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    Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
 
     
 

 
     
     
    Graduate Handbook 
          

     




                                                2011‐2012
       Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • i

    Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
                               a
                       Department in the
       College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences
                 at The University of Tennessee
                           2011-2012

                   Dr. Robert A. Rider, Dean
Dr. Susan M. Benner, Associate Dean and Director of the Graduate
                      School of Education
             Dr. Thomas W. George, Associate Dean
          Dr. Vincent A. Anfara, Jr, Department Head

   “Enhancing Quality of Life through Research, Outreach, and
                            Practice”
                   Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • ii

                                                          Table of Contents
Welcome from the Department Head ........................................................................................................... v
Graduate School Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1
Purpose of Handbook ……………… .......................................................................................................... 1
ELPS Program of Studies Overview (Figure 1)............................................................................................ 1
Mission of Educational Administration and Policy Studies (ELPS) ............................................................ 2
Conceptual Framework for Educational Administration and Supervision Licensure Preparation .............. .3
Conceptual Framework Higher Education Administration........................................................................... 6
Conceptual Design of Professional Education Programs.............................................................................. 6
Faculty of ELPS (Program Area, Contact Information, and Research Interests) ......................................... 7
Staff of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies ..................................................................................... 8
Admissions Requirement and Application Procedure for EAS ............................................................. 9
    M.S., Ed.S., and Pre-K Licensure Certificate ........................................................................................ 9
        Admissions ........................................................................................................................................ 9
       Transfer Courses……………… ...................................................................................................... 10
        Licensure Alternative ...................................................................................................................... 10
        Non-licensure Alternative ............................................................................................................... 10
    Ph.D. Program ...................................................................................................................................... 11
        Admissions ...................................................................................................................................... 11
Admissions Requirement and Application Procedure for HEA ........................................................... 12
    CSP Admission .................................................................................................................................... 12
    Ph. D. Admission ................................................................................................................................. 12
Financial Support...................................................................................................................................... 14
    Graduate Assistantships ....................................................................................................................... 14
    Selection of Graduate Assistants ......................................................................................................... 14
    More on Assistantships ....................................................................................................................... 14
    Scholarships and Other Funding Opportunities ................................................................................... 15
       THEC African American Grant ...................................................................................................... 15
    EAS Scholarships ................................................................................................................................. 15
        Billie Cannon De Mont Scholarship .............................................................................................. 15
        Orin Graff Scholarship .................................................................................................................. 15
        Erma Graff Scholarship ................................................................................................................. 15
    Fellowships .......................................................................................................................................... 16
        Loans Available for Graduate Students ......................................................................................... 16
        Federal Work Study ....................................................................................................................... 16
    Student Loans....................................................................................................................................... 16
        Federal Stafford Loan ..................................................................................................................... 16
        Subsidized Stafford Loan ............................................................................................................... 16
        Unsubsidized Stafford Loan ........................................................................................................... 17
        Repayment .................................................................................................................................... 17
        Loan Amount ................................................................................................................................. 17
    CEHHS Graduate Student Advisory Board ......................................................................................... 17
    Graduate Student Colloquium .............................................................................................................. 17
                   Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • iii

    Graduate Student Travel ...................................................................................................................... 17
    Graduate Student Senate Travel ........................................................................................................... 18
Registration Step-by-Step ........................................................................................................................... 19
    Registration for Use of Facilities ......................................................................................................... 20
Degree Requirements and Examinations for Programs in Educational Administration and
Supervision (EAS) ..................................................................................................................................... 21
Master of Science ........................................................................................................................................ 21
    Degree Requirements ........................................................................................................................... 21
    Admission to Candidacy ...................................................................................................................... 21
    Internship Objectives .......................................................................................................................... 21
    Master’s Committee ............................................................................................................................. 21
    Time Limit ........................................................................................................................................... 22
Specialist in Education ................................................................................................................................ 23
    Degree Requirements ........................................................................................................................... 23
    Educational Administration Hours Credit ............................................................................................ 23
    Ed.S. Committee .................................................................................................................................. 23
    Admission to Candidacy ...................................................................................................................... 23
    Research Requirements ........................................................................................................................ 23
    Time Limit ........................................................................................................................................... 24
PreK-12 Licensure Certificate in Educational Administration ............................................................ 25
    PreK-12 Licensure Certificate Required Credits ................................................................................. 25
Doctoral Program in EAS—Leadership Studies in Education ............................................................. 26
    Admission ............................................................................................................................................ 26
    Doctoral Hours Credit .......................................................................................................................... 26
    Independent Studies ............................................................................................................................. 26
    Cognate Requirements Guidelines ....................................................................................................... 26
    Doctoral Committee ............................................................................................................................. 27
    Residence Requirement........................................................................................................................ 27
    Admission to Candidacy ...................................................................................................................... 27
    Registration for 600 ............................................................................................................................. 28
    Leave of Absence ................................................................................................................................. 28
    Dissertation .......................................................................................................................................... 28
    Dissertation Proposal ........................................................................................................................... 28
    Assessment of Student Progress .......................................................................................................... 28
    Time Limit ........................................................................................................................................... 29
Degree Requirements and Examinations for Programs in Higher Education Administration
(HEA) ....................................................................................................................................................... 30
Master of Science in College Student Personnel .................................................................................... 30
    Required Hours Credit ......................................................................................................................... 30
    Admission to Candidacy ...................................................................................................................... 30
    Time Limit ........................................................................................................................................... 30
Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration ............................................................................................ 31
    Doctoral Hours Credit .......................................................................................................................... 31
                  Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • iv

    Doctoral Committee ............................................................................................................................. 31
    Residence Requirements ...................................................................................................................... 32
    Admission to Candidacy ...................................................................................................................... 32
    Dissertation .......................................................................................................................................... 32
    Time Limit ........................................................................................................................................... 32
Examinations ............................................................................................................................................ 33
Programs in EAS ........................................................................................................................................ 33
    Master of Science: SLLA and Final Examination ............................................................................. 33
    Specialist in Education: Final Examination ....................................................................................... 33
    Doctoral Program: Doctoral Examinations: Qualifying and Comprehensive .................................... 33
Examinations of Programs in HEA ............................................................................................................. 35
    Final Examination− CSP Program ....................................................................................................... 35
    Doctoral Examinations: Qualifying and Comprehensive.................................................................... 35
Standards, Problems, and Appeals ......................................................................................................... 37
    Grade Point Average and Grades ......................................................................................................... 37
    Incomplete Grades .............................................................................................................................. 37
    Assessment of Student Progress .......................................................................................................... 37
    Academic Standards ............................................................................................................................. 38
    Academic Probation ............................................................................................................................. 38
    Dismissal……………… ...................................................................................................................... 38
    Academic Honesty ............................................................................................................................... 39
    Plagiarism        ...................................................................................................................................... 39
    Appeals Process ................................................................................................................................... 40
Useful Information NetID and Email ...................................................................................................... 40
    What’s a NetID? .................................................................................................................................. 40
    What is my NetID? ............................................................................................................................. 40
    What is my NetID Password? ............................................................................................................. 40
    Registering for an Email Account ........................................................................................................ 40
    Accessing Email with Webmail ........................................................................................................... 41
    Changing your Password .................................................................................................................... 41
    How to Get a VolCard ......................................................................................................................... 41
Useful UT Websites .................................................................................................................................... 42
Appendixes ................................................................................................................................................. 43
    A. Master's and Ed.S. Forms ................................................................................................................ 44
    B. Doctoral Forms ................................................................................................................................ 49
    C. IRB Forms ....................................................................................................................................... 54
    D. Graduate Scholarship Application .................................................................................................. 64
    E. Request for Travel Support: Graduate Student Form ...................................................................... 66
    F. Academic Calendar .......................................................................................................................... 67
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • v

                         Welcome from the Department Head
                                 Dr. Vincent A. Anfara, Jr.

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the Department of Educational Leadership and
Policy Studies (ELPS) at The University of Tennessee. This department has had a rich history
since its inception in 1949. We are extremely proud of our graduates who have filled numerous
important positions in both PreK-12 schools and higher education contexts, ranging from
university professors, college presidents and school superintendents to the Commissioner of
Education in Tennessee. I hope that you will find your time with us both challenging and
rewarding. Graduate study affords you the opportunity to explore new ideas, develop new skills,
and establish life-long professional relationships. Through your graduate studies, you will be
challenged to expand your thinking, apply new ideas for the improvement of schools, and
question the assumptions and beliefs that you currently hold about education in America.

The graduate faculty within ELPS is here to work with you as you explore new ideas and
confront new challenges. They represent a wide range of expertise within the field of educational
leadership including issues related to school effectiveness and school improvement, job
satisfaction, staff development, gender issues, educational accountability, higher education
governance, student persistence, international education, and middle grades educational issues.
Faculty have served in the role of assistant principal, principal, elementary school supervisor,
university chancellor, PreK-12 school effectiveness coordinator in a state department of
education, and associate superintendent in a school system. Please take the time to get to know
each of the faculty in ELPS and possibly work with one or more in the conduct of a research
project or grant.

Some of you are from the local region, while others have traveled far from home to study at The
University of Tennessee. Please use this time to get to know your cohort members and to build
the relationships that will hopefully last throughout your professional career. The quality of these
relationships will play a major role in your success as a graduate student.

Finally, I hope that you find this handbook contains many useful pieces of information as you
navigate the steps in attaining your graduate degree. Additionally, you should be aware of the
information about graduate studies that is contained in the Graduate Catalog, Hilltopics, and
other publications of the Graduate School. Please feel free to stop by my office and introduce
yourself to me and let me know how your studies are progressing. I look forward to meeting each
of you.

Vincent A. Anfara, Jr.
Professor and Head
             Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 1

                              Graduate School Introduction
“In order to serve the mission and vision of the Graduate School and preserve the integrity of
Graduate Programs at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, information related to the process
of graduate education in each department is to be provided for all graduate students.”

Based on Best Practices offered by the Council of Graduate Schools, it is important that detailed
articulation of the information specific to the graduate degrees offered in each
department/program be disseminated.

The Department Graduate Handbook does not deviate from established Graduate School Policies
http://catalog.utk.edu/content.php?catoid=2&navoid=27 noted in the Graduate Catalog, but
rather provides the specific ways in which those policies are carried out.”



                                    Purpose of Handbook

Graduate Students are expected to be aware of and satisfy all regulations governing their work
and studies at the university. In addition to this handbook, graduate students are advised to
consult the Graduate Catalog, Hilltopics, and to the publications on the Appeals Procedure and
the Graduate Assistant Handbook available on the Graduate School website
(http://gradschool.utk.edu/GraduateCouncil/Acad Poli//appealprocedure.pdf) .



                            Department/Program Structure

Degree/Certificate                    Major                            Concentration
    M.S.                 Educational Administration          NA
    Ed.S.                Education                           Educational Administration
    PreK-12
    Licensure
    Certificate
    Ph.D.                Education                           Leadership Studies in Education
    M.S.                 College Student Personnel           NA
    Ph.D.                Higher Education Administration     NA
Figure 1. ELPS Program of Studies Overview.



NOTE: For Leadership Academy Programs see LA Handbook
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 2

Mission of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

The mission of the ELPS Department is to prepare entry and executive level administrators for
schools and colleges, faculty in colleges and in universities, and policy scholars to serve in state,
regional and national policy agencies associated with educational and human service enterprises.
The graduate programs of the Department are designed to enrich knowledge, skills, and values
requisite to effective leadership and to effective teaching and research in educational settings.

The Department views leaders as stewards and servants of organizations; designers of the social
and cultural climate in which they work; teachers who facilitate and encourage human growth
and development; change agents who continually examine the purpose and performance of their
organizations, and conceptual provocateurs who challenge ideas and assumptions on which
policy and practice are built.

In keeping with our mission, ELPS offers programs in Educational Administration and
Supervision and in Higher Education Administration. Figure 1 on the previous page shows an
overview of the programs offered in the Department followed by detailed information about each
program and the conceptual frameworks upon which the programs are built.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 3

            Conceptual Framework for Licensure Preparation

                Graduate Programs (M.S. and Ed.S.)
           Leading to Licensure in School Administration
     “Praxis through Self Reflection, Ethics, and Artful Practice”
                                 2011
Introduction

The Educational Administration and Supervision program faculty offers two graduate degrees
(M.S. and Ed.S.) in Educational Administration. These programs are directed to the initial and
advanced education of leaders in PreK-12 schools and are certification programs for the
preparation of principals and supervisors.

All of the University of Tennessee’s graduate educational administration programs are built on
the concept of leadership as a conceptual, moral/ethical, and performing art form. Effective
leadership is built first on the power of ideas and theory. But there is no single theory of
sufficient scope to cover every dimension of educational leadership and the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions that are necessary for effectively linking leadership theory to the world of
practice.

The technical concepts of leadership are then placed in action in response to values held by the
leader; so that moral and ethical concerns become paramount for effective leadership. As with
any ethical/moral dimension, there is an emphasis on awareness of self as a leader, self in
relation to others, and self within the context of the educational administration profession. Our
programs are values-based and values-driven, following the conviction that educational
leadership is an ethical endeavor (Fullan, 2003; Willower, 1994). Values are central to
administrative theory and practice and to administrative decision making (Sergiovanni, 1992).
Orin B. Graff, founder of the educational administration program in 1949, was a tireless defender
of this position when it was unpopular.

The curriculum is directed toward providing beginning practitioners with “best practice”
knowledge and skills derived from the field and from research. The transfer of these “best
practices” into educational settings is a focus of the instruction.

There is a linkage between reflection and action and the art form is perfected in the context of
practice—theory in action, full circle. For the graduate degrees, practice is encouraged in
intensive internship experiences (Daresh, 1988).

In addition to this conceptual base, we firmly believe that educational leaders must have
knowledge of the philosophical and historical contexts of schools, and the dimensions that
distinguish schools from other organizations in our society. We also encourage our students to
engage in policy issues that affect schools and further assist them in the development of program
evaluation and school improvement planning skills that incorporate data-driven decision and
allow them to be active policy voices.
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 4


Knowledge Base

The Educational Administration Master’s and Specialist programs were developed in direct
response to six major themes in the reform literature concerned with the field of educational
administration. Critics have suggested the following:

    1.   Expansion of the knowledge base that forms the framework for leadership and a broader
         conceptualization of educational organizations (Educational Commission of the States,
         1990; Firestone & Riehl, 2005; Griffiths, Stout, & Forsyth, 1988; Mulkeen &
         Tentenbaum, 1990, Murphy & Datnow, 2003) This is accomplished through a course on
         organizational and leadership theory. It is here where they have an opportunity to
         experience leadership within real school contexts and to gain a deeper understanding on
         the leadership stories of numerous practicing principals (Gardner, 1995).

    2.   Emphasis on the performance dimension of the principalship with particular attention
         given to the knowledge, skills, and dispositions underlying performance and delineated
         in the ISLLC standards (Murphy, 1990; Murphy & Datnow, 2003). The graduate
         programs are designed around the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium
         (ISLLC) standards and the Tennessee Instructional Leadership Standards (TILS) which
         have been adopted by the State of Tennessee as the basis for its licensing standards.

    3.   Integration of theory and practice—praxis (Daresh, 1988; Murphy, 1990; Murphy &
         Datnow, 2003). This is accomplished through a two-year internship which is connected
         to course content and closely monitored through on-site visitations, monthly seminar
         meetings, and reflections being posted on PLP.

    4.   Collaboration between universities and schools (Fullan, 2003; Goodlad, 1988; Griffiths,
         Stout, & Forsyth, 1988). This is accomplished through the use of school-based mentors
         for our internship experience, the limited use of school district personnel to assist in the
         teaching of classes, school-site visitations with principals, and the involvement of the
         professors in district-related activities.

    5.   Focus on the use of data and data-driven decision making for the purposes of
         instructional leadership and continual school improvement (Riehl & Firestone, 2005).
         This is accomplished through coursework that is focused on research strategies. School-
         level data, and school improvement planning become the focus of this problems-based
         instruction.

    6.   Focus on the core technology of schooling—teaching and learning. With this in mind
         (Murphy, 2003; Reyes & Wagstaff, 2005), we heavily emphasize instructional
         leadership, curriculum, and supervision of personnel.
             Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 5

References

Daresh, J. C. (1988, April). Are field based programs the answer to the reform of administrator
    preparation programs? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational
    Research Association, New Orleans, LA.
Educational Commission of the States. (1990). State policy and the school principal: A summary
    of case studies from seven states. St. Louis, MO: Danforth Foundation (ERIC Document
    Reproduction Service No. ED 324 795)
Firestone, W. A., & Riehl, C. (Eds.). (2005). A new agenda for research in educational
    leadership. New York: Teachers College Press.
Fullan, M. (2003). The moral imperative of school leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
Gardner, H. (1995). Leading minds: An anatomy of leadership. In J. Smyth (Ed.), Critical
    perspectives on educational leadership (pp. 4-34). Philadelphia, PA: Falmer Press.
Goodlad, J. (1988). School-university partnerships for educational renewal: Rationale and
    concepts. In K. Sirotnik & J. Goodlad (Eds.), School partnerships in action (pp. 3-31). New
    York: Teachers College Press.
Griffiths, D., Stout, R., & Forsyth, P. (1988). The preparation of administrators. In D. Griffiths,
    R. Stout, & P. Forsyth (Eds.), America’s schools (pp. 284-304). Berkley, CA: McCuthan.
Mulkeen, T., & Tentenbaum, J. (1990). Teaching and learning in knowledge organization:
    Implications for the preparation of school administrators. Journal of Educational
    Administration, 28(2), 14-22.
Murphy, J. (1990). Preparing school administrators for the twenty-first century: The reform
    agenda. In B. Mitchell & L. L. Cunningham (Eds.), Educational leadership and changing
    contexts of families, communities, and schools (pp. 232-215). Chicago: University of
    Chicago Press.
Murphy, J., & Datnow, A. (2003). Leadership lessons from comprehensive school reforms.
    Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
Riehl, C., & Firestone, W. A. (2005). What research methods should be used to study
    educational leadership. In W. A. Firestone & C. Riehl (Eds.), A new agenda for research in
    educational leadership (pp. 156-170). New York: Teachers College Press.
Sergiovanni, T. (1992). Moral leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Willower, D. (1994). Educational administration: Inquiry, values, practice. Lancaster, PA:
    Technomic.
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 6

    Conceptual Framework for Higher Education Administration
Just as many organizations in our society find themselves in transitional moments, it is clear that
our conception of leadership is changing as well. From an era when the terms “command” and
“control” were often descriptors of the dominant style and philosophy associated with the
leadership of pyramidal organizational structures, new descriptors are emerging: “steward,
designer, teacher, servant.” No longer is leadership perceived as a responsibility invested only in
formal roles and positions, as something those holding formal position do to or for us, but as a
partnership responsibility shared by all who hold learning organizations in trust.

Leaders are stewards and servants because they hold organizations in trust. Leaders are
designers, because their knowledge and their values shape, in major part at least, the social and
cultural climate in which we do our work. Leaders are teachers in the sense that they have
primary responsibility to facilitate human growth and development. Leaders are change agents,
continually examining the effectiveness of their organizations. Leaders are conceptual
provocateurs, challenging ideas and assumptions on which practice and policy are built. The
programs in Higher Education Administration are designed to enrich knowledge, skills, and
values requisite to effective leadership in educational practice settings.

         Conceptual Design of Professional Education Programs
All graduate leadership education programs are built on the concept of leadership as a
conceptual, moral, and performing art form. Effective leadership is built first on the power of
ideas and theory. There is no single, embracing theory of sufficient scope to cover every
dimension of educational leadership role, tasks, and effectiveness; and there are multiple truths
to be mastered in both leadership and organizational theory. The educational leader is a
conceptual artist in placing these concepts in action. Technical concepts of leadership are placed
in action in response to values held by the leader. Moral and ethical concerns are paramount for
effective leadership. As with any art form, there is a linkage between reflection and action, and
the art form is perfected in the practice of the art. For master’s degrees, practice is encouraged in
intensive internship experiences, and for doctoral degrees, the alternative residence option
accents the simultaneous linking of practice, theory, and research.

For master’s and doctoral study there are two additional accents. The first of these is centered on
the educational leader having knowledge and sensitivity to the “nature of the enterprise,” the
special and important role of higher education in a democratic society. Thus educational leaders
are expected to have knowledge of the philosophic and historic context of colleges, the
dimensions of role that distinguish colleges from other organizations in our society. Second,
students are encouraged in their engagement of policy issues that affect higher education and
further encouraged to develop those skills of policy analysis, program evaluation, and research
that will allow them to be active policy voices.

For both master’s and doctoral programs, cohort models and problem-based learning approaches
to graduate study are used. Students in these programs have extensive course experiences
together where mutual support and sense of community are accented.
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 7

          Faculty of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
Dr. Vincent A. Anfara, Jr., Professor and Department Head
325 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, 1122 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37996-
3430; Phone: 865-974-4985, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: vanfara@utk.edu
Research interests: Middle schools, principal preparation, and qualitative research methods.

Dr. Pamela S. Angelle, Associate Professor and Coordinator of Educational Administration
323 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-3430; Phone: 865-974-4139,
Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: pangelle@utk.edu
Research interests: School effectiveness and school improvement, distributed leadership,
teacher leadership, and catalysts that promote collegiality.

Dr. J. Patrick Biddix, Associate Professor of College Student Personnel and Higher Education
Administration
316 Bailey Education Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-343-, Phone: 865-974-6457, Fax: 865-
974-6146., Email: pbiddix@utk.edu
Research interests: civic engagement and student involvement, student activism, technology
use and implications, career development in student affairs, and research methodology.

Dr. E. Grady Bogue, Professor and Coordinator of Higher Education Program
319 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex Knoxville, TN 37996-3430; Phone: 865-974-6140,
Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: bogue@utk.edu.
Research interests: Accountability, leadership/governance, planning, evaluation, assessment,
and accreditation in higher education..

Dr. Ernest W. Brewer, Professor and Principal Investigator/Director of Federal Grants
324 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex 1122 Volunteer Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37996-
3430; Phone: 865-974-8924, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: ewbrewer@utk.edu.
Research interests: Job satisfaction, occupational stress, and burnout; professional and staff
development; and project management and program evaluation.

Dr. Jimmy Cheek, Professor and Chancellor, 539 Andy Holt Tower, Phone: 865-974-2444,
Email: chancellor@utk.edu

Dr. Mary Lynne Derrington, Assistant Professor of Educational Administration
318 Bailey Education Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-3430: Phone: 865-974-4041, Fax: 865-
974-6146, Email: mderring@utk.edu
Research interests: evaluation of principals, female superintendents, and ethical leadership
practices.

Dr. Jason T. Huff, Assistant Professor of Educational Administration
322 Jane and David Bailey Education Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-3430, Phone:
865.974.9183, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: jhuff12@utk.edu
Research interests: instructional leadership, effective schools, educational leadership expertise,
professional learning communities.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 8



Dr. Sonja McNeely, Adjunct Professor of Educational Administration
321 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-3430; Phone: 865-974-6139,
Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: nmc16@utk.edu
Research interests: Identification of moral and ethical dilemmas for administrators, MBTI and
student behavior, administrator vision and school performance, and the identification of critical
administrative skills as defined by successful (vs. less successful) practicing administrators.

Dr. Norma T. Mertz, Professor and Coordinator of College Student Personnel Program
315 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, 1122 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37996-
3430; Phone: 865-974-6150, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: nmertz@utk.edu.
Research interests: Gender and leadership, mentoring, and role socialization.

Dr. Autumn K. Tooms, Professor and Director of The Center for Educational Leadership
302 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, Knoxville, TN 37996-3430; Phone: 865-974-4553,
Fax: 865-974-4563, Email: atooms@utk.edu
Research interests: Micro-politics of the principalship, macro-politics and educational
leadership, globalization, post-structuralism and discourse analysis, grounded theory, leadership
preparation, socialization of new principals.



            Staff of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
Karen L. Crumley, Administrative Specialist I (HEA and CSP Program)
317 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, 1122 Volunteer Blvd., Knoxville, TN 37996-3430;
Phone: 865-974-2216, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: kcrumle1@utk.edu.

Constance Honorable, Administrative Supervisor
320 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, 1122 Volunteer Blvd., Knoxville, TN 37996-3430;
Phone: 865-974-6154, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: honora00@utk.edu.

Janie S. Young, Administrative Support Assistant III (EAS Program)
321 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex, 1122 Volunteer Blvd., Knoxville, TN 37996-3430;
Phone: 865-974-6139, Fax: 865-974-6146, Email: jsyoung@utk.edu.


Graduate Assistants

Gia Gray, EAS Graduate Assistant, 325 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex
Julee Flood, HEA/CSP Graduate Assistant, 325 Jane and David Bailey Ed. Complex
John Bruckner, The Center for Educational Leadership Graduate Assistant, 302 Jane and David
               Bailey Ed. Complex
             Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 9



         Educational Administration and Supervision Admission
                            Requirements

                        Enrolling in EAS Licensure Programs:
                   M.S., Ed. S., and PreK-12 Licensure Certificate in
                              Educational Administration


          Submit Admission or                                 Complete Online EDAM 
       Readmission Application to                                Application via the  
        Graduate/International                                     following Link: 
        Admissions Office along                               http://elps.utk.edu/ed_ 
       with 3 rating forms (online)                           admin/Admissions.html 
       http://gradschool.utk.edu 




                      Receive Acceptance Letter and                     Schedule a 
                           Register for Classes                     Personal Interview 



Admissions

Students must submit a transcript and the Graduate Application to the Office of Graduate and
International Admissions, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville to The Graduate School.
Applicants are responsible for submitting the following item to the Janie Young in Educational
Administration and Supervision.

       The Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department Application for Graduate
        Study must be submitted.

Admission decisions are made on a holistic basis to discern the candidate’s promise for graduate
study and to ascertain the match of the candidate’s educational goals with the resources and
goals of the Department.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 10

Transfer Courses

Transfer courses must receive prior approval from both the student’s committee/program faculty
and the Dean of the Graduate School. To be transferred into a master’s or specialist program, a
course must be: (1) taken at the graduate level, (2) carry a grade of B or better, and (3) not have
been used for a prior degree. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for complete information on
“transfer” courses. Students interested in transferring graduate courses must petition the faculty
in writing and provide all necessary documentation (e.g., transcripts showing courses and syllabi
for courses being considered). No course may be transferred into the PreK-12 Licensure
Certificate Program, in accordance with Graduate School Policy in Certificate Program.

Licensure Alternative (requires three years teaching experience and a valid teaching
certificate)

The M.S. program requires 36 hours of coursework; the Ed.S. program requires 42 hours.
Evening and summer classes are combined with on-the-job internship activities organized around
real school problems. The school principal (or other administrator at the school site) and a
faculty representative of the Educational Administration and Supervision program together
supervise the internship.

The desired outcome of the program leading to licensure as a school administrator is to produce
thoughtful principal and supervisory practitioners with the skills and scholarship to provide
quality leadership to the organizations they serve. Graduates are expected to have a vision of
quality education combined with good leadership skills to lead our schools in the twenty-first
century.

The program leading to licensure as a school administrator is designed around the standards
developed by the Tennessee State Board of Education, the Tennessee Instructional Leadership
Standards (TILS), and the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) for the
knowledge and skills required today for a school principal. It meets the certification requirements
of the Tennessee State Board of Education. The program is also accredited by the National
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and recognized by the University
Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), indicating national recognition as a quality
program.

Non-licensure Alternative

The non-licensure alternative program for both the M.S. and Ed.S. is designed to prepare leaders
for a variety of settings in other social community service agencies. It requires a common set of
four courses with the remainder of the program tailored to the students’ special needs. While an
internship is required for the non-licensure alternative, the format and parameters of the internship
will be decided in consultation with the faculty advisor.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 11

                              Enrolling in EAS Ph. D. Program



     Submit Admission or                    Complete Online Ph.D. 
  Readmission Application to                  Application via the  
   Graduate/International                       following Link: 
   Admissions Office along               http://elps.utk.edu/ed_adm
  with 3 rating forms (online)           in/EDAM_PhDApply.html
  http://gradschool.utk.edu 




                                                                                  Ph.D. applicants 
                                                                                  Submit Writing 
                                                  Schedule a 
 Receive Acceptance Letter and                                                       Sample to  
                                              Personal Interview 
      Register for Classes                                                        Mrs. Janie Young 



Admissions

Students must submit a transcript and the Graduate Application to the Office of Graduate and
International Admissions, University of Tennessee, Knoxville to The Graduate School.
Applicants are responsible for submitting the following items to the Janie Young in Educational
Administration and Supervision.

      The Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department Application for Graduate
       Study must be submitted.
      An overall GPA of 3.30 in previous graduate study is required for admission to doctoral
       study

For Ph. D. candidates, an interview with the faculty may be required. Admission decisions are
made on a holistic basis to discern the candidate’s promise for doctoral study and to ascertain the
match of the candidate’s educational goals with the resources and goals of the Department.
              Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 12

          Higher Education Administration Admission Requirements
                          Enrolling in the HEA Master’s or Ph. D Program:
                                      College Student Personnel                   Submit electronic versions
                                                                                       of your Resume,  
                                                                                    Letter of Introduction, 
   Submit Admission or                Complete Online Application via the            College or University 
Readmission Application to            Following Link:                                 Transcripts, writing 
Graduate and International                                                        sample, and the name and 
    Admissions Office                 http://graduateadmissions.utk.edu/          e‐mail of three references 
      (online only)                                                                          to the  
                                                                                       graduate school. 


          Register for                    Receive Acceptance 
            Classes                     Letter and Invitation to 
                                        CSP Interview Weekend                   Submit GRE scores to 
                                                                                the ELPS department. 



  CSP Admission

  It is a one-stop application process to apply to the UT Office of Graduate and International
  Admissions and the College Student Personnel program. To be considered for admission to the
  CSP program, please go to http://graduateadmissions.utk.edu/. Prospective students must submit
  their application and all application materials by January 3rd. Certain required items will be
  asked of each student. Students will need to have:

         a $35 non-refundable application fee.
         an earned undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or higher; Graduate GPA of 3.3 or higher.
         recent (within five years) GRE Scores of at least 900 (combined) on the verbal and
          quantitative sections and 4 on the writing portion. The application will request
          "unofficial" numbers, but you will be required to provide an "original" copy to our
          department. GRE codes needed by Ph.D. applicants: Country: 592 (U.S.A.); State: 43
          (TN); University: 1843 (U.T.); Department: 3001 (ELPS); Program: 3502 (Higher
          Education.
         three names with appropriate e-mails for references/raters which speak to your strengths
          and weaknesses as a student affairs/student services practitioner and as a student.

  Students will also be required to have the following items available in electronic format (MS
  Word or PDF) in order to complete the online application:

         a current resume.
         a copy of your transcripts from each previous college or university attended (unofficial
          copies will do).
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 13

Ph.D. Admission

It is a one-step process to apply to the UT Office of Graduate and International Admissions and
the Higher Education Administration program. To be considered for admission to the HEAM
program, please go to http://graduateadmissions.utk.edu/. Certain required items will be asked of
each student. In addition to all the above items (listed under College Student Personnel), the
applicant must have an overall GPA of 3.30 in previous graduate study which is required for
admission to doctoral study. Also in addition to above, the doctoral students will also be
required to have the following items available in electronic format (MS Word or PDF) in order
to complete the online application:

      a letter of introduction. Limit this letter to no more than 3 typed, double-spaced pages and
       including
      your career goals
      how your past educational, work, and/or personal experiences led you to these goals
      how you think this program and degree can assist you in reaching these goals
      a writing sample. This may be a copy of a thesis written for a graduate degree, a
       published article, a legal brief, a research report or course paper, or another form of
       writing that you feel represents your professional writing skills and style.

For Ph. D. candidates, an interview with the faculty may be required. Admission decisions are
made on a holistic basis to discern the candidate’s promise for doctoral study and to ascertain the
match of the candidate’s educational goals with the resources and goals of the Department.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 14

                                    Financial Support

                               Graduate Assistantships
The Department offers selected graduate students positions as graduate assistants. These
graduate students comprise a vital part of the departmental community. The Department follows
University guidelines regarding these appointments and related work assignments. Graduate
assistants should receive appropriate departmental and instructional team communications,
attend departmental and team meetings, and participate in departmental conferences, seminars, or
symposia. However, such activities should not interfere with the student’s primary educational
objective.

Selection of Graduate Assistants

Students interested in obtaining graduate assistantships within the Department should submit
complete assistantship applications to Ms. Constance Honorable, Office Supervisor, in BEC 325.
Faculty shall review applications and make recommendations to the Department Head regarding
assignment of available assistantships. The Department Head, in concert with the faculty,
determines the appropriate distribution of assistantships and assigns faculty supervisors for each
selected student. Pending the availability of departmental resources and satisfactory performance
of the student, graduate assistant appointments can be renewed up to five years. Faculty
supervisors are responsible for the evaluation of graduate assistants and must notify the
Department Head in writing of any reasons why an assistantship should not be renewed for an
otherwise eligible assistant prior to March 15. Work assignments for graduate assistants are
given by assigned faculty supervisors in collaboration with the Department Head.

More on Assistantship

Graduate assistantships are the primary source of funding for graduate students at UT and are
offered by academic departments and administrative offices of the university. An assistantship is
a financial award to a graduate student for part-time work in teaching, administration, or research
while pursuing an advanced degree. Appointments are normally on a one-fourth to one-half time
basis, usually requiring 10-20 hours of service per week. The annual stipend is payable in twelve
monthly installments. In addition to the stipend, Graduate Assistants (with appointments on a
one-fourth time basis or higher) are entitled to a waiver of maintenance fees and tuition for the
period of appointment in accordance with university policy. These appointments also include a
benefit of health insurance for the student.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 15

               Scholarships and Other Funding Opportunities
CEHHS has general scholarship forms for various scholarships. These forms can be found in the
Appendix D (pages 64-64) or at this website:
http://web.utk.edu/~cehhsstu/fin_aid/Graduate%20Scholarship%20Application.pdf


Other Scholarships available are the following:
THEC African American Grant
Based on available funding, this grant is offered to African-American interns. For more
information, contact the College’s Student Services Center at 865-974-8194.


                                    EAS Scholarships
The Billie Cannon De Mont Scholarship is awarded to a full-time masters or doctoral student
in Educational Administration. Recipient must possess excellence in scholarship, sensitivity to
current social problems, and a high degree of leadership potential.

The Orin Graff Scholarship is a substantial monetary award that is available to students
pursuing the doctoral degree in Educational Administration and Supervision. Recipients must be
in full-time residency at The University of Tennessee while they pursue the terminal degree.
Criteria for this award include evidence of the following qualities: (1) excellence in scholarship,
(2) sensitivity to current social problems, and (3) a high degree of leadership potential. This
award can be granted for up to two years.

The Erma Graff Scholarship is also a monetary award that is available to students pursuing the
doctoral degree in Educational Administration and Supervision. Recipients must be in full-time
residency at The University of Tennessee while they pursue the terminal degree. Criteria for this
award include evidence of the following qualities: (1) excellence in scholarship, (2) sensitivity to
current social problems, and (3) a high degree of leadership potential. This award can be granted
for up to two years.

Students interested in any of the above opportunities are encouraged to contact: Dr. Vincent
Anfara, ELPS Department Head, at 865-974-4139; Dr. Grady Bogue, HEA Ph.D. Program
Coordinator, at 865-974-6140; or Dr. Norma Mertz, CSP Program Coordinator at 865-974-6150.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 16

                                         Fellowships
For more information about fellowships available for graduate students at The University of
Tennessee log on to the following website: http://gradschool.utk.edu/fellowships.shtml

This site provides several on-campus funding opportunities as well as links to outside funding
opportunities.

Loans Available for Graduate Students

Graduate students interested in applying for financial support can find additional information at
the UTK financial aid website: http://finaid.utk.edu/ .
The following loan Types are available:

Federal Work Study

Federal Work Study is funded from federal and institutional resources. This is a need-based
program that allows eligible students to earn part of their educational expenses by working part
time. At UT this program awards students an average of $2,600 per year. The exact earning
potential depends upon award limit and hours actually worked. You may not work more than 20
hours per week during regular class sessions.

Students apply for Federal Work Study on the same form that they complete for Federal Aid (the
FAFSA). If you are interested in FWS, when asked if you (the student) will be interested in
student employment, your answer should be "yes." Of course, funds are limited; therefore, those
submitting the FAFSA before the priority deadline will have the greatest chance of being
awarded.

At the beginning of each term report to the Financial Aid Office with your social security card
and UT ID to fill out the appropriate paperwork to be placed in a position. You will be paid bi-
weekly, and the funds will be electronically deposited into your bank account. If you do not have
a bank account, your paycheck will be mailed to your home address.

For additional information, e-mail finaid@utk.edu or call (865) 974-3131.


                                       Student Loans

Federal Stafford Loan
Federal Stafford loans are fixed-rate federal student loans for undergraduate and graduate
students attending college at least half-time.

Subsidized Stafford Loans
Subsidized is a need-based loan program in which the government pays the interest that accrues
during the student's period of enrollment.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 17

Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
Unsubsidized is a non-need-based loan program in which the interest accrues while the student is
attending. The student has the option of paying the interest while in school on a monthly or
quarterly basis or deferring the interest until repayment begins. This accrued interest will be
capitalized.


Repayment
Repayment of the Federal Stafford Loan can be deferred up to six months upon graduation,
leaving the university, or dropping below half-time attendance. This loan is repaid through the
lender chosen by the student. All Stafford Loans have a fixed interest rate with a cap of 8.25%.


Loan Amounts
The maximum annual amounts, if eligible, that you can borrow as a graduate student is $20,500
per year. Graduate or professional students may accrue up to $138,500 ($65,500 subsidized and
$73,000 unsubsidized), which includes undergraduate loans.


                  CEHHS Graduate Student Advisory Board
The CEHHS Graduate Student Advisory Board is composed of graduate student representatives
from each department in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences. These students
are selected by their respective Department Heads to serve as liaisons between graduate students
and Dean Robert Rider. Please see the following website for further information:
http://cehhs.utk.edu/gradstudent/gsab.html

Graduate Student Colloquium

The Graduate Student Colloquium, held each March, provides an opportunity for graduate
students in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences to showcase their graduate-
level research through formal presentations and poster sessions. The colloquium is coordinated
by members of the Dean’s Graduate Student Advisory Board, and gives students a formal setting
for presenting their research in a non-threatening environment prior to participating in
professional conference presentations.


Graduate Student Travel Information

The College will match departmental funding up to $300.00 for presentation of a research paper.
Group presentations will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. A group presentation of more than
three presenters will receive reduced funding for the individuals involved. Requests for graduate
student travel support must be co-submitted by a faculty sponsor such as major professor or
research collaborator. In general, graduate students will be supported for a maximum of three
travel awards during their enrollment in the College.

Other funding possibilities for graduate student funding include the University Program Services
Fee (UPSF) Graduate Student Fund and the Kellie W. McGarrh Fund. Guidelines and submission
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 18

dates for these sources are available from Diane Booker in the Dean’s Office (974-6638). The
UPSF submission dates are firm and applications must be submitted well in advance of intended
travel time.

Requests for departmental and college funding must include the signature of the appropriate
Department Head along with the amount furnished by the Department and any other contributing
accounts other than the College account. Request forms are available from departmental
secretaries. Please submit requests on forms printed for the current academic year. Forms should
be completely filled out with the requested information. All items are important since we log all
travel by the person, the conference or purpose of the trip including places and dates and titles of
presentations made.

The application may be found in the Appendix E, page 66.


Graduate Student Senate Travel Award

The Graduate Student Senate, in cooperation with the Dean of Students and the Dean of the
Graduate School, awards funding for graduate and professional students to travel, present work,
and participate at scholarly conferences and events. Three travel award announcements are made
throughout the year, designed to roughly coincide with the academic term periods. These awards
are based on merit and are given to provide partial reimbursement of certain allowable expenses
such as transportation, lodging and registration expenses. Applications are considered by a
committee composed of graduate students, faculty members, and university administrators.

The application must be filled out completely and returned to the Office of the Dean of Students
with the supporting materials.

Travel fund application and checklist may be downloaded from the Graduate Student Senate
website. In order for the application to be complete, it must be received by the designated date at
the Dean of Students office. The current due date may be found at
http://web.utk.edu/~gss/travelfund/index.html.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 19

                              Registration Step-by-Step
1. Confirm your eligibility to enroll. Make sure one of the following is true: you have been
   admitted/readmitted for the exact term you are registering; OR if you are an undergraduate,
   you attended the semester before the one you are registering; OR if you are a graduate
   student, you attended at least one term during the year before the term you are registering.
2. Determine your UT Net ID and Password. Your UT Net ID and Password allows you to
   register for your classes, set your confirmation of attendance, and pay your fees. For more
   information about Net ID and Password, go to this page: http://registrar.utk.edu/student_id.sh
   tml for Net IDs and Student IDs.

3. Select the sections of the courses you want to take. Course Listings are online at:

      Banner System—MyUTK
      http://myutk
      (searchable by department or prefix, course,
      time of day and day of week) available from
      7:00am to 12:00am Monday through Saturday
      and 1:00pm to 6:00pm on Sundays

      Full-text Online Timetables
      http://myutk (UTK Timetable of classes, Search for term and then subject/program area)
      gs.shtml (full text online version—includes the
      following about courses: special instructions,
      additional fees & contact information). Full Text
      is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

4. Register online. Web Registration is the way to register online for classes at the University of
   Tennessee. Go to http://myutk for Web Registration. For more information about registering
   online: Online Registration at http://registrar.utk.edu/registration/online_faqs.shtml

5. Confirm that the University (Bursar) has your correct billing address. To verify and change
   your address go to Circle Park Online . http://myutk

6. Pay your fees AND confirm your attendance to avoid schedule cancellation! Even if your
   fees have been paid by financial aid or another third party, you MUST confirm your
   attendance. If you register by priority registration, your VOLXpress statement will be mailed
   to you. During final registration, please pick up your VOLXpress statement in 211 Student
   Services Building or 128 University Center. You may pay your account on MyUTK with
   Mastercard, Visa or Discover or by mail with a check, money order or cashier’s check. The
   MyUTK system is available to accept credit card payments 8:00 am to 8:00 pm, Monday
   through Friday.

7. Go to Class!!! If you decide to drop out of a class, it is always the responsibility of the
   student to drop courses not attended. Otherwise, you are liable for a grade of ‘F’ in the course
   and for payment of appropriate fees. If you decide not to continue your enrollment for the
   term (whether classes were attended or not), you must notify the Office of the University
   Registrar in 209 Student Services Building to complete the total withdrawal process. The
   Registrar’s Website is: http://registrar.tennessee.edu.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 20

Registration for Use of Facilities

Students using university facilities, services or faculty time, including summer term, must be
registered. Normally, students are registered for course work or thesis/dissertation credit.
Students who are not taking course work and are not yet eligible to register for thesis or
dissertation hours, must register for course 502 (Use of Facilities) if they wish to have borrowing
privileges in the University Libraries or to use computer labs, other labs, or other university
resources.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 21

            Degree Requirements for Programs in Educational
                    Administration and Supervision

Master of Science
The University of Tennessee’s Educational Administration and Supervision Program offers an
M.S. degree in Educational Administration licensure and non-licensure alternatives.

Degree Requirements

Core Requirements (513, 515, 548, 553)………………………………………………………………… 12
     Licensure Specialization (523, 554, 583 544, TPTE 519) or ……………………………………….15
     Non-licensure Specialization (selected by the student and advisor)
     Research (516 or equivalent)……………………………………………………………………….. 3
     Internship (580) required for licensure specialization……………………………………………… 6
                                                                        Total…………………36


Admission to Candidacy

In the EAS program, the Admission to Candidacy Form and the Graduation Application are
submitted the semester prior to graduation. This form must be signed by the student’s committee
and list all courses to be used for the degree, including transfer coursework.

Internship Objective

The Internship is designed to provide a link between theory and practice in Educational
Administration through planned fieldwork experiences. The goal of the internship is to provide
“on-the-job training.” During an internship, interns are expected to carry real and continuous
responsibility under the direct mentorship of an identified organizational leader. Intern activities
are to coordinate with the Tennessee Instructional Leadership Standards (TILS) and the Interstate
School Leader Licensure Standards (ISLLC).

Master’s Committee

A committee of at least three faculty members is chosen by each student. A minimum of two
members of this committee must represent the unit or major area. The responsibilities include
formulating the students program of coursework, supervising progress, recommending
admissions to candidacy, and coordinating the qualifying and final examinations.
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 22

Time Limit

All course requirements, the comprehensive examination; the School Leader Licensure
Assessment (SLLA) must be passed prior to the University submission of the licensure
application. Candidates have six calendar years from the time of entry to complete the M.S.
degree.

Masters forms are found in Appendix A, pages 44-48.
               Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 23

Specialist in Education
The University of Tennessee’s Educational Administration and Supervision Program offers an
Ed.S. degree in Education with a concentration in Educational Administration, with licensure
and non-licensure alternatives.

Degree Requirements

The Ed.S. with a major in educational administration requires a minimum of 42 hours of study.
A final comprehensive examination is required as is a culminating research paper or thesis
depending on the program. Students who are pursuing licensure in administration must also pass
the SLLA examination.

Education Administration Hours Credit

                                                                                                               Credit Hours
     Core Requirements (513, 515, 548, 553) .............................................................................. 12
      Licensure Specialization (523, 554, 583, ***TPTE 519, 544) or ....................................... 15
      Non-licensure specialization (selected by the student and advisor)
      Research (516, * 592, **Elective: EP 577) ...........................................................................9
      Internship (580 required for licensure students) ....................................................................6
      Electives for non-licensure students ......................................................................................6
                                                                        Total .............................................. 42
*A thesis option is available with approval of advisor. **Elective from outside the Educational
Administration area chosen in consultation with advisor. ***TPTE 519 or an approved
curriculum course. For additional course information, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

Ed.S. Committee

A committee of at least three faculty members is chosen by each student. A minimum of two
members of this committee must represent the unit or major area. The responsibilities include
formulating the student’s program of coursework, supervising progress, recommending
admissions to candidacy, directing research, and coordinating the qualifying and final
examinations.

Admission to Candidacy

In the Ed.S program, the Admission to Candidacy Form and the Graduation Application are
submitted the semester prior to graduation. This form must be signed by the student’s committee
and list all courses to be used for the degree, including transfer coursework. A qualifying
examination may be required for admission to candidacy if the student has a master’s degree
earned six years or more prior to admission to the program. This examination may be written
and/or oral.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 24

Research Requirements

In the problems in lieu of thesis option, a three credit hour research course must be taken as a
prerequisite for EA 592. The student must successfully complete the problems in lieu of thesis
research course while working on the research project in the semester it is accepted by the
Graduate School on behalf of the Graduate Council or the student will be required to register for
an additional three hours of EA 592. This “problems paper” must be prepared according to the
regulations in the most recent Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations, and the
student’s committee will grant final approval and acceptance of the problems in lieu of thesis.

Time Limit

All course requirements, the comprehensive examination, the School Leader Licensure
Assessment (SLLA) must be passed prior to the University submission of the licensure
application. Candidates have six calendar years from the time of entry to complete the Ed .S.
degree.

Ed.S. forms are found in Appendix A, pages 44-48. IRB forms required for human subjects prior
to conducting research are found in Appendix C, pages 54-63.

                                  ~•/•~•/•~ ~•/•~•/•~ ~•/•~•/•~
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 25

PreK-12 Licensure Certificate in Educational Administration
A PreK-12 Licensure Certificate in Educational Administration is an option for students seeking
licensure and who hold a minimum of a master’s degree in teaching or a related field with at
least three years of teaching experience. The certificate consists of a minimum of 21 hours and
the courses are taught concurrently with the M.S. and the Ed.S. degree programs. An on-the-job
internship is also required. Specific course requirements are outlined below. Student must pass
the SLLA examination prior to the university’s submission of the licensure application.

PreK-12 Licensure Certificate Required Credits

                                                                                                           Credit Hours
    Core Requirements (515, 548, 553) ....................................................................................9
    Licensure Specialization (554, 583, TPTE 519) .................................................................9
    Internship (580) (required for licensure specialization) ......................................................3
                                                                    Total ........................................... 21


*Research (516 or equivalent) may also be required if the student did not have a research course
involving data analysis in the master’s degree program.
             Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 26

Doctoral Programs (EAS)
The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies offers a Ph.D. degree with a major
in Education and a concentration in Leadership Studies in Education. Students in Leadership
Studies in Education are required to take courses with credits as shown below. Doctoral
committees may require students to take additional hours to fulfill degree requirements.

Admission

Students must submit a Graduate Application to the Office of Graduate and International
Admissions, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
Departmental Application for Graduate Study must also be submitted. Three rating forms from
those who know of the candidate’s professional record and promise are required. An overall
GPA of 3.30 in previous graduate study is required for admission to doctoral study and an
interview with the faculty may be required. Admission decisions are made on a holistic basis to
discern the candidate’s promise for doctoral study and to ascertain the match of the candidate’s
educational goals with the resources and goals of the Department.

Doctoral Hours Credit for Leadership Studies in Education (EAS)

     *Research .......................................................................................................................... 15
     **Core Requirements (minimum) .................................................................................... 12
     Concentration .................................................................................................................... 18
     Cognate ...............................................................................................................................6
     Dissertation ....................................................................................................................... 24
                                                                                      Total ........................................... 75

Independent Studies

Course requirements for the doctoral degree are considered “minimum” requirements. In
consultation with the dissertation chair/advisor, a doctoral student may arrange for an
independent study to fulfill a course requirement, to be part of additional courses beyond the
minimal degree requirements, or to help further their skills and professional interests.
Independent studies should be used sparingly.

Cognate Requirement Guidelines

Leadership Studies in Education’s cognate area consists of a minimum of six hours of graduate
coursework offered outside the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
(ELPS). A cognate may be defined in two different ways. First, the Department recognizes the
value of developing additional skills related to an individual’s future career plans. Cognate
courses may, then, be in areas not covered in the required/core curriculum. Second, the cognate
courses may be related to students’ research interest and serve as part of the foundation for work
on the dissertation. Finally, the two cognate courses, selected in consultation with the student’s
advisor, are related or connected in a logical way to the field of educational administration.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 27


Doctoral Committee

The major professor directs the student’s dissertation research and chairs the dissertation
committee. The student and the major professor identify a doctoral committee composed of at
least four faculty members holding the rank of assistant professor or above, three of whom,
including the chair, must be approved by the Graduate Council to direct doctoral research. At
least one member must be from an academic unit other than that of the student’s major field.
This committee is nominated by the Department Head and officially approved by the Dean of the
Graduate School.

The committee should be formed about the time a student is completing coursework and is ready
to take the comprehensive examination and start dissertation research. Doctoral committees may
be formed earlier if the student has a fairly well formulated topic for the dissertation and has
identified a faculty member to serve as chair. Prior to the completion of the coursework, the
entire Educational Administration faculty serve as the “committee” and advising is provided to
the doctoral student in the Leadership Forum course.

Subject to Graduate Council policies and individual program requirements, the committee must
approve all coursework applied toward the degree, certify the student’s mastery of the major
field and any cognate field, assist the student in conducting research, and recommend the
dissertation for approval and acceptance by the Graduate School.

Residence Requirements

Residence is defined as full-time registration (i.e., nine hours of coursework) for two consecutive
semesters (spring, fall, and summer) on the campus where the program is located. During
residence, it is expected that the student will be engaged in full-time, on-campus study toward a
graduate degree.

A statement as to how and during what period of time the residence requirement has been met
will be presented with the Application for Admission to Candidacy along with signatures of
approval from the major professor and the Department Head. More information about the
rationale for the residence requirement may be obtained from the Graduate Catalog Web site:
(http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/dlc/catalog/images/g/2007/g_1.pdf)

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to candidacy indicates agreement that the student has demonstrated the ability to
complete and master graduate work and that satisfactory progress has been made toward a
degree. Being “admitted to candidacy” connotes that all coursework has been completed (or that
the student is registered for the last semester of courses needed for the degree) and that the
comprehensive examination has been passed.

A student may be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree after passing the comprehensive
examination and must maintain at least a B average in all graduate coursework. Each student is
responsible for filing the admission to candidacy form, which lists all courses to be used for the
degree, including courses taken at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, or at another
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 28

institution prior to admission to the doctoral program. Admission to candidacy must be applied
for and approved by the Office of the University Registrar at least one full semester prior to the
date the degree is to be conferred.

Registration for ELPS 600 and Continuous Registration

ELPS 600 (Dissertation Research) is reserved for doctoral research and dissertation hours. Initial
registration for 600 generally corresponds to the time at which a student begins work actively on
dissertation research following completion of all coursework and admission to candidacy. From
this time on, students are required to register continuously for at least 3 hours of 600 each
semester, including summer term. A minimum total of 24 hours of course 600 is required and no
more than 99 credits of 600 can be earned. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the
doctoral student’s advisor/dissertation chair and approved by the Department Head.

Leave of Absence

A student who will not be using faculty services and/or university facilities for a period of time
may request leaves of absence from dissertation research up to a maximum of six terms
(including summer terms). The request, approved by the major professor, will be submitted to
the Graduate School.

Dissertation

The dissertation represents the culmination of an original major research project completed by
the student. The organization, method of presentation, and subject matter of the dissertation are
important in conveying to others the results of such research.

A student should be registered for the number of dissertation hours representing the fraction of
effort devoted to this phase of the candidate’s program. An electronic copy of the dissertation
(prepared according to the regulations in the most recent Guide to the Preparation of Theses and
Dissertations) must be submitted to and accepted by the Graduate School on behalf of the
Graduate Council.

Dissertation Proposal

The dissertation proposal for this program consists of fully-developed Chapters 1, 2 and 3.
These chapters are to be developed in consultation with the student’s dissertation chair/major
professor. Attention must be given to both content and formatting (APA− 5th or 6th edition).

Assessment of Student Progress

Students are evaluated annually by the program faculty to ensure adequate progress is being
made toward degree completion. In addition to academic reasons, students may be dismissed
from the program for lack of progress, particularly at the stage of dissertation writing.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 29

Time Limit

Comprehensive examinations must be taken within five years and all requirements must be
completed within eight years from the time of a student’s first enrollment in a doctoral degree
program.

Doctoral forms are found in Appendix B, pages 49-53. IRB forms required for completing the
dissertation are found in Appendix C, pages 54-63.
              Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 30

                              Degree Requirements for Programs in
                               Higher Education Administration
Under Higher Education Administration, two programs are offered—a major in College Student
Personnel under the M.S. degree and a major in Higher Education Administration under the
Ph.D. degree.

Master of Science in College Student Personnel
The college student personnel program is a two-year, practitioner-oriented master’s degree
designed to prepare student personnel administrators and for colleges and universities.
Philosophically based in college and university administration and resting on standards articulated
by the Council for Advancement of Standards for Student Services/Student Development
programs, the program prepares individuals for a wide and growing variety of student and
university service positions in post-secondary institutions including admissions, orientation,
records, financial aid, academic advising, housing, athletics, disability services, career services,
student activities and leadership development, institutional research and assessment, advancement
and alumni relations, Greek life, and international education.

Required Hours Credit—M.S. Degree

                                                                                                                       Credit Hours
     Core Requirements (513, 542, 543, 570, 572,595) ............................................................ 18
     Elective ...............................................................................................................................6
     Research (516) ....................................................................................................................3
     Practicum Experiences (2) (599) ........................................................................................3
     Capstone Seminar ...............................................................................................................3
     Problems in Lieu of Thesis (503)........................................................................................3
                                                                                       Total ........................................... 36
                                                 or
     Thesis (500) ........................................................................................................................6
                                                                                       Total ........................................... 39

Admission to Candidacy

In the CSP program, The Admission to Candidacy Form and the Graduation Application are
submitted the semester prior to graduation. This form must be signed by the student’s committee
and list all courses to be used for the degree, including transfer coursework.

Time Limit

Candidates have six calendar years from the time of entry to complete the M.S. degree.
             Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 31

Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration
The major in higher education administration under the Ph.D. offers advanced graduate study to
those students aspiring to enhance their leadership knowledge and skill for service in their
current positions, to establish knowledge and skill bases for a more responsible executive
leadership appointment, to build the capacity and inclination for active participation in policy
dialogue related to the purpose and performance of higher education, and to prepare selected
scholars for service in faculty and policy scholar roles.

Interdisciplinary in design, the program features core coursework in higher education
foundations, leadership and organizational theory, research foundations, and specialization
interests. The program also features forum and seminar experiences for all students in a
humanities and research seminar in the first year of the program and an issues and inquiry
seminar in the second year of the program.

Doctoral Hours Credit for Higher Education Administration (HEA)

                                                                                                                    Credit Hours
    Higher Education Leadership and Foundations ................................................................. 12
    Research Foundations ....................................................................................................... 15
    Specialization.................................................................................................................... 21
    Dissertation ....................................................................................................................... 24
                                                                                    Total ........................................... 72

Doctoral Committee

The major professor directs the student’s dissertation research and chairs the dissertation
committee. The student and the major professor identify a doctoral committee composed of at
least four faculty members holding the rank of assistant professor or above, three of whom,
including the chair, must be approved by the Graduate Council to direct doctoral research. At
least one member must be from an academic unit other than that of the student’s major field.
This committee is nominated by the Department Head or College Dean and approved by the
Dean of the Graduate School.

The committee should be formed within the first two years of doctoral study. Subject to Graduate
Council policies and individual program requirements, the committee must approve all
coursework applied toward the degree, certify the student’s mastery of the major field and any
cognate field, assist the student in conducting research, and recommend the dissertation for
approval and acceptance by the Graduate School.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 32

Residence Requirements for Higher Education Administration (HEA)

Residence is defined as full-time registration for a given semester on the campus where the
program is located. The summer term is included in this period. During residence, it is expected
that the student will be engaged in full-time on-campus study toward a graduate degree.

For the doctoral degree, a minimum of two consecutive semesters of residence is required.
Individual doctoral programs may have additional residence requirements.

A statement as to how and during what period of time the residence requirement has been met
will be presented with the Application for Admission to Candidacy along with signatures of
approval from the major professor and the Department Head/Program Coordinator. More
information about the rationale for the residence requirement may be obtained from the Graduate
Catalog Website: http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/dlc/catalog/images/g/2007/g_1.pdf

Admission to Candidacy

Students successfully completing the comprehensive examination will file the Admission to
Candidacy form signed by members of their committee with the Graduate School. Admission to
candidacy must be filed at least one semester before the Ph.D. is to be conferred.

Dissertation

The dissertation represents the culmination of an original major research project completed by
the student. The organization, method of presentation, and subject matter of the dissertation are
important in conveying to others the results of such research.

A student should be registered for the number of dissertation hours representing the fraction of
effort devoted to this phase of the candidate’s program. Paper or electronic submission will be
approved by the students committee prior to final preparation of the dissertation. Two paper
copies or an electronic copy of the dissertation (prepared according to the regulations in the most
recent Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations must be submitted to and accepted
by the Graduate School on behalf of the Graduate Council.

Time Limit

Comprehensive examinations must be taken within five years, and all requirements must be
completed within eight years from the time of a student’s first enrollment in a doctoral degree
program.

Doctoral forms are found in Appendix B, pages 49-53.

IRB forms required for human subjects prior to conducting research are found in Appendix C,
pages 54-63.


                                   ~•/•~•/•~ ~•/•~•/•~ ~•/•~•/•~
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 33

                                       Examinations

       Programs in Educational Administration and Supervision

Master of Science: SLLA and the Final Examination

A candidate for the M.S. degree (Licensure Alternative) must pass the School Leader Licensure
Assessment (SLLA) the semester prior to taking the final examination. A candidate cannot take
the final examination until he or she has passed the SLLA. The final examination (given to non-
thesis students) is a demonstration of the candidate’s ability to integrate knowledge across
coursework and make connections between theory and the world of practice.

To be eligible to take the comprehensive examination, student must be enrolled in the last
semester of their program and in the process of completing their final coursework.

Specialist in Education: Final Examination

A candidate for the Ed. S. degree (Licensure Alternative) must pass the SLLA examination in
addition to an examination covering the student’s research and program of study. The final
examination cannot be administered until he SLLA has been passed. A non-thesis student must
pass a final written, or written and oral examination, on all work offered for the degree. The
examination is not merely a test over coursework, but a demonstration of the candidate’s ability
to integrate materials in the major and related fields. Each examination is conducted by the
program faculty. In case of failure, the candidate may not be reexamined until the following
semester. The result of the second examination is final.

To be eligible to take the comprehensive examination, student must be enrolled in the last
semester of their program and in the process of completing their final coursework.

Doctoral Programs (EAS): Doctoral Examinations: Qualifying and Comprehensive

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, through the Educational
Administration faculty, may administer diagnostic and/or qualifying examinations in the early
stages of the student’s doctoral program. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination
and a defense of dissertation are required for all doctoral degrees. Registration is required during
the term in which the examinations are taken.

Successful completion of a doctoral comprehensive examination is required for all doctoral
degrees in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and indicates that, in
the judgment of the faculty and/or doctoral committee, the doctoral student can think analytically
and creatively, has a comprehensive knowledge of the field, knows how to use academic
resources, and is deemed capable of completing the dissertation. (Please refer to the most current
Graduate Catalog for more information on the comprehensive examination).

The nature of the comprehensive examination (the questions asked and the procedures for
completion of the examination) is decided upon by the doctoral student’s dissertation committee.
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 34


For the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies:

   (1) The comprehensive examination is generally taken when the doctoral student has
       completed all or nearly all prescribed courses (i.e., in the last semester of coursework).
   (2) The nature and number of questions which comprise the examination are determined by
       the doctoral student’s dissertation committee and coordinated by the committee’s chair.
   (3) The comprehensive examination will be comprised of both a written component and an
       oral defense of the written responses.
   (4) The faculty/dissertation committee has three decisions that may be rendered relative to
       the student’s performance: (a) pass—with “Admission to Candidacy” paperwork being
       signed and forwarded to the Graduate School, (b) conditional pass—indicating some
       revision is needed before the faculty will sign and forward “Admission to Candidacy”
       paperwork, and (c) fail—the student has not demonstrated the skills and knowledge
       needed to proceed to dissertation writing, is not admitted to candidacy, and the fail is
       officially recorded on the “Admission to Candidacy” form and reported to the Graduate
       School.
   (5) Students are afforded two opportunities at passing the doctoral comprehensive
       examination. If a student fails the comprehensive examination, the scheduling of the
       second attempt is to be determined by the student’s committee.
   (6) Students who receive a “conditional pass” will have to comply with conditions placed on
       the revision relative to variables like time (a maximum time of three month is allowable).
       Failure to comply with any and all conditions will result in the “conditional pass” being
       turned into a “fail.”
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 35

                                       Examinations

               Programs in Higher Education Administration

Final Examination CSP Program

Students are required to complete either a thesis or problems-in-lieu of thesis as a culminating
activity. Both the thesis and problems in lieu of thesis (also called the problems paper) involve
students identifying an issue, problem, or gap in knowledge that they will explore. Both a
problems paper and a thesis must be defended before a committee of three full-time faculty
members.

The options for a problems paper include: (a) a pilot study, (b) a project, or (c) a critical review
of the research or literature on a topic in student affairs/higher education. The length of a
problems paper is approximately 30 pages. For the problems paper, the committee members
must have their doctorate, but may be adjunct faculty.

In addition to the above, a thesis involves conducting original research and reporting the results
and implications for policy, practice, and future research. A thesis is usually more than 90 pages.
For this option, the committee members must be full-time faculty members and have an earned
doctorate.

M.S. forms are found in Appendix A, pages 44-48.

Doctoral Examinations: Qualifying and Comprehensive

Departments may, at their option, administer diagnostic and/or qualifying examinations in the
early stages of the student’s doctoral program. Successful completion of a comprehensive
examination and a defense of dissertation is required for all doctoral degrees. Registration is
required the term in which the examination is taken.

This written portion of the comprehensive examination consists of written responses to “take
home” examination questions framed by the four members of the student’s doctoral committee.
Student responses to the questions are evaluated by the committee in an oral examination to
follow. At or toward the end of course work, each student must take and pass a comprehensive
examination. An overall GPA of 3.5 is required to take the comprehensive examination in the
Higher Education Administration program.

Successful completion of a doctoral comprehensive examination is required for all doctoral
degrees in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and indicates that, in
the judgment of the faculty and/or doctoral committee, the doctoral student can think analytically
and creatively, has a comprehensive knowledge of the field, knows how to use academic
resources, and is deemed capable of completing the dissertation. (Please refer to the most current
Graduate Catalog for more information on the comprehensive examination).
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 36

For the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies:

   (1) The comprehensive examination is generally taken when the doctoral student has
       completed all or nearly all prescribed courses (i.e., in the last semester of coursework).
   (2) The nature and number of questions which comprise the examination are determined by
       the doctoral student’s dissertation committee and coordinated by the committee’s chair.
   (3) The comprehensive examination will be comprised of both a written component and an
       oral defense of the written responses.
   (4) The faculty/dissertation committee has three decisions that may be rendered relative to
       the student’s performance: (a) pass—with “Admission to Candidacy” paperwork being
       signed and forwarded to the Graduate School, (b) conditional pass—indicating some
       revision is needed before the faculty will sign and forward “Admission to Candidacy”
       paperwork, and (c) fail—the student has not demonstrated the skills and knowledge
       needed to proceed to dissertation writing, is not admitted to candidacy, and the fail is
       officially recorded on the “Admission to Candidacy” form and reported to the Graduate
       School.
   (5) Students are afforded two opportunities at passing the doctoral comprehensive
       examination.
   (6) Students who receive a “conditional pass” will have to comply with conditions placed on
       the revision relative to variables like time (a maximum time of three month is allowable).
       Failure to comply with any and all conditions will result in the “conditional pass” being
       turned into a “fail.”
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 37

                         Standards, Problems and Appeals
Should you not be able to register for a class you need, contact your program area secretary.
They have the capability to bypass the system and register you for courses. Your professors do
not have this ability, but will need to grant approval.

Should a class be listed as full, you may still be able to take it. It requires you speaking to the
professor prior to classes starting and having them sign an add slip. “Wait listing” is also an
available route to pursue on the online registration system.

ELPS Faculty and Staff (including administrative staff) contact information is on pages 7-8. The
Academic Calendar is available in Appendix F, page 67.

Grade Point Average and Grades

The academic records of all graduate students are reviewed at the end of each semester,
including the summer term. Graduate students must maintain a cumulative grade point average
(GPA) of at least 3.0 on all graduate courses taken for a letter grade of A-F. Grades of S/NC,
P/NP, and I, which have no numerical equivalent, are excluded from this computation.

The grading system available for a course is based on the level of the course. Courses numbered
500-699 are graded letter grade only, except where the Graduate Catalog indicates
Satisfactory/No Credit only or optional Program/No Program (i.e., 600 Dissertation). There are
restrictions regarding the use of Satisfactory/No Credit graded courses, including the number of
hours that may be used toward any degree program.

No graduate student may repeat a course for the purpose of raising a grade already received. A
graduate student may not do additional work nor repeat an examination to raise a final grade. A
change of grade may occur only in cases of arithmetic or clerical error. An instructor may not
initiate a change of grade as a result of a reevaluation of the quality of the student’s performance
nor as a result of additional work performed by the student.

Incomplete Grades

A grade of I received in a graduate course is computed into the GPA as no quality points.
Students may receive a temporary grade indicating that the student has performed satisfactorily
in the course but, due to unforeseen circumstances, has been unable to finish all requirements.
An I is not given to enable a student to do additional work to raise a deficient grade. The
instructor, in consultation with the student, decides the terms for the removal of the I, including
the time limit for removal. If the I is not removed within one calendar year, the grade will be
changed to an F. The course will not be counted in the cumulative grade point average until a
final grade is assigned. No student may graduate with an I on the record.

Assessment of Student Progress

Student progress is assessed annually by program faculty. In addition to academic indicators, all
students in the M.S., Ed.S. and certificate program in EAS are assessed according to the list of
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 38

dispositions that are part of the NCATE review process. EAS students receive a list of these
dispositions at the time of admission into the program. An annual evaluation letter is sent to the
student and a copy is placed in the student’s files, housed in the department.

Academic Standards

Graduate education requires continuous evaluation of the student. This includes not only periodic
objective evaluation, such as the cumulative grade point average, performance on comprehensive
examinations, and acceptance of the thesis or dissertation, but also judgments by the faculty of
the student’s progress and potential. Continuation in a program is determined by consideration of
all these elements by the faculty and the head of the academic unit.

The academic records of all graduate students are reviewed at the end of each semester,
including the summer term. Graduate students must maintain a cumulative grade point average
(GPA) of at least 3.0 on all graduate courses taken for a letter grade of A-F. Grades of S/NC,
P/NP, and I, which have no numerical equivalent, are excluded from this computation.

Departments and programs may have requirements for continuation or graduation in addition to
the minimum requirements set forth in this catalog for all graduate programs. It is the student’s
responsibility to be familiar with the special requirements of the department or program.

Academic Probation

Upon completion of 9 hours of graduate course work, a graduate student will be placed on
academic probation when his/her cumulative GPA falls below 3.0. A student will be allowed to
continue graduate study in subsequent semesters if each semester’s grade point average is 3.0 or
greater. Upon achieving a cumulative GPA of 3.0, the student will be removed from
probationary status.

Dismissal

If a student is on academic probation, the degree or non-degree status will be terminated by the
Dean of the Graduate School if the student’s semester GPA falls below 3.0 in a subsequent
semester. When the particular circumstances are deemed to justify continuation, and upon
recommendation of the appropriate academic unit and approval of the Dean of the Graduate
School, a student on probation whose semester GPA is below 3.0 may be allowed to continue on
a semester-by-semester basis.

Dismissal of a graduate student by a department or program is accomplished by written notice to
the student, with a copy to the Graduate School. In those cases where the department’s
requirements for continuation are more stringent than university requirements for graduate
programs, the Dean of the Graduate School will evaluate the student’s record to determine
whether the student is eligible to apply for a change of status and register in another area of
study. Registration for courses in a department from which a student has been dismissed will not
be permitted, except by written authorization from that department.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 39

Academic Honesty

Academic integrity is a responsibility of all members of the academic community. An honor
statement is included on the application for admission and readmission. The applicant’s signature
acknowledges that adherence is confirmed. The honor statement declares

An essential feature of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is a commitment to maintaining an
atmosphere of intellectual integrity and academic honesty. As a student of the university, I
pledge that I will neither knowingly give nor receive any inappropriate assistance in academic
work, thus affirming my own personal commitment to honor and integrity.

Plagiarism

Students shall not plagiarize. Plagiarism is using the intellectual property or product of someone
else without giving proper credit. The undocumented use of someone else’s words or ideas in
any medium of communication (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge) is
a serious offense subject to disciplinary action that may include failure in a course and/or
dismissal from the university. Some examples of plagiarism are

      Using without proper documentation (quotation marks and a citation) written or spoken
       words, phrases, or sentences from any source.
      Summarizing without proper documentation (usually a citation) ideas from another
       source (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge).
      Borrowing facts, statistics, graphs, pictorial representations, or phrases without
       acknowledging the source (unless such information is recognized as common
       knowledge).
      Submitting work, either in whole or in part, created by a professional service and used
       without attribution (e.g., paper, speech, bibliography, or photograph).

Extreme caution should be exercised by students involved in collaborative research to avoid
questions of plagiarism. If in doubt, students should check with the major professor and the Dean
of the Graduate School about the project. Plagiarism will be investigated when suspected and
prosecuted if established.


Appeals Process

The Graduate Council Appeal Procedure can be obtained at the Graduate School or at
http://gradschool.utk.edu/GraduateCouncil/AcadPoli/appealprocedure.pdf. Normally, grievances
should be handled first at the department level through the student’s academic advisor, the
graduate program director, or the department head. Further appeal may be made to the dean of
the respective college, the Graduate Council through the Assistant Dean of the Graduate School,
and ultimately to the Dean of the Graduate School.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 40

Appeals may involve the interpretation of and adherence to university, college, and department
policies and procedures as they apply to graduate education and the issuance of grades based on
specific allowable reasons stipulated in the Graduate Council Appeal Procedure

            Useful Information: Net ID and Email Information
What’s a NetID?

All faculty, staff, and students of The University of Tennessee are provided with a Network
IDentifier (NetID). When used with its associated password, the NetID provides access to
network-based services at the University. For instance, you can use your NetID to look up
articles in library databases, buy parking permits, or access the Blackboard course management
system. Your NetID is also used to access your email account on the central mail server.

The NetID is also used to form your short, or University-style, email address (netid@utk.edu).
By default, netid@utk.edu points to your central server account, if you have one. However, you
can route mail from netid@utk.edu to any email address you prefer. All students must have a
working University-style address.

What is my NetID?

You can find out what your NetID is by looking it up in the UT Online Directory. Go to
http://directory.utk.edu and type your name in the search box. If you have requested privacy,
your name will not be listed. You will need to contact the OIT Help Desk for assistance.

What is my NetID Password?

By default you have a NetID password composed of the following three pieces of information:

       The first two letters of your birth month in lower case.
       The last two digits of your birth year.
       The last four digits of your UT ID Number.

For example, if you were born February 1979 and your UT ID Number is 123-45-6789 then your
default password would be fe796789.

Since your default password is made up of personal information that is relatively insecure, you
must change your password to something more private as soon as you can (see Changing Your
Password). You are required to change your password every 180 days.

Registering for an Email Account

All UT students are required to have a UT e-mail address. Incoming students are given an
account upon acceptance to the university. The university is in the process of moving to one e-
mail system. If you were accepted to the university before March 13, 2006, you were given a
WebMail account. You will want to upgrade to all the features and functionality of Tmail as
soon as possible (http://oit.utk.edu/exchange/newstudent). If you have already upgraded, or were
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 41

accepted to the university after March 13th you are ready to check your account. Go to Tmail
(http://tmail.utk.edu) and log in using your NetID and Password.

NOTE: Students, faculty, and staff can find out information about forwarding or registering for
an account at http://oit.utk.edu/exchange/faq. You must register for an email account before you
can use it. To register, go to: https://tmail.utk.edu/uact/register.asp.

Accessing Email with Webmail

Probably the easiest way to access your email is using TMail, a browser-based email program.
Simply go to the TMail page (http://tmail.utk.edu), select “UTK-MAIL” from the list of servers,
and login.

Changing Your Password

You may change your email account password using the OIT Account Management web
interface. You may also use this interface to check the security of your password or to reset a lost
password.

How To Get a VolCard

The VolCard is issued to a new student after admission at the appropriate university level or
anytime during the year to all students. The VolCard is used in nearly all aspects of campus life
to obtain services including meals, vending machines, computers, laundry machines, check
cashing, sporting events, cultural attractions, residence halls access, library, recreational facilities
and equipment, University Bookstore, and much more. Many students have established debit or
charge accounts which are accessed through use of the VolCard ID. These cards are non-
transferable and may not be duplicated. The VolCard must be carried at all times for purposes of
identification. Students are responsible for the safekeeping of this card and must immediately
report it lost or stolen if the card is not in their possession. Failure to notify the VolCard office
will make the student liable for any unauthorized charges to the debit on charge accounts the
student may have. To obtain a new VolCard or replace a lost or stolen card, report to the
VolCard Office, Room 472, South Stadium Hall (between gates 12 and 13 at Neyland Stadium)
on Stadium Drive. There is a minimum charge of $10.00 for replacement of a VolCard
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 42

Useful UT Websites

Best Practices in Teaching http://gradschool.utk.edu/orientation/teaching.shtml
Blackboard website: http://online.utk.edu/
Bursar’s Office Website: http://web.utk.edu/~bursar/
Campus Maps website: http://utk.edu/maps/
Center for International Education http://web.utk.edu/~globe/index.php
Circle Park On-line website: http://cpo.utk.edu/
Computer training: http://oit.utk.edu/
Counseling Center www.utk.edu/counselingcenter
Financial Aid: http://web.utk.edu/~finaid/
Funding, Fellowships, Assistantships for Graduate Students http://gradschool.utk.edu
Graduate School http://gradschool.utk.edu
Graduate Catalog http://catalog.utk.edu
Graduate Student Appeals Procedure http://gradschool.utk.edu/GradAppealHbook.pdf
Graduate Student Senate http://web.utk.edu/~gss
Graduate and International Admissions http://admissions.utk.edu/graduate/
International House http://web.utk.edu/~ihouse
Judicial Affairs http://web.utk.edu/~osja/
New Graduate Student On-line Orientation: http://gradstudies.utk.edu/orientation/
Office of Equity and Diversity http://oed.utk.edu
Office of Minority Student Affairs/Black Cultural Center http://omsa.utk.edu
OIT http://oit.utk.edu/
Parking Services: http://web.utk.edu/~pso/
Research Compliance/Research with Human Subjects http://research.utk.edu/humansubjects/
Registrar’s Office: http://registrar.tennessee.edu/
SPEAK Testing Program http://gradschool.utk.edu/speaktest.shtml
Thesis/Dissertation Website http://web.utk.edu/~thesis/
VolAware http://volaware.utk.edu
Library Website for Graduate Students http://www.lib.utk.edu/refs/gradservices.html
Housing http://uthousing.utk.edu/sutherland/sutherlandresources.htm
Student Health Services: http://web.utk.edu/~shs/
UT Bookstore website: http://web.utk.edu/~bkstore/
UT Computer store website: http://utbookstore.utk.edu/uccs/index.php
UT Dining Services: http://www.utdining.com/
UT Institutes and Centers: http://utk.edu/centers/
UT Library Info: http://www.lib.utk.edu/
UT RecSports website: http://recsports.utk.edu/
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 43

                                                    Appendixes
     Appendixes                                                                                                        Pages

A. Masters and Ed.S. Forms…………………………………………………………….44-48

     Forms available via: http://gradschool.utk.edu/gradforms.shtml


B. Doctoral Forms ........................................................................................................... 49-53

     Forms available via: http://gradschool.utk.edu/gradforms.shtml


C. IRB Forms ................................................................................................................... 54-63

     Forms available via: https://my.tennessee.edu/portal/page?_
     pageid=43,570549&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL


D. Graduate Scholarship Application .............................................................................. 64-65

     Forms available via: http://web.utk.edu/~cehhsstu/fin_aid/
     Graduate%20Scholarship%20Application.pdf


E. Request for Graduate Travel Form ............................................................................. ….66

     Forms available via: http://web.utk.edu/~edpsych/Travel/
     gradstudent-travel.pdf


F. 2009-2010 Academic Calendar................................................................................... ….67
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 44

       Appendix A • Master’s and Ed.S. Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 45

       Appendix A • Master’s and Ed.S. Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 46

       Appendix A • Master’s and Ed.S. Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 47

       Appendix A • Master’s and Ed.S. Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 48

       Appendix A • Master’s and Ed.S. Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 49

              Appendix B • Doctoral Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 50

              Appendix B • Doctoral Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 51

              Appendix B • Doctoral Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 52

              Appendix B • Doctoral Forms
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 53

              Appendix B • Doctoral Forms
                  Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 54

                                         Appendix C • IRB Forms


                                                      FORM A
                  Certification for Exemption from IRB Review for Research Involving Human Subjects



A. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR(s) and/or CO-PI(s) (For student projects, list both the student and the advisor.):

B. DEPARTMENT:

C. COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER OF PI(s) and CO-PI(s):

D. TITLE OF PROJECT:

E. EXTERNAL FUNDING AGENCY AND ID NUMBER (if applicable):

F. GRANT SUBMISSION DEADLINE (if applicable):

G. STARTING DATE (NO RESEARCH MAY BE INITIATED UNTIL CERTIFICATION IS GRANTED.):

H. ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (Include all aspects of research and final write-up.):

I.   RESEARCH PROJECT

     1. Objective(s) of Project (Use additional page, if needed.):

     2. Subjects (Use additional page, if needed.):

     3. Methods or Procedures (Use additional page, if needed.):

     4. CATEGORY(s) FOR EXEMPT RESEARCH PER 45 CFR 46 (See instructions for categories.):

J. CERTIFICATION: The research described herein is in compliance with 45 CFR 46.101(b) and presents subjects
     with no more than minimal risk as defined by applicable regulations.

Principal Investigator: ______________________________            ________________________________ ___________
                                         Name                     Signature                           Date

Student Advisor: _________________________________              __________________________________ ___________
                                  Name                         Signature                              Date

Department Review Committee Chair: _______________________ ___________________________ ___________
                                            Name                           Signature                  Date

APPROVED:
Department Head: _______________________________              __________________________________ ___________
                           Name                                Signature                          Date


           COPY OF THIS COMPLETED FORM MUST BE SENT TO COMPLIANCE OFFICE IMMEDIATELY UPON COMPLETION.

Rev. 01/2005

                                                     Note:
               Dr. Ernest Brewer, Professor, ELPS, is the Department Review Committee Chair.
            Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 55

                                   Appendix C • IRB Forms
                INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING FORM A
    PLEASE TYPE THE INFORMATION REQUESTED ON THE FRONT OF THIS
                               FORM

Provide the required information in the space available if at all possible. If additional space is necessary,
attach a separate sheet. Submit one copy of this form to the Chair of your Departmental Review Committee
for review and approval. [PLEASE NOTE: This form may be reproduced on a personal computer and printed
on a high quality printer (e.g., LaserJet, DeskJet). Form A was originally created under WordPerfect 6.1 and
printed on a HP LaserJet III printer using a 9-point CG Times font.]

ALL SIGNATURES MUST BE ORIGINAL on this form. When certified by your department or unit
head, a copy of the signed Form A will be returned to the Principal Investigator and a copy will be returned
to the Research Compliance Services Section, Office of Research.

I.1. OBJECTIVES: Briefly state, in non-technical language, the purpose of the research, with special
reference to human subjects involved.

I.2. SUBJECTS: Briefly describe the subjects by number to be used, criteria of selection or exclusion, the
population from which they will be selected, duration of involvement, and any special characteristics
necessary to the research.

I.3. METHODS OR PROCEDURES: Briefly enumerate, in non-technical language, the research methods
which directly involve use of human subjects. List any potential risks, or lack of such, to subjects and any
protection measures. Explain how anonymity of names and confidentiality of materials with names and/or
data will be obtained and maintained. List the names of individuals who will have access to names and/or
data.

I.4. CATEGORY(s) FOR EXEMPT RESEARCH PER 45 CFR 46: Referring to the extracts below from
Federal regulations, cite the paragraph(s) which you deem entitle this research project to certification as
exempt from review by the Institutional Review Board. 45 CFR 46.101(b): Research activities in which
the only involvement of human subjects will be in one or more of the following categories are exempt
from IRB review:

(1) Research conducted in established or commonly accepted educational settings, involving normal
educational practices, such as: (i) research on regular and special education instructional strategies, or (ii)
research on the effectiveness of or the comparison among instructional techniques, curricula, or classroom
management methods.

(2) Research involving the use of educational tests (cognitive, diagnostic, aptitude, achievement), survey
procedures, interview procedures or observation of public behavior, unless: (i) information obtained is
recorded in such a manner that human subjects can be identified, directly or through identifiers linked to the
subjects; and (ii) any disclosure of the human subjects' responses outside the research could reasonably place
the subjects at risk of criminal or civil liability or be damaging to the subjects' financial standing,
employability, or reputation.

PLEASE NOTE: An exemption cannot be used when children are involved for research involving survey or
interview procedures or observations of public behavior, except for research involving observation of public
behavior when the investigator(s) do not participate in the activities being observed. [45 CFR 46.401(b)]
               Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 56

                                Appendix C • IRB Forms
(3) Research involving the use of educational tests (cognitive, diagnostic, aptitude,
achievement), survey procedures, interview procedures, or observation of public behavior that
is not exempt under paragraph (2) above, if: (i) the human subjects are elected or appointed
public officials or candidates for public office; or (ii) Federal statute(s) require(s) without
exception that the confidentiality of the personally identifiable information will be maintained
throughout the research and thereafter.

(4) Research involving the collection or study of existing data, documents, records,
pathological specimens or diagnostic specimens, if these sources are publicly available or if the
information is recorded by the investigator in such a manner that subjects cannot be identified,
directly or through identifiers linked to the subjects.

(5) Research and demonstration projects which are conducted by or subject to the approval of
Federal Department or Agency heads, and which are designed to study, evaluate, or otherwise
examine: (i) public benefit or service programs; (ii) procedures for obtaining benefits or
services under those programs; (iii) possible changes in or alternatives to those programs or
procedures; or (iv) possible changes in methods or levels of payment for benefits or services
under those programs.

(6) Taste and food quality evaluation and consumer acceptance studies, if wholesome foods
without additives are consumed or if a food is consumed that contains a food ingredient at or
below the level and for a use found to be safe, or agricultural chemical or environmental
contaminants at or below the level found to be safe, by the Food and Drug Administration or
approved by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Food Safety and Inspection Service
of the US Department of Agriculture.

For additional information on Form A, contact the Office of Research Compliance Officer by
e-mail or by phone at (865) 974-3466.

Rev. 01/2005
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 57

                            Appendix C • IRB Forms

                            FORM B APPLICATION



All applicants are encouraged to read the Form B guidelines. If you have any questions as
you develop your Form B, contact your Departmental Review Committee (DRC) or
Research Compliance Services at the Office of Research.


                                        FORM B

IRB # ____________________________

Date Received in OR ________________




                       THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
                                            	
           Application for Review of Research Involving Human Subjects



I. IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECT

   1.   Principal Investigator Co-Principal Investigator:
        Complete name and address including telephone number and e-mail address

        Faculty Advisor:
        Complete name and address including telephone number and e-mail address

        Department:

   2. Project Classification: Enter one of the following terms as appropriate:
   Dissertation, Thesis, Class Project, Research Project, or Other (Please specify)

   3.   Title of Project:

   4. Starting Date: Specify the intended starting date or insert "Upon IRB
   Approval":

   5.   Estimated Completion Date:

   6.   External Funding (if any):

           o Grant/Contract Submission Deadline:

           o Funding Agency:
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 58

                           Appendix C • IRB Forms
           o   Sponsor ID Number (if known):

           o   UT Proposal Number (if known):

II. PROJECT OBJECTIVES

III. DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE OF RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

IV. METHODS AND PROCEDURES

V. SPECIFIC RISKS AND PROTECTION MEASURES

VI. BENEFITS

VII. METHODS FOR OBTAINING "INFORMED CONSENT" FROM PARTICIPANTS

VIII. QUALIFICATIONS OF THE INVESTIGATOR(S) TO CONDUCT RESEARCH

IX. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT TO BE USED IN THE RESEARCH

X. RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PRINCIPAL/CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR(S)

The following information must be entered verbatim into this section:

By compliance with the policies established by the Institutional Review Board of
The University of Tennessee the principal investigator(s) subscribe to the
principles stated in "The Belmont Report" and standards of professional ethics in
all research, development, and related activities involving human subjects under
the auspices of The University of Tennessee. The principal investigator(s) further
agree that:

   1. Approval will be obtained from the Institutional Review Board prior to
   instituting any change in this research project.

   2. Development of any unexpected risks will be immediately reported to
   Research Compliance Services.

   3. An annual review and progress report (Form R) will be completed and
   submitted when requested by the Institutional Review Board.

   4.    Signed informed consent documents will be kept for the duration of the
        project and for at least three years thereafter at a location approved by the
        Institutional Review Board.

XI. SIGNATURES

ALL SIGNATURES MUST BE ORIGINAL. The Principal Investigator should keep the original
copy of the Form B and submit a copy with original signatures for review. Type the name
of each individual above the appropriate signature line. Add signature
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 59

                             Appendix C • IRB Forms
lines for all Co-Principal Investigators, collaborating and student investigators, faculty
advisor(s), department head of the Principal Investigator, and the Chair of the
Departmental Review Committee. The following information should be typed verbatim,
with added categories where needed:

Principal Investigator: _________________________________________

Signature: ______________________________ Date:
________________________


Co-Principal Investigator _________________________________________

Signature: ______________________________ Date:
________________________


Student Advisor (if any): _________________________________________

Signature: ______________________________ Date:
________________________

XII. DEPARTMENT REVIEW AND APPROVAL

The application described above has been reviewed by the IRB departmental
review committee and has been approved. The DRC further recommends that this
application be reviewed as:

[ ] Expedited Review -- Category(s): ______________________

OR

[ ] Full IRB Review


Chair, DRC: ______________________________

Signature: _______________________________ Date: _________________


Department Head: ______________________________

Signature: _______________________________ Date: _________________


Protocol sent to Research Compliance Services for final approval on (Date) :
________________
        Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 60

                         Appendix C • IRB Forms
Approved:
Research Compliance Services
Office of Research
1534 White Avenue

Signature: _______________________________ Date: _________________


For additional information on Form B, contact the Office of Research Compliance
Officer or by phone at (865) 974-3466.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 61

                               Appendix C • IRB Forms

                       Sample Informed Consent Form

                  (Include or exclude the following information as applicable)

                           INFORMED CONSENT STATEMENT
                                [List title of project here]
INTRODUCTION

State that participants are invited to participate in a research study. State the purpose/objectives
of the study.

INFORMATION ABOUT PARTICIPANTS' INVOLVEMENT IN THE STUDY

List all procedures, preferably in chronological order, which will be employed in the study.
Point out any procedures that are considered experimental. Clearly explain technical and
medical terminology using non-technical language. Explain all procedures using language that
is appropriate for the expected reading level of your participants.

State the amount of time required of participants per session and for the total duration of study.

If audio taping, videotaping, or film procedures are going to be used, provide information about
the use of these procedures. (If applicable, please review the document entitled Videotape
Guidelines.)

If you are plan to include children in your study, please review the document entitled Special
Considerations for the Protection of Children Participating in UT-Sponsored Research.

The videotaping/film and child-participant consideration documents can also be obtained from
Research Compliance Services, 404 Andy Holt Tower.

RISKS

List all reasonably foreseeable risks, if any, of each of the procedures to be used in the study,
and any measures that will be used to minimize the risks.

BENEFITS


List the benefits you anticipate will be achieved from this research, either to the participants,
others, or the body of knowledge.
           Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 62

                               Appendix C • IRB Forms
CONFIDENTIALITY

State that the information in the study records will be kept confidential. Data will be stored
securely and will be made available only to persons conducting the study unless participants
specifically give permission in writing to do otherwise. No reference will be made in oral or
written reports which could link participants to the study.

________ Participant's initials (place on the bottom front page of two-sided consent forms)

COMPENSATION (If applicable to your study, add compensation information here)

Indicate what participants will receive for their participation in this study. Indicate other ways
participants can earn the same amount of credit or compensation. State whether participants
will be eligible for compensation if they withdraw from the study prior to its completion. If
compensation is pro-rated over the period of the participant's involvement, indicate the
points/stages at which compensation changes during the study.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TREATMENT

The University of Tennessee does not "automatically" reimburse subjects for medical claims or
other compensation. If physical injury is suffered in the course of research, or for more
information, please notify the investigator in charge (list PI name and phone number).

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you have questions at any time about the study or the procedures, (or you experience adverse
effects as a result of participating in this study,) you may contact the researcher, [Name], at
[Office Address], and [Office Phone Number]. If you have questions about your rights as a
participant, contact the Office of Research Compliance Officer at (865) 974-3466.

PARTICIPATION

Your participation in this study is voluntary; you may decline to participate without penalty. If
you decide to participate, you may withdraw from the study at anytime without penalty and
without loss of benefits to which you are otherwise entitled. If you withdraw from the study
before data collection is completed you data will be returned to you or destroyed.

[Note: Please delineate the "Consent" section of the Informed Consent Form by drawing a line
across the page. This delineation is especially important when your consent form grammar
shifts from second person to first person, as shown in this example.]
          Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 63



                              Appendix C • IRB Forms

CONSENT

I have read the above information. I have received a copy of this form. I agree to participate in
this study.


Participant's signature ______________________________ Date __________



Investigator's signature _____________________________ Date __________


Additional Notes to Investigators:

1. Researchers are urged by the Committee to use the wording in the checklist and follow the
format in the sample, unless researcher supported reasons are provided for alternative wording.
Use of alternative working or different format may slow down the review process. All sections
of the consent form, except the "Consent Section" should be written in second person ("You are
invited..."). Use of first person ("I") can be interpreted as suggestive and coercive.

2. Be sure to follow the directions for preparing the signature lines. Separate forms should be
prepared when minors are used; one for the minors and one for the parents.

3. If your form is more than one page, there should be a line at the bottom of each page for the
subject's initials, except for the last page where the signature is obtained.

4. Be sure to include any basic elements of informed consent that are appropriate to your study.
If they apply to your study, they must be included. If you have any questions contact the Office
of Research Compliance Officer at 1534 White Avenue or by calling (865) 974-3466.
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 64



  Appendix D • Graduate Scholarships Application
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 65

  Appendix D • Graduate Scholarship Application
      Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 66



Appendix E • Request for Travel Support: Graduate Student Form
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies • Graduate Handbook • 67



           Appendix F • Academic Calendar
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

				
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