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Sports _ Entertainment Marketing _2005_

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					Sports & Entertainment
       Marketing




     Monmouth Regional High School

        Written - Summer - 2005

        Board Approved – 8/2/05
                                            Forward

Title of Course: Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Department: Applied Technology

Number of Credits:    5

Number of periods the course will meet each week: 5

Number of days the course will meet each year: 180

Grade level the course is offered: 10, 11, and 12

Prerequisites to enrollment: Introduction to Business

Name of person(s) writing the guide: Eileen Cilino

Brief Statement of Content:
Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized course for students with a career interest in
the business/marketing aspects of the sports and/or entertainment industries.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the fundamental principles and concepts
identified with sports and entertainment marketing, and to develop critical thinking and decision-
making skills through the application of marketing principles in these industries. Successful
completion of this course will help students develop a knowledge of the career possibilities in the
sports and entertainment industries, develop a fundamental knowledge of marketing as it relates
to sports and entertainment industries, develop a knowledge of sport and entertainment industries
as they relate to a diverse population and global society, develop the necessary entry level skills
for a career in the sports and entertainment fields and develop the knowledge that is required to
produce an actual sports and/or entertainment event.

It will also provide students the opportunity to develop leadership skills through active
participation in the school’s DECA Chapter.

This course of study addresses the following Core Curriculum Content Standards:
Career Education and Consumer, Family and Life Skills

This course of study addresses the following Technology Literacy Standards:
8.2-3A




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                                TABLE OF CONTENTS


Name                                                           Page #

Foreword                                                       2

Table of Content                                               3

MRHS Philosophy                                                4

MRHS Goals and Objectives                                      5-6

Departments Goals/Philosophy                                   7-10

Core Curriculum Content Standards                              11

Technology Literacy Standards                                  12-21

Needs Assessment                                               22

Subject Goals                                                  23

Student Proficiencies                                          24-25

Scope and Sequence                                             26-27

Student Evaluation                                             28-31

Course Activities                                              32-44

Resources/Community Resources/References                       45

Appendix                                                       46
      New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for
      Career Education and Consumer, Family, and Life Skills




                                                                        3
                                       MRHS Philosophy
   Monmouth Regional is a comprehensive high school serving the districts of Eatontown,
Shrewsbury Township and Tinton Falls. The military and naval facilities of Fort Monmouth and
Earle contribute to the creation of a student body which is highly mobile and culturally diverse.
We honor this diversity and believe it to be among our intrinsic strengths.

   We are committed to the premise that all students have the right to be taught without partiality
and with teaching strategies suited to their individual needs. To that end, we provide a
curriculum of required and elective courses, including vocational and life skills designed to
encourage problem solving, critical thinking, and intellectual inquiry. We encourage and support
professional growth as integral to this curricular success. We will use current technology in our
teaching to prepare students to be technologically literate in society, the workplace, and future
academia and we will strive to continually keep pace with emerging developments. Careful
guidance of course and career planning and interdisciplinary cooperation are essential to the
success of this learning process.

    Monmouth Regional High School believes that an extensive co-curricular program
is equally essential to the social, physical, and emotional development of all
students. In an effort to foster school spirit, promote interpersonal relationships,
and challenge students to participate in varied activities, we encourage and support
a co-curricular program which reflects student interests.

   We recognize the necessity of assisting students to value the importance of honesty, ethics,
and integrity in their daily lives, to develop civic responsibility and to respect others, oneself, and
the environment. We model as well as teach across the curricula the responsibilities and
obligations of citizens in a participatory democracy. We recognize our responsibilities not only
to our local, state, and national communities, but also to the global community.

   Monmouth Regional High School will provide a safe and nurturing environment in which
students and staff can thrive and where positive peer relationships are promoted. It is our
obligation to provide the school community with clearly defined rules and regulations and to
enforce them with consistency and equity. We believe that parents and school share a mutual
obligation to communicate regarding student progress, behavior and school policies.

   The vision of Monmouth Regional is to recognize the worth and dignity of each individual
and to provide a quality education to ensure that all students acquire the requisite skills to
function successfully as contributing members of a global society.




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                  MRHS GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
I. To provide students with a program and staff that meet their diverse needs by:
               A. providing a wide variety of courses;
               B. structuring the curricula to accommodate individual
          differences;
               C. providing a professional staff with the background and
          experience to use teaching methods and strategies
   appropriate to various learning styles;
               D. encouraging staff participation in a variety of professional
          programs both within the school and by attending outside
   educational activities;
               E. making available counseling services;
               F. fostering use of community resources.

II. To equip students with literacy and skills to function in a rapidly changing
technological society by:
                A. incorporating problem-solving skills, the ability to think
           critically and perform critical analysis;
                B. developing the confidence to use and apply newly
           emerging technologies effectively;
                C. developing the ability to communicate effectively;
                D. promoting an awareness and appreciation of our
           environment and the necessity for ecological management;
                E. developing the ability to use life skills effectively.

III. To assist students in course and career planning by:
                 A. encouraging communication among parents, students,
            teachers and counselors;
                 B. offering the opportunity to develop a proposed four-year plan of
            studies;
                 C. assisting them in developing career goals;
                 D. ensuring that they are aware of the opportunities for
            post-graduate studies;
                 E. maintaining an effective Guidance Department for all students.

IV. To provide students with the opportunity to develop leisure time activities and
    new interests by:
               A. offering a wide variety of co-curricular activities;
               B. sponsoring student centered assemblies and programs;
               C. encouraging students to appreciate the importance of
           recreational activities;
               D. encouraging positive interpersonal relationships.




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V. To help students understand democratic principles by:
              A. demonstrating the importance of the worth and dignity
          of each person;
              B. encouraging students to understand ethical and moral principles
                 and their value in democratic society;
              C. emphasizing the necessity for individual responsibility;
              D. encouraging participation in the making and administering of
                 school policies.

VI. To provide students with an environment conducive to learning by:
              A. maintaining a clean, attractive and functioning physical plant;
              B. encouraging extensive use of the Media Center;
              C. fostering relationships between administration, teachers and
                  support staff based on mutual trust, respect and open communications;
              D. ensuring a safe educational atmosphere with clearly stated
                  policies which are equitably and consistently enforced;
              E. promoting school spirit;
              F. providing the opportunity for creativity.

VII. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Monmouth Regional High School
     program pertaining to these goals and objectives by establishing evaluative
     procedures that include:
             A. follow-up studies of graduates;
             B. internal evaluation;
             C. utilization of other educational research.




                                                                                          6
                                  APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

                             DEPARTMENT PHILOSOPHY


   The Applied Technology Department believes a diversified program of study must be
offered to meet the needs of students at Monmouth Regional High School. Such a program
includes curriculum encompassing courses in general education, pre-vocational and vocational
areas of study.

   We recognize that all students need guidance to help them realize their place in society. To
accomplish this, we believe that all students must be exposed to the world of work through
exploratory types of programs, including art and career/occupationally oriented programs.
These programs aid students in understanding social work values.

   We further believe if young men and women are to succeed in obtaining positions in
society, they must have knowledge, fundamental skills and practical experience necessary for
procuring positions in their chosen field as well as continuing their education at the post high
school level.




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                                  APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

I. GENERAL GOALS
A - To foster the elimination of sex role stereotypes by encouraging all students to
    participate in Art, Home Economics and Industrial Education programs.

B - To maintain a high quality teaching staff.

C - To prepare students to function in a rapidly changing society by acquiring basic skills
    in obtaining information, solving problems and communicating effectively.

D - To acquire the capacities for assuming satisfying and responsible roles in family life.

E - To help students acquire knowledge necessary for post high school education.

F - To acquire the knowledge, skills and understanding that permit students to assume a
    satisfying and responsible role as both producer and consumer.

G - To provide safe and adequate classroom/laboratory facilities as recommended by the
    State Department of Education.

H - To provide sequential programs of an advanced nature to meet the needs of a diverse
    group of students.

I - To provide programs of Independent Study to meet individual needs of students.

J - To develop an awareness of career clusters.

K - To explore avenues of career options through a variety of activities including field trips, guest
    speakers, and the study of careers.

L - To coordinate guidance and counseling services to obtain maximum benefits for all
    students.

M - To provide leadership opportunities through co-curricular activities.

N - To update courses, when deemed necessary, through student evaluation and follow-up
    studies.


II. INDUSTRIAL ARTS GOALS

A - To provide programs which are exploratory in nature and helpful in aiding Vocational
    and college decisions.

B - To provide sequential programs of an advanced nature for students who are not college
    bound and who will either seek employment or go to a vocational or technical school
    upon graduation.



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C - To provide problem solving, experimental and laboratory work which will offer a
    challenge for the vocational and college bound student.

D - To provide specific pre-vocational programs designed to give students knowledge and
    skills to continue their preparation for careers.

E - To interpret our technological society through a variety of activities including
    field trips, guest speakers and the study of related careers.

F - To provide courses giving students the opportunity to become involved in a 2 +
    2 Program with Brookdale Community College.

III. HOME ECONOMICS GOALS

A - To provide programs which will help students meet the responsibilities of the
    home and family in society.

B - To provide programs which prepare students for employment in wage earning
    occupations involving knowledge and skills in home economics and related
    occupations, as well as leadership roles in the community.

C - To provide problem solving, experimental and laboratory work which will offer
    a challenge for college bound and vocational students.

D - To provide programs of on-the-job training, involving local businesses and
    institutions.

E - To acquire the understanding of ethical principles and values, and the ability to
    apply them to one's life.

F - To provide sequential learning experiences for vocational, technical, college
    bound and terminal students.

G - To provide programs which prepare students for college level work in Home
    Economics and other related career fields.

IV. ART GOALS

A - To emphasize problem solving on an individual basis by encouraging students
    towards originality and personal expression.

B - To develop the ability to communicate artistically.

C - To establish a historical reference using the visual art as a basis.

D - To utilize an established system of critical thinking and evaluation.



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E - To have a wide range of media and art production experiences designed to put
    the student's creative concepts into reality.

F - To foster a greater appreciation and awareness of beauty in different cultures
    and peoples.


V. VOCATIONAL GOALS

A - To provide programs of basic skill and attitude development which will lead to
    satisfactory entry level employment or further skill development in advanced post high
    school programs.

B - To provide a program of on-the-job training involving local industries, for
    students seeking occupational skills not available in the school district.

C - To provide opportunities for students to participate in leadership activities
    through their active involvement in state recognized Vocational Student Organizations.




                                                                                             10
                        Core Curriculum Content Standards


This course satisfies New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Career Education and
Consumer, Family, and Life Skills. Please see Appendix for explanation and list of these
standards.




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New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
for
Technological Literacy

                                     INTRODUCTION

The Vision

Technology, any modification of the natural world designed by human beings to solve human
problems, enhance human life, or extend human capability, was identified by the United States
Department of Labor as an essential workplace competency in a 1992 report called the
Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS). SCANS stated that students
should be able to select equipment and tools, apply technology to specific tasks, and maintain
and troubleshoot equipment. The Department of Education recognized its importance by
including technology in the original cross-content workplace readiness standards. In keeping
with today’s technological society, technological literacy has been further emphasized by its
inclusion as a separate standards area which focuses on both computer and information literacy
and technology education.

Technology is evolving at an amazing rate, with both frequent advancements of existing
technology and the creation of new technologies. All students must understand and be
comfortable with the concepts and application of technology, not only in order to function in
today’s complex society, but also to become informed and productive adults of tomorrow.

Computer and Information Literacy

Computer and information literacy, which supports skills in information-gathering, information-
organizing, and problem solving, has become critical for every student whether college- or
workplace-bound. Colleges and employers are now demanding that students and employees
possess a broad range of computer and information literacy proficiencies. More and more retail
purchasing is being done on-line every year, and all but the most menial of positions now require
a significant understanding of computer and information literacy. To ensure that students are
computer literate, a separate standard that defines rigorous, in-depth learning has been included.
The computer and information literacy standard is designed to be integrated and applied in all of
the content areas of the Core Curriculum Content Standards.

Technology Education

The technology education standard was developed to ensure the literacy needed by all students to
succeed in a highly technological world. Business and industry has clearly stated the need for
technological skills in the workplace of the 21st Century.

This standard is based on the Standards for Technological Literacy (STL): Content for the Study
of Technology (ITEA, 2000), developed as part of the National Science Foundation
(NSF)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funded by the Technology for
All Americans (TfAA) project.


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A study by DeKlerk has found that students form negative attitudes about the technological
world if there are no formal technological experiences during the early school years. This finding
is a great concern to New Jersey business and industry. Other cognitive research suggests that
"design-based learning" is important. Early studies with design and technology curriculum
indicate that students who learn important technological concepts develop positive attitudes
about technology, math, science and learning in general. For these reasons, an introduction to
technology education, including engineering and technological design, is an essential component
of a thorough and efficient K-12 education.

Standards and Strands

There are two technological literacy standards, each of which has a number of lettered strands.
The standards and strands include:

8.1 Computer and Information Literacy

A. Basic Computer Tools and Skills

       Keyboarding
       Word processing
       Internet usage
       Spreadsheets
       Database concepts and usage
       Publications and presentations

B. Application of Productivity Tools

       Social Aspects
       Information Access and Research
       Problem Solving

8.2 Technology Education

A. Nature and Impact of Technology

B. Design Process and Impact Assessment

C. Systems in the Designed World

References

American Library Association and Association for Educational Communications and
Technology. (1998), Information literacy standards for student learning. Online:
http://www.ala.org/aaslTemplate.cfm?Section=Information_Power&Template=/
ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=19937.




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Arizona Department of Education. (2000). Technology education standards. Online:
http://ade.state.az.us/standards/technology.

International Society for Technology in Education. (1998). National educational technology
standards for students. Eugene, OR: Author.

International Society for Technology in Education. (2000). Standards for technological literacy
(STL): Content for the Study of Technology. Online: www.iteawww.org.

National Business Education Association. (2001). National standards for business education.
Online: http://www.nbea.org/curriculum/bes.html.

STANDARD 8.1 (COMPUTER AND INFORMATION LITERACY ) ALL STUDENTS
WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE
INFORMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.

Descriptive Statement: Using computer applications and technology tools students will conduct
research, solve problems, improve learning, achieve goals, and produce products and
presentations in conjunction with standards in all content areas, including career education and
consumer family, and life skills. They will also develop, locate, summarize, organize, synthesize,
and evaluate information for lifelong learning.

                         Strands and Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students will:

A. Basic Computer Skills and Tools

1. Use basic technology vocabulary.

2. Use basic features of an operating system (e.g., accessing programs, identifying and selecting
a printer, finding help).

3. Input and access text and data, using appropriate keyboarding techniques or other input
devices.

4. Produce a simple finished document using word processing software.

5. Produce and interpret a simple graph or chart by entering and editing data on a prepared
spreadsheet template.

6. Create and present a multimedia presentation using appropriate software.

7. Create and maintain files and folders.

8. Use a graphic organizer.


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9. Use basic computer icons.

B. Application of Productivity Tools

Social Aspects

1. Discuss the common uses of computer applications and identify their advantages and
disadvantages.

2. Recognize and practice responsible social and ethical behaviors when using technology, and
understand the consequences of inappropriate use including:

       Internet access
       Copyrighted materials
       On-line library resources
       Personal security and safety issues

3. Practice appropriate Internet etiquette.

4. Recognize the ethical and legal implications of plagiarism of copyrighted materials.

Information Access and Research

5. Recognize the need for accessing and using information.

6. Identify and use web browsers, search engines, and directories to obtain information to solve
real world problems.

7. Locate specific information by searching a database.

8. Recognize accuracy and/or bias of information.

Problem Solving and Decision Making

9. Solve problems individually and/or collaboratively using computer applications.

10. Identify basic hardware problems and solve simple problems.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8,
students will:

A. Basic Computer Skills and Tools

1. Use appropriate technology vocabulary.

2. Use common features of an operating system (e.g., creating and organizing files and folders).


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3. Demonstrate effective input of text and data, using touch keyboarding with proper technique.

4. Input and access data and text efficiently and accurately through proficient use of other input
devices, such as the mouse.

5. Create documents with advanced text-formatting and graphics using word processing.

6. Create a file containing customized information by merging documents.

7. Construct a simple spreadsheet, enter data, and interpret the information.

8. Design and produce a basic multimedia project.

9. Plan and create a simple database, define fields, input data, and produce a report using sort and
query.

10. Use network resources for storing and retrieving data.

11. Choose appropriate electronic graphic organizers to create, construct, or design a document.

12. Create, organize and manipulate shortcuts.

B. Application of Productivity Tools

Social Aspects

1. Demonstrate an understanding of how changes in technology impact the workplace and
society.

2. Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss
consequences of misuse.

3. Explain the purpose of an Acceptable Use Policy and the consequences of inappropriate use of
technology.

4. Describe and practice safe Internet usage.

5. Describe and practice "etiquette" when using the Internet and electronic mail.

Information Access and Research

6. Choose appropriate tools and information resources to support research and solve real world
problems, including but not limited to:

       On-line resources and databases
       Search engines and subject directories


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7. Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness of print and non-print electronic
information sources.

Problem Solving and Decision Making

8. Use computer applications to modify information independently and/or collaboratively to
solve problems.

9. Identify basic hardware problems and demonstrate the ability to solve common problems.

10. Determine when technology tools are appropriate to solve a problem and make a decision.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12,
students will:

A. Basic Computer Skills and Tools

1. Create a multi-page document with citations using word processing software in conjunction
with other tools that demonstrates the ability to format, edit, and print.

2. Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format.

3. Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and
process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results.

4. Given a database, define fields, input data from multiple records, produce a report using sort
and query, and interpret the data.

5. Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound.

6. Produce and edit page layouts in different formats using desktop publishing and graphics
software.

7. Develop a document or file for inclusion into a website or web page.

8. Discuss and/or demonstrate the capability of emerging technologies and software in the
creation of documents or files.

9. Merge information from one document to another.

B. Application of Productivity Tools

Social Aspects

1. Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications
for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs.


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2. Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss
consequences of misuse.

3. Make informed choices among technology systems, resources, and services in a variety of
contexts.

4. Use appropriate language when communicating with diverse audiences using computer and
information literacy.

Information Access and Research

5. Select and use specialized databases for advanced research to solve real world problems.

6. Identify new technologies and other organizational tools to use in personal, home, and/or work
environments for information retrieval, entry, and presentation.

7. Evaluate information sources for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

8. Compose, send, and organize e-mail messages with and without attachments.

Problem-Solving and Decision Making

9. Create and manipulate information, independently and/or collaboratively, to solve problems
and design and develop products.

10. Identify, diagnose, and suggest solutions for non-functioning technology systems.

11. Identify a problem in a content area and formulate a strategy to solve the problem using
brainstorming, flowcharting, and appropriate resources.

12. Integrate new information into an existing knowledge base and communicate the results in a
project or presentation.

STANDARD 8.2 (TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP
AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE AND IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY,
ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGICAL DESIGN, AND THE DESIGNED WORLD AS
THEY RELATE TO THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT.

Descriptive Statement: The following indicators are based on the Standards for Technological
Literacy (STL, 2000) and support the National Academy of Engineering’s (2002) call for
students to gain technological literacy. Students will be expected to understand the various facets
of technology and the design process. They will analyze and evaluate design options and then
apply the design process to solve problems. A systems perspective is employed to emphasize the
interconnectedness of all knowledge and the impact of technology and technological change.
Students will be expected to use technology as it applies to physical systems, biological systems,
and information and communication systems. The intent at the elementary and middle school


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levels is that all students develop technological literacy and are prepared for the option of further
study in the field of technology education. At the elementary level, the foundation for technology
education is found in the science standards, particularly standards 5.2 and 5.4.

                         Strands and Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students will:

A. Nature and Impact of Technology

Refer to Science Standards 5.2 and 5.4.

B. Design Process and Impact Assessment

Refer to Science Standards 5.2 and 5.4.

C. Systems in the Designed World

Refer to Science Standards 5.2 and 5.4.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8,
students will:

A. Nature and Impact of Technology

1. Describe the nature of technology and the consequences of technological activity.

2. Describe how components of a technological product, system, or environment interact.

3. Describe how one technological innovation can be applied to solve another human problem
that enhances human life or extends human capability.

4. Describe how technological activity has an affect on economic development, political actions,
and cultural change.

5. Explain the cultural and societal effects resulting from the dramatic increases of knowledge
and information available today.

B. Design Process and Impact Assessment

1. Demonstrate and explain how the design process is not linear.

2. Use hands on activities to analyze products and systems to determine how the design process
was applied to create the solution.

3. Identify a technological problem and use the design process to create an appropriate solution.


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4. Describe how variations in resources can affect solutions to a technological problem.

5. Select and safely use appropriate tools and materials in analyzing, designing, modeling or
making a technological product, system or environment.

C. Systems in the Designed World

1. Explain technological advances in medical, agricultural, energy and power, information and
communication, transportation, manufacturing, and construction technologies.

2. Explain reasons why human-designed systems, products, and environments need to be
monitored, maintained, and improved to ensure safety, quality, cost efficiency, and
sustainability.

3. Explain the functions and interdependence of subsystems such as waste disposal, water
purification, electrical, structural, safety, climatic control, and communication.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12,
students electing courses in technology education will:

A. Nature and Impact of Technology

1. Use appropriate data to discuss the full costs, benefits and trade-offs, and risks related to the
use of technologies.

2. Explain how technological development is affected by competition through a variety of
management activities associated with planning, organizing, and controlling the enterprise.

3. Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history.

B. Design Process and Impact Assessment

1. Analyze a given technological product, system, or environment to understand how the
engineering design process and design specification limitations influenced the final solution.

2. Evaluate the function, value, and appearance of technological products, systems, and
environments from the perspective of the user and the producer.

3. Develop methods for creating possible solutions, modeling and testing solutions, and
modifying proposed design in the solution of a technological problem using hands-on activities.

4. Use a computer assisted design (CAD) system in the development of an appropriate design
solution.

5. Diagnose a malfunctioning product and system using appropriate critical thinking methods.



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6. Create a technological product, system, or environment using given design specifications and
constraints by applying design and engineering principles.

C. Systems in the Designed World

1. Explain the life cycle of a product from initial design to reuse, recycling, remanufacture, or
final disposal, and its relationship to people, society, and the environment, including
conservation and sustainability principles.

2. Analyze the factors that influence design of products, systems, and environments.

3. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various products, systems, and environments
associated with technological activities in energy, transportation, manufacturing, and information
and communication.




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                                      Needs Assessment
       The Sports and Entertainment Industry has grown to become a major impact on our
National and Global Economy. According to the Institute of Sports Advancement, professional
and amateur athletics is a $250 billion industry in the United States.

        In today’s environment, sports and entertainment generates its revenue from the sale of
broadcast rights, licensing rights for merchandise and numerous promotional opportunities, and
Corporate America purchases billions of dollars of sports-related products annually to promote
their business.

       Sports’ marketing, consequently, has become a mainstream portion of major corporate
marketing programs. The boom in sports channels and programs on cable television, and
Corporate America’s realization that sports sponsorship, advertisements, and team ownership can
be very profitable, necessitates the need for this curriculum in our current educational structure.

       Today, over 200 colleges and universities nationwide offer undergraduate degrees or
courses in sports marketing and/or management. The growing number of programs, many sports
industry executives say, is as much a response to student demand as a way to capitalize on the
growth of the sports industry over the last ten years.

       This course will give students the opportunity to gain firsthand knowledge of how the
industry operates, with practical and related in-school instruction to advance their career choice
path.




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                                       Subject Goals
Subject Goal
#1 Identify the foundations and functions of Marketing.
     Career Education and Consumer, Family, and Life Skills (CE/CFLS) 9.1B3, 4,5 & 9.2E8

#2    Explain the organization and goals of DECA.
      (CE/CFLS) 9.1B3,5 & 9.2C2, NJAC 6A:19
#3    Understand the nature and scope of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and be able to
      explain its role in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

#4    Discuss the social and economic impact of college athletics and amateur sports.
      (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

#5     Demonstrate an understanding of the economic value of professional sports, the ethics of
      acquiring a team, how pro teams as a product are distributed to specific marketing areas,
      the role of agents and managers, and the relationship of ethics to sports.
      (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

#6    Identify how sports are used to market products through sponsorship, promotion, and
      endorsements. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

#7    Explain the importance of marketing athletics through public relations, public speaking,
      book publishing, and fan clubs. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

#8    Identify ways of associating athletes with special events through charities, foundations,
      tournaments, camps, and seminars. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

#9    Define the role of marketing firms, explain sports marketing opportunities in a global
      economy, and identify careers in sports marketing. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4

#10 Understand the nature and scope of the Entertainment industry and be able to explain its
    role in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4

#11 Identify ways of marketing Entertainment to specific target markets.
    (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

#12 Understand the nature and scope of Recreation Marketing and be able to explain its role
    in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4 &Technology Literacy (TL) 8.2A3

#13    Identify steps in planning for advertising and marketing the Sports and Entertainment
      industries. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

#14   Discuss the importance of laws governing Sports and Entertainment contract
      negotiations with players and licensed merchandise. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3


                                                                                                  23
                                  Student Proficiencies

1A   Define marketing.
1B   Identify the nine functions of marketing.
1C   Identify the components of the marketing mix.
1D   Explain basic marketing concepts.
1E   Analyze marketing and it’s relation to the sports & entertainment industry.

2A   Use NJ DECA handbook and National DECA Guide for recruitment and competitive
     events preparation.

3A   Define sports marketing and target markets, as well as identify sports marketing
     strategies.
3B   Discuss entertainment marketing, technological changes, and television as a
     marketing medium.
3C   Explain the marketing mix for recreation, travel, and tourism.

4A   Define market segmentation in amateur and college sports and growth of new markets
     such as women’s sports.
4B   Discuss the economic impact of collegiate athletics, conference realignment, and revenue
     from licensing agreements with colleges.
4C   Identify how increasing popularity has provided more opportunities for marketing and
     sponsorship of amateur sports.

5A   Discuss the financial benefits of a professional team and the perks associated with
     professional sports.
5B   Describe the processes of acquiring and financing a pro team.
5C   Explain the role of sports agents and the impact of ethical behavior on an athlete’s
     promotional value.

6A   Identify the enormous market for sports due to emotional ties and the increasing
     popularity of women’s sports.
6B   Define the investment dollars involved with sponsorship and explain prohibited
     sponsorship.
6C   Discuss the objectives and tools for promotion in sports.
6D   Define endorsements, restrictions on endorsements, and qualifications for endorsers.

7A   Discuss the importance of positive public relations for sports, the role of public relations
     firms, and the public perceptions created by athletes.
7B   List the advantages of fan clubs for fans and athletes, discuss the importance of
     marketing research, and describe successful sports licensees and sponsors.
7C   Explain how a sports figure can be successful on the lecture circuit, and describe the steps
     for creating popular sports books.
8A   Describe the importance of charities and tournaments to the successful images of athletes
     and teams, as well as explain why athletes become involved with or create their own
     foundations.


                                                                                              24
8B    Explain why sports celebrity camps have become increasingly popular, and define the
      importance of corporate and business contacts in the area where a sports camp will be
      held.
8C    Define the relationship between sponsorship and interest in one-day seminars, and
      evaluate three methods of advertising for workshops.

9A    Explain the role of a sports marketing firm.
9B    Describe how sports marketing has increased the awareness and popularity of
      international sports and explain some challenges in marketing the Olympics and women’s
      sports.
9C    Identify and describe numerous sports marketing careers, as well as the skills and
      personal characteristics necessary for each career.

10A   Explain the basics of financing entertainment.
10B   Explore distribution and promotion in the entertainment business.
10C   Discuss the promotion of music and theater and the distribution of music.
10D   Describe promotion of entertainment through awards and the distribution of
      entertainment.
10E   Explain the preparation needed for careers in entertainment marketing.

11A   Explain the importance of customer profiles when creating specialized entertainment
      products for specific groups.
11B   Describe the collection and analysis of audience data.
11C   Discuss the worldwide distribution of entertainment.

12A   Describe how the changing demographics of the U.S. call for a change in recreation
      marketing strategies.
12B   Discuss how technology is changing the operation of the travel industry.
12C   Describe the major role that recreational destinations have in travel marketing.
12D   Discuss the changes in recreation marketing as a career field.

13A   Identify and explain the steps in the advertising process.
13B   Explain how marketing research helps connect people to marketing.
13C   Discuss how planning gives direction to marketing.
13D   Explain how sports and entertainment marketing is a business with profit as a motive.

14A   Discuss risk, copyright laws, and basic contracts.
14B   Explain the impact of strikes and labor laws on sports and entertainment.
14C   Describe licensing as a critical piece of marketing sports and entertainment.




                                                                                              25
                         Scope and Sequence
SUBJECT   PROF.                                                     # of
 GOAL       #                                                      DAYS
   #1             Foundations and Functions of Marketing             14
           1A     Define Marketing
           1B     Functions of Marketing
           1C     Marketing Mix
           1D     Marketing Concepts
           1E     Marketing for Sports and Entertainment.

  #2              DECA Orientation                                   2
           2A     Use of NJ DECA Handbook/DECA Guide

  #3              Sports and Entertainment Marketing                12
           3A     Identify Sports Marketing
           3B     Identify Entertainment Marketing
           3C     Identify Recreation Marketing

  #4              College and Amateur Sports                        12
           4A     Marketing College Athletics
           4B     Economic Impact of College Athletics
           4C     Amateur Sports

  #5              Professional Sports                               12
           5A     Big League Sports
           5B     Attracting a Professional Team
           5C     Agents, Managers, and Ethics

  #6              Marketing Products and Services Through Sports    16
           6A     Using Sports to Market Products
           6B     Sponsorships
           6C     Promotion
           6D     Endorsements

  #7              Public Images                                     12
           7A     Public Relations
           7B     Fans
           7C     Publishing and Speaking Engagements




                                                                           26
#8          Advancing the Cause                         12
      8A    Community Service
      8B    Sports Camps
      8C    Workshops

#9          Sports Marketing                            12
      9A    Marketing Firms
      9B    The Global Market
      9C    Careers in Sports Marketing

#10         Entertainment Industry                      20
      10A   Entertainment Profits
      10B   Distribution of Entertainment
      10C   Marketing and Music Theater
      10D   Awards and Annual Events
      10E   Entertainment Marketing Careers

#11         Marketing Entertainment                     12
      11A   Customized Entertainment
      11B   Entertainment Technology and Marketing
      11C   Work Entertainment Marketing

#12         Recreation Marketing                        16
      12A   Recreational Sports
      12B   Travel and Tourism
      12C   Resorts and Theme Parks
      12D   Recreational Marketing Careers

#13         Marketing Plans                             16
      13A   Advertising
      13B   Marketing Research
      13C   Develop a Marketing Plan
      13D   The Bottom Line

#14         Legal Issues for Sports and Entertainment   12
      14A   Laws and Contracts
      14B   Unions
      14C   Licensing




                                                             27
                                     Student Evaluation

                      Monmouth Regional Honor Code
        All the members of the Monmouth Regional community are expected to act with integrity
and self-respect. Cheating, plagiarism, and any act of dishonesty violate these expectations. If
violations occur, the teacher and department supervisor will research the situation. After they
have both completed their investigation, the infraction of the Monmouth Regional Honor Code,
regardless of the level of severity, must be reported to the student’s parents, guidance counselor,
and case manager. Appropriate disciplinary measures will be taken. In addition, it is the
teacher’s responsibility to provide written documentation of the violation to the Honor Code
Committee via the principal’s office in a timely manner.

The Honor Code Committee

The Honor Code Committee will include the Principal, Guidance Director, and faculty
representatives from Mathematics/Science, Humanities, and Applied Technology/PE/Health. No
member, excluding the Principal and Guidance Director, can serve two consecutive terms on the
committee. In September, the Principal will appoint members to the Honor Code Committee.

                                          Cheating
According to The New Lexicon Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, to cheat is to
trick or deceive; to use unfair methods; to practice fraud. Cheating includes but is not limited to:
        1. Obtaining test or quiz materials prior to assessment without the instructor’s
            knowledge.
        2. Using inappropriately graphing calculators, programmable watches, palm pilots, cell
            phones and other computer or electronic devices.
        3. “Sharing” student work that should be individually/independently produced.
        4. Using crib notes during test situations.
        5. Substituting another source, such as Spark Notes study guides, in place of completing
            an assignment.
        6. Discussing information about a quiz or test with students who have not completed the
            assessment.




                                                                                                 28
                                         Plagiarism
According to The New Lexicon Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, to plagiarize is
to use or pass off someone else’s ideas, inventions, writings, etc. as one’s own.

If a student has any concerns or questions about how to cite material for a particular
assignment, the student has the responsibility to consult his/her teacher.

Plagiarism is cheating. It is academically dishonest as well as an ethical offense. It violates the
school’s philosophy and expectations for students, and will not be tolerated.

Levels of Plagiarism
A level 1 occurrence would involve the student’s use of phrases or a few lines of text or a
paragraph without proper citation. Most of the student’s work is his or her own. Consequences
may include allowing the student to redo all or part of the work. Teachers will use their
discretion to give full or a diminished grade for the assignment, providing this would give
him/her a beneficial experience. Teachers will notify the parent/guardian to inform them of this
“learning experience.”

A level 2 occurrence is more serious. It involves the student’s use of multiple paragraphs of
someone else’s work, and/or the use of someone else’s ideas without the proper attribution,
and/or repeated paraphrasing without proper attribution. While some of the work is the student’s
own, it has been determined/verified that significant portions of the student’s work are not his or
her own.

Level 3 occurrence involves most, if not all, work that has been copied from another source.
Examples may include but are not limited to, papers taken/purchased from the internet or
submission of a paper written by someone other than the student claiming it as their own work.

Level 4 plagiarism occurs when the student has plagiarized, in any way, for the second time.

Consequences for Level 2, Level 3, and Level 4 Plagiarism may include, but not limited to:

       1. A grade reduction on the assignment in question.
       2. A grade of zero for the assignment in question with no opportunity to make up that
          work in any way, including extra credit work.
       3. If the severity of the situation merits it, the Honor Code Committee will determine
          whether or not the student shall be given a failing grade for the quarter in the course
          which the infraction occurred.
       4. If the Honor Code Committee determines that the situation is severe, the National
          Honor Society advisor will be notified.
       5. For any subsequent occurrence at Monmouth Regional, the student, at the discretion
          of the Honor Code Committee, may be dropped from the course and receive a failing
          grade. Students dropped from any course are not eligible to enroll in a summer
          school program for that course.


                                                                                                  29
Teacher Procedures
The teacher, in consultation with the department supervisor, must determine whether the
violation was not intentional or intentional on the part of the student.

If it was decided by the teacher and supervisor that the violation was not intentional, and can be
treated as a “teachable moment” then:
        1. The teacher will notify the parent/guardian.
        2. The teacher will determine what consequence(s) seem(s) appropriate and
            educationally sound. The consequences may include: allowing the student to redo all
            or part of the work: if doing this would give him/her a beneficial experience and
            either give a full grade for the assignment or a diminished grade for the assignment.
            If uncertain of appropriate consequences, the teacher and supervisor should consult
            with the Honor Code Committee.
        3. Notify the Honor Code Committee by submitting the Honor Code Violation Form to
            the Principal’s office. This is for record keeping purposes only. The Honor Code
            Committee will keep track of student infractions across the curriculum.

If the violation seems intentional, then the teacher must, after consulting with the supervisor,
refer the case, in writing, to the Honor Code Committee. Honor Code Violation forms can be
found in each department office. The Honor Code Committee will speak with the teacher and
student, conduct an investigation, and determine the appropriate consequence. Consequences
may include but are not limited to:
        1. A grade reduction on the assignment in question.
        2. A grade of zero for the assignment in question with no opportunity to make up that
            work in any way, including extra credit work.
        3. If the severity of the situation merits it, the Honor Code Committee will determine
            whether or not the student shall be given a failing grade for the quarter in the course
            which the infraction occurred.
        4. If the severity of the situation merits it, The National Honor Society advisor shall be
            notified for possible action.
        5. For any subsequent occurrence in the same course during the same school year at
            Monmouth Regional, the student, at the discretion of the Honor Code Committee,
            may be dropped from the course and receive a failing grade. Students dropped from
            any course are not eligible to enroll in a summer school program for that course.




                                                                                                  30
Works-cited and referenced:

http://shs.westport.k12.ct.us
http://www.tcnj.edu
http://northport.k12.ny.us
http://auburn.org
http://www.sfja.org
http://www.libpurdue
http://www.regent.edu
Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language: Lexicon Publications, 1991 ed.



Evaluations:
The students’ grade will be determined by the following methods with a minimum
average of 70%.

Evaluation #1:       Teacher/text generated quizzes.

Evaluation #2:       Teacher/text generated tests at the end of each major topic.

Evaluation #3:       Homework and assigned projects.

Evaluation #4:       Classroom Participation.

Evaluation #5:       Completion of final examination.




                                                                                    31
                                    Course Activities

SUBJECT GOAL:
 #1 Identify the foundations and functions of Marketing.
    Career Education and Consumer, Family, and Life Skills (CE/CFLS) 9.1B3, 4,5 & 9.2E8

      Proficiency #1A:      Define marketing.
             Activity #1:   Distribute and discuss graphic illustration of “Marketing Wheel”.
             Activity #2:   Students will read independently Marketing Essentials Chapter 1.

      Proficiency #1B:      Identify the nine functions of marketing.
             Activity #1:   PowerPoint presentation on the nine functions of marketing.

      Proficiency #1C:      Identify the components of the marketing mix.
             Activity #1:   Complete MarkED Learning Activity Packet (LAP) “What is
                            Marketing”.
             Activity #2:   Show video “Marketing Product Strategy”, with questions.
             Activity #3:   Classroom discussion of marketing mix.

      Proficiency #1D:      Explain basic marketing concepts.
             Activity #1:   Show video “Marketing Concepts”, with questions.
             Activity #2:   Students will read independently Marketing Essentials Chapter 2.

      Proficiency #1E:      Analyze marketing and it’s relation to the sports &
                            entertainment industry.
             Activity #1:   Students will decorate a cube, each side representing one of the “4
                            P’s of Marketing” for a sports or entertainment event.
             Activity #2:   Class discussion on market segmentation and demographics
                            relative to sports.
             Activity #3:   Review and chapter test.




SUBJECT GOAL:
 #2 Explain the organization and goals of DECA.
    (CE/CFLS) 9.1B3,5 & 9.2C2, NJAC 6A:19

      Proficiency #2A:      Use NJ DECA handbook and National DECA Guide for
                            recruitment and competitive events preparation.
             Activity #1:   Discuss “What is DECA?” with class, using chapter officers when
                            available.
             Activity #2:   Show National DECA Membership Video.
             Activity #3:   Students will select and prepare for competitive events categories.



                                                                                             32
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #3 Understand the nature and scope of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and be able to
    explain its role in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #3A:      Define sports marketing and target markets, as well as identify
                             sports marketing strategies.
              Activity #1:   Students will complete Opening Act, pg. 9
              Activity #2:   Students will independently read Chapter 1, lessons 1.2-1.4.
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss definition of sports
                             marketing, definition of target markets and their importance, and
                             identify/discuss different marketing strategies.

       Proficiency #3B       Discuss entertainment marketing, technological changes, and
                             television as a marketing medium.
              Activity #1:   Students will complete Opening Act, pg. 14.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss why marketing must relate
                             to the specific audience, relationship between advances in
                             entertainment technology to changes in distribution, the power of
                             television and the Internet as marketing tools, and customer
                             feedback.
              Activity #3:   Students will complete Judgment Call, pg. 15.

      Proficiency #3C        Explain the marketing mix for recreation, travel, and tourism.
              Activity #1:   Students will complete Opening Act, pg. 20.
              Activity #2:   Extra Innings Project, pg. 29. (Allow 1-2 computer lab days)
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the marketing mix as it
                             relates to recreation, travel and tourism marketing.
              Activity #4:   Complete “Take a Bow” activity, pg. 24. (Extra Credit)
              Activity #5:   Review and complete chapter test.




                                                                                            33
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #4 Discuss the social and economic impact of college athletics and amateur sports.
    (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #4A       Define market segmentation in amateur and college sports and
                             growth of new markets such as women’s sports.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 33.
              Activity #2:   Read Chapter 2 independently.
              Activity #3:   “Chamber of Commerce” Assignment – design a brochure
                             promoting a city.
              Activity #4:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 34.
              Activity #5:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the importance of the
                             NCAA and team rankings to college sports, market segmentation
                             as it relates to college sports, and the growing market surrounding
                             women’s college athletics.

       Proficiency #4B       Discuss the economic impact of collegiate athletics, conference
                             realignment, and revenue from licensing agreements with
                             colleges.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the benefits of college
                             sports to the home community, the benefits of sponsorship and
                             licensing a team, and the reasons for realignment of college
                             conferences.
              Activity #2:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 44.

       Proficiency #4C       Identify how increasing popularity has provided more
                             opportunities for marketing and sponsorship of amateur
                             sports.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss marketing and sponsoring
                             of amateur sports, and the economic benefits of amateur sports.
              Activity #2:   Complete CyberMarketing activity, pg. 50.
              Activity #3:   Review and test for chapter 2.
              Activity #4:   View movie, “Without Limits”, with questions. (extra credit –
                             research Steve Prefontaine and submit report on the impact he had
                             on his sport.)
              Activity #5:   Guest Speaker: Coach Richard Mosca (Fairleigh Dickinson
                             University) head football coach – marketing college athletics.




                                                                                              34
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #5 Demonstrate an understanding of the economic value of professional sports, the ethics of
    acquiring a team, how pro teams as a product are distributed to specific marketing areas,
    the role of agents and managers, and the relationship of ethics to sports.
    (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #5A       Discuss the financial benefits of a professional team and the
                             perks associated with professional sports.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 59.
              Activity #2:   Read chapter 3 independently.
              Activity #3:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 60.
              Activity #4:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the financial impact of
                             professional sports, and identify the perks associated with big
                             league sports.
              Activity #5:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 61 and Judgment Call, pg. 62.

       Proficiency #5B       Describe the processes of acquiring and financing a pro team.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 67.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the distribution process for
                             and the process for financing a professional sports team.
              Activity #3:   Complete CyberMarketing, pg. 69 (extra credit).

       Proficiency #5C       Explain the role of sports agents and the impact of ethical
                             behavior on an athlete’s promotional value.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the role of agents in
                             marketing, ways that professional sports organizations and their
                             sponsors develop an athlete’s character, and the impact of ethical
                             behavior on an athlete’s promotional value.
              Activity #2:   Review and test for chapter 3.
              Activity #3:   Watch movie, “Jerry McGuire”, with questions.




                                                                                               35
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #6 Identify how sports are used to market products through sponsorship, promotion, and
    endorsements. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #6A       Identify the enormous market for sports due to emotional ties
                             and the increasing popularity of women’s sports.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 85.
              Activity #2:   Read Chapter 4 independently.
              Activity #3:   Cereal Box Project – Students choose their favorite professional
                             sports team and design the front of a cereal box.
              Activity #4:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the enormous market for
                             sports, emotional ties to sports and earning power of women in
                             sports, and the marketing cycle.

       Proficiency #6B       Define the investment dollars involved with sponsorship and
                             explain prohibited sponsorship.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 92.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss sponsors and their
                             investments, and prohibited sponsorship.
              Activity #3:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 95.

       Proficiency #6C       Discuss the objectives and tools for promotion in sports.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss promotion and its
                             objectives and the tools used in promotion.
              Activity #2:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 101.

       Proficiency #6D       Define endorsements, restrictions on endorsements, and
                             qualifications for endorsers.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 103.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss endorsements and their
                             restrictions and qualifications for endorsers.
              Activity #3:   Review and test for chapter 4.
              Activity #4:   Guest Speaker: Ken Carson – sports memorabilia & licensed
                             products.




                                                                                             36
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #7 Explain the importance of marketing athletics through public relations, public speaking,
    book publishing, and fan clubs. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #7A       Discuss the importance of positive public relations for sports,
                             the role of public relations firms, and the public perceptions
                             created by athletes.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 115.
              Activity #2:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 116.
              Activity #3:   Read Chapter 5 independently.
              Activity #4:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the importance of positive
                             public relations for sports, how public relations firms assist in
                             creating favorable images, and how athletes can affect public
                             perceptions.
              Activity #5:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 119.

       Proficiency #7B       List the advantages of fan clubs for fans and athletes, discuss
                             the importance of marketing research, and describe successful
                             sports licensees and sponsors.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 123.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the advantages of fan clubs
                             to both fans and athletes, and the importance of marketing research
                             before undertaking a licensing agreement.
              Activity #3:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 126.

       Proficiency #7C       Explain how a sports figure can be successful on the lecture
                             circuit, and describe the steps for creating popular sports
                             books.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg.129.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss how a sports figure can be
                             successful in the lecture circuit, and the steps in the creation of
                             popular sports books.
              Activity #3:   Complete “Take a Bow” activity, pg. 132.
              Activity #4:   Review and test for chapter 5.




                                                                                               37
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #8 Identify ways of associating athletes with special events through charities, foundations,
    tournaments, camps, and seminars. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #8A        Describe the importance of charities and tournaments to the
                              successful images of athletes and teams, as well as explain why
                              athletes become involved with or create their own foundations.
               Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 141.
               Activity #2:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 142.
               Activity #3:   Read chapter 6 independently.
               Activity #4:   Project: Extra Innings, pg. 163.
               Activity #5:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the importance of charities
                              and tournaments to the successful images of athletes/teams, and
                              explain why athletes become involved with or create their own
                              foundations.
               Activity #6:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 145.
               Activity #7:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 147.

       Proficiency #8B        Explain why sports celebrity camps have become increasingly
                              popular, and define the importance of corporate and business
                              contacts in the area where a sports camp will be held.
               Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 149.
               Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss why sports celebrity camps
                              have become increasingly popular, and describe ways to promote a
                              sports camp.

       Proficiency #8C        Define the relationship between sponsorship and interest in
                              one-day seminars, and evaluate three methods of advertising
                              for workshops.
               Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 154.
               Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the relationship between
                              sponsorship and interest in one-day seminars and evaluate three
                              methods of advertising workshops, and discuss the benefits of
                              each.
               Activity #3:   Guest Speaker: Sports camp supervisor.
               Activity #4:   Review and test for chapter 6.




                                                                                                38
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #9 Define the role of marketing firms, explain sports marketing opportunities in a global
    economy, and identify careers in sports marketing. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4

       Proficiency #9A       Explain the role of a sports marketing firm.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 167.
              Activity #2:   Read Chapter 7 independently.
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the role of a sports
                             marketing firm, and the importance of maintaining a positive
                             image for sports owners and marketing firms.
              Activity #4:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 169.
              Activity #5:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 171.

       Proficiency #9B       Describe how sports marketing has increased the awareness
                             and popularity of international sports and explain some
                             challenges in marketing the Olympics and women’s sports.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss sports that have become
                             popular internationally, ways in which sports marketing has
                             increased international awareness of sports, and some challenges in
                             marketing the Olympics and women’s sports.

       Proficiency #9C       Identify and describe numerous sports marketing careers, as
                             well as the skills and personal characteristics necessary for
                             each career.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 180.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss numerous sports marketing
                             careers, and describe skills and personal characteristics necessary
                             for a career in sports marketing.
              Activity #3:   Complete “Take a Bow” activity, pg. 184.
              Activity #4:   Review and test for chapter 7.
              Activity #5:   Show video “Miracle” with questions.




                                                                                             39
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #10 Understand the nature and scope of the Entertainment industry and be able to explain its
     role in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4

       Proficiency #10A      Explain the basics of financing entertainment.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 193.
              Activity #2:   Read chapter 8 independently.
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss financial strategies in the
                             motion picture industry, calculate film revenue, discuss the
                             importance of foreign markets for movies, and describe financing
                             in auto racing.
              Activity #4:   Project: Extra Innings, pg. 225 – Entertainment Marketing
                             Careers.

       Proficiency #10B      Explore distribution and promotion in the entertainment
       business.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the different kinds of
                             entertainment distribution and promotional strategies for motion
                             pictures.
              Activity #2:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 200.
              Activity #3:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 202.

       Proficiency #10C      Discuss the promotion of music and theater and the
                             distribution of music.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the distribution of music,
                             the legalities of music distribution, and explain the two kinds of
                             theater promotion.
              Activity #2:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 209.

       Proficiency #10D      Describe promotion of entertainment through awards and the
                             distribution of entertainment.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 211.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the promotional value of
                             entertainment awards and ways in which entertainment is
                             distributed.

       Proficiency #10E      Explain the preparation needed for careers in entertainment
                             marketing.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the preparation needed for
                             a career in the entertainment marketing field and the skills needed
                             for specific jobs in entertainment marketing.
              Activity #2:   Review for and test on chapter 8.




                                                                                                40
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #11 Identify ways of marketing Entertainment to specific target markets.
     (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #11A      Explain the importance of customer profiles when creating
                             specialized entertainment products for specific groups.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 229.
              Activity #2:   Read chapter 9 independently.
              Activity #3:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 230.
              Activity #4:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss customizing entertainment
                             products for a market segment and customized entertainment
                             marketing for Baby Boomers.
              Activity #5:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 233.
              Activity #6:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 235.

       Proficiency #11B      Describe the collection and analysis of audience data.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 237.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the economic utility of
                             entertainment, the impact of technology on entertainment, and the
                             need for balance between privacy and marketing information.
              Activity #3:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 239.
              Activity #4:   Complete CyberMarketing, pg. 240.

       Proficiency #11C      Discuss the worldwide distribution of entertainment.
              Activity 1:    Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the economics of global
                             marketing entertainment and global distribution of entertainment.
              Activity #2:   Review for and test on chapter 9.




                                                                                             41
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #12 Understand the nature and scope of Recreation Marketing and be able to explain its role
     in our economy. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A5 & 9.2B3,4 &Technology Literacy (TL) 8.2A3

       Proficiency #12A      Describe how the changing demographics of the U.S. call for a
                             change in recreation marketing strategies.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 255.
              Activity #2:   Read Chapter 10 independently.
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss marketing strategies based
                             on changing demographics and apply market information to
                             recreational events.
              Activity #4:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 257.
              Activity #5:   Complete CyberMarketing, pg. 258.

       Proficiency #12B      Discuss how technology is changing the operation of the travel
                             industry.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 261.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the importance of the
                             travel and tourism industry to sports and entertainment marketing
                             and how technology has changed travel marketing.
              Activity #3:   Project: State Tourism Project – each group (2-3 students each)
                             must create a marketing campaign for a state.

       Proficiency #12C      Describe the major role that recreational destinations have in
                             travel marketing.
              Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 267.
              Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the importance of
                             partnerships between airlines and recreation destinations, the
                             popularity of halls of fame as destinations, and the marketing
                             strategies of theme parks and resorts.

       Proficiency #12D      Discuss the changes in recreation marketing as a career field.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss careers in recreation
                             marketing and how to develop a recreation marketing career plan.
              Activity #2:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 276.
              Activity #3:   Review for and test on chapter 10.
              Activity #4:   Project: Extra Innings, pg. 281 – Theme Parks




                                                                                               42
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #13 Identify steps in planning for advertising and marketing the Sports and Entertainment
     industries. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

       Proficiency #13A      Identify and explain the steps in the advertising process.
              Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 285.
              Activity #2:   Read chapter 11 independently.
              Activity #3:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the steps in the advertising
                             process and the importance of measuring advertising effectiveness.
              Activity #4:   Complete CyberMarketing, pg. 288.

       Proficiency #13B      Explain how marketing research helps connect people to
                             marketing.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the purposes of marketing
                             research and the human element in marketing research.
              Activity #2:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 296.

       Proficiency #13C      Discuss how planning gives direction to marketing.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the purpose of a marketing
                             plan and the components of a strategic marketing plan.
              Activity #2:   Complete Marketing Myths, pg. 299.

       Proficiency #13D      Explain how sports and entertainment marketing is a business
                             with profit as a motive.
              Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the profit motive behind
                             sports and entertainment marketing and the types of financing
                             related to sports and entertainment marketing.
              Activity #2:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 305.
              Activity #3:   Review for and test on Chapter 11.
              Activity #4:   Project: Extra Innings, pg. 311 – Creating a marketing plan for a
                             new sports drink company.




                                                                                             43
SUBJECT GOAL:
 #14 Discuss the importance of laws governing Sports and Entertainment contract
     negotiations with players and licensed merchandise. (CE/CFLS) 9.1A2 & 9.1B3

      Proficiency #14A      Discuss risk, copyright laws, and basic contracts.
             Activity #1:   Complete Winning Strategies, pg. 315.
             Activity #2:   Read chapter 12 independently.
             Activity #3:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 316.
             Activity #4:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss risk management in the
                            distribution of sports and entertainment marketing, the importance
                            of copyright law to pricing, and the need for contracts.
             Activity #5:   Complete Judgment Call, pg. 318.

      Proficiency #14B      Explain the impact of strikes and labor laws on sports and
                            entertainment.
             Activity #1:   Complete Opening Act, pg. 322.
             Activity #2:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss the public relations impact
                            of labor laws on sports, the financial harm that strikes may cause to
                            a sport, and the impact of labor unions on sports and entertainment
                            pricing.
             Activity #3:   Complete Take a Bow, pg. 325.

      Proficiency #14C      Describe licensing as a critical piece of marketing sports and
                            entertainment.
             Activity #1:   Using PowerPoint presentation, discuss licensing and the financial
                            value of licensing sports and entertainment merchandise.
             Activity #2:   Complete CyberMarketing, pg. 330.
             Activity #3:   Review for and test on chapter 12.




                                                                                              44
                   Resources/Community Resources/References

Textbook:     Farese, Kimbell, & Wolszyk, MARKETING ESSENTIALS,
              2nd Edition, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 1997

Textbook:     Kaeser and Oelkers, SPORTS and ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING, 2nd
              Edition, Thompson/Southwestern Publishing, 2005.

Resource:     Pemberton, SPORTS MARKETING: “THE MONEY SIDE OF
              SPORTS”, Sports Services of America Publishing, 1997.

Resource:     Schlossberg, SPORTS MARKETING, 2nd Edition, Blackwell
              Publishers, Inc, 1997.

Modules:      Learning Activity Packets (LAPS), MarkED Resource Center

DECA:         New Jersey DECA Handbook
              National DECA Guide
              Participation in DECA Regional, State and National Competitive Events
              Conferences.

   Other resources include:
          o Local and national newspapers.
          o Videos.
          o Internet sites.
          o ESPN

   Guest speakers invited into the classroom to discuss various Sports and Entertainment
   Marketing topics.

   Possible Field Trips include:
          o Continental Airlines Sports Complex
          o Yankee Stadium
          o Madison Square Garden
          o Minor League Baseball Park
          o National Television Studio
          o Six Flags Great Adventure




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                   APPENDIX



    New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
                         for
Career Education and Consumer, Family, and Life Skills




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