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					 “Readers’ Theatre: More Than a Class
                           Act!”
          UNI Elementary Literacy Conference

                       April 15, 2011
               Barbara Heitzman, UNI Instructor



“THEATER OF THE MIND”
Readers’ Theatre is an oral interpretive reading using a
script.

Traditional presentations include narrator(s) and
character(s) reading their scripts while standing or sitting.
Music stands may be used to hold the scripts. The goal is
to create the illusion of dramatic action through expressive
use of voice and gestures; making comprehension of the
text meaningful and fun!

CREATIVE DRAMA with READERS’ THEATER
This variation to traditional RT involves narrator and
character voices reading while other participants
pantomime the action. Readers may take more than one
role (multiple casting.) Or, 2 students may share the same
lines speaking together as one voice (double casting.) Set
pieces, props, masks and music or sound effects may be
incorporated. This form has both onstage and offstage
focus.


PUPPETRY and READERS’ THEATER
Many of the elements of Creative Drama are used.
Narrators and character voices read from the script while
other participants utilize puppets to act out the story.
Chorus voices may speak or sing words. Sound effects can
be used. Instead of a script, key words may be read or
improvised with the use of pictures that prompt
participants to tell the story. This form has both onstage
and offstage focus.


All forms of Readers’ Theater provide the following
student outcomes:

   Listening, speaking and reading skills
   Writing skills (if a student adaptation of a story is
    made into a script)
   Cooperation and social skills through ensemble work
   Empathy in role-playing different points of view
   Expression of feelings and ideas
   Self-confidence
          READERS’ THEATER SKILLS


 PROJECTION          speaker’s words can be heard


 PRONUNCIATION       words can be understood



 VOCAL EXPRESSION voice shows characters’
                   feelings, creates a mood,
                   builds up the story’s climax



 READING OF CUES     focused and prepared for
                      speaking, pantomiming, etc.



 TIMING/PACING       reading is not too fast/too slow


 EYE CONTACT         eye contact with the audience
                      and/or fellow readers



 GESTURES            gestures and movements add to
                      characterization/setting/plot
    READERS’ THEATER STAGE DIRECTIONS


FTA………………….    Face the Audience

BTA…………………     Back is to the Audience

RRFTA……………..   Rotate Right and Face the Audience

RLBTA …………….   Rotate Left, turn Back to the Audience

NAR…………………     Narrator

(       ) …… Suggestion for vocal or facial expression;
               gesture, musical sound effects
          SOURCES FOR READERS’ THEATRE SCRIPTS


www.aaronshep.com/RTE.html

http://www.timelessteacherstuff.com/

http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/reading/index:shtml/theatre

http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/playhouse/

http://www.readinga-z.com/guided/theater.html

http://www.literacyconnections.com/ReadersTheater.php



Readers Theatre for Beginning Readers, S.I. Barchers

Readers Theatre Scripted Rhymes and Rhythms, C. Braun, C. & W. Braun

A Readers Theatre Treasury of Stories, C.Braun & W. Braun

Readers Theatre for Young Children,   C. Braun & W. Braun

Presenting Readers’ Theatre, C. Feller-Bauer

Frantic Frogs and Other Frankly Fractured Folktales For Readers Theatre, A.D. Fredericks

Social Studies Readers Theatre for Children, M.K. Laughlin & M. LoBerg

Readers Theatre in the Classroom, L. Walker

Readers Theatre in the Middle School and Junior High Classroom, L. Walker

Stories on Stage: Scripts for Reader’s Theater, A. Shephard
                               Tongue Twisters


Warming up that linguistic intelligence!

    Divide students into small groups and provide a list of tongue
     twisters
    Each group chooses one to practice

    One by one, students go around their group’s circle and say the
     tongue twister
    Repeat but say VERY FAST 3x!
    Repeat again with an exaggerated emotion (examples: sad,
     angry, surprised, scared, confused, happy, etc.)
    Each group practices as one choral voice reading their tongue
     twister with exaggerated emotion 3x
    Groups share their tongue twister with the class

A noisy noise annoys an oyster.

Friendly Frank flips fine flapjacks.

While we were walking, we were watching window washers wash Washington’s
window with warm washing water.

Betty and Bob brought back blue balloons from the big bazaar.

Toy boat. Toy boat. Toy boat.

Fat frogs flying past fast.

Shy Shelly says she shall sew sheets.

The myth of Miss Muffett is moot.

The “sawingest” saw I ever saw was the saw I saw in Arkansas.

				
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