

says this is a VERY popular activity.




Library Lesson Plans                     Spring 2004                                    29
Student Name: Tammy Martin

Library Media Specialist Name: Sandy Ingram

Title of Lesson: Freshman Orientation—LMC

Grade Level: 9, English I and IA

Overview: Students will acquire a broad, solid foundation of knowledge and proficiency
in the use of the Media Center, LMC resources, and the computer lab.

Degree of Collaboration: Advanced—This would be a level 6 on Loertscher’s
taxonomy.

Description of Collaborative Effort: The classroom teacher and library media
specialist will work together to involve classroom, informational, and technology
objectives.
   Teacher responsibilities include:
    collaboration between teacher and media specialist for the outline of resources
        and skills covered in the orientation session
    resources are usually based on the class activity/project that teacher prepares
   Library media specialist responsibilities include:
    introduction to media center, Internet use, and resources
    review of LMC Catalog; introduction to public library catalog and online
        databases
    overview of Microsoft Office software and applications
    evaluation of databases and web site information
    review of copyright; crediting for use of information and graphics
    review the use of the school web site as a research tool
   Co-instruction of teacher and LMS will include:
    collaboratively planning resources for alignment with classroom assignment
    assist students in use of the Microsoft Office project

Objectives:
   efficiently and effectively finding resources in the Media Center
   efficiently and effectively using print resources
   efficiently and effectively using online databases, including the LMC catalog and
      the online public and university catalogs
   developing keyword searches including Boolean search terms (and, not, or)
   efficiently using Microsoft Office software and the computer lab

Time Allotted: 3.5 class sessions

Show-Me State Standards: CA 5; SS 7; 1.1; 1.2; 1.4; 1.6; 1.7; 1.8; 2.3; 2.7




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                                      30
Supplies Needed:
LMC Spectrum Catalog
Discovering Collection
EBSCOHost
SIRS
NewsBank
Virtual Vertical File
Microsoft Office
Online Databases
Internet Explorer
LMC Handouts
Class Assignment

Anticipatory Set: ―Your teachers, not just your English teacher, will be bringing you to
the LMC throughout the school year to work on various assignments. It is important that
you know about the resources available to you and that you know how to use them.‖

Teaching/Presentation: The librarian has handouts prepared for students. The handouts
include an outline for the three-day presentation, a copy of the LMC handbook, and an
Internet usage contract. The outline/discussion covers these areas: 1) locating material in
the Media Center, 2) resources for information, 3) online resources, 4) the computer lab
handbook and computer lab guidelines, and 5) Microsoft Office workshop. She has a
projector and screen prepared so that students can watch as she demonstrates use of the
automated catalog and various online resources. She also has a book cart with the
reference materials most commonly used for class assignments. The first day and a half
are spent in the library media center. The remaining two days are spent in the computer
lab.

Modeling/Check for Understanding: The library directs the presentation and
discussion. She asks questions to check prior knowledge. She asks for search topics as
she is using the various sources. After each portion of the presentation, she asks
questions to check understanding.

Guided Practice: The teacher-prepared assignment varies with the English teacher, but it
allows students to incorporate information from reference materials into a Microsoft
Office project.

Closure: Each day ends with an overview of what was learned and what will be
discussed the following day. This often involves a 5-minute question and answer session.

Evaluation: Student performance will be assessed based on an instructor-designed
rubric for the class activity/project. Follow-up activities after the orientation session vary
by instructor.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                        31
Student Name: Tammy Martin

Library Media Specialist: Sandy Ingram

Title of Lesson: PowerPoint Presentations

Grade Level: 9-12

Overview: The PowerPoint instruction could be used in any subject area. However, this
specific example applies to sophomores in English II. Students develop a business
marketing plan for a selected company or product. Microsoft PowerPoint is used to
create and design an oral presentation with graphic components.

Degree of Collaboration: Advanced—Level 6 on Loertscher’s taxonomy

Description of Collaborative Effort: The classroom teacher and library media
specialist will work together to involve classroom, informational, and technology
objectives.

Teacher responsibilities include:
    review the specific components in the presentation
    review the use of key word searches
    present student examples of PowerPoint presentations
    review citing web sites using MLA guidelines
Library media specialist responsibilities include:
    introduce and reinforce basic and advanced features of PowerPoint
    review the insertion of graphics into PowerPoint
    present sample slideshow presentation—show development steps
    provide computer lab access for presentation development and practice in giving
       presentation
Teacher and LMS co-instruction will include:
    assist students in using the basic and custom features of PowerPoint
    assist students in the design and content of their presentation

Objectives: Students will be able to demonstrate effective use of the basic and advanced
features of PowerPoint to prepare a visual presentation with transition, animation, and
graphic features.

Time Allotted: Based on class activity/project; multiple days

Show-Me Standards: CA 1, 4, 6; 1.5; 2.1; 4.5

Supplies Needed:
    Internet access
    PowerPoint
    computer lab


Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                                     32
      PowerPoint handout
      class assignment

Anticipatory Set: ―Ms. Henley has described the business marketing plan assignment
that she wants you to produce. She has also shown you sample student assignments.
Before you begin, I am going to give you an overview of the PowerPoint software. For
some of you this will be review; for others it will be new. Hopefully I can introduce all
of you to some custom features that you may not have used before.‖

Teaching/Presentation and Modeling: The librarian provides students a step-by-step
tutorial for creating PowerPoint slides. Using the projector and screen, she creates a three
slide presentation following the steps on the handout. She then shows them a finished
presentation focusing on the custom feature options that are possible.

Checking for Understanding/Guided Practice: Students begin the teacher-prepared
project. Both the librarian and teacher supervise students and provide assistance when
needed.

Closure: Students present the final products to the entire class.

Evaluation: Evaluation of the presentation product varies by instructor. Each instructor
uses a scoring rubric based on
    creativity
    inclusion of graphics
    documentation
    transition
    use of special features
    coverage of topic area
    design




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                          33
Student Name: Tammy Martin

Library Media Specialist: Sandy Ingram

Title of Lesson: Author/Literary Analysis

Grade Level: 10, American Novel

Overview: Students will use print and electronic resources to retrieve and analyze
biographical and critical information on a selected author and his/her works. Students
will write a short research paper including in-text documentation and bibliographic
citation.

Degree of Collaborative Effort: Advanced—Level 6 on Loertscher’s taxonomy

Description of Collaborative Effort: The classroom teacher and library media
specialist will work together to involve classroom, informational, and technology
objectives.

Teacher responsibilities include:
    provide instruction in the use of in-text citation and bibliographies for research
       papers
    provide instruction in the use of MLA style guidelines
    review the research elements that must be included in the formal paper
    review the use of critical techniques used by authors, i.e., stylistic devices, genre
       characteristics
Library media specialist responsibilities include:
    online database orientation for the Discovering Collection database for
       biographical and critical analysis
    review Masterplots as a biographical and critical tool for literary analysis
    review how to recognize and use primary and secondary sources for this type of
       project
Teacher and LMS co-instruction includes:
    assist students in the critical analysis of author works
    assist students in the use of MLA and in-text citation

Objectives: Students will research biographical and critical analysis sources for authors
and their works. Based on research information they will organize and write a short
research paper including in-text documentation and bibliographic citation.

Time Allotted: four 50-minute class sessions

Show-Me State Standards: CA 1, 4; 1.2; 1.4; 2.1




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       34
Supplies Needed:
    Spectrum (LMC Catalog)
    Masterplots
    Discovering Collection
    Write for College
    literary handbooks
    dictionaries of allusion and technique
    teacher-prepared assignment guidelines

Anticipatory Set: ―Ms. Henley has described the project you are going to be completing.
Before you get started, I am going to review the resources you will be using.‖

Teaching/Presentation: The librarian discusses the Discovering Collection and
Masterplots. Students use the Discovering Collection in freshman English. Only a brief
review is needed for most students. The librarian spends more time describing the
content of and how to use Masterplots and other literary reference materials.

Modeling: The classroom teacher has already shown examples of literary analyses.

Checking for Understanding: Students are given an opportunity to ask questions.

Guided Practice: Students begin the project while the LMS and teacher supervise,
providing assistance as needed.

Closure: The librarian and teacher circulate through the students during the end of each
class period to assess student progress.

Evaluation: A brief research paper will be valuated using a teacher prepared rubric for
summary techniques, understanding of critical information, in-text documentation of
sources, bibliographic citation, writing style, grammar, and content.




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                                      35
Student Name: Lauren Peter                           LMS: Mary Dobson

Title of Lesson: ―Where the Wild Things Are‖ Story Map

Grade Levels: Kindergarten-2nd

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning to Intermediate

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson can take place either in the LMC or the
classroom. It also may begin in one environment and be completed in the other. The
LMS may help the teacher map out how she or he is going to define and give examples of
story elements to the students.

Objectives: The students will identify and give examples of the story elements. The
students will have an understanding of the sequence of events in ―Where the Wild Things
Are.‖

The students will demonstrate written language skills when writing sentences describing
the story.

Time Allotted: 30 minutes

Show-Me Standards: 1.1, 1.5, 2.1, 3.1, 3.6 and CA1, CA2, CA4, CA6
Supplies Needed:
 ―Where the Wild Things Are‖ by Maurice Sendak (at least one copy, but several
   copies would be more accommodating
 Poster board labeled with Setting, Characters, Events 1-6 and Conclusion (one
   heading per poster board)
 Crayons or markers
 Previous days ―Story Quilts‖ (2 good examples)

Anticipatory Set: Discussion of yesterday’s reading of ―Where the Wild Things Are‖ and
how the story quilts were made based on the events of book in the correct sequence.
Short description of today’s lesson, which is to learn about the characters, setting, story
events and conclusion.

Teaching/Presentation: Display the poster boards and give examples of each. Discuss
how an author decides upon the ideas for the setting and characters.

Modeling: Place one example of each item on the poster board.

Checking for Understanding: Teacher asks students to give her examples from the story
for each element of the story. The teacher writes down all their responses and puts the
students’ name next to their answer. Under the Events 1-6, the teacher displays the
previous days Story Quilt to illustrate the events in the story.



Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                      36
Guided Practice: Students can take turns either writings sentences, just words or
illustrations under their response on the poster board.

Closure: Review the story by going through each poster board and having the students
read their own responses to the class.

Evaluation: Students may choose their favorite character or setting in the story and
illustrate a detailed picture and then write two sentences underneath their picture
describing either their character or their setting that they chose.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                     37
Student Name: Lauren Peter                   LMS: Mary Dobson

Title of Lesson: ―Where the Wild Things Are‖ Story Pyramid

Grade Levels: Kindergarten-2nd

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning to Intermediate

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson can take place either in the LMC or the
classroom. It also may begin in one environment and be completed in the other. The
LMS may help the teacher develop an example story pyramid for a different children’s
book.

Objectives: The students will be able to use descriptive words to explain the setting,
characters, events and conclusion of ―Where the Wild Things Are.‖ The students will be
able to successfully complete a story pyramid. The students will be able to write or
dictate complete sentences using the story pyramid prompts.

Time Allotted: 45 minutes

Show-Me Standards: 1.5, 2.1, 2.3 and CA1, CA4, CA6

Supplies Needed:
    Teacher made story pyramid example
    Story Pyramid worksheet for each student
    Pencil

Anticipatory Set: Discuss the previous 2 days lessons based on ―Where the Wild Things
Are‖ and how they will relate to today’s activity.

Teaching/Presentation: Draw the lines for the story pyramid on the board and then
describe what a story pyramid is.

Modeling: Fill out the story pyramid based on another children’s book that all the
students would be familiar with.

Checking for Understanding: Prompt students with ―2 words describing the main
character from your favorite movie‖ or ―five words describing the first event in your
favorite TV show.‖

Guided Practice: Have the students complete their own story pyramid with the teacher
reading the prompts. Example below

Closure: Have students choose 2 lines and then either write or dictate to you complete
sentences using the words from that line.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                       38
Evaluation: Share their sentences and story pyramid with their classmates.

Student Example for ―Where the Wild Things Are‖
1.__________
2.__________ __________
3.__________ __________ __________
4.__________ __________ __________ __________
5.__________ __________ __________ __________                  __________
6.__________ __________ __________ __________                  __________    ________
7.__________ __________ __________ __________                  __________    ________
         __________
8.__________ __________ __________ __________                  __________    ________
         __________ __________

1.   The name of the main character
2.   Two words describing the main character
3.   Three words describing the setting
4.   Four words stating the story problem
5.   Five words describing the first event in the story
6.   Six words describing a second event
7.   Seven words describing a third event
8.   Eight words describing the conclusion to the story

1._Max______
2._Wolf_____ __Trouble_
3.___Bedroom ___Forest__ __Ocean__
4.__Mischief_ __Monsters_ ___Roared_ _Lonely___
5._Mischief__ __Wolf____ __Suite____ __Forest___ _Boat_____
6.__Wild ___ __Things__   __Year____ __Roars___ __Terrible__ _Teeth__
7.__King___ __Rumpus__ __Crown__ ___Danced_ _Love_____ _Bed____
        _Food____
8._Don’t___ __Go______ _Terrible___ __Eyes___    __Boat____ _Food____
        __Room_ _Hot_______




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                 39
Student Name: Lauren Peter                   LMS: Mary Dobson

Title of Lesson: ―Where the Wild Things Are‖ Newspaper

Grade Levels: Kindergarten-2nd

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning to Intermediate

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson can take place either in the LMC or the
classroom. It also may begin in one environment and be completed in the other. The
LMS may teach a lesson about the main parts of a newspaper and information that is
included in a newspaper article.

Objectives: The students will be able to work together as a class to formulate a
newspaper around the story ―Where the Wild Things Are.‖

Time Allotted: 1 hour for students and 1-2 more hours compiling the articles into a paper
format on the computer

Show-Me Standards: 1.1, 1.21.8, 2.1, 2.3 and CA1, CA4, CA5, CA6

Supplies Needed:
    Previous 3 lessons’ work displayed where students can access it easily
    Microsoft Publisher program for computer
    Notebook paper for students
    Pencil

Anticipatory Set: Show various different newspapers (district, local, national) to show
students how much newspapers differ. Explain the different types of sections (weather,
sports, classified, etc). Assign reports and characters and a specific section of the
newspaper. There can be several different Maxes.

Teaching/Presentation: Show students how to conduct an interview by watching tapes of
the news or 48 Hours and 20/20 type of shows.

Modeling: Model for students how to conduct an interview about ―Where the Wild
Things Are‖ by interviewing one the students who will be Max.

Checking for Understanding: Ask the students for sample questions or questions that
they want to ask during their interview.

Guided Practice: The students break up into pairs, with one reporter and one character.
The students write their questions and answers on the notebook paper (it will later be
typed). After awhile the pair may switch roles.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                        40
Closure: The students will gather back into a group and discuss which articles will be in
each section. The students will help the teacher make a rough draft by laying the papers
out in a template and then they can decide on what type of font, graphics, clip art, etc can
go into the paper. The teacher will take notes and then type the articles into Publisher.
After a few days the paper will be ready for distribution.

Evaluation: Have the students attend a children’s theatre production of ―Where the Wild
Things Are‖




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       41
Student Name:          Kristina Sestrich

Library Media Specialist Name: Debbie Chapman

Title of Lesson: Connections

Grade Level(s): 4-6

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson would be taught to foster reading
comprehension, as well as connecting the text to one’s self, the world, or to another text.

Objectives:
The student will be able to make connections between a book and his or her life, the
world, or another book.

Time Allotted: 30 minutes
.
Show-Me State Standards:
This lesson will touch on the following standards:1.5, 1.6.

Supplies Needed:
The book, Stellaluna, by Janel Cannon (or any other picture book that one may prefer),
worksheet: Making Connections, overhead and overhead transparency of Making
Connections

Anticipatory Set:
Discuss how books can relate to real life. Ask students for examples of books they have
read and how they might connect to the world, their selves, or another book.

Teaching / Presentation:
The teacher will explain the three different types of connections: TEXT TO WORLD,
TEXT TO SELF, AND TEXT TO TEXT and give examples of each using a story that
everyone might know (i.e.: Cinderella). The librarian would then read Stellaluna.

Modeling:
Students will be given the Making Connections worksheet. On an overhead the teacher
will demonstrate how to fill the sheet out with an example from the book. Students will
then fill out their own worksheet, making a TEXT TO WORLD, TEXT TO SELF, AND
TEXT TO TEXT connection.

Checking for Understanding:
Once worksheets are filled out, the teacher and/or librarian will ask students to share their
connections with the class. A discussion may ensue, as other kids may have similar
connections.



Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       42
Closure
Students will be given a chance to ―show what they know‖ by defining each of the
connections for the teacher and/or librarian. The teacher and/or librarian may elaborate
on each connection, again, giving examples from well-known stories. Students could also
bring up stories and share connections.

Evaluation
The students will turn their papers into their teacher for evaluation and review.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                  43
Student Name:          Kristina Sestrich

Library Media Specialist Name: Debbie Chapman

Title of Lesson: Making Visualizations

Grade Level(s): 4-6

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson can be taught for a variety of purposes:
reading comprehension, reading and language appreciation, poetry, and an author’s use of
language to create images in a reader’s mind.

Objectives:
The student will use their five senses to create their own image or memory of an Oreo
cookie.

Time Allotted: 50 minutes for the actual Oreo cookie brainstorm activity. The writing
could take place in the Language Arts classroom and then be shared during the next
library time.
.
Show-Me State Standards:
This lesson will touch on the following standards:1.5 and CA 2.

Supplies Needed:
Overhead, overhead transparency of the Five Senses Chart, Five senses Chart worksheet,
Oreo cookies, paper, and pencil.

Anticipatory Set:
Read and discuss the poem, ―I Love the Look of Words,‖ by Maya Angelou. Ask the
questions: What kind of images do you see in your head? How do the words appeal to
your five senses.

Teaching / Presentation:
Pass out the Five Senses Chart worksheet and one Oreo cookie to each student. Explain
to students that they will be using their five senses to describe the Oreo. It probably goes
without saying, but I always say it anyway: DO NOT TOUCH THE OREO UNTIL I
SAY TO TOUCH THE OREO! Next, ask students which of the five senses that they
think is the most important and which that they think they could live without. At this
point, discuss each of the five senses with students and explore why each of the senses is
important and how one’s senses can enhance his or her reading experience.


Modeling:




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       44
Using the Five Senses Chart on the overhead as a guide for students, ask students to pick
up the Oreo cookie and touch it...what does it feel like? How does it feel? Ask students to
fill out the touch part of their chart. Give one example on the overhead. Continue through
each sense until you have done all five. I save taste for last.

Checking for Understanding:
Once charts are filled out, ask students to share what they have written under the five
categories. Once sharing is done, students will write a descriptive paragraph about their
Oreo. It can be a memory, an image, or about something that the Oreo reminds them of
(i.e.: an Oreo reminds me of dirty snow). The students must use every sense in their
paragraph and must try to be as descriptive as possible. Students will share their
paragraphs with a partner or with the class. If the teacher or librarian has written a
paragraph, it would be good to share as well.

Closure
Go back to Maya Angelou’s poem. Read it again. Discuss further images and appeals to
the five senses. Review the Oreo cookie activity and discuss how the activity created
images and used the five senses. What kinds of things did the students visualize? Why is
visualization important while reading?

Evaluation
The students will turn their papers into their teacher for evaluation and review.




Student Name:          Kristina Sestrich




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                         45
Library Media Specialist Name: Debbie Chapman

Title of Lesson: Forms of      Writing

Grade Level(s): 6

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: This lesson can be done at the introduction of a
writing segment. It backs up the teaching of the Six-Traits of Writing. The Language
teacher would introduce the Six-Traits and touch on different writing forms...narrative,
descriptive, poetry, expository, etc. The librarian would then pull and discuss books from
the library that exemplify each of these forms.

Objectives:
The student will be able to recognize different writing forms and their purpose.

Time Allotted: 50 minutes
.
Show-Me State Standards:
This lesson will touch on the following standards:1.5, and CA 2 and CA 3.

Supplies Needed:
Books from the library that exemplify the different writing forms, overhead, card
catalogue, and paper and pen/pencil.

Anticipatory Set:
The librarian will read a segment from the books she has chosen. Ideally, one topic (i.e.:
skateboarding) would be chosen. The librarian would then chose books from his or her
collection about this topic and then read from those books. The point illustrated here is
that students would then be able to see that one topic can be written about in various
ways.

Teaching / Presentation:
Students will take notes over different forms of writing. Teacher will give notes from the
overhead and the librarian would, again, read examples from books that he or she has
chosen. Once notes have been given the teacher and librarian might engage students in a
short discussion of various topics and ways to write those topics.

Modeling:
Once notes have been given, the teacher would then ask students to do a web brainstorm
on a topic that they would like to write about. At the same time, the teacher would do his
or her own web brainstorm. Once topics are decided upon, then the students will go
through the library to find examples of their topic written in different ways. Another
variation of this is to have students chose three different writing forms and go on a ―hunt‖




Library Lesson Plans                     Spring 2004                                     46
through the library and card catalogue to find different sources to aid them in their
writing of this topic.

Checking for Understanding:
The teacher and librarian will ―mill about‖ the library, being available for questions, but
also offering help and suggestions. This will allow both to check for understanding and
comprehension. The teacher may also wind the activity down and ask students to
volunteer topics and the information that they found. This would allow for group
discussion and understanding.

Closure
The librarian would review the different forms of writing with the students and highlight
different areas of the library and the types of resources that students can use when
looking for information on a topic.

Evaluation
The students will turn their papers into their teacher for evaluation and review.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       47
Student Name: Angie Moehlman
Library Media Specialist: Gayle McLaughlin

Title of Lesson: Searching the World Wide Web
Grade Level: 6th, 7th or 8th Grade

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Students will work individually on assignment.

Objectives: To be able to research and evaluate information via the Internet.
Time Allotted: 45 minutes (one class session)

Show-Me State Standards:
1.2 Conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas.
1.4 Use technological tools and other resources to locate, select, and organize information

Supplies Needed: Assignment sheet, writing utensil, individual computers with Internet
access

Anticipatory Set: Discuss how may students use the Internet. What do they use it for? Let
students respond with answers for the different uses of Internet. Discuss facets of
information on the Web. Timeliness, accuracy, reliability

Teaching/Presentation: Discuss how information on the Internet is not always accurate
information. Explain that information can be put on the web by anyone, and explain that
it is important to determine whether the site they are at is credible or not.


Modeling: Have students search a topic and have them search using a web search engine
and a web directory. Also have them search topic using a Boolean search, demonstrating
the effectiveness of using different keywords and also how the Boolean search may
misdirect their search depending on use of keywords.

Checking for Understanding: Have students find several different websites on a certain
topic, and have them evaluate the websites by ranking them on the reliability, accuracy
and quality of information.

Guided Practice: Allow search of Internet for other topics, asking students to share with

class when they find a website they deem to be interesting or helpful.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                        48
Student Name: Angie Moehlman
Library Media Specialist: Gayle McLaughlin

Title of Lesson: Find Book in Library
Grade Level: 6th grade

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Students will work individually on assignment, using
their new Library as they enter Middle School

Objectives: To be able to find a particular book in the library, acquainting themselves
with new library, layout, and staff
Time Allotted: 45 minutes (one class session)

Show-Me State Standards:
1.2 Conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas.
1.4 Use technological tools and other resources to locate, select, and organize information

Supplies Needed: Assignment sheet, writing utensil, library catalog access

Anticipatory Set: Introduce students to library. Give them the ―tour.‖ Explain how your
library works, demonstrating how to use the card catalog to find a particular book.

Teaching/Presentation: Explain how there will be various instances that students will
need to use the library to gather information for research. Also explain how they will
need to provide bibliographic reference for the projects.


Modeling: Demonstrate how to use the computer to pull up the call number of a book.
Walk them through the process of locating a book using the card catalog. Also walk them
through the process of checking out the book.

Checking for Understanding: Have students set out and find particular books. Assignment
sheet involves finding particular book and filling out information on the worksheet,
including call number of book, title, author, place of publication, publisher, date, also
other items such as, e.g. What does page 33, third paragraph, 2nd sentence say?

Guided Practice: Have students complete worksheet, and also check out a book.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                       49
Student Name: Angie Moehlman
Library Media Specialist: Gayle McLaughlin

Title of Lesson: Reference Research
Grade Level: 10th

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Students gain experience and knowledge on using
various reference material available at the library

Objectives: For students to recognize different reference material and also how to use
various reference material.

Time Allotted: 45 minutes (one class session)

Show-Me State Standards:
1.1 Develop questions and ideas to initiate and refine research
1.2 Conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas.
1.4 Use technological tools and other resources to locate, select, and organize information

Supplies Needed: Assignment sheet, writing utensil, library reference material

Anticipatory Set: Ask students what they do and don’t like about doing research project.
Expound upon the fact that many of them don’t know how to use reference material
available. Explain the different methods that are available, . Ask students what types of
reference material are.

Teaching/Presentation: Explain the different types of reference material available. Also
explain why students would want to use reference material for research, and for what
information it is particular useful to use a reference source.

Modeling: Using assignment sheet, have students check various facts and statistics.
Assignment has them find information using a variety of reference material, including
almanac, dictionary, encyclopedias, bibliographies, and atlases.

Checking for Understanding: By finding information in various reference books, and
completing assignment sheet, students will show proficiency for finding information
using reference material.

Guided Practice: Have students find an interesting fact or information in a reference
book, and share it verbally with the class during discussion.




Library Lesson Plans                   Spring 2004                                         50
Title: Inventions Grade: 5-7 Time Needed: Two 50 minute class periods

Degree of collaboration: Beginning

Show-Me Standards: 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 1.8, 2.1, 2.7

Objectives: Students will understand the difference between general and specialized

encyclopedias. Students will locate information using encyclopedias. Students will create

a bibliography.

Materials Needed: Set of general encyclopedias, and a specialized science and

technology encyclopedia, such as How It works: the Illustrated Encyclopedia of Science

and Technology, a list of inventions, and poster board and art supplies for all students.

Anticipatory Set: Discuss various inventions. Have students choose an invention to

research.

Instruction: Discuss the differences between general and specialized encyclopedias.

Determine strengths and weaknesses of each.

Modeling: Model bibliographic citation for the students. Show students where

bibliographic information is found.

Guided Practice: Students will use the encyclopedias to gather information about their

invention. They will use this information to write a description of how the invention

works. Appropriate bibliographic citations will be created. Students will then create a

poster about their inventions.

Assessment: The LMS will evaluate the student’s ability to locate and use information

through observation and the final product.

Closure: Students will present their posters to the class. The posters can then be put up

for display.




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                         51
Title: Classification Game Grade: 5-7 Time Needed: One 50 minute class period

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Show-Me Standards: 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, 4.1, 4.6

Objectives: Students will demonstrate an understanding of library classification.

Materials Needed: Several different types of books, with their Dewey Decimal numbers

covered.

Anticipatory Set: Ask students how books are shelved in a library. Is there a pattern in

the location? How do they find a book they need?

Instruction: Discuss with students the basic principles of the DDC. Explain that

nonfiction books are categorized by subject. Discuss other types of materials, such as

biographies and fiction.

Modeling: With the class, practice determining where a book would be cataloged.

Guided Practice: Divide the students into teams. Give each team 10-15 books with their

classification numbers covered. Have each team assign general classification numbers to

each book. They may walk around the library to help determine where the book belongs.

Assess: Give one point for each book a team put in the right category. The team with the

most points is declared the winner.

Closure: Discuss the importance of classification. What would libraries be like if they

didn’t use a system like DDC?




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                                         52
Elizabeth Dean

Title of Lesson: Who was Martin Luther King, Jr.

Grade Level: 3-6

Degree of Collaboration: intermediate

Description of Collaborative Effort: Third grade teacher asked me to teach her class a

lesson on Martin Luther King, Jr. material presented was discussed. 3rd, 5th, and 6th

thought this would be a good idea for their classes also.

Objectives: Students will learn who this man was, his ideals, and how he died.

Time allotted: 40 min.

Show-Me Standards: 1.1, 1.2

Supplies needed: computer, pencil and paper

Anticipatory Set:

Ask students if they know who Martin Luther King, Jr. was? Do they know his famous

speech?

Presentation:

Discuss the questions the class wants to find answers for? (we usually have 6). Each

student lists them on their paper. Students go to the computers and access

HistoryChannel.com to find the answers to their questions.

Modeling:

I help find the first answer by reading some of the material to the students. I walk around

making sure they are on the correct site, and answer any questions they might have.

Checking for Understanding:

When the research is finished we will discuss what they found, as well as what is




Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                      53
prejudice, and how things have/have not improved in today’s world.

Evaluation: Papers will be collected, corrected and returned.




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004                    54
Elizabeth Dean

Title of Lesson: Using the Encyclopedia

Grade Level: 3

Degree of Collaboration: Beginning

Description of Collaborative Effort: Library curriculum requires encyclopedia use be
taught in the 3rd grade.

Objective: Students will know that all information is alphabetized in the encyclopedia
and be able to choose the correct volume and find the subject.

Time Allotted: 45 mix

Show-Me Standards: 1.1, 1.2

Supplies needed: Encyclopedias for each student, paper, and pencils

Anticipatory Set:
Explain what an encyclopedia and how they are alphabetically organized to the students.
Explain to the students that encyclopedias are a good source of information and at times
it is faster to find things in them then on the internet.

Presentation:
Hand out the papers the subject written on it for them to research.

Modeling:
Demonstrate with an encyclopedia how to look up a subject by looking one up first.

Checking for Understanding:
Circulate through the students to answer questions, solve problems, and observe the work
they are doing.

Closure:
Each student will briefly tell the class about their subject.

Evaluation:
Collect, correct and hand back the papers.




Library Lesson Plans                     Spring 2004                                     55
Elizabeth Dean

Title of Lesson: Famous Missourians

Grade Level: 4th

Degree of Collaboration: Advanced

Description of Collaboration Effort: The 4th grade teacher ad the librarian will meet
prior to the project to discus who is responsible for each lesson.

Objectives:
Students will research facts about a famous Missourian
Students will organize and present the information
Students will site references in a bibliography

Time Allotted: 6 or more sessions in the library and/or classroom

Show-Me Standards:
CA-4-3-2
SS-4-2-2

Supplies needed:
Reference books, nonfiction books, encyclopedias, and the internet.

Anticipatory Set
Ask the students to name famous Missourians. Give them additional Missourians they
did not think of. Explain they will be researching a famous Missourian.

Presentation:
The classroom teacher will give each student a famous Missourian to research.

Modeling:
In the library we will discuss the difference reference materials and the librarian will
demonstrate how to use each one.

Checking for Understanding
Circulate among the students to answer questions, give helpful hints, check over work,
help with citations, etc,

Guided Practice
The students will have ample time to complete this in the classroom and the library under
the supervision and guidance of the teacher and librarian. When the students have
finished their research the will write a paper about their Missourian which will be
exhibited in a folder that looks like their person. These folders are then hung outside the
4th grade room for all to see.



Library Lesson Plans                    Spring 2004                                        56
Evaluation
The papers are collected, corrected, and given back.




Library Lesson Plans                  Spring 2004      57

								
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