lehrer by 0REq3q

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									                                             Register Report



                                         First Generation
                            _________________________________________

1. Ferdinand LEHRER.

Ferdinand married Barbara CUSTER.

They had one child:
       2         i.    Mathias (1714-1787)




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                                                Second Generation
                                _________________________________________
                             Family of Ferdinand LEHRER (1) & Barbara CUSTER


2. Mathias LEHRER. Born in 1714 in Germany. Mathias died in Rockingham, Virginia in 1787; he was 73.

Excerpts from Background Of The Lair Family 1738 - 1958, by Maude Ward Lafferty and Helen Lafferty Nisbet
Lexington, Kentucky, 1958

Introduction. Maude Ward Lafferty's and Helen Lafferty Nesbit's essay on the Lair family provides a fascinating
history of the origins of Bourbon County, Kentucky. Because of its historical value, I have included the complete
history. Researchers of the Lair family will find this an invaluable resource in tracing their family roots. Hopefully,
this history will also prove interesting to family researchers whose ancestors are closely linked to the Lairs.--Bob
Francis

THE BACKGROUND
The story of the Lairs is the story of America. It is the story of a peace-loving people living centuries ago on the
banks of the Rhine, tending their vineyards and their flocks until a great religious war shattered that peace. It is the
story of their crossing the Atlantic in a sailing vessel; of their landing in Pennsylvania and their home life there; of
their moving on into the fertile valley of Virginia and then moving on again over Indian infested trails to the Blue
Grass region of Kentucky. From the landing of the first Matthias Lair two hundred and twenty years ago to the
present day, this family of ours has spread to the forty-eight states, crossing plains and mountains in covered wagons
to Oregon, California, Colorado and Texas, and has played a great part in the building of this country.


The story begins with Matthias Lehrer, or Lair, a sturdy young German born in the Rhineland in 1714, who sailed on
"The Nancy," William Wallace Master, landing in Philadelphia in 1738.

On the same ship came Catharina Margaretha Moyer, said to be an heiress, and it was whispered that her father, Will
Moyer, was bringing her to this country to avert an undesirable marriage The poor father died on shipboard and was
buried at sea, leaving Catharina to face life alone in a strange land.

Immediately after the ship landed, Matthias took the Oath of Allegiance to King George II and fidelity to the Penns,
as the English Sovereign required of all male Germans and other foreigners within forty-eight hours of arrival. He
also took the Oath of Abjuration which was required in 1729, renouncing the temporal power of the Pope of Rome
and the claims of the Pretender and he paid twelve pence and forty shillings for the privilege of entering
Pennsylvania. The British authorities required all ship masters to fiat male passengers, giving their birth place and
birth date. According to their records Matthias wee twenty-four years old, was born in the Rhineland and landed in
1738. We, his descendants, are grateful for this information as it enables us to follow his footsteps through the
intervening years.

It is not surprising that the passengers of "The Nancy" tarried in Philadelphia for a time as it was a pleasant city and
was filled to overflowing with Germans, so the late arrivals found friends while studying the country and finding
their way about.

Nor is it surprising that our lonely young Germans, Matthias and Catharina, should fall in love and marry in 1744 in
their own church, nor that the Register of St. Michaels and Zion Church should record the baptism of the four
children born to them during their stay in Philadelphia.

Recorded in German, it is as follows:
September 15, 1745. Johan Juwua Lehrer, son of Matthias and Catharina Margaretha. Born September 12, 1745.



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Sponsors, Josua Duer and wife Elizabeth, Johannea Ahlgeyer and wife Margretha Catharina.
December 18, 1747. Catharina Margretha Lehrer, daughter of Matthias and Catharina (Reformed). Born November
5, 1747. Sponsors, Jurg Heppele and wife Margretha.
February 18, 1750. Andreas Lehrer, son of Matthias Lehrer, and wife Catharina Margretha. Sponsors, Andreas
Beller and wife, Catharina.
April 6, 1752. Matthias Lehrer, son of Matthias and wife, Catharina, born February 15, 1752. Sponsors, Andreas
Beller and wife, Catharina.

As they had property in York County, Pennsylvania, it is good to know that Matthias was prospering. The tax list
shows that he was possessed of land, cattle and horses in 1779.

As we become interested in them we involuntarily ask: "Who were they? Where did they come from?"

In order to answer these questions we should read a few German histories, such as: Menzel's "History of Germany,"
"The Thirty Years War" by Schiller, "The Story of the Palatines" by Cobb, "The Book of the Rhine," by S. Baring
Gould and Wayland's "History of Rockingham County, Virginia," and should also search court records.

On the base of a famous statue at Bonn is the inscription: "The Rhine is the River, not the Frontier of Germany." It
might have been said with equal truth that it is the river of Europe, for no other European river has played so great a
part in human destiny. The struggle for its possession is the struggle for supremacy in Europe, which has lasted
nearly 2,000 years and is yet unsettled, notwithstanding the price paid in blood in many wars.

As early as 57 B.C., the mighty Caesar built a chain of forts, walls and palasades along its banks to make the Roman
Empire impregnable.

From its source in the Julian Alps to its mouth in the North Sea, it measures 750 miles. Its basin contains coal beds
and minerals. It waters a region of great fertility and it is not only important from a military and strategic standpoint,
but as a channel of commerce. It is the most direct pathway from Italy and the Orient to the British Isles and to
Scandinavia and the wines of the Rhineland, the fruits and oils of the Mediterranean, the ivory and spices, Baghdad
silks and India shawls that come by way of Cairo.

Its fertility makes the Rhine Valley the garden spot of Europe. The alluvial soil affords fine pasturage and their
cattle are held in high esteem. Among their exports are Edam and Limberger cheeses and Rhenish wine is acclaimed
the finest on the continent.

The vineyards carpet the steep banks of the river, terrace above terrace, for 350 feet. Some of these have belonged to
one family for centuries. A recent article in the New York Times chronicled the death of Germany's oldest grape
vine which had produced 75 gallons a year for over 400 years, the great cash crop of the valley is the Rhine wine.
It's the "Nectar of the Gods" to the dilettante: The most famous is the Moselle and the Bacharach is made at
Dinkelsbuhl where children wearing wreaths of grape leaves in their hair, playing guitars and mandolins, dance
through the streets to celebrate the Vine Festival.

The difference in flavor of Rhine wines is due to the quality of the soil and the dampness of the hillsides. The
choicest portion of this super-wine is selected from the most exquisite clusters. In early summer when the vine is in
flower the busy hands of farmer, wife and children pluck off the superfluous blossoms which are preserved and
dried, to be cast into the wine press in the autumn to give aroma to the wine. In order to keep the soil fertile, the
people carry the fertilizer up the steep river banks in baskets. Obviously the wine-growers love their vineyards, and
we wonder why Matthias and Catharina Lair left them willingly to live in a faraway land. Envious countries sought
to destroy these people and to usurp their fertile hillsides. To do so, they instigated The Thirty Years War.

The Thirty Years War was a religious war between Catholics and the Protestants. It originated in Bohemia, reached
into Moravia, Austria, Germany, France, as well as Denmark and Scandinavia. It devastated countries, destroyed
harvests, reduced villages to ashes and opened graves for thousands of combatants.



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Yet, out of this war, Europe came forth free and independent, a community of nations, and this alone reconciles the
philosopher to its horrors.

Religion, only, could have made it possible. For the State or the Prince, few nations would have drawn the sword,
but for religion the merchant, the artist, the peasant, flew to arms. They became hopeful of success when that good
man, Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, took up arms for the cause. He was the only prince in Europe from
whom the oppressed could look for protection. He was the hero of the age, the greatest general of his time. Before a
battle he knelt in prayer.

Finally at the Battle of Lützen Gustavus Adolphus spurred his charger too near to an exposed point and there
received the bullet that took his life.

His men rallied when they beheld his riderless steed and fought more viciously than ever, but the die was cast and
when they knew that their great leader was dead, they had no recourse but to sell their homes, salvage what they
could and set sail for America.

The Lairs, natives of the principality of Palatine, known to history as Palatines or Palatinates, deeply religious,
appreciating freedom in churches and in schools, fled their Rhineland following their participation in The Thirty
Years War and made their long and hazardous trek to a new home and a new life in America.

William Penn, an English aristocrat of great learning and vast wealth, had received from his sovereign in payment of
a debt, certain lands in the New World, called "Sylvania." His King, with a twinkle in his eye, added the prefix
"Penn" making it Pennsylvania. Penn was a Quaker who had the courage of his own convictions. Pennsylvania
needed settlers, and he believed the Palatines would make good citizens. In order to be sure, he made a missionary
tour of the Rhine which convinced him that he was right and the result of his labor was the great exodus of the
Palatines to Pennsylvania. It proved to be an ideal arrangement and between 1730 and 1750, more than thirty
thousand Palatines found homes in a free country where they could live in peace and happiness.

It was not long before a second migration followed to Pennsylvania which gave that state the name of Little
Germany. Great numbers settled in Philadelphia and Germantown, or Brocks Gap, bringing with them the same fine
attributes for which they were known in their native land. They changed their names. Dewitt became Dwight, Groen
became Green, Gouldschmidt became Goldsmith, etc., and by this means Americanized their names.

THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA
After the birth of their first children, our immigrant ancestors, Matthias and Catherina, decided to establish their
permanent home in the rich Shenandoah Valley. They purchased several extensive tracts of hundreds of acres, each
on Linville Creek, near Brocks Gap and Raders Meeting House in Rockingham County. Their neighbors were old
friends, the Chrismans, Bowmans, Hites, Kizers, Cassels, Millers and Custers, some of whom were related by
marriage. In this ideal community four more children were born to Matthias and Catharina; Elizabeth, Mary,
Margaret and John.

In the Shenandoah Valley they reproduced the homes they had enjoyed in the Rhine Valley, building them of stone
with tile roofs, a huge chimney in the middle sometimes eight feet in diameter which made fire in every room
possible and at minimum cost. Instead of grates, they used quaint stoves of tile, much like those still to be seen in
German cities.

Their barns were reproduced from the "Switzer barns" of the Rhineland, They were always built on a hillside with
foundation of stone to provide warm stalls for the live stock. The second floor was for hay or grain. On the up-hill
level there was always a huge revolving door, wide enough for a team of horses to drive in with a wagon, unload
and drive out in turnstile fashion. The barns were of log, put together with wooden pins as there were no iron nails to
be had.

Scarcely were the Lairs settled in their new home until they were swept into the current of the Revolutionary War.
Matthias and Catharina were too old for service, but according to the Militia vouchers of Rockingham County, 1788,


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the record shows slaves and horses given by them to help the cause, which designated them as patriots.

Living was difficult during the Revolutionary War but they managed to get along. Catharina's granddaughter stated
that she "made frequent trips on horseback to Philadelphia to obtain little luxuries necessary to her comfort," though
that city was 260 miles from her stone house in the valley of Virginia. She even worked at the loom, which was the
abomination of the pioneer housewives. In these days when we can buy our clothes and household linens from the
stores all ready for use, it is difficult for us to realize how those grand old women wove and spun and sewed without
machines. But Catharina met her emergencies face forward and played her part, according to the bits of family
tradition handed down to us. One of the first household articles set up was the cumbersome old loom. It sometimes
found its abiding place in one of the main rooms, but more often in a shed or an attic room. Sometimes there was a
"loom house" set apart for it. Weaving, spinning and carding, were duties assigned to the women of the household.
The mother usually took the weaving while her daughters did the spinning and spooling. During the spring months
the loom was busy with making rag carpets, while in the fall, it was used for making the requisite amount of
clothing and linen for the household. Jeans, usually gray, used for suits for men and boys, linsey in chestnut browns,
dull blues and scotch plaids, were the materials used for the wearing apparel for the women and girls. Towels and
counterpanes were made during the fall. The flax used was grown in a little patch near the house and was harvested
by the women. My mother, Helen Lair Ward, who grew up at "Boscobel" at Lair, Kentucky, told me that the flax
was so pretty when in flower that her mother (my little grandmother Kittie) would lift her up on the back fence and
say: "Helen, dear, look away over there across the Licking River at your grandmother's flax patch. Isn't it the
prettiest blue you ever saw? She says that is Rhine blue." When grandmother Kittie was a girl she asked for a flax
wheel and as she was left-handed, it had to be made especially to meet her needs. It is now used to hold magazines
and newspapers and is handy as well as a cherished keepsake.

Sometimes the loom would turn out "kivvers" or coverlets, that highest form of the weaver's art. Every mother
desired that each of her children should have one of these treasures of her skill as a wedding gift, and proud indeed
is the housewife who owns one today. The wool blankets were also made on the loom. They were all wool and
warm as toast. The one I inherited is light in weight and warmer than any present-day double blanket. These quaint
old relics and the old carpets not only taxed the ingenuity but the artistic taste of the weaver and many a mother was
famous for her "coloring" secrets. The coloring matter was largely vegetable and had to be boiled for hours before
the rags could be immersed and hung on the fence to dry. Someone has calculated that in weaving three yards of
close woolen cloth regarded as a day's work, the shuttle was thrown 3,000 times the tredle pressed down and the
batten swung the same number of times. Our ancestors loved their home in the Shenandoah Valley and I have heard
my mother and Cousin Dink Smith tell how their grandmothers used to sit on the banks of the Licking in the
moonlight and talk in undertones of the glories and beauties of the Shenandoah homes and often tears coursed down
the furrowed cheeks of Sallie Custer Lair as she sang a plaintive old song in which every verse ended in a wailing
refrain "in the Shenandoah Valley."

Some writers contend that the German element was not good for this country generally because it constituted 70%
of the entire population and living isolated upon their own farms marrying and intermarrying as they did adhering to
their own language publishing their own books writing their songs and conducting their religious services in
German, they remained a separate and distinct people. Others however maintain that German thrift and religious
zeal set a good example in every section where they located and that they gradually became so noted for their fine
farming and staunch morality, that they commanded the respect of all. This was as true of the Holland Dutch who
settled New York as of the German element in Pennsylvania Virginia and Kentucky.

Matthias and Catharina Lair had for neighbors in their Shenandoah Valley home the Custers, prosperous
store-keepers of Brocks Gap and also the Ruddles, Moyers, Huffmans, Rushes and Newmans. They all lived near
their church, Raders Meeting House, which served as church, school and community center. Raders Meeting House,
which was remembered by Catharina in her will, was built of logs in 1762. When it was organized, Adam Rader and
Alex Painter deeded three acres of land to be used for a church. As that was more ground than was needed for a
church building, the presumption is that it was intended for church, school and cemetery for members of the
congregation. It was replaced by a more pretentious log building in 1806 and so the members of Raders Meeting
House sent their children there to school and when they married, held the wedding ceremony in the same building.
The school was taught by the preacher who opened it with prayer at eight o'clock in the morning and dismissed at


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six o'clock in the evening, allowing one hour for intermission. He taught them reading, spelling, writing, arithmetic,
grammar and geography. On Sunday they sat in the same seats while they listened to his sermon. The school had
very severe rules. It did not allow games of any sort, nor were any "scholars" allowed to wear ruffles or "powder
their hair" but they were allowed to work in the garden for recreation if they so desired.

Matthias Lehrer (or Lair) died in 1787, aged 73, leaving his property to his wife who outlived him about 12 years.
Her will, dated July 9, 1799, was probated in January, 1804. It is found among the burnt records of Rockingham
County, Virginia, Will Book A, Page 80. After the usual formalities, she left a small sum to her church, Raders
Meeting House, made arrangements for the freedom of her body servant, "Rebecca, daughter of Jude," then
continued:

"I give and bequeath unto my several sons and daughters, viz; my son, Joseph Lair, my daughter, Catharina
Newman, my son, Andrew Lair, my son, Matthias Lair, dec'd or his heirs, my daughter, Elizabeth Trumbo, dec'd or
her heirs, my daughter, Mary Ruddle, my daughter, Margaret Custer, and my son, John Lair, all my personal estate
to be equally divided among them agreeable to quality and quantity.

"After payment of the lawful debts and funeral expenses, I do hereby constitute and appoint my well-beloved friend,
Henry Stolph, executor of this my last will and testament and do hereby disallow all other former testaments, Wills,
legacies, bequests, and Executors by me in any way before named, willed or bequeathed, ratifying and confirming
this and no other to be my last will and testament in the presence of us and the presence of such others hereunto
subscribed over our names, ninth day of July, 1799.

(Signed) Catherine Lair
witnesses
James Barnett
Benjamin Yount
Frederick Prises
Rockingham County. Probated January, 1804

In this document she anglicizes their names for the first time, also writing Lair instead of Lehrer. She even signed
her name Catherine Lair. She had indeed become an American.

THE WILDERNESS ROAD
Three sons of Matthias and Catharina Lair, Andrew, Matthias and John, served in the Revolutionary War. There was
a great deal of talk about the Wilderness of Kentucky where the rich farm lands were tempting farmers to settle in
spite of the Indians on the warpath. Andrew, the oldest of the three brothers, took the lead and prepared to follow
Colonel Benjamin Logan over Boone's Wilderness Road to Kentucky which Boone described as "a second
Paradise."

The importance of the Wilderness Road cannot be over-estimated. The English speaking colonies stretched like a
ribbon along the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida and the colonials were beginning to need more land. The only
available territory unoccupied by Indian tribes was Kentucky, whose fertility and desirability had been heralded by
fur traders, The land seekers became obsessed with a desire to possess it. The opening of the Wilderness Road and
the Revolutionary War were simultaneous. The pioneers came to Kentucky by tens of thousands over the rough,
narrow path. In some places it was necessary to travel single file and even a horse had to pick its way. Creeks had to
be crossed, or dry creek beds used for roads and laurel thickets had to be cut away before even a horse could travel
through. The pioneers felled the forests, planted crops and played a most conspicuous part in the Revolutionary War
by protecting their own interests and the back door of the seaboard colonies at the same time, so that they could give
their undivided attention to the British on the eastern shore. With George Rogers Clark, they captured "Hamilton the
Hair-buyer," the British commanding general at Detroit and conquered the Northwest Territory, out of which the
great states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and part of Minnesota were later carved.

Though would-be settlers had striven in vain to gain a foothold in Kentucky, the real settlement came through the
Transylvania Company. This group of hard-headed, moneyed men of North Carolina, gathered the Overhill


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Cherokees at Watauga in 1775 for a powwow that lasted twenty days and finally succeeded in purchasing their
claims to Kentucky, including the path," for the nominal sum of $50,000. Looking about for an experienced
woodsman to lay out the road, they selected Daniel Boone, who believed himself the instrument of Providence,
foreordained for that purpose. It was a wise choice. This natural leader of men, fearless, strong, resourceful, had
spent many months in exploring the land and he knew it well. Boone and his party, familiar with the land, crossed
the Cumberland River without difficulty, an achievement not attained by any who followed them. The Cumberland,
like many mountain streams, became a torrent after a bard rain and the current was swift. Out in the middle of the
stream, firmly planted by Divine Providence, was a huge boulder, known to the pioneers as the "Ford Rock." This
was their water-gauge. If it could be seen above the swirling water, they knew they could pass over it safely; if,
however, the "Ford Rock" could not be located, the settlers dared not attempt to cross, even though they might be
pursued by savages pressing hard upon them.

There is no more human study of the Wilderness Rood than that contained in Calk's diary. Minutely he describes the
events of each day, telling how "Abram's dog's leg got broke by Drake's dog," how "Daniel Drake bakes bread
without washing his hands," how "Abram's mare ran into the river with her load and swam over and he followed her
and got on her and made her swim back again," how "at Richland Creek they had to tote their packs over on a tree
limb and swim their horses over," how "they turned up a creek that they had crossed about 50 times," etc. But
bravely he came along and brought his instruments with which he surveyed Boonesborough.

The first addition to the garrison of Boonesborough was Colonel Richard Henderson and members of the
Transylvania Company "to the number of 30 guns," who followed Boone's Wilderness Road.

Coming with them was Benjamin Logan and his party. He left the Transylvanians at the Rockcastle River, however,
and followed an older trail to the present site of Stanford, Kentucky, where he established Logan's Fort, eleven miles
beyond Crab Orchard. Twenty miles away was Harrod's Fort which was considered "the end of the trail." With
Benjamin Logan came Andrew Lair.

Colonel Logan made his first trip to Kentucky in 1775 and, with his friend, William Galaspey and two or three of
his slaves, built his fort a mile from the present city of Stanford, Kentucky. He called it Logan's Fort, but some
people called it St. Asaphs Fort.

There they raised a crop of corn in 1775. Next year, 1776, he brought his wife and family and the rest of his slaves
and his cattle. He placed his wife and family in Harrod's Fort, however, until he could make his fort safer for them.

Logan's Fort filled up quickly with settlers who, less cautious than he, had brought their wives and children along.
On May 20, 1777, in the early morning while the women were outside the fort walls milking the cows and their
husbands were guarding them with guns loaded, a hundred Indians attacked them and during the attack a man named
Burr Harrison was shot and fell. The others succeeded in getting into the fort in safety. The agony of the wounded
man, his cries for help and the distress of his wife, were too much for Benjamin Logan and notwithstanding the
danger of almost certain death, he dashed out of the fort gate, picked up the wounded man, threw him over his
shoulder and ran with him into the fort, while bullets whizzed around his head. That was characteristic of Benjamin
Logan who was recognized as one of the bravest and also one of the kindest men in pioneer history. He was a man's
man, tall, handsome, courageous, a born leader and Andrew Lair made no mistake in following him.

LIFE IN THE FORTS
The Kentucky forts were built in the form of a parallellogram, their site determined by the location of a good spring.
Trees were cut down and the logs neatly picketed and set in a ditch or trench which had been dug the adze and shape
desired. When the logs had been rammed tight, they made a solid wall from nine to twelve feet high, impervious to
rifle fire and to the arrows of the Indians but not to cannon. The blockhouses, or bastions, built at each of the four
corners, were two stories high and extended over the lower story about eighteen inches so that no enemy could make
lodgement under the walls without risk of enfilading their fire.

The cabins were built against the inner walls of the fort. They had clapboard roofs and slab doors hung on deer
thongs, which served as hinges. The windows were covered with oiled paper or oiled doe skin as there was no glass


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to be had. All the cabins opened into the enclosure.

The beds in the forts were constructed by forcing forked sticks into the earthen floor, running poles through the
forks and between the logs of the wall, and stretching buffalo skins tightly over the frame work. Bedding consisted
of homespun sheets and blankets, quilts and coverlets. In very cold weather bear skins or elk skins were added for
warmth. The floor coverings were also of animal skins.

Cooking was done at the open fireplace with spits, pothooks and kettles. Tables were made of slabs of wood into
which pegs were driven for legs. Noggins, piggies and bowls were neatly turned and pewter plates and horn spoons
were considered luxuries.

In these forts friends found friends, neighbors sought former neighbors, kith and kin banded together in pre-empting
land and soon built homes of log and stone outside the protecting enclosure of the fort. When danger threatened, a
messenger was sent from home to home to warn the settlers to gather their families and a few necessaries and flee to
the friendly fort. Not daring to light a candle, they hurried noiselessly through the savage-infested woodland to the
friendly fort. Even the dog of the pioneer was trained in silence lest his bark betray his master's whereabouts to the
wily savage.

Such were the conditions under which the wives of Benjamin Logan and Andrew Lair, and thousands of others,
lived during forting days. Many of the women had been accustomed to comfortable living and were, therefore, able
to substitute many items at hand for the things they needed in their daily lives.

At the beginning of the Revolutionary War there were only three forts, Harrod's, Boone's and Logan's, but by its
close there were sixty forts, stretched like cities of refuge along the Wilderness Road and the Buffalo Trace, into
which settlers "coming in" could spend their nights in safety and then proceed on their journey by day.

The attack on his fort had convinced Benjamin Logan that he did not have sufficient ammunition to withstand Indian
warfare. He was needed at his forts but he also knew the fort could not survive without gunpowder. The nearest
supply was 200 miles away at the Holston settlement, far beyond the mountains. Selecting two trusty helpers, he
slipped out of the fort as soon as it was dark and avoiding the Cumberland Gap and the traveled ways where Indians
might intercept him, he went afoot at full speed up the steep mountain sides and down into the dark valleys until he
reached the Holston. He procured the gunpowder and lead and left it for his trusty helpers to carry back to Logan's
Fort while he hurried homeward alone, reaching there just ten days after he had left.

When Logan built his fort in 1775, what we now know as Kentucky was West Fincastle County, Virginia. It was a
vast tract of desirable land with a few scattered forts here and there, too weak to take care of themselves and too far
from Williamsburg, Virginia, their seat of government, to secure aid in time of need. Some sort of organized
government was urgent and the first step taken was to divide the unwieldy tract into smaller areas and to appoint a
reliable officer to be responsible for it. Therefore Fincastle County, Virginia, became Washington, Montgomery and
Kentucky counties. In 1780 Kentucky County was divided into Jefferson, Lincoln and Fayette. John Floyd was
made Colonel of Jefferson County, Benjamin Logan Colonel of Lincoln County, and John Todd Colonel of Fayette
County, while General George Rogers Clark was Commander in Chief, appointed by Virginia.

DESTRUCTION OF RUDDLE'S FORT
As settlers became more numerous, the Indians were more determined than ever to drive them out of their "Happy
Hunting Ground" and their atrocities were more severe and terrifying. The Indians were aided by the British who
resented George Rogers Clark's conquest of the Northwest Territory and raised an army under Captain Henry Byrd
of the Eighth Regiment of His Majesty's forces. This army of 1,000 men, consisting of British Regulars, Canadian
Volunteers and Tories, came on June 22, 1780, to capture Ruddle's and Martin's Forts. The British came from
Detroit and the Indians from their Ohio towns, they crossed Lake Erie, came down the Miami and the Ohio Rivers,
paddled up the Licking and reached Ruddle's Fort just at daybreak and announced their presence by cannon fire. It
was the first cannon shot fired south of the Ohio River. The forters were asleep but knew instantly what it meant.
Captain Isaac Ruddle protested in vain but the savages dashed into the fort, tore the baby of Mrs. Ruddle from her
arms and threw it into the fire, tore wives from their husband's arms, tomahawked and scalped men, women and


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children and adding the prisoners to those they had captured at Martin's Fort four miles away, drove 470 men,
women and children, loaded down with plunder from their cabin homes, to Detroit, a distance of 600 miles. There
they were divided among their captors and some were taken 800 miles farther to Mackinac and on to Montreal. The
story of their capture, of the separation of families, of hardships endured during the six weeks journey and of the
conditions under which they lived during the fourteen years of their captivity is one of the most shocking in the
pioneer period of Kentucky's history. Mad Anthony Wayne's Treaty of Greenville set them free. In executing their
plan, they waged the War of the American Revolution on Kentucky soil, for they came under the command of a
British officer, flying the British flag and demanding surrender in the name of his Britanic Majesty, King George III.
Captain Byrd made official report of the expedition to Sir Frederick Haldimand, the British Lieutenant General who
was then Governor of Canada.

This battle of the Revolutionary War was fought on land now known as the Matthias Lair farm and is where the Lair
Association holds its reunions. Ruddle's Fort stood in the hollow pasture back of the house at "The Cedars" and it
was Cousin Eliza Lair who erected the monument that marks its site on the banks of the Licking River. It is fitting
that the Lair Association should commemorate the tragic event by holding reunions on June 22, or the first Sunday
thereafter.

EXPEDITION AGAINST CHILLIC0THE
By way of retaliation, George Rogers Clark called all fort commanders to collect their troops and rendezvous at the
mouth of the Licking, march in a body to the Indian towns of 0ld Chillicothe and Piqua and punish the Indians so
severely they would not be able to make forays into Kentucky again. Boatloads of soldiers came from Louisville on
the Ohio, others floated down the Ohio and the Licking. Then Clark gave the signal, the largest army of Kentuckians
in pioneer history landed on the present site of Cincinnati and marched through the virgin forest to take the Mad
River Indians by storm.

Many historians including Collins, McClung, J.F. Smith, Mann Butler and Kerr, have described those battles and
disagreed widely. Since Andrew Lair was a soldier under Benjamin Logan and was one of that army of 970 men, it
seems advisable to describe it, giving the account by Theodore Roosevelt, the distinguished historian and soldier
who had access to the best source material available.

According to him: "Clark realized that he would have trouble raising an army of volunteers and the first thing he did
was to close the Land Court and the next was to station armed men at the Crab Orchard, the point from which those
returning to Virginia gathered as they were well armed for protection over the dangerous Wilderness Road. The
soldiers were ordered to stop all men from leaving the country and to take away their arms, if necessary as
four-fifths of all grown men were drafted and needed immediately for the expedition against Chillicothe.

"Logan went with Clark as second in command and carried with him a light three-pound gun on horseback. They
began the march on the second of August in a drizzling rate, every night they encamped in a hollow square with the
equipment and horses in the middle.

"After their fifty-mile march, they found Chillicothe deserted and burning, so they pushed on to Piqua on the Little
Miami, arriving at about 10 o'clock in the morning of August 8.

"Pique-town was strongly built like all French towns. The stout log houses were far apart and the strip of land
between them was planted in corn. A blockhouse with loopholed walls stood in the middle. Round about was a
woodland.
"Clark divided his army into four divisions, taking command of two of them in person and giving the other two to
Logan. He ordered Logan to cross the river above the town and take it in the rear, while he crossed directly below
and assailed the town in front.

"Logan did his best to obey the orders but he could not find a ford and marched three miles upstream making
repeated and vain attempts to cross, When he finally succeeded, the day was almost done and the fighting was over.

"Meanwhile Clark plunged into the river and crossed it at the head of one of his own two divisions. The other was


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                                                Register Report

delayed for a short time. Both Simon Girty and his brother were in the town with several hundred Indian warriors.
They were surprised by Clark's swift advance just as a scouting party of warriors were returning to the village. The
warning was so short that the squaws and children had barely time to retreat out of the way. As Clark crossed the
stream, the warriors left their cabins and formed in some thick timber. A long-range skirmish ensued with the
warriors in the timber, but in the approach of Clark's second division the Indians fell back. After a slight running
fight of two hours, the whites lost sight of their foes and wondering what had become of Logan's wing, they
gathered together and marched back toward the river. The scattered detachments now sat down to listen for the
missing wing.

"After half an hour's silent waiting, they suddenly became aware of the presence of a body of Indians that had
slipped in between them and the town. The backwoodsmen rushed to the attack, while the Indians whooped and
yelled defiance. There was a moment's heavy firing, but as both sides carefully sheltered themselves behind trees,
there was very little loss and the Indians steadily gave way until they reached the town about two miles distant from
the spot where the whites had halted. They then made a stand and for the first time there occurred some real fighting.
The Indians stood stoutly behind the loop-holed walls of the cabins and in the blockhouse. The Americans,
advancing cautiously and gaining ground, suffered much more loss than they inflicted. Late in the afternoon Clark
managed to bring the three-pounder into action from a point below the town. A few shots from the three-pounder
dislodged the defenders of the blockhouse and about sunset the whites closed in, only to find that their foes had
escaped and disappeared. A few stragglers exchanged shots with the advance guard of Logan's wing as it at last
came down the bank. This was the only part Logan was able to take in the battle. Of the Indians six or eight were
slain, whereas the whites lost seventeen and a large number were wounded.

"Clark destroyed all the houses and a large quantity of corn, then the army marched back to the mouth of the Licking
and disbanded, most of the volunteers having been out just twenty-five days.

"The Indians were temporarily cowed by their loss and by the damage they had suffered. Especially were they
cowed by the moral effect of so formidable a retaliation foray following immediately on the heels of the victory of
Byrd's inroad. Therefore, thanks to Clark, the settlements south of the Ohio were but little molested for the
remainder of the year."

The first court for Lincoln County was held in 1781 at Harrod's Fort, the earliest and strongest fort in Kentucky. As
it did not have the required population, Colonel Benjamin Logan offered ten acres of land at St. Asaph's, or Logan's
Fort and fifty acres at Stanford, on condition that a courthouse be built there as a permanent site. His offer was
accepted and plans were made at once to build the courthouse.

At the July term it was proven that Benjamin Logan and James Harrod were employed for twenty days, each of
theme with one horse to ride and one pack horse, to transport from the Long Island of Holston to the Kentucky
country. They were allowed 22 pounds for their services. This is in reference to Logan's 200 mile run to the Holston
for ammunition after the Indian attack at Logan's Fort.

Mathias married Catharina Margaretha MOYER, daughter of Will MOYER (~1720-1738). Born in Germany.
Catharina Margaretha died after 1787.

They had the following children:
       3           i.     Joseph (1745-1826)
       4          ii.     Catharina Margaretha (1747-)
       5        iii.      Andrew (1750-1826)
       6         iv.      Matthias (1752-1795)
       7          v.      Mary (ca1756->1824)
       8         vi.      John (1762-1827)
                vii.      Johan Jusua.
       9       viii.      Margaret
                 ix.      Elizabeth. Elizabeth died before 1799.
                          Elizabeth married Richard TRUMBO Jr..



                                                      Page 10
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    Page 11
                                                Register Report



                                               Third Generation
                                _________________________________________
                      Family of Mathias LEHRER (2) & Catharina Margaretha MOYER


3. Joseph LAIR. Born in 1745 in Pennsylvania. Joseph died in Licking County, Ohio in 1826; he was 81.

Notes on Joseph Lair: [1]
Joseph Lair, first child of Matthias and Catharina Lair, the immigrants, was born in Pennsylvania in 1745. He
married Persis Warren in Virginia and moved to Licking County, Ohio, dying there in 1826. Joseph Lair was
undoubtedly in the Revolutionary War as were his three brothers, but there are no records of his service in Kentucky
and probably could be found in Virginia.

It is interesting to learn that the census of 1820 taken in Monroe Twp., Licking Co., Ohio, shows Joseph Lair and his
wife both listed as "over 45 yrs of age."

Esther Lair, the eleventh child of Joseph Lair and his wife, Persis Lair, was born in Rockingham County, Virginia,
January 9, 1799, and died some time after the census of 1850 as she is then listed with her husband, Preston Coulter,
in Crawford County, Illinois. Their oldest child was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1821.

For this information we are indebted to Mrs. Addie Baker Stowell, a descendant.

An interesting story handed down in the Newman family and related by Mrs. Peyton Welch, a descendant, is that a
daughter of Catherine Lair Newman went to Ohio to live. While she and her child were on a visit to her Uncle
Joseph Lair in Licking County, Ohio, the Indians killed her husband and a number of people in the settlement, and
all were buried in one grave.

Joseph married Persis WARREN.

They had one child:
                 i.       Esther. Born on January 9, 1799 in Rockingham County, Virginia. Esther died after 1850;
                          she was 50.
                          Esther married Preston COULTER.

4. Catharina Margaretha LEHRER. Born in 1747.

Notes on Catherine Lair: [1]
Catherine Lair, second child of the immigrants, Matthias and Catharina Lair, born in Pennsylvania in 1747, married
Walter Newman. They were the parents of ten children, their oldest being Jonathan, born in 1768. Although
Catherine Lair Newman did not come to Kentucky to make her home, her son Jonathan did come to Jessamine
County, Kentucky, in 1793. In Virginia he married Hannah Spears and to this union were born seven children.
David Newman, born in 1794 and their oldest child, was a distiller of peach brandy, a tanner, a breeder of horses,
owned a blacksmith shop and was a Justice of the Peace. He was a large slave owner, many being valued by him as
high as $1,000. He built a tavern on the Kentucky River, a ferry and warehouses for shipping down the "mucky
River.

David Newman married Esther Huston Boggs, built his beautiful Colonial house known as "Cedar Grove" in 1820."
It has been lived in by six generations, Mrs. Peyton Welch and her son, Robert, being the present occupants. Built
high on a hill, the proportions of this exquisite house; the graceful Paladian windows, the portico supported by four
white square pillars with a fan transom of leaded panes over the "double witch" front doors, indeed make this house
an architect's delight. As in the case of "The Cedars" built by Charles Lair in 1828, this house is also built of
hand-made bricks, fashioned by the slaves on the place . Floors are of wide ash, the wood-work Carved and the



                                                      Page 12
                                                  Register Report

hand-rail on the staircase is of wild cherry. On the first floor there is a parlor, dining room and two bedrooms and
other bedrooms are on the second floor. The back door of the hall opens onto a porch which extends across the back
of the house and leads to the stone kitchen with its walls two feet in thickness. There is a hand-made walnut press
beside the great chimney that measures eight feet in breadth. The crane still hangs in the open fireplace. The Cellar
shows great beams that are tree trunks with the bark left on Along the walls of the cellar lie hollowed logs used in
bygone days to salt down the meat or for drying apples and vegetables for winter use, The beautiful house is
surrounded by immense cedar trees, many eight feet in girth, hence the name "Cedar Grove."

"The Cedars" passed out of the family's hands in 1950; "Boscobel" in 1869; "Smiser House" was sold many years
ago. "Cedar Grove" is now the only house lived in by Lair descendants continuously in the state of Kentucky.

Records show immense tracts of land in Kentucky owned by Jonathan Newman in Estill, Casey and in Jessamine
Counties. Walter Newman who married Catherine Lair, the daughter of the immigrants Matthias and Catharina Lairs
and his son, Jonathan Newman, were members of the First Independent Company in Dunmore's War. See Virginia
History, May 1936, Vol. XLIV, page 102. Walter Newman served as in the Virginia Militia.

Although the son and the grandson of Catherine Lair Newman, Jonathan and David Newman, were the first in their
line to settle in Kentucky, they selected for their lands a location some forty miles from the homes of the uncles,
Matthias and John in Harrison County and Andrew in Lincoln County.

Jonathan Newman came over the Wilderness Road into Kentucky as did his uncle, Andrew Lair, eighteen years
before; he possessed thousands of acres of land; built a handsome house as his cousin, Charles Lair, had done, and
his descendants became the prominent citizens in their community.

It is to be noted that the four children of the immigrants, Matthias and Catharina Lair, described in the preceeding
pages of this story, are not taken in the order of their birth dates, but in the order of their coming into Kentucky. First
came Andrew, the Indian fighter in 1775, to be followed in 1791 by his two brothers, Matthias and John, and in
1793 by their nephew, Jonathan Newman, who took up vast lands in Jessamine County. But little is known of the
other four children of Matthias and Catharina, as they did not come to this state and traces of them have been lost.

Catharina Margaretha married Walter NEWMAN.

They had the following children:
      10          i.      Jonathan (1765-)
      11         ii.      Mary
      12        iii.      John

5. Andrew LAIR. Born in 1750 in Philadelphia. Andrew died in Lincoln County, Kentucky in 1826; he was 76.

Andrew Lair was born in Philadelphia in 1750 and died in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in 1826. In Virginia he
married Lady Frances Hubbard, who was born in 1752 and died in Lincoln County in 1792.

ANDREW LAIR RECORDS
In an original document in the Virginia State Library and known as the "Illinois Papers," D. 156, is the pay roll of
Captain George Adams Company in actual service in Lincoln County Militia 1782.

In the above mentioned pay roll the name of Andrew Lair appears as having served as a , he having enlisted June 29,
and being discharged July 25. Sworn to before Benjamin Logan, by Colonel John Logan, that this service was
performed. Certified copy can be obtained from Virginia State Library.

In the Lincoln County Court Records of 1786, published in the Kentucky State Register, May 1922, Vol. 20, No. 59,
Andrew Lair was commissioned "An Lieutenant, l779."

Also in the index of Certificate Book of the Land Commissions in 1779-80 the name of Andrew Lair appears


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                                                 Register Report

reference page 141 of Certificate Book. This index is published in the Kentucky Register September 1923, Vol. 21
No. 63.

By the Act of 1779 "every person who had entered a claim and raised a crop of corn prior to 1778 was entitled to
400 acres at the sale (?) of $2.25 per hundred acres and were also given the right to pre-empt 1,000 acres in addition
to be paid for at the higher rate of $40.00 per hundred acres."

The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society for May 1923 Vol. 21, page 141, records the following:
"And'w Lear this day claimed a pre-emption of 400 acres of land at the state price in the District of Kentucky lying
on a small creek running into the Kentucky River about 13 miles up the said creek from the river by making an
actual settlement in the month of March 1779. Satisfactory proof being made to the Court they are of Opinion that
the s'd Lear has a right to a pre-emption of 400 acres of Land to include the above Location & that a Cert. issue
accordingly."

Jillson's Land Grants:
"Andrew Lair 300 acres Book 4 Page 428
Date 3-25-1784
Fayette Ky. River
" " 100 " Book 9 Page 532
Date 12-3-1784
Fayette Johnson's Fork
Licking
" 192 " Book 144 Page 101
592 Date 5-2-1786
Fayette Johnson's Fork

Andrew Lair could not have chosen a more beautiful site for a home. The Dix River plunges down its steep banks
into the Kentucky in a white froth. It was a favorable site for mill dams, necessary at that time, and court records
show that Colonel Bowman, Colonel Logan, John Craig, Joseph Hunt and Robert Allen were granted mill sites there
and were neighbors of the Lairs. It was on this land in Lincoln County that Andrew Lair spent the remainder of his
very eventful life, and where he died in 1826.

The Will of Andrew Lair, probated April 10, 1826, is to be found in the Lincoln County records, Book of
1824-1829, Book 1, and is as follows:
"In the name of God Amen, I Andrew Lair of Lincoln County and state of Kentucky, being of a good memory and
of a sound disposing mind, calling into mind the frailties of human life and the certainty of death, do make and
constitute this my last will and testament revoking and disannulling all others in the manner and form as follows:
"Item first, I recommend my spirit to God who gave it in full hope of a happy immortality through the redemption
that is in Christ Jesus and my body to the grave to be buryed under the direction of my executors untyl the morning
of the resurrection.
"Item, I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Anderson the tract of land whereon I now live supposed to
contain three hundred and thirty acres at ten dollars per acre making 3,000 three 300 Dollars, by his making the
following payments towit.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son John Lair seven hundred and fifty two dollars to be paid by William
Anderson and year after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law Thomas Pope three hundred and seventy six Dollars to be paid by
William Anderson two years and six months after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law George Smiser three hundred and seventy six Dollars to be paid by
William Anderson four years after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Catherine Stepp one hundred Dollars to be paid by William Anderson
six years after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son William Lair one hundred Dollars to be paid by William Anderson six years
after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son Hubbard Lair one hundred Dollars to be paid by William Anderson six years


                                                       Page 14
                                                 Register Report

after my D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son James Lair ten dollars to be paid by William Anderson six years after my
D.S.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Pope ten dollars to be paid by William Anderson six years
after my dec.
"Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Anderson three hundred seventy six Dollars out of my land.
It is also my will that my son in law William Anderson for his services in affection and attention unto me during
several years in the latter part of my life that he shall have eleven hundred Dollars out of the value of the land.
"Item I appoint my son John Lair and my son in law William Anderson my executors to execute this my last will
and testament.
"Given from under my hand this 7th day April in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred and twenty five."
ANDREW LAIR
Witness:
John S. Higgins
James Withers
Braddock Withers


THE FAMILY OF ANDREW LAIR [1]
Andrew Lair was born in Philadelphia in 1750 and died in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in 1826. In Virginia he
married Lady Frances Hubbard, who was born in 1752 and died in Lincoln County in 1792.
The following are the names of the nine children born to Andrew and Frances Hubbard Lair, in order of their birth
dates, the married names of the daughters and such names as could be had of the next generation.

1. Catherine, born about 1773 in the state of Virginia, was brought as an infant into the fort home of her parents in
the wilderness of Kentucky. She married a Mr. Stepp and all other records of her are lost.

2. Elizabeth Lair, born in 1774 in the Kentucky fort, was the second white girl baby born in Kentucky, according to
the Smiser Bible and letters from descendants in the papers of Eliza Lair. She lived in Kentucky for "three score
years," according to the Smiser Bible, then moved to Missouri where she died at the age of 104. Cousin Lenie
Euffman of Cynthiana, Kentucky, had a copy of a letter written by Elizabeth Lair Pope shortly before her death in
which she wrote she had her teeth and eyesight, did not wear glasses and had spent the day before at the home of her
son, walking a mile each way. She had declined an invitation to the Philadelphia Centennial. She first married a Mr.
Brady and had two children by that marriage. After his death she married Thomas Pope and by that marriage had
three sons; William, Andrew and Thomas. The latter had one son, Daniel Pope, who married Mollie Hatfield. There
are no records of descendants of the first two sons.

3. William, born in 1775, married Mary Graham and died in Russell County, Kentucky, in 1875. There were eight
children born to this union; Margaret, who married Dr. R. C. Hill, lived in Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri, then
moved to Oregon, making the trip in 1853 in a covered wagon; Enoch Green Lair married Lucy Stapp; Martha Jane
Lair married John P. Buster of Texas; Almira Lair married Simeon Yakey; John Lair married Harriet Owens; Emily
Lair married Edward Tiller; William Dixon Lair graduated in medicine from Transylvania, lived in Texas and
married Marie Hayner and Thomas Lair, a farmer, married Kittie Anderson.

4. James Lair, born in 1778, married a Miss Robinson. The name of one son is given, William Lair, who later lived
at Glennville, Missouri. One daughter, Mollie Lair.

5. Martha Lair, known as "Patsy," was born in 1780 in Lincoln County, Kentucky, and died in Harrison County in
1857. In 1803 she married George Smiser in Harrison County. This remarkable woman showed great courage at an
early age as she escaped capture and possible death by an Indian when she was not yet in her teens. There was
illness in the family of Andrew Lair and finding it necessary to make a trip through the woods to the mill, only
Martha was well enough to go. Her father cautioned her to save her horse on the way to the mill as his strength
might be needed for the return and told her to get her corn ground as quickly as possible. Reaching the mill she
found many people ahead of her and when the miller finished her meal and fastened the sack to her saddle. It was


                                                       Page 15
                                                 Register Report

quite dark. Galloping through the dense woods, her horse suddenly shied and an Indian sprang from the thicket and
tried to catch her bridle. She remembered her father's instructions and whipping her horse, calling "go, Billie, go,"
she flattened herself out against his neck, dashed through the woods, and watching every shadow reached her home
in safety, where she fell sobbing into her father's arms.
Martha Lair was twenty-three when she made her momentous visit to her relatives in Harrison County, taking three
days to make the trip on horseback, a distance of scarcely 80 miles from her Lincoln County home Accompanied by
a body-guard, she spent the nights along the way with friends, reaching the handsome home of her cousin, Charles
Lair at Lair Station, on the third day. Since the death of the original owner, Martha's uncle Matthias Lair, the home
was presided over by his son Charles. Living in the home was Charles' small niece, Betsy Smiser the three-year-old
daughter of Charles' sister Catherine and their neighbor, George Smiser. Catherine died soon after the birth of her
daughter Betsy and George Smiser then married another sister of Charles Lair, Mary, who died at the birth of twin
daughters, who also died. Being left a widower a second time and evidently liking the Lair girls, it was not long until
he was courting the lovely guest and cousin, Martha Lair. Thus the visit to the relatives in Harrison County lasted
for a lifetime and George Smiser is known to the family as the brave man who married three Lair girls, Catherine
and Mary, daughters of Matthias Lair, and their cousin, Martha, the daughter of Andrew.

Martha Lair Smiser's home was across the Licking River and not far from "The Cedars." It had been built for George
Smiser's first wife and was one of the earliest and most pretentious brick houses in Harrison County at that time.
Built of small hand-made bricks two stories high with an attic, the four large rooms and hall on the first floor were
done in "rice plaster" which had the glaze of fine porcelain. There were hard-carved mantels and chair-boards in the
house and its furnishings were considered the last word in elegance. Martha made the outside of her house as
beautiful as it was within and her flower garden with its intricate brick walks and pretty beds of blooming plants
soon became the envy of the countryside. However, she was more widely known for her herb garden which her
slaves called "old missus' yard garden." As there were no apothecary shops in those days, every doctor had to obtain
his medicinal plants and roots and with other elements, mix his concoctions. Martha, with her knowledge of herbs,
soon became a godsend to the medical profession and doctors were often her distinguished guests. Being deeply
religious as were all the Lairs, she entertained her minister and his family and the work of her church was one of her
greatest interests.

Martha liked pretty clothes and gave the greatest care to her toilet, especially to the selection of "neckacher" cap and
"breast pin" to be worn that day. She rode to Cynthiana on horseback to do her shopping, taking along her favorite
maid, "Julie, " to carry her "carpet bag" of purchases. The merchants considered her an authority on fine goods and
her adoring slaves thought she knew everything. Living as they did on the Buffalo Trace, the slaves working on the
farm would frequently find bones of the mastodon and other pre-historic animals. These they carried to her and she
had them cleaned and recognizing each one, stored them in the "saddle house" to show to distinguished guests. A
good story of the loyalty of her slaves is told of "Ike," who opened the door of the "saddle house to show a
neighboring slave "old missus' bones." The visiting slave sneeringly said: "Why man, my missus, she knows the
name of every tree thet grows in this here woods," and Ike, not to be outdone, raised his powerful voice and shouted:
"Hesh yo mouf, nigger, I'm a-telling you, my Miss Patsy Smiser, she knows de names ob de stahs in Hebben."

Martha Lair Smiser was a noted housekeeper and her wines, cordials, pickles, jellies and preserves were famous.
The vegetable garden was her pride and delight and she knew how to store her vegetables in her cellar for winter
use. Her slaves became skillful in the curing of the fine old hams and in making the sausage by Martha's recipe and
mixing it in a trench from a hollowed log.

Martha had a gay disposition but she was also self-willed. Not agreeing with her in some small decision, she became
irritated with George and said: "If you will not agree with me in this, I will jump out of the window," whereas
George, without raising his eyes from the book he was reading, said in his broken English: "yump, Marthy, yump!"
Her gay laughter made everything right again.

George Smiser, the husband of Martha Lair, was born in 1772 in Virginia. As a young man of considerable means
he came to Kentucky to make his home, selecting the location on the Licking River as an admirable one to carry on
his business as he had learned the hatter's trade, a lucrative one in those days. Small dams were made in the river
where the beavers were trapped and making use of the eighty or so slaves he owned, he soon had a thriving business


                                                       Page 16
                                                 Register Report

at Lair Station. The pelts of the beavers were tanned by the negro slaves and the fine sewing of the watermelon pink
silk linings was done by young women who lived in the neighborhood. These elegant tall beaver hats, so fashionable
for the dandies of that day, were sent to Philadelphia where they sold for excellent price.

Some slaves were also used in the lead mines George Smiser owned and in the operation of his distillery. A note in
his Bible reads: "Put in a small copper distillery - made much of it, sold it in Maisville and Lexington at .10 and 12
1/2 per gal." Although his "it" was cheaply sold, George made money on it as he did on the large farm he operated.

George Smiser was the grandson of the immigrant George Smiser who at nine years of age came to America with
his widowed mother Barbara Smiser, his brother Matthias, 16, and his sister Margaret, 20. Sailing from Rotterdam
on "The Britannia" they landed in this country September 21, 1731. The husband and father, Marton Schmeisser
(Smiser) served as second in command under Frederick V, and fell mortally wounded at the battle of Würtenburg,
an important engagement of The Thirty Years War between the Catholics and the Protestants. This war was bitter as
all religious wars are and as it was won by the Catholics, the Protestants found it advisable to seek new homes in
America where they could worship God as they pleased.

The family of Schmeisser, or Smeisser, is one of the oldest German families of free or noble descent, who flourished
among the Silesian Knighthood. Known as "Schmeissers von Ehrenpreisberg" their castle was located on the Rhine
and their coat-of-arms shows the crown and the lifted arm hurling a javelin, thus giving the name Schmeisser which
means "one who throws." In America the name has been variously spelled; Schmeisser, Smeisser. Smizer, Smyser,
Smiser.

Martha Lair and George Smiser had the following eight children: Samuel Merritt Smiser married Rebecca Frazer;
John Hilton Smiser married Julian Edwards; George Smiser married (1) Mary Allen, (2) Margaret Collier, (3)
Martha Wilson; Catherine Smiser married John Wesley Lair, a first cousin of her mother's; Darius Smiser married
(1) Louisa Smith, (2) Sarah Jane Howe; William Smiser married Helena Lair, his first cousin; Mary Smiser married
James Frazer; Celia Smiser who was unmarried.

In explanation of the above Smiser-Lair marriages: Catherine Smiser, daughter of Martha Lair Smiser, was the
granddaughter of Andrew Lair and she married John Wesley Lair, the son of John Lair who was a brother of
Andrew Lair, thus John Wesley Lair was a first cousin of Martha Lair Smiser, his wife's mother.
William Smiser, the son of Martha Lair Smiser and the grandson of Andrew Lair, married Helena Lair, the daughter
of John Lair and the granddaughter of Andrew Lair, showing them to be first cousins.
The two John Lairs are not to be confused. One was a brother of Andrew, the other was a son of Andrew.

6. Mary Lair was the sixth child of Andrew and Frances Hubbard Lair. She was born in 1782, and married William
Pope. Their daughter Helena, married (1) William Faulkner and had one daughter who married William Huffman.
Her second marriage was to John Miller Anderson and had four sons and three daughters. Married names of
daughters are: Robertson, Thomas and Keller.

7. Hubbard Lair, born in 1783, married Julia Montgomery. Their children were: William Lair, who married a Miss
Wilkinson; Andrew Lair who married Mary Ann Wilson, and John Montgomery Lair who married Mary Tatum.

8. Celia Lair, born in 1786, married William Anderson and had one daughter who married N. Carter of Dallas,
Texas, It was Celia and her husband William Anderson who cared for Andrew Lair the last years of his life and to
whom he willed his farm in Lincoln County.

9. The youngest child of Andrew and Frances Hubbard Lair was John who married Elizabeth Buchanan, said to be a
relative of the President of that name, There were three daughters of this union: Helena Lair who married her cousin
William Smiser; Elizabeth Lair who married Jonathan Smith and Catherine Lair who married Charles Smith.

This completes the story of Andrew Lair, son of Matthias and Catharina Lair, the immigrants; born in Virginia;
married Frances Hubbard in Virginia; came over the Wilderness Trail into Kentucky; fought under George Rogers
Clark and Benjamin Logan; hero of Indian warfare; commissioned a Lieutenant for service in the Revolutionary


                                                       Page 17
                                               Register Report

War against the British and Indians; took up his lands in Lincoln County, Kentucky, where he died in 1826. As the
first Lair in Kentucky, we can indeed think of him with pride.

Andrew married Lady Frances HUBBARD. Born in 1752. Lady Frances died in Lincoln County, Kentucky in 1792;
she was 40.

They had the following children:
      13          i.      Martha “Patsy” (1780-1857)
                 ii.      Catherine. Born in 1773 in Virginia.
                          Catherine married STEPP.
      14        iii.      Elizabeth (1774-1888)
      15        iv.       William (1775-1875)
      16         v.       James (1778-)
      17        vi.       Hubbard (1783-)
               vii.       Celia. Born in 1786.
                          Notes on Celia Lair: [1]
                          Celia Lair, born in 1786, married William Anderson and had one daughter who married
                          N. Carter of Dallas, Texas, It was Celia and her husband William Anderson who cared for
                          Andrew Lair the last years of his life and to whom he willed his farm in Lincoln County.

                          Celia married William ANDERSON, son of William ANDERSON (1753-1830) &
                          Elizabeth HINKSON (-ca1790).

                          The Will of Andrew Lair, probated April 10, 1826, is to be found in the Lincoln County
                          records, Book of 1824-1829, Book 1, and is as follows:
                          "In the name of God Amen, I Andrew Lair of Lincoln County and state of Kentucky,
                          being of a good memory and of a sound disposing mind, calling into mind the frailties of
                          human life and the certainty of death, do make and constitute this my last will and
                          testament revoking and disannulling all others in the manner and form as follows:
                          "Item first, I recommend my spirit to God who gave it in full hope of a happy immortality
                          through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus and my body to the grave to be buryed
                          under the direction of my executors untyl the morning of the resurrection.
                          "Item, I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Anderson the tract of land
                          whereon I now live supposed to contain three hundred and thirty acres at ten dollars per
                          acre making 3,000 three 300 Dollars, by his making the following payments towit.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son John Lair seven hundred and fifty two dollars to
                          be paid by William Anderson and year after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law Thomas Pope three hundred and seventy
                          six Dollars to be paid by William Anderson two years and six months after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law George Smiser three hundred and seventy
                          six Dollars to be paid by William Anderson four years after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Catherine Stepp one hundred Dollars to be
                          paid by William Anderson six years after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son William Lair one hundred Dollars to be paid by
                          William Anderson six years after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son Hubbard Lair one hundred Dollars to be paid by
                          William Anderson six years after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son James Lair ten dollars to be paid by William
                          Anderson six years after my D.S.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Pope ten dollars to be paid by
                          William Anderson six years after my dec.
                          "Item I give and bequeath unto my son in law William Anderson three hundred seventy
                          six Dollars out of my land. It is also my will that my son in law William Anderson for his
                          services in affection and attention unto me during several years in the latter part of my
                          life that he shall have eleven hundred Dollars out of the value of the land.
                          "Item I appoint my son John Lair and my son in law William Anderson my executors to


                                                     Page 18
                                                 Register Report

                           execute this my last will and testament.
                           "Given from under my hand this 7th day April in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred
                           and twenty five." [1]
      18       viii.       John
      19        ix.        Mary (1788-1839)

6. Capt. Matthias LAIR. Born on February 15, 1752 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Matthias died in Lair, Harrison
County, Kentucky on October 16, 1795; he was 43.

Book 5, pg. 11, Sept. 1816--Humphrey Lyon and wife, Margaret, late Margaret Hinckson, widow of John Hinckson,
deed., to Samuel Hinkson and wife, Susannah, said Samuel being son of John Hinckson, deed., and Chas Lair, John
Lair, Jr., Wm. Lair, Joseph Lair, Matthias Lair, Betsey Harter, wife of Jacob Harter, late Betsey Smiser, heir to
Catherine Smiser, late Catherine Lair, all being heirs of Matthias Lair, deed., deed land located in Harrison Co., Ky.
[2]
-----
MATTHIAS AND JOHN LAIR SETTLE IN KENTUCKY [1]
Sixteen years after Andrew Lair came over the Wilderness Road to make his home in Kentucky, his two brothers,
Matthias and John, accompanied by their families, slaves and livestock left their fertile Shenandoah Valley in
Virginia to also make their home in the same state, Matthias, a man of 39, and John ten years younger, came by the
river route and the Buffalo Trace and though the year was 1791, the route was equally as dangerous as the
Wilderness Road had been when traveled by Andrew in 1775.

England claimed the eastern part of the continent, Spain controlled the Mississippi at its mouth and both England
and France desired the great Mississippi basin. Hemmed in as the colonies were between the Atlantic and the
Alleghany Mountains, a Mystery Land lay beyond and both nations were alert to find a way to possess it.

The beautiful Ohio River was the alluring avenue provided by nature to open up this country, and like a siren, it
beckoned men of all sorts and conditions to follow its course. The Alleghany from the north and the Monongahela
from the south join below Pittsburgh to form the Ohio, the river that filled the Indians with awe and was known to
the Wyandotts as the Ohezhu, the Mohawks as Oheyo, the Oneidas as the Ohe and the Iroquois as the Oyo.

Painted savages in undisturbed possession had crept silently through the dark forests that fringed the Ohio River and
climbing into their birch canoes, had crossed it and paddled up its numerous tributaries into the heart of Kentucky,
called by them, "Happy Hunting Ground."

The first white men who followed the Indians into Kentucky were the fur-traders for fur--not gold, silver or oil, but
fur was the lure that opened up this continent, and France and England struggled for a century to get control of the
Ohio country. Bartering gaudy calicoes, whistles, combs, knives and looking glasses for the pelts the Indians
discarded, these traders came and went but not making permanent homes in the state, were not molested by the
Indians.

As the white settlers came down the Ohio, the Indians on the northern bank concealed themselves behind the giant
forest trees that grew down to the water's edge and attacked them whenever possible, using guns and ammunition
supplied by England. Often they would force white prisoners to run along the bank of the river, crying to be taken on
board by the settlers but woe unto the soft-hearted who went to their rescue, only to be taken prisoners also. There
were dangers of whirlpools, sandbars and of large trees floating in the current with great branches to catch the small
boats and crush them. There were two guide books which the settlers found helpful: Darby's "Emigrant's Guide" and
"The Navigator." There are no records to tell us of the hundreds of boats destroyed and the thousands of settlers who
were drowned or picked off by the Indians, yet on and on they came in a continuous procession to make their homes
in Kentucky.

Matthias Lair, his wife, Ann Elizabeth Rush Lair and seven of their children with slaves, livestock and household
goods, occupied several flatboats These boats were built at Redstone and could be purchased for about $35.00 each,
although the larger ones with partial roof and sleeping bunks were more expensive. John Lair, his wife Sallie Custer


                                                       Page 19
                                                  Register Report

Lair and two children, followed with their boats similarly loaded. The other children of Matthias and John Lair were
born in Kentucky as indicated by the dates of their birth.
We do not know whether our two Lair families embarked at Pittsburgh or at Redstone but, as the long string of
flatboats, each with a man heavily armed for the night and day watch, began their perilous journey down the Ohio,
they must have made an impressive departure.

We can only imagine the hardships of that trip: the exposure and discomfort of the small boats; the difficulty in
milking the cows and preparing the food; and the constant fear of river and Indians. We do not know, either, how
long it took them to float down the Ohio but we can well imagine their great joy when they saw for the first time the
great limestone cliffs jutting out into the river where the small settlement of Maysville was located.

The unloading of the flatboats, the great scramble up the steep hill, took time, and arranging for the pack-train took
even more time. The packtrains consisted of six or eight horses fastened together and on each horse was a
pack-saddle in which was placed the many small articles, household goods and in some instances, the small children
who were too young to go on foot and too heavy to be carried a great distance. A driver and a leader were required
to handle a pack-train and having many slaves with them, it is possible the Lairs used their own men in the operation
of the pack-train.

Driving the livestock before them, the packtrains were followed by the slaves on foot end members of the families
on horseback. The last lap of their Journey was less than fifty miles from Maysville to the land they had purchased
on the banks of the Licking River but it took them several days. They spent their nights in "lean-tos," a make-shift
shelter of boughs fastened together around a fire where the slaves took turns keeping a constant watch, guns in hand.
This last stretch must have seemed the longest of all as they excitedly made plans for their new homes in the
wilderness and traveled on the only highway of the state - the Buffalo Trace.
The Buffalo Trace is the oldest road in North America. Beaten down by the hoofs of buffalos thousands of years
ago, this trace is as directly cut as if designed by an experienced engineer. The buffalos came from the North and the
West, trampling and beating the earth in their frenzy to reach the salt deposits found in abundance in this section of
Kentucky. The Buffalo Trace was used by the Indians as they came to their "Happy Bunting Ground;" by the fur
traders who came to barter gifts for pelts; by the backwoodsmen who hunted and explored the state; and by all the
settlers who came this way. In making their decision as to the location of their lands, Matthias and John Lair must
have taken into account the fact that the Buffalo Trace ran through their lands and that it would be a good place to
build their permanent homes, facing the trace.

All indications are that these Lair men made numerous trips into the state prior to 1791 in order to look things over
before making their final decision as to location. Records show that they had owned some land in Kentucky near
Maysville in Mason County and also in Lincoln County. They were entitled grants for their service in the
Revolutionary War and they also had the means with which to buy additional land. With their background as
farmers of the Rhineland, they were attracted by the Blue Grass region and by the rich land on the banks of the
Licking. Between them, Matthias and John Lair owned more than 2,000 acres in the bend of the Licking River,
according to the family records. The land on which they settled soon became known as "The Lair Settlement'" then
as "Lair Station" and now is known as "Lair, Kentucky."

As soon as they reached their destination' they set to work felling the large trees in order to make a "clearing" for the
houses and also to get in as many crops as possible. The best logs were selected for the building of the cabins as logs
were the best material at hand for those first homes Matthias built a double cabin for his family and John built a
single one, well within sight of his brother's home. Cabins also had to be built for the slaves of the two men and
close by the cabins of their master.

The site of Matthias' cabin was where the smoke house later stood and back of the fine house built years later by his
son, Charles. The double cabin consisted of two cabins built end to end with a "dog trot" between. This trot later
became a hall connecting the two cabins, and still later a small porch or portico was added in front. There was a
stairway like a ladder to the loft above where the children slept. Both cabins had a large stone chimney on the end.
The floors were puncheon, logs smoothed on the up-side and laid close together; the windows were of doe skin,
greased and stretched very tight, which permitted light to enter the room. These windows, however, had shutters of


                                                        Page 20
                                                 Register Report

solid wood on the inside that could be quickly closed if Indians should attack, The doors were slabs of wood hung
on deer thongs and each door had B hole cut through in order that the "latch string" could be put outside. Thus the
expression, "The latch-string is hanging on the out ice" which always spelled hospitality.

The inside was made comfortable and attractive by Annliss Lair with the few treasured possessions she had brought
with her from her Virginia home and when she put the "kivvers" on the beds made of boughs fastened through the
logs of the wall, the bright rag carpets on the floor and hung her cooking vessels by the large stone fireplace, she no
doubt made a homey place of her log cabin.

The single cabin built for John Lair and his family was located near the site of his stone house which was started
almost immediately and the original cabin became the outside kitchen and was used by the family for many years.

Matthias Lair brought his livestock with him when he came from Virginia and needing a pen for them used the
stockade of the old Ruddle's Fort left standing after the massacre by the British and Indians June 22, 1780, eleven
years before. This made a splendid stock pen and when Matthias soon became an extensive mule buyer selling
throughout that section of the state, the stockade became known to the family as the "mule pen" and remained so for
several years or until a better pen was built near the barns. The old stockade was then torn down and the large logs
used for buildings about the place. It is also interesting to know that the bones of the forters scalped and killed in
that massacre were covered with rocks and dirt by men from nearby forts soon after the tragedy and the bones
remained there until Charles Lair built the family vault several years later and placed them there.

MATTHIAS LAIR RECORDS
Matthias Lair served as a Captain in the Revolutionary War but his service was in the state of Virginia and records
are not to be found in Kentucky. A careful search was made of The Register, publication of the Kentucky State
Historical Society, Frankfort, Kentucky, but there is no mention of the service of Matthias Lair. Records in the
possession of his descendants show: "Matthias, a Captain in the Revolutionary War spent his final pay, amounting to
$600.00, for a pair of boots and a pair of silver cuff buttons."

W. W. Stevenson of Harrodsburg said records there showed: "December 6, 1782, Matthias Lair entered 100 acres of
land upon part of a Treasure Warrant, 11,065 lying in a 'bent' of Dicks River opposite the mouth of the Hanging
Fork on the Trace leading from Jackmans to Downeys station to Southeast for quantity including the
before-mentioned also same, adding the Warrant Records out of the office June 1783 "

Matthias Lair - Henry Lee Va., Warrant 240. October 13,, 1779, 400 acres Lincoln's Rolling Fork.
Matthias Lair - Beverly Randolph-Va., Warrant 3739.

The above information is from bits of paper found in the papers of Eliza Lair, a descendant. These warrants were
always for Revolutionary War service and all can be found in the Virginia records.

As shown in the family records, Matthias Lair bought 463 acres in Harrison County from Robert and Nancy
Hinkson for 580 pounds, this land having been patented by them. There is no record of the purchase of the
additional acreage.

Matthias Lair did not live long after coming into Kentucky for he died in 1795, at 42 years of age. The Smiser Bible
shows: "Matthias Lair died from exposure fighting for our independence." His wife, Ann Elizabeth Rush Lair,
known as "Annliss" out-lived him many years. Matthias' death dropped the burden of leadership upon the young
shoulders of his oldest son, Charles, not yet twenty years old.

before 1775 when Matthias was 22, he married Anna Elizabeth RUSH, daughter of Charles “Carl” RUSH
(1725-~1806) & Anna Elizabeth SUESS (~1731->1806), in Virginia. Born in 1754 in McGaheysville, Augusta,
Virginia. Anna Elizabeth died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky in 1806; she was 52.

LAIR, ELIZABETH-C, 93-Sons, Chas., John, Wm., Joseph and Matthias; dau., Sarah; Elizabeth Smiser, dau. of
Geo. Smiser. Jan. 30, 1806-Apr. 1806. Geo. Reading, Catherine Kees, Wts. [3]


                                                       Page 21
                                                Register Report


They had the following children:
      20          i.      Charles (1775-1860)
      21         ii.      Catherine (1778-1800)
                iii.      Mary. Born on August 6, 1780 in Rockingham, Virginia. Mary died in Lair, Harrison
                          County, Kentucky in 1802; she was 21. Buried in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky.
                          Notes on Mary Lair: [1]
                          Mary Lair, the third child of Matthias and Ann Elizabeth Rush Lair, was born in Virginia
                          and came to Kentucky with her parents. She became the second wife of George Smiser
                          after the death of her sister Catherine. Mary Lair Smiser died after the birth of twin
                          daughters who died also. It was after the death of Mary Lair that George Smiser married
                          the first cousin of his first two wives, Martha Lair, the daughter of Andrew Lair of
                          Lincoln County. George was the "brave man who married three Lair girls."

                          On December 5, 1800 when Mary was 20, she married George SMISER, son of Mathias
                          SMISER & , in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Born on December 30, 1772. George died in
                          Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky on April 22, 1856; he was 83.
                iv.       Sallie. Born in 1789 in Virginia. Sallie died in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1809; she
                          was 20. Buried in Bourbon County, Kentucky.
                          Sallie married ALLEN.
      22          v.      Matthias (1795-1841)
      23         vi.      John (1784-1821)
      24        vii.      William (1784-)
               viii.      Elizabeth. Born in 1785 in Virginia. Elizabeth died in 1803; she was 18.
                          LAIR, ELIZABETH-B, 206-Mother; brother, John Lair, Geo. Smiser, Extr. Mar. 18,
                          1803-June, 1803. Michael Smith, Katherine Keese, Wts. [4]

                ix.       Joseph. Born in Rockingham, Virginia. Joseph died about 1812 in Louisiana.
                          Notes on Joseph Lair: [1]
                          Joseph Lair, the sixth child, born in Virginia and who also came over the trace with his
                          parents, died unmarried in either New Orleans or Baton Rouge, Louisiana. It is believed
                          he is the brother of Charles Lair who unselfishly offered to go into service in the War of
                          1812.


7. Mary LEHRER. Born circa 1756 in Shenandoah County, Virginia. Mary died in Rockingham County, Virginia
after 1824; she was 68. Buried in Riddle Cemetery Near Chimney Rock.

about 1780 when Mary was 24, she married John RUDDELL, son of Cornelius RUDDELL (~1717-1798) &
Ingabo? (1730-1814), in Rockingham County, Virginia. Born about 1755 in Frederick County, Virginia. John died
in Rockingham County, Virginia in 1824; he was 69. Buried in Riddle Cemetery Near Chimney Rock.

For further information about John and Mary (Lair) Ruddell, refer to “The Genealogy of the Ruddell’s Family,” Vol.
II, p. 30.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Mary Margaret. Born in 1776 in Brock’s Gap, Augusta County, Virginia. Mary Margaret
                          died on February 4, 1860; she was 84.
                          On March 19, 1799 when Mary Margaret was 23, she married William DYER. Born
                          about 1775.
      25         ii.      Cornelius (1780-1876)
                iii.      John H. Born on October 16, 1788 in Brock’s Gap, Augusta County, Virginia. John H.
                          died on February 14, 1871; he was 82.
                          On March 5, 1827 when John H. was 38, he married Sarah BYRD. Born in 1791. Sarah
                          died in 1875; she was 84.



                                                      Page 22
                                                 Register Report

      26         iv.       Isaac (1791-1882)

8. John LAIR. Born in 1762 in Rockingham, Virginia. John died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky in 1827; he
was 65. Buried in Buried Indiana Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky.

Notes on John Lair: [1]
John Lair, the youngest child of Matthias and Catharina Lair, the immigrants, was born in Virginia in 1762. He
married Sallie Custer, a neighbor, whose line is that of General George Custer, killed at the battle of "Little Big
Horn." in l876. Two children were born to them while living in Virginia and were mere babies when John and Sallie
Lair came into Kentucky by the river route, over the Buffalo Trace and to their new home on the banks of the
Licking River.

John Lair was ten years younger than his brother Matthias, but seems to have always "tagged along" with him as is
shown by many records and stories handed down in the family. When Matthias went to enlist for service in the
Revolutionary War, John, a very young boy, went along and the officer who was enlisting Matthias asked: "What
can that strippling do?" Whereupon John drew himself up to his greatest height, which was certainly not much, and
said: "I have a strong wagon and a good team and I can haul things, I reckon."

Knowing the devotion of these brothers, it was a most natural thing that they should set out with their wives,
children, slaves, livestock and household goods together to settle on their lands in the Blue Grass region of
Kentucky. The story of their hardships on the trip from Redstone to Maysville, over the trace from Maysville to their
land later known as "The Lair Settlement" and the building of their first log cabin homes there, has been told in the
chapter on Matthias Lair, John's brother. Matthias being ten years older than John was definitely the leader on the
trek to Kentucky, but John and his little family shared the same hardships on the perilous journey.

As stated before, the two brothers set to work upon arrival, clearing their land for the crops and for their homes.
John built a single cabin, well within sight of his brother's double log cabin. This cabin later became the outside
kitchen for the larger house and was used as such for many years.

Although Matthias Lair's family lived in their double log cabin until his son Charles began the building of the
handsome house in 1812, John found his cabin too small for comfort and set to work in 1791 to build his house of
stone, which is standing today. This was one of the earliest houses of that type in Kentucky and as all records read:
"Was standing when Kentucky became a state in 1792." Built of field stone, the house consisted of two large rooms,
one before the other, with an upstairs room for the children reached by an "in the wall" stair from the front bedroom.
Windows of these rooms were deep and very high, as there was still danger of Indians lurking around.

Soon after the completion of the log house, Sallie Custer Lair, her children and several of the slave women, were in
her room when she noticed a horse galloping toward the house. This was always an indication that Indians were
about and realizing all the men were felling trees a great distance from the house, she immediately gathered the
women and children together and removed the rug over a hidden door in the floor that led to a dark cellar below.
After they were all huddled in a dark corner of the cellar room, Sallie carefully closed the door and managed to get
the rug over it so it would not be noticed. A few moments later they heard the whoops and yells of the Indians as
they came into the house, exploring each room and looking everywhere for the occupants. A large ham was on the
table, other delicacies were on the sideboard and in the closet. The Indians had a banquet and ate everything in sight,
emitting great yells of satisfaction between bites. Sallie Custer prayed the entire time the Indians were in the room
above and lest her baby cry out. She nursed him at the breast to keep him quiet. (This child is believed, by his birth
date, to have been Paul Custer Lair, their first child born in their Kentucky home. After the Indians could not find
anything more to eat, they noisely departed, leaving the house a complete wreck, Hearing the Indians yelling, John
Lair and his slave men came running toward the house, expecting to find the women and children killed and the
house burned, but instead found them in Sallie's room gathered about her as she prayed in thanksgiving.

It is believed the Matthias Lair place was not called "The Cedars" until the fine house was built by his son, Charles,
in 1828. On the other hand, John Lair and his wife, Sallie Custer Lair, named their stone house "Boscobel" at the
time it was built in 1791 and so it is known today. Sallie Custer Lair had brought with her from Virginia many


                                                       Page 23
                                                 Register Report

beautiful things, and a great many pieces of her white and gold china are in the family now. This china was added to
by the next generation, John Wesley Lair and his wife, Catherine Smiser Lair, and it is interesting to study the
difference in the pieces, the older ones having the panel in the rim. Furniture of the house was made by the cabinet
makers, principally in Maysville, and were of the native woods. One very fine piece, a bow-front chest, was made in
the late 1790s and is now in the home of a great-great-great granddaughter.

As in the case of his brother Matthias, John Lair's service record of the Revolutionary War can be found in Virginia,
as his service was there and there is no record to be found in The Register, publication of the State Historical
Society, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Records show that John Lair and Sallie Custer Lair owned land in Mason County, Kentucky, in 1789 on Johnson
Fork of Licking, "part of John Lair's survey of 400 acres."

John Lair bought part of his land in Harrison County from Samuel Anderson and the rest from George Kirkpatrick
and a Mr. Callahan of Opolusa, in 1796.

Sallie Custer Lair continued to live at "Boscobel" after the death of her husband. Her youngest son, John Wesley
Lair, managed the extensive farm and cared for his mother until her death in 1847.
-----
BOSCOBEL
This old house called "Boscobel" is located on the old Lair Pike about five miles from Cynthiana and within sight of
Lair Station. (Both front and rear of the house are pictured here.) The stone part was built by John Lair in the late
1790's. Since then over the years, Boscobel has been owned by J. Wesley Lair, T. J. Megibben, Orah Ballinger, T. J.
Craycraft and the Sidney Cummins family, in that succession.

John Lair emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky in 1791 with his brothers, Andrew and Mathias. All three were
Revolutionary soldiers. Andrew was one of the founders of Logan's Fort, now Stanford, Ky. Mathias and John came
on to Harrison County and, on their 2,000-acre claim, built their log cabins near the ruins of Hinkson's or Ruddle's
Fort on the South Licking River. Near the site of his log cabin Mathias soon built his imposing manor house "The
Cedars," now partly standing. And John built Boscobel out of stone and near his original log cabin. Both are now
approached from the Old Lair Pike.

While John Lair and his wife, Sally Custer Lair, were living in the log cabin they were continually harassed by
Indians. A short log in the floor was left loose so that in case of an Indian surprise they could creep into the small
cellar made as a hiding hole. One day when the horses started running and snorting, as they did when they sensed
Indians, Sally Lair was alone in the cabin with her baby. She took the child into the cellar and, fearing that he might
cry and betray their hiding place, she nursed him during the entire time she was in hiding while the Indians overhead
danced about and ate everything they could lay their hands on.

Soon John Lair began building the stone house Boscobel. It had three rooms on the ground floor, an outside kitchen
and a hall with extremely narrow stairway which led up to the three upper rooms, all of which are intact today. And
here the John Lairs reared their children.

Near the house is the family graveyard. Besides the family graves, there is the grave of "the wandering woman," not
unusual in those days, we are told. According to the family, she wandered in from nowhere, and John Lair allowed
her to occupy a vacant cabin, gave her a garden plot, had it plowed and gave her a pig and a cow. When the other
cows in the neighborhood went dry, the slaves said she was a witch woman and had dried up their cows. They even
said they peeped through her window one night and saw her milking her dish rag and that she was filling her bucket
with foaming milk. They wanted to run her off, but John Lair protected her and, when she died, had her buried with
the family.

John Lair's son, John Wesley Lair, married Catherine Smiser from the George Smiser house still standing just across
the river. And here they reared their children, John A, Helen, Mary, Arabella.



                                                       Page 24
                                                 Register Report

Fanny and Lida. Before the Civil War they enlarged Boscobel, because the five young daughters having beaus made
a large parlor almost a necessity. The new section was built of frame and included a large hallway opening into an
ample parlor and a circular stairway in the hall leading to one large room above. Wesley Lair died during the Civil
War. In 1867 his wife sold Boscobel and the 227 surrounding acres to T. J. Megibben, and moved to town to the
present Jack Magee house. the second from the hotel on Main St. Here her daughter, Helen, married Cynthiana's
eloquent attorney, A. H. Ward, and here their first daughter, Maud (Mrs. W. T. Lafferty), was born. Their other
children were Harry, Kitty, Paul and Ash Ward.

T. J. Megibben, who purchased Boscobel from the Lairs, was at one time the largest landowner in the county. He
was part owner of six distilleries and 2,800 acres of land. He had a younger brother, James K., who was in business
with him, and who became the next occupant of the old house, Boscobel after the Lairs. In 1866 James K. Megibben
married Mary E. Shawhan (sister of Mr. Jim Shawhan) who lived in the columned brick mansion now the Jett place)
just across the road from Boscobel, and they moved into Boscobel in 1867. Here the first two of their eight children
were born-Charlie and Lela.

After the Jim Megibbens, the next occupants of Boscobel during the T. J. Megibben ownership, were the Tyce
Hutsells. Tyce Hutsell was manager of the Megibben race horses and married Ada Shawhan (sister of Mrs. Jim
Megibben). They had two children, Jack and Ada Mae, Jack born in Lexington and Ada Mae (now Mrs. Charles L.
Robinson) at Boscobel. According to Perrin's History the. Megibbens had 50 racehorses and 100 trotters and
roadsters. Outstanding among the racehorses were Huntress and Spring Bok. Spring Bok ran a dead heat in one of
the California Derbys, winning half of the $60,000 stake. A short time after this, Spring Bok killed a man on one of
the Clarence LeBus farms, literally pawing him to death, it is said. Jim Megibben's son, Will, at the age of 17, one
day took eight of their horses to the Latonia track and won eight races.

Boscobel was also occupied for a time during the, T. J. Megibben ownership by John Carter.

The next occupants of the old place were the Orah Ballingers Orah had previously kept the Lair store, post office
and depot, all in one building and lived in the large frame house still standing on the hill at Lair, known as Hillside
Retreat, which he sold along with his business to the late J. T. Wornall in 1896, and came to Boscobel to live. Here
their children, Marguerite (Mrs. Clyde Abbott), and Roy, were born. Miss Fanny Zoller, a sister of Mrs. Ballinger,
was then teaching school at Lair and often visited at Boscobel although she continued to live at Hillside Retreat with
the Wornalls. In 1904 Orah Ballinger sold the place to T. J. Craycraft and moved to town where Orah became
cashier of The Harrison Deposit Bank. They later moved to Cincinnati where he was first with the American
National, then the Fifth-Third Bank.

William David then John Lowe and finally a Rankin family, lived in the house, each for a short period while it was
still owned by Orah Ballinger.

When the Sidney Cumminses moved to Boscobel their sons, John and Joe, were three years and three months old,
respectively. Their daughter, Katherine, was born there. It was the Cumminses who built the porch on front of the
house in 1938. After their three children were grown, the Cummins family moved to town in 1941, but the place has
been in tile family ever since.

The people who have lived in the place since 1941 are, first the Wallace Sosbes next the Sterling Wagoners, then the
Virgil Feebacks and last the Donald Frymans. The present owners are Joe Cummins and Mrs. M. J. Dermody
(Katherine Cummins). The house, however, is now unoccupied.

John and Joe Cummins say they often wondered, while living there and have often wondered since. just why so
many tramps always stopped at Boscobel rather than the other houses nearer the road and railroad. We think the
wandering woman of early Boscobel is the answer. Passing tramps today may never see the tombstone of the
wandering woman in the family graveyard, but she probably started the word 150 years ago, which has passed on
from wanderer to wanderer on down through the years, a legend which is still a part of Boscobel. [5]

John married Sarah CUSTER, daughter of Paul KUSTAR (~1730-~1824) & Lucinda MALONE (~1725-). Born in


                                                       Page 25
                                               Register Report

1766 in Rockingham, Virginia. Sarah died in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky in 1847; she was 81. Buried in
Buried Indiana Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky.

They had the following children:
      27          i.      Mathias Custer (~1787-1860)
      28         ii.      William G. (1789-1863)
      29        iii.      John Wesley (1799-1867)
                iv.       Paul. Born in Kentucky.
                          Paul married Martha FRAZER.
      30         v.       Jacob
                vi.       Catherine. Born circa 1793. Catherine died in Girard, Macoupin, Illinois. on April 30,
                          1866; she was 73.
                          On April 6, 1815 when Catherine was 22, she married William Y. YOUNG, in Harrison
                          County, Kentucky.

                          E-mail message:
                          I am researching LAIR, YOUNG, and related families from Harrison County. My
                          3rd great grandmother was Catherine Ann LAIR, born c. 1793 ?, Harrison, KY,
                          MARRIAGE: 6 APR 1815, Cynthiana, Harrison, KY to William Y Y0UNG, died 30
                          April 1866, Girard, Macoupin, IL. She was the daughter of John A LAIR and
                          Sarah CUSTER. I have a great deal of information on the LAIR family, but
                          precious little on William Y YOUNG, who fought in the KY regiments during
                          the War of 1812.

                          Don Castella dcastell@interaccess.com
               vii.       Mary.
                          Mary married PEYTON.
      31       viii.      Sarah Ellen

9. Margaret LAIR.

Notes on Margaret Lair: [1]
This daughter of the immigrants, Matthias and Catharina Lair, married Jacob Custer in 1781. Records show two
daughters: Dorah Custer who married a Mr. Corcoran and moved to Alabama, and Catherine Custer who married
Charles Chrisman and had one daughter, Kittie, who married a Dr. Gray.

Kentucky was admitted to statehood in 1792 and stood alone for four perilous years on the frontier of civilization.
Her statehood was followed by the admission of Tennessee in 1796 and by Ohio in 1803. Thus Kentucky led the
way to the West and the settlers pushed across the confluent to take up their lands where the great states of
California, Oregon, Colorado and Texas were later carved. With the same intrepid spirit their ancestors had shown
when they came over the Wilderness Road and the Buffalo Trace into Kentucky, the Lair descendants of the fourth,
fifth and the sixth generations have made their homes throughout the West and have placed their names in the annals
of its history.

In 1781 Margaret married Jacob CUSTER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Dorah.
                          Dorah married CORCORAN.
      32         ii.      Catherine




                                                     Page 26
                                                Register Report



                                              Fourth Generation
                                _________________________________________
                      Family of Catharina Margaretha LEHRER (4) & Walter NEWMAN


10. Jonathan NEWMAN. Born in 1765.

Jonathan married Hannah SPEARS.

They had one child:
      33         i.       David

11. Mary NEWMAN.

Mary married David MOFFITT.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Walter.
                 ii.      John.
                iii.      Horatio.
                iv.       Franklin.

12. John NEWMAN.

John married Polly MOORE.

They had the following children:
      34          i.      Catharine
                 ii.      Fannie.
                          Fannie married ALLEN.
      35        iii.      Walter
                iv.       Phoebe.
                          Phoebe married Zebulun GILMOUR.
                 v.       Reuben.
      36        vi.       George


                            Family of Andrew LAIR (5) & Lady Frances HUBBARD


13. Martha “Patsy” LAIR. Born on December 28, 1780 in Lincoln, Kentucky. Martha “Patsy” died in Harrison,
Kentucky on October 7, 1857; she was 76. Buried in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky.

Notes on Martha Lair: [1]
Martha Lair, known as "Patsy," was born in 1780 in Lincoln County, Kentucky, and died in Harrison County in
1857. In 1803 she married George Smiserin Harrison County. This remarkable woman showed great courage at an
early age as she escaped capture and possible death by an Indian when she was not yet in her teens. There was
illness in the family of Andrew Lair and finding it necessary to make a trip through the woods to the mill, only
Martha was well enough to go. Her father cautioned her to save her horse on the way to the mill as his strength
might be needed for the return and told her to get her corn ground as quickly as possible. Reaching the mill she
found many people ahead of her and when the miller finished her meal and fastened the sack to her saddle, lt was
quite dark. Galloping through the dense woods, her horse suddenly shied and an Indian sprang from the thicket and
tried to catch her bridle.She remembered her father's instructions and whipping her horse, calling "go, Billie, go,"



                                                      Page 27
                                                 Register Report

she flattened herself out against his neck, dashed through thewoods, and watching every shadow reached her home
in safety, where she fell sobbing into her father's arms.

Martha Lair was twenty-three when she made her momentous visit to her relatives in Harrison County, taking three
days to make the trip on horseback, a distance of scarcely 80 miles from her Lincoln County home Accompanied by
a body-guard, she spent the nights along the way with friends, reaching the handsome home of her cousin, Charles
Lair at Lair Station, on the third day. Since the death of the original owner, Martha's uncle Matthias Lair, the home
was presided over by his son Charles. Living in the home was Charles' small niece, Betsy Smiser the three-year-old
daughter of Charles' sister Catherine and their neighbor, George Smiser. Catherine died soon after the birth of her
daughter Betsy and George Smiser then married another sister of Charles Lair, Mary, who died at the birth of twin
daughters, who also died. Being left a widower a second time and evidently liking the Lair girls, it was not long until
he was courting the lovely guest and cousin, Martha Lair. Thus the visit to the relatives in Harrison County lasted
for a lifetime and George Smiser is known to the family as the brave man who married three Lair girls, Catherine
and Mary, daughters of Matthias Lair, and their cousin, Martha, the daughter of Andrew.

Martha Lair Smiser's home was across the Licking River and not far from "The Cedars." It had been built for George
Smiser's first wife and was one of the earliest and most pretentious brick houses in Harrison County at that time.
Built of small hand-made bricks two stories high with an attic, the four large rooms and hall on the first floor were
done in "rice plaster" which had the glaze of fine porcelain. There were hard-carved mantels and chair-boards in the
house and its furnishings were considered the last word in elegance. Martha made the outside of her house as
beautiful as it was within and her flower garden with its intricate brick walks and pretty beds of blooming plants
soon became the envy of the countryside. However, she was more widely known for her herb garden which her
slaves called "old missus' yard garden." As there were no apothecary shops in those days, every doctor had to obtain
his medicinal plants and rootsand with other elements, mix his concoctions. Martha, with her knowledge of herbs,
soon became a godsend to the medical profession and doctors were oftenher distinguished guests. Being deeply
religious as were all the Lairs, she entertained her minister and his family and the work of her church was one of her
greatest interests.

Martha liked pretty clothes and gave the greatest care to her toilet, especially to the selection of "neckacher" cap and
"breast pin" to be worn that day. She rode to Cynthiana on horseback to do her shopping, taking along her favorite
maid, "Julie, " to carry her "carpet bag" of purchases. The merchants considered heran authority on fine goods and
her adoring slaves thought she knew everything. Living as they did on the Buffalo Trace, the slaves working on the
farm would frequently find bones of the mastodon and other pre-historic animals. These they carried to her and she
had them cleaned and recognizing each one, stored them in the "saddle house" to show to distinguished guests. A
good story of the loyalty of her slaves is told of "Ike," who opened the door of the"saddle house to show a
neighboring slave "old missus' bones." The visiting slave sneeringly said: "Why man, my missus, she knows the
name of every tree thet grows in this here woods," and Ike, not to be outdone, raised his powerful voice and shouted:
"Hesh yo mouf, nigger, I'm a-telling you, my Miss Patsy Smiser, she knows de names ob de stahs in Hebben."

Martha Lair Smiser was a noted housekeeper and her wines, cordials, pickles, jellies and preserves were famous.
The vegetable garden was her pride and delight and she knew how to store her vegetables in her cellar for winter
use. Her slaves became skillful in the curing of the fine old hams and in making the sausage by Martha's recipe and
mixing it in a trench from a hollowed log.

Martha had a gay disposition but she was also self-willed. Not agreeing with her in some small decision, she became
irritated with George and said: "If you will not agree with me in this, I will jump out of the window," whereas
George, without raising his eyes from the book he was reading, said in his broken English: "yump, Marthy, yump!"
Her gay laughter made everything right again.

George Smiser, the husband of Martha Lair, was born in 1772 in Virginia. As a young man of considerable means
he came to Kentucky to make his home, selecting the location on the Licking River as an admirable one to carry on
his business as he had learned the hatter's trade, a lucrative one in those days. Small dams were made in the river
where the beavers were trapped and making use of the eighty or so slaves he owned, he soon had a thriving business
at Lair Station. The pelts of the beavers were tanned by the negro slaves and the fine sewing of the watermelon pink


                                                       Page 28
                                                 Register Report

silk linings was done by young women who lived in the neighborhood. These elegant tall beaver hats, so fashionable
for the dandies of that day, were sent to Philadelphia where they sold for excellent price.

Some slaves were also used in the lead mines George Smiser owned and in the operation of his distillery. A note in
his Bible reads: "Put in a small copper distillery - made much of it, sold it in Maisville and Lexington at .10 and 12
1/2 per gal." Although his "it" was cheaply sold, George made money on it as he did on the large farm he operated.

George Smiser was the grandson of the immigrant George Smiser who at nine years of age came to America with
his widowed mother Barbara Smiser, his brother Matthias, 16, and his sister Margaret, 20. Sailing from Rotterdam
on "The Britannia" they landed in this country September 21, 1731. The husband and father,Marton Schmeisser
(Smiser) served as second in command under Frederidk V, and fell mortally wounded at the battle of Würtenburg,
an important engagement of The Thirty Years War between the Catholics and the Protestants. This war was bitter as
all rellgious wars are and as it was won by the Catholics, the Protestants found it advisable to seek new homes in
America where they could worship God as they pleased.

The family of Schmeisser, or Smeisser, is one of the oldest German families of free or noble descent, who flourished
among the Silesian Knighthood. Known as "Schmeissers von Ehrenpreisberg" their castle was located on the Rhine
and their coat-of-arms shows the crown and the lifted arm hurling a javelin, thus giving the name Schmeisser which
means "one who throws." In America the name has been variously spelled; Schmeisser, Smeisser. Smizer, Smyser,
Smiser.

Martha Lair and George Smiser had the following eight children: Samuel Merritt Smiaer married Rebecca Frazer;
John Hilton Smiser married Julian Edwards; George Smiser married (1) Mary Allen, (2) Margaret Collier, (3)
Martha Wilson; Catherine Smiser married John Wesley Lair, a first cousin of her mother's; Darius Smiser married
(1) Louisa Smith, (2) Sarah Jane Howe; William Smiser married Helena Lair, his first cousin; Mary Smiser married
James Frazer; Celia Smiser who was unmarried.

In explanatlon of the above Smiser-Lair marriages: Catherine Smiser, daughter of Martha Lair Smiser, was the
granddaughter of Andrew Lair and she married John Wesley Lair, the son of John Lair who was a brother of
Andrew Lair, thus John Wesley Lair was a first cousin of Martha Lair Smiser, his wife's mother.

William Smiser, the son of Martha Lair Smiser and the grandson of Andrew Lair,married Helena Lair, the daughter
of John Lair and the granddaughter of Andrew Lair, showing them to be first cousins.

The two John Lairs are not to be confused. One was a brother of Andrew, the other was a son of Andrew.

On January 11, 1803 when Martha “Patsy” was 22, she married George SMISER, son of Mathias SMISER & , in
Kentucky. Born on December 30, 1772. George died in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky on April 22, 1856;
he was 83.

They had the following children:
      37           i.     Samuel Merritt (1804-1870)
      38          ii.     John Milton (1807-1894)
      39        iii.      George (1809-1875)
      40         iv.      Catherine (1811-)
      41          v.      Darius (1814-1909)
                 vi.      William. Born on October 17, 1817. William died in December 1894; he was 77.
                          On September 18, 1844 when William was 26, he married Helena P. LAIR, daughter of
                          John LAIR (18) & Elizabeth BUCHANAN. Born on October 3, 1826. Helena P. died in
                          1900; she was 73.
                vii.      Mary “Polly”. Born in October 1820. Mary “Polly” died on April 5, 1891; she was 70.
                          Mary “Polly” married James FRAZER.
               viii.      Celia (Selah?). Born on December 24, 1825.




                                                       Page 29
                                              Register Report

14. Elizabeth LAIR. Born in 1774 in Kentucky. Elizabeth died in Missouri in 1888; she was 114.

Elizabeth first married BRADY.

Elizabeth second married Thomas POPE.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William.
                 ii.      Andrew.
                iii.      Thomas.

15. William LAIR. Born in 1775. William died in Russell County, Kentucky in 1875; he was 100.

William married Mary GRAHAM.

They had the following children:
                   i.     Margaret.
                          Margaret married Dr. R.C. HILL.
                  ii.     Enoch Green.
                          Enoch Green married Lucy STAPP.
                iii.      Martha Jane.
                          Martha Jane married John P. BUSTER.
                 iv.      Almira.
                          Almira married Simeon YAKEY.
                  v.      John.
                          John married Harriet OWENS.
                 vi.      Emily.
                          Emily married Edward TILLER.
                vii.      William Dixon.
                          William Dixon married Marie HAYNER.
      42       viii.      Thomas P. (1805-1885)

16. James LAIR. Born in 1778.

James married ROBINSON.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William.
                 ii.      Mollie.

17. Hubbard LAIR. Born in 1783.

Notes on Hubbard Lair: [1]
Hubbard Lair, born in 1783, married Julia Montgomery. Their children were: William Lair, who married a Miss
Wilkinson; Andrew Lair who married Mary Ann Wilson, and John Montgomery Lair who married Mary Tatum.

Hubbard married Julia MONTGOMERY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William.
                          William married WILKENSON.
                 ii.      Andrew.
                          Andrew married Mary Ann WILSON.
                iii.      John Montgomery.
                          John Montgomery married Mary TATUM.


                                                    Page 30
                                                 Register Report


18. John LAIR.

John married Elizabeth BUCHANAN.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Helena P. Born on October 3, 1826. Helena P. died in 1900; she was 73.
                          On September 18, 1844 when Helena P. was 17, she married William SMISER, son of
                          George SMISER (1772-1856) & Martha “Patsy” LAIR (13) (1780-1857). Born on
                          October 17, 1817. William died in December 1894; he was 77.
                 ii.      Elizabeth.
                          Elizabeth married Jonathan SMITH.
                iii.      Catherine.
                          Catherine married Charles SMITH.

19. Mary LAIR. Born in 1788. Mary died in 1839; she was 51.

Mary Lair was the sixth child of Andrew and Frances Hubbard Lair. She was born in 1782, and married William
Pope. Their daughter Helena, married (1) William Faulkner and had one daughter who married William Huffman.
Her second marriage was to John Miller Anderson and had four sons and three daughters. Married names of
daughters are: Robertson, Thomas and Keller. [1]

Mary married William POPE.

They had one child:
      43         i.        Helena (1808-1891)


                          Family of Capt. Matthias LAIR (6) & Anna Elizabeth RUSH


20. Charles LAIR. Born in 1775 in Virginia. Charles died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky in 1860; he was 85.

CHARLES LAIR [1]

Charles Lair, the oldest child of Matthias and Ann Elizabeth Rush Lair, born in Virginia in 1775, was a boy of
sixteen when the family made the long and dangerous trek from their home in Virginia to their new home in
Kentucky and no doubt was the principal assistant of his father and uncle. He lived to be 85 years of age, dying in
1860, and was well remembered by my mother, Helen Lair Ward, who described him as a large man, very
handsome, with brilliant mind and known to her and the entire relationship as "Uncle Charlie" although he was a
first cousin of her father's.

This remarkable man of vision was farmer, stockman, architect, scientist and above all, a great scholar. It was he
who developed the land in the wilderness until it became a magnificent farm; who added to his livestock until he
became known in all that section for his successful dealings; who built the famous barn in 1811 without a planing
mill and without nails; who designed and built his beautiful house in 1812, "The Cedars," known throughout
Kentucky as an architectural gem and admired by the best architects in this country for one hundred and forty-five
years. His library, built up through the years, was a remarkable one, showing his unusual taste and his great breadth
of knowledge.

Upon the death of his father, Matthias Jr., Charles shouldered the responsibility of his mother and the eight younger
brothers and sisters, caring tenderly for them all. In 1801 he married Sallie Anderson and with the arrival of his own
children, he found the double log cabin crowded and began making plans for the building of a magnificent house.




                                                       Page 31
                                                 Register Report

Started by Charles Lair in 1812 and completed in 1828, this house was built at a cost of $40,000, a tremendous sum
for that day, and could not be built today for many times that amount. In 1930 the main part of this exquisite house
was burned and today only the ell of the house and the old library wing are left standing. The porches, however,
were saved and one can be seen on the ell where it is used by the present occupants. Also, if you dig about in the
grass, you can plainly discern the foundation of the main section of the house. We have several pictures, two in this
booklet, to show the perfect proportions of the house and to give one an idea of the grandeur of that house that
Charles Lair built.

For one hundred and two years The Cedars was the center of gay social life for that section of Kentucky and a guest
in those days would have found himself in a small yard after entering by the gate at the side and would have
followed a wide brick walk to the main door. There were many brick walks in the yard, laid out in a symmetrical
pattern, flower beds between and with a sundial in the middle of the yard. (The original sundial is in the possession
of the family now and copies of it have been made.) The house had a perfectly proportioned portico at either end of
the main hall, these two porticoes having graceful small pillars set high on iron standards which gave the pillars the
look of being suspended as they were unattached at the top. The roof of the portico was curved, giving the whole an
exceedingly light and graceful appearance. The doorway into the hall was duplicated at the other end and these
doorways were fan-shaped with leaded panes of glass that had been brought in from Philadelphia. The hall was
tremendous with the stairway, long and shallow of tread, up one side, across on a long landing then up a shorter
flight to the floor above and the bedrooms. The floors were of wide ash, the woodwork carved and painted white, On
the left of the hall was the parlor, a large room running the full depth of the house with ample space for the large
pieces of mahogany furniture brought in from Philadelphia and New Orleans. Around the wall ran a molding of
wood with sandwich glass knobs on which hung pictures at even distances apart. These pictures, well remembered
by members of the family, were scenes of Germany and the Rhineland and hung on silk cords. Other pieces of
furniture were made by cabinet makers in Maysville and Lexington of the native woods; curly sugartree, wild cherry
and walnut. But the wonderful piece of furniture in the parlor was the piano, one of the earliest in Kentucky. This
instrument was made in Maysville by two brothers who were cabinet makers and had learned the making of spinets
and pianos in "the old country." Only two were made by these brothers, and Charles Lair was fortunate in being able
to buy one of them. The piano was short, more the type of a spinet than a piano, was ornamented in front by a brass
sunburst and was lined with sky-blue silk. The magnificent clock from this house is now in the home of a
descendant.

From the parlor you went down several steps into what was called the "library porch," a small porch closed on the
back but open on the side next the yard. Crossing this porch you entered the library, a beautiful room with windows
front and back, a hand-carved mantel and with built-in bookcases, beautifully carved also with "butterfly shelves"
for the many books Charles Lair had collected. He bought his books in Philadelphia and the larger cities in this
country, often sending to London for one he especially desired. The most remarkable thing in the library was the
ingenious way he provided for the study of his maps. On either side of the back windows, behind the shutters, were
small grooves with heavy cords and when these were pulled and the door in the ceiling was opened, the maps
descended into the room from a small attic above, thus permitting the student to carefully study the map on either
side. After getting his information, Charles would pull his cords and the map would be drawn up to the room above
and the door closed. There were several cords, each attached to a large map and this novel idea of Charles Lair
permitted them to be studied without using too much space in the beautiful room.

At the end of the house, beyond the library, was a tool room and also a "saddle house" both used for the many things
needed about the place.

On the right side of the hall as you entered the house was the "family room" which was a very large room running
the depth of the house Back of it was the "girl's room" and across a porch was a large room known as the "boy's
room." Beyond it was the loom room.

At right angles to the main part of the house and across this last porch was the "ell" with dining room, kitchen and a
room back with attic above used as servant's quarters. The kitchen had a large stone open fireplace where the
cooking was done and was equipped with cranes, cooking utensils of copper, etc. This ell was the first part of the
house built by Charles and was occupied by the family during the years the handsome main part was being


                                                       Page 32
                                                  Register Report

constructed.

Crossing the yard from the ell and standing where the sundial stood, one could study the beautiful lines of the house:
the roof line and the dormer windows in the bedrooms above; the perfect proportion of the windows of the
downstairs rooms and the bricks, painted white, which were laid in what is known as "Flemish bond" by the students
of our early architecture. These bricks were hand-made by the slaves on the place and the perfection of their work
made them among the finest examples in the state.

Just beyond the sundial was the spring house which was a small brick structure with conical roof and reached by
several store steps. Within it was always cool, even on the hottest summer days, and as children we liked to go there
and sit while we drank our milk from the crocks in the spring. This spring probably determined Matthias on the
location of that double cabin of his when he first explored his land after arrival.

In 1811 Charles Lair built his barn, which is said to be the oldest log barn standing in Kentucky. Patterned after the
"Switzer" barns built by the Germans in Pennsylvania and Virginia which were copied from those built in the
Rhineland, this great old barn had the roof raised in one day by 500 men who came for a big barbecue dinner as the
guests of Charles Lair. Sheep, pigs and chickens were roasted in pits and the preparations went on for days before
hand. It stands on a hillside on a foundation of stone and has stalls for the livestock below where it is protected
against the hill. On the upside there is a tremendous revolving door, 40 feet wide, that turns on a huge squared log
serving as pivot. This door enables the wagons to drive in on one side, turn round and go out on the other side. Two
bins were on either side built for grain.

At the beginning of the War of 1812, men in that section were mustered in at the barn. Charles Lair, standing in the
great doorway, held a hat in which were placed slips of paper to be drawn by the men. A story in the family is that
Charles drew a slip for service and his brother drew one that was blank. His brother said: "You have children and
your family needs you. I will give you the blank slip and will take the one for service." The story related was that the
brother was killed and that Charles grieved for the rest of his life, because his brother had sacrificed his life for him.
Just which brother it was who so unselfishly gave his life in this manner has never been exactly clear but as Joseph
died quite young, unmarried, and either in New Orleans or in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, it is believed it was he.

In 1845 Charles Lair decided to build a vault on the banks of the Licking River just below "The Cedars" and to place
in it the bodies of the members of the family who were buried in a nearby graveyard. He secured the best workmen
possible and had a large room or opening dynamited out of the solid limestone cliff. A story is that one of the
workmen wee blown into the river below by a large charge of dynamite but escaped with only minor injuries. After
the stone vault was completed, a door of iron was hung and placed above, a slab of marble on which are the words:
"Please do not disturb the remains of the Sleeping Dead" and the date 1845. A ledge was left before the door with
room enough for a procession of people to stand during a service. A small iron gate was placed between this ledge
and the pathway that led to the vault from the house. After completion of the vault, Charles bought in Maysville
several large iron coffins which were being used at that time in some of the cities. These coffins were to replace
those in the graveyard that had decayed and in some instances, fallen apart. For the ceremony of moving the bodies
from the graveyard to the vault on the banks of the river, he invited all the relatives and friends who lived nearby.
Cousin Dink Smith, a granddaughter of Charles Lair, was a small girl at the time and accompanied by her mother
went to the ceremony. She said: "Grandpa had a sense of the dramatic and he asked that all hold hands as each
coffin was opened and the bodies moved to the new iron coffins. The first to be opened was that of his mother, Ann
Elizabeth Rush Lair, and as Charles Lair lifted her up all saw the beautiful woman's face, her bright dress, golden
brown hair bound with a brown velvet ribbon embroidered in gold leaves. As they all pressed forward to get a better
look, whiff, She fell into dust." Cousin Dink related that the negroes moaned and wailed and she, getting the fright
of her small life, ran under her mother's tilters, nearly upsetting that dignified lady.

As the iron coffins and such others as were in good condition were placed in the vault, the headstones used in the
graveyard were placed at the head of each. After all the members of the family had been moved into the vault,
Charles Lair gathered up the bones of the twenty forters who had been massacred at Ruddle's Fort and had them
placed in two stone coffins and put in the vault. These bones are the only remains of the pioneer forters known to be
in Kentucky preserved in this way and had it not been for Charles Lair and his thoughtfulness, they would have


                                                        Page 33
                                                 Register Report

remained near the mule pen back of "The Cedars."

In 1909 Cousin Eliza Lair, a descendant of Charles Lair and with her sister, owner of "The Cedars" met me at the
vault with undertakers, photographers, cement men, etc., and after bringing the iron coffins from the vault in order to
take pictures of them, they were placed in rows in the vault and cemented in, so as not to be disturbed in the years to
come. There they are today and where they should remain. The vault and surroundings should be kept in better
order, as Charles Lair left money for that purpose, and the Lair Association should see that it is done well.

Charles Lair died in 1860, age 85, after a long and useful life, and was pieced in the vault he had built. He was
indeed the Great Charles Lair.

The children of Charles Lair and his wife, Sallie Anderson Lair, are as follows:

Catherine and Betsey, died as infants;
Isaac Newton Lair married Lucretia Jamison;
Sallie Lair married William Redmon;
Martin Luther Lair married Nancy Williams, and built the Colonial house across the road;
Matthias Lair married Rowena Lair;
William Lair married Mary Elizabeth Lair;
Joseph Lair, unmarried;
Eliza Lair married George Redmon;
Cynthia Lair married John Redmon;
John Lair married (1) Emily Redmon, (2) Maria Varnon.

In explanation of the Lair-Lair marriages: Matthias Lair, son of Charles and grandson of the first Matthias in
Kentucky, married Rowena Lair, the daughter of Matthias Lair and the granddaughter of the first John in Kentucky,
Thus Matthias and Rowena were second cousins.

William Lair, son of Charles Lair, married Mary Elizabeth, the daughter of Matthias Lair. Charles Lair and Matthias
were brothers and the sons of the first Matthias in Kentucky. Thus William and Mary Elizabeth Lair were first
cousins.

On August 20, 1801 when Charles was 26, he married Sallie ANDERSON, daughter of William ANDERSON
(1753-1830) & Elizabeth HINKSON (-ca1790), in Harrison County, Kentucky. Born in 1781. Sallie died in Lair,
Harrison County, Kentucky on April 9, 1860; she was 79.

They had the following children:
      44          i.      Isaac Newton (~1807->1893)
      45         ii.      Matthias (1813-)
      46        iii.      William (1816-1860)
                iv.       Joseph. Born on June 10, 1818. Joseph died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky on July
                          11, 1861; he was 43.
      47         v.       Elizabeth (1820-1847)
      48        vi.       Martin Luther (1817-1862)
               vii.       Cynthia. Born about 1823 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Cynthia died in Lair Family
                          Vault, Harrison County, Kentucky on July 22, 1845; she was 22. [6]
                          On July 22, 1842 when Cynthia was 19, she married John REDMON, son of Charles
                          REDMON (1779-1851) & Mary RYBOLT (1785-1856). Born in 1818 in Harrison
                          County, Kentucky.

                           Notes for JOHN REDMON: Redmon Distilling Company is proprietor of Distillery No.
                           15, of the 6th District. It is located on Leesburg pike, a half mile from Cynthiana, on
                           Gray's Run, and was built about 1859 by John Redmon. After passing through several
                           hands, it was bought by the Redmon Distilling Company, in March 1880, when buildings



                                                       Page 34
                                                 Register Report

                           were fully repaired and rebuilt, and new machinery put in. [Perrin, p. 228] (Tentatively
                           attributed to this John Redmon)

                           Notes for CYNTHIA LAIR: Buried in the Lair Family Vault, Lair Station. "Cinthy, wife
                           of John Redmon, died July 22, 1845, aged 22 years." [McAdams, Kentucky and Pioneer
                           Court Records, p. 228]

                           Notes for John Redmon: [7]
                           1. 1850 Census for Harrison Co., Kentucky. Roll 203, page 61 - Jno Redmon-32,
                           Elizabeth-21, Joseph-01.

                           Marriage Notes for Elizabeth Pugh and John Redmon:
                           1. Marriage Records, 1794-1893, Harrison County Clerk of the County Court. LDS
                           Microfilm #0216877 - Bond #4040, John Redmon, Elizabeth Pugh, License 5/31/1848,
                           Marriage 6/1/1848, Married by S.S. Deering.
      49       viii.       John (1825->1882)
                ix.        Catherine. Born in 1804.
                 x.        Betsey. Born in 1806.
      50        xi.        Sally Ann (1809-1883)

21. Catherine LAIR. Born on March 30, 1778 in Virginia. Catherine died in Kentucky in 1800; she was 21. Buried
in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky.

Notes on Catherine Lair: [1]
Catherine Lair, born in Virginia in 1777 was the second child of Matthias and Ann Elizabeth Rush Lair and came
over the trace with them to their new home in Kentucky. She died in 1800 and was placed in the family vault. She
married their neighbor, George Smiser, and it was for her he built his home. They had one child, Elizabeth (Betsey)
who lived in the home of her uncle Charles Lair after the death of her mother and until the marriage of her father to
her aunt, Mary Lair. After the death of Mary Lair Smiser, the little girl returned to the home of her uncle where she
lived until her father married his third wife, Martha Lair, when she then went to live with her father and step-mother.
When Betsey was but fourteen years old she ran off and married Jacob Dove Harter, a young man who was serving
as an apprentice to her father at his "hattery" conducted at Lair Station. In the middle of the night Betsey slipped to
the attic of the home, located her saddle and bridle in the dark, and dropping them out the window to the waiting
arms of "Jakie" stole out the front door and away they went to Falmouth, Kentucky, to be married at the home of her
cousin, Paul Custer Lair. Returning some time 1ater, her father angrily shouted at her in his broken English but her
step-mother, Martha Lair Smiser, kindly took them in. They did not remain there for long, however, but went to
Ohio to make their home among the relatives of Jakie Harter, where they prospered, reared a large family and often
returned to visit the Kentucky kin. The large fortune of the Harters came from the manufacture of their well-known
medicine known as "Harter's Little Liver Pills" and "Harter's Iron Tonic." It was a bitter dose but every spring,
whether we needed it or not, all five of us were rounded up and given a thorough course of treatment. Tears and
protests were unavailing. Mama said firmly, waving the large tablespoon: "Open your mouth, you know it is a great
medicine and that it is made by our Lair kinfolks." Verily there was no limitation to the Lair loyalty.

On February 28, 1798 when Catherine was 19, she married George SMISER, son of Mathias SMISER & . Born on
December 30, 1772. George died in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky on April 22, 1856; he was 83.

They had one child:
                 i.        Elizabeth. Born on January 20, 1799 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Elizabeth died in
                           Troy, Miami County, Ohio on May 15, 1871; she was 72.

22. Matthias LAIR Jr. Born on January 4, 1795 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Matthias died in Harrison County,
Kentucky on March 10, 1841; he was 46. Buried in Harrison County, Kentucky.

In 1826 when Matthias was 30, he married Rachel SIDLE.



                                                       Page 35
                                              Register Report


They had the following children:
      51          i.      Sarah Ann Eliza (1835-)
                 ii.      Thomas Pain. Born in 1830.
                          Thomas Pain first married Mary VEATCH, daughter of David VEATCH (1792-) & Mary
                          BROADWELL (1799-). Born in 1835. Mary died on October 25, 1857; she was 22.
                          Thomas Pain second married Jane MEGIBBEN.
      52        iii.      Mary Elizabeth (1827-1865)

23. John LAIR. Born in 1784. John died in 1821; he was 37.

John married Peggy BELL.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Betsey. Born in 1815. Betsey died in 1834; she was 19.
                          In 1833 when Betsey was 18, she married GEN Asbury STEELE.
                 ii.      Joseph. Born in 1817. Joseph died in 1821; he was 4.
                          Died in infancy (4 years of age). [1]

      53       iii.      John (1820-1888)

24. William LAIR. Born in 1784 in Virginia.

William married Emily BELL.

They had the following children:
                   i.     Charles.
                          Charles married Sarah ZIMMERMAN.
                  ii.     Saphronia.
                          Saphronia married Rudolph ZIMMERMAN.
                iii.      John.
                          John married Elvina WILLIAMS.
                 iv.      Emily Jane.
                          Emily Jane married S.V. HELVIE.
                  v.      Sarah.
                          Sarah married Richard THOMAS.
                 vi.      Joseph.
                          Joseph married Sarah ROSS.
                vii.      Rachel.
                          Rachel married Wells WILLETT.
               viii.      Ossie.
                          Ossie married Frank PIPER.
      54         ix.      Matthias
                  x.      Henrietta.
                          Henrietta married Albert STIFFLER.
                 xi.      Addie.
                          Addie married Dr. John NESBIT.


                              Family of Mary LEHRER (7) & John RUDDELL


25. Cornelius RUDDLE. Born on November 15, 1780 in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia. Cornelius
died in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia) on October 14, 1876; he was 95. Buried in Ruddle, (West)
Virginia.



                                                   Page 36
                                                Register Report


On March 24, 1808 when Cornelius was 27, he first married Hanah DYER.

They had one child:
      55         i.       James Dyer (1809-1894)

On April 28, 1852 when Cornelius was 71, he second married Margaret BROWN. Born in 1805. Margaret died in
1865; she was 60. Buried in Dyer Cemetery.

26. Isaac RIDDLE. Born on December 15, 1791 in Western Rockingham County, Virginia. Isaac died in Riddle
Cemetery Near Chimney Rock on October 16, 1882; he was 90.

On November 17, 1829 when Isaac was 37, he married Deborah KANESTER. Born on August 8, 1806. Deborah
died in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia on June 7, 1886; she was 79.

They had the following children:
      56          i.      John Malcolm (1830-1911)
      57         ii.      Joseph Newman (1832-1921)


                                  Family of John LAIR (8) & Sarah CUSTER


27. Mathias Custer LAIR. Born about 1787 in Virginia. Mathias Custer died in 1860; he was 73.

Notes on Mathias Custer Lair: [1]
The oldest child of John and Sallie Custer Lair, born in Virginia in 1787, was Matthias Custer Lair. He married Jane
Anderson,
The children of Matthias Custer and Jane Lair were:
Rowena Lair married Matthias Lair;
John Miller Lair married Sue Grimes;
William Lair married (1) Sue Wyatt, (2) Mattie Clay;
Margaret Lair married (1) Dan Shawhan, (2) Joe Taylor;
Jacob Lair married Emily Lair;
Abraham Lair married Fannie Dungan;
Zerelda Lair married Ben Reynolds.

In explanation of the Lair-Lair marriages: Rowena Lair, the daughter of Matthias Custer Lair and the granddaughter
of John Lair, the first in Kentucky, married Matthias Lair, the son of Charles Lair and the grandson of the first
Matthias Lair in Kentucky. Rowens and Matthias Lair were second cousins.

Jacob Lair, the son of Matthias Custer Lair and grandson of the first John in Kentucky, married Emily Lair, the
daughter of Addison Lair, granddaughter of William Lair and the great granddaughter of John the first of Kentucky.
Jacob Lair and his wife, Emily Lair, were first cousins once removed as Jacob's father and Emily's grandfather were
brothers.

On June 23, 1817 when Mathias Custer was 30, he married Jane ANDERSON, daughter of William ANDERSON
(1753-1830) & Elizabeth MILLER, in Harrison County, Kentucky. Born in 1785 in Harrison County, Kentucky.
Jane died in 1868; she was 83.

They had the following children:
      58          i.      Margaret (1827-)
      59         ii.      John Miller (1820-)
      60        iii.      Rowena (Roanna)


                                                      Page 37
                                                Register Report

      61        iv.       William
                 v.       Jacob.
                          Jacob married Emily LAIR, daughter of Addison LAIR (62) & Nancy WOOD.
                vi.       Abraham.
                          Abraham married Fannie DUNGAN.
                vii.      Zerelda.
                          Zerelda married Benjamin REYNOLDS.

28. William G. LAIR. Born on November 9, 1789 in Virginia. William G. died in Marion, MO on March 16, 1863;
he was 73. Buried in Woodland Cemetery, Marion, MO.

Notes on William G. Lair: [1]
The second child of John Lair and Sallie Custer Lair was William G. Lair, born in Virginia in 1789. He married (1)
Mary Anderson, (2) Mrs. Bradley. Children were:

Robert Lair, wife's name not given. Record states there were six children;
Addison Lair married (1) Nancy Wood; (2) Nancy Blackford;
George Lair, wife's name not given. Six sons,, four daughters;
James Lair, wife's name not given. One son and one daughter;
Wesley Lair. No other record;
Susan Lair married a Mr. Vanskike;
Margaret Lair married a Mr. Moss;
Mary Lair married a Mr. Pepper; Mamie Lair married a Hr. Howell;
Fannie Lair married a Mr. Davenport.

William G. married Mary ANDERSON.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Robert.
      62         ii.      Addison
                iii.      George.
                iv.       James.
                 v.       Wesley.
                vi.       Susan.
                          Susan married William VANSCHOAICKE, son of Robert VANSCHOAICKE (~1772-)
                          & Elizabeth ALLEN (1770-).

                          Contributed to KyGenWeb Project by: "Mia K. Fleegel"


                          The original copy of The Genealogy of Our Parentage was discovered by Mia K. Adkins
                          Fleegel in the possession of Emmett and Vernon Clark of Philadelphia, Marion County,
                          Missouri on August 19, 1974. They graciously allowed me to borrow the little booklet
                          and photocopy it in nearby Hannibal, Missouri. Emmett and Vernon Clark are both now
                          deceased and I have no knowledge of the whereabouts of the original. In the late 1970's I
                          donated a copy to the Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort, Kentucky while visiting
                          there and believe it is still available to researchers. This copy was transcribed by myself,
                          Mia K. Fleegel in April, 2000. Spelling and punctuation is as it appears in the original
                          copy. Known errors are noted in the footnotes.

                          [Before posting the only change I made was to remove the hypens when a word was at
                          the end of a line so that I could make use of word-wrap. nt]

                          The Genealogy of Our Parentage




                                                      Page 38
                     Register Report

The genealogy of our parents as handed down by our father to brother J. D. Clark some
thirty years ago. As he gave a portion from memory there may be some omissions and
mistakes but in the main correct.

Our great-grand father John Clark, was born in England about the year 1750 of
Scotch-Irish parentange. He came when quite a lad to America, married in Maryland to
a Miss Baker about the beginning of the Revolutionary war. He moved to Kentucky in
the latter part of the seventeenth century, before what was known as the Dark Days. He
was a rugged eccentric Scotchman prosperous and charitable. He had much grain when
that country was stricken with famine and he opened the doors to his graineries and gave
it away. All through his life a widow was never charge a cent for grain to make bread.

He was converted to the Methodist religion through the Wesley meetings in London and
always adheared to that belief. He built the first log church that was in that section of
Kentucky on his farm and named it Pisga, the sight of the church is yet known.

The Baker family were ardent Revolutionist giving their means and some of them their
lives to the cause. By agreement John Clark stayed with the family while the Baker boys
joined the army.

Of this marriage three children were raised, two girls and one boy. One of
the girls married Josiah Vanschoaick* the other a Mr. Tewell. Samuel, the
son born May 13th, 1777, died March 12, 1858, on a farm formerly owned by
Robert Vanschoiack, in Mason county, Kentucky, on the Mayesville and
Lexington road.

* A marriage of Hezikiah Vanschiack and Sarah Clark was recorded in Mason Co., KY
on July 16, 1798.

--- 2 ---

Samuel Clark, our grandfather, married Miss Sallie Fife, who was raised near Gilford
Court House, Virginia*. She was eight years old when the battle of that place was
fought. She always remembered the sound of the fire arms and confusion of the day when
it was announced that General Green was repulsed. Her father was in the battle and lived
to welcome LaFayette on his first visit to that place after Independence was
acknowledged. The Fifes were Scotch, being very early settlers in that State.

Samuel and family settled in Kentucky in the latter part of the Seventeenth Century
accompanying his father. In character a high roller, fight, sing drink whiskey and for a
good time in general, for all, was genial and charitable, twice rich and three times poor.
All that knew him loved him. At his funeral the greatest gathering that was ever known in
that country. As a fighter was never whipped, in his last fight defeated the bully of
Bourbon county, in a pitch battle.

Their first home was on Shannon River in Nicholas county, having bought a small farm, a
mill and a distillery was on the farm as was the custom in those days; the house and mill
was below the dam and one night the dam broke and all had a narrow escape for their
lives. Many funny incidents our father would tell as grandfather had told him of their ups
and downs in the early settlement of the State.

Of this family there were four children born all boys, namely: Singleton, James, John and
Daniel, the      families of Singleton and Daniel still live in Kentucky, the families of
James and John in Missouri.

James, our father, born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, February 28th, 1800, he married



                           Page 39
                      Register Report

Polly Vanshoaicke, near Mayesville, Mason county, Kentucky, March 15th, 1826, who
was born at that place February, 23rd, A.D. 1806.

*Guilford Court House is located in Greensboro, North Carolina – not Virginia as stated
in this piece.

--- 3 ---

They immigrated to Missouri in the fall of 1830, with Robert Vanschoaicke and family
and all lived together in a log house hastily built that winter; it being the winter of the
deep snow. The house is standing near Woodland on the farm owned by Wm. Howell.

In the spring of 1831 moved on a track of land near South River. In the summer of 1836
sold out to a Mr. Jack Snell, of Kentucky, that was during the time of the Muldrow and
Ely boom. Mr. Snell agreed to give two thousand dollars for the 160 acres, paying four
hundred dollars down, the remaining sixteen hundred dollars was to come at a fixed date
to Monticello, Lewis county, Missouri, by a certain man of Kentucky. When father
received word that the money was ready for him he went to Monticello after it, it was in
gold and silver, mostly silver, so he carried it in a small hemp sack on the pommel of his
saddle from Monticello to near where Woodland is. Snell never settled on the land but
sold it to a Mr. Smith.

The fall after selling to Snell father bought land and moved to Warren Township near
Shannon's Mill and Distillery, there lived and died January 29th, 1876. Polly our mother,
dying two years previous.

Of this family there were ten children born, seven sons and three daughters.

Robert Vanschoaicke, our grandfather, was born in Pennsylvania of Dutch parentage
about 1773. He married Elizabeth Allen about 1793, they moved to Kentucky soon
after, and improved a farm in Mason county on the Mayesville and Lexington Road,
twelve miles from Mayesville. They built the first brick residence in that part of the
country. He sold the farm in 1830 and came to Missouri traveling overland crossing
the Mississippi River at St. Louis.

He settled on the land now owned by Wm. Howell remained their a few years and sold
out; he then moved to Monroe county settling on a farm about 4 1/2 miles

--- 4 ---

south of Hunnewell, where he died February 20th, 1853. He possessed the Dutch
characteristics in many ways. In religious belief a Baptist. He served in the War of 1812
under General Shelby. He was at the      Battle of the Thames River where the Indians
were defeated and the great Tecumseh was killed. He saw Tecumseh charge on General
Johnson but Johnson did not kill him and many of the soldiers fired on him at the same
time and his body was pierced by several bullets. He always deplored the fact that the
body of the old chieftian was afterward mutulated.

Elizabeth Allen was born in 1770 and married Robert Vanschoiacke as previously stated.
She was English, and East Virginian Tuckeyhoe. Part of the Allen family moved to Ohio
and became famousf in politics of that State. Another branch moved to Kentucky from
there to Missouri.

Of this marriage there were born seven sons and three daughters, all born in Kentucky.

Hezikiah married in Kentucky to a Miss Nancy Grover. Jesse was married to a Miss Patsy



                            Page 40
                     Register Report

Howser. Enoch was afflicted and died soon after coming to Missouri.

William married in Marion county, Missouri, to a Miss Susan Lair, a daughter of William
Lair who lived near Woodland.

Robert married a Miss Holley near Woodland. Samuel married a Miss Ary Ann
Ragsdale of Monroe county. Alfred to a Miss Louisia Frazier of Monroe county.

Louisa married Joseph Ragsdale her first husband, her second husband was John Milan.
Nancy married James Williamson of Monroe county. Polly married James Clark. These
are the names of the children of Robert and Elizabeth Vanschoaicke and all came to
Missouri with their parents. The mother died in Monroe county on the farm July 3rd,
1844.

[continued]

--- 10---

MARRIAGES.

John Samuel Garner and Miss Ella C. Bush were married March 25th, 1884. James R.
Garner and Mollie Rector were married March 6th, 1890. Alonzo Garner and Annie
Rector were married March 2nd, 1897. Floran Garner and Ada Garner were married
December 28th, 1898.

DEATHS.

Andrew T. Garner died December 2nd, 1867. Robert Garner died January 16th, 1869.
Will Edward Garner died November 2nd, 1877. Thomas J. Garner died October 18th,
1877. Elizabeth Jane Garner died at Nevada, Mo., and was laid to rest in the cemetery at
that place. She joined the church at Mt. Vernon in 1858. John Thomas Garner died at
Monroe City, he came to Monroe City on a visit and died while there.

There were three children born to the union of John S. Garner and Ella Garner, his wife.
Velpo, born in Palmyra March 27th, 1888. Elizabeth born November 23rd, 1892. Died
November 25th, 1892. Robert Francis, born October 13th, 1902.

Sarah F. Clark was born July 31st, 1838, was married to Elias M. Tuley, March 3rd,
1875, by Rev. Boling. To this union there was one heir, Ida Belle Tuley, born April
20th, 1878. Elias M. Tuley was born in Kentucky September 22nd, 1815. Died July
3rd, 1898.

Robert Newland Howell, born July 16th, 1868, was married to Ida Bell Tuley, October
24th, 1901.

Sister Elizabeth and sister Sarah joined the M. E. church, South, at the same time in 1858,
at Mt. Vernon church.

James Daniel Clark, born December 22nd, 1843. Jessie Valient Clark, nee Valient, born
June 16th, 1853 united in Marriage November 7th, 1888. He graduated in medicine at the
Old Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, March 1886. He practiced in the old neigh-

--- 11 ---

borhood until November 1887, when he moved to Palmyra, following his profession until
March 1901. He was elected mayor of Palmyra in April 1892, served six years. He was



                           Page 41
                     Register Report

County Physician nine years. After giving up his practice they lived on their farm near the
city.

Little brother Marion's life numbered only a few days. The youngest son was still born
August 17th, 1854, numbering ten children in all, seven sons and three daughters. Of
those born to our dear father and mother there remain only four living, three brothers and
one sister, Robert M., William, Sarah F., and Dr. J. D. Clark.

Of the children born to R. M. and Sarah Jane Clark there is five living: James David,
Sarah Elizabeth, Robert Alexander, Samuel Wilson, and Ollie Bell Clark.

Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson, nee Hardcastle, the wife of James Wilson, was born on the
Eastern shore of Maryland October 27th, 1772. Died in Marion county, Mo., December
2nd, 1842 and laid to rest in the Parker cemetery.

David Gosney, was born in West Virginia, near Wheeling, December 10th, 1797. Ann
Wilson, the daughter of James and Elizabeth Wilson, was born on the Eastern shore of
Maryland, December 4th, 1803. She emigrated with her parents to West Virginia when in
her fifteenth year. She united in marriage with David Gosney December 9th, 1824, and
they emigrated to Adams county, Ohio, about the year of 1826, from there they emigrated
to Marion county, Mo., in the spring of 1844. He lived and died on a farm near See's
Creek. David departed this life July 10th, 1863. His wife died November 16th, 1877 and
was laid to rest in the Parker grave yard. To this union there were born nine children,
five boys and four girls. Robert H., the

--- 12 ---

eldest, born in West Virginia September 10th, 1825, was married to Miss Martha Morgan
in the fall of 1854. To this union there were three sons and six girls born. Elizabeth
Gosney born in Adams county, Ohio, December 24th, 1826, was married to Henry P.
Shaw, December 9th, 1852. Died March 9th, 1889. To this marriage was born one son
and two girls, Robert Henry Shaw, Emma Francis and Ann Bell Shaw. Emma Francis
married David Gay. Anna Bell married Olander Waters of Illinois. The parents were laid
to rest side by side in the Andrew Chapel cemetery. Sarah Jane Clark, nee Gosney, was
born September, 23rd, 1828, as previously stated.

James W. Gosney, was born in Adams county, Ohio, September 23rd, 1830. He crossed
the plains to California in 1850 and returned in the fall of 1852. He was united in
marriage with Miss Alice Hagar in the winter of 1855. To them were born thirteen
children, there are four boys and five girls living. Alice, the mother, spent her entire
married life in Shelby county, Mo. She died at Clarence of typhoid fever July 2nd, 1896,
and was laid to rest in the Clarence cemetery. Peace be unto her ashes and all that may
follow.

Alexander Gosney was born in Adams county, Ohio March 3rd, 1832. Emerine Gosney,
nee Mefford, was born January 28th, 1828. She united in marriage with Alex Gosney,
August 20th, 1854. She united with the M.E. Church, South, when in her fifteenth year,
he in November 1869. To this union there were born six children, three sons and three
daughters, namely: William W., Laura Ann, Thomas Leonard, David Watson, Sarah
Alice, and Senora Margaret. The mother always adhered to the Methodist doctrine. She
departed this life March 17th, 1896, and was laid to rest in the Brown cemetery near
Hunnewell.

--- 13 ---

William W. Gosney, born April 24th, 1855. Departed this life July 7th, 1855.



                           Page 42
                     Register Report


Laura Ann Gosney, now Mrs. J. C. Stoddart, of St. Paul, Minnesota, was born May 11th,
1857. To this union there was born one son and one daughter, Clarence and Emerine.

Thomas Leonard Gosney, born March 4th, 1860, and was married to Miss Effie May
McMurry, September 3rd, 1885. To this marriage were born two daughters, Elizabeth
Vance Gosney, born May 5th, 1887. Helen osney, born September 4th, 1862

David Watson Gosney born May 17th, 1862. Died June 17th, 1862.

Sarah Alice Gosney, born August 21st, 1864. She married Oliver C. Vaughn in 1898.
Departed this life November 5th, 1902. She sleeps in the Brown cemetery.

Senora Margaret Gosney, was born September 20th, 1868. She joined the M.E. church,
South, in 1883 when in her fifteenth year. She was married to Joshua H. Gentry,
December 22nd, 1897. To them was born a son and daughter, Christie Alexander Gentry,
born October 15th, 1898. Emerine Evada Gentry, born August 17th, 1902.

William Fredric Gosney, was born in Adams county, Ohio, November 13th, 1835, and
came with his parents to this state in 1844, and now lives on the old homestead where his
father settled, lived and died.

Lucretia Gosney, nee Hagar, daughter of Thomas Hagar, an early settler of Ralls county,
being here the winter of the deep snow. Lucretia was born in Ralls county, December
24th, 1836. United in marriage with W. F. Gosney, January 4th, 1866. She was a great
sufferer through life, being sorely afflicted for many a year, although she bore her
affliction with great fortitude. To this marriage there were seven children born,

--- 14 ---

four sons and three daughters, namely: James Gosney, their first-born, was born
December 23rd, 1866, and       died May 5th, 1876. Six remain living.

Della Bell married Lee Wright. Mary Ann married Harvey Graves.

William A. Gosney, born May 17th, 1871. Emma Francis McCann, born September 4th,
1871 united in marriage April 17th, 1895. To this union there was a daughter and son
were born, Francis Marie Gosney, born January 30th, 1896. Everett Fredric Gosney, born
April 4th, 1901

Ida Jane Gosney married Henry McCann.

We failed to get the date of the births of John T. Gosney, and David Gosney, Jr.

Miss Fannie Estella Cassady, was born January 6th, 1885, united in marriage with David
Gosney, Junior, March 15th, 1905. Lucretia Gosney, nee Hagar, departed this life
January 17th, 1905, and was laid to rest in the Monroe City cemetery. Peace be to her
ashes. This contains the generation of W. F. Gosney and Lucretia Gosney.

There was one other a son of David and Ann Gosney, named David, born and died in
Adams county, Ohio, whose dates we failed to get.

Mary Ann Gosney died September 10th, 1844, aged three years. She sleeps in the Parker
cemetary.

Eliza Maria Gosney was born in Adams county, Ohio, January 27th, 1843 and departed



                           Page 43
                                                  Register Report

                           this life November 12th, 1877. She was joined in marriage about 1863 with Charles
                           Gosney, who was born in Kentucky in 1832. He died February 14th, 1888. To this
                           union there were born seven children, five sons and two daughters. William Gosney,
                           born in 1864. John Gosney, born in 1865.

                           Ella Gosney, born in 1868. She was united in mar-

                           --- 15 ---

                           riage to William Gibbons, December 14th, 1898. To this union there is four children
                           born, two sons and two daughter. The eldest, a son, died quite young.

                           Richard Wilson Gosney was born in Hunnewell, Shelby county, August 21st, 1870.
                           Ninna Viola Gosney, nee Howe, was born June 6th, 1875, united in marriage January 3rd,
                           1894. To them there is born four sons and one daughter. Yancey Howard, born April
                           9th, 1896. Charles William, born July 26th, 1898. James Laban, born June 7th, 1901.
                           Resford Thomas, born September 3rd, 1903. Eunice Francis, born August 31st, 1905*.

                           Edward Gosney, born in 1872. Julia Ann Gosney, born in 1874.

                           James Theodore Gosney, was born November 26th, 1876. Anna Maria Gosney, nee
                           McElroy, was born November 26th, 1880, united in marriage with J. T. Gosney, January
                           7th, 1903. To this union there is two sons. Elmer Pearl, born October 3rd, 1903.
                           James Everett, born May 27th, 1905.

                           As I must now close. I will only say to you, my dear friends and relatives, to accept and
                           practice these noble traits of character that is set forth by our worthy ancestry, that we
                           may so live and our walk be so upright through life that we may be permitted to spend a
                           blissful eternity with those whom we have loved on earth.

                                        Written by R. M. Clark.

                           * August 31, 1905 is the latest date recorded in this history.
                vii.       Margaret.
                           Margaret married MOSS.
               viii.       Mary.
                           Mary married PEPPER.
                ix.        Mamie.
                           Mamie married HOWELL.
                 x.        Fannie.
                           Fannie married DAVENPORT.

29. John Wesley LAIR. Born in 1799 in Harrison, Kentucky. John Wesley died in 1867; he was 68.

Notes on John Wesley Lair: [1]
John Wesley Lair, the seventh child of John and Sallie Custer Lair, married Catherine Smiser, the daughter of his
first cousin. John Wesley's father, John Lair, was a brother of Andrew, the grandfather of Catherine Smiser. Her
mother, Martha Lair, daughter of Andrew, had married George Smiser.

John Wesley Lair lived with his parents at "Boscobel" and continued to live there after his marriage to his cousin.
Six children were born to this union:

John Andrew Lair married Lida Bickham. He became a surgeon of note and served in the Northern Army with
distinction;
Helen Henry Lair married the Hon. A.H. Ward, famous lawyer who also served in the Reconstruction Congress;



                                                       Page 44
                                                Register Report

Arabella Lair married John Burton Maude of St. Louis;
Mary Lair married Captain James M. Givens, Confederate officer;
Frances Hubbard Lair married Rev. A. B. Griffith of Ohio;
Lida Lair married Achilles Martin.
These children of John Wesley Lair and Catherine Smiser Lair lived in "Boscobel" until the close of the War
Between the States and the death of their father, John Wesley Lair. Their childhood there as told me by my mother,
Helen Lair Ward, was delightful. A small school for the many Lair children in the neighborhood was conducted on
the Charles Lair farm and the little Lairs would be accompanied through the woods by one of the slave women, the
school being a great treat. Their mother's parents, Martha Lair Smiser and George Smiser, lived across the Licking
River and they made almost daily visits there where "Grandmother's sweet-cakes and goodies were eaten with
relish." Aunt Lida Lair Martin told how frightened she was if her Grandfather Smiser spoke loud to them in his
broken English. When they went on these visits, one of the slave women would accompany them to the river's edge,
then calling: "Hello the boat. Hello the boat" and Grandma Patsy's servant would come from the other side in the
boat and take them across. It was also delightful to sleep in Grandma Patsy's trundle bed and to feel the cozy warmth
of the heavy curtains of the fourposter bed above.

While the Wesley Lairs were there and the children were small, a strange woman appeared at the door of the home.
She was dressed in rags, her hair tousled, and she spoke "utterly and was not easily understood. The kindly John
Wesley Lair learned enough from her to know that she was homeless, without relatives, and wanted a place to stay.
Having a vacant cabin on the place, he gave it to her to use, gave her chickens, pigs, a cow, and Catherine Lair gave
the woman enough to make her comfortable in the house. The woman tended her garden, milked her cow, seemed to
get along well, but had nothing to say to any who came to her little house. As this was the time of witchcraft in the
New England states, some people in the neighborhood and especially the slaves on the Lair places nearby, believed
the woman to be a witch and began to tell all sorts of tales of looking in the window and seeing her milking
dishrags. About that time, some cows in the neighborhood went dry. They said the witch had cast a spell over the
cows and the witch was getting the milk from her dishrags. Then the horses often stalled in the road near the house
of the witch. As the tales grew taller and the feeling against the woman grew greater, John Wesley Lair came to her
defense, calming the fears of the slaves by placing his hand on the horses' neck and the superstitious thought he
broke the spell. Soon the woman was left to her little home and garden without bodily harm having been done.
When she died, she was buried in the garden at "Boscobel" and the marker stated simply: "The Wandering Woman."

This account as told by Paul S, Ward is as follows: "When the Proclamation of President Lincoln was published,
John Lair, with the paper in his hand, went out to the farm bell which hung on the tall pole midway between the
house and the Negro quarters, pulled three times as in calling the blacks out for orders. They assembled in front.
Then, addressing them, he said, "Boys and girls, our President has issued a proclamation which declares you all to
be free men and women. I know you can't know what that means. It means you can go anywhere to work and for
anyone you like, that needs help. Miss Kittie and I have taught you all you know, gardening, farm work, spinning,
weaving, knitting, sewing, and you, Alex, carpentry and smithing. We have planned ahead for meat, vegetables and
all food and warm, comfortable clothing and shoes, and shelter, everything you need. If you want to leave us, you
can take clothes, furniture and chattels you using; they are yours. But if you decide to stay, we will go on planning
the same as now. I will pay you the top pay for freemen."

When he finished, has eyes and those of his black folks were wet with tears. Only one mulatto girl left.

When the daughters of John Wesley Lair were grown and their many parties made the stone house crowded, a wing
was added with a hall and parlor downstairs and bedrooms upstairs. It was from that house that the daughters
married and went to homes of their own, and the farm was sold after the death of John Wesley Lair who died on his
knees in prayer in 1869. His wife, Catherine Smiser Lair, died in Cynthiana.

On October 25, 1835 when John Wesley was 36, he married Catherine SMISER (40) , daughter of George SMISER
(1772-1856) & Martha “Patsy” LAIR (13) (1780-1857), in Harrison, Kentucky. Born on November 10, 1811.

They had the following children:
      63          i.      Helen Henry (1838-)


                                                      Page 45
                                                Register Report

                ii.      John Andrew. Born in August 1836.
                         John Andrew married Lida BICKHAM.
               iii.      Arabella. Born on March 11, 1841.
                         Arabella married John Burton MAUDE.
               iv.       Mary. Born on November 4, 1843.
                         Mary married Captain James GIVENS CSA.
                v.       Frances Hubbard.
                         Frances Hubbard married Rev. A.B. GRIFFITH.
               vi.       Lida.
                         Lida married Achilles MARTIN.

30. Jacob LAIR.

Jacob married HALL.

They had one child:
                 i.      Johnnie.
                         Johnnie married TURNER.

31. Sarah Ellen LAIR.

Sarah Ellen married James W. BERRY, son of Bazzel BERRY (1765-1853) & Rhoda FLOWERS (1776-1855).
Born on December 18, 1814. James W. died on May 11, 1891; he was 76.

They had the following children:
      64          i.      Rhoda Ellen (1840-)
      65         ii.      Sarah Frances
      66        iii.      Willie Mary (1854-)


                              Family of Margaret LAIR (9) & Jacob CUSTER


32. Catherine CUSTER.

Catherine married Charles CHRISMAN.

They had one child:
                 i.      Kittie.
                         Kittie married Dr. GRAY.




                                                    Page 46
                                            Register Report



                                            Fifth Generation
                              _________________________________________
                           Family of Jonathan NEWMAN (10) & Hannah SPEARS


33. David NEWMAN.

David first married Esther Huston BOGGS.

They had the following children:
      67          i.      Robert Boggs
                 ii.      Mary Elizabeth.

David second married Louisiana GRAY.


                               Family of John NEWMAN (12) & Polly MOORE


34. Catharine NEWMAN.

Catharine married WILLIAMS.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Jared.
                 ii.      Mary.
                iii.      John.
                iv.       Martha.
                          Martha married Dr. JENNINGS.

35. Walter NEWMAN.

Walter married Betty JONES.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Joseph.
                 ii.      Annie.
                iii.      Alice.
                iv.       Sallie.
                 v.       Walter.
                vi.       John.
               vii.       Edward.

36. George NEWMAN.

George married Evalyn LINDSAY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Joseph.
                 ii.      Sallie.
                iii.      Julia.
                iv.       Strother.
                 v.       Walter.



                                                Page 47
                                              Register Report

               vi.       Sadie.


                          Family of Martha “Patsy” LAIR (13) & George SMISER


37. Samuel Merritt SMISER. Born on October 20, 1804. Samuel Merritt died on November 13, 1870; he was 66.

Samuel Merritt married Rebecca FRAZER. Born in June 1805. Rebecca died on February 2, 1873; she was 67.

They had one child:
                 i.      George Henry. Born in December 1831. George Henry died on August 1, 1832.

38. John Milton SMISER. Born on February 10, 1807 in Harrison County, Kentucky. John Milton died in Paris,
Monroe County, Missouri on April 10, 1894; he was 87.

On November 22, 1832 when John Milton was 25, he married Julia A. EDWARDS, daughter of Major John Henry
EDWARDS Jr. (1773-1852) & Mary GARRARD (1776-~1818), in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Born on April 8,
1814 in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Julia A. died in Monroe County, Missouri.

They had the following children:
                   i.     George Perrin. Born on September 26, 1833 in Cynthiana, Kentucky. George Perrin died
                          in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri on July 18, 1857; he was 23.
      68          ii.     Arabella Perrin (1835-1863)
      69        iii.      John Edwards (1837-1865)
      70         iv.      James Samuel (1839-1925)
      71          v.      William Garrard (1845-1931)
      72         vi.      Henry Thomas Allen (1845-)
                vii.      Wesley Taylor. Born on January 10, 1848 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. Wesley
                          Taylor died in Near Granville, Missouri on May 2, 1920; he was 72.
                          On March 6, 1879 when Wesley Taylor was 31, he married Lockie Virginia “Jennie”
                          SAUNDERS, in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri.
               viii.      Milton Berry. Born on October 9, 1857 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. Milton Berry
                          died in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri on January 1, 1902; he was 44.
                 ix.      Llewellyn Davis. Born on December 4, 1860 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri.
                          Llewellyn Davis died in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri on May 16, 1939; he was 78.
                          On October 22, 1891 when Llewellyn Davis was 30, he married Linnie ARNOLD.

39. George SMISER. Born on May 17, 1809. George died in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on October 22, 1875; he was
66.

George first married Mary ALLEN. Born on November 27, 1811. Mary died on February 26, 1833; she was 21.

They had the following children:
                  i.      John M. Born in October 1830. John M. died on March 11, 1833; he was 2.
                 ii.      Mary. Born on September 13, 1831.
                iii.      George W. Born on February 15, 1833.

George second married Margaret COLLIER.

George third married Martha WILSON. Martha died on November 13, 1889.

40. Catherine SMISER. Born on November 10, 1811.




                                                    Page 48
                                                Register Report

On October 25, 1835 when Catherine was 23, she married John Wesley LAIR (29) , son of John LAIR (8)
(1762-1827) & Sarah CUSTER (1766-1847), in Harrison, Kentucky. Born in 1799 in Harrison, Kentucky. John
Wesley died in 1867; he was 68.

Notes on John Wesley Lair: [1]
John Wesley Lair, the seventh child of John and Sallie Custer Lair, married Catherine Smiser, the daughter of his
first cousin. John Wesley's father, John Lair, was a brother of Andrew, the grandfather of Catherine Smiser. Her
mother, Martha Lair, daughter of Andrew, had married George Smiser.

John Wesley Lair lived with his parents at "Boscobel" and continued to live there after his marriage to his cousin.
Six children were born to this union:

John Andrew Lair married Lida Bickham. He became a surgeon of note and served in the Northern Army with
distinction;
Helen Henry Lair married the Hon. A.H. Ward, famous lawyer who also served in the Reconstruction Congress;
Arabella Lair married John Burton Maude of St. Louis;
Mary Lair married Captain James M. Givens, Confederate officer;
Frances Hubbard Lair married Rev. A. B. Griffith of Ohio;
Lida Lair married Achilles Martin.
These children of John Wesley Lair and Catherine Smiser Lair lived in "Boscobel" until the close of the War
Between the States and the death of their father, John Wesley Lair. Their childhood there as told me by my mother,
Helen Lair Ward, was delightful. A small school for the many Lair children in the neighborhood was conducted on
the Charles Lair farm and the little Lairs would be accompanied through the woods by one of the slave women, the
school being a great treat. Their mother's parents, Martha Lair Smiser and George Smiser, lived across the Licking
River and they made almost daily visits there where "Grandmother's sweet-cakes and goodies were eaten with
relish." Aunt Lida Lair Martin told how frightened she was if her Grandfather Smiser spoke loud to them in his
broken English. When they went on these visits, one of the slave women would accompany them to the river's edge,
then calling: "Hello the boat. Hello the boat" and Grandma Patsy's servant would come from the other side in the
boat and take them across. It was also delightful to sleep in Grandma Patsy's trundle bed and to feel the cozy warmth
of the heavy curtains of the fourposter bed above.

While the Wesley Lairs were there and the children were small, a strange woman appeared at the door of the home.
She was dressed in rags, her hair tousled, and she spoke "utterly and was not easily understood. The kindly John
Wesley Lair learned enough from her to know that she was homeless, without relatives, and wanted a place to stay.
Having a vacant cabin on the place, he gave it to her to use, gave her chickens, pigs, a cow, and Catherine Lair gave
the woman enough to make her comfortable in the house. The woman tended her garden, milked her cow, seemed to
get along well, but had nothing to say to any who came to her little house. As this was the time of witchcraft in the
New England states, some people in the neighborhood and especially the slaves on the Lair places nearby, believed
the woman to be a witch and began to tell all sorts of tales of looking in the window and seeing her milking
dishrags. About that time, some cows in the neighborhood went dry. They said the witch had cast a spell over the
cows and the witch was getting the milk from her dishrags. Then the horses often stalled in the road near the house
of the witch. As the tales grew taller and the feeling against the woman grew greater, John Wesley Lair came to her
defense, calming the fears of the slaves by placing his hand on the horses' neck and the superstitious thought he
broke the spell. Soon the woman was left to her little home and garden without bodily harm having been done.
When she died, she was buried in the garden at "Boscobel" and the marker stated simply: "The Wandering Woman."

This account as told by Paul S, Ward is as follows: "When the Proclamation of President Lincoln was published,
John Lair, with the paper in his hand, went out to the farm bell which hung on the tall pole midway between the
house and the Negro quarters, pulled three times as in calling the blacks out for orders. They assembled in front.
Then, addressing them, he said, "Boys and girls, our President has issued a proclamation which declares you all to
be free men and women. I know you can't know what that means. It means you can go anywhere to work and for
anyone you like, that needs help. Miss Kittie and I have taught you all you know, gardening, farm work, spinning,
weaving, knitting, sewing, and you, Alex, carpentry and smithing. We have planned ahead for meat, vegetables and
all food and warm, comfortable clothing and shoes, and shelter, everything you need. If you want to leave us, you


                                                       Page 49
                                                 Register Report

can take clothes, furniture and chattels you using; they are yours. But if you decide to stay, we will go on planning
the same as now. I will pay you the top pay for freemen."

When he finished, has eyes and those of his black folks were wet with tears. Only one mulatto girl left.

When the daughters of John Wesley Lair were grown and their many parties made the stone house crowded, a wing
was added with a hall and parlor downstairs and bedrooms upstairs. It was from that house that the daughters
married and went to homes of their own, and the farm was sold after the death of John Wesley Lair who died on his
knees in prayer in 1869. His wife, Catherine Smiser Lair, died in Cynthiana.

They had the following children:
      63          i.      Helen Henry (1838-)
                 ii.      John Andrew. Born in August 1836.
                          John Andrew married Lida BICKHAM.
                iii.      Arabella. Born on March 11, 1841.
                          Arabella married John Burton MAUDE.
                iv.       Mary. Born on November 4, 1843.
                          Mary married Captain James GIVENS CSA.
                 v.       Frances Hubbard.
                          Frances Hubbard married Rev. A.B. GRIFFITH.
                vi.       Lida.
                          Lida married Achilles MARTIN.

41. Darius SMISER. Born on July 4, 1814. Darius died in 1909; he was 94.

On May 15, 1837 when Darius was 22, he first married Louisa SMITH.

They had the following children:
      73          i.      John Harmon (1837-1902)
                 ii.      James William. Born in 1842.
                          In 1880 when James William was 38, he married Fannie FISHER.

In 1843 when Darius was 28, he second married Sarah Jane HOWE.


                                Family of William LAIR (15) & Mary GRAHAM


42. Thomas P. LAIR. Born in 1805. Thomas P. died in 1885; he was 80.

In 1830 when Thomas P. was 25, he married Catherine “Kitty” ANDERSON, daughter of William ANDERSON
(1753-1830) & Elizabeth MILLER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William A. Born in 1831. William A. died in 1836; he was 5.
                 ii.      Elizabeth Ann. Born in 1833.
                          In 1852 when Elizabeth Ann was 19, she married William RAWLINGS.
                iii.      Sarah E. Born in 1838. Sarah E. died in 1901; she was 63.
                          Sarah E. married B.T. HATFIELD.
                iv.       James H. Born in 1839. James H. died in 1856; he was 17.
                 v.       Emily G. Born in 1841. Emily G. died in 1869; she was 28.
                          In 1860 when Emily G. was 19, she married Joseph MONROE.
                vi.       Catherine. Born in 1845. Catherine died in 1856; she was 11.
               vii.       Almira Y.
                          Almira Y. married Reuben LONG.


                                                       Page 50
                                                 Register Report

               viii.       Martha E.
                           Martha E. married LONG.
      74         ix.       Margaret R. (1850-)


                                   Family of Mary LAIR (19) & William POPE


43. Helena POPE. Born in 1808. Helena died in 1891; she was 83.

In 1824 when Helena was 16, she first married William FAULKNER.

They had one child:
                 i.        Mary Elizabeth. Born in 1825.
                           Mary Elizabeth married William HUFFMAN.

In 1829 when Helena was 21, she second married John Miller ANDERSON, son of William ANDERSON
(1753-1830) & Elizabeth MILLER. Born in 1795. John Miller died in 1866; he was 71.

From “This Old House” by Kathryn Wilson, “H. Tod Smiser House:”

This old house stands opposite the First Methodist Church and at the corner of Pike and Church Streets. The old
place distinguished itself during the Civil War by housing one of the famed generals of the Confederacy. Yes, Gen.
John Hunt Morgan slept here.

The families who have occupied the house come in this succession: the William Huddlesons, the John Miller
Andersons, the Jacob F. Millers, the Gustavus Magees, the William Lairs, the James Curles, the Dr. John Harmon
Smisers, the Dr. Tod Smisers and the Glassel Butlers.

The one-story brick section in the rear was built long before the two-story frame front section, and evidently by
William Huddleson in the early 1800's. After the death of Huddleson, William Lowry, guardian of Huddleson's
infant heirs, authorized Judge James Curry to sell it at the Court House door. At this sale in September of 1833 it
was bought by John Miller Anderson.

Though he had possession for only a year, the Andersons most certainly occupied it during that time, for Miss
Analena Anderson says she has heard her father, Thomas W. Anderson, son of John Miller, tell about moving in
1834 from there to the house where the City Hall now stands. He said he was such a small boy that his little red
chair which he was commissioned to carry to the new house, seemed a very heavy load.

A year later in September, 1934, Jacob F. Miller came into possession of the house and evidently built the front part
somewhere around that date, for the next deed mentions the place as the two-story frame house.

The next owner was Gustavus Magee. We have no information of any of the incidents of his occupancy. Gus Magee
sold the place to William Lair for $1,700 in 1856, just 100 years ago.

William Lair is said by several of his relatives here to have been the one-armed Lair. At any rate the William Lairs
lived in the old house for some years. They had only one daughter, Emma Alice. After they died, Emma Alice
boarded in town and went to school for a while and loved the social life of early Cynthiana. But by the time she was
twenty she was in such bad health that she went to live at "The Cedars," on the Old Lair Pike with her uncle, John
Lair. Here she was confined to her bed for several years, and it is said that as she lay there she often looked at the
burial vault key which hung near the mantel and said, "Please don't bury me in that vault." But sad to say she died in
her early twenties and was buried in the vault. Mrs. Alice Lair was named for Emma Alice, and Miss Varnon
Northcutt is in possession of a beautiful diamond which once belonged to the same Emma Alice.




                                                       Page 51
                                                  Register Report

After the Lairs moved out, the old frame house was soon occupied by the James Curles. Here their second child and
only daughter was born. She was named Annie Morgan to please their star boarder at the time-Gen. John Hunt
Morgan.

Gen. Morgan is thought to have occupied the upstairs east bed room. And there it was no doubt, that he left his
watch when he was surprised by a message that fresh Union troops were approaching town. This was probably the
Sun(lay morning, June 12, 1864 (the day after the Confederate victory in the Second Battle of Cynthiana), when the
Union Gen. Burbridge approached in the early hours from the Millersburg Pike and recaptured Cynthiana. At any
rate Gen. Morgan rushed off without his gold watch, never to return. The watch, however, was sent to him later.

It was probably during the First Battle of Cynthiana, that a minnie ball tore through the window of this same room
and landed on the Curles' best feather bed. In the middle of this same feather bed, lay baby George Ashbrook, a few
months old. His mother, Mrs. Sam Ashbrook had brought him to call on her good friends the Curles, then had
promptly forgotten him and run to the basement with the others when the shots began to whiz around the house.
Finally somebody in the safety of the basement happened to think of baby George and ran upstairs just in time to
jerk him from the burning mattress and put out the fire.

The Curles moved from this old house to Robinson Station. Their other children were Will, Pierre and Jim.

Dr. John Harmon Smiser then bought the house from the Emma Alice Lair estate around 1870. He married Mary
Ewalt and here they reared their children. While studying medicine in St. Louis, John Harmon Smiser had become
such an admirer of one of his professors, Dr. Tod Helman, that he named his second son, Tod, after him. Their other
children were Hunt, Mary, Louise and Earl.

Tod Smiser grew up and went to study medicine in New York City. Here he studied under the same illustrious Dr.
Tod Helman. Dr. Tod Smiser married Kate Whaley and here at the old house they reared their children, Louise and
Harmon Tod. Louise married Glassel Butler from Culpepper County, Va., and they continue to make their home
with Mrs. Kate Smiser in the old place after nearly 90 years of Smiser ownership. Harmon Tod studied medicine at
the University of Louisville. married Katherine Wiglesworth arid they built their present home on the Leesburg
Pike.

The bedroom pictured here is the one where Gen. Morgan slept and also where baby George Ashbrook slept on the
burning bed. Above the mantel in the bedroom across the hall is a portrait of Dorcas Saunders, the
step-great-grandmother of Britain's Hon. Harold MacMillan. Of course Dorcas Saunders' place over this mantel is
due to the fact that she is also the great-great-grandmother of Mrs. Glassel Butler (Louise Smiser) one of the present
mistresses of this old house.

A significant piece of furniture in the hallway picture, is the carved oak bench, the carving having been done by the
late Louise Smiser, Mrs. Butler's aunt for whom she was named. This same Louise Smiser also did some of the
carving on the interior woodwork of the Episcopal Church here.

An outstanding feature of this old place is the ancient poplar tree seen in the picture. It was old when Charles
Rieckel, who died some years ago at the age of 108, walked here from Paris in 1856 and rested under its branches.
He said it was the first thing he saw of Cynthiana. The old tree stood there in all its majesty and watched as the
Methodists built their first church, of red brick, across the street. This was in 1820. The old tree saw the church burn
down in 1844 and watched the building of a smaller edifice in 1845, saw it torn down in 1870, then rebuilt, and the
present building erected in 1905.

The famous old tree saw a great deal of both the first Battle of Cynthiana in July, 1862, and the second Battle of
Cynthiana in June of 1864, which lasted about five hours, during which time the entire business section of town was
burned. The same old tree no -doubt sheltered Indians and the earliest pioneers. In fact, if trees could talk, a historian
could sit under the branches of this old tree and write as interesting a history of Cynthiana as any which has ever
been written.



                                                        Page 52
                                                 Register Report

They had the following children:
      75          i.      Martha (1844-1902)
                 ii.      Thomas William. Born in 1833. Thomas William died in 1906; he was 73.
                          Thomas William first married Anna THOMAS, daughter of William Henry THOMAS
                          (1818-1900) & Nancy KELLER (1821-1886).
                          Thomas William second married Mary F. RICHARDSON.
      76        iii.      Hugh Miller (1830-1885)
                iv.       Pugh Miller.
                 v.       Robert.
                vi.       A. Keller.
                          Became a general with the Army.

                vii.       Orra.


                               Family of Charles LAIR (20) & Sallie ANDERSON


44. Isaac Newton LAIR. Born about 1807. Isaac Newton died after 1893; he was 86.

Isaac Newton married Lucretia JAMISON.

They had the following children:
      77          i.      Charles
      78         ii.      James

45. Matthias LAIR. Born on September 5, 1813 in Harrison County, Kentucky.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 663

MATTHIAS LAIR, Sr., farmer, P. O. Lair's Station; is a native of Harrison County, and son of Charles and Sallie
(Anderson) Lair. He was born Sep. 5, 1813. He lived his earlier life with his parents, receiving his education from
the common schools of his native county, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. In 1835 he married
Roanna Lair, a native of Harrison County, and daughter of Matthias C. Lair. She has borne him eleven children,
eight of whom are now living, viz: Charles John H., M. L., Franklin P., Sally, Roanna and Joseph. He is the owner
of 122 acres of choice land called "Locust Hill" upon which he raises all the principal cops and all kinds of stock. He
is a member of the Grangers' Lodge, No. 154, at Cynthiana. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for four
years, and has been a school trustee for about thirty years. He is a Democrat. Mr. Lair is a man of good ability and
knowledge, and is most respected by his neighbors, having taken a great interest in the welfare of his country as well
as that of his fellow men.

In 1835 when Matthias was 21, he married Rowena (Roanna) LAIR (60) , daughter of Mathias Custer LAIR (27)
(~1787-1860) & Jane ANDERSON (1785-1868).

They had the following children:
      79           i.     Charles F. (1837-1898)
      80          ii.     John William
      81        iii.      Matthias (1852-1909)
                 iv.      Franklin P.
      82          v.      Sally (1849-1906)
                 vi.      Roanna.
      83        vii.      Joseph
      84       viii.      Luther



                                                       Page 53
                                                Register Report


46. William LAIR. Born on January 28, 1816. William died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky on January 15,
1860; he was 43.

William married Mary Elizabeth LAIR (52) , daughter of Matthias LAIR Jr. (22) (1795-1841) & Rachel SIDLE.
Born on June 16, 1827. Mary Elizabeth died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky on March 18, 1865; she was 37.
Buried in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Sarah Eliza. Born on January 31, 1852. Sarah Eliza died in Lair, Harrison County,
                          Kentucky on April 30, 1859; she was 7.
                 ii.      Emma Alice. Born on April 26, 1854. Emma Alice died in Lair, Harrison County,
                          Kentucky on March 19, 1877; she was 22.
                          From “This Old House” by Kathryn Wilson, “H. Tod Smiser House:”

                          This old house stands opposite the First Methodist Church and at the corner of Pike and
                          Church Streets. The old place distinguished itself during the Civil War by housing one of
                          the famed generals of the Confederacy. Yes, Gen. John Hunt Morgan slept here.

                          The families who have occupied the house come in this succession: the William
                          Huddlesons, the John Miller Andersons, the Jacob F. Millers, the Gustavus Magees, the
                          William Lairs, the James Curles, the Dr. John Harmon Smisers, the Dr. Tod Smisers and
                          the Glassel Butlers.

                          The one-story brick section in the rear was built long before the two-story frame front
                          section, and evidently by William Huddleson in the early 1800's. After the death of
                          Huddleson, William Lowry, guardian of Huddleson's infant heirs, authorized Judge James
                          Curry to sell it at the Court House door. At this sale in September of 1833 it was bought
                          by John Miller Anderson.

                          Though he had possession for only a year, the Andersons most certainly occupied it
                          during that time, for Miss Analena Anderson says she has heard her father, Thomas W.
                          Anderson, son of John Miller, tell about moving in 1834 from there to the house where
                          the City Hall now stands. He said he was such a small boy that his little red chair which
                          he was commissioned to carry to the new house, seemed a very heavy load.

                          A year later in September, 1934, Jacob F. Miller came into possession of the house and
                          evidently built the front part somewhere around that date, for the next deed mentions the
                          place as the two-story frame house.

                          The next owner was Gustavus Magee. We have no information of any of the incidents of
                          his occupancy. Gus Magee sold the place to William Lair for $1,700 in 1856, just 100
                          years ago.

                          William Lair is said by several of his relatives here to have been the one-armed Lair. At
                          any rate the William Lairs lived in the old house for some years. They had only one
                          daughter, Emma Alice. After they died, Emma Alice boarded in town and went to school
                          for a while and loved the social life of early Cynthiana. But by the time she was twenty
                          she was in such bad health that she went to live at "The Cedars," on the Old Lair Pike
                          with her uncle, John Lair. Here she was confined to her bed for several years, and it is
                          said that as she lay there she often looked at the burial vault key which hung near the
                          mantel and said, "Please don't bury me in that vault." But sad to say she died in her early
                          twenties and was buried in the vault. Mrs. Alice Lair was named for Emma Alice, and
                          Miss Varnon Northcutt is in possession of a beautiful diamond which once belonged to
                          the same Emma Alice.



                                                      Page 54
                      Register Report


After the Lairs moved out, the old frame house was soon occupied by the James Curles.
Here their second child and only daughter was born. She was named Annie Morgan to
please their star boarder at the time-Gen. John Hunt Morgan.

Gen. Morgan is thought to have occupied the upstairs east bed room. And there it was no
doubt, that he left his watch when he was surprised by a message that fresh Union troops
were approaching town. This was probably the Sun(lay morning, June 12, 1864 (the day
after the Confederate victory in the Second Battle of Cynthiana), when the Union Gen.
Burbridge approached in the early hours from the Millersburg Pike and recaptured
Cynthiana. At any rate Gen. Morgan rushed off without his gold watch, never to return.
The watch, however, was sent to him later.

It was probably during the First Battle of Cynthiana, that a minnie ball tore through the
window of this same room and landed on the Curles' best feather bed. In the middle of
this same feather bed, lay baby George Ashbrook, a few months old. His mother, Mrs.
Sam Ashbrook had brought him to call on her good friends the Curles, then had promptly
forgotten him and run to the basement with the others when the shots began to whiz
around the house. Finally somebody in the safety of the basement happened to think of
baby George and ran upstairs just in time to jerk him from the burning mattress and put
out the fire.

The Curles moved from this old house to Robinson Station. Their other children were
Will, Pierre and Jim.

Dr. John Harmon Smiser then bought the house from the Emma Alice Lair estate around
1870. He married Mary Ewalt and here they reared their children. While studying
medicine in St. Louis, John Harmon Smiser had become such an admirer of one of his
professors, Dr. Tod Helman, that he named his second son, Tod, after him. Their other
children were Hunt, Mary, Louise and Earl.

Tod Smiser grew up and went to study medicine in New York City. Here he studied
under the same illustrious Dr. Tod Helman. Dr. Tod Smiser married Kate Whaley and
here at the old house they reared their children, Louise and Harmon Tod. Louise married
Glassel Butler from Culpepper County, Va., and they continue to make their home with
Mrs. Kate Smiser in the old place after nearly 90 years of Smiser ownership. Harmon Tod
studied medicine at the University of Louisville. married Katherine Wiglesworth arid
they built their present home on the Leesburg Pike.

The bedroom pictured here is the one where Gen. Morgan slept and also where baby
George Ashbrook slept on the burning bed. Above the mantel in the bedroom across the
hall is a portrait of Dorcas Saunders, the step-great-grandmother of Britain's Hon. Harold
MacMillan. Of course Dorcas Saunders' place over this mantel is due to the fact that she
is also the great-great-grandmother of Mrs. Glassel Butler (Louise Smiser) one of the
present mistresses of this old house.

A significant piece of furniture in the hallway picture, is the carved oak bench, the
carving having been done by the late Louise Smiser, Mrs. Butler's aunt for whom she was
named. This same Louise Smiser also did some of the carving on the interior woodwork
of the Episcopal Church here.

An outstanding feature of this old place is the ancient poplar tree seen in the picture. It
was old when Charles Rieckel, who died some years ago at the age of 108, walked here
from Paris in 1856 and rested under its branches. He said it was the first thing he saw of
Cynthiana. The old tree stood there in all its majesty and watched as the Methodists built
their first church, of red brick, across the street. This was in 1820. The old tree saw the



                            Page 55
                                                 Register Report

                          church burn down in 1844 and watched the building of a smaller edifice in 1845, saw it
                          torn down in 1870, then rebuilt, and the present building erected in 1905.

                          The famous old tree saw a great deal of both the first Battle of Cynthiana in July, 1862,
                          and the second Battle of Cynthiana in June of 1864, which lasted about five hours, during
                          which time the entire business section of town was burned. The same old tree no -doubt
                          sheltered Indians and the earliest pioneers. In fact, if trees could talk, a historian could sit
                          under the branches of this old tree and write as interesting a history of Cynthiana as any
                          which has ever been written.


47. Elizabeth LAIR. Born on October 12, 1820 in Flat Run, Bourbon County, Kentucky. Elizabeth died in Lair,
Harrison County, Kentucky on June 11, 1847; she was 26.

On November 14, 1839 when Elizabeth was 19, she married George REDMON, son of Charles REDMON
(1779-1851) & Mary RYBOLT (1785-1856). Born on March 29, 1816 in Flat Run, Bourbon County, Kentucky.
George died after 1882; he was 65.

[John Lair in] 1876... bought the farm upon which he now resides of George Redmon, having 167 acres of choice
land, situated one mile from Cynthiana, on the Cynthiana and Lair's Station Pike, and is called "Sunnyside." [Perrin,
p. 663]

George's first wife Eliza (daughter Cynthia Redmon) and grandson George Cosby were buried in the Lair Family
Vault, Lair Station, Harrison Co. [McAdams, Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records, p. 228]

Cynthiana News, Thursday, January 4, 1855:
On the 2d instant by Rev. Carter Page, Mr. George Redmon to Mrs. Ruth T. Magee of Cynthiana.

Paris Western Citizen, January 13, 1875:
Mrs. Ruth T. Redmon, wife of Judge George Redmon, died at Cynthiana, on Friday. She was a granddaughter of
Col. Isaac Miller, and daughter of Hon. Henry Warfield, who was a brother of Dr. Lloyd Warfield, formerly of
Paris. Her father died in the fall of 1830. Her first husband was Dr. Thomas Magee.
-----
History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
Co., Chicago, 1882. p. 677. [Harrison County] [Cynthiana City and Precinct]

GEORGE REDMON, farmer, P. O. Cynthiana, was born on the old homestead of the family, March 29, 1816, son
of Charles and Mary (Reibolt) Redmon; he, born above Pittsburg in 1779, and emigrated with his parents to
Bourbon County, and learned the saddler's trade at Millersburg. Settled off South Fork of the Licking, and afterward
moved to the farm, one and a half miles from Cynthiana, where he died; his wife was a native of Lexington, born
about 1782, and died in 1856; they were the parents of eight children. Our subject was in the clerk's office for
eighteen months, with Samuel Endicott, Clerk of the County, but has followed farming since 1870, at present
owning 183 acres of land, for which he gave $18,300 cash, a nice residence in Cynthiana and a vacant lot that cost
$4,000. In 1870, he was elected Police Judge of Cynthiana for four years, which position he filled creditably and to
the entire satisfaction of his fellow citizens. Previous to his removal to his magnificent farm, Mr. Redmon had sold
goods in Cynthiana for about eight years. Nov. 14, 1839, he married Eliza Lair, born Oct. 12, 1820, daughter of
Charles Lair, a native of Rockingham County, Va., by which union there were two daughters, one of whom died in
1859, and the other married Joseph Cosby. Mrs. Redmon dying in 1847. Mr. Redmon married, Jan. 2, 1855, Mrs.
Ruth T. McGee, daughter of Henry and Eliza (Miller) Warfield, who died in 1875, having borne one child, which
died in infancy. March 13, 1877, he married Miss Mattie E. Martin, daughter of William and Delilah J. (Brannock)
Martin, of Harrison County. Mrs. Redmon is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Redmon was a Union man
during the war, and he is a Republican.

They had the following children:



                                                       Page 56
                                               Register Report

      85          i.      Charles Ann Eliza (~1841-1907)
                 ii.      Cynthia. Born on June 11, 1847 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Cynthia died in Harrison
                          County, Kentucky on December 19, 1859; she was 12.

48. Martin Luther LAIR. Born on September 14, 1817. Martin Luther died on November 1, 1862; he was 45.

The Western Visitor, 09 Jan 1836--Marriages:
On Thursday last, by Doctor Cropper, Martin Luther Lair to Nancy Williams, daughter of John Williams, Esq., all of
this vicinity.

On January 7, 1836 when Martin Luther was 18, he married Nancy WILLIAMS, daughter of John WILLIAMS &
Sally JONES. Born on January 4, 1819.

They had the following children:
                   i.     Mary H. Born on October 26, 1836. Mary H. died on August 6, 1837.
                  ii.     John Henry. Born on June 12, 1838. John Henry died in 1883; he was 44.
                iii.      Sarah M. Born on December 23, 1839. Sarah M. died on August 9, 1840.
      86         iv.      Susan Alice (1841-1909)
                  v.      William Hubbard. Born on January 9, 1851. William Hubbard died on January 19, 1856;
                          he was 5.
                 vi.      Matthew (or Matthias). Born on February 17, 1852. Matthew (or Matthias) died on
                          February 29, 1852.
                vii.      Charles Samuel. Born on November 29, 1852. Charles Samuel died in August 1859; he
                          was 6.
               viii.      Nancy Cabell Breckenridge. Born on January 26, 1853.

49. John LAIR. Born in 1825. John died in Lair Station, Harrison County, Kentucky after 1882; he was 57.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 663.

JOHN LAIR, farmer, P. O. Lair's Station, native of Harrison County, and son of Charles and Sallie (Anderson) Lair.
He was born in 1825. His father was a native of Virginia, and son of Matthias and Sallie (Rush) Lair. He received
his education from the common schools in Virginia. In 1791 he emigrated with his parents to Harrison County, Ky.
One year after their arrival in Kentucky his father died, leaving the burden of the family upon him. During his
lifetime he followed the occupation of farming and also carried on a distilling business. He died in 1860, aged 86
years. His wife and mother of our subject, was a native of Harrison County, Ky., and daughter of Wm. Anderson;
she was born in 1781 and died in 1860, aged seventy-nine years. They were the parents of twelve children, living to
arrive at man and womanhood. John received his education in his native county, living with his parents to the time
of their death' and is now still residing upon the old homestead. In 1850 he married Emily Redmon, a native of Clark
County, Ky., and daughter of Robert Redmon. She died in October, 1854, aged twenty-eight years. By this union
they had two children, one of whom is now living--Robert Wm. She was a member of the Baptist Church. He was
married a second time, to Miss Maria S. Varnon, a daughter of Benjamin Varnon, and a native of Bourbon County,
Ky., near Millersburg. She has borne him four children, two of whom are now living: Sarah E. and Laura, both
living at home. His family are members of the Methodist Church at Cynthiana. He is the owner of 740 acres of
choice land called "Evergreen Valley." Upon his farm he makes the raising and breeding of short horn cattle a
specialty. He is a member of the Grangers' Lodge No. 154 at Cynthiana. He is a Democrat. [8]

On May 3, 1850 when John was 25, he first married Emily REDMON, daughter of Robert REDMON, in Clark,
Kentucky. Born in 1820. Emily died in October 1854; she was 34.

They had the following children:
      87          i.      Robert William (1851-1879)
      88         ii.      Emily Frances (1854-)



                                                     Page 57
                                              Register Report


John second married Maria S. VARNON, daughter of Benjamin VARNON.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Newton. Born in 1856. Newton died in 1878; he was 22.
                 ii.      Sarah Eliza. Born in 1860.
      89        iii.      Laura (1861-)
                iv.       George W. Born in 1864. George W. died in 1871; he was 7.

50. Sally Ann LAIR. Born in 1809. Sally Ann died in 1883; she was 74.

Sally Ann married William T. REDMON, son of George REDMON Jr. (1781-1844) & Sallie HAYES (1786-). Born
in 1809 in Flat Run, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

This may be the same William Redmon who married Sallie A. Lair (1809-1883). I have no proof of this.
---------
Notes for WILLIAM T. REDMON:

All of [the Redmon brothers] became farmers and all continued to live in Kentucky except William, who when well
advanced in years moved to Texas.... William's son George was a merchant in Paris after his return from the
Confederate Army. He served as major in Morgan's command. [Kerr, Vol. 4, p. 407]

They had the following children:
                  i.      Mary J. Born about 1831.
                 ii.      Charles L. Born about 1834.
                          Notes for CHARLES L. REDMON: [9]
                          Paris Western Citizen, August 11, 1865:
                          Charles L. Redmon married Mss Alice W. Dorsey of New Orleans, La., on August 3,
                          1865.

                         After Charles died, Alice married John B. Kennedy of Bourbon Co (Perrin, p. 477]

                         In August 1865 when Charles L. was 31, he married Alice W. DORSEY.
               iii.      George. Born about 1836.
                         Notes for GEORGE REDMON: Was a dry goods merchant in Paris and served in the
                         Civil War under John R Morgan. [Kerr, p. 407] Censuses show him living with his
                         parents in 1850, 1860 and 1870. In 1870 he had property valued at $16,000.



                             Family of Matthias LAIR Jr. (22) & Rachel SIDLE


51. Sarah Ann Eliza LAIR. Born in 1835.

In 1854 when Sarah Ann Eliza was 19, she married John Shawhan LAIL, son of George LAIL (1802-1850) & Sarah
Elizabeth "Betsey" SHAWHAN (1807-). Born in 1826. John Shawhan died in 1878; he was 52.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William Adair. Born on December 1, 1854. William Adair died on November 25, 1926;
                          he was 71.
                          William Adair married Mary Gill LACLERC. Born circa 1848. Mary Gill died on
                          November 23, 1924; she was 76.
      90         ii.      Henry Miller (1853-1914)



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                                                Register Report

52. Mary Elizabeth LAIR. Born on June 16, 1827. Mary Elizabeth died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky on
March 18, 1865; she was 37. Buried in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky.

Mary Elizabeth married William LAIR (46) , son of Charles LAIR (20) (1775-1860) & Sallie ANDERSON
(1781-1860). Born on January 28, 1816. William died in Lair, Harrison County, Kentucky on January 15, 1860; he
was 43.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Sarah Eliza. Born on January 31, 1852. Sarah Eliza died in Lair, Harrison County,
                          Kentucky on April 30, 1859; she was 7.
                 ii.      Emma Alice. Born on April 26, 1854. Emma Alice died in Lair, Harrison County,
                          Kentucky on March 19, 1877; she was 22.
                          From “This Old House” by Kathryn Wilson, “H. Tod Smiser House:”

                          This old house stands opposite the First Methodist Church and at the corner of Pike and
                          Church Streets. The old place distinguished itself during the Civil War by housing one of
                          the famed generals of the Confederacy. Yes, Gen. John Hunt Morgan slept here.

                          The families who have occupied the house come in this succession: the William
                          Huddlesons, the John Miller Andersons, the Jacob F. Millers, the Gustavus Magees, the
                          William Lairs, the James Curles, the Dr. John Harmon Smisers, the Dr. Tod Smisers and
                          the Glassel Butlers.

                          The one-story brick section in the rear was built long before the two-story frame front
                          section, and evidently by William Huddleson in the early 1800's. After the death of
                          Huddleson, William Lowry, guardian of Huddleson's infant heirs, authorized Judge James
                          Curry to sell it at the Court House door. At this sale in September of 1833 it was bought
                          by John Miller Anderson.

                          Though he had possession for only a year, the Andersons most certainly occupied it
                          during that time, for Miss Analena Anderson says she has heard her father, Thomas W.
                          Anderson, son of John Miller, tell about moving in 1834 from there to the house where
                          the City Hall now stands. He said he was such a small boy that his little red chair which
                          he was commissioned to carry to the new house, seemed a very heavy load.

                          A year later in September, 1934, Jacob F. Miller came into possession of the house and
                          evidently built the front part somewhere around that date, for the next deed mentions the
                          place as the two-story frame house.

                          The next owner was Gustavus Magee. We have no information of any of the incidents of
                          his occupancy. Gus Magee sold the place to William Lair for $1,700 in 1856, just 100
                          years ago.

                          William Lair is said by several of his relatives here to have been the one-armed Lair. At
                          any rate the William Lairs lived in the old house for some years. They had only one
                          daughter, Emma Alice. After they died, Emma Alice boarded in town and went to school
                          for a while and loved the social life of early Cynthiana. But by the time she was twenty
                          she was in such bad health that she went to live at "The Cedars," on the Old Lair Pike
                          with her uncle, John Lair. Here she was confined to her bed for several years, and it is
                          said that as she lay there she often looked at the burial vault key which hung near the
                          mantel and said, "Please don't bury me in that vault." But sad to say she died in her early
                          twenties and was buried in the vault. Mrs. Alice Lair was named for Emma Alice, and
                          Miss Varnon Northcutt is in possession of a beautiful diamond which once belonged to
                          the same Emma Alice.

                          After the Lairs moved out, the old frame house was soon occupied by the James Curles.


                                                      Page 59
                      Register Report

Here their second child and only daughter was born. She was named Annie Morgan to
please their star boarder at the time-Gen. John Hunt Morgan.

Gen. Morgan is thought to have occupied the upstairs east bed room. And there it was no
doubt, that he left his watch when he was surprised by a message that fresh Union troops
were approaching town. This was probably the Sun(lay morning, June 12, 1864 (the day
after the Confederate victory in the Second Battle of Cynthiana), when the Union Gen.
Burbridge approached in the early hours from the Millersburg Pike and recaptured
Cynthiana. At any rate Gen. Morgan rushed off without his gold watch, never to return.
The watch, however, was sent to him later.

It was probably during the First Battle of Cynthiana, that a minnie ball tore through the
window of this same room and landed on the Curles' best feather bed. In the middle of
this same feather bed, lay baby George Ashbrook, a few months old. His mother, Mrs.
Sam Ashbrook had brought him to call on her good friends the Curles, then had promptly
forgotten him and run to the basement with the others when the shots began to whiz
around the house. Finally somebody in the safety of the basement happened to think of
baby George and ran upstairs just in time to jerk him from the burning mattress and put
out the fire.

The Curles moved from this old house to Robinson Station. Their other children were
Will, Pierre and Jim.

Dr. John Harmon Smiser then bought the house from the Emma Alice Lair estate around
1870. He married Mary Ewalt and here they reared their children. While studying
medicine in St. Louis, John Harmon Smiser had become such an admirer of one of his
professors, Dr. Tod Helman, that he named his second son, Tod, after him. Their other
children were Hunt, Mary, Louise and Earl.

Tod Smiser grew up and went to study medicine in New York City. Here he studied
under the same illustrious Dr. Tod Helman. Dr. Tod Smiser married Kate Whaley and
here at the old house they reared their children, Louise and Harmon Tod. Louise married
Glassel Butler from Culpepper County, Va., and they continue to make their home with
Mrs. Kate Smiser in the old place after nearly 90 years of Smiser ownership. Harmon Tod
studied medicine at the University of Louisville. married Katherine Wiglesworth arid
they built their present home on the Leesburg Pike.

The bedroom pictured here is the one where Gen. Morgan slept and also where baby
George Ashbrook slept on the burning bed. Above the mantel in the bedroom across the
hall is a portrait of Dorcas Saunders, the step-great-grandmother of Britain's Hon. Harold
MacMillan. Of course Dorcas Saunders' place over this mantel is due to the fact that she
is also the great-great-grandmother of Mrs. Glassel Butler (Louise Smiser) one of the
present mistresses of this old house.

A significant piece of furniture in the hallway picture, is the carved oak bench, the
carving having been done by the late Louise Smiser, Mrs. Butler's aunt for whom she was
named. This same Louise Smiser also did some of the carving on the interior woodwork
of the Episcopal Church here.

An outstanding feature of this old place is the ancient poplar tree seen in the picture. It
was old when Charles Rieckel, who died some years ago at the age of 108, walked here
from Paris in 1856 and rested under its branches. He said it was the first thing he saw of
Cynthiana. The old tree stood there in all its majesty and watched as the Methodists built
their first church, of red brick, across the street. This was in 1820. The old tree saw the
church burn down in 1844 and watched the building of a smaller edifice in 1845, saw it
torn down in 1870, then rebuilt, and the present building erected in 1905.



                            Page 60
                                                Register Report


                         The famous old tree saw a great deal of both the first Battle of Cynthiana in July, 1862,
                         and the second Battle of Cynthiana in June of 1864, which lasted about five hours, during
                         which time the entire business section of town was burned. The same old tree no -doubt
                         sheltered Indians and the earliest pioneers. In fact, if trees could talk, a historian could sit
                         under the branches of this old tree and write as interesting a history of Cynthiana as any
                         which has ever been written.



                                   Family of John LAIR (23) & Peggy BELL


53. John LAIR. Born in 1820. John died in 1888; he was 68.

In 1847 when John was 27, he married Isabella COOK.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Margaret Elizabeth. Born in 1848.
      91         ii.      Mary Emma (1850-1903)
      92        iii.      Cynthia Ann (1853-)
      93        iv.       Edith Florence (1856-)


                                 Family of William LAIR (24) & Emily BELL


54. Matthias LAIR.

Matthias first married Martha ROSS.

They had one child:
      94         i.      Edna

Matthias second married Discretion FERGUSON.

Matthias third married Ella SPARKS.


                             Family of Cornelius RUDDLE (25) & Hanah DYER


55. James Dyer RUDDLE. Born on May 10, 1809 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia). James Dyer died
in Ruddle, (West) Virginia on December 31, 1894; he was 85. Buried in Ruddle Cemetery, Ruddle (West) Virginia.

On November 29, 1832 when James Dyer was 23, he first married Elizabeth HAMMER. Born on August 4, 1809 in
Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia). Elizabeth died in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia) on June
27, 1852; she was 42. Buried in Jacob Hammer Cemetery.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William George. Born on October 13, 1833 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West
                          Virginia). William George died on February 7, 1916; he was 82.
                          about 1857 when William George was 23, he married Samantha HARTMAN. Born about
                          1833.



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                                              Register Report

                ii.      Edmund Dyer. Born on May 30, 1835 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia).
                         Edmund Dyer died on November 3, 1894; he was 59.
                         On September 2, 1874 when Edmund Dyer was 39, he married Dorothy
                         PUFFENBARGER. Born about 1835.
               iii.      Isaac Cornelius. Born on February 24, 1837 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West
                         Virginia). Isaac Cornelius died on July 3, 1916; he was 79.
                         On December 28, 1865 when Isaac Cornelius was 28, he married Mary Margaret
                         SKIDMORE. Born about 1837.
                iv.      Abel Miles. Born on March 4, 1839 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia). Abel
                         Miles died in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia) on January 11, 1892; he was
                         52. Buried in Jacob Hammer Cemetery.
                         about 1876 when Abel Miles was 36, he married Mary C. DAHMER. Born in 1859. Mary
                         C. died in 1939; she was 80.
      95         v.      John Matthew (1841-1911)
                vi.      James Hammer. Born on June 8, 1843 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia).
                         James Hammer died on January 21, 1921; he was 77.
                         On June 24, 1868 when James Hammer was 25, he married Caroline Phoebe HOMAN.
                         Born about 1849.
               vii.      Anderson Newman. Born on July 12, 1845 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West
                         Virginia). Anderson Newman died on November 8, 1905; he was 60.
              viii.      Mary Catherine. Born on May 9, 1847 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia).
                         Mary Catherine died on August 8, 1905; she was 58.
                         In 1870 when Mary Catherine was 22, she married Franklin Dyer. Born on May 9, 1847
                         in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia). Franklin Dyer died on August 8, 1905; he
                         was 58.
      96        ix.      Henry Clay (1850-1910)

In 1858 when James Dyer was 48, he second married Jane Frances PAYNE. Born on February 17, 1830 in Dry
River, Virginia. Jane Frances died in Ruddle, West Virginia on April 30, 1916; she was 86. Buried in Ruddle
Cemetery, Ruddle, West Virginia.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Charles Boggs. Born on May 26, 1859 in The Branch, Pendleton County, Virginia.
                          Charles Boggs died on March 27, 1954; he was 94.
                          On November 11, 1888 when Charles Boggs was 29, he married Mary Jane SMITH.
                          Born about 1860.
                 ii.      Phoebe Jane. Born on December 24, 1860 in The Branch, Pendleton County, Virginia.
                          Phoebe Jane died on May 9, 1919; she was 58.
                          On January 4, 1886 when Phoebe Jane was 25, she married Mathias CONRAD. Born
                          about 1860.
                iii.      Harness Lee. Born on December 22, 1862 in The Branch, Pendleton County, Virginia.
                          Harness Lee died on May 14, 1956; he was 93.
                          On January 9, 1890 when Harness Lee was 27, he married Cora DOVE. Born about 1865.
                iv.       Margaret Etta. Born on December 9, 1870 in The Branch, Pendleton County, Virginia.
                          Margaret Etta died on August 15, 1963; she was 92.
                          On October 10, 1889 when Margaret Etta was 18, she married Edward J. HARTMAN.
                          Born about 1870.
                 v.       Benjamin Franklin. Born on November 24, 1873 in The Branch, Pendleton County,
                          Virginia. Benjamin Franklin died on December 24, 1894; he was 21.
                vi.       Hannah Sidney. Born on June 23, 1876 in Buffalo Hills, Pendleton County, West
                          Virginia. Hannah Sidney died on January 18, 1968; she was 91.
                          On February 9, 1898 when Hannah Sidney was 21, she married Charles B. SIMMONS.
                          Born about 1875.




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                                               Register Report

                            Family of Isaac RIDDLE (26) & Deborah KANESTER


56. John Malcolm RUDDLE. Born on November 26, 1830 in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia. John
Malcolm died in Deer Run, West Virginia on February 17, 1911; he was 80.

On October 14, 1852 when John Malcolm was 21, he married Mary Elizabeth EYE. Born on August 7, 1832 in
Sugar Grove, West Virginia. Mary Elizabeth died in Deer Run, West Virginia on April 14, 1910; she was 77.

They had the following children:
                   i.     William Pendleton. Born on December 1, 1854.
      97          ii.     Isaac Newton (1857-1943)
                iii.      Sarah K. Born on February 7, 1860.
                 iv.      Deborah Alice. Born on September 15, 1862.
      98          v.      Virginia H. (1866-1966)
                 vi.      Mary Emily. Born on November 21, 1868.
                vii.      Annie Maud. Born on February 14, 1874.
               viii.      Franklin Pierce. Born on July 20, 1877.

57. Joseph Newman RIDDLE. Born on June 21, 1832 in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia. Joseph
Newman died in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia on April 7, 1921; he was 88.

In 1852 when Joseph Newman was 19, he first married Amanda TRUMBO. Born about 1834. Amanda died in
Rockingham County, Virginia in 1852; she was 18.

They had one child:
                 i.       Charles W. Born on June 17, 1852 in Brock’s Gap, Rockingham County, Virginia.
                          Charles W. died on July 13, 1909; he was 57.

On December 27, 1855 when Joseph Newman was 23, he second married Sarah Jane FUNK. Born about 1835.


                          Family of Mathias Custer LAIR (27) & Jane ANDERSON


58. Margaret LAIR. Born in 1827. [10]

No children.

Margaret first married Daniel SHAWHAN, son of Joseph SHAWHAN (1781-1871) & Sarah "Sallie" EWALT
(1783-1837). Born in 1823. [10]

They had one child:
                 i.       Elizabeth. Born in 1848. [10]

Margaret second married Joe TAYLOR.

59. John Miller LAIR. Born on October 7, 1820 in Near Lair’s Station, Kentucky. Buried in Cynthiana, Harrison
County, Kentucky.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 663

JOHN M. LAIR, farmer ; P. 0. Cynthiana ; is a native of Harrison County, Ky., son of Matthias C. and Jane



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                                                 Register Report

(Anderson) Lair. He was born on South Licking near Lair's Station, Oct. 7, 1820. His grandparents .John A. and
Sarah (Custard) Lair, were natives of Virginia, they emigrated to Kentucky in 1791, and settled in Harrison County
at Houston's Fort. His father was a native of Harrison County, and during his life followed the occupation of farmer;
he died in 1860, aged sixty years; he was a Democrat. His mother was a native of Harrison County and daughter of
William and Elizabeth (Miller) Anderson; she was a member of the Methodist Church; she died in 1868, aged
eighty-three years. John M., the subject of this sketch, received his education from the common schools of his native
county; at the age of eighteen, on account of his father's failing health, he became the manager of his farm. In1869
he bought the old homestead farm, and remained on the same until 1876, when he sold it and bought the farm upon
which he now resides, of George Redmon, having 167 acres of choice land, situated one mile from Cynthiana, on
the Cynthiana and Lair's Station Pike, and is called "Sunnyside." He has been quite an extensive stock raiser of
cattle, mules, sheep, and hogs. He was married in 1866 to Miss Mary S. Grimes, daughter of David and Zerilda
(Hedges) Grimes. She has borne him two children; one of whom is living : Zerilda A. His wife died in ISM, aged
eighty- four years. She was a member of the Christian Church at Leesburg, Harrison Co. He is a Democrat and a
member of the Grangers' Lodge at Cynthiana.

In 1866 when John Miller was 45, he married Mary Susan GRIMES, daughter of David GRIMES & Zerilda
HEDGES (1795-1879). Born in 1795. Mary Susan died in 1879; she was 84.

They had one child:
                 i.        Zerilda A.

60. Rowena (Roanna) LAIR.

In 1835 Rowena (Roanna) married Matthias LAIR (45) , son of Charles LAIR (20) (1775-1860) & Sallie
ANDERSON (1781-1860). Born on September 5, 1813 in Harrison County, Kentucky.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 663

MATTHIAS LAIR, Sr., farmer, P. O. Lair's Station; is a native of Harrison County, and son of Charles and Sallie
(Anderson) Lair. He was born Sep. 5, 1813. He lived his earlier life with his parents, receiving his education from
the common schools of his native county, and assisting in tilling the soil of his father's farm. In 1835 he married
Roanna Lair, a native of Harrison County, and daughter of Matthias C. Lair. She has borne him eleven children,
eight of whom are now living, viz: Charles John H., M. L., Franklin P., Sally, Roanna and Joseph. He is the owner
of 122 acres of choice land called "Locust Hill" upon which he raises all the principal cops and all kinds of stock. He
is a member of the Grangers' Lodge, No. 154, at Cynthiana. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for four
years, and has been a school trustee for about thirty years. He is a Democrat. Mr. Lair is a man of good ability and
knowledge, and is most respected by his neighbors, having taken a great interest in the welfare of his country as well
as that of his fellow men.

They had the following children:
      79           i.     Charles F. (1837-1898)
      80          ii.     John William
      81        iii.      Matthias (1852-1909)
                 iv.      Franklin P.
      82          v.      Sally (1849-1906)
                 vi.      Roanna.
      83        vii.      Joseph
      84       viii.      Luther

61. William LAIR.

On February 10, 1859 William first married Susan Rebecca WYATT, daughter of Fleming Redd WYATT
(1806-1893) & Martha McCauley ROGERS (1808-1889). Born on December 13, 1833. Susan Rebecca died on June



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                                              Register Report

15, 1874; she was 40.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Sallie Lula. Born on January 10, 1868.
                          On December 24, 1904 when Sallie Lula was 36, she married F. G. HEDGES.
                 ii.      Ashby. Born on June 12, 1872. Ashby died on May 14, 1874; he was 1.

William second married Mattie CLAY, daughter of Samuel H. CLAY (1813-1872) & Julia A. KENNEDY
(1814-1878). Born in 1847.


                            Family of William G. LAIR (28) & Mary ANDERSON


62. Addison LAIR.

Addison first married Nancy WOOD.

They had one child:
                 i.       Emily.
                          Emily married Jacob LAIR, son of Mathias Custer LAIR (27) (~1787-1860) & Jane
                          ANDERSON (1785-1868).

Addison second married Nancy BLACKFORD.


                         Family of John Wesley LAIR (29) & Catherine SMISER (40)


63. Helen Henry LAIR. Born on September 3, 1838.

In 1868 when Helen Henry was 29, she married A.H. WARD.

They had one child:
      99         i.       Burton Maude (1869-)


                            Family of Sarah Ellen LAIR (31) & James W. BERRY


64. Rhoda Ellen BERRY. Born on January 13, 1840.

Rhoda Ellen married Rev. W.W. CHAMBERLAIN. W.W. died on November 24, 1904.

They had the following children:
                  i.      James William. Born on July 21, .
                 ii.      Orphah Francis.
    100         iii.      James Poynt (1869-)

65. Sarah Frances BERRY.

In November 1866 Sarah Frances married Thomas W. HARDY.

They had the following children:



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                                             Register Report

     101         i.      Lena Thomas
                ii.      Charles Miller. Resided in Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky.
                         Charles Miller married Estella PENN.
               iii.      Albert.
               iv.       Julia Ella.

66. Willie Mary BERRY. Born in October 1854.

Willie Mary married Claude CANTRILL.

They had the following children:
    102           i.      Gertrude
    103          ii.      Lillian
                iii.      Claudia.




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                                                 Register Report



                                                Sixth Generation
                               _________________________________________
                           Family of David NEWMAN (33) & Esther Huston BOGGS


67. Robert Boggs NEWMAN.

Robert Boggs married Eliza CALDWELL.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Nannie Boggs.
                          Nannie Boggs married Marcus CASSALL.
                 ii.      Mary E.
                          Mary E. married Wilson BERRY.
                iii.      Maggie E.
                          Maggie E. married Leonard CASSALL.


                          Family of John Milton SMISER (38) & Julia A. EDWARDS


68. Arabella Perrin SMISER. Born on February 26, 1835 in Cynthiana, Kentucky. Arabella Perrin died in Paris,
Monroe County, Missouri on September 1, 1863; she was 28.

On December 27, 1855 when Arabella Perrin was 20, she married Cyrus M. SMITH, in Paris, Monroe County,
Missouri.

They had the following children:
    104           i.      Julia A. (1856-)
                 ii.      William Byers. Born on January 26, 1859.
                          On December 20, 1893 when William Byers was 34, he married Lillie V. HOULE.
    105         iii.      Elizabeth Pope (1861-)
    106         iv.       Arabella Edwards (1863-1949)

69. John Edwards SMISER. Born on February 16, 1837 in Cynthiana, Kentucky. John Edwards died in Paris,
Monroe County, Missouri on February 14, 1865; he was 27.

On April 27, 1865 when John Edwards was 28, he married Anne M. EDWARDS, in Paris, Monroe County,
Missouri.

They had the following children:
    107           i.      Kate S.
    108          ii.      Ephraim B.

70. James Samuel SMISER. Born on July 6, 1839 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. James Samuel died in Paris,
Monroe County, Missouri on January 19, 1925; he was 85.

Notes for JAMES SAMUEL SMISER (NOTES FROM LAWRENCE SMISER): [11]

James Samuel was a pioneer farmer in Monroe County. During the Civil War he left Missouri due to a problem
related to slavery. His name appeared on a list of possible hostages to be taken to insure the release of a southern
sympathizer held by pro Union Missourians. The possibility of being executed for that reason was enough to send
him on the run.



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                                                 Register Report


He went west to Salt Lake City and started a freight hauling business between that city and Sacramento, CA. He
would later relate the saga of his two years in the freight business to his grandson Milton back in Missouri. The
second year of his business venture he took a partner. He never told any of the family the name of that partner which
remains a mystery to this day. Decades later his great grandson would discover the Smiser Freight Transfer
Company operating in South Gate, CA. with a story very similar to his about starting a freight business between the
same two cities. It remains to be seen whether the two businesses are one and the same!

He was active in getting a rock road built from Paris to his neighborhood. Although a member of the Christian
Church, he worked to get an endowment fund for the cemetery at Salem Baptist Church. He was a member of the
Smiser School Board for 30 years and taught in the school system for several years.

He is buried in Salem Baptist Church Cemetery.

JAMES SAMUEL SMISER

This true story was told by James Samuel Smiser to his grandson, Milton B. Smiser. At the time Milton was around
six years of age. When eighty years of age, Milton recounted it to his niece, Grace James Hannah, who has hereby
recorded it for posterity.

" The year was 1838. Missouri farmland was rapidly being settled. John Milton Smiser was among those early
pioneers who had come from Kentucky and Virginia. His family was rapidly growing. Today, July 6, a third son,
hearty and beautiful was born. He and his wife Julia named the new arrival James Samuel.

Already the tight log cabin seemed full. But the little home near Paris in northeast Missouri was soon to be the
abode of a family consisting of eleven children, their parents and also negro slaves. Julia had been an Edwards. Her
family was descended from the well-known New England preacher, Jonathan Edwards. When she married, she was
given a choice of one thousand dollars or two slaves as a wedding gift from her parents. She chose the slaves, a man
named John, and a maid servant named Black Mammie.

Little is known of James Samuel's early years, but durig the Civil War he fought on the side of the confederacy. He
was in the battle of Wilson's Creek near Springfield, Missouri. For the state, this was the major battle of the war with
a total missing, wounded and killed of 1317 for the Union and 1230 for the confederacy. who sent the Federal forces
in wild retreat. It was August 10, 1961. scarcely four months since the war began. The countryside was rolling hill
country, covered with scrub oaks and dense undergrowth. The heat was oppressive. Clouds of dust from the horses
hooves mingled with the smoke belched forth from the cannon and other firearms. Not everyone wore a uniform.
Many owned only part of a uniform. At least one officer refused to wear one. He went into battle clad in a business
suit. Some entire units were confused as to who was fighting whom.

It was not surprising that James became separated from his fellow soldiers. Unable to establish any contact with the
confederate army and surrounded by the enemy, James decided it would be a point of discretion to make himself
scarce. With great care, he secretely made his way to his home near Paris.

Since Missouri was a state of divided localities, she was plagued by numerous incidents all during the war. One
history lists Missouri as ranking third among all the states in having the highest number of military actions which
included battles, skirmishes, engagements, operations, etc. Palmyra, a little town, not far from Paris had her troubles.
On August 12, 1862 a Confederate colonel named Joseph E. Porter, led a radi on the Palmyra jail, seeking to free
Southern prisoners housed there. Owing to the jail's thick unyielding walls Porter was not successful, but he was
able to take some prisoners, among them one Andrew Allsman, a spy-informant and advisor for the federal officers
of that vicinity.

Union officers were furious. They demanded Allsman's return. Meanwhile old Allsman disappeared. It was
generally thought that he was killed by Southern soldiers who hated him because he had reported their sympathies to
the Federal officers. What actually happened was never known except to those involved. Allsman's body was never


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                                                Register Report

found. On October 18, 1862, Union officers took ten Confederate prisoners out of jail, set them on coffins, and
executed them by a firing squad retaliation.

After the incident rumor spread like wildfire. It was said ten men would be executed every Saturday until old
Allsman was returned to his home. These would not only include prisoners, but free men as well. Even those who
criticized such justice would also be shot, the rumor said. Terror reigned.

Shortly after this, James went on business to Shelbina, a neighboring town. Here an acquaintance saw and
recognized him. "You better get out of this area," he warned. "Your name was brought up in connection to that
trouble in Palmyra." Fleeing for his life, James headed west. Soon he arrived in St. Joseph, Missouri. While there he
found a wagon train preparing to leave for California. Upon inquiring,James found to his pleasure, a cook was
needed, and as this was a line of work at which he excelled, he quickly signed on, and was soon on his way to a new
chapter in his life. This wagon line was owned by Glenn and Wilson, who regularly ran wagon trains west to
California. The wagon master on this particular trip proved to be a man with the bad habit of over-indulgence in the
use of alcohol. Quite early in the journey one evening, somewhere in Western Kansas, he got roaring drunk and
began to abuse and berate those under his authority. He became so obnoxious that in desperation, James picked up a
wooden neck yoke, a piece used to hitch a team together, and struck the ranting drunk a blow to the head. He fell to
the ground unconscious.

While the wagon master lay on the ground in this condition, who should appear on the scene, but the owners of the
wagon train. They began to question everyone. James readily admitted to his part in the state of affairs. He was then
backed up by those who had observed the commotion. The owners were soon convinced that their employee was
unfit for his position, and began to seek someone to replace him. Turning to James, they asked him if he would
consider leading the expostion to its destination. This was something he had never done, nor had he had any
experience in this line. Nevertheless, James liked the idea and was willing to make an attempt. He was hired on the
spot.

In good time the wagon train arrived in Sacramento. Then James decided this would be a good place to wait out the
war, since he was not anxious to return home for the present. To make a living, he soon began a wagon line of his
own. He ran freight wagons pulled by oxen between Sacramento and Salt Lake City. The latter being at that time not
a city, just an outpost. It was on this route that he made friends with an old Indian chief called Winnemucca, through
whose territory he traveled. The chief's son became the official guide for the line. Old Winnemucca renamed a son
"Big Jim", which is what he called James.

Old Chief Winnemucca valued their friendship highly. On one trip as the wagon line came near his village,
Winnemucca net him as an honored guest and offered his daughter to James for a bride. James was already engaged
to a childhood sweetheart back home, but he valued the chief's friendship and had no desire to offend him. He
assured Winnemucca that he was flattered and appreciated his confidence. He told Winnemucca that he could not
offend his father's friend back home and had already promised him to marry his daughter. The old chief was
respectful of James' previous commitment without loss of pride or resentment. They continued to be friends.

The freight line prospered and James changed from oxen to mules. He took on a young partner whose name he did
not disclose even in later years. Then on a subsequent trip somewhere between Sacramento and Salt Lake City
tragedy struck. James contracted Rocky Mountain spotted fever. It was disease carried by wood ticks and in those
days almost always meant certain death. His fever raged fiercely and finally James lapsed into a coma. His
companions gave him up for dead. Not wanting to wait for his final hours, they left him beside the trail and
continued on their way. But Providence and fate have a way of fooling the wisest of men. James did not die. It was
while he lay in this low state between the living and the dead, that his Indian friends found him and took him to the
village of Old Winnemucca. How he was able to survive only God knows. The Indians gave him their best. They
administered their native herbs and medicines and watched over him. His convalescent period lasted many months.
When he was able to realize what had happened to him, James was overwhelmed by a wave of homesickness. Oh,
how he longed to leave this place of disease and return to his loved ones and familiar countryside. His strength
returned irritatingly slowly. Weak though he was, when a wagon train came along going East, he eagerly joined it.
Once home, he married the sweetheart of his earlier days, and settled down to farming and raising a family. There is


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                                                 Register Report

a mystery to this story because of some unanswered questions. What became of James' wagon train business? What
became of his young partner? James was left beside the trail minus his gold watch, billfold and all identification
papers. Why? If his business was of great value, why did he never return to claim it? Was his illness so great that it
took him years to regain his former strength? Perhaps the rigors of traveling that hazardous route was beyond his
endurance until the effects of time on his business were irrevocable. This part of the story we can only surmise.

Years later James' grandson, Milton Smiser visited his own grown son now living in Southern California. While
there he waw a huge tractor truck with the name "Smiser" printed on the side. He was assure this was a
well-established business of the area.

Sometime in the 1950's a woman from California telephoned Milton at his home in Marceline, Missouri. She was
inquiring into the history of the Smiser family. She said her father was James S. Smiser and had started a wagon
freight line drawn by mules. Her call came at a time when Milton was quite ill and in much pain., It was not until
later that he realized the significance of her call. Because he had not kept her name or address, he could not
reestablish contact.

Milton remembered that in recounting his experience, James Samuel did not mention the name of his young partner,
and although he seemed to believe this man had taken over his business, he never showed any animosity towards
him in any respect.

After contemplating the facts for some time, Milton came to this conclusion. James' partner believed him dead. He
took James' watch, wallet and papers, but that was not all he took. he also took James' name and continued to
operate his business as his own. Milton believes he never told anyone, not even the family he later acquired, that the
true name he was given was not James S. Smiser. He also believes that the large trucking firm that exists today was
started by his grandfather. You may draw you own conclusions, but if what Milton thinks is true, then an entire
family now lives today under a name not rightfully theirs.

On February 27, 1868 when James Samuel was 28, he married Mary Frances WEST, in Paris, Monroe County,
Missouri.

They had the following children:
    109           i.      Ernest Perrin (1868-1953)
                 ii.      Edward Thomas. Born on July 8, 1871 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. Edward
                          Thomas died in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri on April 2, 1895; he was 23.
                iii.      James Frazer. Born on September 27, 1873 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. James
                          Frazer died on January 10, 1938; he was 64.

71. William Garrard SMISER. Born on July 14, 1845 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. William Garrard died in
Paris, Monroe County, Missouri in 1931; he was 85.

On December 24, 1884 when William Garrard was 39, he married Ella CARVER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Bertha H.
                 ii.      Son.

72. Henry Thomas Allen SMISER. Born on August 2, 1845 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri.

Notes for HENRY THOMAS ALLEN SMISER: [11]
Four children were born to this couple; all died young. One born in 1876 is buried in Paris, Mo. Two are buried in
California.

In 1872 when Henry Thomas Allen was 26, he married Nellie KENNIE.




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                                                 Register Report

They had the following children:
                  i.      Lena.
                 ii.      Freddie.


                                Family of Darius SMISER (41) & Louisa SMITH


73. John Harmon SMISER. Born on July 27, 1837 in Harrison County, Kentucky. John Harmon died in 1902; he
was 64.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 679

J. H. SMISER, M. D.; P. O. Cynthiana; was born in Harrison County, Ky., July 27, 1837, and is the son of Denos
Smiser, who was born in Harrison County, July 4, 1814, and is now a farmer in Bates County, Mo.; and grandson of
George Smiser, who was born in Maryland, and emigrated to Kentucky as early as 1795; the Doctor's mother was
Miss Louisa Smith, daughter of Michael and Mary Smith, of Harrison County; the Doctor received his literary
education in the common schools of Harrison County and at Eminence, and graduated as an M. D. in Missouri, in
1868, beginning practice in Cynthiana the same year; he began life as a farmer; followed that business eight years,
but gave it up for the study and practice of medicine, in which his natural talent and ability have been proved by his
success; in 1870, the Doctor was married to Miss Mary, daughter of John H. Ewalt, of Bourbon County; four
children have been born to them, viz: Hunt A., Louisa H., Todd, and Earle. The doctor is a member of the Christian
Church, is a Democrat, and a Master Mason.
-----

From “This Old House” by Kathryn Wilson, “H. Tod Smiser House:”

This old house stands opposite the First Methodist Church and at the corner of Pike and Church Streets. The old
place distinguished itself during the Civil War by housing one of the famed generals of the Confederacy. Yes, Gen.
John Hunt Morgan slept here.

The families who have occupied the house come in this succession: the William Huddlesons, the John Miller
Andersons, the Jacob F. Millers, the Gustavus Magees, the William Lairs, the James Curles, the Dr. John Harmon
Smisers, the Dr. Tod Smisers and the Glassel Butlers.

The one-story brick section in the rear was built long before the two-story frame front section, and evidently by
William Huddleson in the early 1800's. After the death of Huddleson, William Lowry, guardian of Huddleson's
infant heirs, authorized Judge James Curry to sell it at the Court House door. At this sale in September of 1833 it
was bought by John Miller Anderson.

Though he had possession for only a year, the Andersons most certainly occupied it during that time, for Miss
Analena Anderson says she has heard her father, Thomas W. Anderson, son of John Miller, tell about moving in
1834 from there to the house where the City Hall now stands. He said he was such a small boy that his little red
chair which he was commissioned to carry to the new house, seemed a very heavy load.

A year later in September, 1934, Jacob F. Miller came into possession of the house and evidently built the front part
somewhere around that date, for the next deed mentions the place as the two-story frame house.

The next owner was Gustavus Magee. We have no information of any of the incidents of his occupancy. Gus Magee
sold the place to William Lair for $1,700 in 1856, just 100 years ago.

William Lair is said by several of his relatives here to have been the one-armed Lair. At any rate the William Lairs
lived in the old house for some years. They had only one daughter, Emma Alice. After they died, Emma Alice


                                                       Page 71
                                                 Register Report

boarded in town and went to school for a while and loved the social life of early Cynthiana. But by the time she was
twenty she was in such bad health that she went to live at "The Cedars," on the Old Lair Pike with her uncle, John
Lair. Here she was confined to her bed for several years, and it is said that as she lay there she often looked at the
burial vault key which hung near the mantel and said, "Please don't bury me in that vault." But sad to say she died in
her early twenties and was buried in the vault. Mrs. Alice Lair was named for Emma Alice, and Miss Varnon
Northcutt is in possession of a beautiful diamond which once belonged to the same Emma Alice.

After the Lairs moved out, the old frame house was soon occupied by the James Curles. Here their second child and
only daughter was born. She was named Annie Morgan to please their star boarder at the time-Gen. John Hunt
Morgan.

Gen. Morgan is thought to have occupied the upstairs east bed room. And there it was no doubt, that he left his
watch when he was surprised by a message that fresh Union troops were approaching town. This was probably the
Sun(lay morning, June 12, 1864 (the day after the Confederate victory in the Second Battle of Cynthiana), when the
Union Gen. Burbridge approached in the early hours from the Millersburg Pike and recaptured Cynthiana. At any
rate Gen. Morgan rushed off without his gold watch, never to return. The watch, however, was sent to him later.

It was probably during the First Battle of Cynthiana, that a minnie ball tore through the window of this same room
and landed on the Curles' best feather bed. In the middle of this same feather bed, lay baby George Ashbrook, a few
months old. His mother, Mrs. Sam Ashbrook had brought him to call on her good friends the Curles, then had
promptly forgotten him and run to the basement with the others when the shots began to whiz around the house.
Finally somebody in the safety of the basement happened to think of baby George and ran upstairs just in time to
jerk him from the burning mattress and put out the fire.

The Curles moved from this old house to Robinson Station. Their other children were Will, Pierre and Jim.

Dr. John Harmon Smiser then bought the house from the Emma Alice Lair estate around 1870. He married Mary
Ewalt and here they reared their children. While studying medicine in St. Louis, John Harmon Smiser had become
such an admirer of one of his professors, Dr. Tod Helman, that he named his second son, Tod, after him. Their other
children were Hunt, Mary, Louise and Earl.

Tod Smiser grew up and went to study medicine in New York City. Here he studied under the same illustrious Dr.
Tod Helman. Dr. Tod Smiser married Kate Whaley and here at the old house they reared their children, Louise and
Harmon Tod. Louise married Glassel Butler from Culpepper County, Va., and they continue to make their home
with Mrs. Kate Smiser in the old place after nearly 90 years of Smiser ownership. Harmon Tod studied medicine at
the University of Louisville. married Katherine Wiglesworth arid they built their present home on the Leesburg
Pike.

The bedroom pictured here is the one where Gen. Morgan slept and also where baby George Ashbrook slept on the
burning bed. Above the mantel in the bedroom across the hall is a portrait of Dorcas Saunders, the
step-great-grandmother of Britain's Hon. Harold MacMillan. Of course Dorcas Saunders' place over this mantel is
due to the fact that she is also the great-great-grandmother of Mrs. Glassel Butler (Louise Smiser) one of the present
mistresses of this old house.

A significant piece of furniture in the hallway picture, is the carved oak bench, the carving having been done by the
late Louise Smiser, Mrs. Butler's aunt for whom she was named. This same Louise Smiser also did some of the
carving on the interior woodwork of the Episcopal Church here.

An outstanding feature of this old place is the ancient poplar tree seen in the picture. It was old when Charles
Rieckel, who died some years ago at the age of 108, walked here from Paris in 1856 and rested under its branches.
He said it was the first thing he saw of Cynthiana. The old tree stood there in all its majesty and watched as the
Methodists built their first church, of red brick, across the street. This was in 1820. The old tree saw the church burn
down in 1844 and watched the building of a smaller edifice in 1845, saw it torn down in 1870, then rebuilt, and the
present building erected in 1905.


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                                                  Register Report


The famous old tree saw a great deal of both the first Battle of Cynthiana in July, 1862, and the second Battle of
Cynthiana in June of 1864, which lasted about five hours, during which time the entire business section of town was
burned. The same old tree no -doubt sheltered Indians and the earliest pioneers. In fact, if trees could talk, a historian
could sit under the branches of this old tree and write as interesting a history of Cynthiana as any which has ever
been written.

On May 31, 1870 when John Harmon was 32, he married Mary K. EWALT, daughter of John EWALT (1822-1900)
& Sarah LOCKHART (1822-1908).

They had the following children:
                  i.      Hunt. Born in 1871.
                 ii.      Louise. Born in 1874. Louise died on February 4, 1904; she was 30. [12]
                          On April 30, 1901 when Louise was 27, she married Daniel Bradley SHAWHAN, son of
                          Daniel Bell SHAWHAN (1847-1912) & Emma GIBSON (1853-1919), in Church Of The
                          Advent, Cynthiana, Kentucky. [13] Born in 1870.
    110         iii.      Harmon Todd
                iv.       Earl. Born in 1880.
                 v.       Mary. Born in 1884.


                       Family of Thomas P. LAIR (42) & Catherine “Kitty” ANDERSON


74. Margaret R. LAIR. Born in 1850.

In 1865 when Margaret R. was 15, she married Ezra SHAWHAN.

They had the following children:
                   i.     John Albert. Born in 1775.
                          John Albert married Lena PARSONS.
    111           ii.     Hugh M. (1866-)
    112         iii.      William (1869-)
    113          iv.      Joseph Lester (1873-)
    114           v.      Otto (1875-)
                 vi.      Kittie. Born in 1877.
                          Kittie married Gregory PARSONS.
    115         vii.      Etta Emma (1879-)
    116        viii.      Tom (1882-)
    117          ix.      Cora (1884-)
                  x.      Melvin. Born in 1887.
                          Melvin married E. PATTON.
                 xi.      Carlyle. Carlyle died in 1890.


                             Family of Helena POPE (43) & John Miller ANDERSON


75. Martha ANDERSON. Born in 1844. Martha died in 1902; she was 58.

In 1866 when Martha was 22, she married Keller THOMAS, son of William Henry THOMAS (1818-1900) &
Nancy KELLER (1821-1886). Born in 1845. Keller died in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1914; he was 69.

They had the following children:



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                                              Register Report

                  i.     Henry A. Born on June 17, 1867.
                         On October 11, 1893 when Henry A. was 26, he married Emma ALLEN.
     118         ii.     Anna E. (1868-)
     119        iii.     T. William (1870-)
     120        iv.      Nancy Clay (1875-1939)
                 v.      George. Born on February 2, 1878. George died in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1880;
                         he was 1.

76. Hugh Miller ANDERSON. Born in 1830. Hugh Miller died in 1885; he was 55.

In 1853 when Hugh Miller was 23, he married Louisa MILLER.

They had one child:
                 i.      Mary.


                          Family of Isaac Newton LAIR (44) & Lucretia JAMISON


77. Charles LAIR.

Charles married Sallie WINSTON.

They had the following children:
    121           i.      Issac Newton (1871-)
    122          ii.      Clarence (1874-)
    123         iii.      Floyd
    124         iv.       Charles Boscom

78. James LAIR.

In 1887 James married Annie BRADLEY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Robert. Born in 1874.
                 ii.      George. Born in 1876.


                        Family of Matthias LAIR (45) & Rowena (Roanna) LAIR (60)


79. Charles F. LAIR. Born in 1837. Charles F. died in 1898; he was 61.

Charles F. married Laura SHY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      French. Born in 1871. French died in 1901; he was 30.
                 ii.      Annie. Born in 1881.
                          In 1901 when Annie was 20, she married W. PIPER.
                iii.      Edward. Born in 1876.

80. John William LAIR.

John William married Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” REDMON, daughter of John T. REDMON (1821-1882) & Nancy



                                                    Page 74
                                                Register Report

SPEAKES (-1857). Born on December 22, 1849. Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” died in 1927; she was 77.

Cynthiana News, October 21, 1 869: Tuesday at the Merchant's Hotel in Cincinnati, George H. Shawhan was
married to Maggie Redmon; J. H. Ewalt to Anna Offutt; and J., W. Lair to Lizzie Redmon.

Lizzie Lair, 30, her daughter Katie, 9, and son F., 9, were living with her father John T. Redmon in 1880.

They had the following children:
    125           i.      Kate
    126          ii.      John T. Redmon
                iii.      Joe Reynolds.
                          Joe Reynolds married Kate.

81. Matthias LAIR. Born in 1852 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Matthias died in Paris, Kentucky in 1909; he was
57.

In 1880 when Matthias was 28, he married Mollie CURRENT, daughter of Thomas Jefferson CURRENT
(1829-1862) & Martha Eleanor THOMAS (1837-1862). Born on February 2, 1859 in Ruddle’s Mills, Kentucky.
Mollie died in Paris, Kentucky on July 5, 1932; she was 73.

They had the following children:
    127           i.      Fannie (1881-)
    128          ii.      Ethel (1892-)

82. Sally LAIR. Born in 1849. Sally died in 1906; she was 57.

In 1866 when Sally was 17, she married Samuel T. REYNOLDS.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Ida Belle. Born in 1868.
                 ii.      Emma Alice. Born in 1871.
    129         iii.      Rowena Lair (1875-)

83. Joseph LAIR.

Joseph married Sallie MOORE.

They had the following children:
    130           i.      Maud
    131          ii.      Matthias (1895-)

84. Luther LAIR.

Luther married Sallie EWALT, daughter of COL Samuel EWALT (1826-1868) & Margaret Elizabeth SMITH
(1834-<1904).

They had the following children:
    132           i.      Tinnie
                 ii.      Daisy.
                          Daisy first married Frank SHARP.
                          Daisy second married Harvey RANSDALE.


                              Family of Elizabeth LAIR (47) & George REDMON



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                                                  Register Report



85. Charles Ann Eliza REDMON. Born about 1841. Charles Ann Eliza died in 1907; she was 66.

Charles Ann Eliza married Joseph COSBY.

I cannot prove it as yet, but I strongly suspect that this Cosby is related to the greater family going back to Robert of
Cossibie. Any help connecting him to the greater family would be appreciated--REF

Could this Joseph Cosby be the son of Joseph D. Cosby and Julian Wright? The birth year is right and this Cosby
moved to Kentucky.

They had the following children:
    133           i.      Eliza Lair (-1889)
    134          ii.      Cynthia Redmon (Tinnie)
                iii.      Lizzie.
                          Lizzie married John DEVERE.


                            Family of Martin Luther LAIR (48) & Nancy WILLIAMS


86. Susan Alice LAIR. Born on November 14, 1841. Susan Alice died on May 5, 1909; she was 67.

The True Kentuckian
September 8, 1869

Tomorrow morning, Thursday 9th, Frank Smith of Bourbon, famous sharpshooter of Gen. Lyon’s command and a
teacher, will marry Miss Alice Lair, sister of Gen. John Henry Lair, a resident of Harrison County.

On September 9, 1869 when Susan Alice was 27, she married Prof. N. Frank SMITH. Born on September 9, 1839.
N. Frank died on December 23, 1903; he was 64.

They had the following children:
                   i.     Fred Hinde. Born on June 26, 1870. Fred Hinde died in September 1922; he was 52.
                  ii.     Walker Buckner. Born on July 28, 1872. Walker Buckner died on January 19, 1896; he
                          was 23.
    135         iii.      Nancy (1873-1934)
                 iv.      Edith. Born on April 17, 1875.
                  v.      Alice Lair. Born on June 4, 1877.
                 vi.      Luther Lair. Born on January 13, 1879.
                vii.      N. Frank. Born on April 29, 1880.
               viii.      Mary Henry. Born on July 16, 1881.
                          Mary Henry married Charles B. HOOD.
                 ix.      Male. Born on October 18, 1882.
                  x.      Frankie. Born on March 23, 1886.


                                   Family of John LAIR (49) & Emily REDMON


87. Robert William LAIR. Born in 1851. Robert William died in Harrison County, Kentucky in 1879; he was 28.

On January 29, 1873 when Robert William was 22, he married Fannie REDMON, daughter of Washington



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                                                Register Report

REDMON (1824-1908) & Mary Rebecca ASHURST (1837-1915), in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Born in 1854 in
Bourbon County, Kentucky. Fannie died in Bourbon County, Kentucky on November 6, 1911; she was 57.

Cynthiana News, January 30, 1873: In Paris yesterday at the Bourbon House, Robert Lair of this county to Miss
Redmon of Bourbon County, daughter of Wash Redmon.

Fannie is listed with her father Washington in 1860, age 6, and in 1870, age 13; is not with him in 1880; and is with
him again in 1900 as Fannie Stone, 37, with a birth date reported as Oct 1862.

Winchester Sun, Wednesday, November 8, 1911:

Paris, Ky.--Mrs. W. W. Shropshire left Lair Station on the L&N Railroad. Late Monday night she shot herself. She
was born Miss Fannie Redman, daughter of the late Wash Redman, a prominent county farmer.

She was married three times: (1) Mr. Lair; (2) Mr. Newt Stone, brother of Mr. Kinzea Stone of Georgetown; and (3)
Mr. William W. Shropshire to whom she had been married for five or six years survives. She had been in ill-health
for some time. [copied from Early Kentucky Newspapers, Vol. 4]

They had the following children:
    136           i.      John Muir (1876-1937)
    137          ii.      Redmon (1874-)

88. Emily Frances LAIR. Born in 1854.

Emily Frances married Frank AMMERMAN.

They had the following children:
    138           i.      Alice Lair (1877-)
    139          ii.      Wallace (1884-)


                                Family of John LAIR (49) & Maria S. VARNON


89. Laura LAIR. Born in 1861.

Laura married John K. NORTHCUTT.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Maria Vernon. Born in 1894.
                 ii.      William. Born in 1897.
    140         iii.      Marie Louise (1895-)


                         Family of Sarah Ann Eliza LAIR (51) & John Shawhan LAIL


90. Henry Miller LAIL. Born on January 28, 1853. Henry Miller died on February 3, 1914; he was 61.

From “This Old House” by Kathryn Wilson, “Miller Lail House:”

This old house is in Harrison county with its entrance in Bourbon County, on the Townsend Valley Pike. It is 10
miles from Cynthiana and 10 miles from Paris. The driveway to the house crosses Silas Creek, Which is the
boundary line between the two counties. The house and its 700 surrounding acres are owned and operated by Mrs.


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                                                 Register Report

Miller Lail, her daughter, Anne Eliza, and her step-son, John Lail.

The place was built in 1840 by James L. Patterson. James L. was one of the sons of Joseph Patterson who came to
Harrison County from Virginia soon after the Revolutionary War and settled near the present James Patterson farm
on the Jacksonville Pike. James L. married Margaret Miller and they lived for one year in the ancient log cabin still
standing at the rear of the house pictured here. This beautiful old frame house was constructed by a colored man
who cut the wood from the farm, had the weather-boarding sawed, then measured and laid out every single piece for
the entire house in perfect order before he started to build.

Mr. Patterson added to his land until the place included 1,460 acres and named it "Rural Choice." He was a
successful breeder of Cotswold sheep, Shorthorn cattle, horses and mules, but took particular pride in his cattle. He
sold his registered Shorthorns all over the United States, delivering them in person. He loved to tell how he and his
colored man, Sid, would travel all over the country, bedded down at night in the freight cars with the cattle. Oil
paintings of two of the prize Shorthorns hang in the lovely old parlor today along with the portraits of Mr. and Mrs.
Patterson.

The Pattersons had only one child, a foster son, Miller Lail, who was a cousin of Mrs. Patterson. The child came to
live with them at the age of two, when 'his mother died. He grew up in the old house and became its second master.
He first married Emma Noise and here they reared their three children, Jim and Margaret (both deceased) and John
Lail, who now lives at the house and manages the farm.

After the death of Emma Noise Lail, Miller Lail married Mary Drane in 1900. Their only child, Anne Eliza, now
manages the house, although she still considers her mother its mistress, for, at 95, Mrs. Lail is spry in body and keen
in mind, her 95th birth-day coming on March 16th. Her sister who is also a member of the household is 82 and now
spends her days in a wheel chair.

And a more lively household you'll go far to find. For Anne Eliza during the past six years has housed 31 orphans
ranging in age from three days to 16 years. She keeps them until proper homes can be found for them. One girl she
kept for nine years. This girl is now married and has two children, making Anne Eliza a grandmother. One little girl,
now four years old, named Sara Jean, she's adopted permanently. And next week she's getting a 10--day old baby.

Anne Eliza and John Lail do not go in for cattle breeding on as large a scale as did the first master of this old place,
but When it comes to dogs and canaries- One year they bred and sold 100 canary birds. And they've bred and sold
hundreds of puppies into nearly every state in the union. They have Scotties, collies, toy terriers, Boston terriers and
formerly had the Pekingese. No, there's never a dull moment in this beautiful peaceful looking old house.

Henry Miller first married Emma J. NOYES. Born on August 28, 1858. Emma J. died on July 29, 1899; she was 40.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Margaret. Born on April 19, 1889. Margaret died on March 8, 1945; she was 55.
                          Margaret married JOHNSON.
                 ii.      James Patterson. Born on June 9, 1891. James Patterson died circa 1977; he was 85.
                          James Patterson married Mary Louise BRUCE.
                iii.      John Noyes. Born on March 25, 1893. John Noyes died on March 27, 1956; he was 63.
                          Unmarried.


In 1900 when Henry Miller was 46, he second married Mary DRANE. Born on March 16, 1961. Mary died on
February 14, 1960.

They had one child:
                 i.        Sarah Ann Eliza. Born on November 18, 1910.




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                                               Register Report

                                    Family of John LAIR (53) & Isabella COOK


91. Mary Emma LAIR. Born in 1850. Mary Emma died in 1903; she was 53.

In 1882 when Mary Emma was 32, she married John Prince TIBBETS.

They had one child:
    141          i.       Minnie May (1883-)

92. Cynthia Ann LAIR. Born in 1853.

In 1872 when Cynthia Ann was 19, she married Jacob S. ROBEY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Roswald J. Born in 1878.
                          Roswald J. married Maude KNOWLES.
                 ii.      Lillian I.
                iii.      Ivan. Born in 1901.

93. Edith Florence LAIR. Born in 1856.

Edith Florence married Frank M. BLANCHARD.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Mary Isabella. Born in 1884.
                 ii.      John Milton. Born in 1885.
                iii.      Helen. Born in 1888.
                          Helen married J.E. BELCHER. Born in 1910.
                iv.       William Palmer. Born in 1890.
                 v.       Anna Lair.
                vi.       Bernice Edith. Born in 1894.
                          Bernice Edith married Gilbert WRIGHT.


                                Family of Matthias LAIR (54) & Martha ROSS


94. Edna LAIR.

Edna married Albert HUBERT.

They had the following children:
    142           i.      Walter
                 ii.      Jennie.
                iii.      Edgar.
                iv.       Virgil.


                         Family of James Dyer RUDDLE (55) & Elizabeth HAMMER


95. John Matthew RUDDLE. Born on January 21, 1841. John Matthew died on April 22, 1911; he was 70.




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                                             Register Report

On September 10, 1868 when John Matthew was 27, he married Virginia Florence HAMMER. Born about 1840.

They had the following children:
                   i.     Mary Elizabeth. Born in 1868. Mary Elizabeth died in 1942; she was 74.
                  ii.     Calvin D. Born in 1870. Calvin D. died in 1942; he was 72.
                iii.      Almeda. Born in 1872. Almeda died in 1956; she was 84.
                 iv.      Lelia G. Born in 1875. Lelia G. died in 1919; she was 44.
                  v.      Tyree Bruce. Born in 1877. Tyree Bruce died in 1899; he was 22.
                 vi.      Phoebe C. Born in 1880. Phoebe C. died in 1945; she was 65.
                vii.      James Floyd. Born in 1883. James Floyd died in 1939; he was 56.
               viii.      John Preston. Born in 1885. John Preston died in 1949; he was 64.
                          about 1915 when John Preston was 30, he married Clara Ella RUDDLE, daughter of
                          Henry Clay RUDDLE (96) (1850-1910) & Mary Susan HENDRICK (1855-1892). Born
                          in 1886. Clara Ella died in 1971; she was 85.
                 ix.      Aude B. Born in 1888. Aude B. died in 1965; she was 77.
                  x.      George Ernest. Born in 1891. George Ernest died in 1965; he was 74.

96. Henry Clay RUDDLE. Born on May 11, 1850 in Pendleton County, Virginia (West Virginia). Henry Clay died
on July 8, 1910; he was 60.

On January 18, 1883 when Henry Clay was 32, he married Mary Susan HENDRICK. Born in 1855. Mary Susan
died in 1892; she was 37.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Lura Catherine. Born in 1883. Lura Catherine died in 1965; she was 82.
                          On October 23, 1906 when Lura Catherine was 23, she married Don BYRD. Born in
                          1882. Don died in 1963; he was 81.
                 ii.      Maude Deniza. Born in 1884. Maude Deniza died in 1948; she was 64.
                iii.      Clara Ella. Born in 1886. Clara Ella died in 1971; she was 85.
                          about 1915 when Clara Ella was 29, she married John Preston RUDDLE, son of John
                          Matthew RUDDLE (95) (1841-1911) & Virginia Florence HAMMER (~1840-). Born in
                          1885. John Preston died in 1949; he was 64.
                iv.       Ona Dyer. Born in 1888.
                 v.       Otto Franklin. Born in 1890. Otto Franklin died in 1970; he was 80.
                          about 1914 when Otto Franklin was 24, he married Luna F. SMITH. Born in 1893. Luna
                          F. died in 1978; she was 85.
                vi.       Otho Clay. Born in 1892. Otho Clay died in 1892.


                      Family of John Malcolm RUDDLE (56) & Mary Elizabeth EYE


97. Isaac Newton RUDDLE. Born on November 12, 1857. Isaac Newton died in 1943; he was 85.

On April 10, 1886 when Isaac Newton was 28, he married Emily Susan DAHMER. Born about 1858. Emily Susan
died in 1932; she was 74.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Edward Claude. Born in 1887. Edward Claude died in 1980; he was 93.
                          In 1895 when Edward Claude was 8, he married Lynn Lee RUDDLE. Born in 1886.
                          Lynn Lee died in 1960; she was 74.
                 ii.      Whitney Hammer. Born in 1889 in Pendleton County, Virginia. Whitney Hammer died in
                          1936; he was 47.
                          about 1915 when Whitney Hammer was 26, he married Janie PITSENBARGER. Born
                          about 1890.



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                                                Register Report

                iii.      Isaac Saylor. Born in 1890. Isaac Saylor died in 1960; he was 70.
                          about 1915 when Isaac Saylor was 25, he married Verna C. SMITH. Born in 1895. Verna
                          C. died in 1976; she was 81.
                iv.       Reta Florence. Born in 1891. Reta Florence died in 1979; she was 88.
                          about 1909 when Reta Florence was 18, she married J. Melvin EYE. Born in 1887. J.
                          Melvin died in 1979; he was 92.
                 v.       Roy Campbell. Born in 1893. Roy Campbell died in 1956; he was 63.
                          about 1915 when Roy Campbell was 22, he married Leta SIMMONS. Born about 1895.
                vi.       Newton Decatur. Born in 1895. Newton Decatur died in 1937; he was 42.
                          about 1920 when Newton Decatur was 25, he married Mary DUNKLE. Born in 1898.
                          Mary died in 1968; she was 70.
                vii.      John P. Born in 1897. John P. died in 1942; he was 45.
               viii.      Susan Catherine. Born in 1900. Susan Catherine died in 1974; she was 74.
                          about 1923 when Susan Catherine was 23, she married Arthur Herbert PROPST. Born
                          about 1903.
                ix.       Ruben Dee. Born in 1902. Ruben Dee died in 1983; he was 81.
                          about 1925 when Ruben Dee was 23, he married Lillian Oleah SIMMONS. Born about
                          1905.
                 x.       Ralph. Born in 1904.
                          about 1924 when Ralph was 20, he married Evelyn PITSENBARGER. Born about 1904.
                xi.       Anna. Born in 1905.
                          about 1925 when Anna was 20, she married Noel Spier COOK. Born about 1905.

98. Virginia H. RUDDLE. Born on May 15, 1866. Virginia H. died in 1966; she was 99.

In 1885 when Virginia H. was 18, she married John MOYERS. Born in 1856. John died in 1898; he was 42.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Samuel R. Born in 1891. Samuel R. died in 1919; he was 28.
                 ii.      Virgil. Born in 1893. Virgil died in 1950; he was 57.
                          In 1920 when Virgil was 27, he married Frances WILLIAMS. Born in 1900. Frances died
                          in 1969; she was 69.
                iii.      Mary. Born in 1895. Mary died in 1969; she was 74.
                iv.       Ella. Born about 1896. Ella died in 1984; she was 88.
                          about 1916 when Ella was 20, she married John LOWE. Born in 1896. John died in 1946;
                          he was 50.


                                Family of Helen Henry LAIR (63) & A.H. WARD


99. Burton Maude WARD. Born in 1869.

Maud Ward Lafferty is the author of “The Destruction of Ruddle’s and Martin’s Forts During the Revolutionary
War.”

This old house called "Boscobel" is located on the old Lair Pike about five miles from Cynthiana and within sight of
Lair Station. (Both front and rear of the house are pictured here.) The stone part was built by John Lair in the late
1790's. Since then over the years, Boscobel has been owned by J. Wesley Lair, T. J. Megibben, Orah Ballinger, T. J.
Craycraft and the Sidney Cummins family, in that succession.

John Lair emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky in 1791 with his brothers, Andrew and Mathias. All three were
Revolutionary soldiers. Andrew was one of the founders of Logan's Fort, now Stanford, Ky. Mathias and John came
on to Harrison County and, on their 2,000-acre claim, built their log cabins near the ruins of Hinkson's or Ruddle's
Fort on the South Licking River. Near the site of his log cabin Mathias soon built his imposing manor house "The


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                                                 Register Report

Cedars," now partly standing. And John built Boscobel out of stone and near his original log cabin. Both are now
approached from the Old Lair Pike.

While John Lair and his wife, Sally Custer Lair, were living in the log cabin they were continually harassed by
Indians. A short log in the floor was left loose so that in case of an Indian surprise they could creep into the small
cellar made as a hiding hole. One day when the horses started running and snorting, as they did when they sensed
Indians, Sally Lair was alone in the cabin with her baby. She took the child into the cellar and, fearing that he might
cry and betray their hiding place, she nursed him during the entire time she was in hiding while the Indians overhead
danced about and ate everything they could lay their hands on.

Soon John Lair began building the stone house Boscobel. It had three rooms on the ground floor, an outside kitchen
and a hall with extremely narrow stairway which led up to the three upper rooms, all of which are intact today. And
here the John Lairs reared their children.

Near the house is the family graveyard. Besides the family graves, there is the grave of "the wandering woman," not
unusual in those days, we are told. According to the family, she wandered in from nowhere, and John Lair allowed
her to occupy a vacant cabin, gave her a garden plot, had it plowed and gave her a pig and a cow. When the other
cows in the neighborhood went dry, the slaves said she was a witch woman and had dried up their cows. They even
said they peeped through her window one night and saw her milking her dish rag and that she was filling her bucket
with foaming milk. They wanted to run her off, but John Lair protected her and, when she died, had her buried with
the family.

John Lair's son, John Wesley Lair, married Catherine Smiser from the George Smiser house still standing just across
the river. And here they reared their children, John A, Helen, Mary, Arabella.

Fanny and Lida. Before the Civil War they enlarged Boscobel, because the five young daughters having beaus made
a large parlor almost a necessity. The new section was built of frame and included a large hallway opening into an
ample parlor and a circular stairway in the hall leading to one large room above. Wesley Lair died during the Civil
War. In 1867 his wife sold Boscobel and the 227 surrounding acres to T. J. Megibben, and moved to town to the
present Jack Magee house. the second from the hotel on Main
St. Here her daughter, Helen, married Cynthiana's eloquent attorney, A. H. Ward, and here their first daughter,
Maud (Mrs. W. T. Lafferty), was born. Their other children were Harry, Kitty, Paul and Ash Ward.

T. J. Megibben, who purchased Boscobel from the Lairs, was at one time the largest landowner in the county. He
was part owner of six distilleries and 2,800 acres of land. He had a younger brother, James K., who was in business
with him, and who became the next occupant of the old house, Boscobel after the Lairs. In 1866 James K. Megibben
married Mary E. Shawhan (sister of Mr. Jim Shawhan) who lived in the columned brick mansion now the Jett place)
just across the road from Boscobel, and they moved into Boscobel in 1867. Here the first two of their eight children
were born-Charlie and Lela.

After the Jim Megibbens, the next occupants of Boscobel during the T. J. Megibben ownership, were the Tyce
Hutsells. Tyce Hutsell was manager of the Megibben race horses and married Ada Shawhan (sister of Mrs. Jim
Megibben). They had two children, Jack and Ada Mae, Jack born in Lexington and Ada Mae (now Mrs. Charles L.
Robinson) at Boscobel. According to Perrin's History the. Megibbens had 50 racehorses and 100 trotters and
roadsters. Outstanding among the racehorses were Huntress and Spring Bok. Spring Bok ran a dead heat in one of
the California Derbys, winning half of the $60,000 stake. A short time after this, Spring Bok killed a man on one of
the Clarence LeBus farms, literally pawing him to death, it is said. Jim Megibben's son, Will, at the age of 17, one
day took eight of their horses to the Latonia track and won eight races.

Boscobel was also occupied for a time during the, T. J. Megibben ownership by John Carter.

The next occupants of the old place were the Orah Ballingers Orah had previously kept the Lair store, post office
and depot, all in one building and lived in the large frame house still standing on the hill at Lair, known as Hillside
Retreat, which he sold along with his business to the late J. T. Wornall in 1896, and came to Boscobel to live. Here


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                                                  Register Report

their children, Marguerite (Mrs. Clyde Abbott), and Roy, were born. Miss Fanny Zoller, a sister of Mrs. Ballinger,
was then teaching school at Lair and often visited at Boscobel although she continued to live at Hillside Retreat with
the Wornalls. In 1904 Orah Ballinger sold the place to T. J. Craycraft and moved to town where Orah became
cashier of The Harrison Deposit Bank. They later moved to Cincinnati where he was first with the American
National, then the Fifth-Third Bank.

William David then John Lowe and finally a Rankin family, lived in the house, each for a short period while it was
still owned by Orah Ballinger.

When the Sidney Cumminses moved to Boscobel their sons, John and Joe, were three years and three months old,
respectively. Their daughter, Katherine, was born there. It was the Cumminses who built the porch on front of the
house in 1938. After their three children were grown, the Cummins family moved to town in 1941, but the place has
been in tile family ever since.

The people who have lived in the place since 1941 are, first the Wallace Sosbes next the Sterling Wagoners, then the
Virgil Feebacks and last the Donald Frymans. The present owners are Joe Cummins and Mrs. M. J. Dermody
(Katherine Cummins). The house, however, is now unoccupied.

John and Joe Cummins say they often wondered, while living there and have often wondered since. just why so
many tramps always stopped at Boscobel rather than the other houses nearer the road and railroad. We think the
wandering woman of early Boscobel is the answer. Passing tramps today may never see the tombstone of the
wandering woman in the family graveyard, but she probably started the word 150 years ago, which has passed on
from wanderer to wanderer on down through the years, a legend which is still a part of Boscobel. [5]

Mrs. Maud Lafferty is the wife of Judge W.T. Lafferty, and daughter of the Hon. A.H. Ward, all of this city. She is
tall and well proportioned with a queenly poise of the head and shoulders. Her soft, dark, velvety eyes are in rich
contrast with her semi-blond hair, and constitute a style that is rare as it is attractive. Mrs. Lafferty is both cultured
and traveled, having spent an entire year in Paris perfecting herself in the language, which she speaks with fluency
and precision. Her beautiful home in its appointments bears many marks of her French taste. She is the devoted
mother of two lovely little girls--Helen and Kathleen--and while she finds her greatest enjoyment in ministering to
the comfort of her family, she still has time for her social duties and to visit and console those in bereavement. One
of the charms of this charming woman is her little courtesies to persons older than herself and her attention to the
sick and downcast. [14]

Burton Maude married William Thornton LAFFERTY, son of John A. LAFFERTY (1832-1905) & Frances
Elizabeth HENRY (1839-). Born on March 1, 1851 in Harrison County, Kentucky.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin &
County, Chicago, 1882, p. 662

W. T. LAFFERTY, lawyer; P.O. Cynthiana. This promising young man was born March 1, 1851, in Harrison
County. His father, John A. Lafferty a native of the county, served as sheriff for six years, resides filling numerous
positions of minor importance. His wife the mother of our subject, was Frances E., daughter of John Henry, of
Harrison. His father, James Lafferty, was a Pennsylvanian, and came to the Virginia State of Kentucky about the
year 1802. W. T. Lafferty, after attending the common schools of the county, entered the A. & M. College of
Kentucky University at Lexington, where he pursued his studies for a couple of years. His course through college
was marked by plodding industry, still a determination to make his mark in the world. Returning from Lexington to
Cynthiana, he began reading law with A. H.& J.Q.Ward. By dint of hard study he was enabled to pass an
examination, and was admitted to the bar, Dec. 1, 1879. He has now a growing practice, and has been honored by
the Democratic party with the nomination for County Attorney. He is a member of the Christian Church and is
regarded as a model young man.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Harry.


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                                             Register Report

                ii.      Kathleen Lair. Born in 1892.
               iii.      Paul.
               iv.       Ash.
     143        v.       Helen Ward (1891-)


                      Family of Rhoda Ellen BERRY (64) & Rev. W.W. CHAMBERLAIN


100. James Poynt CHAMBERLAIN. Born on July 17, 1869.

James Poynt married Meddie LAFFERTY, daughter of John A. LAFFERTY (1832-1905) & Frances Elizabeth
HENRY (1839-).

They had the following children:
                  i.      Cecil Marion.
                 ii.      Joseph Marvin.
                iii.      Leland Poynt.
                iv.       Owen Lafferty.
                 v.       Edna Francis.


                        Family of Sarah Frances BERRY (65) & Thomas W. HARDY


101. Lena Thomas HARDY.

Lena Thomas married J. Newton RENAKER. Resided in Winchester, Kentucky.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Eugene.
                 ii.      Everett.
                iii.      Hewlett.
                iv.       Edward Allen.
                 v.       Leora Hardy.


                          Family of Willie Mary BERRY (66) & Claude CANTRILL


102. Gertrude CANTRILL.

Gertrude married John N. SHROPSHIRE.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Ruby Cantrell.
                 ii.      Frank.

103. Lillian CANTRILL.

Lillian married William BARCLAY.

They had one child:
                 i.      Mary Frances.



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    Page 85
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                                            Seventh Generation
                               _________________________________________
                         Family of Arabella Perrin SMISER (68) & Cyrus M. SMITH


104. Julia A. SMITH. Born on November 16, 1856.

On February 4, 1874 when Julia A. was 17, she first married George L. McAFEE, in Paris, Monroe County,
Missouri. George L. died before 1888.

They had the following children:
                  i.      George Lewis. Born on September 15, 1876 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. George
                          Lewis died on November 28, 1876 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri.
                 ii.      Frank Caldwell. Born on April 11, 1875. Frank Caldwell died on April 21, 1898; he was
                          23.

On January 19, 1888 when Julia A. was 31, she second married T. E. CROW.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Nell Eustace. Born on April 14, 1889.
                 ii.      Lizzie Bell. Born on June 9, 1891.
                iii.      William Bland. Born on February 9, 1895.
                iv.       Thomas. Born on July 18, 1897.

105. Elizabeth Pope SMITH. Born on May 13, 1861.

On July 26, 1884 when Elizabeth Pope was 23, she married T. J. BATSELL.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Sebella. Born on April 30, 1885.
                 ii.      Lulu May. Born on March 20, 1887.

106. Arabella Edwards SMITH. Born on August 28, 1863. Arabella Edwards died in Indianapolis, Indiana on
September 15, 1949; she was 86.

On June 28, 1888 when Arabella Edwards was 24, she married J. M. HEDGES.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Henry Berkly. Born on July 29, 1890.
                 ii.      James M. Born on November 4, 1892.


                       Family of John Edwards SMISER (69) & Anne M. EDWARDS


107. Kate S. SMISER.

Kate S. married James H. WARREN.

They had one child:
                 i.      William B.

108. Ephraim B. SMISER.



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                                             Register Report


Ephraim B. married Daisy McCASLING.

They had one child:
                 i.      Kathleen.


                       Family of James Samuel SMISER (70) & Mary Frances WEST


109. Ernest Perrin SMISER. Born on November 22, 1868 in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri. Ernest Perrin died
in Paris, Monroe County, Missouri on April 20, 1953; he was 84.

On September 1, 1893 when Ernest Perrin was 24, he married Margaret Emma GOLLEHON, in Paris, Monroe
County, Missouri.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Mary Ione. Born on May 24, 1894.
                 ii.      Lillie Lurene. Born on January 23, 1899.
                iii.      Milton Brian. Born on November 18, 1907.
                iv.       Emmet O’neal.


                         Family of John Harmon SMISER (73) & Mary K. EWALT


110. Dr. Harmon Todd SMISER.

On June 15, 1902 Harmon Todd married Katherine “Kate” WHALEY, daughter of Benjamin Franklin WHALEY
(1828-1901) & Honora Isabell SHANNON (1850-1933), in Harrison County, Kentucky. Born on August 24, 1880
in Harrison County, Kentucky.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Louise. Born on October 28, 1903 in Cynthiana, Kentucky.
                          On July 19, 1928 when Louise was 24, she married Glassel BUTLER. Born in 1898.
                          Glassel died on April 17, 1971; he was 73.
    144          ii.      Harmon Todd (1906-)


                           Family of Margaret R. LAIR (74) & Ezra SHAWHAN


111. Hugh M. SHAWHAN. Born in 1866.

Hugh M. married G. NEWTON.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Glenn H.
                          Glenn H. married H. GELBACH.
                 ii.      Ezra S.
                          Ezra S. married HUMSTON?.

112. William SHAWHAN. Born in 1869.




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                                           Register Report

William married Millicent ASHBY.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Arthur.
                          Arthur married A. WHITMIRE.
                 ii.      Clyde.
                          Clyde married Evelyn.

113. Joseph Lester SHAWHAN. Born in 1873.

Joseph Lester married Maurita F..

They had the following children:
                  i.      George.
                          George married Bertha D..
                 ii.      Miller.
                          Miller married Hazel D..
                iii.      Annabelle.
                          Annabelle married SHOEMAKER.
                iv.       Jesse.
                 v.       Mary.

114. Otto SHAWHAN. Born in 1875.

Otto married Pansy MARIA.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Mildred.
                          Mildred married PARSONS.
                 ii.      Wilfred.
                          Wilfred married Delores.
                iii.      Lloyd.

115. Etta Emma SHAWHAN. Born in 1879.

Etta Emma married W. ASHBY.

They had one child:
                 i.       Delbert.

116. Tom SHAWHAN. Born in 1882.

Tom married Anna GARLOCK.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Emilio.
                          Emilio married CUPP.
                 ii.      Lorenzo.
                          Lorenzo married G. PARNISH.

117. Cora SHAWHAN. Born in 1884.

Cora married EPPERSON.




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                                            Register Report

They had the following children:
                  i.      Cora.
                          Cora married WILSON.
                 ii.      Robert S.
                          Robert S. married M. LOCKHART.


                          Family of Martha ANDERSON (75) & Keller THOMAS


118. Anna E. THOMAS. Born on December 6, 1868 in Bourbon County, Kentucky.

On December 9, 1891 when Anna E. was 23, she married William Gerrard TALBOT.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Marie Dudley. Born on June 27, 1900.
                          Marie Dudley married Frank W. SLEDD. Born on January 15, 1917.
                 ii.      Martha Anderson. Born on October 27, 1900.
                iii.      William Garrard. Born on October 5, 1909.

119. T. William THOMAS. Born on December 4, 1870.

In 1902 when T. William was 31, he married Edith COHEN.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Jean E. Born on September 3, 1903.
                          In August 1921 when Jean E. was 17, she married Roy SPRAGUE.
                 ii.      William Keller. Born on September 16, 1905.

120. Nancy Clay THOMAS. Born on July 12, 1875 in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Nancy Clay died in Bourbon
County, Kentucky on March 3, 1939; she was 63.

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume
106

Mrs. Clay Thomas Ewalt.
DAR ID Number: 105955
Born in Bourbon County, Ky.
Wife of Joe H. Ewalt.
Descendant of Abraham Frye, Maj. John Hinkston, John Strode, Moses
Thomas, and Thomas Pope, as follows:
1. Keller Thomas (b. 1844) m. 1866 Martha Anderson (1844-1902).
2. William Henry Thomas (1818-1900) m. 1838 Nancy Keller (1821-86); John
Miller Anderson (1795-1866) m. 1829 Helena Pope (1808-91).
3. George Thomas m. 1817 Susanna Strode; Abraham Keller (1777-1834) m.
1799 Margaret Anderson (1784-1866); William Pope (b. 1785) m. Mary Fair
(1788-1839).
4. Moses Thomas m. Elizabeth Whaley; Jacob Keller m. Elizabeth Frye (d.
1837); James Strode (b. 1765) m. 1791 Margaret Forman; Thomas Pope m.
Phyliss Ann Bland.
5. Abraham Frye m. Agnes Ann Frye; John Strode m. Mary Bayles (b. 1739).
Abraham Frye served, 1778, as private in the 1st battalion of Cumberland
County, Pennsylvania militia, Capt. Charles McClay's company. He was born
in Pennsylvania; died in Fallowfield, Pa.



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                                                 Register Report

 John Hinkston (1740-1810) served in the warfare of Kentucky. He was
 captured by the Indians, but made his escape. A station is named after
 him. He was born in Virginia; died in Kentucky.
 Also No. 82512.
 John Strode, a patriot, built Strode's Station, which, in 1780, was
 besieged by Indians. He was born in Virginia; died in Clarke County, Ky.
 Moses Thomas (1756-1821) was a private in Capt. John Payton Harrison's
 company, 2nd regiment of Virginia troops. He was born in Loudoun County,
 Va.; died in Bourbon County, Ky.
 Thomas Pope served in the navy as a mariner. He was born in Virginia;
 died in Lancaster County, Ky.

On November 19, 1903 when Nancy Clay was 28, she married Joseph Hedges EWALT, son of Joseph Henry
EWALT (1828-1877) & Henrietta HEDGES (1839-1917). Born on July 16, 1865 in Paris, Bourbon County,
Kentucky. Joseph Hedges died in Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky on January 4, 1956; he was 90.

HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, E. Polk Johnson, three volumes, Lewis Publishing Co., New
York & Chicago, 1912. Common version, Vol. III, pp. 1357-1360. [Bourbon County]

JOSEPH HEDGEs EWALT.-In view of the nomadic spirit that has grown to animate the American people to so
great an extent, it is pleasing to find in any community representatives of old and honored families whose names
have been long and prominently identified therewith and to find such scions worthily and successfully carrying
forward the industrial enterprises of the sections in which they were born and reared. This is significantly true of Mr.
Ewalt, who is numbered among the essentially representative agriculturists and stock-growers of Bourbon county
and who owns and resides upon the fine old homestead plantation which figured as the place of his nativity.

Joseph Hedges Ewalt, an honored representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of Bourbon county, was born
on his present homestead in Centerville precinct, that county, on the 15th of July, 1865. He is a son of Joseph Henry
and Henrietta (Hedges) Ewalt, both likewise natives of Bourbon county, where the former was born November 27,
1828, and the latter, August 6, 1839. Joseph Henry Ewalt was a son of Samuel and Cynthia (Pugh) Ewalt, both of
whom were natives of Bourbon county, where the former was ushered into the world August 12, 1792, and the latter
on the 30th of March, 1795. Samuel Ewalt was a son of Henry Ewalt, who was born in Germany, on the 27th of
January, 1754, and who was a lad of eleven years at the time when his parents, John and Sarah Ewalt, severed the
ties that bound them to their fatherland and emigrated to America. They established their home in what is now
Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and there they passed the residue of their long and useful lives. Henry Ewalt was
reared to maturity in the old Keystone state, and it was his to render gallant service as a soldier in the Continental
line in the war of the Revolution. On the 10th of December, 1777, about one month prior to his twenty-fourth
birthday, he was commissioned ensign of the Sixth Company of the First Battalion of Pennsylvania Militia, and it
was with this command that he played well his part in the great conflict through which oppression was hurled back
and the boon of liberty gained. He married Mrs.. Elizabeth (Frye) Keller, widow of Jacob Keller and daughter of
Abraham, Sr., and Agnes Ann Frye. Abraham Frye, Sr., was born in Frederick county, Virginia. He was a member
of Captain Charles McClay's company of the First Battalion of Cumberland county (Pennsylvania) militia during the
Revolutionary war.

In 1788 Henry and Elizabeth Ewalt removed from Pennsylvania to Kentucky and numbered themselves among the
pioneers of Bourbon county. Their original homestead was that now owned and occupied by their great-grandson,
Joseph H. Ewalt, whose name initiates this article. Here Henry Ewalt and his wife continued to reside until they
were summoned to that "undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns," and they contributed their
quota to the development and upbuilding of this now opulent section of the Blue Grass state. On the 4th of August,
1788, John Hagin, of Mercer county, deeded to Henry Ewalt two hundred acres of land north of Cooper's Run,
Bourbon county, for a consideration of one hundred and ten poundsabout five hundred dollars-and on this
homestead Henry Ewalt died in September, 1829. Elizabeth Ewalt died in 1837. Their remains are interred in the
family burying ground on the old homestead. The property has never passed out of the hands of the Ewalt family, by
which it has thus been retained for nearly a century and a quarter.


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                                                 Register Report


Samuel Ewalt was born and reared in Bourbon county, and he contributed his quota to the reclamation and
development of the home farm, while his educational advantages were limited to the primitive schools of the pioneer
epoch. He became the owner of a large and valuable landed estate in Bourbon county and was one of the most
successful planters of this section of the state, where he was influential in public affairs. He married Cynthia Pugh
December 24, 1817. She was the daughter. of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hunt) Pugh. Joseph Pugh, in Bedford county,
Virginia, in the spring of 1777, was commissioned a lieutenant

in the Fourteenth Virginia Regiment, upon Continental establishment. Cynthia (Pugh) Ewalt died September 28,
1833. His second marriage. was to Eliza Porter Smith, of Harrison county, on June 7, 1834. She was born August
27, 1799, and died February 29, 1852. Samuel Ewalt died August 28, 1878.

Joseph Henry Ewalt, the sixth in order of birth of the children of Samuel and Cynthia (Pugh) Ewalt, was reared to
maturity on the old homestead plantation and was afforded such advantages as were offered in the common schools
of the locality and period. On the 18th of December, 1856, was solemnized his marriage to Sophia M. Spears (born
September 6, 1838), who died August 27, 1857. On the 10th of December, 1863, he wedded Henrietta Hedges, a
daughter of Samuel (see sketch of Joseph Hedges on other pages of this work) and Rebecca (Moran) Hedges,
members of well known pioneer families of Bourbon county. Rebecca (Moran) Hedges [born August 26, 1815, died
February 9, 1893,] was the daughter of Edward B. and Letitia (Clay) Moran and granddaughter of Samuel and
Nancy (Winn) Clay. Samuel Clay enlisted in the Revolutionary war in 1777, when less than sixteen years old, and
followed General Greene throughout the campaign of the Carolinas.

Joseph Henry Ewalt well upheld the prestige of the family name and continued to be numbered among the
representative agriculturists and stock-growers of his native county, until his death, which occurred on the 15th Of
August, 1877. He was a man of strong character and most generous impulses,-direct. kind-hearted and sincere,-and
no citizen commanded a fuller measure of popular confidence and esteem. His wife still survives hill' and has
attained to the venerable age of seventy-one years (1910). She resides on the old homestead with her son Joseph H.,
and this place is endeared to her by the gracious memories and associations of the past. Her husband lived until his
death, and virtually his entire life was passed on the ancestral estate, of a considerable portion of which Ile became
the owner. The homestead, as now constituted, comprises two hundred and fifteen acres, and is one of the well
improved an" valuable farm properties of the county Joseph Henry Ewalt was a staunch adherent of the Democratic
party and ever manifested a lively interest in public affairs, though he never desired or held political office. He was
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. Hiswidow has been a devoted adherent of the Christian church for over fifty
years. Concerning the four children the following record is entered: Joseph Hedges, the eldest of the number, was
born July 15, 1865, as has already been noted in this context; Rebecca Ann, who was born January 11, 1867, died on
the 17th of the following September; Lily, who was born April 20, 1869, died November 15, 1885; and Lettie Clay,
who was born December 31, 1870, died April 15, 1874. Thus the subject of this review is the only surviving child.

Joseph Hedges Ewalt found his early experiences compassed by the scenes, incidents and work of the home farm,
and after duly availing himself of the advantages of the public schools of his native county he continued his studies
for three years in the Kentucky University, now known as Transylvania University, at Lexington. Later he
completed an effective course in the celebrated Eastman Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York, in which
institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1884. He then went to the city of Delaware, Ohio, where for
the three ensuing years he held the position of bookkeeper for the Delaware Wagon Company, one of the leading
industrial concerns of that place. In March, 1887, Mr. Ewalt returned to the fine old homestead, and here be has
since been actively and -successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock-raising, in which latter department
he has gained special prominence as a breeder of high-grade Short-horn cattle and Southdown sheep. He is
progressive in connection with his business activities and avails himself of the best modern facilities in carrying
forward the various departments of his farm industry. Everything about the attractive old homestead bears evidence
of thrift and prosperity, and he has every reason to find satisfaction in the fact that he has not wavered in his
allegiance to the vocation under whose influences he was reared, as his success has been of unequivocal order, the
while his course hag been such as to retain to him the high regard of the community in which virtually his entire life
has been passed.



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                                                  Register Report

As a man of strong intellectuality and well fortified opinions, Mr. Ewalt has been influential in public affairs of a
local character, and lie is ever ready to lend his co-operation in the promotion of enterprises and undertakings that
tend to advance the general welfare of the community. Though showing no predilection for official preferment, he
clings to the faith in which he was reared and is a stalwart in the camp of the Democratic party. Both he and his wife
are members of the Christian church and are earnest and liberal in the support of the various departments of its work.

 This review would stultify its consistency were there failure to make special note of the prominent position held by
Mr. Ewalt in the time-honored Masonic fraternity, of which he is one of the most influential members in his native
state. He has completed the circle of both the York and Scottish Rites, in which latter he has attained to the
thirty-second degree, being affiliated with the Grand Consistory, A. A. S. R., in the city of Louisville, Kentucky. He
has not only passed the various official chairs in each of the four subordinate bodies of York Rite Masonry, in which
his maximum affiliation is with Cynthiana Commandery, No. 16, Knights Templar, at Cynthiana, Kentucky, but he
has also been called to high official station in the state organizations of these bodies. Thus it may be noted, that he is
at the present time Grand Senior Warden of the Kentucky Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons, and thus in line
of advancement to the supreme office, that of Grand Master. He is Past Grand High Priest of the Kentucky Grand
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons; Past Grand Master of the state Grand Council of Royal & Select Masters; and Past
Grand Commander of the Kentucky Grand Commandery of Knights Templar.' In 1912 he will, in course of regular
events, succeed to the exalted office of Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the state, the highest position in the gift
of the ancient-craft Masons of this jurisdiction. Upon his advancement to this position he will be one of only eight
persons who have served as head of each of the Grand Bodies of York Rite 'Masons in the state of Kentucky. He is
also affiliated with the adjunct bodies, the Order of the Eastern Star and the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of
the Mystic Shrine, in which he is identified with Oleika Temple, at Lexington, Kentucky. Mr. Ewalt has been a close
and appreciative student of Masonic history, traditions and both the esoteric and exoteric phases of its work, and few
are better fortified in such knowledge. He holds membership also in the Knights of Pythias and the Kentucky
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Five of his ancestors served in the Revolutionary war.

In the historic home of William Garrard Talbot, at Mount Lebanon, Bourbon county, on the 19th of November,
1903, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ewalt to Miss Nancy Clay Thomas, who was born in this county on the
17th of July, 1875, and who is a woman of culture and most gracious personality, being thus a charming chatelaine
of the beautiful home over which she presides.

Mrs. Ewalt is the daughter of Keller and Martha (Anderson) Thomas, both of whom were born in Kentucky, the
former on the 12th of October, 1845, in Bourbon county, and the latter on the 20th of February, 1844, in Harrison
county, both being representatives of old and honored families of the Blue Grass state. Mrs. Thomas died in
Bourbon county on the 29th of August, 1902, and Mr.Thomas now resides in the home of his son Henry A., in the
city of Pontiac, Michigan. They became the parents of five children: Henry A., Anna, William, Nancy Clay and
George, and of the number, William and George are deceased. Anna is a resident of Bourbon county, the wife of
William Garrard Talbot, of whom mention is made on other pages of this work. Mrs. Ewalt is the
great-great-granddaughter of Moses Thomas, one of the 1779 pioneers of Kentucky. Keller Thomas, her father,
enlisted in the Confederate army at the age of sixteen years and served under General John Hunt Morgan. His
daughters, Mrs. Ewalt and Mrs. Talbot, are enthusiastic members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The
latter served two years as president of the state organization. Mr. and Mrs. Ewalt have two charming little daughters,
Anne Thomas, born October 13, 1904, and Josephine Hedges, born July 4, 1906.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Ann Thomas. Born on October 13, 1904 in Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky.
                          On April 15, 1933 when Ann Thomas was 28, she first married Cloyde Edwin
                          McKINLEY. Born on September 6, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois. Cloyde Edwin died on
                          August 20, 1938; he was 43.
                          On March 23, 1957 when Ann Thomas was 52, she second married Frederick James
                          SMITH. Frederick James died on May 31, 1966 in Northbrook, Illinois.
                 ii.      Josephine Hedges. Born on July 4, 1906 in Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky. Josephine
                          Hedges died in Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky on February 18, 1996; she was 89.




                                                        Page 92
                                                Register Report


                                Family of Charles LAIR (77) & Sallie WINSTON


121. Issac Newton LAIR. Born in 1871.

Issac Newton married Alice Lair AMMERMAN (138) , daughter of Frank AMMERMAN & Emily Frances LAIR
(88) (1854-). Born in 1877.

MISS ALICE AMMERMAN

Another figure of this group is Miss Alice Ammerman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ammerman of this city.
She is tall and graceful in her movements, with a face which shows her to a womenly woman, born to fulfill the
sweetest and holiest of earthly missions. She has soft, brown hair and eyes which combine bewitchingly with the
girlish blush that often mounts into her clear, dark face; but her unaffected friendliness of manner is quite as
attractive as her sweet modesty. Miss Alice has scarcely yet entered society. She was graduated from the
Cynthiana Graded School only the past session, and will probably occupy her place as a young lady the coming
winter. We predict for her socially an enviable place and an influential career, for, with beauty of form and face,
she wears that within her heart and mind which exeeds all other endowments--purity and gentleness. [15]

They had one child:
    145          i.       Issac Newton (1904-)

122. Clarence LAIR. Born in 1874.

Clarence married Mary ROBINSON.

They had one child:
    146          i.       John Prentice (1906-)

123. Floyd LAIR.

Floyd married Elizabeth DOUGLAS.

They had one child:
                 i.       Eugenie D.
                          Eugenie D. married Ronald MOSS.

124. Charles Boscom LAIR.

Charles Boscom married Helen MARTIN.

They had one child:
                 i.       Reynolds. Born in 1911.


                   Family of John William LAIR (80) & Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” REDMON


125. Kate LAIR.

Kate married J.E. MELOAN.

They had one child:


                                                      Page 93
                                                 Register Report

                 i.      J. B.

126. John T. Redmon LAIR.

John T. Redmon married Garnat SOWARD.

They had the following children:
    147           i.      Katherine Redmon
                 ii.      John Harvey.


                             Family of Matthias LAIR (81) & Mollie CURRENT


127. Fannie LAIR. Born in 1881.

In 1902 when Fannie was 21, she married Frank B. WRIGHT, son of John Ward WRIGHT (1852-1935) & Fannie
B. ARDERY (1854-1926). Born in 1876. Frank B. died on September 9, 1955; he was 79.

They had the following children:
    148           i.      Mattie A. (1903-)
    149          ii.      Mary Francis (1906-)
                iii.      Ward.

128. Ethel LAIR. Born in 1892 in Lair Station, Harrison County, Kentucky.

In 1912 when Ethel was 20, she married Huston RION. Born in 1874 in Paris, Kentucky.

They had one child:
                 i.      Gladys. Born in 1913.


                            Family of Sally LAIR (82) & Samuel T. REYNOLDS


129. Rowena Lair REYNOLDS. Born in 1875.

On September 20, 1894 when Rowena Lair was 19, she married John William “Will” MEGIBBEN, son of James K.
MEGIBBEN (1844-1899) & Mary E. SHAWHAN (1845-1895). Born on May 19, 1867 in Cynthiana, Harrison
County, Kentucky. John William “Will” died in Battle Grove Cemetery, Cynthiana, Kentucky on August 25, 1933;
he was 66.

They had the following children:
    150           i.      James Reynolds “Buck” (1896-1961)
                 ii.      Mary Elizabeth. Born in 1896.
                          Mary Elizabeth married Charles HUDGENS.
                iii.      Sarah Rowena. Born in 1905.


                                 Family of Joseph LAIR (83) & Sallie MOORE


130. Maud LAIR.




                                                     Page 94
                                              Register Report

Maud married CURRENT.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Russell.
                          Russell married Eloise HOGG.
                 ii.      Howard.

131. Matthias LAIR. Born in 1895.

Matthias married Hazel HOUSTON.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Martha.
                          Martha married William ROGERS.
                 ii.      Dorothy.
                          Dorothy married Samuel CLARK.
                iii.      Matthias.
                          Matthias married Helen Frances DAVIS, daughter of John B. DAVIS & Jane WILMOT.
                          Born on January 7, 1925 in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Helen Frances died in Ephraim
                          McDowell Regional Medical Center, Fayette County, Kentucky on February 6, 2000; she
                          was 75.

                         Subject: Lair
                         Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2000 11:14:11 -0600
                         From: George And Sandie
                         To: Bob Francis

                         Bob,

                         If you will send me your address, I will put the original in the mail to you tomorrow
                         morning. Until it arrives, the obit reads:

                         Helen Frances D. Lair, 75, Argyle Drive, died Sunday, February 6, 2000 at the Ephraim
                         McDowell Regional Medical Center. A native of Bourbon County, she was born January
                         7, 1925, to the late John B. and Jane Wilmot Davis. She was a homemaker and a retired
                         home economics teacher in the Bourbon County School system. She was a volunteer for
                         Heritage Hospice and Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center, and a member of the
                         First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Survivors include her husband, Matt R. Lair,
                         Jr., and nieces and nephews.

                         Services were held Wednesday, February 16, 2000 at the First Christian Church by Rev.
                         Norman Hagley and Rev. Caroline Bloomfield, with interment in the Lexington
                         Cemetery. Casket bearers were Stephen Mayes, Michael Mayes, Dickie Mayes, Matthew
                         Mayes, Bobby Mayes, Chris Whitehouse and Jerry Milburn. Honorary casket bearers
                         were members of the Lair Circle at the First Christian Church.

                         The family suggests memorials take the form of contributions to the church building fund
                         or to one's favorite charity. Preston-Pruitt Funeral Home, Inc., Danville, was in charge of
                         arrangements.
               iv.       Hazel.


                                Family of Luther LAIR (84) & Sallie EWALT




                                                    Page 95
                                               Register Report

132. Tinnie LAIR.

Tinnie married Mr. COURTRIGHT.

They had one child:
                 i.      Russell.


                       Family of Charles Ann Eliza REDMON (85) & Joseph COSBY


133. Eliza Lair COSBY. Eliza Lair died in 1889.

Eliza Lair married Henry AMMERMAN.

They had one child:
    151          i.      Harmon Smiser

134. Cynthia Redmon (Tinnie) COSBY.

Cynthia Redmon (Tinnie) married Luther AMMERMAN.

They had one child:
    152          i.      George Warren


                         Family of Susan Alice LAIR (86) & Prof. N. Frank SMITH


135. Nancy SMITH. Born on October 3, 1873. Nancy died in October 1934; she was 60.

On June 29, 1898 when Nancy was 24, she married Prof. James Richard JOHNSON, in Cynthiana Methodist
Episcopal Church, Cynthiana, Kentucky.

They had one child:
    153          i.      Vinson Lair (1899-)


                         Family of Robert William LAIR (87) & Fannie REDMON


136. John Muir LAIR. Born on December 26, 1876 in Harrison County, Kentucky. John Muir died in Bourbon
County, Kentucky on May 27, 1937; he was 60.

John Muir married America Layson MOORE, daughter of John Thomas MOORE (1844-) & Jennie POLLOCK
(1846-1880). Born on October 25, 1878. America Layson died in Bourbon County, Kentucky on September 16,
1972; she was 93.

They had the following children:
    154           i.      Eugene (1902-1944)
    155          ii.      William Moore “Sus”
                iii.      John W.
                          John W. married Jane SEYMORE.
    156         iv.       Willie Moore



                                                   Page 96
                                                 Register Report


137. Redmon LAIR. Born in 1874.

Redmon married Bess DEDMAN, daughter of Robert DEDMAN (1822-) & Mary REMINGTON.

They had the following children:
    157           i.      Robert Dedman
    158          ii.      Harry R. (1910-)
    159         iii.      Mary Remington (1905-)


                          Family of Emily Frances LAIR (88) & Frank AMMERMAN


138. Alice Lair AMMERMAN. Born in 1877.

MISS ALICE AMMERMAN

Another figure of this group is Miss Alice Ammerman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ammerman of this city.
She is tall and graceful in her movements, with a face which shows her to a womenly woman, born to fulfill the
sweetest and holiest of earthly missions. She has soft, brown hair and eyes which combine bewitchingly with the
girlish blush that often mounts into her clear, dark face; but her unaffected friendliness of manner is quite as
attractive as her sweet modesty. Miss Alice has scarcely yet entered society. She was graduated from the
Cynthiana Graded School only the past session, and will probably occupy her place as a young lady the coming
winter. We predict for her socially an enviable place and an influential career, for, with beauty of form and face,
she wears that within her heart and mind which exeeds all other endowments--purity and gentleness. [15]

Alice Lair married Issac Newton LAIR (121) , son of Charles LAIR (77) & Sallie WINSTON. Born in 1871.

They had one child:
    145          i.       Issac Newton (1904-)

139. Wallace AMMERMAN. Born in 1884.

Wallace married Hattie STEVENS.

They had one child:
                 i.       Wallace. Born in 1909.


                             Family of Laura LAIR (89) & John K. NORTHCUTT


140. Marie Louise NORTHCUTT. Born in 1895.

Marie Louise married Charles COOK.

They had the following children:
    160           i.      Charles Lair (1925-)
    161          ii.      Billie (1930-)
    162         iii.      Johnnie (1928-)


                          Family of Mary Emma LAIR (91) & John Prince TIBBETS


                                                      Page 97
                                               Register Report



141. Minnie May TIBBETS. Born in 1883.

In 1901 when Minnie May was 18, she married Edward ANDUS.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Elmer J. Born in 1903.
                 ii.      Leslie J. Born in 1905.


                                 Family of Edna LAIR (94) & Albert HUBERT


142. Walter HUBERT.

Child:
                 i.        Donna Jean.


                      Family of Burton Maude WARD (99) & William Thornton LAFFERTY


143. Helen Ward LAFFERTY. Born in 1891.

Helen Ward married B.L. NISBET.

They had one child:
                 i.        Louise.
                           Louise married Warren ROBERTS Jr..




                                                    Page 98
                                               Register Report



                                            Eighth Generation
                               _________________________________________
                 Family of Dr. Harmon Todd SMISER (110) & Katherine “Kate” WHALEY


144. Harmon Todd SMISER Jr. Born on July 30, 1906 in Cynthiana, Kentucky.

On August 11, 1932 when Harmon Todd was 26, he married Katherine WIGGLESWORTH, in Harrison County,
Kentucky. Born in 1908. Katherine died on March 29, 1980; she was 72.

“History of Kentucky and Kentuckians” p. 1557 mentions a Katherine Ellis Wiglesworth, daughter of Harry Rhodes
Wiglesworth.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Ann Katherine (1938-)
                 ii.      Louise VanDeren (1939-)


                      Family of Issac Newton LAIR (121) & Alice Lair AMMERMAN (138)


145. Issac Newton LAIR. Born in 1904.

Issac Newton first married Dorothy BUSH.

They had one child:
                 i.       Gordon (LAIR)

Issac Newton second married Jane CHARLES.


                             Family of Clarence LAIR (122) & Mary ROBINSON


146. John Prentice LAIR. Born in 1906.

John Prentice first married Margaret SHUTTS.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Linda
                 ii.      John

John Prentice second married Hazel SLUSHER.


                          Family of John T. Redmon LAIR (126) & Garnat SOWARD


147. Katherine Redmon LAIR.

Katherine Redmon married Edward VAN STONE.

They had the following children:


                                                    Page 99
                                             Register Report

                  i.      Edward Lair
                 ii.      Garnet Dean
                iii.      John Joseph
                iv.       Elizabeth Irene


                              Family of Fannie LAIR (127) & Frank B. WRIGHT


148. Mattie A. WRIGHT. Born in 1903.

Mattie A. first married Robert REISTER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      June
                 ii.      Robert
                iii.      Lair B.

Mattie A. second married Raymond KENDALL.

149. Mary Francis WRIGHT. Born in 1906.

Mary Francis first married Frank E. EATON.

They had one child:
                 i.       Frank

Mary Francis second married Eugene CECIL.


               Family of Rowena Lair REYNOLDS (129) & John William “Will” MEGIBBEN


150. James Reynolds “Buck” MEGIBBEN. Born on August 19, 1896 in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky.
James Reynolds “Buck” died in Flemingsburg, Kentucky on September 1, 1961; he was 65. Buried in Battle Grove
Cemetery, Cynthiana, Kentucky.

On August 21, 1922 when James Reynolds “Buck” was 26, he married Stella Etna MOCKBEE, daughter of Robert
L. MOCKBEE, in Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky. Stella Etna died on October 14, 1987 in Spring Grove
Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William Reynolds (1923-)
                 ii.      Luther Charles (1926-1994)
                iii.      Catherine A. (1927-)
                iv.       Margret (1929-)


                          Family of Eliza Lair COSBY (133) & Henry AMMERMAN


151. Harmon Smiser AMMERMAN.

Harmon Smiser married Nell MOFFITT.



                                                  Page 100
                                            Register Report


They had one child:
                 i.       Harry Moffitt


                 Family of Cynthia Redmon (Tinnie) COSBY (134) & Luther AMMERMAN


152. George Warren AMMERMAN.

George Warren married Minnie B. WREN.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Tinnie
                 ii.      Golda
                iii.      Emma Reed
                iv.       Ada


                      Family of Nancy SMITH (135) & Prof. James Richard JOHNSON


153. Vinson Lair JOHNSON. Born in 1899.

On April 5, 1930 when Vinson Lair was 31, he married Winifred DAVIESS, in Dutch Reformed Church,
Bronxville, New York.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Winifred Nancy
                 ii.      Vinson (1940-)


                       Family of John Muir LAIR (136) & America Layson MOORE


154. Eugene LAIR. Born on March 30, 1902 in Harrison County, Kentucky. Eugene died in Paris, Bourbon
County, Kentucky on May 31, 1944; he was 42.

On August 25, 1925 when Eugene was 23, he married Mary Heath MAY, daughter of Charles Brent MAY
(1875-1953) & Edna Heath FITHIAN (1882-1923), in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Born on September 3, 1904 in
Bourbon County, Kentucky. Mary Heath died in Bourbon County, Kentucky on October 3, 1982; she was 78.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Betty Hewitt (1939-)
                 ii.      Mary Gene (1926-1995)

155. William Moore “Sus” LAIR.

In 1934 William Moore “Sus” married Elaine LUMPKIN.

They had one child:
                 i.       Marian

156. Willie Moore LAIR.



                                                  Page 101
                                            Register Report


Willie Moore married William Pugh MILLER Jr., son of William MILLER (1843-) & Sarah RULE. Born on
November 16, 1871.

They had one child:
                 i.      Mabel


                               Family of Redmon LAIR (137) & Bess DEDMAN


157. Robert Dedman LAIR.

In 1932 Robert Dedman married Rozelle KRAMER.

They had one child:
                 i.      Martha

158. Harry R. LAIR. Born in 1910.

Harry R. married Margaret.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Jennie
                 ii.      Harry

159. Mary Remington LAIR. Born in 1905.

In 1926 when Mary Remington was 21, she married Oliver ALFORD.

They had one child:
                 i.      Bess Dedman (1928-)


                       Family of Marie Louise NORTHCUTT (140) & Charles COOK


160. Charles Lair COOK. Born in 1925.

Charles Lair married Joyce MINER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      William Russell
                 ii.      John Varnon

161. Billie COOK. Born in 1930.

Billie married Betty Lake MINER.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Annie Laurie
                 ii.      Minar
                iii.      William T.
                iv.       Guy R.



                                                Page 102
                                         Register Report


162. Johnnie COOK. Born in 1928.

Johnnie married Samuel W. ARNOLD Jr., son of Samuel W. ARNOLD & Arleane KUSTER (1896-1956). Born in
March 1925.

They had the following children:
                  i.      Sam William
                 ii.      Charles John




                                             Page 103
                                              Register Report



                                                   Sources
1. Maude Ward Lafferty, “Background of the Lair Family.”
2. Kentucky Records, Volume II, Harrison County, Harrison Deeds, p. 150.
3. Kentucky Records, Volume II, BOURBON COUNTY, Abstracts by Jane Clay Kenney, WILLS FROM BOOKS
A, B, C, AND D, p. 18.
4. Kentucky Records, Volume II, BOURBON COUNTY, Abstracts by Jane Clay Kenney, WILLS FROM BOOKS
A, B, C, AND D, p. 17.
5. “This Old House,” privately published pamphlet by Katherine Wilson.
6. “Cinthy, wife of John Redmon, died July 22, 1845, aged 22 years.” (McAdams, Kentucky and Pioneer Court
Records, p. 228)
7. Michael, “Joseph Pugh Genealogy,” March, 2000, Spydermyk@aol.com.
8. History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin
& County, Chicago, 1882, p. 663.
9. Enoch, genealogy section, p. 16.
10. Bourbon County, Kentucky, 1850 census.
11. “Descendants of John Edwards,” Kay Withers--from research that she and a group of Edwards descendants
compiled.--REF
12. “Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records,” p. 170
13. “Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records” by Mrs. Harry McAdams, p. 168
14. Cynthiana Democrat, June 1896, Page 5
15. Cynthiana Democrat, June 1896, Page 16




                                                    Page 104
                                   Register Report



                                       Index
?
    Margaret                           spouse of 158
    Maurita F.                         spouse of 113
ALFORD
    Bess Dedman (1928 - )              child of 159
    Oliver                             spouse of 159
ALLEN
    Mary (1811 - 1833)                 spouse of 39
AMMERMAN
    Ada                                child of 152
    Alice Lair (1877 - )               spouse of 121
    Alice Lair (1877 - )               138
    Emma Reed                          child of 152
    Frank                              spouse of 88
    George Warren                      152
    Golda                              child of 152
    Harmon Smiser                      151
    Harry Moffitt                      child of 151
    Henry                              spouse of 133
    Luther                             spouse of 134
    Tinnie                             child of 152
    Wallace (1884 - )                  139
    Wallace (1909 - )                  child of 139
ANDERSON
    A. Keller                          child of 43
    Catherine “Kitty”                  spouse of 42
    Hugh Miller (1830 - 1885)          76
    Jane (1785 - 1868)                 spouse of 27
    John Miller (1795 - 1866)          spouse of 43
    Martha (1844 - 1902)               75
    Mary                               spouse of 28
    Mary                               child of 76
    Orra                               child of 43
    Pugh Miller                        child of 43
    Robert                             child of 43
    Sallie (1781 - 1860)               spouse of 20
    Thomas William (1833 - 1906)       child of 43
ANDUS
    Edward                             spouse of 141
    Elmer J. (1903 - )                 child of 141
    Leslie J. (1905 - )                child of 141
ARNOLD
    Charles John                       child of 162
    Sam William III                    child of 162
    Samuel W. Jr. (1925 - )            spouse of 162
ASHBY
    Delbert                            child of 115
    Millicent                          spouse of 112
    W.                                 spouse of 115



                                      Page 105
                             Register Report


BARCLAY
  Mary Frances                   child of 103
  William                        spouse of 103
BATSELL
  Lulu May (1887 - )             child of 105
  Sebella (1885 - )              child of 105
  T. J.                          spouse of 105
BELL
  Emily                          spouse of 24
  Peggy                          spouse of 23
BERRY
  James W. (1814 - 1891)         spouse of 31
  Rhoda Ellen (1840 - )          64
  Sarah Frances                  65
  Willie Mary (1854 - )          66
BLACKFORD
  Nancy                          spouse of 62
BLANCHARD
  Anna Lair                      child of 93
  Bernice Edith (1894 - )        child of 93
  Frank M.                       spouse of 93
  Helen (1888 - )                child of 93
  John Milton (1885 - )          child of 93
  Mary Isabella (1884 - )        child of 93
  William Palmer (1890 - )       child of 93
BOGGS
  Esther Huston                  spouse of 33
BRADLEY
  Annie                          spouse of 78
BRADY
  UNNAMED                        spouse of 14
BROWN
  Margaret (1805 - 1865)         spouse of 25
BUCHANAN
  Elizabeth                      spouse of 18
BUSH
  Dorothy                        spouse of 145
CALDWELL
  Eliza                          spouse of 67
CANTRILL
  Claude                         spouse of 66
  Claudia                        child of 66
  Gertrude                       102
  Lillian                        103
CARVER
  Ella                           spouse of 71
CECIL
  Eugene                         spouse of 149
CHAMBERLAIN
  Cecil Marion                   child of 100
  Edna Francis                   child of 100



                                Page 106
                            Register Report

  James Poynt (1869 - )         100
  James William                 child of 64
  Joseph Marvin                 child of 100
  Leland Poynt                  child of 100
  Orphah Francis                child of 64
  Owen Lafferty                 child of 100
  Rev. W.W. ( - 1904)           spouse of 64
CHARLES
  Jane                          spouse of 145
CHRISMAN
  Charles                       spouse of 32
  Kittie                        child of 32
CLAY
  Mattie (1847 - )              spouse of 61
COHEN
  Edith                         spouse of 119
COLLIER
  Margaret                      spouse of 39
COOK
  Annie Laurie                  child of 161
  Billie (1930 - )              161
  Charles                       spouse of 140
  Charles Lair (1925 - )        160
  Guy R.                        child of 161
  Isabella                      spouse of 53
  John Varnon                   child of 160
  Johnnie (1928 - )             162
  Minar                         child of 161
  William Russell               child of 160
  William T.                    child of 161
COSBY
  Cynthia Redmon (Tinnie)       134
  Eliza Lair ( - 1889)          133
  Joseph                        spouse of 85
  Lizzie                        child of 85
COURTRIGHT
  Mr. UNNAMED                   spouse of 132
  Russell                       child of 132
CROW
  Lizzie Bell (1891 - )         child of 104
  Nell Eustace (1889 - )        child of 104
  T. E.                         spouse of 104
  Thomas (1897 - )              child of 104
  William Bland (1895 - )       child of 104
CURRENT
  UNNAMED                       spouse of 130
  Howard                        child of 130
  Mollie (1859 - 1932)          spouse of 81
  Russell                       child of 130
CUSTER
  Barbara                       spouse of 1
  Catherine                     32



                               Page 107
                                   Register Report

  Dorah                                child of 9
  Jacob                                spouse of 9
  Sarah (1766 - 1847)                  spouse of 8
DAHMER
  Emily Susan (~1858 - 1932)           spouse of 97
DAVIESS
  Winifred                             spouse of 153
DEDMAN
  Bess                                 spouse of 137
DOUGLAS
  Elizabeth                            spouse of 123
DRANE
  Mary (1961 - 1960)                   spouse of 90
DYER
  Hanah                                spouse of 25
EATON
  Frank Jr.                            child of 149
  Frank E.                             spouse of 149
EDWARDS
  Anne M.                              spouse of 69
  Julia A. (1814 - )                   spouse of 38
EPPERSON
  UNNAMED                              spouse of 117
  Cora                                 child of 117
  Robert S.                            child of 117
EWALT
  Ann Thomas (1904 - )                 child of 120
  Joseph Hedges (1865 - 1956)          spouse of 120
  Josephine Hedges (1906 - 1996)       child of 120
  Mary K.                              spouse of 73
  Sallie                               spouse of 84
EYE
  Mary Elizabeth (1832 - 1910)         spouse of 56
FAULKNER
  Mary Elizabeth (1825 - )             child of 43
  William                              spouse of 43
FERGUSON
  Discretion                           spouse of 54
FRAZER
  Rebecca (1805 - 1873)                spouse of 37
FUNK
  Sarah Jane (~1835 - )                spouse of 57
GARLOCK
  Anna                                 spouse of 116
GOLLEHON
  Margaret Emma                        spouse of 109
GRAHAM
  Mary                                 spouse of 15
GRAY
  Louisiana                            spouse of 33
GRIMES


                                      Page 108
                                 Register Report

  Mary Susan (1795 - 1879)           spouse of 59
HALL
  UNNAMED                            spouse of 30
HAMMER
  Elizabeth (1809 - 1852)            spouse of 55
  Virginia Florence (~1840 - )       spouse of 95
HARDY
  Albert                             child of 65
  Charles Miller                     child of 65
  Julia Ella                         child of 65
  Lena Thomas                        101
  Thomas W.                          spouse of 65
HEDGES
  Henry Berkly (1890 - )             child of 106
  J. M.                              spouse of 106
  James M. Jr. (1892 - )             child of 106
HENDRICK
  Mary Susan (1855 - 1892)           spouse of 96
HOUSTON
  Hazel                              spouse of 131
HOWE
  Sarah Jane                         spouse of 41
HUBBARD
  Lady Frances (1752 - 1792)         spouse of 5
HUBERT
  Albert                             spouse of 94
  Donna Jean                         child of 142
  Edgar                              child of 94
  Jennie                             child of 94
  Virgil                             child of 94
  Walter                             142
JAMISON
  Lucretia                           spouse of 44
JOHNSON
  Prof. James Richard                spouse of 135
  Vinson Jr. (1940 - )               child of 153
  Vinson Lair (1899 - )              153
  Winifred Nancy                     child of 153
JONES
  Betty                              spouse of 35
KANESTER
  Deborah (1806 - 1886)              spouse of 26
KENDALL
  Raymond                            spouse of 148
KENNIE
  Nellie                             spouse of 72
KRAMER
  Rozelle                            spouse of 157
LAFFERTY
  Ash                                child of 99
  Harry                              child of 99



                                    Page 109
                                    Register Report

  Helen Ward (1891 - )                  143
  Kathleen Lair (1892 - )               child of 99
  Meddie                                spouse of 100
  Paul                                  child of 99
  William Thornton (1851 - )            spouse of 99
LAIL
  Henry Miller (1853 - 1914)            90
  James Patterson (1891 - ca1977)       child of 90
  John Noyes (1893 - 1956)              child of 90
  John Shawhan (1826 - 1878)            spouse of 51
  Margaret (1889 - 1945)                child of 90
  Sarah Ann Eliza (1910 - )             child of 90
  William Adair (1854 - 1926)           child of 51
LAIR
  Abraham                               child of 27
  Addie                                 child of 24
  Addison                               62
  Almira                                child of 15
  Almira Y.                             child of 42
  Andrew (1750 - 1826)                  5
  Andrew                                child of 17
  Annie (1881 - )                       child of 79
  Arabella (1841 - )                    child of 29
  Arabella (1841 - )                    child of 40
  Ashby (1872 - 1874)                   child of 61
  Betsey (1806 - )                      child of 20
  Betsey (1815 - 1834)                  child of 23
  Betty Hewitt (1939 - )                child of 154
  Catherine (1773 - )                   child of 5
  Catherine (1778 - 1800)               21
  Catherine (1804 - )                   child of 20
  Catherine                             child of 18
  Catherine (ca1793 - 1866)             child of 8
  Catherine (1845 - 1856)               child of 42
  Celia (1786 - )                       child of 5
  Charles (1775 - 1860)                 20
  Charles                               child of 24
  Charles                               77
  Charles Boscom                        124
  Charles F. (1837 - 1898)              79
  Charles Samuel (1852 - 1859)          child of 48
  Clarence (1874 - )                    122
  Cynthia (~1823 - 1845)                child of 20
  Cynthia Ann (1853 - )                 92
  Daisy                                 child of 84
  Dorothy                               child of 131
  Edith Florence (1856 - )              93
  Edna                                  94
  Edward (1876 - )                      child of 79
  Elizabeth ( - <1799)                  child of 2
  Elizabeth (1785 - 1803)               child of 6
  Elizabeth (1774 - 1888)               14
  Elizabeth                             child of 18



                                       Page 110
                               Register Report

Elizabeth (1820 - 1847)            47
Elizabeth Ann (1833 - )            child of 42
Emily                              child of 62
Emily                              child of 15
Emily Frances (1854 - )            88
Emily G. (1841 - 1869)             child of 42
Emily Jane                         child of 24
Emma Alice (1854 - 1877)           child of 46
Emma Alice (1854 - 1877)           child of 52
Enoch Green                        child of 15
Esther (1799 - >1850)              child of 3
Ethel (1892 - )                    128
Eugene (1902 - 1944)               154
Eugenie D.                         child of 123
Fannie                             child of 28
Fannie (1881 - )                   127
Floyd                              123
Frances Hubbard                    child of 29
Frances Hubbard                    child of 40
Franklin P.                        child of 45
Franklin P.                        child of 60
French (1871 - 1901)               child of 79
George                             child of 28
George (1876 - )                   child of 78
George W. (1864 - 1871)            child of 49
Harry Jr.                          child of 158
Harry R. (1910 - )                 158
Hazel                              child of 131
Helen Henry (1838 - )              63
Helena P. (1826 - 1900)            child of 18
Henrietta                          child of 24
Hubbard (1783 - )                  17
Isaac Newton (~1807 - >1893)       44
Issac Newton (1871 - )             121
Issac Newton (1871 - )             spouse of 138
Issac Newton (1904 - )             145
Jacob                              child of 27
Jacob                              30
James                              child of 28
James (1778 - )                    16
James                              78
James H. (1839 - 1856)             child of 42
Jennie                             child of 158
Joe Reynolds                       child of 80
John (1762 - 1827)                 8
John (1784 - 1821)                 23
John                               18
John                               child of 15
John                               child of 24
John (1820 - 1888)                 53
John Jr.                           child of 146
John (1825 - >1882)                49
John Andrew (1836 - )              child of 29
John Andrew (1836 - )              child of 40


                                  Page 111
                                      Register Report

John Harvey                               child of 126
General John Henry (1838 - 1883)          child of 48
John Miller (1820 - )                     59
John Montgomery                           child of 17
John Muir (1876 - 1937)                   136
John Prentice (1906 - )                   146
John T. Redmon                            126
John W.                                   child of 136
John Wesley (1799 - 1867)                 29
John Wesley (1799 - 1867)                 spouse of 40
John William                              80
Johnnie                                   child of 30
Joseph (1745 - 1826)                      3
Joseph ( - ~1812)                         child of 6
Joseph (1818 - 1861)                      child of 20
Joseph                                    83
Joseph                                    child of 24
Joseph (1817 - 1821)                      child of 23
Kate                                      125
Katherine Redmon                          147
Laura (1861 - )                           89
Lida                                      child of 29
Lida                                      child of 40
Linda                                     child of 146
Luther                                    84
Mamie                                     child of 28
Margaret (1827 - )                        58
Margaret                                  9
Margaret                                  child of 28
Margaret                                  child of 15
Margaret Elizabeth (1848 - )              child of 53
Margaret R. (1850 - )                     74
Marian                                    child of 155
Martha                                    child of 157
Martha                                    child of 131
Martha E.                                 child of 42
Martha Jane                               child of 15
Martha “Patsy” (1780 - 1857)              13
Martin Luther (1817 - 1862)               48
Mary (1780 - 1802)                        child of 6
Mary                                      child of 28
Mary                                      child of 8
Mary (1843 - )                            child of 29
Mary (1843 - )                            child of 40
Mary (1788 - 1839)                        19
Mary Elizabeth (1827 - 1865)              spouse of 46
Mary Elizabeth (1827 - 1865)              52
Mary Emma (1850 - 1903)                   91
Mary Gene (1926 - 1995)                   child of 154
Mary H. (1836 - 1837)                     child of 48
Mary Remington (1905 - )                  159
Mathias Custer (~1787 - 1860)             27
Matthew (or Matthias) (1852 - 1852)       child of 48
Capt. Matthias (1752 - 1795)              6


                                         Page 112
                                      Register Report

Matthias Jr. (1795 - 1841)                22
Matthias (1852 - 1909)                    81
Matthias                                  54
Matthias (1895 - )                        131
Matthias Jr.                              child of 131
Matthias (1813 - )                        45
Matthias (1813 - )                        spouse of 60
Maud                                      130
Mollie                                    child of 16
Nancy Cabell Breckenridge (1853 - )       child of 48
Newton (1856 - 1878)                      child of 49
Ossie                                     child of 24
Paul                                      child of 8
Rachel                                    child of 24
Redmon (1874 - )                          137
Reynolds (1911 - )                        child of 124
Roanna                                    child of 45
Roanna                                    child of 60
Robert                                    child of 28
Robert (1874 - )                          child of 78
Robert Dedman                             157
Robert William (1851 - 1879)              87
Rowena (Roanna)                           spouse of 45
Rowena (Roanna)                           60
Sallie (1789 - 1809)                      child of 6
Sallie Lula (1868 - )                     child of 61
Sally (1849 - 1906)                       82
Sally Ann (1809 - 1883)                   50
Saphronia                                 child of 24
Sarah                                     child of 24
Sarah Ann Eliza (1835 - )                 51
Sarah E. (1838 - 1901)                    child of 42
Sarah Eliza (1852 - 1859)                 child of 46
Sarah Eliza (1852 - 1859)                 child of 52
Sarah Eliza (1860 - )                     child of 49
Sarah Ellen                               31
Sarah M. (1839 - 1840)                    child of 48
Susan                                     child of 28
Susan Alice (1841 - 1909)                 86
Thomas P. (1805 - 1885)                   42
Thomas Pain (1830 - )                     child of 22
Tinnie                                    132
Wesley                                    child of 28
William (1784 - )                         24
William (1816 - 1860)                     46
William (1816 - 1860)                     spouse of 52
William                                   61
William (1775 - 1875)                     15
William                                   child of 16
William                                   child of 17
William A. (1831 - 1836)                  child of 42
William Dixon                             child of 15
William G. (1789 - 1863)                  28
William Hubbard (1851 - 1856)             child of 48


                                         Page 113
                                        Register Report

  William Moore “Sus”                       155
  Willie Moore                              156
  Zerelda                                   child of 27
  Zerilda A.                                child of 59
LEHRER
  Catharina Margaretha (1747 - )            4
  Ferdinand                                 1
  Johan Jusua                               child of 2
  Mary (ca1756 - >1824)                     7
  Mathias (1714 - 1787)                     2
LINDSAY
  Evalyn                                    spouse of 36
LUMPKIN
  Elaine                                    spouse of 155
MARIA
  Pansy                                     spouse of 114
MARTIN
  Helen                                     spouse of 124
MAY
  Mary Heath (1904 - 1982)                  spouse of 154
McAFEE
  Frank Caldwell (1875 - 1898)              child of 104
  George L. ( - <1888)                      spouse of 104
  George Lewis (1876 - 1876)                child of 104
McCASLING
  Daisy                                     spouse of 108
MEGIBBEN
  Catherine A. (1927 - )                    child of 150
  James Reynolds “Buck” (1896 - 1961)       150
  John William “Will” (1867 - 1933)         spouse of 129
  Luther Charles (1926 - 1994)              child of 150
  Margret (1929 - )                         child of 150
  Mary Elizabeth (1896 - )                  child of 129
  Sarah Rowena (1905 - )                    child of 129
  William Reynolds (1923 - )                child of 150
MELOAN
  Dr. J. B.                                 child of 125
  J.E.                                      spouse of 125
MILLER
  Louisa                                    spouse of 76
  Mabel                                     child of 156
  William Pugh Jr. (1871 - )                spouse of 156
MILLS
  Gordon (LAIR)                             child of 145
MINER
  Betty Lake                                spouse of 161
  Joyce                                     spouse of 160
MOCKBEE
  Stella Etna ( - 1987)                     spouse of 150
MOFFITT
  David                                     spouse of 11



                                           Page 114
                                    Register Report

  Franklin                              child of 11
  Horatio                               child of 11
  John                                  child of 11
  Nell                                  spouse of 151
  Walter                                child of 11
MONTGOMERY
  Julia                                 spouse of 17
MOORE
  America Layson (1878 - 1972)          spouse of 136
  Polly                                 spouse of 12
  Sallie                                spouse of 83
MOYER
  Catharina Margaretha ( - >1787)       spouse of 2
MOYERS
  Ella (~1896 - 1984)                   child of 98
  John (1856 - 1898)                    spouse of 98
  Mary (1895 - 1969)                    child of 98
  Samuel R. (1891 - 1919)               child of 98
  Virgil (1893 - 1950)                  child of 98
NEWMAN
  Alice                                 child of 35
  Annie                                 child of 35
  Catharine                             34
  David                                 33
  Edward                                child of 35
  Fannie                                child of 12
  George                                36
  John                                  12
  John                                  child of 35
  Jonathan (1765 - )                    10
  Joseph                                child of 35
  Joseph                                child of 36
  Julia                                 child of 36
  Maggie E.                             child of 67
  Mary                                  11
  Mary E.                               child of 67
  Mary Elizabeth                        child of 33
  Nannie Boggs                          child of 67
  Phoebe                                child of 12
  Reuben                                child of 12
  Robert Boggs                          67
  Sadie                                 child of 36
  Sallie                                child of 35
  Sallie                                child of 36
  Strother                              child of 36
  Walter                                spouse of 4
  Walter                                35
  Walter                                child of 35
  Dr. Walter                            child of 36
NEWTON
  G.                                    spouse of 111
NISBET


                                       Page 115
                                           Register Report

  B.L.                                         spouse of 143
  Louise                                       child of 143
NORTHCUTT
  John K.                                      spouse of 89
  Maria Vernon (1894 - )                       child of 89
  Marie Louise (1895 - )                       140
  William (1897 - )                            child of 89
NOYES
  Emma J. (1858 - 1899)                        spouse of 90
PAYNE
  Jane Frances (1830 - 1916)                   spouse of 55
POPE
  Andrew                                       child of 14
  Helena (1808 - 1891)                         43
  Thomas                                       spouse of 14
  Thomas                                       child of 14
  William                                      child of 14
  William                                      spouse of 19
REDMON
  Charles Ann Eliza (~1841 - 1907)             85
  Charles L. (~1834 - )                        child of 50
  Cynthia (1847 - 1859)                        child of 47
  Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” (1849 - 1927)       spouse of 80
  Emily (1820 - 1854)                          spouse of 49
  Fannie (1854 - 1911)                         spouse of 87
  George (~1836 - )                            child of 50
  George (1816 - >1882)                        spouse of 47
  Mary J. (~1831 - )                           child of 50
  William T. (1809 - )                         spouse of 50
REISTER
  June                                         child of 148
  Lair B.                                      child of 148
  Robert                                       spouse of 148
  Robert Jr.                                   child of 148
RENAKER
  Edward Allen                                 child of 101
  Eugene                                       child of 101
  Everett                                      child of 101
  Hewlett                                      child of 101
  J. Newton                                    spouse of 101
  Leora Hardy                                  child of 101
REYNOLDS
  Emma Alice (1871 - )                         child of 82
  Ida Belle (1868 - )                          child of 82
  Rowena Lair (1875 - )                        129
  Samuel T.                                    spouse of 82
RIDDLE
  Charles W. (1852 - 1909)                     child of 57
  Isaac (1791 - 1882)                          26
  Joseph Newman (1832 - 1921)                  57
RION
  Gladys (1913 - )                             child of 128



                                              Page 116
                                    Register Report

  Huston (1874 - )                      spouse of 128
ROBEY
  Ivan (1901 - )                        child of 92
  Jacob S.                              spouse of 92
  Lillian I.                            child of 92
  Roswald J. (1878 - )                  child of 92
ROBINSON
  UNNAMED                               spouse of 16
  Mary                                  spouse of 122
ROSS
  Martha                                spouse of 54
RUDDELL
  John (~1755 - 1824)                   spouse of 7
RUDDLE
  Abel Miles (1839 - 1892)              child of 55
  Almeda (1872 - 1956)                  child of 95
  Anderson Newman (1845 - 1905)         child of 55
  Anna (1905 - )                        child of 97
  Annie Maud (1874 - )                  child of 56
  Aude B. (1888 - 1965)                 child of 95
  Benjamin Franklin (1873 - 1894)       child of 55
  Calvin D. (1870 - 1942)               child of 95
  Charles Boggs (1859 - 1954)           child of 55
  Clara Ella (1886 - 1971)              child of 96
  Cornelius (1780 - 1876)               25
  Deborah Alice (1862 - )               child of 56
  Edmund Dyer (1835 - 1894)             child of 55
  Edward Claude (1887 - 1980)           child of 97
  Franklin Pierce (1877 - )             child of 56
  George Ernest (1891 - 1965)           child of 95
  Hannah Sidney (1876 - 1968)           child of 55
  Harness Lee (1862 - 1956)             child of 55
  Henry Clay (1850 - 1910)              96
  Isaac Cornelius (1837 - 1916)         child of 55
  Isaac Newton (1857 - 1943)            97
  Isaac Saylor (1890 - 1960)            child of 97
  James Dyer (1809 - 1894)              55
  James Floyd (1883 - 1939)             child of 95
  James Hammer (1843 - 1921)            child of 55
  John H. (1788 - 1871)                 child of 7
  John Malcolm (1830 - 1911)            56
  John Matthew (1841 - 1911)            95
  John P. (1897 - 1942)                 child of 97
  John Preston (1885 - 1949)            child of 95
  Lelia G. (1875 - 1919)                child of 95
  Lura Catherine (1883 - 1965)          child of 96
  Margaret Etta (1870 - 1963)           child of 55
  Mary Catherine (1847 - 1905)          child of 55
  Mary Elizabeth (1868 - 1942)          child of 95
  Mary Emily (1868 - )                  child of 56
  Mary Margaret (1776 - 1860)           child of 7
  Maude Deniza (1884 - 1948)            child of 96
  Newton Decatur (1895 - 1937)          child of 97


                                       Page 117
                                  Register Report

  Ona Dyer (1888 - )                  child of 96
  Otho Clay (1892 - 1892)             child of 96
  Otto Franklin (1890 - 1970)         child of 96
  Phoebe C. (1880 - 1945)             child of 95
  Phoebe Jane (1860 - 1919)           child of 55
  Ralph (1904 - )                     child of 97
  Reta Florence (1891 - 1979)         child of 97
  Roy Campbell (1893 - 1956)          child of 97
  Ruben Dee (1902 - 1983)             child of 97
  Sarah K. (1860 - )                  child of 56
  Susan Catherine (1900 - 1974)       child of 97
  Tyree Bruce (1877 - 1899)           child of 95
  Virginia H. (1866 - 1966)           98
  Whitney Hammer (1889 - 1936)        child of 97
  William George (1833 - 1916)        child of 55
  William Pendleton (1854 - )         child of 56
RUSH
  Anna Elizabeth (1754 - 1806)        spouse of 6
SHAWHAN
  Annabelle                           child of 113
  Arthur                              child of 112
  Carlyle ( - 1890)                   child of 74
  Clyde                               child of 112
  Cora (1884 - )                      117
  Daniel (1823 - )                    spouse of 58
  Elizabeth (1848 - )                 child of 58
  Emilio                              child of 116
  Etta Emma (1879 - )                 115
  Ezra                                spouse of 74
  Ezra S.                             child of 111
  George                              child of 113
  Glenn H.                            child of 111
  Hugh M. (1866 - )                   111
  Jesse                               child of 113
  John Albert (1775 - )               child of 74
  Joseph Lester (1873 - )             113
  Kittie (1877 - )                    child of 74
  Lloyd                               child of 114
  Lorenzo                             child of 116
  Mary                                child of 113
  Melvin (1887 - )                    child of 74
  Mildred                             child of 114
  Miller                              child of 113
  Otto (1875 - )                      114
  Tom (1882 - )                       116
  Wilfred                             child of 114
  William (1869 - )                   112
SHROPSHIRE
  Frank                               child of 102
  John N.                             spouse of 102
  Ruby Cantrell                       child of 102
SHUTTS
  Margaret                            spouse of 146



                                     Page 118
                                  Register Report


SHY
  Laura                               spouse of 79
SIDLE
  Rachel                              spouse of 22
SLUSHER
  Hazel                               spouse of 146
SMISER
  Ann Katherine (1938 - )             child of 144
  Arabella Perrin (1835 - 1863)       68
  Bertha H.                           child of 71
  Catherine (1811 - )                 spouse of 29
  Catherine (1811 - )                 40
  Celia (Selah?) (1825 - )            child of 13
  Darius (1814 - 1909)                41
  Earl (1880 - )                      child of 73
  Edward Thomas (1871 - 1895)         child of 70
  Elizabeth (1799 - 1871)             child of 21
  Emmet O’neal                        child of 109
  Ephraim B.                          108
  Ernest Perrin (1868 - 1953)         109
  Freddie                             child of 72
  George (1772 - 1856)                spouse of 13
  George (1772 - 1856)                spouse of 21
  George (1809 - 1875)                39
  George Henry (1831 - 1832)          child of 37
  George Perrin (1833 - 1857)         child of 38
  George W. (1833 - )                 child of 39
  Dr. Harmon Todd                     110
  Harmon Todd Jr. (1906 - )           144
  Henry Thomas Allen (1845 - )        72
  Hunt (1871 - )                      child of 73
  James Frazer (1873 - 1938)          child of 70
  James Samuel (1839 - 1925)          70
  James William (1842 - )             child of 41
  John Edwards (1837 - 1865)          69
  John Harmon (1837 - 1902)           73
  John M. (1830 - 1833)               child of 39
  John Milton (1807 - 1894)           38
  Kate S.                             107
  Kathleen                            child of 108
  Lena                                child of 72
  Lillie Lurene (1899 - )             child of 109
  Llewellyn Davis (1860 - 1939)       child of 38
  Louise (1903 - )                    child of 110
  Louise (1874 - 1904)                child of 73
  Louise VanDeren (1939 - )           child of 144
  Mary (1884 - )                      child of 73
  Mary (1831 - )                      child of 39
  Mary Ione (1894 - )                 child of 109
  Mary “Polly” (1820 - 1891)          child of 13
  Milton Berry (1857 - 1902)          child of 38
  Milton Brian (1907 - )              child of 109
  Samuel Merritt (1804 - 1870)        37



                                     Page 119
                                   Register Report

  Son                                  child of 71
  Wesley Taylor (1848 - 1920)          child of 38
  William (1817 - 1894)                child of 13
  William Garrard (1845 - 1931)        71
SMITH
  Alice Lair (1877 - )                 child of 86
  Arabella Edwards (1863 - 1949)       106
  Cyrus M.                             spouse of 68
  Edith (1875 - )                      child of 86
  Elizabeth Pope (1861 - )             105
  Frankie (1886 - )                    child of 86
  Fred Hinde (1870 - 1922)             child of 86
  Julia A. (1856 - )                   104
  Louisa                               spouse of 41
  Luther Lair (1879 - )                child of 86
  Male (1882 - )                       child of 86
  Mary Henry (1881 - )                 child of 86
  Prof. N. Frank (1839 - 1903)         spouse of 86
  N. Frank Jr. (1880 - )               child of 86
  Nancy (1873 - 1934)                  135
  Walker Buckner (1872 - 1896)         child of 86
  William Byers (1859 - )              child of 68
SOWARD
  Garnat                               spouse of 126
SPARKS
  Ella                                 spouse of 54
SPEARS
  Hannah                               spouse of 10
STEVENS
  Hattie                               spouse of 139
TALBOT
  Marie Dudley (1900 - )               child of 118
  Martha Anderson (1900 - )            child of 118
  William Garrard (1909 - )            child of 118
  William Gerrard                      spouse of 118
TAYLOR
  Joe                                  spouse of 58
THOMAS
  Anna E. (1868 - )                    118
  George (1878 - 1880)                 child of 75
  Henry A. (1867 - )                   child of 75
  Jean E. (1903 - )                    child of 119
  Keller (1845 - 1914)                 spouse of 75
  Nancy Clay (1875 - 1939)             120
  T. William (1870 - )                 119
  William Keller (1905 - )             child of 119
TIBBETS
  John Prince                          spouse of 91
  Minnie May (1883 - )                 141
TRUMBO
  Amanda (~1834 - 1852)                spouse of 57
VAN STONE


                                      Page 120
                                Register Report

  Edward                            spouse of 147
  Edward Lair                       child of 147
  Elizabeth Irene                   child of 147
  Garnet Dean                       child of 147
  John Joseph                       child of 147
VARNON
  Maria S.                          spouse of 49
WARD
  A.H.                              spouse of 63
  Burton Maude (1869 - )            99
WARREN
  James H.                          spouse of 107
  Persis                            spouse of 3
  William B.                        child of 107
WEST
  Mary Frances                      spouse of 70
WHALEY
  Katherine “Kate” (1880 - )        spouse of 110
WIGGLESWORTH
  Katherine (1908 - 1980)           spouse of 144
WILLIAMS
  UNNAMED                           spouse of 34
  Jared                             child of 34
  John                              child of 34
  Martha                            child of 34
  Mary                              child of 34
  Nancy (1819 - )                   spouse of 48
WILSON
  Martha ( - 1889)                  spouse of 39
WINSTON
  Sallie                            spouse of 77
WOOD
  Nancy                             spouse of 62
WREN
  Minnie B.                         spouse of 152
WRIGHT
  Frank B. (1876 - 1955)            spouse of 127
  Mary Francis (1906 - )            149
  Mattie A. (1903 - )               148
  Ward                              child of 127
WYATT
  Susan Rebecca (1833 - 1874)       spouse of 61




                                   Page 121

								
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