art - Download as DOC by LBY2ks

VIEWS: 149 PAGES: 318

									Missouri Western State University MoSTEP
            Program Report
                Art (K-12)



                                                    2
                                                    0
                                                    0
                                                    8
       Prepared by: Dr. Allison Sauls Chairperson
                   Department of Art
                                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS



Description of Certification Program....................................................................................6

           Size and Program History..............................................................................................6

           Unit’s Conceptual Framework.......................................................................................6

            Authority and Collaboration to Offer the Program......................................................8

           Membership, Authority and Responsibilities of the Education Leadership Team..........8

Certification Program Requirements ...................................................................................11

           Description of Required Courses..................................................................................12

           Courses linked to standards and subject specific competencies...................................17

           List of any electives courses..........................................................................................24

           Degree versus professional sequence courses..............................................................25

           Options for completing traditional, certification only and alternative certification.....25

           Description of advisement process................................................................................25

           Method in which syllabi meet state requirements ........................................................27

Characteristics of Certification Program Candidates.........................................................36

           Number of Candidates...................................................................................................36

           ―Home grown‖ versus ―transfer‖ ................................................................................36

Diversity....................................................................................................................................38

           CBASE test results..........................................................................................................41

           Graduates of our program..........................................................................................................41

           Oral Communication Verification..................................................................................42

           Entrance GPA................................................................................................................42



                                                                                                                                                  2
           Persistence to Graduation ............................................................................................43

Course List ..............................................................................................................................44

           LAS Focus Areas.......................................................................................................... 53

            Catalog descriptions for the required Content Courses ................................................55

           Catalog descriptions for the required courses within the professional sequence ...........57

Description of Field Experiences ...........................................................................................68

Diverse Classrooms .................................................................................................................71

Description of Certification Program Assessment ...............................................................74

Assessment Data 4.4 ................................................................................................................77

Technology ...............................................................................................................................80

Faculty ......................................................................................................................................83

           Content faculty................................................................................................................83

           Demographic characteristics of faculty..........................................................................83

           Documentation of program faculty’s involvement in the public schools
           and in the larger ―professional community‖..................................................................83

           Summary of program faculty’ scholarly activity..............................................................84

           Advising Responsibilities..................................................................................... ............. 102

           Process by which program evaluates teaching...........................................................                         103

           Involvement in beginning teacher assistance program...............................................                             104

           Description of training for part-time faculty................................................................. 105

Certification Program Resources ........................................................................................106




                                                                                                                                                   3
                                        APPENDICES

A      Major/Minor forms                                                108

B      Program Brochures                                                111

C      Checklist for graduation                                         114

D      Syllabi and Curriculum Vitae of Content Teachers                 112

E      Syllabi and Curriculum Vitae of Professional Sequence Teachers   226

F      C-Base Results                                                   315

G      Praxis                                                           317



                                          TABLES

Table 1 --―Becoming a Teacher Leader: Taking Responsibility

       for Student Learning‖                                            7

Table 2 – Five Assessment Areas                                         7

Table 3 -- Unit Governance Chart                                        10

Table 4 – Requirements for Transitions within the Program               13

Table 5 – Art Education Teacher Candidates 2001-2007                    38

Table 6 – Number of Art ―Homegrown‖ Versus ―Transfer‖ Candidates*       39

Table 7 Diversity of Candidates with Gender Included                    41

Table 8 Art K-12                                                        45

Table 9—Courses Labeled Official LAS Focus Courses                      56

Table 10. Type of Field Experience                                      70

Table 11 MWSU Field and Clinical Experiences                            71

Table 12 Unit Diversity Proficiencies                                   73



                                                                              4
Table 13 – Requirements for Transitions within the Program                         76



Table 14 Assessments linked to candidate professional and

       pedagogical skill development                                               77

Table 15 Cumulative GPA – Content and Professional Education                       79

Table 16 Graduate Survey Results –

       Standard 1 Candidate Content Knowledge N= 72                                80

Table 17 Employer Survey Results - Standard 1 –

       Candidate Content Knowledge N=37                                            80

Table 18 Content Tests for Initial Teacher Certification – Praxis II – 2001-2007   80

Table 19 Departmental Advising Load Fall 2007                                      104

Table 20 Faculty Student Evaluations                                               105

Table 21 Department Funding – 2007-2008                                            108




                                                                                         5
              Missouri Western State University
                      MoSTEP Program Report
                                      Art (K-12)

Description of Certification Program

Missouri Western State University offers stand alone certification in art grades K-12 at the
undergraduate level. The Art Department is part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and
is responsible for the content curriculum/courses offered within the program. Teacher candidates
identify art education as their selected major (Bachelor of Science in Art Education – BSE-ART)
through a major-minor declaration form (Appendix A) which outlines all required general
studies, content, elective and professional coursework. The professional pedagogical
coursework (the Professional Sequence) is consistent for all teacher education candidates and is
primarily offered through the Department of Education. Coordination of the curriculum is
through the Education Leadership Team (ELT). Teacher candidates fulfill all of the university
general education requirements as well as the major and state requirements in content and
professional pedagogical coursework in approximately four years and, if successful, are awarded
a bachelor‘s degree and recommended for teacher certification to the Missouri Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education and the Missouri State Board of Education.

Size and Program History

Western has been approved to recommend teacher candidates in Art for certification since 1969.
There have consistently been candidates seeking art education as a major and the unit is
committed to providing a program supporting candidates seeking art education. At this point
many of our students are teaching in the region and send their best art students either into our
other art major programs or into the department to seek an art education degree. As such the
word of mouth recommendations of our teaching graduates represent one of our most respected
recruiting tools for the program. In addition the extremely high placement rate of the art
education program makes this major very attractive for the higher ability student. There have
been 18 program graduates since 2001.

Unit’s Conceptual Framework

The art education program fully integrates the unit‘s conceptual framework of ―Becoming a
Teacher Leader – Taking Responsibility for Student Learning‖ through the four developmental
phases of the art education program (Phase I – Awareness, Phase II – Developing Theoretical
Knowledge, Phase III – Investigation, and Phase IV – Finding Voice) and the focus on
instruction that supports, and indeed requires, evidence of an impact on K-12 student learning.
The following graphic illustrates the four phases of the art education program.

                                                                                                   6
    Table 1 - ―Becoming a Teacher Leader: Taking Responsibility for Student Learning”




At each phase, five areas of key assessments assure that art education teacher candidates are
developing the knowledge and skills needed to become effective art teachers. Candidate
assessments are distributed across courses to include multiple experiences in host schools with
each experience connected to an on-campus course. Candidate progress is measured across five
assessments. Table 2 identifies the five assessment areas.

                               Table 2 – Five Assessment Areas

   1. 12 Teacher Education Standards                      2. Four Domains of
    (Aligned with MoSTEP and INTASC Standards)            Dispositions
   1. Knowledge of Subject Matter
   2. Human Development and Learning                      A. Self-awareness
   3. Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs
   4. Planning, Implementing and Evaluating the           B. Self-management
   Curriculum
   5. Multiple Instructional Strategies                   C. Social Awareness
   6. Classroom Motivation and Management
   Strategies                                             D. Relational Management
   7. Communication Skills                                3. 10 Professional Behaviors
   8. Assessment of Student Learning
                                                          4. Commitment to Diversity
   9. Reflective Practitioner
   10. Partnerships                                       5. Integration of Technology
   11. Technology in Teaching and Learning
   12. Foundations of Education, Ethics, and Law




                                                                                                  7
Authority and Collaboration to Offer the Program

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education through the authority of the
Missouri State Board of Education has granted art education program approval to the teacher
education unit at Missouri Western State University. Most recently this approval was granted
based on the site visit of October 2000 with program approval by the Missouri State Board of
Education in 2001.

Membership, Authority and Responsibilities of the Education Leadership Team

The teacher education unit at Missouri Western State University is led by the Chair of the
Teacher Education Program, Dr. Richard Porr. The unit works collaboratively to design, deliver
and effectively manage all teacher education programs. The unit promotes or advertises its
programs through university publications (University Catalog), course schedules (View the
Spring 2008 Class Schedule!), program brochures (Appendix B) and marketing efforts
(newspaper ads and articles, billboards, web pages and mailings).

The Art Department coordinates the curriculum for the art education major through the MWSU
curriculum process. The MWSU Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UGCC) has clear
policies and procedures for proposing curriculum changes. The MWSU UGCC, composed of
MWSU faculty from both the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of
Professional Studies, meets regularly to support the curriculum revision process.

Art Department faculty provide candidate advisement within the major. All first time freshman
and transfer students entering the art program must see the chairperson of the department who
will discuss curriculum and options in the department. The chair will also lift the ―advising
block‖ to enable the student to register for classes. This block is in place each semester and can
be lifted only after consultation with an advisor. Once a student declares a major in Art
Education, the CDA will designate a faculty member in the chosen program for further
supervision.
Art students must consult with their faculty advisor each semester. Students majoring in art
education are required to undergo a review of their work once they have completed the
Foundation Core Curriculum sequence. The student is responsible for scheduling this review
with their advisor and submitting a representative sampling of work for examination by the art
faculty. The consent of this committee, based on portfolio, presentation and professional
demeanor and overall ability, is necessary before the student enrolls in further study in the
department.

Each student is carefully tracked and advised throughout the program, not only in the art
department but in the education department as well. Each art teacher candidates has an Education
Department advisor who signs the major/minor form and provides advisement on the
professional sequence coursework.

The appropriate academic dean, department chair and methods instructors that oversee academic
programs that lead to teacher certification are members of the Education Leadership Team
(ELT – Click on ―Membership‖) that coordinates the ―Professional Sequence‖ of education

                                                                                                     8
courses which provide the knowledge, skills, leadership dispositions, professional behaviors,
commitment to diversity, and integration of technology that meet unit assessments of quality.

Decisions regarding matters such as assignment of faculty to teach courses related exclusively to
teacher education or supervising in-school experiences require concurrent approval of the
education chairperson and the chair of the department where the faculty member is housed.
Ongoing collaboration and communication between program faculty and teacher candidates
supports candidate success in the art teacher education program.

The following chart represents the organizational structure of the unit:

                                Table 3 Unit Governance Chart




Since the last MoSTEP/NCATE visit in the fall of 2000, the art education program has
experienced several changes at the university and program level including:

      Granted university status and name change from Missouri Western State College to
       Missouri Western State University (2005)
      The revision of the unit conceptual framework from that of a reflective practitioner to the
       more responsive teacher leader model was a major move toward assisting teacher
       candidates in understanding their role in supporting student learning (Becoming a teacher
       leader – taking responsibility for student learning).
      Institutional technology changes to SCT Banner system (2005)
      Development of an electronic assessment system - Education Performance System (EPS)
      Developed a resource room dedicated to candidate resources (Murphy 111 E)



                                                                                                 9
   Established a TeacherLeader blog to help candidates apply dispositions and sensitivity to
    diversity (http://teacherleader.blogspot.com)
   Development/defining of Candidate Dispositions based on the literature of Daniel
    Goleman
   Development of strategies and instruments to assess dispositions
   Revision of entrance examination scores on the C-BASE from 265 to 235 within a pilot
    program to inform changes to admission requirements
   Adopted an up-or-out tenure system organized around teaching, scholarship, and service
   Creation of Education Leadership Team and Teacher Education Advisory Board
   In addition to embedding the revised conceptual framework into the art methods course
    (ART 350), there was increased emphasis on impacting student learning in field and
    clinical experiences (EDU 203, EDU 303 and EDU 409) and EDU 404 Seminar in
    Secondary Education and Human Relations. The culminating certification portfolio
    required of all secondary majors requires documentation of candidate impact on student
    learning.
   The certification portfolio (requirements and evaluation form) was revised to provide a
    comprehensive assessment of candidate performances as based on the
    MoSTEP/INTASC/MWSU teacher education standards, unit dispositions and unit
    professional behaviors.
   The evaluation process for field and clinical experiences was revised with practitioner
    input to align with the unit conceptual framework, (developmental progress/focus on
    student learning), standards, dispositions and professional behaviors.
   Catalog prefixes changed from EED/MED/SED to EDU. EED 410 changed number only
    to EDU 315, but retained the same content.




                                                                                          10
Certification Program Requirements

Art teacher candidate progress is monitored through the unit assessment system and regular
advisement meetings. Art teacher candidates must successfully complete the general education
requirements of the major (42-46 credits), maintain a 2.5 GPA and successfully complete
content, pedagogical, field and clinical coursework (78 credit hours) and meet any additional
program requirements (e.g. criminal background checks, passage of PRAXIS II exam, and the
Measure of Academic Progress and Proficiency (MAPP) exam). This program of study totals
124 credit hours (See the Art Education Major/Minor form – Appendix A).

Each art education student completes the entrance requirement to the Department of Art at the
earliest possible point in their tenure with the department. ART 110 Beginning Drawing I, ART
120 Two-Dimensional Art, And ART 130 Tools and Techniques are the foundation of any art
degree. The MWSU program prides itself on being an art program producing artists – artists who
teach! Drawing and two-dimensional design set the groundwork for other skills later in the
program. In addition, the faculty recognizes that a portion of our students will find employment
in rural school systems where the background, skill and ingenuity of the art education teacher
may replace the better endowed resources of the higher budgeted urban school. We are a hands-
on department. We mix our own clay and glazes for ceramics, chemicals for printmaking and
photomedia and make our own stretchers for painting. Tools and Techniques provides training
for the student, gives valuable safety instruction and certifies that safety though checklists and
testing. A student must attain a minimum GPA in these three art courses to be admitted to the
program. Until that time they may not enroll in any other courses in the department.

The unique advising program in the department give stability to the art education student. All
first time freshman and transfer students entering the art program must see the chairperson of the
department who will discuss curriculum and options in the department. The chair will also lift
the ―advising block‖ to enable the student to register for classes. This block is in place each
semester and can be lifted only after consultation with an advisor. Once a student declares a
major in Art Education, the CDA will designate a faculty member in the chosen program for
further supervision.
Art students must consult with their faculty advisor each semester. Along with the CDA, this
advisor assures that the teacher candidate takes the proper general education courses in the
correct sequence. They assist the student in scheduling the correct mathematics course, that they
enter PSY 101, which is a prerequisite for many of the education courses, at an early point in
their career with the department. They guarantee that the student chooses GOV 101 and Biology
from the available general education courses. These offerings are critical for Missouri
certification.
Students majoring in art education are required to undergo a review of their work once they have
completed the Foundation Core Curriculum sequence. The student is responsible for scheduling
this review with their advisor and submitting a representative sampling of work for examination
by the art faculty. The consent of this committee, based on portfolio, presentation and
professional demeanor and overall ability, is necessary before the student enrolls in further study
in the department.



                                                                                                 11
Each student is carefully tracked and advised throughout the program, not only in the art
department but in the education department as well. With the close cooperation of the
departments of art and education the student is guided through the four phases of the program..

                    Table 4 – Requirements for Transitions within the Program


Initial   Phase 1                    Phase II   Phase III      Phase IV          After program
Teacher                                                                         completion
Education
Programs

Art       General Education           CBASE,    Field          PRAXIS II        Final evaluation of
program
          coursework, ART 110,                  experience     passed,          entire program,
          120, 130 (with a GPA of GPA (2.5)     completed,                      graduate and
          2.5 in these three courses)                          clinical         employer surveys
          EDU 202/203                 ACT       2.5 GPA        experience
                                                               completed, 2.5
          Criminal Background        Content/   Major in       GPA
          Check                      methods    teacher
                                     courses    education
                                                declared


Description of Required Courses

ART 110 Beginning Drawing I (3) F, Sp. Elementary drawing with the figure, still life,
landscape, and perspective in various media. Six studio hours.

ART 120 Two-Dimensional Design (3) F, Sp. Design principles and fundamentals in two-
dimensional media using a problem-solving approach. (Lab fee) Six studio hours.

ART 130 Introduction to Tools and Techniques (2) F, Sp. Basic skills with studio hand tools
and power equipment; emphasizes safety procedures. This course is a prerequisite for any studio
art course except ART 110 and 120. Four studio hours. (Students must purchase their own
project materials.)

ART 140 Ceramics I (3) F, Sp. Traditional and contemporary approaches to ceramics as an art
form; emphasizes technical, historical, and aesthetic problems. Six studio hours. (Students must
purchase the clay they use.)

ART 160 Beginning Drawing II (3) Sp. The figure in various media; still life, landscape, and
nonobjective directions; problems dealing with the complete drawing. Six studio hours. (Lab
fee) Prerequisite: successful completion of ART 110, 120, 130, with a GPA of 2.50 or better in
the three courses.



                                                                                                  12
ART 170 Three-Dimensional Design (3) Sp. Emphasis on form and composition using a
problem solving approach; exploration of a wide variety of three-dimensional materials and
processes. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: successful completion of ART 110, 120, 130,
with a GPA of 2.50 or better in the three courses.

ART 205 Ancient through Medieval Art (3) F. History of art in western civilization:
prehistoric times through the Middle Ages. LAS Writing.

ART 255 Renaissance through Modern Art (3) Sp. History of art in western civilization:
Renaissance through modern times. Prerequisite: ART 205. LAS International/Intercultural.

ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3) F, Sp, Su. Current methods
and materials for the teaching of art in the elementary grades; theory and experience with
elementary school art projects. Prerequisite: EED 202 and MUS 101. Elementary education
majors may not take this course until officially admitted to teacher education.

ART 335 Art Theory and Criticism (3) F. Critical thought in art theory, philosophy, and
criticism. Prerequisite: ART 205, 255, and completion of freshman core curriculum in art. LAS
Writing.

ART 339 Printmaking I (3) F. Relief and intaglio printmaking processes. Six studio hours.
(Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 120, 130 and 160.

ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3) Sp (even-numbered years).
Teaching methodologies and materials for the secondary school art teacher; design of appropriate
art learning experiences for the adolescent. Prerequisite: ART 300.

ART 359 Photomedia I (3) F, Sp. Black-and-white photographic processes and problems;
student must have access to a camera with adjustable aperture and shutter speed. Six studio
hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 110, 120 and 130.

ART 369 Painting I (3) F, Sp. Color, composition, and technique; the figure, still life, and
nonobjective problems. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 130 plus 6 credits in
drawing.

ART 379 Sculpture I (3) F. Basic foundations in sculpture: theory, techniques, materials,
processes. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 130 and 170.

ART 494 Senior Seminar and Exhibit (1) F, Sp. Class session on professional topics;
preparation and presentation of an exhibition of the student‘s personal art work. Prerequisite:
Passing of Junior Review and departmental approval required.




                                                                                                  13
The syllabi and vita of faculty teaching the content sequence of courses (See Appendix D) for
spring 2008 includes:

Bachelor of Science in Education
Major in Art
Foundation Core Curriculum
ART    110      Beginning Drawing I                          3         Estes, Fuson
ART    120      Two-Dimensional Design                       3         Fuson, Harmon-Miller
ART    130      Tools and Techniques                         2         Smith*
ART 160         Beginning Drawing II                         3         Fuson, Sipp
ART 170         Three-Dimensional Design                     3         Fuson, Harmon-Miller
ART 205         Ancient Through Medieval                     3         Sauls
       *courses in italics must be taken with a GPA of 2.5 in these three courses before a student is allowed to
       proceed within the department with a course of study.



Sophomore Review
ART 140         Ceramics I                                   3         Estes
ART 255         Renaissance Through Modern Art               3         Sauls
ART 300         Elementary Art Teaching:                     3         Wood
                      Philosophy and Methods

ART 355         Art Theory and Criticism                     3         Mikkelsen
ART 339         Printmaking I                                3         Sipp
ART 350         Secondary Art Teaching:                      3         Wood
                      Philosophy and Methods

ART 359         Photomedia I                                 3         Harmon-Miller
ART 369         Painting I                                   3         Sipp
ART 379         Sculpture I                                  3         Estes
ART 494         Senior Seminar And Exhibition                3         Estes, Harmon-Miller, Sipp, Sauls
                                                                       (on rotation)

Plus 6 hours of upper level art history selected from


                                                                                                                   14
ART 356         American Art: from the              3       Sauls
                      Columbus to 1865
ART 357         American Art Since 1865             3       Sauls
ART 456         Art in the Age of Modernity         3       Sauls
ART 457         Art Since 1945                      3       Sauls
_________________________________________________________
                TOTAL                              51



Professional Education Courses include:

EDU 202 Introduction to Education                   3 credit hours

EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I                 1 credit hour

EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II                   3 credit hours

EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                      4 credit hours

EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques                2 credit hours

EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the             2 credit hours
            Exceptional Student

EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education &            3 credit hours
            Human Relations
EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III              9 credit hours

__________________________________ ___________

Eight courses                                       27 credit hours

All professional education courses are offered each fall and spring semester. Catalog descriptions
for the courses within the professional sequence are:

EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3) F, Sp. Basic introduction to professional education;
an on-campus exploratory course to aid participants in deciding whether or not to become
teachers. The course also provides the basic information and attitude development necessary for
successful teaching. Taken the same semester and time as EDU 203. Prerequisite: ENG 104
and 108, or 112.


                                                                                               15
EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1) F, Sp. Laboratory course taken concurrently with
EDU 202. During this off-campus experience, the participant serves as a teacher assistant. This
exploratory course provides concrete exposure to teaching, students, and the school. Graded
pass/fail. Taken the same semester and time as EDU 202.

EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3) F, Sp. Continuation of the off-campus experiences in
cooperating schools as teacher associates. To be taken concurrently with EDU 304 (and 375 for
elementary). Prerequisite: EDU 203 and 310, 320, 330, 340, 360, MAT 351, and MAT 352 and
approved admission to the Teacher Education Program OR Secondary and K-12: EDU 203, and
approved admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4) F, Sp. Psychological principles as applied to educational
settings. To be taken concurrently with EDU 303. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and EDU 203.

EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2) F, Sp. Techniques of teaching reading
comprehension strategies to middle and high school students. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108,
or 112 and admission to the Education Department. Elementary teacher candidates must have
completed EDU 310 and 320.

EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2) F, Sp. This course is a
survey of issues related to the identification and teaching of exceptional students. All state and
federally defined categories of disability will be addressed by definition, etiology, prevalence,
school law, civil rights law and curriculum and teaching issues. Topics will include curriculum
and instruction modifications and adaptations as well as behavior management and discipline.
Prerequisites: EDU 202 and 203; declared minors in Childhood Studies are exempt from EDU
303 and 304 as prerequisites.

EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3) F, Sp. Philosophical,
ethical, and legal problems related to secondary education instructional strategies, including
classroom and laboratory experiences; considers interpersonal relations as applied to teaching.
To be taken concurrently with EDU 409. Prerequisite: EDU 303 and EDU 304.

EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9) F, Sp. Full-time, off-campus teaching
experiences working with students in an area secondary school and a mentor teacher. To be
taken concurrently with EDU 404. Prerequisite: EDU 303, EDU 304, special methods course in
the major, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the major field of study and approval from the major
department; Must have passed the Praxis II exam in the are of certification.

The syllabi and vita of faculty teaching the professional sequence of courses (See Appendix E)
for spring 2008 includes:

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education                     Dr. Elizabeth Hendrix

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I                   Dr. Debby Bogle

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II                     Dr. Debby Bogle


                                                                                                     16
       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                     Dr. Debby Bogle

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques               Mr. Mike Flowers

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the            Mrs. Lisa Robbins
            Exceptional Child

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education             Dr. Terry Barmann
            and Human Relations

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III             Dr. Debby Bogle

Courses linked to standards and subject specific competencies-- The following information
describes and documents how the certification programs is meeting General Education Standard
1.1.1 and 1.2.1., professional Competencies – Standard 1.2 or 1.3 or 1.4 or 1.5, Certification
requirements and Subject Specific Competencies.

TEACHER EDUCATION STANDARDS

1.   Knowledge of Subject Matter

       ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

       ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

2.   Human Development and Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

3.   Adapting Instruction


                                                                                             17
       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

4.   Planning, Implementing, Evaluating the Curriculum

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

5.   Multiple Instructional Strategies

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

6.   Classroom Motivation & Management



                                                                        18
       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

7.   Communication Skills

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

8.   Assessment of Student Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

9.   Reflective Practitioner

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)



                                                                        19
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)


10. Partnerships

      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

11. Technology in Teaching & Learning

      EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

12. Foundations of Education, Ethics, Law
      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

DESE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

I. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

      A. A baccalaureate degree from a college or university having a teacher education
      program approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;

      B. Must have recommendation of designated official for teacher education in the college
      or university;



                                                                                            20
    C. Must have a grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale overall and in the major area of
    study;

    D. Must complete the content knowledge or specialty area test designated by the State
    Board of Education with a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score. If
    no content knowledge or specialty area test is designated for the area of concentration,
    completion of the Principles of Learning and Teaching: Grades 9-12 test is required with
    a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score;

    E. Completion of professional requirements as determined by the recommending college
    or university, which may exceed these minimum requirements; and

    F. Individuals who completed their teacher education program outside of the United
    States shall provide documentation of completion of course work in the following:

           1. English Composition, two (2) courses, each a minimum of two (2) semester
           hours;

                   ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric (3) AND

                   ENG 108 College Writing and Research (3)

           2. U.S. History, three (3) semester hours; and

                   HIS 140 American History to 1865 (3) OR

                   HIS 150 American History since 1865 (3)

           3. U.S. Government, three (3) semester hours.

                   GOV 101 American National Government (3)




II PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

    A. Foundations for Teaching (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester hours): 1.
    The Pupil/Society--A minimum of six (6) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
    competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
    following content areas:

                   a. Adolescent Growth and Development (Physical-Mental-Social);

                          EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)


                                                                                            21
              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       b. Adolescent Behavior Management Techniques;

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       c. Psychology of Learning (must include adolescent learning);

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       d. Adolescent Interaction with Others; and

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       e. *Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child (including
       the Gifted); and

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

2. The School/Society--A minimum of two (2) semester hours with knowledge
acquired and competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation
institution in the following content areas, including multi-cultural aspects:

        a. Legal Foundations of Education;

              EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       b. Historical Foundations of Education;



                                                                               22
                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              c. Philosophical Foundations of Education; and

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              d. Sociological Foundations of Education; and

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

B. Secondary Methods and Techniques (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester
hours): A minimum of eight (8) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
following content areas:

       1. *Basic Reading Techniques for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       2. Instructional Strategies for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

              EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

       3. *Curriculum, Methods, and Techniques in each subject area specialty;


              ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

              ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)


       4. Measurement and Evaluation; and

              EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)


                                                                                         23
                      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

               5. Microcomputer Applications in Education; and

                      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       C. Clinical Experiences (Minimum requirement of ten (10) semester hours):
       Certification in grades 9-12 should include clinical experience at the secondary level. A
       minimum of two (2) semester hours prior to student teaching**

               EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

               EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       And a minimum of eight (8) semester hours of student teaching in grades 9-12 is
       required, except that K-9 or K-12 certification must also include K-6 experience in
       student teaching.

               EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

               EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

               A fully certificated elementary or middle school teacher with two (2) or more
               years of elementary or middle school teaching may satisfy this requirement
               through the completion of a two (2) or more semester hour practicum at the
               secondary level.

List of any electives courses - Art education teacher candidates are required to complete their
content coursework with six additional credits in art history. Those credits can be earned
through the following courses:

ART 100 Introduction to Art (3) F, Sp, Su. General background in the history, philosophy,
principles, and techniques of the visual arts.

ART 283 Introduction to Research Methods in Art (1-2) (DD). Introduction to basic research
methods in art. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving art-related research
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

ART 324 Topics in the History of Cinema (3) (DD). Viewing and discussion of thematic
concepts of cinema from genre of films, auteur theory of directors and other related topics.
Prerequisites: Freshman core for majors plus ART 205, ART 255 or permission of the
department or instructor.

ART 356 American Art: Columbus to 1865 (3) F (even-numbered years). Development of
art in the United States. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205 and ART 255.



                                                                                                   24
ART 357 American Art Since 1865 (3) Sp (even-numbered years). Architecture, decorative
arts, painting and sculpture since the Civil War. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205, ART
255 and ART 356.

ART 381 IN-Site Art and Cultural Experience (2-3) (DD). Directed studio and art history
opportunities for students off-campus. Prerequisites: Permission of the department or instructor.

ART 426 The Business of Art (3) Sp. Introduction to the business aspects of art. Prerequisite:
Junior class standing as a declared Art Major or permission of the instructor. LAS Ethics.

ART 450 Independent Research/Project (3) F, Sp. Investigation of a research problem,
project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite: Completion of the major-minor
declaration in art, minimum 2.5 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

ART 456 Art in the Age of Modernity (3) F (odd-numbered years). Major movements of the
19th and 20th centuries focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture. (Materials Fee)
Prerequisite: ART 205 and ART 255.

ART 457 Art Since 1945 (3) Sp (odd-numbered years). The latest trends, theories and
technologies in visual and conceptual art. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205, ART 255, and
ART 456.

ART 493 Internship in Art (2-6) F, Sp, Su. Practical guided experience in a range of design,
graphic art, typography, illustration, photography and publications tasks. Prerequisite: ART 359
and 329, portfolio review. Junior or senior level art majors only. Departmental approval
required.

Degree versus professional sequence courses – As noted, the professional sequence courses are
clearly identified on the selected major/minor form (Appendix A) and candidates are informed of
all general (42-46 credit hours), content (78 credit hours) and professional coursework (27 credit
hours) required within the art education major.

Options for completing traditional, certification only and alternative certification – Teacher
education candidates seeking the traditional art certification degree must complete the required
courses as identified in the major/minor forms or have the accepted transfer equivalents,
maintain the required grade point average, successfully complete the PRAXIS II exam in the
content area and meet the all program and degree requirements as well as those identified on the
Checklist for Graduation (Appendix C). All certification only and alternative certification
candidates must have an existing degree in the content area, meet the same GPA, major and
professional coursework requirements, and passage of the PRAXIS II exam in the content area
(See the Program Report for Alternative Certification).

Description of advisement process – Candidates are advised early and often through their
program of study at Missouri Western State University. Unit recruiting is accomplished through
institution-wide recruitment by the MWSU Admissions office while more specific recruitment is
provided through multiple ―Open House‖ events on campus where art faculty staff informational


                                                                                                 25
tables and displays, distribute recruitment materials that contain clear admission requirements,
and answer questions from prospective candidates and their parents. Standardized major/minor
declaration forms and majors brochures further specify program and unit admission
requirements, as does the university catalog. Once a teacher candidate has been admitted to
MWSU and begins coursework, the more formal relationships with their assigned major advisor
starts. Teacher candidates transferring to MWSU attend special transfer day orientation and
registration events and are advised immediately by an advisor within their intended major. All
teacher candidates must meet with their advisor each semester to update their progress toward
their degree goal and to obtain a pin number needed for registration. Candidates are able to
complete and sign a pre-major form which provides an outline of needed coursework and
determines the catalog degree requirements and can, at any time they are eligible, formalize their
major choice by signing the major/minor form (Appendix A) which clearly identifies the
coursework requirements for the degree. As candidates meet each semester with their advisor to
determine coursework, the advisor monitors GPA, sequencing of coursework and progress
toward graduation. The MWSU Office of the Registrar monitors candidate progress primarily
through GPA and completes the Checklist for Graduation (Appendix C) once a candidate has
applied for graduation (generally at least six months prior to the intended graduation date).

MWSU has an early intervention and attendance policy for all 100 and 200 level courses. The
early intervention policy asks all faculty to notify the Dean of Student Services if any student
appears to need additional support in being successful in their coursework. The attendance policy
requires candidates in all 100 and 200 level courses to attend regularly and, if attendance is not
acceptable, faculty submit an early intervention notice to the office of the Dean of Student
Services whose staff contacts candidates to offer support as needed. Counseling services are
available through the university and are used by advisors to aid students with issues that are
beyond what is appropriate for academic advising. Non-traditional candidates take advantage of
the support offered by the Non-traditional Services office. All teacher candidates have access
to Disability and Tutoring Services and are informed of the availability of these services during
orientation and transfer programs.

All students entering the Department of Art must complete a pre-major form at the beginning of
study. No student may declare a major in art education until the first three courses (ART 110
Beginning Drawing I, ART 120 Two-Dimensional Design and ART 130 Tools and Techniques)
have been completed with a proscribed grade-point average. In addition, art education students
have an additional obligation from the education department. Students are strongly encouraged
to complete the first three courses of the Freshman Core during the first semester art MWSU.
Further study in the department will be denied unless the student receives a GPA of 2.5 in these
three courses. The student is also urged to take the subsequent studio components of ART 160
Beginning Drawing II and Art 170 Three Dimensional Design of the foundation core curriculum
during the second semester at MWSU. Failure to do so will disrupt the sequential prerequisite
restrictions and add additional time to degree completion.
All first time freshman and transfer students entering the art program must see the chairperson of
the department who will discuss curriculum and options in the department. The chair will also
lift the ―advising block‖ to enable the student to register for classes. This block is in place each
semester and can be lifted only after consultation with an advisor. Once a student declares a



                                                                                                  26
major in Art Education, the CDA will designate a faculty member in the chosen program for
further supervision.
Art students must consult with their faculty advisor each semester. Students majoring in art
education are required to undergo a review of their work once they have completed the
Foundation Core Curriculum sequence. The student is responsible for scheduling this review
with their advisor and submitting a representative sampling of work for examination by the art
faculty. The consent of this committee, based on portfolio, presentation and professional
demeanor and overall ability, is necessary before the student enrolls in further study in the
department.
Each student is carefully tracked and advised throughout the program, not only in the art
department but in the education department As well. Once the student applies for graduation, the
registrar evaluates the progress of the student and sends a checklist to the chair, the major
advisor and also to the student, advising them that this person is ready for graduation.
Deficiencies are also pointed out in order that the chair may consult with the student to rectify
the shortcoming. Of interest, this last scenario is rarely a viable one.

Method in which syllabi meet state requirements –

TEACHER EDUCATION STANDARDS

1.   Knowledge of Subject Matter

       ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

       ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

2.   Human Development and Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

                                                                                                 27
3.   Adapting Instruction

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

4.   Planning, Implementing, Evaluating the Curriculum

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

5.   Multiple Instructional Strategies

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)



                                                                        28
6.   Classroom Motivation & Management

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

7.   Communication Skills

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

8.   Assessment of Student Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

9.   Reflective Practitioner

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)



                                                                        29
      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

10. Partnerships

      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

11. Technology in Teaching & Learning

      EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

12. Foundations of Education, Ethics, Law
      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

DESE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

I. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

      A. A baccalaureate degree from a college or university having a teacher education
      program approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;

      B. Must have recommendation of designated official for teacher education in the college
      or university;


                                                                                            30
    C. Must have a grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale overall and in the major area of
    study;

    D. Must complete the content knowledge or specialty area test designated by the State
    Board of Education with a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score. If
    no content knowledge or specialty area test is designated for the area of concentration,
    completion of the Principles of Learning and Teaching: Grades 9-12 test is required with
    a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score;

    E. Completion of professional requirements as determined by the recommending college
    or university, which may exceed these minimum requirements; and

    F. Individuals who completed their teacher education program outside of the United
    States shall provide documentation of completion of course work in the following:

           1. English Composition, two (2) courses, each a minimum of two (2) semester
           hours;

                   ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric (3) AND

                   ENG 108 College Writing and Research (3)

           2. U.S. History, three (3) semester hours; and

                   HIS 140 American History to 1865 (3) OR

                   HIS 150 American History since 1865 (3)

           3. U.S. Government, three (3) semester hours.

                   GOV 101 American National Government (3)

II PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

    A. Foundations for Teaching (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester hours): 1.
    The Pupil/Society--A minimum of six (6) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
    competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
    following content areas:

                   a. Adolescent Growth and Development (Physical-Mental-Social);

                          EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

                          EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

                          EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)


                                                                                            31
              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       b. Adolescent Behavior Management Techniques;

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       c. Psychology of Learning (must include adolescent learning);

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       d. Adolescent Interaction with Others; and

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       e. *Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child (including
       the Gifted); and

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

2. The School/Society--A minimum of two (2) semester hours with knowledge
acquired and competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation
institution in the following content areas, including multi-cultural aspects:

        a. Legal Foundations of Education;

              EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
              (3)

       b. Historical Foundations of Education;

              EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       c. Philosophical Foundations of Education; and



                                                                               32
                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              d. Sociological Foundations of Education; and

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

B. Secondary Methods and Techniques (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester
hours): A minimum of eight (8) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
following content areas:

       1. *Basic Reading Techniques for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       2. Instructional Strategies for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

              EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

       3. *Curriculum, Methods, and Techniques in each subject area specialty;


              ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

              ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)


       4. Measurement and Evaluation; and

              EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       5. Microcomputer Applications in Education; and


                                                                                         33
                     EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      C. Clinical Experiences (Minimum requirement of ten (10) semester hours):
      Certification in grades 9-12 should include clinical experience at the secondary level. A
      minimum of two (2) semester hours prior to student teaching**

             EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

             EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      And a minimum of eight (8) semester hours of student teaching in grades 9-12 is
      required, except that K-9 or K-12 certification must also include K-6 experience in
      student teaching.

             EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

             EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

             A fully certificated elementary or middle school teacher with two (2) or more
             years of elementary or middle school teaching may satisfy this requirement
             through the completion of a two (2) or more semester hour practicum at the
             secondary level.

III. SUBJECT MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION AREA

Art Methods (3)

      1. Design--Composition (2)

       2. Two-Dimensional Art (7 hours minimum) a. Drawing (3) b. Painting (2) c. Graphics
      (2)

      3. Three-Dimensional Art (7 hours minimum) a. Ceramics (3) b. Sculpture (2) c. Fibers
      (2) d. History, Theory, Criticism, Visual Arts (3)

       4. Art for Elementary Grades (2) 5. Electives (9) TOTAL = 30 + Methods

BEGINNING TEACHER COMPETENCIES

Art Production (NSAE 1, 2)

      1. The production and presentation of traditional and contemporary art forms; (FA1; M2;
      CR 1-3)

      2. Characteristics of tools and materials used in the production of art, including safety and
      health issues; and (FA1; HPE6; CR 1-3)


                                                                                                  34
        3. The formal (elements and principles) and expressive qualities of art through artistic
       problem solving and divergent thinking. (G1.3, 2.5; FA2; CR 1-3)

Art History (NSAE 4, 6)

       1. The role of the visual arts and the artist in society throughout history; and (FA4, 5;
       SS5; CR 4)

       2. The work of diverse artists from various cultures and times.(G1.9; FA4, 5; SS6; CA7;
       CR 4)

Art Criticism (NSAE 2, 5)

       1. Terminology commonly used in the visual arts; (G2; FA3; CR 4)

       2. Analysis and interpretation of works of art; (G1.5; FA3; CR 4)

       3. Critique of art in oral and written formats; (G1.5; FA3; CA4; CR 4)

Aesthetics (NSAE 3, 6)

       1. Understand and develop aesthetic perceptions; (G1.6, 3.5; FA4, 5; CA5; CR 1-4)

       2. Reflection on and response to works of visual art through written, oral and visual
       formats; (FA1; CA6; CR 1-4)

       3 . interrelationships of the fine arts. (FA1-5; CR 4)




                                                                                                   35
Characteristics of Certification Program Candidates

There have been 18 candidates in the Art Education program since 2001

Number of Candidates

The following chart identifies the number of art education graduates (N=18) since 2001.

                        Table 5 – Art Education Teacher Candidates 2001-2007

Program          2001       2002      2003      2004     2005      2006      2007      2008     Total
Art K-12         4          3         3         1        2         2         3         0        18


                                            Art K-12
                      Number of Candidates—Admitted and Completed/Certified
                                          for 2001-2007


                     Year               Admitted             Completed/Certified
                     2001-2002          5*                   4
                     2002-2003          1*                   3
                     2003-2004          3*                   3
                     2004-2005          4                    1
                     2005-2006          3                    2
                     2006-2007          4                    2
                     Fall 2007          1                    3
                     TOTAL              21                   18**
                        *University-wide switch to Banner System in 2004-2005—earlier system
                          did not keep databases by ―program tags‖—the Banner system is still
                          adjusting to previous data in Hewlett-Packard system.
                       **unable to calculate persistence to certification based on lack of
                          accuracy in early numbers



―Home grown‖ versus ―transfer‖

Candidates who complete their full program of study and candidates who transfer to MWSU to
complete their program of study in art education do equally well. The following table identifies
the balanced success of both ―homegrown‖ and transfer art teacher education candidates.




                                                                                                        36
              Table 6 – Number of Art ―Homegrown‖ Versus ―Transfer‖ Candidates*



               Homegrown            Transfer             Others         Total

               #      %             #    %               #   %          #       %

Fall 2001      1       33%          1          33%       1 33%          3       100%

Spring 2002    0       0%           2          100%      0   0%         2       100%

Fall 2002      0       0%           1          100%      0   0%         1       100%

Fall 2003      0       0%           2          100%      0   0%         2       100%

Spring 2004    0       0%           1          100%      0   0%         1       100%

Spring 2005    4       100%         0          0%        0   0%         4       100%

Fall 2005      1       100%         0          0%        0   0%         1       100%

Spring 2006    2       100%         0          0%        0   0%         2       100%

Fall 2006      1       50%          1          50%       0   0%         2       100%

Spring 2007    1       50%          1          50%       0   0%         2       100%

Fall 2007      1       50%          1          50%       0   0%         2       100%

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Total          11     50%           10         45%       1   4%         22      100%




                                                                                        37
Diversity

The art education‘s commitment to diversity is embedded in the conceptual framework,
content/pedagogical/professional coursework and key assessments and field and clinical
experiences. Art teacher candidates understand that the conceptual framework description of
―taking responsibility for student learning‖ is the core principle guiding their program
experience. Candidates are required to examine the geographic and cultural environment of the
region to better understand the needs and strengths of the area. Further candidates are asked to
examine the world cultural and historical influences on the development of the content for their
discipline. All candidates are required to take coursework to support a positive learning
environment for students with disabilities (EDU 315). All methods courses address the respect
for gender and cultural differences in learning situations. Candidates receive regular feedback on
their performance related to supporting the diverse learning needs of today‘s students and
classrooms. Finally, all candidates critically study the work of Ruby Payne whose text, A
Framework for Understanding Poverty, focuses on the impact of poverty on students and their
families. In October 2007, unit candidates were able to attend a jointly-sponsored (MWSU,
SJSD, and Heartland Health) workshop led by Ruby Payne picture link.

By the nature of our discipline we are constantly surrounded by diversity. The history of art is
not by nature a Eurocentric, white, male domain; to teach it as such would be a disservice not
only to our students but to our field of study as well. Art history not only illuminates other
cultures but it cuts though the diversity of time periods as well. In complex and sometime
surprising interconnections of people, trade systems, philosophical exchange as well as the
attending cultural artifacts that produced are fascinating if presented in a comprehensible manner
in which the student can relate. That ―Eureka!‖ moment when a student recognizes the
motivation, the reason why a work was produced is a true learning experience. The department‘s
seasoned faculty is constantly bringing this diversity into the classroom and making the
connections real.

For example, our ceramics professor relates, ―I show slides of work and discuss Japanese pottery
Shoju Homadi and British potter Bernard Leach. I also show a video titled ―The Potters of
India‖ which chronicles the life of village potters in Bendapour, India. While this video focuses
on the life of potters, it also gives a portrait of life in countries with a caste system of social
structures.‖

Geo Sipp from printmaking and painting uses his personal experience to bring the work of Koko
Griffin, a renowned African American printmaker whom he knew before he became an
important name in the art world. ―Kojo Griffin is a friend of mine; he‘s a young artist from
Atlanta whom I knew when I was at Clemson University and when he was a framer for Pearl Art
Supplies. I liked his work and invited him to speak to graduate students at Clemson. Shortly after
my meeting him, his work was selected for inclusion in the Whitney Biennial; he has since
become very well known, with his paintings commanding about $50,000.00.‖ Professor Sipp
believes that African-American artists such as Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Benny
Andrews, Warrington Colescott are both important and fascinating because the art is ―so
personal, and speaks of the nature of family, history and personal experience. . . . I often will
spend a couple of weeks talking about the work of this ethnic group.‖ In addition Professor Sipp


                                                                                                 38
brings the art of other diverse cultures and geographical regions into his classroom. ―I routinely
show the art of the Mexican muralists, Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros, as well as art from India,
Japan and Africa.‖

The Department is seeking other venues than the traditional classroom to expose our students to
diversity. The proximity to major galleries and museums in the region is attractive. Omaha,
Kansas City and Chicago and Dallas are sites for field trips and conferences that our students
enjoy. Every spring Professor Sipp takes a large group of students to New York so that they can
see the work of international artists exhibiting in the city. Several years ago, Dr. Sauls and
Professor Sipp began a Study Away Program in the summer. They have taken art students to
Amsterdam, Italy and Russia to study both the art and the culture that produced it. Future plans
are being made for France and Spain.

In 2005, Fulbright scholar Bob Berglund brought Dr. Olena S. Kovalchuk, Ukrainian scholar and
Chair of the Humanities at Lutsk Liberal Arts University at Lutsk, Ukraine to Dr. Sauls‘ ART 255
Renaissance Through Modern class for a lecture on Russian icons. She treated the students to a lively
discussion on politics and arts from a part of the world not readily available to the Midwest.

In Dr. Sauls‘ art history seminar class, Art Since 1945, she and her students work together to
discover contemporary art, art of our time. One of her favorite artists is Felix Gonzalez-Torres
who was born in Cuba in 1957. ―The struggle of an artist from a different ethnic background
coming to America and attempting to experience the ‗American Dream‖ while holding fast to
their own cultural background is interesting to me. How these cultures clash and mix and marry
is the story of modern art at its richest. Our classes have some lively discussions and are full of
learning opportunities.‖

Students in all classes study artists of different nationalities and ethnic backgrounds. Some of the
artists studied in Professor Harmon-Miller‘s photomedia classes are Afro-American photographer
Gordon Parks, French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, Russian photographer, Gerf Jochems Rus,
Danish photographer, Rogert Frank, and Japanese photographer, Jan Sheracka. Because of the nature
of the discipline, ―diversity happens,‖ says Graphic Design professor, Teresa Harris.

The following table provides the demographic data of Art Teacher Candidates:

                        Table 7 Diversity of Candidates with Gender Included

                                                 Art K-12
                              Diversity of Candidates with Gender Included*
                              Phase IV--Candidates Ready for Certification
                                            Fall 2001-Fall 2007
                        (Semesters with no candidates in Phase IV are eliminated from the list.)
Academic       White,            Black or             Hispanic or         Asian            Native     TOTAL
Year                                                                      American         American
               Non-              African              Latino
               Hispanic
                                 American




                                                                                                              39
              #       %         #   %              #        %              #       %           #      %   #   %



Fall 2001     2 100%            0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   2   100%

Spring 2002   2     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   2   100%

Fall 2002     2     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   2   100%

Spring 2003   1     50%         0   0%             1        50%           0        0%          0     0%   2   100%

Spring 2004   1     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   1   100%

Spring 2005   2     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   2   100%

Fall 2005     1     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   1   100%

Spring 2006   1     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   1   100%

Fall 2006     1     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   1   100%

Spring 2007   1     100%        0   0%             0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   1   100%

Fall 2007     2     66%         1   33%            0        0%            0        0%          0     0%   3   100%

Total         16 88%            1   6%             1        6%                                            18 100%

              Academic Year               Female                  Male                 TOTAL

                                          #        %              #       %            #       %

                  Spring 2002                 2    50%                2   50%              4       100%

                  Fall 2002                   1    50%                1   50%              2 100%

              Spring 2003                     1    100%               0       0%           1 100%

              Spring 2004                     2    66%                1   33%              3 100%

                  Spring 2005                 1    100%               0   0%               1 100%

                  Fall 2005                   1    50%                1   50%              2 100%

                  Spring 2006                 0        0%             1   100%             1 100%

                  Fall 2006                   0        0%             1   100%             1 100%

                  Fall 2007                   2    66%                1   33%              3 100%

              Total                           10   56%            8       44%              18 100%



                                                                                                                  40
*Please note that diversity and gender reporting is optional. Teacher candidates may choose not to
respond to these items on Missouri Western State University forms, or they may choose to respond
to more than one category. No one chose the ―Other‖ category under ―Diversity‖ in this population.

CBASE test results – See APPENDIX E

Graduates of our program—The following are graduates of our program. Included are honors
and placement



2001    Megan Root                 Teaches art at Lafayette HS         Cum Laude
                                                                       Department Scholarship F00;
                                                                       Scholastic Certificate 99-00, 00-01

        Jennifer Taylor            Teaches art in St. Joseph SD,       Department Scholarship F99, F00, S0;
                                   St. Joseph, MO                      Scholastic Certificate 98-99, 99-00, 00-01

        Jeff Wright                Teaches art in the Texas Public
                                   School System

        Aaron Hardin               Teaches art in the Oklahoma
                                   Public School System


2002    Kristi Critten             Principal of North Davies HS.       Department Scholarship S00, S01. F 01, S02
                                   She received her Masters of         Scholastic Key Award 01-02
                                   Education from William Wood         Topeka Competition 24‖ 2000; Regional
                                   Fulton, MO, where she pursued       Juried Competition, a sculpture made of
                                   her superintendence degree. She     welded steel, colored class entitled Holes–
                                   is currently seeking PhD in          Purchase Award
                                   Teaching Administration


        Brian Hernandez            Teaches art in RIU School           Cum Laude;
                                   District,                           Department Scholarship S99, F99, S00, F01,
                                                                       S02;Scholastic Certificate 00-01
                                                                       Scholastic Key Award 99-00

        Sara Caldwell              Teaches art in the North
                                   Kansas City School District,
                                   Kansas City, MO



2003    Jacqueline Roy             Taught art for a year with          Magna Cum Laude
                                   South Holt School District,         Department Scholarship 03
                                   K-12. She now teaches three art     ―Photography Midwest Exhibit‖ Regional
                                   classes and two sections of         juried exhibit, photograph entitled
                                   yearbook at Central HS in           Ascending University of Wisconsin
                                   St. Joseph, MO.                     Madison, Madison, WI ; 30th Annual


                                                                                                                    41
                                                                 Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members
                                                                 Exhibition, Regional member‘s exhibition, a
                                                                 photograph entitled The Big Top-
                                                                 Honorable Mention

       Mary Margaret Adams   Teaches art with the Gallatin       Department Scholarship S02, S03
                             School District, grades 7-12        Scholastic Key Award 02-03

       Stephanie Madison     Teaches part-time until her two     Department Scholarship F01, S03
                             Small children begin school


2004   Jill Kirkendoll       Teaches art at Neely Elementary
                             School, St. Joseph, MO

2005   Carrie J. Campbell    Teaching Art at South Holt          Cum Laude
                             Elementary                          Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society in
                                                                 Education , Xi Omega Chapter one of the
                                                                 largest and most prestigious educational
                                                                 honor societies in the world with over 500
                                                                 active chapters worldwide.

       Kim Gertz             Teaches art in the Hamilton SD,     Department Scholarship S99, F99
                             Hamilton, MO

2006   Shawn Michael Kiehl   Teaches as para-educator for
                             North East Kansas Academy
                             Alternative School (Special needs
                             students.) Atchison, KS

       Corey Longers         Elementary art teacher split between
                             Picket and Pershing Elementary
                             Schools, St. Joseph, MO


2007   Dana Dyann Wilson     Teaches art at Minnie Kline
                             Elementary School Andrew
                             County, MO

       Tracy Hamilton

       Katherine Sherman


Oral Communication Verification – At Missouri Western, all students are required to
successfully complete Oral Communication (COM 104 – 3 credit hours) or its transfer
equivalent. This course requires all students to understand and demonstrate the ―principles of
speech as applied in meaningful participation in society.‖ As a result, all teacher education
candidates (100%) graduating from Missouri Western have an understanding of the complexities
of effective oral communication and have practiced improving their skills in oral
communication.

Entrance GPA – As noted previously, all art education candidates are required to achieve and
maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA to be eligible for admission and continuation in the Western art

                                                                                                              42
teacher education program. Candidates must meet unit entrance and phase transition
requirements as identified in Table 4.

Persistence to Graduation - One strength of the art education program at MWSU is the
persistence to graduation of program candidates. Not only are candidates successful in
coursework and in successfully passing the PRAXIS II exam, a majority of the candidates who
were admitted to the art education program since 2001 have earned degrees in art education.
Those not completing the art education degree were successful in completing a traditional art
degree.

                                          Table 8 Art K-12

          Number of Candidates—Admitted and Completed/Certified for 2001-2007

                   Year              Admitted             Completed/Certified
                   2001-2002         5*                   5
                   2002-2003         1*                   1
                   2003-2004         3*                   3
                   2004-2005         4                    3
                   2005-2006         3                    3
                   2006-2007         4                    2
                   Fall 2007         1                    1
                   TOTAL             21                   18**
                      *University-wide switch to Banner System in 2004-2005—earlier system
                           did not keep databases by ―program tags‖—the Banner system is still
                           adjusting to previous data in Hewlett-Packard system.
                      **unable to calculate persistence to certification based on lack of accuracy
                      in early numbers




                                                                                                     43
Course List

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences provides the core of the university's general education
program. Individually, and as a part of a team, students learn to:

      Communicate ideas effectively
      Develop critical, analytical, and quantitative skills
      Use the scientific process in daily living
      Compare, contrast, and evaluate ideas
      Develop historical frameworks in which to evaluate current and possible future events
      Experience the arts and participate in the cultural life of the community

 These components of a liberal arts education allow students to become capable, well-rounded
human beings, knowledgeable citizens, and productive members of society. Liberal Arts and
Sciences graduates are valued by graduate and professional schools, by employers in business
and nonprofit organizations, and in other careers where flexibility, creativity, and problem-
solving are required. General education courses at Missouri Western State University include:

MAT 110 Contemporary Problem Solving (3) F, Sp, Su. Mathematics for solving selected
real-world problems using elementary graph theory, data analysis, techniques of decision
making, and the mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: ACT math score of at least 20 or the
equivalent.

MAT 112 Finite Mathematics (3) F, Sp. Linear and quadratic equations, graphs, and functions
including exponential and logarithmic functions; mathematics of finance, annuities, sinking
funds and mortgages; linear programming; counting methods, probability, expectation;
descriptive statistics. Prerequisite: ACT math score of at least 20 or the equivalent. (Not open to
the student with credit in MAT 167.)

MAT 116 College Algebra (3) F, Sp, Su. Linear, quadratic, and miscellaneous equations and
inequalities; relations and functions including polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic
functions; graphing; systems of equations; and matrices. Prerequisite: ACT math score of at least
20 or the equivalent. (Not open to the student with credit in MAT 167 or MAT 130.)

ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric (3) F, Sp, Su. Instruction in reading and writing;
emphasizes expository prose. Fulfills first half of the general studies requirement in English
composition. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENG 100, OR a score of 19 or higher on
the ACT English subtest, OR a passing score on the Writing Placement Examination. (See class
schedule for information about the WPE.)

ENG 108 College Writing and Research (3) F, Sp, Su. Instruction in reading various literary
genres and continued practice in writing. Fulfills second half of the General Studies requirement
in English composition. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENG 104.

ENG 112 Honors Composition and Rhetoric (3) F. An enriched course open to students who
achieve superior scores on the Writing Placement Examination (WPE) administered by the


                                                                                                  44
Department of English, Foreign Languages and Journalism OR who score 27 or above on the
ACT English subtest. This course fulfills the English composition requirement for basic skills in
general studies for four-year degree programs. (See class schedule for information about the
WPE.)

COM 104 Oral Communication (3) F, Sp, Su. Principles of speech as applied in meaningful
participation in society.

BIO 101 Principles of Biology (5) F, Sp., Su. Principles of living phenomena; meets the
general education biological science requirement. Four hours lecture, two hours lab.

BIO 105 Principles of Organismal Biology (5) F, Sp. Examines basic concepts and principles
related to organismal morphology and homeostasis of representative organisms. Three hours
lecture and three hours lab per week. LAS Writing.

CHE 101 Introductory Chemistry (4) F, Sp, Su. Chemistry for liberal arts and sciences
students; meets the minimum physical science requirement. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.

CHE 104 Fundamentals of Chemistry (5) F, Sp, Su. A survey of chemistry with special
emphasis on solution and biochemistry; for students majoring in scientific and technological
fields such as nursing or agriculture. Four hours lecture, two hours lab.

CHE 111 General Chemistry (5) F, Sp. Basic concepts of chemistry: atomic theory and
periodic system, chemical calculations, oxidation-reduction, states of matter, theory of chemical
bonding, atomic structures. Four hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Math ACT of 20 or
higher or the equivalent.

ESC 111 Physical Geology (4) F, Sp. Survey of geologic materials and processes.

PHY 101 Physics for the Liberal Arts (4) F. A comprehensive, descriptive study of the
scientific principles of the physical world, including the history of science, motion, energy,
cosmology, geophysics, etc. Designed to provide students without significant previous
coursework in the physical sciences with a solid introduction to the terminology and concepts
required for further study. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. (Not open to
the student with credit in PHY 107, PHY 110, or PHY 210.)

PHY 107 Introduction to Physics (4) Sp. A comprehensive, quantitative study of the concepts
and laws of physics. Designed for students majoring in fields other than the physical sciences,
mathematics, or engineering. Topics include motion, gravity, electromagnetism, atomic and
nuclear physics, optics, and relativity. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per
week. Prerequisite: ACT math score of at least 20 or the equivalent. (Not open to the student
with credit in PHY 110 or PHY 210.)

PHY 110 College Physics I (4) F, Sp. Classical treatment of mechanics, energy, waves, and
heat. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: MAT 116. (Not open to students with
credit in PHY 210.)


                                                                                                45
PHY 210 University Physics I (5) F. This course is a comprehensive study of mechanics,
relativity, oscillations, waves, and thermodynamics involving simulations, applications, and
experimentation. Course assignments require the student to have a thorough knowledge of
college algebra, trigonometry, and calculus. Three hours lecture, two hours computer aided
instruction laboratory, two hours experimentation laboratory. Prerequisite: MAT 167.

PHY 104 Introduction to Astronomy (4) F, Sp. Basic course in astronomy, mostly descriptive
in nature; solar system, stellar astronomy, structure of galaxy and universe. Three hours lecture
plus two hours lab.

ECO 101 Current Issues in the Economy (3) F, Sp, Su. Introductory course covering current
economic events and economic problems facing society. Topics include health care, the
environment, crime and poverty, globalization, and recession and growth in the national
economy. As the economic aspects of these issues are explored, the student is introduced to the
methods used by economists to analyze problems and to develop possible solutions.

ECO 260 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) F, Sp, Su. Introduction to basic principles of
economics with emphasis on the analysis of unemployment, GDP, inflation, and public debt;
discusses fiscal and monetary theories and public policies.

ECO 261 Principles of Microeconomics (3) F, Sp, Su. Introduction to economic fundamentals
with emphasis on supply and demand analysis, factor markets, different market structures,
international economics, and various economic problems.

GEO 100 World Geography (3) F, Sp. A systematic and regional analysis of the world's
diverse cultural realms emphasizing the five themes of geography (location, place, interaction of
people and the physical environment, movement, and region).

PSY 101 General Psychology (3) F, Sp, Su. General information about psychology in everyday
life, designed to correct misconceptions and to give the student a better understanding of self and
others.

SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology (3) F, Sp, Su. An introduction to the discipline of
sociology; basic sociological concepts and theories; a survey of the major topics such as culture,
society, social interaction, groups, crime, race/ethnicity, class, gender, the family, education,
religion, medicine, economy, politics. Cross-cultural comparisons.

SOC 120 General Anthropology (3) F. The bio-cultural evolution of the human species, with
emphasis on culture as adaptation for survival; comparison of human non-literate societies,
stressing cultural variability, cultural relativity, and similarities between cultures.

HIS 140 American History to 1865 (3) F, Sp. The discovery of America to the end of the Civil
War; colonial America, the Revolution, national development, sectionalism, and the Civil War.




                                                                                                 46
HIS 150 American History since 1865 (3) F, Sp. Continuation of HIS 140. Reconstruction,
industrialization, urbanization, emergence as a world power, progressivism, World War I, the
New Deal, World War II, and postwar America.

GOV 101 American National Government (3) F, Sp, Su. The American constitutional system,
including Congress, the presidency, and the courts; and public issues.

HIS 100 Ancient and Medieval Civilization (3) F, Sp. The western world from antiquity to the
fifteenth century; the emergence of civilization in the Nile and Tigris-Euphrates valleys; the
political, social, economic, and intellectual contributions of Greece, Rome, and medieval
Europe.

HIS 110 Early Modern Civilization (3) F, Sp. The western world from 1500 to 1815; national
states, the geographical revolution, the founding of European overseas empires, the Reformation,
the emergence of constitutional governments, the Scientific Revolution, and the American and
French Revolutions.

HIS 130 Modern Europe: 1789 to the Present (3) F, Sp. The French Revolution and
Napoleonic periods; reaction, nationalism, and revolution; rise of socialism; imperialism; World
War I; the Russian Revolutions and Soviet communism; the rise of fascism; Hitler, Stalin, and
World War II; the Holocaust; the postwar bi-polar world order; the bloc system.

HUM 203 Humanities: Ancient and Medieval (3) F, Sp. The social and intellectual history of
humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from the classical period to
the Renaissance.

HUM 204 Humanities: Middle Ages to the French Revolution (3) F, Sp. The social and
intellectual history of humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from
the Middle Ages to the French Revolution.

HUM 205 Humanities: American Revolution to the Present (3) F, Sp. The social and
intellectual history of humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from
the American Revolution to the present.

ENG 210 Approaches to Literature (3) F, Sp, Su. A General Studies course emphasizing ways
of reading and writing about poetry, fiction and drama. Various thematic approaches may be
offered. May not be repeated for credit.

ENG 220 Introduction to Reading Texts (3) F, Sp. A General Studies course designed
primarily for English majors emphasizing ways of reading and writing about literature texts.

PHL 210 Introduction to Philosophy (3) F, Sp. Survey of the origins and development of
philosophical thought focusing on texts selected from the classical, medieval, modern and
contemporary periods.




                                                                                                    47
PHL 230 Ethics (3) F, Sp. An introduction to ethical theory focusing on the major traditions of
Western philosophical ethics and their practical application to contemporary moral issues.

HUM 250 Comparative Religions (3) F, Sp. Survey of nature and effects of major and minor
religions on the culture and civilization of mankind.

ART 100 Introduction to Art (3) F, Sp, Su. General background in the history, philosophy,
principles, and techniques of the visual arts.

MUS 101 Perspectives in Music (3) F, Sp, Su. Music materials, forms, historical-social
development of composers and compositions. Various themes may be pursued; however, this
course may not be repeated for credit.

THR 113 Introduction to Theatre (3) F, Sp. The contributions made by directors, actors,
designers, technicians, and playwrights to modern dramatic productions. Participation in a
production as performer, member of stage or construction crew, or member of production
committee is an optional activity but is not required.

FRE 102 Elementary French I (3) F. Beginning study of French language and culture,
including speaking, listening, reading and writing. Focus on topics of personal interest and
activities, using primarily the present tense. Students whose high school transcripts show three or
more years of French (with a grade of C or better, and within three years of the semester in
question) should attempt the placement exam because they will receive audit credit only should
they enroll in the beginning French course (FRE 102).

GER 102 Elementary German I (3) F. Beginning study of German language and culture,
including speaking, listening, reading and writing. Focus on topics of personal interest and
activities, using primarily the present tense. Students whose high school transcripts show three or
more years of German (with a grade of C or better, and within three years of the semester in
question) should attempt the placement exam because they will receive audit credit only should
they enroll in the beginning German course (GER 102).

SPA 102 Elementary Spanish I (3) F. Beginning study of Spanish language and culture,
including speaking, listening, reading and writing. Focus on topics of personal interest and
activities, using primarily the present tense. Students whose high school transcripts show three or
more years of Spanish (with a grade of C or better, and within three years of the semester in
question) should attempt the placement exam because they will receive audit credit only should
they enroll in the beginning Spanish course (SPA 102).

PED 101 Fitness and Wellness (3) F, Sp, Su. Develops knowledge and skill in obtaining
optimal health fitness through nutrition, stress management, cardiorespiratory endurance,
recognition of risk factors for heart disease, and musculoskeletal development. Two hours
lecture, two hours lab. Students must enroll in the lecture and one of the following seven PED
101 labs:




                                                                                                 48
       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Aquatic Conditioning. Designed to instruct
       students in a variety of aquatic exercises to develop overall muscular strength, muscular
       endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness. Swimming skills not needed.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: General Physical Conditioning. Designed
       to instruct students in a variety of physical exercise activities to develop overall muscular
       strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Fitness Swimming. Designed to instruct
       students in a swimming program to develop overall muscular strength and muscular
       endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming
       level and above.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Jogging. Designed to instruct students in a
       jogging program to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility
       and cardiovascular fitness.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Rhythmic Aerobics. Designed to instruct
       students in a variety of choreographed exercise routines to music to develop overall
       muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Strength Training. Designed to instruct
       students in weight resistant activities to develop overall muscular strength, muscular
       endurance, and flexibility.

       PED 101 Fitness & Wellness Laboratory: Walking for Fitness and Weight Control.
       Designed to instruct students in a walking exercise program to develop overall muscular
       strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness.

MIL 105 Rappelling and Military Rifle Marksmanship (1) DD. Course teaches techniques
and methods of rappelling, rope management, knot tying, small bore rifle marksmanship and
range safety. May be substituted for physical education activity credit. Category five - Physical
Education under General Studies.

PED 110 Adaptive Activities (1) (DD). A program of activities adapted to the needs of the
handicapped and physically restricted student. This class may be repeated for credit with
permission of the Coordinator of Adaptive Activities.

PED 112 Beginning Racquetball (1) (DD). A beginner‘s course of instruction in the basic
skills of racquetball, including the techniques of singles and doubles play. Student must furnish
racquet and a new can of racquetballs.

PED 116 Beginning Bait and Fly Casting (1) (DD). Introduction to sport fishing. Emphasizes
casting skills, methods of fishing, fish habitat, conservation practices, and lure making. Field trip
may be required.



                                                                                                   49
PED 117 Beginning Riflery and Trap Shooting (1) (DD). Instruction in recreational shooting.
Emphasizes firearms safety; rifle and shotgun trap marksmanship, particular stress on range
practice; methods and techniques of reloading ammunition and cleaning firearms. Students must
provide own ammunition.

PED 118 Beginning Bowling (1) (DD). House fee required.

PED 119 Beginning Golf (1) (DD). Students must furnish four new golf balls.

PED 120 Beginning Tennis (1) (DD). Students must furnish racquet and one can of new tennis
balls.

PED 121 Beginning Badminton (1) (DD). Students must furnish three new shuttlecocks.

PED 122 Beginning Orienteering: Map and Compass (1) (DD). An exciting new
recreational sport which combines use of map and compass with physical activity; combines
several styles of orienteering with practice on actual courses.

PED 123 Beginning Judo (1) (DD). Student must furnish gi.

PED 124 Beginning Survival and Primitive Living (1) (DD). Instruction in preparing for
environmental emergencies with emphasis on the psychological aspect of survival situations and
establishment of priorities for sustaining life in an environmental emergency. An overnight
experience is required.

PED 127 Beginning Archery (1) (DD). Introduction to target and field archery. Emphasizes
shooting technique and various types of archery games and competition. Students must furnish a
matched set of six arrows.

PED 128 Beginning Backpacking (1) (DD). Instruction in backpacking. Emphasizes
equipment orientation, personal conduct within the natural environment, clothing and shelter,
preservation of wilderness area integrity, safety, foods, and cooking. Course includes on-the-trail
instruction and practicum. All equipment furnished by the department.

PED 130 Beginning Swimming (1) (DD). Basic skills in swimming. Swim suit required. Non-
swimmers only.

PED 131 Lifeguard Training (1) (DD). Provides minimum skills training for a person to
qualify to serve as a lifeguard. Prerequisite: Be at least 15 years old, able to swim 500 yards
continuously using side stroke, front crawl, and breast stroke. Each stroke demonstrated a
minimum of 100 yards. Surface dive to 8 - 12 feet and recover a 10-pound brick. Tread water for
2 minutes with arms across chest (legs only).

PED 132 Intermediate Swimming (1) (DD). Development of swimming strokes. Swim suit
required. Prerequisite: Ability to swim.



                                                                                                 50
PED 135 Skin and Scuba Diving (1) (DD). Techniques and safety for skin and scuba diving.
Swim suit and special fee required. Prerequisite: Above-average ability to swim.

PED 137 Water Safety Instructor (1) (DD). Water safety techniques as prescribed by the
American Red Cross; W.S.I. Certification for those who qualify. Swim suit required.
Prerequisite: Be at least 17 years of age at the end of the course, able to pass the precourse
written test and skills test. The written test is taken from the Community Water Safety and/or
Swimming and Diving Text (Chapters 2 and 13). The skills test involves rescue skills and stroke
evaluation.

PED 138 Beginning Sailing and Canoeing (1) (DD). Practical instruction in sailing and
canoeing. Emphasizes safety and techniques. On-the-water experiences are integral with
instruction. Students must be able to swim.

PED 139 Beginning Skiing (1) (DD). Development of basic skills in downhill (Alpine) and/or
cross country skiing. Special fee required.

PED 140 Beginning Ice Skating (1) (DD). Special fee required.

PED 141 Beginning Karate (1) (DD). Students must furnish gi.

PED 142 Hap Ki Do (1) (DD). A martial art activity with emphasis on self-defense. Students
must furnish gi.

PED 144 Beginning Recreational Games (1) (DD). Shuffleboard, table tennis, horseshoes,
croquet, and others.

PED 145 Aerobic Dance (1) (DD). An activity course in which students‘ cardiovascular
endurance is developed through continuous rhythmic exercise and dance set to music.

PED 146 Beginning Social Dance (1) (DD).

PED 147 Beginning Ballet (1) (DD). Introduction to ballet with emphasis on developing style,
the basics of body alignment, arm placement, footwork and expressiveness. Students must
furnish ballet shoes.

PED 153 Beginning Modern Dance (1) (DD). Students must furnish leotard.

PED 156 Beginning Tap Dance (1) (DD). Students must furnish tap shoes.

PED 157 Dance Choreography (1) (DD). Designed to teach principles and fundamental dance
skills for use in choreography assignments relating to time, space, energy, group relationships,
and performance techniques. The choreography is especially relevant to vocal music, musical
theatre, and concert dance. Two hours lab.




                                                                                              51
PED 158 Intercollegiate Sports I (1) (DD). Intercollegiate athletic team members who are on
the men‘s football, men‘s basketball, women‘s volleyball, women's golf, or women‘s basketball
teams only. May be taken up to four times for credit.

PED 159 Intercollegiate Sports II (1) (DD). Intercollegiate athletic team members who are on
the men‘s baseball, men‘s golf, women‘s tennis, or women‘s softball teams only. May be taken
up to four times for credit.

PED 160 Dance Participation (1) (DD). Open to any individual interested in developing higher
level skills in dance performance through participation in the Missouri Western State University
Dance Company. May be taken up to four times for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Dance
Company Sponsor.

PED 171 Beginning Cave Exploring (1) (DD). Introduction to the sport of spelunking.
Emphasizes safety aspects and appreciation of cave ecology. Course includes caving trips.
Equipment furnished by the department.

PED 172 Intermediate Cave Exploring (1) (DD). Continuation of PED 171. Involves
intermediate activities in spelunking: reading cave maps, basic vertical techniques, basic rescue
techniques, and discussions in cave geology. Course includes caving trips. Most equipment
furnished by the department. Special fee required. Prerequisite: PED 171.

PED 175 Beginning Volleyball (1) (DD).

PED 180 Pilates (1) (DD). A progressive activity where students learn proper body alignment
and techniques for integration into movement with emphasis on lower back and abdominal
strength.

PED 185 Beginning Weight Training and Conditioning (1) (DD).

PED 186 Aerobics Fitness (1) (DD).

PED 187 Beginning Cycling (1) (DD). Students must furnish bicycle.

PED 188 Wilderness Canoeing (1) (DD). Comprehensive course in flatwater and river
canoeing; emphasizes whitewater paddling technique and personal conduct in wilderness
environments; includes wilderness camping skills and expedition dynamics. Class is usually held
in Minnesota, South Missouri, or Arkansas.

PED 189 Beginning Pistol and Skeet (1) (DD). Pistol and skeet marksmanship, emphasizing
range practice; methods and techniques of reloading ammunition and cleaning firearms. Students
must provide own ammunition.

PED 190 Adult Physical Fitness (1) F, Sp. An activity course in which student‘s knowledge of
high level wellness is developed through participation in discussion and physical activity



                                                                                                52
programs. Designed as a class for returning students to be taught concurrently with the adult
physical fitness class in Continuing Education.

PED 193 Special Weight Training Class for Athletes Only (1) (DD). Limited to members of
MWSU Intercollegiate Athletic Teams only. May be taken one time only for credit.

PED 219 Intermediate Golf (1) (DD). Students must furnish four new golf balls. Prerequisite:
PED 119.

PED 250 Intermediate Ice Skating (1) (DD). Continuation of PED 140. Emphasizes ice
skating as a leisure activity for a lifetime. Special fee required.

PED 253 Intermediate Modern Dance (1) (DD). Students must furnish leotard. Prerequisite:
PED 153.

LAS Focus Areas - In addition to the comprehensive program of general studies courses, Western
requires that a student graduating with a major in any of the disciplines within the College of
Liberal arts and Sciences (except Medical Technology) is required to take one course designated
as LAS Writing and a second course designated as LAS Computer Literacy. In addition,
students with majors in the departments of Art, Communication Studies/Theatre, English/Foreign
Languages/Journalism, History/Philosophy/Geography, and Music are required to take one
course designated LAS Ethics, and another course designated LAS
International/Intercultural. For students with majors in other LAS departments, it is only
recommended that they take a LAS Ethics and a LAS International/Intercultural course. If a
course is designated in more than one area, the student must choose which one of the four area
requirements it will satisfy.

1. LAS Writing. A course in which faculty assign students both formal and informal writing in
order to increase student learning, improve student writing, and initiate students into discipline-
specific forms of written communication.

2. LAS Computer Literacy. A course designed to teach discipline-specific computer software
and hardware. A partial list of skills which may be taught include: data collection and analysis,
word processing, desktop publishing, ethical or human issues of computing, discipline-specific
applications of computer technology.

3. LAS Ethics. A course in which issues of ethical concern to professionals in their major field
of study are addressed. These courses will give significant attention to professional codes of
ethics, case studies identifying ethical dilemmas, or issues of contemporary (or historical) social
concern.

4. LAS International/Intercultural. A course which presents a significant recognition,
awareness, and understanding of cultural or international diversity.

These courses are designated in the course descriptions listed with each academic department
and the Missouri Western catalog.


                                                                                                    53
                                             Table 9.
          Courses Officially Designated for Liberal Arts & Sciences Areas of Focus


Department       LAS Writing          LAS Computer         LAS Ethics      LAS International/
                                        Literacy                            Intercultural
Art              ART 205                ART 229              ART 315            ART 255
                 ART 335                ART 329


Biology          BIO 105                BIO 115               *NA               *NA

Chemistry        CHE 495                CHE 321               *NA               *NA
                                        CHE 381/382
CS&T             COM 305                COM 320            COM 210              COM 338
                 COM 342                COM 362            COM 415              COM 342
                 COM 345                                   COM 465              COM 345
                 COM 360
                 COM 468
                 COM 470

CS/M/P           CSC 387                CSC 184               *NA               *NA
                 CSC 400                MAT 167
                 MAT 301                MAT 301
                 MAT 480

Eng/FL/J         ETC 324                ETC 200            ETC 200              ENG 320
                 ENG 301                ETC 324            ENG 321              ENG 321
                 ENG 385                ENG 323            ENG 364              ENG 324
                 ENG 386                ENG 465            ENG 410              ENG 354
                 ENG 400                EPR 326            ENG 430              ENG 355
                 EPR 422                EPR 422            ENG 460              ENG 356
                 JOU 302                JOU 327            ENG 480              ENG 357
                 FRE 207/307            FRE 302            JOU 303              ENG 467
                 FRE 422                SPA 332            FRE 322              ETC 421
                 FRE 442                                   FRE 432              FRE 206/306
                 SPA 302                                   SPA 322              FRE 207/307
                                                                                FRE 322
                                                                                SPA 248/348
                                                                                SPA 322
                                                                                SPA 332
                                                                                SPA 250/350
                                                                               FRE/GER/SPA 340

Economics        ECO 367                ECO 460            ECO 362              ECO 461
                 ECO 462                ECO 464            ECO 365              ECO 463
                                                           ECO 375
                                                           ECO 376

Gov’t/           GOV 310                GOV 300            GOV 310              GOV 200
Soc Work/        GOV 370                SOC 460            GOV 312              GOV 340
Sociology        GOV 390                                   GOV 370              GOV 380
                 GOV 420                                   SOC 360              GOV 400
                 SWK 485                                   SOC 430              SOC 315


                                                                                            54
                                                                 SWK 350                  SOC 400
                                                                                          SWK 330

History/        HIS 300                    GEO 210               PHL 312                  GEO 320
Philosophy/     HIS 302                                          PHL 330                  HIS 320
Geography       HIS 310                                                                   HIS 336
                                                                                          HIS 370

Music           MUS 310                    MUS 210               MUS 327                  MUS 303
                MUS 311                    MUS 419               MUS 330                  MUS 310
                MUS 327                    MUS 429               MUS 331                  MUS 311
                                                                 MUS 332                  MUS 321
                                                                 MUS 333
                                                                 MUS 334
                                                                 MUS 335
                                                                 MUS 467
                                                                 MUS 468


Psychology      PSY 303                    PSY 300               PSY 301                  PSY 222
                PSY 490                    PSY 415               PSY 303                  PSY 260
                                                                 PSY 400                  PSY 230

Catalog descriptions for the required Content Courses -

ART 110 Beginning Drawing I (3) F, Sp. Elementary drawing with the figure, still life, landscape, and
perspective in various media. Six studio hours.

ART 120 Two-Dimensional Design (3) F, Sp. Design principles and fundamentals in two-dimensional
media using a problem-solving approach. (Lab fee) Six studio hours.

ART 130 Introduction to Tools and Techniques (2) F, Sp. Basic skills with studio hand tools and
power equipment; emphasizes safety procedures. This course is a prerequisite for any studio art course
except ART 110 and 120. Four studio hours. (Students must purchase their own project materials.)

ART 140 Ceramics I (3) F, Sp. Traditional and contemporary approaches to ceramics as an art form;
emphasizes technical, historical, and aesthetic problems. Six studio hours. (Students must purchase the
clay they use.)

ART 160 Beginning Drawing II (3) Sp. The figure in various media; still life, landscape, and
nonobjective directions; problems dealing with the complete drawing. Six studio hours. (Lab fee)
Prerequisite: successful completion of ART 110, 120, 130, with a GPA of 2.50 or better in the three
courses.

ART 170 Three-Dimensional Design (3) Sp. Emphasis on form and composition using a problem
solving approach; exploration of a wide variety of three-dimensional materials and processes. Six studio
hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: successful completion of ART 110, 120, 130, with a GPA of 2.50 or better
in the three courses.


                                                                                                          55
ART 205 Ancient through Medieval Art (3) F. History of art in western civilization: prehistoric times
through the Middle Ages. LAS Writing.

ART 255 Renaissance through Modern Art (3) Sp. History of art in western civilization: Renaissance
through modern times. Prerequisite: ART 205. LAS International/Intercultural.

ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3) F, Sp, Su. Current methods and
materials for the teaching of art in the elementary grades; theory and experience with elementary school
art projects. Prerequisite: EED 202 and MUS 101. Elementary education majors may not take this course
until officially admitted to teacher education.

ART 335 Art Theory and Criticism (3) F. Critical thought in art theory, philosophy, and criticism.
Prerequisite: ART 205, 255, and completion of freshman core curriculum in art. LAS Writing.

ART 339 Printmaking I (3) F. Relief and intaglio printmaking processes. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee)
Prerequisite: ART 120, 130 and 160.

ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3) Sp (even-numbered years).
Teaching methodologies and materials for the secondary school art teacher; design of appropriate art
learning experiences for the adolescent. Prerequisite: ART 300.

ART 359 Photomedia I (3) F, Sp. Black-and-white photographic processes and problems; student must
have access to a camera with adjustable aperture and shutter speed. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee)
Prerequisite: ART 110, 120 and 130.

ART 369 Painting I (3) F, Sp. Color, composition, and technique; the figure, still life, and nonobjective
problems. Six studio hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 130 plus 6 credits in drawing.

ART 379 Sculpture I (3) F. Basic foundations in sculpture: theory, techniques, materials, processes. Six
studio hours. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: ART 130 and 170.

ART 494 Senior Seminar and Exhibit (1) F, Sp. Class session on professional topics; preparation and
presentation of an exhibition of the student‘s personal art work. Prerequisite: Passing of Junior Review
and departmental approval required.

Candidates are required to complete their content coursework with six additional credits in art history.
Those credits can be earned through the following courses:

ART 283 Introduction to Research Methods in Art (1-2) (DD). Introduction to basic research methods
in art. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving art-related research problems.
Prerequisite: Consent of department.

ART 324 Topics in the History of Cinema (3) (DD). Viewing and discussion of thematic concepts of
cinema from genre of films, auteur theory of directors and other related topics. Prerequisites: Freshman
core for majors plus ART 205, ART 255 or permission of the department or instructor.


                                                                                                           56
ART 356 American Art: Columbus to 1865 (3) F (even-numbered years). Development of art in the
United States. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205 and ART 255.

ART 357 American Art Since 1865 (3) Sp (even-numbered years). Architecture, decorative arts,
painting and sculpture since the Civil War. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205, ART 255 and ART
356.

ART 381 IN-Site Art and Cultural Experience (2-3) (DD). Directed studio and art history opportunities
for students off-campus. Prerequisites: Permission of the department or instructor.

ART 450 Independent Research/Project (3) F, Sp. Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic
on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite: Completion of the major-minor declaration in art,
minimum 2.5 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

ART 456 Art in the Age of Modernity (3) F (odd-numbered years). Major movements of the 19th and
20th centuries focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205
and ART 255.

ART 457 Art Since 1945 (3) Sp (odd-numbered years). The latest trends, theories and technologies in
visual and conceptual art. (Materials Fee) Prerequisite: ART 205, ART 255, and ART 456.

Catalog descriptions for the required courses within the professional sequence:

EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3) F, Sp. Basic introduction to professional education; an on-
campus exploratory course to aid participants in deciding whether or not to become teachers. The course
also provides the basic information and attitude development necessary for successful teaching. Taken
the same semester and time as EDU 203. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or 112.

EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1) F, Sp. Laboratory course taken concurrently with EDU 202.
During this off-campus experience, the participant serves as a teacher assistant. This exploratory course
provides concrete exposure to teaching, students, and the school. Graded pass/fail. Taken the same
semester and time as EDU 202.

EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3) F, Sp. Continuation of the off-campus experiences in
cooperating schools as teacher associates. To be taken concurrently with EDU 304 (and 375 for
elementary). Prerequisite: EDU 203 and 310, 320, 330, 340, 360, MAT 351, and MAT 352 and
approved admission to the Teacher Education Program OR Secondary and K-12: EDU 203, and approved
admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4) F, Sp. Psychological principles as applied to educational settings.
To be taken concurrently with EDU 303. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and EDU 203.

EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2) F, Sp. Techniques of teaching reading comprehension
strategies to middle and high school students. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or 112 and admission to
the Education Department. Elementary teacher candidates must have completed EDU 310 and 320.

                                                                                                        57
EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2) F, Sp. This course is a survey of
issues related to the identification and teaching of exceptional students. All state and federally defined
categories of disability will be addressed by definition, etiology, prevalence, school law, civil rights law
and curriculum and teaching issues. Topics will include curriculum and instruction modifications and
adaptations as well as behavior management and discipline. Prerequisites: EDU 202 and 203; declared
minors in Childhood Studies are exempt from EDU 303 and 304 as prerequisites.

EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3) F, Sp. Philosophical, ethical,
and legal problems related to secondary education instructional strategies, including classroom and
laboratory experiences; considers interpersonal relations as applied to teaching. To be taken concurrently
with EDU 409. Prerequisite: EDU 303 and EDU 304.

EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9) F, Sp. Full-time, off-campus teaching experiences
working with students in an area secondary school and a mentor teacher. To be taken concurrently with
EDU 404. Prerequisite: EDU 303, EDU 304, special methods course in the major, a cumulative GPA of
2.5 in the major field of study and approval from the major department; Must have passed the Praxis II
exam in the are of certification.




5. Meeting of various standards – The following information describes and documents how
the certification programs is meeting General Education Standard 1.1.1 and 1.2.1., professional
Competencies – Standard 1.2 or 1.3 or 1.4 or 1.5, Certification requirements and Subject Specific
Competencies.

TEACHER EDUCATION STANDARDS

1.   Knowledge of Subject Matter

        ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)



                                                                                                           58
       ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

2.   Human Development and Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

3.   Adapting Instruction

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

4.   Planning, Implementing, Evaluating the Curriculum

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)



                                                                        59
       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

5.   Multiple Instructional Strategies

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

6.   Classroom Motivation & Management

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

7.   Communication Skills

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)



                                                                        60
8.   Assessment of Student Learning

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

9.   Reflective Practitioner

       EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)


10. Partnerships

       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

11. Technology in Teaching & Learning

       EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)


                                                                        61
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

12. Foundations of Education, Ethics, Law
      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

DESE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

I. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

      A. A baccalaureate degree from a college or university having a teacher education
      program approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;

      B. Must have recommendation of designated official for teacher education in the college
      or university;

      C. Must have a grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale overall and in the major area of
      study;

      D. Must complete the content knowledge or specialty area test designated by the State
      Board of Education with a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score. If
      no content knowledge or specialty area test is designated for the area of concentration,
      completion of the Principles of Learning and Teaching: Grades 9-12 test is required with
      a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score;

      E. Completion of professional requirements as determined by the recommending college
      or university, which may exceed these minimum requirements; and

      F. Individuals who completed their teacher education program outside of the United
      States shall provide documentation of completion of course work in the following:

             1. English Composition, two (2) courses, each a minimum of two (2) semester
             hours;

                     ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric (3) AND

                     ENG 108 College Writing and Research (3)

             2. U.S. History, three (3) semester hours; and


                                                                                              62
                  HIS 140 American History to 1865 (3) OR

                  HIS 150 American History since 1865 (3)

           3. U.S. Government, three (3) semester hours.

                  GOV 101 American National Government (3)

II PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

    A. Foundations for Teaching (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester hours): 1.
    The Pupil/Society--A minimum of six (6) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
    competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
    following content areas:

                  a. Adolescent Growth and Development (Physical-Mental-Social);

                         EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

                         EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

                         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

                         EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
                         (3)

                  b. Adolescent Behavior Management Techniques;

                         EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

                         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

                  c. Psychology of Learning (must include adolescent learning);

                         EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

                         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

                  d. Adolescent Interaction with Others; and

                         EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

                         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

                         EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
                         (3)


                                                                                         63
              e. *Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child (including
              the Gifted); and

                      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

       2. The School/Society--A minimum of two (2) semester hours with knowledge
       acquired and competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation
       institution in the following content areas, including multi-cultural aspects:

               a. Legal Foundations of Education;

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

                      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations
                      (3)

              b. Historical Foundations of Education;

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              c. Philosophical Foundations of Education; and

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

              d. Sociological Foundations of Education; and

                      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)

B. Secondary Methods and Techniques (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester
hours): A minimum of eight (8) semester hours with knowledge acquired and
competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the
following content areas:

       1. *Basic Reading Techniques for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

       2. Instructional Strategies for Secondary Teachers;

              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)

              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)

              EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)


                                                                                         64
                   EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

                   EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

           3. *Curriculum, Methods, and Techniques in each subject area specialty;


                   ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)

                   ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods (3)


           4. Measurement and Evaluation; and

                   EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

                   EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)

                   EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

           5. Microcomputer Applications in Education; and

                   EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)

    C. Clinical Experiences (Minimum requirement of ten (10) semester hours):
    Certification in grades 9-12 should include clinical experience at the secondary level. A
    minimum of two (2) semester hours prior to student teaching**

           EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)

           EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

    And a minimum of eight (8) semester hours of student teaching in grades 9-12 is
    required, except that K-9 or K-12 certification must also include K-6 experience in
    student teaching.

           EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)

           EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)

           A fully certificated elementary or middle school teacher with two (2) or more
           years of elementary or middle school teaching may satisfy this requirement
           through the completion of a two (2) or more semester hour practicum at the
           secondary level.

III. SUBJECT MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION AREA


                                                                                                65
Art Methods (3)

       1. Design--Composition (2)

        2. Two-Dimensional Art (7 hours minimum) a. Drawing (3) b. Painting (2) c. Graphics
       (2)

       3. Three-Dimensional Art (7 hours minimum) a. Ceramics (3) b. Sculpture (2) c. Fibers
       (2) d. History, Theory, Criticism, Visual Arts (3)

       4. Art for Elementary Grades (2) 5. Electives (9) TOTAL = 30 + Methods

BEGINNING TEACHER COMPETENCIES

Art Production (NSAE 1, 2)

       1. The production and presentation of traditional and contemporary art forms; (FA1; M2;
       CR 1-3)

       2. Characteristics of tools and materials used in the production of art, including safety and
       health issues; and (FA1; HPE6; CR 1-3)

        3. The formal (elements and principles) and expressive qualities of art through artistic
       problem solving and divergent thinking. (G1.3, 2.5; FA2; CR 1-3)

Art History (NSAE 4, 6)

       1. The role of the visual arts and the artist in society throughout history; and (FA4, 5;
       SS5; CR 4)

       2. The work of diverse artists from various cultures and times.(G1.9; FA4, 5; SS6; CA7;
       CR 4)

Art Criticism (NSAE 2, 5)

       1. Terminology commonly used in the visual arts; (G2; FA3; CR 4)

       2. Analysis and interpretation of works of art; (G1.5; FA3; CR 4)

       3. Critique of art in oral and written formats; (G1.5; FA3; CA4; CR 4)

Aesthetics (NSAE 3, 6)

       1. Understand and develop aesthetic perceptions; (G1.6, 3.5; FA4, 5; CA5; CR 1-4)




                                                                                                   66
2. Reflection on and response to works of visual art through written, oral and visual
formats; (FA1; CA6; CR 1-4)

3 . interrelationships of the fine arts. (FA1-5; CR 4)




                                                                                        67
Description of Field Experiences

Type In the art education program at Missouri Western State University, teacher candidates have
staged and increasingly challenging field and clinical placements. These experiences are across
the phases and include observations (EDU 203), limited teaching in a field experience (EDU
303) and full teaching responsibilities in a clinical experience (EDU 409). In each instance, the
field or clinical experience is also linked to coursework that supports, reinforces and extends the
learning in both situations. That linkage includes:

                              Table 10. Type of Field Experience

On-Campus Course                                     In-School Field or Clinical Experience
EDU 202 Introduction to Education                    EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I
EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and           EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching
Human Relations                                      III


Observation At the Phase I – Awareness (EDU 203 – Participation in Teaching I) level,
candidates are placed in Title I schools with specific observation/participation guidelines for
their experience. They are expected to complete at least 30 observation hours over an eight week
period.

Practicum There are no formal practicum experiences in the art education program.

Field Experience - The unit at MWSU requires all teacher candidates to complete a teaching
experience in Phase III EDU 303. At the end of each week, candidates in EDU 303 give their
supervisor a weekly time log and week-to-come expected activities form. Supervisors visit
(Phase III – EDU 303) teacher candidates once every three weeks They observe candidates
teaching classes, give candidates general feedback, provide specific feedback concerning
dispositions and diversity, share candidate progress with cooperating teachers and complete a
mid-term and final evaluation with the cooperating teacher.

Candidates are placed in public school classrooms at the beginning of the third week of
university classes, and they remain there for twelve weeks. They also enroll concurrently in a
four-credit Psychology in Teaching class (EDU 304) which directly ties theory to
practice. During Phase III EDU 303 candidates are in a classroom five hours a week. After
observing for two or three weeks, candidates begin planning, implementing, and assessing
lessons. Art education candidates must create and implement a minimum of fifteen lessons using
the MWSU lesson plan format (block class format – 80-90 minutes in length if in a middle or
high school placement) or 30 lessons (if placed in an elementary setting). Some of those lessons
must be in the form of a unit which has specific requirements. Following the teaching of their
unit, candidates write a unit reflection in which they discuss how they were able to address at
least four unit standards. They also must show proof of a positive impact on student
learning. The Phase III EDU 303 is a time for candidates to try a variety of teaching strategies
and classroom management techniques. They also write journals each week in which they


                                                                                                 68
discuss topics from the Psychology in Teaching class and how they relate to observations in the
classroom. Cooperating teachers and principals often tell us that they believe the Phase III
experience better prepares our candidates for student teaching. They also report that, as a result
of this experience, our student teachers frequently resemble first-year teachers.

Student Teaching The culminating clinical experience for all art program candidates is the
student teaching clinical experience (EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III). Taken
concurrently with EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Teaching and Human Relations, these two
courses support the final documentation of content and pedagogical skills in art candidates. Art
candidates must meet all program requirements of GPA, content and pedagogical coursework
and passage of the PRAXIS II exam in their content area (Art: Code 10133) to apply for student
teaching. Candidates meeting eligibility requirements apply for the experience and identify a
choice of school districts for placement. Actual placement arrangements are handled by the
MWSU Coordinator of Clinical Placement to assure that all program and district requirements
are met. As with the EDU 303 experience, candidates are regularly observed (every two weeks)
and provided feedback by the assigned cooperating teacher and university supervisor. At the
completion of the student teaching semester/experience, candidates are asked to evaluate the
overall art teacher education program and the quality of the supervision provided by the
university supervisor.

The following table identifies the phase, course, number of hours/weeks required and the total
number of hours required for each field or clinical placement.

                       Table 11 MWSU Field and Clinical Experiences

Phase                   Course        Number of     Number of        Total Number of hours
                                      hours per     weeks per
                                      week          semester
I - Awareness           EDU 203       4             8                32 (30 hours minimum)
III - Investigation     EDU 303       5             12               60
IV – Finding Voice      EDU 409       40            12               480


Reference Unit’s handbook and other documents received by candidates

In addition to the advisement materials, course syllabi and the regular contact with the assigned
art department advisor, the education department advisor, and the course faculty, all art
education candidates have access to the MWSU Education Handbook and the MWSU teacher
candidate listserv. Lesson plan formats, weekly time log and reporting forms give candidates
general feedback, provide specific feedback concerning dispositions and diversity, and
provide mid-term and final evaluation results with candidates. The mid-term and final
evaluation reports are written collaboratively and a final grade is determined jointly with the
university supervisor and the cooperating teacher.

Clinical faculty supervising candidates receive training and program materials such as the
observation and evaluation forms and all school-based clinical faculty receive the Cooperative


                                                                                                 69
Teacher Handbook (online – web address). To assure effective communication between unit and
clinical faculty, the unit worked with university supervisors to ensure that the unit conceptual
framework, clinical expectations and candidate evaluations were understood, implemented and
assessed. A dedicated web site was established to provide support for unit supervisors and use
of the site was included in supervisor training. On January 9, 2008, a university supervisors‘
training meeting was held. Material packets were organized and distributed to the field
supervisors to aid in the professional development of the school-based cooperating teachers.




                                                                                              70
Diverse Classrooms

The unit‘s commitment to diversity is embedded in the conceptual framework, coursework and
key assessments and field and clinical experiences. Our candidates understand that the
conceptual framework description of ―taking responsibility for student learning‖ is the core
principle guiding their program experience. Candidates are required to examine the geographic
and cultural environment of the region to better understand the needs and strengths of the area.
Further candidates are asked to examine the world cultural and historical influences on the
development of the content for their discipline. All candidates are required to take coursework to
support a positive learning environment for students with disabilities (EDU 315). All methods
courses address the respect for gender and cultural differences in learning situations. Candidates
receive regular feedback on their performance related to supporting the diverse learning needs of
today‘s students and classrooms. Finally, all candidates critically study the work of Ruby Payne
whose text, A Framework for Understanding Poverty, focuses on the impact of poverty on
students and their families. In October 2007, unit candidates were able to attend a jointly-
sponsored (MWSU, SJSD, and Heartland Health) workshop led by Ruby Payne.

Diversity proficiencies in the MWSU teacher education programs come from our commitment
to diversity and are organized to align with the developmental phases of the conceptual
framework as follows:

                             Table 12 Unit Diversity Proficiencies

Unit Diversity Proficiencies
Proficiency One                            Gain awareness of six ―isms‖ (racism, sexism, socio-
                                           economic ―classism,‖ ―ableism,‖ ethnocentrism, and
        (Phase I) ―Awareness‖              heterosexism) as well as issues pertaining to education
                                           regarding race, class, ability, gender, sexual
                                           orientation, ethnicity, and religions
Proficiency Two                            Develop theoretical knowledge of human
                                           relationships, prejudice, cultural bias, and strategies
 (Phase II) ―Developing Theoretical        to promote pluralism and diversity
             Knowledge‖
Proficiency Three                          Adapt instruction to accommodate the needs of all
                                           students
     (Phase III) ―Investigation‖
Proficiency Four                           Demonstrate sensitivity to issues pertaining to
                                           cultures and diversity
     (Phase IV) ―Finding Voice‖


In Phase I (EDU 202/203), the candidate demonstrates awareness of six ―isms‖ (racism, sexism,
socio-economic ―classism,‖ ― ableism,‖ ethnocentrism, and heterosexism) as well as issues
pertaining to education regarding race, class, ability, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and
religions. All education candidates must take EDU 202/203 or its transfer equivalent. In Phase II
(the methods classes), the candidate develops theoretical knowledge of human relationships, is


                                                                                                71
able to recognize situations of prejudice and cultural bias, and develops strategies to promote
pluralism and diversity. Art candidates must take courses within the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences focus areas (writing, computer literacy, ethics and international/intercultural). The
International/Intercultural courses present a significant recognition, awareness, and
understanding of cultural and international diversity. In addition, all unit candidates are required
to take EDU 315 (Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child). In Phase III (EDU
303/304) and Phase IV (EDU 403/408 and 404/409), all candidates adapt instruction to
accommodate the needs of all students, and the candidates must demonstrate sensitivity to issues
pertaining to cultures and diversity. Perhaps most importantly, art candidates are challenged to
explore the history of the content they are teaching to identify cultures and individuals who
discovered new information such as in the arts, literature and humanities. They are challenged to
show how individuals and cultures contribute to the knowledge base being studied.

By the nature of our discipline we are constantly surrounded by diversity. The history of art is
not by nature a Eurocentric, white, male domain; to teach it as such would be a disservice not
only to our students but to our field. Art history not only illuminates other cultures but it cuts
though the diversity of time periods as well. In complex and sometime surprising
interconnections of people, trade systems, philosophical exchange as well as the attending
cultural artifacts that produced are fascinating if presented in a comprehensible manner in which
the student can relate. That ―Eureka!‖ moment when a student recognizes the motivation, the
reason why a work was produced is a true learning experience. The department‘s seasoned
faculty is constantly bringing this diversity into the classroom and making the connections real.

For example, our ceramics professor relates, ―I show slides of work and discuss Japanese potter
Shoju Homadi and British potter Bernard Leach. I also show a video titled ―The Potters of
India‖ which chronicles the life of village potters in Bendapour, India. While this video focuses
on the life of potters, it also gives a portrait of life in countries with a caste system of social
structures.‖

Geo Sipp from printmaking and painting uses his personal experience to bring the work of Koko
Griffin, a renowned African American printmaker whom he knew before he became an
important name in the art world. ―Kojo Griffin is a friend of mine; he‘s a young artist from
Atlanta whom I knew when I was at Clemson University and when he was a framer for Pearl Art
Supplies. I liked his work and invited him to speak to graduate students at Clemson. Shortly after
my meeting him, his work was selected for inclusion in the Whitney Biennial; he has since
become very well known, with his paintings commanding about $50,000.00.‖ Professor Sipp
believes that African-American artists such as Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Benny
Andrews, Warrington Colescott are both important and fascinating because the art is ―so
personal, and speaks of the nature of family, history and personal experience. . . . I often will
spend a couple of weeks talking about the work of this ethnic group.‖ In addition Professor Sipp
brings the art of other diverse cultures and geographical regions into his classroom. ―I routinely
show the art of the Mexican muralists, Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros, as well as art from India,
Japan and Africa.‖

The Department is seeking other venues than the traditional classroom to expose our students to
diversity. The proximity to major galleries and museums in the region is attractive. Omaha,


                                                                                                  72
Kansas City and Chicago and Dallas are sites for field trips and conferences that our students
enjoy. Every spring Professor Sipp takes a large group of students to New York so that they can
see the work of international artists exhibiting in the city. Several years ago, Dr. Sauls and
Professor Sipp began a Study Away Program in the summer. They have taken art students to
Amsterdam, Italy and Russia to study both the art and the culture that produced it. Future plans
are being made for France and Spain.

In 2005, Fulbright scholar Bob Berglund brought Dr. Olena S. Kovalchuk, Ukrainian scholar and
Chair of the Humanities at Lutsk Liberal Arts University at Lutsk, Ukraine to Dr. Sauls‘ ART 255
Renaissance Through Modern class for a lecture on Russian icons. She treated the students to a lively
discussion on politics and arts from a part of the world not readily available to the Midwest.

In Dr. Sauls‘ art history seminar class, Art Since 1945, she and her students work together to
discover contemporary art, art of our time. One of her favorite artists is Felix Gonzalez-Torres
who was born in Cuba in 1957. ―The struggle of an artist from a different ethnic background
coming to America and attempting to experience the ‗American Dream‖ while holding fast to
their own cultural background is interesting to me. How these cultures clash and mix and marry
is the story of modern art at its richest. Our classes have some lively discussions and are full of
learning opportunities.‖

Students in all classes study artists of different nationalities and ethnic backgrounds. Some of the
artists studied in Professor Harmon-Miller‘s photomedia classes are Afro-American photographer
Gordon Parks, French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, Russian photographer, Gerf Jochems Rus,
Danish photographer, Rogert Frank, and Japanese photographer, Jan Sheracka. Because of the nature
of the discipline, ―diversity happens,‖ says Graphic Design professor, Teresa Harris.




                                                                                                   73
Description of Certification Program Assessment

A. Performance Benchmarks – used to promote and advise candidates throughout the program

         Acceptance to Program
         Acceptance to Field Experience
         Acceptance to Student teaching
         Graduation
         Recommendation for certification

As noted previously, art candidates take coursework organized into four developmental phases
that include transition points for continuation in the program.

                      Table 13 – Requirements for Transitions within the Program


Initial     Phase 1            Phase II      Phase III     Phase IV             After program
Teacher                                                                        completion

Education
Programs

Art         General           Acceptance     Acceptance    Acceptance to       Final evaluation of
program
            Education         to program,    to field      student teaching,   entire program,
            coursework, ART CBASE,           experience,   PRAXIS II passed,   graduate and
            100, 120, 130                                  2.5 GPA,            employer surveys
            (with an entrance GPA (2.5)      2.5 GPA
            requirement for                                EDU 404/409
            these three       ACT            Major in      completed
            courses of 2.5)                  teacher
            EDU 202/203       Content/       education
                              methods        declared
            Criminal          courses
            Background
            Check

B. Entrance assessment(s) – Candidates seeking to enter the art education program must
complete ART100, 120, 130 (with an entrance requirement for these three courses of a GPA of
2.5) have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average, have an ACT score on file and based on that
ACT scores must pass the C-BASE exam with no score lower than 265 (66%).

C. Field Placement Assessment(s) – Art education candidates are regularly and systematically
evaluated by both the school-based clinical faculty and the university supervisor. Clinical
experience evaluations are based upon the NCATE/MoSTEP/MWSU unit standards. Work
samples of P-12 student learning are kept to document the teacher candidates‘ abilities to work
with a diverse group of candidates (see candidate portfolios). Prior to the student teaching


                                                                                                  74
semester formal assessments occur during and at the end of the field experience (EDU 303).
Both mid-term and final evaluations are completed together by the cooperating teacher and
university supervisor. A candidate must pass the experiences at the target level of ―Basic‖ (EDU
303) and ―Proficient‖ (EDU 408/409). A measure of a prospective teacher's general ability to
demonstrate the knowledge and skills associated with teaching is the ability to receive a grade of
"C" or better in the major education methods classes.

D. Graduate surveys are organized around the MWSU teacher education standards, dispositions
and professional behaviors. The MWSU teacher education standards are identical to the
MoSTEP standards with the additional of a twelfth standard. Surveys of graduates (September
2007) resulted in 72 responses. Survey results

E. Employer surveys are an important tool for determining program effectiveness and
opportunities for improvement. Employer survey employers (124) were sent in December 2007
with a follow-up survey reminder in January 2008. There were 37 responses.

   1. Professional knowledge and skills are developed and assessed for all unit candidates.
      Assignments and assessments related to MWSU standards 2-12 encourage candidates to
      understand the history, traditions, culture and influences on American education.
      Assessments include essays, lesson plans focused on different instructional strategies and
      differentiated needs of learners, lessons focused on the cultural, racial, socio-economic
      and gender diversity of students. Lesson and unit reflections document candidate
      understanding of working with a professional relationship such as with a university
      supervisor and clinical faculty. Across all phases, coursework and assessments are
      sequenced to build upon the introductory understanding of American education and the
      larger legal and ethical context within which it functions. Table 15 provides a summary
      of assessments linked to candidate professional and pedagogical skill development.



 Table 14 Assessments linked to candidate professional and pedagogical skill development

professional             Phase I                 Phase II             Phase III          Phase IV
knowledge and skills
related to…
foundations of           EDU 202 Philosophy Methods course – EDU 303                     EDU 408/409
education                of Education essay critical learning Experience in              Experience in
                                            pieces            Teaching II                Teaching III
                                                              Evaluation                 Evaluation
the ways children        EDU 202 Diversity  Methods course – EDU 304 Unit,               EDU 408/409
and adolescents          essay              critical learning Student Work               Experience in
develop and the                             pieces            Sample &                   Teaching III
relationship to                                                                          Evaluation/
learning                                                              EDU 303
                                                                      Experience in      EDU 403/404
                                                                      Teaching II


                                                                                                75
                                                                 Evaluation       Portfolio

                                                                 (Stan 2)         (Standard 2)
professional ethics,     EDU 202 Justics     Methods courses     EDU 303          EDU 404 Test
laws, and policies       Paper on ―isms‖     – professional      Experience in    on School Law
                                             ethics of content   Teaching II      & EDU 408/409
                                             area                Evaluation       Experience in
                                                                                  Teaching III
                                                                 (Standard 12)
                                                                                  Evaluation
use of research in       EDU 202 Philosophy Methods course –     Educational      EDU 403/404
teaching                 of Education essay  pedagogical         Psychology       portfolio
                                             foundations;        theories and
                                             EDU 315 Psych       research – EDU
                                             of Exceptional      304
                                             Child lesson
                                             plans
roles and                EDU 202 Philosophy Methods course       EDU 304 Unit     EDU 403/404
responsibilities of      of Education essay                      aligned to       portfolio –
professional                                 Lesson plans        professional     Standard 10
communities                                  aligned to          content
                                             professional        standards –
                                             content areas       Standard 10
diversity of student     EDU 202 Diversity   EDU 315             EDU 303          EDU 403/404
populations, families    Paper/Framework for Psychology of       Experience in    portfolios, EDU
and communities          Understanding       the Exceptional     Teaching II      408/409
(this one may be         Poverty - Payne     Child               Evaluation and   Experience in
addressed in the first                       Methods courses     EDU 304 Unit     Teaching III
element of Standard                          – Lesson plans      (Standard 3)     Evaluation
4)                                           (Standard 3)                         (Standard 3)
the consideration of     EDU 202             Methods courses     EDU 303          EDU 403/404
school, family, and      Disposition Paper/  –Critical           Experience in    portfolio, EDU
community contexts       EDU 203             Learning Pieces     Teaching II,     408/409
and the prior                                                    EDU 304          Experience in
experiences of           Participation in    Standard 10/12      Psychology in    Teaching III
students                 Teaching I                              Teaching Unit    Evaluation
                         Experience                              Evaluation




                                                                                        76
Assessment Data 4.4

A. College Base — See APPENDIX E

B. Cumulative GPA – Content and Professional Education

               Table 15 Cumulative GPA – Content and Professional Education

                                          Art K-12
                    Cumulative GPA—Content and Professional Education
                                    For Spring-Fall 2007
                 N=3
                Cumulative GPA for Content Area            3.01
                Cumulative GPA for Professional Education  3.48

 C. Performance in clinical practice – All art teacher candidates are evaluated in both the EDU
303 field experience and EDU 409 clinical experience. Candidates are evaluated by both their
cooperating teacher and university supervisor on the twelve MWSU standards, the four areas of
dispositions and the ten professional behaviors.

D. Exit Exam (Praxis II)-- See Appendix G

      Table 18 Content Tests for Initial Teacher Certification – Praxis II – 2001-2007

Program                 # of Test Takers              % Passing at State Cut Overall Pass Rate for
                                                      Score at Program       All Institutions in the
                          2001-2007 at program        Completion             State*
                               completion
Art K-12                22                            100%                      99%

E. Candidate performance assessment – culminating experience/work sample/portfolio – All
teacher candidates in art are required to demonstrate an impact on K-12 student learning. During EDU
303 Experience in Teaching II, candidates prepare a teaching unit, have that unit approved by their art
methods teacher, implement the unit under the supervision of their University supervisor and their
cooperating teacher and receive feedback on their teaching performance. Embedded within the unit is the
requirement of either pre-post testing, summative testing, or some measure to document improvement of
student learning. In the certification portfolio created in the EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Teaching
and Human Relations, art teacher candidate creates a professional portfolio which has a specific section
focused on impact of student learning. Art candidate portfolios and the accompanying scoring guides are
available in the work room documents.

F. Results from Surveys – Graduate and Employer - The teacher education unit is able to survey
both Missouri Western graduates and their employers electronically via the Education
Performance System (EPS). Surveys were sent to both graduates (387 surveys sent September
2007) and 124 employers (December 2007) with a second survey request to employers (124 -
January 2008). Graduate survey responses (72) from fall 2007 requested graduate opinions on

                                                                                                      77
how well they were prepared in the areas of knowledge and skills, dispositions, professional
behaviors, use of technology and readiness to support diversity within the classroom. Graduates
were asked to indicate their level of preparation using four performance levels:


4 well prepared Advanced                             3 little or no problems Proficient
2 playing ‗catch-up‘ Basic                           1 weak Below Basic


Data indicate Missouri Western unit graduates (94%) describe their preparation as ―well
prepared‖ or had ―little or no problems‖ in teaching their content area.



Table 16 Graduate Survey Results - Standard 1 Candidate Content Knowledge N= 72

                       4 – Well       3 – Little or 2- Playing 1 - Weak No Response Total
                       prepared       no problems Catch-up
Graduate responses
                       32     44% 36         50% 3           4% 0        0% 1           1% 72 100%


In addition, employer surveys (37) sought opinions on unit graduates‘ strengths in the areas of
the unit standards, dispositions, professional behaviors, diversity, use of instructional technology
and in comparison to graduates from other teacher preparation programs. This survey instrument
used the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) performance level descriptors to provide some
familiarity with the language of the performance levels (Advanced, Proficient, Basic and Below
Basic). The performance levels are also consistent with the field and clinical experience
performance levels. Data (2007) indicate that employers found 95 % of unit candidates were
operating at the Advanced or Proficient level.

  Table 17 Employer Survey Results - Standard 1 – Candidate Content Knowledge N=37

                      Advanced Proficient          Basic    Below        No Response Total
                                                            Basic
Employer responses
                      6      16% 29       79% 2         5% 0         0% 0           0% 37     100%



G. Impact on K-12 student learning - All teacher candidates in art are required to demonstrate an
impact on K-12 student learning. During EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II, candidates prepare a
teaching unit, have that unit approved by their art methods teacher, implement the unit under the
supervision of their University supervisor and their cooperating teacher and receive feedback on their
teaching performance. Embedded within the unit is the requirement of either pre-post testing, summative


                                                                                                     78
testing, or some measure to document improvement of student learning. In the certification portfolio
created in the EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Teaching and Human Relations, art teacher candidate
creates a professional portfolio which has a specific section focused on impact of student learning. Art
candidate portfolios and the accompanying scoring guides are available in the work room documents.




                                                                                                           79
Technology

The Department of Art is driven by technology. Each art teacher candidate learns not only to use,
but also to service and do minor repair to the machines, technology and equipment that is part of
the everyday domain of the art educator.

Professor Sipp states that ―Teaching Painting, Drawing, Printmaking and Illustration gives me
the opportunity to design course material to take advantage of my interests in interdisciplinary art
making. I encourage students to employ various methodologies to arrive at an image, and we
have the resources to provide for students‘ explorations. I‘ve written several university grants to
acquire sophisticated printers and exposure units that allow material to be outputted digitally and
then manipulated through traditional studio practices. In prints, we can create our imagery on the
computer, expose film using our computerized exposure unit and then develop that imagery on
photosensitized steel plates. Our Illustration projects are generally hybrid images that are initially
generated by hand, and then manipulated on the computer using Photoshop. Projects are turned
in as digital files. I have developed a new technologically based printing process that I use for
my personal prints. This process formed the basis of my lecture and workshop at the 2007
Southern Graphics Council conference, the largest and most prestigious Print conference in the
world. It is incumbent on me as a professor to keep up with technological advances so that I can
deliver information to my students.‖


Professor Estes agrees with him. ―In sculpture we utilize various methods of cutting and welding
metal that are relatively new and utilize technology such as our ―plasma‖ metal cutting unit, our
―M16‖ metal inert gas welding and ―T16‖ Tungsten Inert gas welding. Ceramics is a media
which has fewer advances in the area of technology. We also have utilized oxygen probes and
photo transfer techniques in the firing and decorating of ceramic work. Additionally, students do
internet searches for new techniques, materials on artist in both Ceramic and Sculpture.‖

The department recently replaced our current electric kiln with a computer operated unit.

Education students routinely take a course in Computer Graphic Design to fulfill the LAS Focus
Area in Computer Literacy. This is a good course for anyone teaching art. Professor Teresa
Harris states, ―All of my graphic design classes are driven by creative concept and technology.
Although I strive for originality, critical thinking and problem solving, the finished work is
almost always ―completed‖ on the computer. We are currently using the Macintosh G5 dual-
processor computers with Adobe Creative Suite II software. The programs including Photoshop,
InDesign, Illustrator, and Flash. Students are also encouraged to use the Microsoft Office 2004
including Word, Excel and Power Point. We also have assignments that incorporate the Nikon 8
mega-pixel camera, Microtex scanner, Epson scanner, and a variety of Epson and HP printers. I,
as well as the students, give Power Point presentations.‖

Photodesign is an area used by all secondary and elementary schools in a variety of ways, either
as direct coursework or support to the program. Art Education candidates are checked out on the
following equipment both technically and aesthetically:



                                                                                                   80
3-digital cameras

1-Sony cyber-shot still & Mp eg Movie HQ camera

1-Nikon cool –pix 8700 digital camera

1-Olympus progressive ccp digital camera

35 mm cameras (film)

3-Minolta cameras

1- Minolta 102 camera

1-Minolta x 700 camera

35 mm lens

               1-24 mm

               1-28 mm

               1-90 mm

2-Canon F1 cameras, with 1-50 mm, 1-macro and 1-100mm lens

120 Cameras

2- Yashica Mat 124 G 120 mm cameras

1- Seagull 120 mm camera

2- Flashes

1-Autowinder

1- 4‖x5‖ calumet medium format camera and lens enlargers

2-Bessler dichro 45 computerized color heads

4-Bessler 23C III color and black & white enlarger

3-Omego Modular C760 color and black & white enlarger

1-Omego Pro-lab B66 black and white enlarger



                                                             81
11-darkroom clocks

1-omega HD film dryer

1 Arkay dual-dri rotary print dryer

1-Seal materprece Z10 m dry mounting/laminating press

Also Photo students plus 3-D Design students and 2-D Design students use the computer station
equipment in Potter Hall room 202 for power point presentation.

The teacher station computer is a MAC OS-X 10.48 plus a document camera.

2-MAC OS x version 10.30

2-MAC OS x Version 9.2

1 MAC OS x Version 10.4.8 (teacher station)

All 5 computers have adobe photoshop, In-Design, and Illustrator software.



The MacLab 20 station architecture is replaced every three years. The department is due for an
overhaul this summer with all new ProMacs with Leopard and new software for Fall 2008.




                                                                                             82
Faculty

Collaboration and FORMAL communication between/among content and Professional
Education faculty – The Education Leadership Team is the formal process for collaboration
between content and professional education faculty across all Missouri Western teacher
education programs. The chair of the department is a member of this team as is the Methods
teacher. In addition the chair works closely with the supervising teacher as well as the
cooperating teacher. Both departments, art and education, exchange information frequently
concerning teacher candidates as well as information on the cooperating school experience for
each student.

Content faculty—the Department of Art has eight content faculty working within the department.
Together they are responsible for all studio courses, art history and aesthetics, and education
methods courses. All have terminal degrees with the exception of one studio professor who is
actively seeking a terminal degree. Curriculum Vitae for these individuals may be found in
APPENDIX D.

Demographic characteristics of faculty—Demographics for the content faculty are found in the
following table:

Male      Percentage            Female Percentage                Total      Percentage
4            50%                4           50%                  8            100%

Documentation of program faculty’s involvement in the public schools and in the larger
―professional community‖ –

      Professor Harmon-Miller supports education in the city with her membership in the
       Central High School Booster Club. She has served as a judge for the annual Central
       Regional Debate and Speech Tournaments

      Dr. Sauls is on the Levy Initiation Team at Lafayette High School promoting this year‘s
       voter initiative on the school levy

      Dr. Sauls supervises the GenEd Component (ART 100 Introduction to Art) for Dual
       Credit offered through 2 regional high schools.


      Dr. Sauls judged the Hamilton School District and Braymer High School Art
       Exhibition, sponsored by the Caldwell County Arts Association, Hamilton, Missouri.
       this K-12 Exhibition held in the J.C. Penny Memorial Museum, Hamilton, Missouri

      Professor Estes was a Faculty Leader for the 2004 Summer Research Institute His
       ceramics research team included one exceptional high school senior who later became a
       major of the department after graduation. Eight of the ten proposals were funded.




                                                                                                83
      Professor Harmon-Miller also painted and did the graphic work on the 3-D sculpture for
       the St. Joseph Youth Alliance that was started at Trails West! and was on display at City
       Hall and then moved to the Albrecht-Kemper Museum. She used tile work produced by
       school children in the anthropometric works.

      Dr. Sauls was presented with a Mayor’s Awards for the Arts for 2003 in the category of
       Arts Educator for recognition of her work with art education in the community.

      Later the same year as the Mayor‘s Award, Dr. Sauls was nominated for a Missouri
       Governor’s Award for the Arts in the category of Outstanding Arts Educator.

      In 2004 Professor Sipp judged the Regional High School Art Show at the Albrecht-
       Kemper Museum of Art, Saint Joseph.

      In 2005 Professor Harris and Dr. Sauls were the judges for the Parkway Elementary School‘s
       entries for the St. Joseph School District Reflections Program. Parkway had over 254 entries for
       this competition. Harris and Sauls chose three. Students who placed went on to state
       competition.

  Summary of program faculty’ scholarly activity--
2001

                                       Professor James Estes

      27th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
           o Professor Estes won 1st Place for the category of Sculpture/Ceramics

      Origins in Clay II National Juried Exhibition
          o Professor Estes had work juried into this national exhibition at the University of Texas
              at San Antonio Fine Art Gallery. The jurors were Howard Taylor and Nancy
              Goldsberry

      Topeka Competition 24
          o Professor Estes has had work juried into for Topeka Competition 24, Topeka and
             Shawnee Public Library. The juror was Seo Eo.


      66th National Juried Competition, Cooperstown, NY
           o Professor Estes had work juried into this prestigious exhibition held at the
              Cooperstown Art Association Gallery, Cooperstown, NY. The juror for the event
              was Sylvia deSwaan.

      Wichita National 2001
          o Professor Estes had work juried into the Wichita National 2005 hosted by the
              Wichita Center for the Arts in Wichita Kansas. Albert Paley was the juror.

      37th Mid-States Craft Exhibition, Evansville Museum of Arts and Sciences


                                                                                                     84
          o Professor Estes had work juried into this event held at the Evansville Museum of
            Arts and Sciences, Evansville, Indiana. The juror was Holly Hotchner

      Texas National Exhibition
          o Professor Estes had a work juried into the Texas National held in Nacogdoches,
              Texas. The juror was Sandy Skogland. His work was selected from over 2300
              entries.
                                     Dr. Allison Sauls

      Design Guidelines for St. Joseph, Missouri Historic Districts
          o Reviewing and editing with Ron Peterson, Roger Martin, Marilyn Maxwell, Morton
              Nelson, Denis Brewer, Tim Stites, Steve Carrilli, Scott Johnson, Diana Midyett, Mark
              Mikkelsen, Denise Denman, Terry Jimenez, Allison Sauls, Harrison Hartley, Joan
              Sweet, Dan Moore, Thomas Kirschner and Donna Farrow-Ball reviews and editors.
              St. Joseph Landmarks Commission. Published Fall 2001. Adopted October 2, 2001

      Gilbert’s Living With Art, by Mark Getlin. Sixth Edition, review
           o McGraw-Hill Higher Education, A Division of McGraw Hill Publications, New York.
               2001

      Workshop on Teaching Online Courses though Learning resources Network, River Falls,
       Wisconsin
          o This was a weeklong workshop funded through the Department of Continuing
              Education.

      Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri

2002
                                     Professor James Estes

      Topeka Competition 24
          o Professor Estes has had work juried into for Topeka Competition 24, Topeka and
              Shawnee Public Library. The juror was Victor Spinski

      28th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
           o Professor Estes won 1st Place for the category of Sculpture/Ceramics

      52rd Annual Quad State Exhibition, Quincy Art Center, Quincy, IL
           o Professor Estes had a stoneware sculpture selected for the 52rd Annual Quad State
              Exhibition at the Quincy Art Center on Quincy, Illinois. The juror was J.P. Begley


      MOAK 2002 Regional Art Exhibition
         o Professor Estes had two works juried into the MOAK 2002 Regional Art
             Exhibition, Springfield Art Museum, Springfield, Missouri. The two Ceramic
             Sculptures selected by juror Marcia Manhart, Executive Director of the Philbrook
             Museum of Art in Tulsa Oklahoma, are titled Midwest Waters and Great Plains


                                                                                                85
                             Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

   International Juried Exhibition XVII, Central Missouri State University Art Centre,
    Warrensburg, MO
        o A photograph entitled Boxed was juried into this international exhibition.

   28th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
        o Professor Harmon-Miller won Best of Show for the category of Photography with a
           photograph entitled Abby’s Journey

   Bi- Annual Faculty Exhibition
        o New works in the Bi-annual Faculty Exhibition

   Spiritual Art V International, Point Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska.
        o A photographic painting and collage entitled Hoping was juried into this exhibition.


                                      Dr. Allison Sauls

   The Italians and the Holocaust: Persecution Rescue and Survival, by Susan Zucotti review
       o For the Journal of the Association for the Interdisciplinary Study of the Arts

   Visualizing Boccaccio: Studies in Illustrations of the Decameron from Giotto to Pasolini, by
    Jill Ricketts, review
         o Review in Journal of the Association for the Interdisciplinary Study of the Arts Vol
             XVIII, No 2. Fall 2001

   Bridges and Borders, New York College English Association Fall Conference, Presenter
        o Paper entitled Two Guys in Search of an Author: Brando, Peckinpah and the Vision of
           the True West.


   Bridges and Borders, New York College English Association Fall Conference, Panel Chair
        o Panel entitled Narrative Technique in Novel and Film

   Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri



                                    Professor Geo Sipp

   28th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
        o Professor Sipp won 1st Place for the category of Mixed media and 1st Place for the
           category of Printmaking



                                                                                                   86
2003

                                   Professor James Estes

      Three-Person Exhibition, VanDeusen Gallery in Prairie Village, Kansas.

          o Professor Estes was in a three-person exhibit shown at the, VanDeusen Gallery in
            Prairie Village, Kansas. This is held in conjunction with the NCECA Convention
            March 13-16.

      Topeka Competition 24
          o Professor Estes has had work juried into for Topeka Competition 24, Topeka and
             Shawnee Public Library. Work chosen is a sculpture stoneware piece entitled
             Twilight.

      LaGrange National XXII Biennial in LaGrange, Georgia
          o Professor Estes had work juried into the LaGrange National XXII Biennial in
             LaGrange, Georgia. This exhibition took place at the Chattahoochee Valley Art
             Museum. The juror was Robert Lyon who chose 42 works out of 354 entries.

      Delmar 37th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Exhibition

          o Professor Estes had a work juried into the Delmar 37th Annual National Drawing
            and Small Sculpture Exhibition at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. The
            juror was Brian Paulson.

                              Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

      18th Annual Five State Photography Exhibition
           o Professor Harmon-Miller had a photo collage entitled Vulnerable juried into the
              exhibition at Fort Hays, Kansas.

      3rd Annual Art in the Park Visual Art Show and Sale, Saint Joseph
           o Professor Harmon-Miller was one of the judges for this event.

      Annual Resident Art Exhibition, Saxton Riverside Care Center, St. Joseph
          o Professor Harmon-Miller was one of the judges for this event.


      19th Five State Photography Competition and Exhibition in Fort Hays, Kansas
           o Professor Harmon-Miller had 2 photographs, Abby’s Journey and Remembering
               September 11th, 2001 juried into the Five State Photography Competition and
               Exhibition in Fort Hays, Kansas. Abby’s Journey won the third place cash
               award for the People Category.



                                                                                             87
                                      Dr. Allison Sauls

      Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century Architecture, R. Stephen Sennott, Editor, Fitzroy
       Dearborn Publishers, Chicago, Illinois
          o Dr. Sauls is the author of two illustrated entries entitled, Museum of Modern
             Art, Frankfurt, Germany and The Pilgrimage Church at Neviges, France,
             Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century Architecture, R. Stephen Sennott, Editor,
             Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, Chicago, Illinois

      Runcie Club, Saint Joseph, MO
          o Dr. Sauls presented a paper at the Runcie Club entitled Recent Discoveries of
              Iconography of the Berward Doors at St. Michael’s Hildesheim: An Academic
              Journey.

      Art for the Health of It
           o Dr. Sauls was one of three judges for this event.

      Braymer High School Art Exhibition, Sponsored by the Caldwell County Art
       Association, Hamilton, Missouri
          o Dr. Sauls judged this K-12 Exhibition held in the J.C. Penny Memorial Museum,
            Hamilton, Missouri

      Outside Reviewer for Dr. Rozmeri Basic Tenure Dossier University of Oklahoma,
       Norman Oklahoma
          o Dr. Andrew Phalan, Director, School of Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman
              Oklahoma requested this review

      Undergraduate Research Summer Institute Grant
          o Dr. Sauls lead this research grant with art major Jane Travis and BIS major (Art
             Emphasis) Bryan Clark for a project entitled Exploration and Replication of
             Salt-Firing Methodology by Early Mid-West Potters

      Annual Faculty Exhibition
          o New works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition

      Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri




2004

                                    Professor James Estes

      Ceramics USA Exhibition



                                                                                               88
       o Professor Estes had work juried into the Ceramics USA hosted by the University
         of North Texas at Denton, Texas. The artwork selected was entitled Passages.
         The event garnered over 600 entries by ceramic artists across the United States.
         Doug Casebeer, Director of Ceramics, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Snow Mass,
         Colorado juried this exhibition.

   Topeka Competition 26
       o Professor Estes has had work juried into for Topeka Competition 26, Topeka and
          Shawnee Public Library. Work chosen is a sculpture stoneware piece entitled
          Mellow Skies. Juror was Elaine Coleman. This is a seven state regional
          exhibition

   Faculty Leader: 2004 Summer Research Institute
       o Professor Estes was selected as a Faculty Leader for the Summer Research
           Institute. Eight of the ten proposals were funded.

   30th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
        o Professor Estes won 1st Place in the Sculpture and Ceramics category at the
           Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art’s 30th Annual Membership Exhibition, St.
           Joseph, MO. The work was entitled Enough to Spare.

   Craftforms 2003 National Juried Exhibition of Fine Contemporary Crafts
       o Professor Estes had a ceramic sculpture juried into the Wayne Art Center‘s
           Craftforms 2003 National Juried Exhibition of Fine Contemporary Crafts Paul J.
           Smith selected 85 pieces by 73 artists from 26 state and Canada. 674 were
           submitted.

   Making Marks by Robin Hopper
      o Professor Estes‘ ceramic sculpture Dusk will be illustrated in Robin Hopper‘s
          upcoming book, Making Marks published by Krause Publishers

   Texas National Exhibition
       o Professor Estes had a work juried into the Texas National held in Nacogdoches,
           Texas. His work was selected from 719 artists from 48 states. The Jurors were
           Jerry Uelsmann & Maggie Taylor. His piece was entitled Missouri Memories.

   Delmar 37th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Exhibition
       o Professor Estes had a work juried into the Delmar 37th Annual National Drawing
          and Small Sculpture Exhibition at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. The
          juror was Brian Paulson.


   53rd Annual Quad State Exhibition, Quincy Art Center, Quincy, IL
        o Professor Estes had a stoneware sculpture entitled Robidoux’s Landing selected
           for the 53rd Annual Quad State Exhibition at the Quincy Art Center on Quincy,
           Illinois.


                                                                                           89
                                Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

   53rd Annual Quad State Exhibition
        o
           Professor Harmon-Miller had a work juried into the 53rd Annual Quad State
           Exhibition hosted at the Quincy Art Center, Quincy Illinois. The piece selected
           was a series of colored photographs entitled Remembering September 11th, 2001
           The juror was William Meek. 111 works were chosen from 758 slide entries.

   St. Joseph Mayor’s Awards for the Arts
         o Professor Harmon-Miller was nominated for the Mayor’s Awards for the Arts as Arts
            Educator.

   Fine Arts at Trails West!
       o Professor Harmon-Miller was a juror for Fine Arts at Trails West!.

   St. Joseph Youth Alliance
         o Professor Harmon-Miller also painted and did the graphic work on the 3-D
            sculpture for the St. Joseph Youth Alliance that was started at Trails West! and
            was on display at City Hall and then moved to the Albrecht-Kemper Museum

   Photography Mid-West 2004, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison Wisconsin
       o A photographic Painting entitled Hope was juried into this exhibition. Keith
          Carter was the juror.

   19th Annual Five State Photography Exhibition and Competition
        o Professor Harmon-Miller had two color photographic series entitled Abby’s
           Journey and Remembering September 11th , 2001 juried into the exhibition at
           Fort Hays, Kansas, sponsored by Hays Arts Council. Abby’s Journey received a
           3rd Place Award.

   30th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
        o Professor Harmon-Miller had one work, Hope entered in this exhibition in St.
           Joseph, Missouri. She won First Place in the Photography category

   53rd Quad State Exhibition, Quad State Exhibition, Quincy Art Center in Quincy Illinois.
        o Professor Harmon-Miller had a color photographic series entitled Remembering
           September 11th , 2001 juried into the exhibition.




   Spiritual Art International
        o Professor Harmon-Miller had a photo collage entitled Hoping juried into the
            Omaha Nebraska exhibit. Larry Bradshaw of the Period Gallery, Omaha juries
            this event
                                  Dr. Allison Sauls


                                                                                            90
   Barnet’s: A Short Guide to Writing About Art, Seventh Edition
       o Dr. Sauls has been asked by publisher, Pearson Longman, New York, New York
          to review the seventh edition of this text.

   Research Study Lynch School of Education at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA.
       o Dr. Sauls participated in a research study focusing on visual art and design in higher
           education. The purpose of this research is to gather important data about the role of
           artist as professors and design professionals as professionals. Lynch School of
           Education at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA is responsible for the research.

   Natures Web Exhibition
       o Dr. Sauls was juror and curator for this exhibition sponsored by the Columbia Art
           League in Columbia, Missouri

   Mayor’s Awards for the Arts
      o Dr. Sauls was presented with a Mayor’s Awards for the Arts for 2003 in the
          category of Arts Educator.

   Outstanding Honors Program Faculty for 2002-2003
       o The Student Honors Organization Outstanding Honors Program Faculty for 2002-
           2003 (SHO) selected Dr. Sauls as Outstanding Honors Program Faculty for
           2002-2003

   Missouri Governor’s Awards for the Arts
       o Dr. Sauls was nominated for a Missouri Governor‘s Award for the Arts in the
          category of Outstanding Arts Educator.

   Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri

                                    Professor Geo Sipp

   America’s 2000: Works on Paper Competition
      o Professor Sipp had a work Sew, He Popped a Cop at Chesme Church juried into
          this exhibit sponsored by the Northwest Art Center at Minot State University.
          Shelly Lang, Assistant Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Philadelphia
          Museum of Art juried this show. Professor Sipp won a Juror’s Award for his
          work.



   17th Parkside Small Print Exhibition
        o Professor Sipp had a work entitled The Nocturnal Musings of John Negroponte
           juried into this exhibition at the University of Wisconsin. The print was later
           purchased for their permanent collection.

   Dennis Morgan Gallery


                                                                                                   91
          o Professor Sipp‘s mixed media drawing /lithograph, Jacob’s Waltz is being shown at
            the Kansas City Gallery.

      Texas National Exhibition
          o Professor Sipp had a work juried into the Texas National held in Nacogdoches,
              Texas. His work was selected from 719 artists from 48 states. Professor Sipp‘s
              drawing, Sew, He Popped a Cop at the Chesme Church, that was juried into the
              Texas National won honorable mention The Jurors were Jerry Uelsmann &
              Maggie Taylor.

      Regional High School Art Show
          o Professor Sipp also judged the Regional High School Art Show at the Albrecht-
             Kemper Museum of Art, Saint Joseph.


2005

                                    Professor James Estes

      Alterations and Manipulations, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art
           o Professor Estes and Professor Sipp had a joint exhibition in the main gallery of
               the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art.

      27th Annual Topeka Competition
           o Professor Estes had two works juried into this exhibition held at the Sabatini
              Gallery, Topeka and Shawnee Public Library. This was a 12 state competition.
              Juror Isabella Barbuzza, Professor of Art, University of Iowa chose 47 works
              from 232 entries.
           o

      Wichita National 2005
          o Professor Estes had work juried into the Wichita National 2005 hosted by the
              Wichita Center for the Arts in Wichita Kansas. Mr. Harold Nelson, former
              director if the Long Beach Museum of Art in Long Beach, CA juried the
              competition. Estes‘ work Rites of Autumn was one of 67 chosen from over 300
              entries.

      31st Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
           o Professor Estes entered two works in this annual exhibit.

      48th Annual Delta Exhibition
           o Professor Estes‘ ceramic sculpture entitled Ancient Ones was juried into the 48th
              Annual Delta Exhibition held at the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock, AK.
              45 works by 44 artists were chosen from 630 pieces submitted by 351 artists.
              Roger Shimoura was the juror



                                                                                                92
   2005 Earth Wheel and Fire International Ceramics Exhibition
       o Professor Estes had two works juried into the Earth Wheel and Fire International
          Ceramics Exhibition at the International Exhibition of Arts and Sciences,
          McAllen Texas. The juror was Juan Granados from Georgia Tech in Atlanta,
          Georgia

   30th Annual Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art Members Exhibition
        o Professor Estes exhibited two works in the AKMA‘s Annual Membership Exhibit.

   Annual Faculty Exhibition
       o New works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition


                           Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

     Society of Photographic Education Midwest and South Central Regional
         Conference, ―Down by the Riverside: Politics, Propaganda and Pixels‖.
          St. Louis, Missouri.

   2005 Tri State National
       o Professor Harmon-Miller had a photo collage entitled Structures accepted into the
          2005 Tri State National held at the Brown and Scurlock Galleries in Beaumont,
          Texas. 72 entries were accepted from the 304 that were submitted.

   20th Greater Midwest International Exhibition
        o Professor Harmon-Miller‘s photograph Blues was juried into the 20th Greater
           Midwest International Exhibition sponsored by Central Missouri State University.

   Annual Faculty Exhibition
       o New works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition

   22nd Annual Five State Photography Exhibition and Competition
       o Professor Harmon-Miller‘s photograph Ethereal Space and Distant Memories
          were juried into the 22nd Annual Five State Photography Exhibition and
          Competition sponsored by the Hayes Art Council and held at the Hays Art
          Gallery, Hays, KS. The juror was Keith Davis, Fine Arts Program Director at
          Hallmark. Mr. Davis expanded the Hallmark Photographic Collection to over
          5000 works and has curated seventy exhibitions from Hallmark art and
          photography holdings.

   Center for Contemporary Art, Abilene, TX
       o The photograph Blues was also exhibited at the Center for Contemporary Art,
           Abilene, TX

   TPS 13 National Juried Exhibition
       o Blues was juried into the TPS 13 National Juried Exhibition.



                                                                                         93
   12 X12
       o Professor Harmon Miller had a mixed media triptych Dark Light juried into the
           national juried exhibition of small scale works of art, 12 X 12. The juror was Mark
           Scala curator of exhibitions for the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville, TN. Scala
           has overseen the development of the Frist‘s exhibition program that includes not less
           than sixty-eight very successful and significant exhibitions of contemporary and
           historic works.

   Tri-State National 43rd Annual Juried Exhibition
        o Professor Harmon-Miller was juried into the Tri-State National 43rd Annual
            Juried Exhibition at the Brown and Scurlock Galleries in Beaumont, Texas. 72
            entries were accepted from 304 submitted artworks.

    31st Annual Albrecht-Kemper Member Exhibition
     Photograph entitled A Distant Memory won 3rd Place in the Photography Category.

                                  Professor Teresa Harris

   Preamble Monument for the Missouri House of Representatives
       o Working with MWSU, State Representative Rob Shaaf and Dr. Sauls,
          Chairperson of the Department of Art, Professor Harris designed and supervised
          the production of a monument for the wall of the Missouri House of
          Representatives commemorating the 40th anniversary of the State Preamble. The
          University‘s, Professor Harris‘ and Dr. Sauls‘ name were introduced into the
          legislative records during the installation of the artwork.


   Kansas Artist Craftsman Association Membership Exhibition
       o Teresa had a work Reliquary I exhibited at the Kansas Artist Craftsman
          Association Membership Exhibition at the Sabatini Gallery in Topeka Kansas.
          Although this is a relatively small show, only 28 exhibitors in the membership
          exhibition, professors from the following institutions displayed work: Kansas
          State University, Washburn University, Baker University, Fort Hays State
          University, Emporia State University, Pittsburg State University and Missouri
          Western State University.

   31st Annual Albrecht-Kemper Member Exhibition
         Photograph entitled Bound won 2nd Place in the Mixed Media Category.

   Delaware Valley League High School Art Festival
       o Professor Harris judged the Delaware Valley League High School Art Festival at the
          Wathena High School. She awarded 75 Gold Medals and 75 Certificates of Merit and
          Honorable Mention. 400 students submitted artwork.

   Greater Midwest International XXI Competition




                                                                                                 94
        o A work entitled 624 was juried into this exhibition at the Art Center Gallery at Central
          Missouri State University in Warrensburg, MO. The jurors were David Murano and
          Brian Hinke of the Wichita Arts Center.

   Annual Faculty Exhibition
       o New works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition

   7th Annual Handcrafted Juried Art Exhibition.
         o Professor Harris had a work Legacy juried into the exhibit sponsored by Rocky Mount
            Arts Center, Rocky Mount, NC. The juror was Reed J. McMillan, Director of
            Marketing and Communications for the American Crafts Council, New York. This is
            a national exhibit with 44 artist showing 78 works. Over 225 works were submitted
            for consideration.

   35th Annual Americas 2000: Paper Works Exhibition
        o Professor Harris had a mixed media piece Clay Stories juried into this exhibition
            featuring international art works in the Harntett Hall Gallery at Minot State University.
            30 pieces were accepted out of the over 800 works by 250 artists who submitted. The
            juror was Stephen Gluecker, curator at the Missoula Art Museum.

   St. Joseph School District Reflections Program
         o Professor Harris and Dr. Sauls were the judges for the Parkway Elementary
            School‘s entries for the St. Joseph School District Reflections Program. Parkway
            had over 254 entries for this competition. Harris and Sauls chose three. Students
            who placed went on to state competition.


                                          Dr. Allison Sauls

   College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP) Program
       o Dr. Sauls was asked by the College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP) Program
           committee for Art History Development to participate in a curriculum survey of
           introductory college art history courses, the committee conduct s such surveys
           periodically to ensure that the AP History Exam and related publications
           accurately reflect the content of introduction courses currently being taught in
           colleges.



   Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Conference
       o Dr. Sauls attended a Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Conference in
          Bridgewater, Massachusetts as part of the university team that included Applied
          Learning Director, Dr. Kelly Henry, Dr. Kaye Adkins, Dr. Joachim Kibirige and
          Dr. Mark Mikkelsen.

   Lynch School of Education, Boston College



                                                                                                  95
       o Dr. Sauls participated in a research study focusing on visual art and design in higher
         education. The purpose of this research is to gather important data about the role of
         artist as professors and design professionals as professionals. The Lynch School of
         Education at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, is doing the research.

   Fine Arts at Trails West!
       o Dr. Sauls was a juror for Fine Arts at Trails West!.

   Midwest Artists Organization’s 21st Annual Membership Exhibition
       o Dr. Sauls was the juror for the Midwest Artists Organizations 21st Annual
          Membership Exhibition. Over thirty artists exhibited in the categories of oils,
          pastels, photography, and porcelain.

   Mosaic Exhibition
       o Dr. Sauls was the juror for the Mosaic Exhibition a regional art exhibition for
           community and high school competition sponsored by Word of Life Church.

   St. Joseph School District’s Reflections Program
         o Dr. Sauls and Professor Harris were the judges for the Parkway Elementary
            School's entries for the St. Joseph School District Reflections Program. Parkway
            had over 254 entries for this competition. Harris and Sauls chose three. Students
            who placed went on to state competition.

   MWSU Grant
      o Dr. Sauls wrote a successful grant for the gallery program that brings both
        professional artists and student portfolios and senior exhibitions to the campus,
        community and region. The gallery is an excellent training tool as well as a
        recruiting device for the university.

   Preamble Monument for the Missouri House of Representatives.
       o Dr. Sauls was the facilitator between MWSU, State Representative Rob Shaaf and
          Professor Teresa Harris to produce a monument for the wall of the Missouri
          House of Representatives commemorating the 40th anniversary of the State
          Preamble. Missouri Western‘s, Dr. Sauls‘ and Professor Harris‘ names were
          introduced into the legislative records during the installation of the artwork.

   Annual Faculty Exhibition
       o Three new photographic works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition

   31st Annual Albrecht-Kemper Member Exhibition
       o Photograph entitled Tempietto won 2nd Place in the Photography Category.

   Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri




                                                                                                  96
                                  Professor Geo Sipp

   Thornhill Gallery in Kansas City
       o Geo had an exhibition entitled Threat Perception at the Thornhill Gallery in
          Kansas City. Avila University was the sponsoring institution.

   Alterations and Manipulations, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art
        o Professor Estes and Professor Sipp had a joint exhibition in the main gallery of
            the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art.

   Annual Faculty Exhibition
       o New works in the Annual Faculty Exhibition

   XX Annual Greater Midwest International
       o Professor Sipp had work juried into this exhibition by juror Randall Griffey,
          Associate Curator of American Art, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City,
          MO

   2005 Delta National Small Prints & Lundquist Purchase Award
       o Professor Sipp won the prestigious Lindquist Purchase Award at the 2005 Delta
          National Small Prints Exhibition. They selected a print Baghdad Oilfields along
          with a print by both Warrington Colescott and Yuri Hiratsuka for the Arkansas
          State University Permanent Collection of Art. Geo had two of the 59 prints that
          were chosen from 320 selected for the exhibition by juror Lloyd Menard, director
          and founder of Frogman‘s Press and Gallery. Frogman‘s is one of the most
          influential print programs and national workshops in the country. Professor
          Menard called the Delta National Exhibition one of the best juried shows in
          America.

   The First Annual Dodge City Invitational
       o The First Annual Dodge City Invitational, sponsored by the Dodge City
           Community College invited Professor Sipp‘s participation in this exhibit. The
           juror was Scott Garrard, Associate Professor of Art at Dodge City Community
           College. The exhibition was shown in traditional venue as well as a national
           online exhibition.

   Sharjah Art Museum, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates and Purchase Awards
       o Professor Sipp was invited to show work with 20 other artists in the United Arab
           Emirates. A private collection in Los Angeles, California purchased one of his
           works. Professor Sipp had a print entitled Algerian Series #1 on exhibition at the
           Sharjah Art Museum in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. The print is part of a
           suite of prints that documents the French-Algerian War of the 1960s. The work is
           in conjunction with the development of a graphic novel entitled Wolves in the
           City. The print was purchased by the museum for their permanent collection.
           The Sharjah Art Museum is under the Auspices of the Department of Culture and
           Information, Government of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. The director of the
           museum is Hisham Al Madhloum.

                                                                                             97
      Wolves in the City
         o Professor Sipp continues his collaboration with the writer Conger Beasley on the
             graphic novel Wolves in the City. This is an ongoing project that will take several
             years to complete.

      Girls, Girls, Girls! Exhibition at Alice Gallery at Chameleon Arts
          o Professor Sipp had work included in the exhibition entitled Girls, Girls, Girls! at
               the Alice Gallery at Chameleon Arts in Kansas City. Curated by Adelia Ganson,
               the exhibition is collaboration between the Morgan Gallery, Chameleon Arts and
               the Lawrence Lithography Workshop.

      206 Gallery
          o Professor Sipp serves the university as Director of the 206 Gallery that is located
             in Potter Hall and provides the community with nationally acclaimed professional
             visiting artists, lectures, workshops and exhibitions.

      Solo Exhibit, Piedmont College, Demorest, GA
          o Professor Sipp has been offered a solo exhibition at Piedmont College in
              Demorest, Georgia. The show will consist of the Algerian Series Prints.
              Currently 27 prints comprise the exhibition. Piedmont College is located in the
              Mountains of northeast Georgia, one hour north of Atlanta.


      19th Parkside National Small Print Exhibition
           o Professor Sipp had a print from his Algerian Series entitled Oil Fields juried into
              the 19th Parkside National Small Print Exhibition held at the University of
              Wisconsin-Parkside. The juror for the exhibit was Rudy Pozzatti, Distinguished
              Professor Emeritus at Indiana University‘s Hope School of Fine Arts.
2006

                                        Professor James Estes

      27th Annual Topeka Competition
           o Professor Estes had two works juried into this exhibition held at the Sabatini
              Gallery, Topeka and Shawnee Public Library. This was a 12 state competition.
              Juror Isabella Barbuzza, Professor of Art, University of Iowa chose 47 works
              from 232 entries

      Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art ―Members Exhibit, St. Joseph, Missouri.
      Gallery 206, ―Faculty Art Exhibit‖, Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph,
       Missouri
      108th Midwest Art Exhibition, Birger Sandzen Memorial Gallery, Lindsburg, Kansas
          o 18 works exhibited.



                                                                                                98
   Missouri Western State University,
      o created and installed welded metal sculpture ―Beyond 2010‖

                              Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

     ―Twenty-Fourth Annual Five State Competition And Exhibition‖ Hays, Kansas.
       o Juror: Greg Cradick, fine art photographer and Executive Director of Working
         with Artist School and Flash Gallery. ―Storm Shadow‘ and ―Midwest Space‖,
         two color triptych collages were accepted into this exhibit.

     12 X 12‖, National Juried Show, Todd Gallery, Middle Tennessee State
       University; Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
       o Juror: Mark Scala, Exhibition Curator, First Center for the Visual Arts. ―Dark
           Light‖, a color triptych collage was accepted into this exhibition.

     ―Annual Faculty Art Exhibition‖ Fine Arts Gallery, Art Department, Missouri Western
       State University, St. Joseph, Missouri.
       o Three new color triptychs collages and three new black and white photographs
           were exhibited.

                               Professor Teresa Harris

   2006 HOW Design Conference Las Vegas, Nevada
   2006 AIGA Student Design Forum Wichita, Kansas

   Juror
            Delaware Valley League Art High School Art Competition Wathena, Kansas
   Juror
            Doniphan County Bicentennial High School Art Competition Troy, Kansas
   Juror
            Reflections Art Competition Parkway Elementary School St. Joseph, Missouri
   Juror
            Midwest Artists 22nd Annual Membership Exhibition St. Joseph, Missouri
   Juror
            Members Art Exhibition Saxton Retirement Center St. Joseph, Missouri



   "MWSU Faculty Exhibition"
      o Group Exhibition
      o Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University St. Joseph, Missouri

   "Rocky Mount Arts Center’s 7th Annual Juried Art Exhibition"
       o National Juried Exhibition
       o Rocky Mount Art Center Rocky Mount, North Carolina

   Americas 2000: Paper Works Exhibition"

                                                                                          99
          o International Juried Exhibition - 35th Annual Exhibition
          o Harnett Hall Gallery, Minot State University Minot, North Dakota

      "Albrecht-Kemper Membership Exhibition"
          o Group Membership Exhibition * 1st Place Award - Mixed Media
          o The Albrecht-Kemper Museum St. Joseph, Missouri

      "Greater Midwest International XXI Competition"
          o International Exhibition
          o Art Center Gallery, Central Missouri State University Warrensburg, Missouri

                                          Dr. Allison Sauls

      Outstanding Instructor , Presented by Disabilities Services Missouri Western State
       University (Student Nomination)

      Foundations Grant, for Gallery 206 operational budget, Missouri Western State
       University Foundation, Saint Joseph, Missouri

      Albrecht-Kemper Museum 32h Annual Membership Exhibition.
          o AWARD 2nd Place Photography

      Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri

      Faculty Bi-Annual Exhibition, Gallery 206, Missouri Western State College, Saint
       Joseph, Missouri


                                     Professor Geo Sipp

    XXI Greater Midwest International Exhibition Central Missouri State University
     Warrensburg, Missouri

    Parkside National Small Print Exhibition University of Wisconsin-Parkside




2007

                                   Professor James Estes

      Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art ―Members Exhibit‖ St. Joseph, MO
      Missouri Western State University,
         o Created and installed welded metal sculpture work titled ―Passages‖ on grounds of
            Western, St. Joseph, MO


                                                                                            100
                           Professor Jeannie Harmon-Miller

     ―Photo Spiva 2007 National Photographic Competition‖ ―The oldest continuous
    national photographic competition‖,
       o George A. Spiva Center for the Arts, Joplin, MO. Juror: John Paul Caponigro,
          photographer, painter, editor and author. ―Still‖ and ―Boxed‖, two color triptych
          collages were accepted into this exhibition.

                                Professor Teresa Harris


     ―Twenty –Third Annual Five State Competition And Exhibition‖, Hays Kansas.
      o Juror: Dan Burkholder, photographer and author of the book titled, ―Making
         Digital Negatives for Contact Printing‖. ―Still‖ and ―Dark Light‖, two color
         triptych collages were accepted into this exhibition.

   ―25th Annual National Small Works Exhibition‖
      o National Juried Exhibition
           Gallery 107 Cobleskill, New York

   ―Quincy Biennial Quad-State Exhibition‖
      o Four-State Juried Exhibition
         Quincy Art Center Quincy, Illinois

   ―TEXAS NATIONAL 2007 Exhibition‖
      o National Juried Exhibition
        Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, Texas

   "12th Oklahoma Biennial: Centerfold"
      o National Juried Exhibition *Juror‘s Award
          Leslie Powell Gallery Lawton, Oklahoma
          The University of Arts and Sciences Chickasha, Oklahoma
          November 2006, January 2007



                                    Dr. Allison Sauls

   Albrecht-Kemper Museum 33h Annual Membership Exhibition.
      o AWARD 1st Place Printmaking; AWARD Honorable Mention Photograph

   Board Member, David H. Morton Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph, Missouri

   Faculty Bi-Annual Exhibition, Gallery 206, Missouri Western State College, Saint
    Joseph, Missouri


                                                                                          101
                                        Professor Geo Sipp


       Bradley International Drawing & Print Exhibition, Bradley University
          o Honorable Mention

       The Russian Experience, Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University

       Solo Exhibition Piedmont College, Demorest, Georgia

       31st Bradley International Print & Drawing Biennial Heuser Art Center, Bradley
        University Peoria, Illinois

       Professors / Printmakers Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University


Advising Responsibilities -- Art Department faculty provide candidate advisement within the
major. All first time freshman and transfer students entering the art program must see the
chairperson of the department who will discuss curriculum and options in the department. The
chair will also lift the ―advising block‖ to enable the student to register for classes. This block is
in place each semester and can be lifted only after consultation with an advisor. Once a student
declares a major in Art Education, the CDA will designate a faculty member in the chosen
program for further supervision.
Art students must consult with their faculty advisor each semester. Students majoring in art
education are required to undergo a review of their work once they have completed the
Foundation Core Curriculum sequence. The student is responsible for scheduling this review
with their advisor and submitting a representative sampling of work for examination by the art
faculty. The consent of this committee, based on portfolio, presentation and professional
demeanor and overall ability, is necessary before the student enrolls in further study in the
department.
Each student is carefully tracked and advised throughout the program, not only in the art
department but in the education department as well. Each art teacher candidates has an Education
Department advisor who signs the major/minor form and provides advisement on the
professional sequence coursework.

The following table represents departmental activity for last year:

                        Table 19 Departmental Advising Load Fall 2007

       Estes         Harmon-Miller             Harris                 Sauls                Sipp
       15-17              33                   48-50                   89                   35


Process by which program evaluates teaching - The evaluation of a faculty member is a
continuous process that involves the accumulation of relevant data and information that permits


                                                                                                   102
intelligent judgments concerning a faculty member's performance. Evaluation procedures are
used in the annual review, in the midterm review, in the tenure review, in promotion reviews,
and in special reviews such as those for Board of Governors Distinguished Professor awards and
grants for professional leave and sabbatical. At the heart of an effective evaluation system lies
the requirement that a faculty member diligently seek self-improvement and that evaluators
responsibly interpret results and carefully support comments and recommendations.

Faculty performance is evaluated in three areas: teaching, scholarship/creative activity and
service. All unit faculty members, including tenured/nontenured and full-time/adjunct, are
evaluated by all candidates in every section of every course every semester. This evaluation
provides one measure of the faculty member‘s performance and is especially useful for the
individual faculty member‘s own self-reflection and development as a teacher. In addition to the
standard student evaluations, all supervisors of field and clinical experiences are evaluated by
candidates each semester.

Further, all faculty members prepare an annual self-evaluation document that is submitted to the
department chairperson. The self-evaluation documents the faculty member‘s performance in
each of the following areas: teaching, scholarship/creative activity and service. The student
evaluation data are a required part of this annual self-evaluation. Some faculty use a variety of
peer review options for extending their evaluation data. The department chair reviews the self-
evaluation and completes a formal evaluation. This written evaluation is used in the annual
review interview in which the chairperson discusses strengths and concerns regarding the faculty
member‘s performance during that year. The chairperson may provide recommendations and
expectations for improved performance for the next year. The formal evaluation document is
forwarded to the college dean for review and comment, on to the Provost for review and
comment and then a copy is returned to the faculty member.

Additional evaluations occur when the faculty member completes a mid-term tenure review
(third year), a tenure review (sixth year), an application for promotion, or an application for the
Governors Distinguished Professor award.

Unit faculty members are well respected and recognized as individuals who provide significant
contributions to student learning, to the work of the unit and to the success of the institution. In the area of
teaching, students rank unit faculty members as some of the best teachers at Missouri Western. The
average student evaluation rating for the Fall 2007 semester for faculty members in the Education
Department was 1.30 on a scale of 1 (excellent) to 5 (poor). The average student evaluation rating for the
Fall 2007 semester for all faculty members in the College of Professional Studies was 1.65; for all faculty
members in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences the average rating was 1.71 and the average for all
faculty at Missouri Western was 1.68. Summary student evaluations of faculty data are maintained by the
Vice-President of Academic and Student Affairs. Overall candidates within the art education program
have a positive opinion of faculty teaching and instruction.



                                  Table 20 Faculty Student Evaluations




                                                                                                            103
                    Faculty Student Evaluations*
    Fall 2007       Faculty    Standard     ART      Standard    LAS       Standard    Campus    Standard
                    Overall    Deviation    Mean     Deviation    Mean     Deviation    Total    Deviation
                     Mean

Professor       1        1.4        0.48      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       2       1.36        0.52      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       3       1.58        0.53      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       4       1.46          0.5     1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       5        1.7        0.66      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       6        1.2        0.25      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       7       2.08          0.9     1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93

Professor       8       1.61        0.75      1.76        1.03      1.71        0.94      1.68        0.93



Overall                 3.17        0.89
effectiveness

Course Mean             3.27        1.16



*Professor 9 is assigned to another department

Involvement in beginning teacher assistance program – The Missouri Western State University
Teacher Education unit has offered Beginning Teacher Assistance programs in a variety of
venues since 2001. For example, in 2001/2002, 2002-2003 unit faculty provided mentor teacher
training and beginning teacher assistance programs both on the Western campus and within area
school districts. In 2003-2004, 2004-2005, the unit offered in-district beginning teacher
assistance programs and coordinated the training and awarding of certificates through district
professional development committees. Further, since 2005, the teacher education program has
co-sponsored beginning teacher assistance programs with professional associations such as the
Missouri State Teachers Association and the Missouri National Education Association. There is
a Beginning Teacher Assistance Program scheduled at Missouri Western State University for the
near future. Finally, unit faculty has worked with area districts and program graduates to locate
and promote additional beginning teacher assistance programs through the Northwest Missouri
Regional Professional Development Center.

Description of training for part-time faculty – Part-time faculty members are selected because of
their knowledge and skill in a specific area. These faculty members are invited to unit meetings,
participate in department projects, and attend supervisor/part-time training workshops and
take advantage of web-based support. For example, on January 9, 2008, the unit conducted a
training workshop for unit supervisors and part-time faculty that included support for new
responsibilities of relating with and helping school-based clinical faculty. The unit conceptual


                                                                                                      104
framework and assessment system were reviewed as well as the process for completing the field
and clinical evaluation forms.




                                                                                          105
Certification Program Resources

The art certification program has a variety of resources provided to the program, faculty and
candidates. Program resources include such support as staff, operating funds and institutional
support such as the Hearnes Library. Faculty support includes professional development support
and performance incentives. Finally candidates in the art program benefit from a variety of
resources including academic support services, counseling services, entertainment options, clubs
and organization involvement and applied learning experiences.

MWSU provides adequate funding for academic programs including faculty, professional
development/travel, operating funds, and student labor. The following table documents the funds
provided to support those activities on a per faculty basis.

                                  Table 21 Department Funding – 2007-2008

                                      ART K-12 Program - Highlighted

 Department                           Student   Operating   Travel   Total     # of      Budget/faculty
                                      Labor                          Budget    Faculty
 Business                             $7,500    $32,118     $3,900   $43,518   21        $2,072.29
 Criminal Justice/Legal Studies       $4,235    $16,638     $2,100   $22,973   10        $2,297.30
 Education                            $5,299    $36,025     $2,300   $43,624   11        $3,965.82
 Engineering Technology               $2,569    $16,193     $1,800   $20,562   7         $2,937.43
 HPER                                 $2,420    $31,000     $2,000   $35,420   11        $3,220.00
 Military Science                     $5,181    $9,778      $700     $15,659   5         $3,131.80
 Nursing                              $2,452    $25,007     $3,100   $30,559   15        $2,037.27


 Art                                  $4,235    $16,316     $1,300   $21,851   5         $4,370.20
 Biology                              $7,500    $18,687     $2,700   $28,887   15        $1,925.80
 Chemistry                            $12,000   $14,262     $1,700   $27,962   8         $3,495.25
 Com Studies/Theatre                  $3,690    $19,310     $2,100   $25,100   10        $2,510.00
 CS/M/P                               $3,000    $23,284     $4,000   $30,284   20        $1,514.20
 Economics                            $1,000    $8,410      $900     $10,310   4         $2,577.50
 EFLJ                                 $8,000    $33,714     $4,900   $46,614   24        $1,942.25
 GSWS                                 $1,500    $12,711     $1,700   $15,911   7         $2,273.00
 HPG                                  $1,500    $13,235     $1,900   $16,635   9         $1,848.33
 Music                                $5,054    $41,458     $2,300   $48,812   11        $4,437.45
 Psychology                           $1,500    $11,498     $1,700   $14,698   8         $1,837.25



Professional development funds are available equally to faculty across the institution and include
support for travel to attend and present at conferences, departmental support for local and state
professional activities, and foundation funding that includes support for travel to present papers
at professional conferences and, in some cases, for terminal degree work. Many departments go

                                                                                                      106
beyond the formal funding limits to provide additional support for professional development for
new faculty and for scholarly activities.

The teaching load for faculty at Western is similar to other regional universities in the state.
Many faculty at Western are very effective teachers, have impressive records of scholarship and
provide extensive service to the institution, the profession and the community. As Murphy Hall
was designed, the intent was to have small classrooms where class sizes are kept to about 25 and
where interactive classes are encouraged. New online course development is supported by
training (Online Pedagogy course) and incentive compensation. Part-time faculty members are
selected because of their knowledge and skill in a specific area. These faculty members are
invited to unit/department meetings, participate in department projects, and attend
supervisor/part-time training workshops and take advantage of web-based support.

The Art department has a full-time administrative assistant to provide essential clerical and front
office support. The assessment system team and the web support team from the Instructional
Media Center (IMC) work closely with unit faculty to continue development and refinement of
the assessment system, aid in creating supporting web pages and online course support, and
respond immediately to needs related to teaching in the smart classrooms. The Information
Technology (IT) department provides PC support for faculty and staff to include training in
software as requested. The Library provides physical housing of hard copy resources as well as
online access to databases for research and curriculum support.

Classrooms are all smart classrooms with uniform hardware, software, and controls. Light and
sound are controlled and fiber optic connections provide for broadband access to the Web and a
full range of classroom services. Education classrooms are further equipped with built-in video
cameras with VCRs for recording micro teaching lessons. The Education Department has a
dedicated computer lab (Murphy 114) for use by all unit candidates to provide easy access to
hardware and software used to integrate technology into the curriculum. Faculty offices are
functional in size, providing enough space for furniture to include chairs for candidates to meet
with their advisors or instructors. University computer labs are distributed across the campus and
are available many hours out of the day and evening. The library provides journals, books, and
online access to databases and journals.

Faculty members are issued either a desktop or laptop computer that is replaced, at their request,
on a three-year cycle. The newer laptops now have 802.11G wireless built in and can connect
with the wireless access that permeates almost all areas of the campus.

The Missouri Western State University Library offers a wealth of resources in support of
curriculum, instruction, and research. Library resources are a reviewed and updated yearly in
response to department input. Off campus access is available from the Internet, and includes the
ability to search multiple online databases for research journal articles and to place materials on
hold. Available databases include EBSCO host, Towers, ERIC, Lexis-Nexis, and many others




                                                                                                107
          APPENDIX A

MAJOR/MINOR FORM FOR B.S.E.ART

  (PreMajor and Major/minor Form)




                                    108
 MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
 PRE-MAJOR FORM
 Student Name:______________________________________________
                                                                                  Degree/Program:           Pre-Major — Art Education                20B
                                                                                  Major:                    Art Education
 Address:___________________________________________________
                 Street                  City               State           ZIP   Minor:
 Telephone:________________________ID#______________________
                                                                                  Catalog Year: 2007-2008              Expires: 2010-2011
 ?  Students are expected to read the regulations and policies in both
 the University Catalog and Student Handbook and to conform to                    Advisor:___________________________________          Date:___________
 them. The student, not the University or a member of the faculty or
                                                                                  Student’s Signature:_________________________        Date:___________
 staff, is primarily responsible for knowing the regulations and
 policies, and for meeting the requirements for a degree or certificate.          Advisor’s Signature:_________________________        Date:___________

 PREPARATORY COURSES (Do not count towards General                                Chairperson’s Signature:______ _______________       Date:___________
 Studies. RDG095, MAT090/095 or equivalent does not count toward
 graduation requirements.)                                                        EDU Advisor’s Signature:_____________________        Date:___________

 Based on placement criteria                                  Credits Grade       DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
 MAT090 or equivalent                                               3     _____   1. A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation (including
 MAT095 or equivalent                                               3     _____      60 from a senior college).
 ENG100                                                             3     _____   2. For the baccalaureate degree, 30 of the last 45 credits of course
 RDG095                                                             3     _____      work must be earned at MWSU with a minimum of 30 credits in
                                                                                     upper division courses. Lower division transfer courses accepted
 GENERAL STUDIES                                         (42-46 Credits)             as meeting upper division departmental course requirements
                                                                                     cannot be used to fulfill this requirement.
                                                                                  3. You are required to participate in departmental and campus wide
 CATEGORY ONE: BASIC SKILLS (12-14 credits)
                                                                                     assessment efforts as part of your degree requirements. Contact
 1.    MAT110 or any higher level mathematics course                                 the Academic and Student Affairs Office for more information.
       of 3 or more credits (excluding MAT127 and 132)*       3/4/5      _____
 2.    ENG104 and 108 or                                        6        _____
       ENG112                                                                                       Admission to Teacher Education
 3.    COM104                                                   3        _____    1. A. ACT composite of 22 or SAT combined score of 1030, and
                                                                                     B. Passing score on each subtest of C-BASE.
CATEGORY TWO: NATURAL SCIENCES (8-10 credits)                                                                    Or
Minimum of 8 credits from TWO of the following groups.
                                                                                     A. ACT composite score on file at MWSU, and
 1. BIO101 or 105                                              5        _____        B. C-BASE with no score lower than 265 (66 percentile) for each
 2. CHE101(4) or 104(5) or 111(5)                             4/5       _____
                                                                                         subtest
 3. ESC111                                                     4        _____
 4. PHY101(4) or 107(4) or 110(4) or 210(5)                   4/5       _____     2. Overall GPA of 2.5
 5. PHY104                                                     4        _____     3. Satisfactory completion of EDU202/203
                                                                                  ACT and C-BASE scores should be received the semester before
CATEGORY THREE: SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 credits)                                       application for admission to teacher education is made (up to 4 months
Minimum of 9 credits with at least one course from each of the two                should be allowed for scores to be processed).
following groups.
                                                                                  *Alternative avenues to Teacher Education available for recruitment of
 1.    ECO101 or 260 or 261 or GEO100 or PSY101 or
       SOC110 or 120                                            3       _____
                                                                                  historically under-served populations. Contact the Department
 2.    HIS140 or 150 or GOV101                                  3       _____     Chairperson for guidelines and procedures.
 3.    Additional course from group 1 or 2                      3       _____
                                                                                  ACT:                                      Date:
CATEGORY FOUR: HUMANITIES (9 credits)
One course each from three of the following four groups.                          SAT:                                      Date:
 1.    HIS100 or 110 or 130 or HUM203 or 204 or 205                 3     _____   C-BASE:                                   Date:
 2.    ENG210 or 220 or PHL210 or 230 or HUM250                     3     _____
 3.    ART100 or MUS101 or THR113                                   3     _____   Overall GPA:                              Date:
 4.    FRE/GER/SPA102 or any higher level 3-credit                  3     _____
       language course                                                            All students must successfully complete ART110/120/130 and
 CATEGORY FIVE: PHYSICAL HEALTH (4 credits)                                       have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher in these 3 courses to
                                                                                  declare a major in art.
 1.    PED101                                                   3        _____
 2.    MIL105 or any PE lifetime sports activity class          1        _____
                                                                                  GPA in ART110/120/130:__________________
 LAS AREAS OF FOCUS                                            Course ID                                                                Credit    Grade
                                                                                  ART110     Beginning Drawing I                           3
 1.   LAS Writing Intensive                                             ______
                                                                                  ART120     Two-Dimensional Design                        3
 2.   LAS Computer Literacy                                             ______
 3.   LAS Ethics                                                        ______    ART130     Introduction to Tools & Techniques            2
 4.   LAS International/Intercultural                                   ______    EDU202     Introduction to Education                     3
                                                                                  EDU203     Participation in Teaching                     1
 TR beside grade denotes transfer work fulfills course requirements.
                                                                                                                                           109
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
                                                                           Degree/Program:             B.S.E. — Art Education                   20B
Name
ID#
                                                                           Major:                      Art Education
Minor                                                                      Catalog Year: 2007-2008               Expires: 2013-2014

                                                                           Advisor_________________________          Department________________
?  Students are expected to read the regulations and policies in
both the University Catalog and Student Handbook and to                    Registrar’s Signature_____________________          Date_____________
conform to them. The student, not the University or a member of
the faculty or staff, is primarily responsible for knowing the             DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
regulations and policies, and for meeting the requirements for a           Check when the requirement is completed.
degree or certificate.
                                                                           _____1.    A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation
                                                                                      (including 60 from a senior college).
PREPARATORY COURSES (Do not count towards General                          _____2.    For the baccalaureate degree, 30 of the last 45 credits of
Studies. RDG095, MAT090/095 or equivalent do not count toward                         course work must be earned at MWSU with a minimum of
graduation requirements.)                                                             30 credits in upper division courses. Lower division
                                                                                      transfer courses accepted as meeting upper division
Based on placement criteria.                         Credits      Grade
                                                                                      departmental course requirements cannot be used to
MAT090 or equivalent                                   3          _____               fulfill this requirement.
MAT095 or equivalent                                   3          _____    _____3.    Participation in departmental and campus wide
ENG100                                                 3          _____               assessment efforts is required. Contact the Academic
RDG095                                                 3          _____               Affairs Office for more information.
                                                                           _____4.    Complete the requirements below.
GENERAL STUDIES                                      (42-46 Credits)
CATEGORY ONE: BASIC SKILLS (12-14 credits)
                                                                           MAJOR REQUIREMENTS                                      (78 Credits)
                                                                                                                                       Credit
1. MAT110 or any higher level mathematics course of                        Grade
   3 or more credits (excluding MAT127 and 132) 3/4/5             _____    ART110    Beginning Drawing I                                 3
2. ENG104 and 108 or                               6              _____    ART120    Two-Dimensional Design                              3
   ENG112                                                         _____
                                                                           ART130    Introduction to Tools & Techniques                  2
3. COM104                                          3              _____
                                                                           ART140    Ceramics I                                          3
CATEGORY TWO: NATURAL SCIENCES (8-10 credits)                              ART160    Beginning Drawing II (Sp)*                          3
Minimum of 8 credits from TWO of the following groups.                     ART170    Three-Dimensional Design (Sp)*                      3
1.    BIO101 or 105                                    5          _____
                                                                           ART205    Ancient through Medieval Art (F)                    3
2.    CHE101(4) or 104(5) or 111(5)                   4/5         _____    ART255    Renaissance through Modern Art (Sp)*                3
3.    ESC111                                           4          _____    ART300    Elementary Art Teaching (Sp)                        3
4.    PHY101(4) or 107(4) or 110(4) or 210(5)         4/5         _____    ART335    Art Theory and Criticism (F)                        3
5.    PHY104                                           4          _____    ART339    Printmaking I (F)                                   3
                                                                           ART350    Secondary Art Teaching (Sp, E)                      3
CATEGORY THREE: SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 credits)                                ART359    Photomedia I (F)                                    3
Minimum of 9 credits with at least one course from each of the two
following groups.                                                          ART369    Painting I                                          3
                                                                           ART379    Sculpture I (F)                                     3
1. ECO101or 260 or 261or GEO100 or PSY101                                  ART494    Senior Seminar & Exhibit                            1
   or SOC110 or 120                                    3          _____
                                                                           PLUS 6 additional credits in Art History:
2. HIS140 or 150 or GOV101                             3          _____
3. Additional course from group 1 or 2                 3          _____                                                                 3
                                                                                                                                        3
CATEGORY FOUR: HUMANITIES (9 credits)                                                      TOTAL                                       51
One course each from three of the following four groups.                   PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE
1.    HIS100 or 110 or 130 or HUM203 or 204 or 205     3          _____    EDU202        Introduction to Education                        3
2.    ENG210 or 220 or PHL210 or 230 or HUM250         3          _____    EDU203        Participation in Teaching I                      1
3.    ART100 or MUS101 or THR113                       3          _____    EDU303        Experience in Teaching II                        3
4.    FRE/GER/SPA102 or any higher level 3-credit                          EDU304        Psychology in Teaching                           4
      language course                                  3          _____    EDU311        Reading Techniques                               2
                                                                           EDU315        Psych. and Ed. of the Exceptional                2
CATEGORY FIVE: PHYSICAL HEALTH (4 credits)                                               Student
1. PED101                                              3          _____    EDU404        Seminar in Sec. Ed. and Human Relations          3
2. MIL105 or any PE lifetime sports activity class     1          _____    EDU409        Secondary Student Teaching III                   9
                                                                                           TOTAL                                         27
LAS AREAS OF FOCUS                                             Course ID   PSY101 is a prerequisite for several EDU courses.
1.    LAS Writing Intensive                                       ______   To be certified to teach in the state of Missouri, students must complete:
2.    LAS Computer Literacy                                       ______   1. BIO101 or equivalent 2. GOV101           3. HIS140 or 150
3.    LAS Ethics                                                  ______
4.    LAS International/Intercultural                             ______
TR beside grade denotes transfer work fulfills course requirements.
                                                                           This form is not official until signed by the Registrar.
                                                                                                                                       110
MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
Major - Minor Declaration
Four Year Program                                                               Degree/Program:            B.S.E.—Art Education                               3B
                                                                                Major:                     Art Education
Student Name________________________________________________
                                                                                Minor:
Address_____________________________________________________                    Catalog Year: 2007-2008                     Expires: 2013-2014
                 Street                 City           State              ZIP
Telephone_______________________________ID#_________________                    Advisor ______________________            Department __________________

? Students are expected to read the regulations and policies in                 Student’s Signature                                ______ Date _________
both the University Catalog and Student Handbook and to                         Advisor’s Signature                                ______Date __________
conform to them. The student, not the University or a member of
the faculty or staff, is primarily responsible for knowing the                  Chairperson’s Signature                            ______Date __________
regulations and policies, and for meeting the requirements for a
degree or certificate.                                                          EDU Advisor’s Signature_________________________ Date__________

PREPARATORY COURSES (Do not count towards General                               Registrar’s Signature                             ______ Date __________
Studies. RDG095, MAT090/095 or equivalent do not count toward                   DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
graduation requirements.)                                                       Check when the requirement is completed.
                                                                                ____1. A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation
Based on placement criteria                                Credits    Grade             (including 60 from a senior college).
MAT090 or equivalent                                         3        _____     ____2. A minimum of 30 credits must be earned in upper level
MAT095 or equivalent                                         3        _____             courses. Lower division transfer courses accepted as
ENG100                                                       3        _____             meeting upper division departmental course requirements
RDG095                                                       3        _____             cannot be used to fulfill this requirement. Thirty (30) of the
                                                                                        last 45 credits of course work must be earned at MWSU.
GENERAL STUDIES                                      (42- 46 Credits)           ____3. Participation in departmental and campus wide
                                                                                        assessment efforts is required. Contact the Academic
CATEGORY ONE: BASIC SKILLS (12-14 credits)                                              and Student Affairs Office for more information.
                                                                                ____4. Complete the requirements below.
1. MAT110 or any higher level mathematics course of
   3 or more credits (excluding MAT127 and 132)            3/4/5      _____     MAJOR REQUIREMENTS                                             (78 Credits)
2. ENG104 and 108 or ENG112                                  6        _____                                                                    Credit        Grade
3. COM104                                                    3        _____     ART110     Beginning Drawing I                                    3
CATEGORY TWO: NATURAL SCIENCES (8-10 credits)                                   ART120     Two-Dimensional Art                                    3
Minimum of 8 credits from TWO of the following groups.                          ART130     Introduction to Tools & Techniques                     2
                                                                                ART140     Ceramics I                                             3
1.   BIO101 or 105                                           5        _____
2.   CHE101(4) or 104(5) or 111(5)                          4/5       _____     ART160     Beginning Drawing II (Sp)*                             3
3.   ESC111                                                  4        _____     ART170     Three-Dimensional Design (Sp)*                         3
4.   PHY101(4) or 107(4) or 110(4) or 210(5)                4/5       _____     ART205     Ancient through Medieval Art (F)                       3
5.   PHY104                                                  4        _____     ART255     Renaissance through Modern Art (Sp)*                   3
                                                                                ART300     Elementary Art Teaching (Sp)                           3
CATEGORY THREE: SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 credits)
Minimum of 9 credits with at least one course from each of the two              ART335     Art Theory and Criticism (F)                           3
following groups.                                                               ART339     Printmaking I (F)                                      3
                                                                                ART350     Secondary Art Teaching (Sp, E)                         3
1. ECO101or 260 or 261or GEO100 or PSY101
                                                                                ART359     Photomedia I (F)                                       3
   or SOC110 or 120                                          3        _____
2. HIS140 or 150 or GOV101                                   3        _____     ART369     Painting I                                             3
3. Additional course from group 1 or 2                       3        _____     ART379     Sculpture I (F)                                        3
                                                                                ART494     Senior Seminar & Exhibit                               1
CATEGORY FOUR: HUMANITIES (9 credits)                                           PLUS 6 additional credits in Art History:
One course each from three of the following four groups.
                                                                                                                                                 3
1.   HIS100 or 110 or 130 or HUM203 or 204 or 205            3        _____                                                                      3
2.   ENG210 or 220 or PHL210 or 230 or HUM250                3        _____                TOTAL                                                 51
3.   ART100 or MUS101 or THR113                              3        _____     PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE
4.   FRE/GER/SPA102 or any higher level 3-credit
     language course                                         3        _____
                                                                                EDU202   Introduction to Education                                3
                                                                                EDU203   Participation in Teaching I                              1
CATEGORY FIVE: PHYSICAL HEALTH (4 credits)                                      EDU303   Experience in Teaching II                                3
1. PED101                                                    3        _____     EDU304   Psychology in Teaching                                   4
2. MIL105 or any PE lifetime sports activity class           1        _____     EDU311   Reading Techniques                                       2
                                                                                EDU315   Psych. and Ed. of the Exceptional Student                2
                                                                                EDU404   Seminar in Sec. Ed. and Human Relations                  3
LAS AREAS OF FOCUS                                           Course ID
                                                                                EDU409   Secondary Student Teaching III                           9
                                                                                         TOTAL                                                   27
1.   LAS Writing Intensive                                           ______
                                                                                PSY101 is a prerequisite for several EDU courses.
2.   LAS Computer Literacy                                           ______
                                                                                To be certified to teach in the state of Missouri, students must complete:
3.   LAS Ethics                                                      ______
                                                                                1. BIO101 or equivalent          2. GOV101         3. HIS140 or 150
4.   LAS International/Intercultural                                 ______
                                                                                   * Indicates prerequisite
TR beside grade denotes that transfer work fulfills course requirements.           This form is not official until signed by the Registrar.
                                                                                                                                                111
   APPENDIX B

PROGRAM BROCHURE




                   112
113
      APPENDIX C

CHECKLIST FOR GRADUATION




                           114
                   BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE CHECK LIST

 Student Name: __________________          Graduation Semester      ___________

Major: __________________________________________________

Minor: __________________________________________________

Date: ___________________________________________________
As of this date, the following deficiencies/questionable areas/potential problems exist. (If checked, requirements
have been fulfilled, or will be fulfilled based upon current registration and/or preregistration.) If specific course
deficiencies exist, they will be highlighted on an attached copy of your Major/Minor Form.
APPROPRIATE MAJOR/MINOR FORM ON FILE________________________________________________
GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS ______________________________________________________________
Teacher certification requires specific General Studies (see Major/Minor form)
MINIMUM 124 CREDIT HOURS ____________________________________________________________________
144 hours for 2 baccalaureate degrees, same
semester additional 20 hours for second
degree
COURSES NOT APPLICABLE TO GRADUATION _____________________________________________________
Maximum 64 Jr. College hours applicable to degree
Maximum 6 CED hours applicable to degree (100 level or above)
Maximum 30 hours non-traditional credit applicable to degree (Cones., CLEP, departmental, military)
MINIMUM 2.00 MAJOR GPA _______________________________________________________________________

" C" or better in each course in major

MINIMUM 2.50 OVERALL GPA _____________________________________________________________________

30 HOURS UPPER-DIVISION (300/400 level) ___________________________________________________________
RESIDENCY HOURS: 30 OF THE LAST 45 AT MWSU _________________________________________________

(Must include senior student teaching)

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS __________________________________________________________________________

CONCENTRATION AREA _______________________
LAS AREAS OF FOCUS -4 courses required for majors in these
  areas: (Art, English, French, Spanish, Music, Speech & Theatre)
OTHER NOTES__ ______________________________________________________
Students graduating will be required to participate in MAPP Exit Exam and/or departmental exit
evaluations. Please consult with your advisor. ______________________________ Revised 07/IM7




                                                                                                          115
                   APPENDIX D

SYLLABI AND CURRICULUM VITAE FOR CONTENT COURSES




                                                   116
BEGINNING DRAWING I                           ART110                         JIM ESTES


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Elementary drawing with the figure, still-life, landscape, and perspective in various media.
Attention to cultural and historical background and its application to contemporary forms and
aesthetics through assigned reading and slides. Critique and discussion. 6 studio hours. 3
credits. No prerequisites. For art majors and non-art majors.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

   1. To provide the student with the opportunity for creative and aesthetic experiences in the
      performance of drawing through the introduction of a wide range of materials and
      techniques fundamental to the drawing area.
   2. To provide the student the opportunity of a practical exploration of the elements of art
      through studio exercises, assignments, and demonstrations.

   3. To provide the student with a basic understanding of drawing as an aesthetic experience
      as it relates to the present time and other periods.

   4. To develop within the student the ability to think critically, to reason analytically, in the
      evaluation of his own artwork and that of others.

   5. To help the student gain a broader appreciation and perspective of the art of drawing with
      its many approaches, techniques, variations and intentions.

COURSE TOPICS:

   1. Still-life drawings

   2. Landscape or nature study

   3. Figure drawings

   4. Perspective drawings

   5. Problems dealing specifically with elements of art-line, volume, mass, shape, texture, etc.

   6. Matting, framing, and presenting artwork.




                                                                                                 117
SUPPLY LIST:

   1. 18 x 24 drawing pad (not newsprint)

   2. 18 x 24 Newsprint pad

   3. Assorted drawing pencils: 2B, 4B, and 6B (1 each)

   4. Graphite stick

   5. Charcoal pencil

   6. Hardmuth #2 and #4 (1 each)

   7. Erasers – 1. Kneaded 2. Art Gum

   8. Spray fixative

   9. Conte‘Crayon (sanguine or umber)

   10. 20 x 26 Masonite drawing board

   11. Black portfolio or envelope portfolio

   12. Set of colored pencils/pastels (later in semester) will discuss in class

GRADING:

The ability and effort you have shown in the following areas will determine your final grade:

   1. QUALITY of your completed drawings as evidence in mid-term and final portfolio.

   2. PROGRESS AND GROWTH SHOWN IN YOUR WORK. I am not so much
       concerned about your present abilities or limitations. I am concerned about the abilities
       and limitations you will have at the end of this semester. For that reason, each of you
       will be considered individually in order to evaluate your personal improvement.

   3. ATTENDANCE: Because of the importance of drawing within all art media, I expect
       you to attend class EACH day. I consider excess absence a sign of a lack of interest and
       desire within the student. Because of this, the student‘s grade will be dropped a FULL
       LETTER GRADE with 4 ABSENCES and a total of 6 ABSENCES (during a 3-session
       per week semester) will necessitate A FAILING GRADE for the course.

       Late arrivals will be counted at the rate of two late arrivals equal one absence.



The basic breakdown of grade determination will be as follows:


                                                                                                118
60% Overall quality of completed drawings and individual progress and refinement of drawing skills
    as evidenced in mid-term, final portfolios, and daily drawing exercises.



25% Daily class attendance, work habits, receptiveness.

15% Outside assignments (drawings, matting, and reading). All drawing assignments must be
    turned in on the due date. Those drawings that are turned in one session late will receive
    ½ credit for that assignment. NO CREDIT WILL BE GIVEN FOR WORK HANDED IN
    AFTER THIS ONE-DAY EXTENSION.

Mid-term portfolios will be due mid-October for fall and mid-March for spring.

Personal stereos, headphones, cellular phones, etc. are NOT ALLOWED during classroom
sessions. Please leave these items in your lockers during class time.

TEXT: Mendelowitz‘s Guide to Drawing, latest edition by Duane Wakeham. As we progress
through the course, we will rely heavily on our text and its many illustrations of drawings of past
and present masters. Because our text is such an important resource for the course, each student
is expected to read the entire text by mid-term.

AUDITING: Students AUDITING this course are expected to comply with all course
assignments and attendance requirements. Failure to meet and maintain these course
expectations will necessitate dismissal from class.

CLASS RESPONSIBILITIES: The student is held responsible for all lectures, demonstrations,
discussions, reading assignments, etc., throughout the course. If you miss anything, it is YOUR
RESPONSIBILITY to find out what it is and correct the situation.

DISABILITY: If you have any condition or impairment that hinders the full expression of your
true ability, please meet with me to personally discuss this in regard to class requirements and
performance.

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY: Since honesty in the course is required, cheating,
plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the instructor and/or college constitutes
a violation. When applicable, a grade of zero may be assessed in the area that has been violated.
This may affect your final grade.

   The schedule(s) and procedures in this course are subject to change at the discretion of the
                                           instructor.




                                                                                                119
BEGINNING DRAWING I                                                       ERIC FUSON
ART110                                                          fuson@missuriwestern.edu


COURSE DESCRIPTION

Elementary drawing with the figure, still life, landscape, and perspective in various media.
Attention to cultural and historical background and its application to contemporary forms and
aesthetics through assigned reading and slides, critique and discussion. Six studio hours. 3
credits. No prerequisites. For art majors and non-art majors.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

1. To provide the student with the opportunity for creative and esthetic experiences in the
   performance of drawing through the introduction of a wide range of materials and techniques
   fundamental to the drawing area.

2. To give the student a practical exploration of the elements of art through studio exercise,
   assignments and demonstrations.

3. To provide the student with a basic understanding of drawing as an esthetic experience as it
   relates to the present time and other periods.

4. To develop within the student the ability to think critically, to reason, analytically, in the
   evaluation of his own artwork and that of others.

5. To help the student gain a broader appreciation and perspective of the art of drawing with its
   many approaches, techniques, variations and intentions.

COURSE TOPICS

1. Problems dealing specifically with the elements of line, shape, texture, etc.

2. Perspective drawings

3. Still-life drawings

4. Landscape or nature study

5. Figure drawings

6. Matting, framing and presenting artwork




                                                                                                    120
SUPPLY LIST

1. 18‖ x 24‖ drawing pad                                        9. Spray fixative

2. 18‖ x 24‖ newsprint pad or larger)                          10. Black portfolio (18‖ x 24‖

3. 20‖ x 26‖ Masonite drawing board                            11. India ink (Black)

4. Assorted drawing pencils: 2B, 4B, 6B (1 each)               12. Chinese brush (Bamboo)

5. Erasers: 1. Kneaded     2. White plastic                    13. Oil pastels

6. Compressed Charcoal sticks #2 and #4 (1 each)               14. Brush (#4 or larger flat)

7. Conte‘ crayons (sanguine and umber/bistre) piece)           15. Black Arches Paper (1

8. Colored pencils – box of 10/15 Prismacolor thick lead

TEXT Mendelowitz‘s Guide to Drawing by Duane Wakeham, latest edition. We will be using
this text throughout the semester, therefore it is required.

GRADING

Your final grade will be determined by the ability and effort you have shown in the following
areas:

   1. QUALITY: Drawings done throughout the semester will be evaluated to give you an
      overall grade in this area.

   2. PROGRESS AND GROWTH: Overall progress in drawing technically (handle the
      various media and techniques), accuracy in reproducing a subject, and growth in your
      abilities to appreciate and critically look at various drawings.

   3. ATTENDANCE: In order to improve student learning as well as to achieve compliance
      with federal financial aid policies, Western has a mandatory attendance policy for all 100
      and 200 level courses. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official
      representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the
      faculty/staff supervisor of the event. [The instructor should provide here the policy for
      other forms of excused absences and policies for granting an excused absence.] All other
      absences will be deemed unexcused. The maximum number of unexcused absences
      allowed for this class before the midterm report, March 17 [for Spring 2008] is 5 Thus,
      when you have 6 unexcused absences you will be reported to the Registrar‘s Office, who
      will automatically withdraw you from this class. The Financial Aid Office will reduce
      financial aid as appropriate.

In accordance with Art Department policies the maximum number of unexcused absences


                                                                                                121
allowed for the entire semester is also 5. Exceeding this number will result in a failing grade. In
any case it is the responsibility of the student to obtain the material covered and make up any
work missed during an absence. Late arrivals will be accrued at the rate of two late arrivals equal
one absence.

Merely showing up each class period is not enough, attendance means ready and willing to be
attentive and productive. Failing to do so will affect grades negatively.

GRADING BREAKDOWN

60%    Overall quality of completed drawings and individual progress and refinement of drawing
       skills as evidenced in midterm, final portfolios and daily drawing exercises.

25%    Daily class attendance, work habits, receptiveness

15%    Outside assignments (drawings, matting, reading, portfolios and sketchbook)

Midterm portfolios will be due mid March. Final portfolios will be due just before the final
times. You will be required to attend class on the day of your final.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is required in all academic endeavors. Violations of academic honesty include
any instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work, falsifying documents or
academic records, or any other fraudulent activity. Violations of academic honesty may result in
a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the University. When a
student‘s grade has been affected, violation of academic honesty will be reported to the Provost
or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report forms.

Please see the Student Handbook and Calendar for specific activities identified as violations of
this policy and the student due process procedure. This handbook is also available online at
http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf.

AUDITS

Students auditing this course are expected to comply with all course assignments and attendance
requirements. Failure to meet and maintain these course expectations will necessitate dismissal
from class.

DISABILITY

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have
emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the
building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible to discuss
your situation in regard to class requirements and performance.


                                                                                               122
ART120                              TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN         ERIC FUSON
Office: Potter 103                                       fuson@missouriwestern.edu

TEXT: Design Basics, Latest Edition by David Lauer

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES:

This class is a studio class and part of the Freshman Foundation Program. This class deals with
flat surfaces – meaning surfaces containing length and width, but no depth. In this class students
will study the elements of design, which are sometimes called the tools one works with to create
art. In addition students will study how to compose these elements to create a unified whole or
composition. These are called the principles of design.

The Elements of Design:                                            Principles of Design:



       Color                                                         Unity
       Line                                                          Balance
       Shape                                                         Depth (the illusion)
       Size                                                          Motion (the illusion)
       Space                                                         Proportion & Scale
       Texture                                                       Rhythm
                                                                     Contrast

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

   1. ATTENDANCE: In order to improve student learning as well as to achieve compliance
      with federal financial aid policies, Western has a mandatory attendance policy for all 100
      and 200 level courses. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official
      representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the
      faculty/staff supervisor of the event. [The instructor should provide here the policy for
      other forms of excused absences and policies for granting an excused absence.] All other
      absences will be deemed unexcused. The maximum number of unexcused absences
      allowed for this class before the midterm report, March 17 [for Spring 2008] is 5 Thus,
      when you have 6 unexcused absences you will be reported to the Registrar‘s Office, who
      will automatically withdraw you from this class. The Financial Aid Office will reduce
      financial aid as appropriate.


       In accordance with Art Department policies the maximum number of unexcused absences
       allowed for the entire semester is also 5. Exceeding this number will result in a failing
       grade. In any case it is the responsibility of the student to obtain the material covered and
       make up any work missed during an absence. Late arrivals will be accrued at the rate of
       two late arrivals equal one absence.



                                                                                                123
     Merely showing up each class period is not enough, attendance means ready and willing
     to be attentive and productive. Failing to do so will affect grades negatively.

  2. Class assignments follow a problem-solving approach. Prior to each assignment,
     assigned readings from the text will be given and class discussions will be held
     throughout the semester.

  3. Class demonstrations on various procedures, tools and materials will also be given
     throughout the semester.

  4. Critiques will be held at the end of each assignment. Occasionally, midway critiques will be
     held for longer assignments.


GRADING:

  1. Each assignment will be graded after the scheduled critique. A letter grade will be recorded in
     the grade book for larger assignments and a +, √, or – will be recorded for smaller
     assignments. Failure to have artwork finished on time for the scheduled critique will lower
     the student’s grade.

  2. However, if the student wishes to ―redo‖ an assignment after the critique, the assignment
     will need to be completed as soon as possible and turned in for a grade. All ―redos‖ must
     be turned in no later than mid-term time or final time. If a student chooses to ―redo‖ a
     project, it WILL NOT lower his or grade. The grade is lowered only if artwork is not
     finished at the scheduled critique time.

  3. Individual art project grades will be determined by how successfully the student‘s project
     or artwork does the following:
         a) SOLVES THE PARTICULAR PROBLEM OR ASSIGNMENT AS IT WAS
            GIVEN.
         b) Is a unique solution to the assignment or does it look more like a quick solution
            without much involvement or push from the student artist/designer?
         c) Is unified both visually and conceptually.
         d) Is well crafted.

  4. On Wednesday, March 12th a written mid-term will be given. A written final test will be
     given during finals week April 30th-May 6th. These will count as much as a project grade.
     During the class period following the mid-term test, students will meet individually with the
     instructor to view the student‘s portfolio, to give help as needed, and to assign a mid-term
     grade.

  5. The week following mid-terms students will research and write a short paper or give a Power-
     Point presentation on a profession in design, i.e. graphic design, interior design, industrial
     design, architectural design or a contemporary designer. This too will count as much as a
     project grade.


                                                                                                 124
   6. The semester grade will be assigned during finals. STUDENTS WILL TURN IN A
      PORTFOLIO CONTAINING ALL OF THEIR PROJECTS FOR THE SEMESTER
      DURING CLASS ON THE LAST DAY OF CLASSES.


   7. The student‘s semester grade will be based on the following criteria, listed in order of
      importance:
         a) Averaging project grades given throughout the semester.
         b) The mid-term and final tests will count as much as a project grade and will be
             averaged with project grades to determine a mid-term and final grade.
         c) Participation in class discussions and critiques.
         d) Student‘s open-mindedness and willingness to learn.
         e) Written paper or Power Point presentation on professions in design will count as much
             as a project grade.
         f) General improvement throughout the semester.
         g) Completion of all assignments.
         h) Participation during workdays


ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is required in all academic endeavors. Violations of academic honesty include
any instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work, falsifying documents or
academic records, or any other fraudulent activity. Violations of academic honesty may result in
a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the University. When a
student‘s grade has been affected, violation of academic honesty will be reported to the Provost
or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report forms.

Please see the Student Handbook and Calendar for specific activities identified as violations of
this policy and the student due process procedure. This handbook is also available online at
http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf.

AUDITS

Students auditing this course are expected to comply with all course assignments and attendance
requirements. Failure to meet and maintain these course expectations will necessitate dismissal
from class.

DISABILITY

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have
emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the
building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible to discuss
your situation in regard to class requirements and performance.




                                                                                               125
ART120           TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN                         JEANNIE HARMON-MILLER
Office: Potter 103                                                harmon@missouriwestern.edu

TEXT: Design Basics, Latest Edition by David Lauer

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES:

This class is a studio class and part of the Freshman Foundation Program. This class deals with
flat surfaces – meaning surfaces containing length and width, but no depth. In this class students
will study the elements of design, which are sometimes called the tools one works with to create
art. In addition students will study how to compose these elements to create a unified whole or
composition. These are called the principles of design.

The Elements of Design:                                            Principles of Design:

       Color                                                         Unity
       Line                                                          Balance
       Shape                                                         Depth (the illusion)
       Size                                                          Motion (the illusion)
       Space                                                         Proportion & Scale
       Texture                                                       Rhythm
       Contrast

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

   1. ATTENDANCE: In order to improve student learning as well as to achieve compliance
      with federal financial aid policies, Western has a mandatory attendance policy for all 100
      and 200 level courses. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official
      representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the
      faculty/staff supervisor of the event. [The instructor should provide here the policy for
      other forms of excused absences and policies for granting an excused absence.] All other
      absences will be deemed unexcused. The maximum number of unexcused absences
      allowed for this class before the midterm report, March 17 [for Spring 2008] is 5 Thus,
      when you have 6 unexcused absences you will be reported to the Registrar‘s Office, who
      will automatically withdraw you from this class. The Financial Aid Office will reduce
      financial aid as appropriate.


       In accordance with Art Department policies the maximum number of unexcused absences
       allowed for the entire semester is also 5. Exceeding this number will result in a failing
       grade. In any case it is the responsibility of the student to obtain the material covered and
       make up any work missed during an absence. Late arrivals will be accrued at the rate of
       two late arrivals equal one absence.




                                                                                                126
     Merely showing up each class period is not enough, attendance means ready and willing
     to be attentive and productive. Failing to do so will affect grades negatively.

  2. Class assignments follow a problem-solving approach. Prior to each assignment,
     assigned readings from the text will be given and class discussions will be held
     throughout the semester.


  3. Class demonstrations on various procedures, tools and materials will also be given
     throughout the semester.


  4. Critiques will be held at the end of each assignment. Occasionally, midway critiques will be
     held for longer assignments.


GRADING:

  1. Each assignment will be graded after the scheduled critique. A letter grade will be recorded in
     the grade book for larger assignments and a +, √, or – will be recorded for smaller
     assignments. Failure to have artwork finished on time for the scheduled critique will lower
     the student’s grade.


  2. However, if the student wishes to ―redo‖ an assignment after the critique, the assignment
     will need to be completed as soon as possible and turned in for a grade. All ―redos‖ must
     be turned in no later than mid-term time or final time. If a student chooses to ―redo‖ a
     project, it WILL NOT lower his or grade. The grade is lowered only if artwork is not
     finished at the scheduled critique time.


  3. Individual art project grades will be determined by how successfully the student‘s project
     or artwork does the following:
         a. SOLVES THE PARTICULAR PROBLEM OR ASSIGNMENT AS IT WAS
            GIVEN.
         b. Is a unique solution to the assignment or does it look more like a quick solution
            without much involvement or push from the student artist/designer?
         c. Is unified both visually and conceptually.
         d. Is well crafted.


  4. On Wednesday, March 12th a written mid-term will be given. A written final test will be
     given during finals week April 30th-May 6th. These will count as much as a project grade.
     During the class period following the mid-term test, students will meet individually with the
     instructor to view the student‘s portfolio, to give help as needed, and to assign a mid-term
     grade.



                                                                                                 127
   5. The week following mid-terms students will research and write a short paper or give a Power-
      Point presentation on a profession in design, i.e. graphic design, interior design, industrial
      design, architectural design or a contemporary designer. This too will count as much as a
      project grade.


   6. The semester grade will be assigned during finals. STUDENTS WILL TURN IN A
      PORTFOLIO CONTAINING ALL OF THEIR PROJECTS FOR THE SEMESTER
      DURING CLASS ON THE LAST DAY OF CLASSES.


   7. The student‘s semester grade will be based on the following criteria, listed in order of
      importance:
         a. Averaging project grades given throughout the semester.
         b. The mid-term and final tests will count as much as a project grade and will be
             averaged with project grades to determine a mid-term and final grade.
         c. Participation in class discussions and critiques.
         d. Student‘s open-mindedness and willingness to learn.
         e. Written paper or Power Point presentation on professions in design will count as much
             as a project grade.
         f. General improvement throughout the semester.
         g. Completion of all assignments.
         h. Participation during workdays


ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is required in all academic endeavors. Violations of academic honesty include
any instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work, falsifying documents or
academic records, or any other fraudulent activity. Violations of academic honesty may result in
a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the University. When a
student‘s grade has been affected, violation of academic honesty will be reported to the Provost
or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report forms.

Please see the Student Handbook and Calendar for specific activities identified as violations of
this policy and the student due process procedure. This handbook is also available online at
http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf.

AUDITS

Students auditing this course are expected to comply with all course assignments and attendance
requirements. Failure to meet and maintain these course expectations will necessitate dismissal
from class.




                                                                                                 128
DISABILITY

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have
emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in case the
building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible to discuss
your situation in regard to class requirements and performance.




                                                                                           129
                                          MWSU
                ART 300 Elementary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods
                                     Mrs. Diana Wood
                     Office Hours: After class and by appointment only
                            E-mail: Diana.wood@sjsd.k12.mo.us
                           Phone: 816-752-0401 (leave message)

You Are Here




Catalog Description: Current methods and materials for the teaching of art in
the elementary grades; theory and experience with elementary school art projects.
Prerequisite: EED 202 and MUS 101. Elementary education majors may not take this course
until officially admitted to teacher education.

Class Time: 3:30 to 4:50
Room: Potter Hall 210
Required text: Elliot W. Eisner. (2002) The Arts and the Creation of Mind.

Course Purpose: A lecture/ discussion/ studio course designed to acquaint students with art
education content, concepts, art media and processes useful in creating meaningful art activities
for elementary students. This course will focus on the following topics: (1) The GLE‘s in art,
(2) Philosophical approaches to defining art, its role in school, and society, (3) Instructional
methods and materials focusing on learner diversity, (4) Characteristics of artistic growth and
development of children ages 6 to 12, (5) Discipline –based art education, (6) Development of
higher order thinking skills through art, (7)Art assessment, (8) and class room management, Art
materials and student health.

Course Objectives: The student:
    Understands ways of organizing art curricula;
    Apply a philosophy that encompasses art education and life experiences.
    Understands how to develop and implement instructional plans for the teaching of art
      concepts within the elementary curriculum;
    Understands options for delivery of art content across and within grade levels.


                                                                                               130
      Understands art assessment.
      Is experienced in the making of art and a variety of art media.


Course requirements:
    Attendance is essential to achieve the course objectives.
           It is important as a professional to behave accordingly, therefore attendance and
             tardies will influence grades.
    Cell Phones.
           Please turn off all cell phones and pagers during class.
    Read assignments and actively participate in class discussions.
           You will be expected to participate in all activities and class discussions.
    Complete all activities on time.
    Journal entries for each lesson.
           Journal entries will be expected to be completed at the end of each class period.
             These may be checked and graded at random.
    Completion of all quizzes and test

Grading Policy:
Each assignment must be completed on time. Any late projects or papers will receive ½ credit.
You may e-mail me with any questions or drafts of journals or papers before they are due and I
will be happy to read them. If you are gone the day an assignment is due please e-mail the work
on time. Digital photos of art may be e-mailed and then brought in when you return.

Special Needs:
Please inform me as soon as possible of any special needs you may have that might interfere
with your ability to participate fully in this class.

Academic Honesty Policy

Academic honesty is required in this class. Violations of academic honesty include any instance
of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work. Violations of academic honesty may
result in a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the
University. When a student‘s grade has been affected, violations of academic honesty will be
reported to the Provost or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report
form.

Grades:

Grades are based on the following:
725 points are possible in this class.

550-600pts = A; 505-545pts = B; 455-500pts =C

Assignment             #                  Total Points
Journal Entries        25                125 pts


                                                                                              131
Art Projects          10            100 pts
Research Paper        1              50 pts
Class Activities      25            125 pts
Midterm                             100 pts
Final                               100 pts
A portfolio must be complete and turned in for review the day of Finals

Tentative Daily Assignments

Jan 15-        Syllabus, Student information, Read Chapter 1

Jan 17-        Classroom management, Art materials, and student safety and health issues in the
               art room
                      .
Jan 22-        Continuation of discussion on ordering and material safety

Jan 24-        Discuss Chapter 1. Introduction to Art GLE‘s Read chapter 2

Jan 29-        Discuss chapter 2, Bloom‘s Taxonomy and Multiple Intelligences.

Jan 31-        Art Project due, Class activity

Feb 5-         Read chapter 3, Creating objectives and Lesson plan writing

Feb 7-         Art Project due, Class activity

Feb 12-        Discuss chapter 3, Art Criticism, Lesson Plans due

Feb 14-        Art Project due, Class activity, Read chapter 4

Feb 19-        Discuss chapter 4, Philosophical approaches to defining art, its role in schools,
               and society
                      .
Feb 21-        Art Project due, Class activity, read chapter 5

Feb 26-        Discuss chapter 5, Instructional methods, Lesson Plans due

Feb 28-        Art Project due, Class activity

March 4-       Test, DBAE

March 6-       Art Project due, Class activity

March 18-      Discipline based art education, Lesson Plans due

March 20-      Art Project due, Class activity


                                                                                                   132
March 25-      Materials and lesson focusing on learner diversity

March 27-     Art Project due, Class activity

April 1-      Guest speaker

April 3-      Guest speaker

April 6-      Characteristics of artistic growth and development, Research paper assigned

April 10-     Art Project due, Class activity

April 15-     Lesson Plans due

April 17-     Art Project due, Class activity

April 22-     Research Paper due and presented

April 24-     Presentations

Final May 1 at 2:00 – 3:50




                                                                                            133
                       MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
                      COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
                        ART335: ART THEORY AND CRITICISM
                         PHL335: AESTHETICS AND THE ARTS
                                  J. Mikkelsen, Ph. D.
                                       Fall 2007

Texts


     1. Elkins, James. What Happened to Art Criticism? Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press,
        2003.
     2. Barrett, Terry. Why Is That Art? Aesthetics and Criticism of Contemporary Art. New
        York & Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
     3. Tucker, Amy. Visual Literacy: Writing about Art. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher
        Education, 2002.


Contact information
     Office location: Poppelwell 115D;
     Office hours: MWF 9-10 a.m.; T/Th 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., or by appointment;
     Campus phone = x4530
     Campus e-mail = <mikkelsen>.

LAS writing focus course guidelines

1.      Writing should be an integral, on-going part of the course. Writing assignments should be
     due on virtually every day of the semester. Each exam should require writing.

2.      Students will be given details instructions to ensure that they adequately complete all
     written assignments and to introduce the manner in which professionals in both art theory
     and criticism and in philosophical aesthetics write.

3.      A substantial percentage of course activity, both in-class and out-of-class, should be
     devoted to writing.

4.      A substantial and clearly defined part of the course grade should be based on writing
     assignments, including the production of fully completed papers in clear, correct, well-
     organized prose.

5.      Enrollment in these classes will be limited to 25 students to provide the instructor ample
     opportunity to provide each student individualized instruction.

6.      The entire responsibility for instruction, supervision, and evaluation of student work rests
     with the instructor. No such work shall be delegated to anyone else.

7.      The course should assist students in expressing themselves in writing and to develop the

                                                                                                  134
      writing skills that will aid them in other upper-level courses that require written work as well
      as prepare them for graduate work and/or their professional careers.

8.       Writing assignments shall include both informal and ungraded writing. Credit for such
      assignments may, however, be given for timely submission—and students who do not
      submit ungraded writing assignments on time may be penalized for their failure to do so.

9.       Major, longer writing assignments should be broken down into stages of writing. The
      feedback that students receive on ungraded writing assignments, including drafts of longer
      writing assignments, are intended to help them do better on the major, longer assignments.

10.       Students should understand that any act of plagiarism may result in a grade of zero for
      that assignment and possibly failure in the course. Students will also learn how and when it
      is appropriate to incorporate the work of others into their writing and how to document
      properly the use of other sources.

Student evaluation
The final grade in the course will be based upon the following point system, which has been
developed in conformity with the guidelines for LAS writing focus courses listed on the previous
page (see below for preliminary information on each of the writing assignments): Writings
Assignments 1, 3, 4 & 5 (10 pts. each X 4=40 pts.); Writing Assignment 2 (3 pts./ journal entry +
3 pts. for timely submission of all entries = 21 pts.); Writing Assignment 6 (60 pts.); Writing
Assignment 7 (90 pts.); Writing Assignment 8 (40 pts.); Mid-term exam (80 pts.); Final exam
(70 pts.). The total points for the course are thus 401. To earn an ―A‖ in the course, you must,
therefore, earn at least 360 pts., to earn a ―B‖ in the course you must earn at least 320 pts., etc.
Writing assignments
• Writing Assignment 1
Critical review of What Happened to Art Criticism? (3-5 pages)
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 12 noon, Sun., Sept. 9

• Writing Assignment 2(1-6)
6 journal entries (1-3 pages each)
See Visual Literacy, Chp. 1– Responding to Art: Visual Literacy and the Practice of Writing, pp.
2-24
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 2 p.m. weekly from Sun., Sept. 16 through Sun., Oct. 21

• Writing Assignment 3
Critical review of the Bloch building addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum (3-5 pages)
See Visual Literacy, Chp. 3 – On Site: Art and Architecture in Social Contexts, pp. 59-90
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 2 p.m., Tues, Sept. 25

• Writing Assignment 4


                                                                                                  135
Critical review of a gallery exhibition (3-5 pages)
See Visual Literacy, Chp. 4 – The Museum as Context, pp. 91-113
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 2 p.m., Sun., Oct. 7

• Writing Assignment 5
Formal analysis of a work of art (3-5 pages)
See Visual Literacy, Chp. 2 – ―Intelligent Seeing‖: Description and Analysis of Forms, pp. 25-58
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 2 p.m., Sun., Oct. 21

• Writing Assignment 6
Revise Writing Assignment 3, 4, or 5
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 2 p.m., Sun., Nov. 4

• Writing Assignment 7
Critical analysis or philosophical research paper
See, e.g., Visual Literacy, Chp. 10 – Critical Perspectives: On Women of Algiers in Their
Apartment, p. 210-263
Further details provided in class.
First draft due @ 12 noon, Sun., Nov. 25
Final draft due @ 12 noon, Sat., Dec. 15

• Writing Assignment 8
Revise Writing Assignment 1 (5 pg. minimum)
Further details provided in class.
Due date: 12 noon, Sat., Dec. 15

Course schedule
The following course schedule, like most course schedules, is subject to change, but every effort
will be made to limit the number of changes. Changes, when necessary, will be discussed and
announced in class. Students should assume, unless informed otherwise, that the readings and
assignments listed on this schedule are due on the date listed. Additional readings–some of
which may be required and some of which may be optional–will likely also be assigned at
various points throughout the semester, but the course will focus mainly on readings from the
required texts.
Date
Week 1
(1) Aug. 27 (M)           Course introduction
(2) Aug. 29 (W)           What Happened to Art Criticism? 1, pp. 1-13
(3) Aug. 31 (F)           What Happened to Art Criticism? 2, pp. 15-53




                                                                                              136
 Week 2
Sept. 3 (M)               Labor Day (no classes)
(4) Sept. 5 (W)           What Happened to Art Criticism? 3-4, pp. 55-86
(5) Sept. 7 (F)           Continued
● 12 noon, Sept. 9 (Su)   Writing Assignment 1

Week 3 (6) Sept. 10 (M) Why Is That Art? 1. Artworlds and Definitions: How That
                        Became Art, pp. 1-15; Visual Literacy, Chp. 1– Responding to
                        Art: Visual Literacy and the Practice of Writing, pp. 2-24
(7) Sept. 12 (W)        Continued
(8) Sept. 14 (F)        Continued
● 2 p.m., Sept. 16 (Su) Writing Assignment 2(1)

Week 4(9) Sept. 17 (M)    Why Is That Art? 2. Realism: Art is Realistic, Truthful, and
                          Beautiful, pp. 16-55; Visual Literacy, Chp. 3 – On Site: Art and
                          Architecture in Social Contexts, pp. 59-90
(10) Sept. 19 (W)         Continued
(11) Sept. 21 (F)         Continued
● 2 p.m., Sept. 23 (Su)   Writing Assignment 2(2)

 Week 5
(12) Sept. 24 (M)         Continued
● 2 p.m., Sept. 25, (T)   Writing Assignment 3
(13) Sept. 26 (W)         Why Is That Art? 3. Expressionism and Cognitivism: Art Shows
                          Feelings, Communicates Thoughts, and Provides Knowledge, pp. 56
                          105; Visual Literacy, Chp. 4 – The Museum as Context, pp. 91-113
(14) Sept. 28 (F)         Continued
● 2 p.m., Sept. 30 (Su)   Writing Assignment 2(3)

 Week 6
(15) Oct. 1 (M)           Continued
(16) Oct. 3 (W)           Continued
(17) Oct. 5 (F)           Continued
● 2 p.m., Oct. 7 (Su)     Writing Assignment 2(4) & Writing Assignment 4

 Week 7
(18) Oct. 8 (M)           Why Is That Art? (4. Formalism: Art is Significant Form, pp.
                          106- 145)
(19) Oct. 10 (W)          Continued
Oct. 12 (F)               Mid-term break (no classes)
● 2 p.m., Oct. 14 (Su)    Writing Assignment 2(5)

 Week 8
(20) Oct. 15 (M)          Continued
(21) Oct. 17 (W) *        Continued
(22) Oct. 19 (F)          Continued
● 2 p.m., Oct. 21 (Su)    Writing Assignment 2(6) & Writing Assignment 5

                                                                                             137
Week 9
(23) Oct. 22 (M)          Mid-term exam
(24) Oct. 24 (W)          Why Is That Art? (5. Postmodern Pluralism: Art Destabilizes the
                             Good, the True, the Beautiful, and the Self, pp. 146-203)
(25) Oct. 26 (F)          Continued

Week 10
(26) Oct. 29 (M)          Continued
(27) Oct. 31 (W)          Continued
(28) Nov. 2 (F)           Continued
● 2 p.m., Nov. 4 (Su)     Writing Assignment 6

Week 11
(29) Nov. 5 (M)           Why Is That Art? (6. Conclusion, pp. 204-212); Visual Literacy, Chp.
                             10 – Critical Perspectives: On Women of Algiers in Their
                             Apartment by Eugene Delacroix, pp. 210-263
(30) Nov. 7 (W)           Continued
(31) Nov. 9 (F)           Continued

 Week 12
(32) Nov. 12 (M)          Continued
(33) Nov. 14 (W)          Continued
(34) Nov. 16 (F)          Continued
(35) Nov. 19 (M)          Continued
Nov. 21-25 (W-Su)         Thanksgiving vacation (no classes)
● 12 noon, Nov. 25 (Su)   First draft of Writing Assignment 7

 Week 13(36) Nov. 26 (M)               TBA
(37) Nov. 28 (W)        TBA
(38) Nov. 30 (F)        TBA

 Week 14
(39) Dec. 3 (M)           TBA
(40) Dec. 5 (W)           TBA
(41) Dec. 7 (F)           TBA

 Final exams period
(42) Dec. 12 (W)          Final exam (11:30 a.m.– 1:20 p.m.)
● 12 noon, Dec. 15 (Sa)   Final draft of Writing Assignment 7 & Writing Assignment 8

2 p.m., Dec. 18 (T) Final grades due




                                                                                            138
ART 339, 340 & 440
Printmaking I, II & III
Spring 2008
Geo Sipp, Professor – e-mail: sipp@missouriwestern.edu
Office Hours: M, W, F 7:00 – 9:00; T, TH 8:00 – 9:30

Objectives:

Printmaking intrinsically concerns itself with the development of imagery. From a conceptual
perspective, imagery is the language of thought, philosophy and visual sensibilities that links the
works of one person together. The emphasis of this course is on imagery and its development
through the various techniques that may be applied in the printmaking process. We will also be
looking at the cultural influence on printmaking as well as individual printmakers from around the world.

This semester, the focus of the course will be on the development of technical skills as applied to
the Intaglio print. Among the techniques you will learn and apply to your images will be:
aquatint, soft-ground, sugar-lift and spit-bite. Each of these processes will enable you to be more
expressive with your images by allowing you to create a more complex and richly developed
print.

Making a print is not an ―instant gratification‖ process. The development of imagery is the result
of a deliberate and sequenced staging of processes. It takes a great deal of effort to achieve the
balance of line and tonalities that give a print its rich appeal. You must be persistent and patient;
moreover, you will need at least 9 hours a week of studio time outside of class to adequately
address the issue of time.

Grading and Attendance:

Attendance is mandatory. Instruction and lectures are critical, since printmaking is a highly
technical art form. Two or more unexcused absences constitutes the lowering of a student’s
grade by one full point – i.e., from A to B. Entering class late or leaving early will also affect a
student‘s grade. Six absences or more constitute an automatic F. Students will be expected to
be present and working in the studio as needed to complete assignments. There is not enough
time in class to meet the demands required for satisfactory completion of projects. Manage
your time. A point scale of a maximum 10/10 will define grading. The first number is for image
development; the second number is for technique. The total grade is based on portfolio, attitude,
participation and studio work ethic. The Shop Policy is that each student has a responsibility to
other students to keep the shop clean and safe. This means students will thoroughly clean up
after themselves and follow safety guidelines. If the shop is a mess, you will spend time the
following class period cleaning the printing area.




                                                                                                      139
Wear gloves through all stages of etching plates in acid, inking and printing. When preparing
paper and using the press and blankets, put on a clean pair of gloves.

Assignments:

There will be five editions with no fewer than five prints in each edition. Each edition must be
presented clean and free from ink smudges or tears. Each print must have a border of a minimum
of two inches on the top and sides and two and a half inches on the bottom. The prints must be
titled, signed and numbered in pencil. When presented at the end of critiques, the prints must be
slip-sheeted between glassine, which is to be cut to the same size as the print paper.

Assignment 1: Print must have elements of aquatint to suggest the layering and the
enhancement of tonality.

Assignment 2: Soft-ground. Soft-ground is done on a plate that has a thin ground applied to it.
This ground never really hardens; therefore a line or texture can be impressed into it. A line
similar to a pencil mark can be achieved by drawing on top of a textured tracing paper placed
over the soft-ground. The texture will be picked up and the resulting line can be etched with acid.
Fabric, cloth, leaves and other material can be pressed into the ground, and when etched and
printed, their textures are faithfully replicated.

Assignment 3: Sugar-lift. This method offers a free form and expressive method to mark making
in your prints. A brush, rag, pen, etc… is used with a water-soluble material to paint directly
onto the plate. When the drawing is dry, a thin coat of hard ground is applied over the surface of
the plate. When the ground is thoroughly dry, the plate is immersed in a tepid water bath and the
drawn areas lift off the plate, exposing the bare negative areas on the plate. These open areas can
be bitten in acid or aquatinted and bitten.

Assignment 4: Spit-bite. We use a solution of Gum Arabic and nitric acid to create a solution to
direct etch onto the plate. The plate must be given an even tone of aquatint, either with spray
paint or powdered rosin that has been fused to the plate. Paint with the solution directly on the
plate and leave on the plate for at least thirty minutes. Do not allow the solution to dry on the
plate; keep replenishing the solution. This method creates delicate wash effects, with soft, graded
edges.

Assignment 5: Multiple Techniques -The final assignment will involve working with at least
three of the five techniques used in previous assignments.




Materials:

                                                                                                140
   1.   Bone Black Etching Ink
   2.   Etching Needle
   3.   Scraper
   4.   Burnisher
   5.   Zinc Plates
   6.   Paper – Rives BFK or Stonehenge
   7.   Mineral Spirits
   8.   Disposable Gloves


I stock most of the required materials.




                                          141
                                          MWSU
                 ART 350 Secondary Art Teaching: Philosophy and Methods
                                     Mrs. Diana Wood
                     Office Hours: After class and by appointment only
                            E-mail: Diana.wood@sjsd.k12.mo.us
                           Phone: 816-752-0401 (leave message)

YOU ARE HERE




Catalog Description: Teaching methodologies and materials for the secondary art teacher;
design of appropriate art learning experiences for the adolescent.

Prerequisite: Art 300

Class Time: 3:30 to 4:50
Room: Potter Hall 210
Required text: Elliot W. Eisner. (2002) The Arts and the Creation of Mind.

Course Purpose: A lecture/ discussion/ studio course designed to acquaint students with art
education content, concepts, art media and processes useful in creating appropriate art learning
for the secondary art student. This course will focus on the following topics: (1) The GLE‘s in
art, (2) Philosophical approaches to defining art, its role in school, and society, (3)Art shows and
careers (4) AP art education curriculum, (5) Lesson Planning (6) Development of higher order
thinking skills through art, (7)Art assessment, (8) and class room management, Art materials and
student health.

Course Objectives: The student:
    Understands ways of organizing art curricula;
    Apply a philosophy that encompasses art education and life experiences.
    Understands how to develop and implement instructional plans for the teaching of art
      concepts within the secondary curriculum;
    Understands the importance of educating students on career choices.
    Understands art assessment.




                                                                                                 142
Course requirements:
   1. Attendance is essential to achieve the course objectives.
      It is important as a professional to behave accordingly, therefore attendance and tardies
      will influence grades.
   2. Cell Phones.
      Please turn off all cell phones and pagers during class.
   3. Read assignments and actively participate in class discussions.
      You will be expected to participate in all activities and class discussions.
   4. Complete all activities on time.
   5. Journal entries for each lesson.
      Journal entries will be expected to be completed at the end of each class period. These
      may be checked and graded at random.
   6. Completion of all quizzes and test.

Grading Policy:
Each assignment must be completed on time. Any late projects or papers will receive ½ credit.
You may e-mail me with any questions or drafts of journals or papers before they are due and I
will be happy to read them.

Special Needs:
Please inform me as soon as possible of any special needs you may have that might interfere
with your ability to participate fully in this class.

Academic Honesty Policy
Academic honesty is required in this class. Violations of academic honesty include any instance
of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work. Violations of academic honesty may
result in a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the
University. When a student‘s grade has been affected, violations of academic honesty will be
reported to the Provost or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report
form.

Grades:
Grades are based on the following:
725 points are possible in this class.

550-600pts = A; 505-545pts = B; 455-500pts =C

Assignment            #   Total Points
Journal Entries      25    125 pts
Art Projects         10     100 pts
Research Paper        1     50 pts
Class Activities      25     125 pts
Midterm                     100 pts
Final                        100 pts
A portfolio must be complete and turned in for review the day of Finals



                                                                                              143
Tentative Daily Assignments

Jan 15-            Syllabus, Student information

Jan 17-            Classroom management, Art materials, and student safety and
                   health issues in the art room.

Jan 22-            Continuation of supply preparations

Jan 24-            Incorporating Art GLE‘s in the lesson plan.

Jan 29-            Bloom‘s Taxonomy and Multiple Intelligences.

Jan 31-            Write meaningful Objectives

Feb 5-             Creating objectives and Lesson plan writing

Feb 7-             Art Project due, Class activity

Feb 12-            Art Criticism and group critics, Lesson Plans due

Feb 14-            Art Project due, Class activity

Feb 19-            Creating units

Feb 21-            Art Project due, Class activity

Feb 26-            Lesson Plans due sharing and comparing

Feb 28-            Art Project due, Class activity

March 4-           Test, AP Art

March 6-           Art Project due, Class activity

March 18-          Art history, Lesson Plans due

March 20-          Art Project due, Class activity

March 25-          Materials and lesson focusing on learner diversity

March 27-          Art Project due, Class activity

April 1-           Guest speaker

April 3-           Guest speaker


                                                                                 144
April 6-             Characteristics of artistic growth and development, Research
                     paper assigned

April 10-            Art Project due, Class activity

April 15-            Lesson Plans due

April 17-            Art Project due, Class activity

April 22-            Research Paper due and presented

April 24-            Presentations

Final May 1 at 2:00 – 3:50




                                                                                    145
                        MISSOURI WESTERN STATE COLLEGE
                              DEPARTMENT OF ART
                                  Dr. Allison Sauls

                         ART 356 American Art: Columbus to 1865
                             Section 01 12:00 – 12:50 MWF
                    Dr. Thompson E. Potter Fine Arts Center Room 107

COURSE DESCRIPTION

ART 356 presents an overview of the major cultural movements and influences on the
development of art history from the beginning of European contact in the New World to the
close of the Civil War. Where indicated, individual artists and movements will be discussed.
Although this is primarily a slide lecture course, class participation and discussion is
STRONGLY encouraged.

OBJECTIVES

   1. To analyze and compare the major styles and periods in art from European contact in the
      New World to the close of the Civil War.

   2. To identify and discuss the importance of major artifacts and their contribution to the
      development of art from European contact in the New World to the close of the Civil
      War.

   3. To identify specific artists where applicable and determine their role in the history of art.

   4. To determine the significance of art in cultural development and the importance of these
      objects in the study of man.

TEXT

American Art: History and Culture. Wayne Craven, Brown and Benchmark Publishers,
Madison, WI, 1994.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS

   1. Class participation and Attendance. Class attendance is mandatory and roll will be taken
      daily. A portion of the final evaluation will be based on attendance and participation.
      Over three unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your grade.

   2. Written Exams. Up to three exams may be given. The exams will consist of (but not be
      limited to) a combination of four main components including: 1. Glossary; 2. Slide
      identification; 3. Essay Question(s); 4. Slide comparison. The material to be tested will
      come from Craven‘s text as well as lectures. Slide identification will be restricted to
      images appearing in American Art History and Culture and slides held for review in the



                                                                                                146
     departmental slide case unless otherwise noted. A study guide for each period covered
     will be provided.

  3. Final Exam. The final exam will be comprehensive and count slightly more than the
     other exams. The final exam is scheduled for Wednesday, December 15th, 11:30 am –
     1:20 pm. (Check time and date when final schedule is published again in the Spring.)

  4. Presentations. A student presentation will be given during class time before the end of
     the semester. Students will be expected to lecture on a topic approved by Dr. Sauls. The
     presentation should be scholarly and accompanied by appropriate slides or AV materials.
     Students will have the entire class period to present their thesis. A typed
     BIBLIOGRAPHY must be turned in before final grades are distributed. An
     incomplete will be given until the bibliography is submitted.



POLICIES

  1. Absences and Make-up Work. Exams and reports are due when scheduled. If a conflict
     occurs, prior arrangement may be made with Dr. Sauls before the scheduled date.
     Emergencies which preclude the taking of an exam or the submission of a paper must be
     bro8ught to the attention of the professor by telephoning 387-8159 or by leaving a
     message with the department secretary, Mrs. Noland, 271-4282. Except for genuine,
     documented emergency, no make-up work will be given or accepted. This includes
     presentations and bibliographies.

  2. Students with disabilities. Any Student in this course who has a disability that prevents
     the fullest expression of abilities should contact me personally as soon as possible so that
     we can discuss class requirements.

  3. Office Hours:

     M, W, F 10:00 – 11:30 am
     Tu, Th 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
     (or by appointment)

     Class begins promptly at noon.




                                                                                              147
                       MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
                              DEPARTMENT OF ART

                                        Dr. Allison Sauls


ART 357 Section 01                                                    American Art Since 1865
12:00 – 12:50 MWF                                                            107 Potter Hall

COURSE DESCRIPTION
ART 357 presents an overview of the major cultural movements, ethnic diversity and influences
on the development of American art history from 1865 to the present. Where indicated,
individual artists and movements will be discussed. This course relies heavily on slide lecture by
Dr. Sauls, presentations or panel discussion by students as well as classes devoted to discussions
of theory, criticism and current issues in the art world. Class participation and discussion is
mandatory.

OBJECTIVES
  1. To analyze and compare the major styles and periods in American art from 1865 to
     present.

   2. To identify and discuss the importance of major American artists, works and issues.

   3. To assess their contribution to the development of American art from 1865 to present.

   4. To determine the significance of American art in cultural development and importance of
      object in the study of man.

   5. To foster a desire on the part of the student toward true inquiry and sharpen research
      skills.

TEXT
  Wayne Craven, American Art: History and Culture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

   1. Class participation and Attendance. Class attendance is mandatory and roll will be taken
      daily. A portion of the final evaluation will be based on attendance and participation.
      Over three unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your grade.

   2. Presentations and Panels. Individual presentation or a group panel discussion will be
      delivered during class time before the end of the semester. The presentation or panel
      discussion should be scholarly and may be accompanied by appropriate slides, AV
      material or appropriate handout. Students will have the entire class period to present
      their thesis. A typed BIBLIOGRAPHY for either the presentation or panel
      discussion must be turned in before final grades are given.


                                                                                               148
   3. Fabulous Fridays. Each Friday will be devoted to a group discussion taken from articles
      from current art journals. Each Friday we will meet in the conference room and discuss
      current issues as well as contemporary events in the art world.

   4. Final Exam. The final exam will be comprehensive and count slightly more than the
      other exams. The final exam is scheduled for Wednesday, May 4th, 11:30 am – 1:20 pm.
      (Check time and date when final schedule is published again in the spring.)


POLICIES

   1.              Absences and Make-up Work. Exams and reports are due when scheduled. If
        a conflict occurs, prior arrangement may be made with Dr. Sauls before the scheduled
        date. Emergencies which preclude the taking of an exam or the presentation of material
        must be brought to the attention of the professor by telephoning 387-8159 or by leaving a
        message with the department administrative assistant, Mrs. Patten 271-4282. Except for
        genuine, documented emergency, no make-up work will be given or accepted. This
        includes presentations and Fabulous Friday schedules.

   2.             Students with disabilities. Any Student in this course who has a disability that
        prevents the fullest expression of abilities should contact me personally as soon as
        possible so that we can discuss class requirements.

                                         Office Hours:
                                  M, W, F       10:00 – 11:30 am
                              Tu, Th          10:00 am – 1:00 pm
                                       (or by appointment)

Class begins promptly at noon.




                                                                                               149
ART359 – Spring 2008     PHOTOMEDIA I                        J. HARMON-MILLER
 Office Hours: Monday, Wednesday 9-10 & 3-4           Friday: 9-10 Tuesday, Thursday: 9-9:30


TEXT: A Short Course in Photography by Barbara London & Jim Stone

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES:
This class is designed to acquaint the student with basic principles of traditional black and white
photography as well as introduction to digital imagery. The student will be expected to visually
demonstrate an understanding of the following fundamentals in photography.
1. The anatomy and workings of a 35mm camera and a digital camera.
2   Various types of film and paper
3. Darkroom procedures including film development, print enlargement, print finish and print
   presentation.
4. Personal development of image selection and composition.
5. After mid-term time, students will be introduced to digital imagery. Each student will learn
   how to shoot with a digital camera and print pictures. In addition they will learn how to scan
   photos and negatives and alter images. At least one assignment needs to be completed using
   the digital process. From thereafter, the student may elect to work traditional or digitally for
   the rest of the semester.
6. Introduction to a brief history of photography and contemporary photographers or give a
   brief Power Point to the class.
7. Students will select one contemporary photographer and write a brief paper or give a short
   Power Point presentation about the photographer. background, philosophy and photographs.
   This research assignment is due after mid-term time.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1. Attendance is required. More than THREE absences will lower the student‘s grade: Two
   tardies equal an absence.
2. Class assignments will be made throughout the semester and discussed in class. Failure to
   turn in these assignments on time will lower the student‘s grade.
3. Assigned readings from the text and handouts will be given throughout the semester.
4. THE ART DEPARTMENT HAS A POLICY WHICH STATES THAT IF A
   STUDENT ACQUIRES MORE THAN SIX ABSENCES DURING THE SEMESTER,
   HE OR SHE WILL AUTOMATICALLY FAIL THE COURSE.




                                                                                                150
GRADING:
1. No grade will be recorded in the grade book until mid-term time. At that scheduled time the
   student will meet individually with the instructor to view the student‘s work, to give help as
   needed, and to assign a grade.

   The student should bring the following to mid-term critiques: Monday, March 3 or
   Friday, March 7.

                   A notebook containing all negatives and contact sheets.
                   All working prints.
                   At least one finished print, meaning one containing a total range of
                    values, one that has no dust spots or chemical spots and one that has been
                    mounted and/or matted.


2. On the last day of photo class students will turn in their FINAL Photography Portfolio.
   If the portfolio is turned in late, it will be downgraded. The portfolio should contain the
   following:
   a. At least 16 36-exposure contact sheets + negatives (needed to pass the course). OR if
      students choose to work digitally the second half of the semester, they should turn in at
      least 8 contact sheets and negatives (288 images) plus at least another 288 images on a
      CD (or any combination of the two as long as a total of 576 pictures are taken.)
   b. The student selects 20 of their best, finished prints (no more than 20).
       Best meaning:
       1. Images they find visually pleasing and intriguing.
       2. Images with good values. Meaning a range of grays plus black & white plus strong
          tonal qualities in color if the student chooses to work digitally.
       3. No chemical spots or stains or printing defects.
       4. No dust or water spots.
       5. Images are in focus (if intended).
   c. Of those 20 prints, at least 5 should be matted and/or mounted.
   d. Written comments about their photo portfolio‘s strengths and weaknesses.
Also at that time or before, students will return all Art Department photo equipment.
Students will be charged for photo equipment not returned and their grade will be held.
During the scheduled final time the class will view and critique all the portfolios. Students
will discuss what they consider their portfolios’ strengths and weaknesses to be.




                                                                                              151
I will determine the student‘s semester grade after reviewing their portfolios and written
comments. Therefore, portfolios will be returned sometime after the scheduled final time.



The instructor will select one print from the 20 to keep in the All Student Photo Portfolio.
This is done in exchange for the photo chemicals provided by the department.




                                                                                               152
ART 369, 370 & 470

Painting 1, 2 & 3
Geo Sipp, Professor; sipp@missouriwestern.edu
Office Hours: M, W, F 7:00-8:00; T, TH 7:00-9:00
Spring 2008

Course Objectives:
The program in painting will offer a firm foundation in the discipline, emphasizing the technical
and visual aspects of materials and techniques. Students will gain an understanding of the
medium and strengthen their skills through the study of color, shape, space, texture and the
physical qualities of the paint. We will also look at different methods of painting employed by
various cultures and diversity groups and determine how the practices of other peoples impact
our understanding of the craft.
Assignments will focus on conceptual problems including figuration and abstraction. Critiques
and lectures will support the work being done in the studio.
At the 400 level, the emphasis shifts towards the development of a personal aesthetic. The
students develop a personal visual vocabulary and iconography that has continuity. Because it is
common at this level for students to find themselves dealing with issues and images that do not
adhere to traditional painting methodologies, there will be strong support towards merging studio
disciplines.

Grading and Attendance:
Attendance is mandatory. Two unexcused absences or more will constitute the lowering of a
student’s grade by one full point, i.e., from A to B. Arriving late or leaving early from class
will also affect a student‘s grade. Six or more absences constitute an automatic F. Please
contact me if you have a conflict that necessitates an absence. Grading art is subjective and I
base much of my interpretation of performance by your commitment to the studio. You need to
be in the studio well beyond the allotted class time. I expect students to be thoroughly prepared
to discuss work.
Critiques will be frequent, as they allow for a free exchange of ideas. I will ask questions of
students as to their intent and decision-making processes while a painting is in progress.
The experience of painting is one of developing a visual aesthetic and syntax. Towards that end,
students must be aware of the history of art, and how world events influenced artists‘ work. Part
of an artist‘s responsibility is to well – read and well – informed. An artist documents a position
in time and puts that documentation before an audience. The response of the viewer completes
the circuit of the art‘s performance. There will be weekly assigned readings. You will be asked
to comment on work and interpret paintings through brief essays; we‘ll also view artwork.
Students are expected to participate in discussions and to be cogent in their analysis.




                                                                                                  153
Painting is a highly individual discipline. A style and technique evolves through repetition and
comfort with the medium. While I make every effort to look at and discuss each student‘s work
during studio, the size of the class makes it difficult to devote specific instruction to students on
an individual basis. Therefore, if a student needs assistance it is incumbent on the student to
schedule an appointment during office hours.




                                                                                                   154
ART 379                                     SCULPTURE I                    SYLLABUS
JIM ESTES

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

     ART 379: Beginning Sculpture (3 credit hours). Basic Foundations in Sculpture;
     Theory, Techniques, materials and Processes. 5 studio hours. Prerequisites: ART 130,
     170.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. To introduce to the student techniques required in the fabrication of sculpture.
     Techniques to be covered include: Modeling, Mold making, Casting, Carving, Wood
     construction and Finishing, etc.

  2. To develop the conceptual skills of the Beginning Sculpture student so the designing and
     fabrication of their work is at its highest possible level.

  3. To make the student more acutely aware of sculpture as it relates to contemporary
     movements in art, divers ethnic populations and different cultures.

  4. To encourage critical dialog in class and individual critiques.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

  A. Assignment in modeling, mold making and casting: A three-week problem involving the
     modeling of a head study, making a piece mold and ultimately the casting of this work in
     clay slip. Topics to be covered include: clays, armatures, modeling techniques, mold
     making procedures, casting procedures and finishing techniques. Critique at conclusion
     of problem.

  B. Assignment in: (1) Carving: A three-week assignment dealing with the problems and
     techniques associated with various carving materials. The assignment may be fulfilled by
     the carving of a sculpture piece in wood, stone, cast stone materials, etc. Techniques
     presented include: lamination of wood, casting carving materials, power and hand tools
     for carving. Critique at conclusion of assignment.

  C. (2) Welding: A three-week assignment dealing with fabrication and welding of a metal
     sculpture piece. Welding may be done with arc, acetylene or wire feed welder.
     Demonstration of these welding tools and other metal working equipment will be given
     as needed. Topics that may be covered are: metal cutting, brazing, finishing, etc.
     Critique at the end of assignment.




                                                                                          155
   D. Assignment in the construction of an outdoor sculpture piece: This three-week
      assignment may be done either individually or in pairs. This work shall be developed
      through drawings and/or maquettes and discussed extensively with peers and the
      instructor. Materials and scale are unlimited however, cost factors, exhibition space etc.
      must be reasonably considered. Critique at conclusion of problem.

   E. Assignment in Assemblage: A three to four-week assignment in fabricating a sculpture
      piece. This problem may be fulfilled by the construction of a work that utilized a number
      of shapes, objects, parts, etc. that must be joined together to complete the final work. The
      techniques covered may vary considerably according to the student‘s choice of materials,
      i.e. wood, metal, stone, cloth, etc. Critique at conclusion of problem.

   F. Bronze Casting Assignment: A three-week assignment in the casting of a bronze
      sculpture piece. This problem will require the making of a ―wax‖ original (12‖
      maximum) investing this wax work, burnout of investment, clean up and patina. As in
      the other assignments, the ideas for this work are to be developed through
      drawings/maquettes and discussed extensively with the instructor. Cost for the bronze
      and wax are the responsibility of the student who will pay for the final cast work. This
      work is to be presented at the class final along with a one-page typed paper describing the
      concepts involved and expressed in this work.

   G. Mid-Term & Final Reports (5+5): 10 contemporary sculptors: One-page per artist
      detailing the concepts and philosophy embodied in their works and life. Each report shall
      be accompanied by a photocopy of one of their most significant works.

GRADES

 Grades will be given for each assignment with these five assignments (A – E) making up 80% of
the final grade, the additional 20% will be determined by the student‘s attendance, work habits,
individual progress and receptiveness. Projects and assignments handed in late or unfinished
will not be given full credit for that assignment. These five assignments have a degree of
complexity by their very nature, therefore, considerable extra time and effort must be given to
these projects outside our scheduled class time

ATTENDANCE:

Because of the complexity of our assignments, I expect you to attend class each day. I consider
excess absences a sign of a lack of interest and desire within the student. Because of this, the
student‘s grade may be subject to drop a full letter grade after 3 absences and a total of 5
absences will necessitate a FAILING GRADE for the course.

TEXT: Sculpture Since 1945 by Edward Lucie-Smith
      (Art Department will supply a limited number of texts)



                                                                                              156
SUPPLIES

  1. TOOL BOX: Pliers, screwdrivers, utility knife, tape measure, hammer, pencil, assorted
     nails, screws, etc.

                                    (Required by second week of class)

  2. NOTEBOOK: A notebook will be given out on the first day of class. All handouts,
     papers, artist write-ups, etc. are to be kept in this notebook which will be turned in at
     final.

  3. SKETCH PAD: (Required)



CLASSROOM GUIDELINES:



  1. ABSOLUTELY NO TOOLS ARE TO BE TAKEN FROM THIS STUDIO WITHOUT
     FACULTY APPROVAL!

  2. THIS STUDIO IS NOT TO BE USED AS A STOREROOM FOR MATERIALS OR
     PROJECTS!

  3. CLEAN UP ANY MESS YOU MAY HAVE MADE AND RETURN ALL TOOLS TO THEIR
     PROPER PLACE AT THE CONCLUSION OF YOUR WORK IN THIS STUDIO
     (DAILY)!

  4. DO NOT USE ANY TOOLS IN THIS STUDIO WITHOUT PRIOR CONSENT OF
     INSTRUCTOR!

  5. PERSONAL STEREOS/HEADPHONES, ETC. ARE NOT ALLOWED DURING
     CLASSROOM SESSIONS!

AUDITING:

     Students auditing this course are expected to comply with all course assignments and
     attendance requirements. Failure to meet and maintain these course expectations will
     necessitate dismissal from class.



CLASS RESPONSIBILITIES:




                                                                                                 157
     The student is held responsible for all lectures, demonstrations, discussions, reading
     assignments, etc. throughout the course. If you miss anything, it is YOUR responsibility
     to find out what it is and correct the situation.

DISABILITY:

     If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, if you have
     emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need special arrangements in
     case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as
     possible to discuss your situation in regard to class requirements and performance.

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY:

     Since honesty in the course is required, cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing
     false information to the instructor and or college constitutes a violation. Where
     applicable, a grade of zero may be assessed in the area that has been violated. This may
     affect your final grade.




THE SCHEDULE(S) AND PROCEDURES IN THIS COURSE ARE SUBJECT TO

              CHANGE AT THE DISCRETION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.




                                                                                           158
                         MISSOURI WESTERN STATE COLLEGE

                                   DEPARTMENT OF ART
                                        Fall 2007

ART 456 01                            Dr. Allison Sauls            Art in the Age of Modernity
                                        107Potter Hall



COURSE DESCRIPTION
Art 456 presents an overview of the major cultural movements and influences on the
development of art history from the traditional salon of the mid-1800s to the period between the
great World Wars. Where indicated, individual artists and movements will be discussed. This
course will be divided roughly into three parts: lecture by Dr. Sauls, student presentations and
discussion of handouts and printed materials. Class participation and discussion is mandatory.

OBJECTIVES
  1. To analyze and compare the major styles and periods in art from the traditional salon of
     the mid-1800s to the period between the great World Wars.
   2. To identify and discuss the importance of major artists, works and issues. To assess their
      contribution to the development of art from the traditional salon of the mid-1800s to the
      period between the great World Wars.

   3. To determine significance of art in cultural development and importance of object in the
      study of man.

   4. To foster a desire on the part of the student toward true inquiry and sharpen research
      skills.

TEXT
History of Modern Art, by H. H. Arnason and Marla F. Prather

A notebook will be constructed in class from handouts and reprints of articles, papers and other
sources.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
   1. Class participation and Attendance. Class attendance is mandatory and will be taken
      daily. A portion of the final evaluation will be based on attendance and participation.
      Over three unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your grade.

   2. Presentations and Panels. Individual presentations will be delivered during class. Topics
      will be assigned by Dr. Sauls. The presentation should be scholarly and may be
      accompanied by appropriate slides. AV material or appropriate handout. Students will


                                                                                                159
       have the entire class period to present their thesis. A typed BIBLIOGRAPHY must be
       turned in before final grades are given. The presentation is one half of your grade and
       will be achieved by peer review.

   3. Fabulous Friday‘s. Some Fridays will be devoted to group discussion taken from
      handouts and reprints of articles, papers and other sources. These Fridays (unless
      otherwise noted) we will meet in the conference room and discuss these supplementary
      materials.

   4. Final Exam. The final exam will be comprehensive and count slightly more than the other
      exams. The final exam is scheduled for Wednesday, December 14th, 11:30 a.m. – 1:20
      p.m. (Check time and date when final schedule is published again in December.)

POLICIES


   1. Absences and Make-up work: Exams and reports are due when scheduled. If a conflict
      occurs, prior arrangement may be made with Dr. Sauls before the scheduled date.
      Emergencies which preclude the taking of an exam or the submission of a paper must be
      brought to the attention of the professor by telephoning 387-8159 or by leaving a
      message with the departmental secretary, Ms. Noland; 271-4282. Except for genuine,
      documented emergency, no make-up work will be given or accepted. This includes
      presentations and Fabulous Friday schedules.



   2. Students with disabilities: Any student in this course who has a disability that prevents
      the fullest expression of abilities should contact me personally as soon as possible so that
      we can discuss class requirements.

                                       Office Hours:
                                 MWF 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                                 TTH 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
                                    (or by appointment)

Class begins promptly at noon.




                                                                                               160
ART 457
Winter Quarter 2008
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Allison Sauls
EMAIL: sauls@missouriwestern.edu

SYLLABUS

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course deals with the chaotic aftermath of World War II and
the resulting move of the art center from Europe to NewYork. In addition, we will examine the
globalization of the art world at the close of the 20th century to the present. Discussions will
include modernism, post-modernism, contemporary art and design movements, the impact of
electronic media, and the philosophical issues raised by emerging technologies and diversity.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: this course presents materials that will help students to

  Explore developments in art and design since 1945.
  Recognize the role of emerging technologies in the development of contemporary art.
  Conduct research on issues in modern art and design.
  Respond both critically and creatively to issues in contemporary art and design history.
  Examine the influence of philosophy, culture, and politics on artists and designers in the
twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

EXIT COMPETENCIES: by the end of this course, students are expected to demonstrate the
ability to:

   Recognize the principle movements and representative artists in art that developed after 1945.
   Participate in discussions that indicate the ability to think creatively and critically about
contemporary works of art and design.
   Deliver effective oral and visual presentations on selected artists, movements, or topics in
contemporary art.
   Conduct college-level research, work effectively in groups, present material cogently, and
articulate conceptual development by designing and conducting a seminar discussion on a
selected topic.
   Create original works that employ an understanding of the historical techniques, subject
matter, and cultural concerns of the post-war era.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING CRITERIA: Students must complete the
following assignments in order to receive a passing grade in the course.




                                                                                               161
  Deliver a short, illustrated presentation on some twentieth-century artist, designer, or
movement (25%). The presentation, the primary basis for mid-term assessment, must include an
annotated bibliography and a one-page concept statement, and be submitted as a PowerPoint file
with notes.
  Find, copy, disseminate and lead a discussion on a recent article on contemporary art or
design. (30%).
  Present an illustrated, group seminar discussion on a topic of importance to the development
of post-war art and design (30%). This presentation must also include an in-depth, annotated
bibliography, and a one-page concept statement that describes the focus of the of the project, as
well as a "package" designed to exhibit the project materials to the class. (30%)
  Participate in class discussions and in-class assignments and exhibit professionalism on a
consistent basis by attending class regularly and punctually, submitting assignments on time,
following instructions carefully, and producing work that demonstrates appropriate reading,
writing, thinking, and research skills (15%).

This class is designed for university level students, and a comparable level of work is
expected. Come to class having read all assigned material, and expect to spend time outside of
class pursuing topics related to the course. The ability to work independently and to develop
creative curiosity by conducting college-level research is a major focus of this course. Grades
will therefore reflect the extent to which you accomplish the objectives and exhibit developing
intellectual skills.

SUPPLIES: Please purchase a large (three-inch minimum) loose-leaf, 3-ring binder to be used
for your work/sourcebook.

CLASSROOM POLICIES: Please consult your Student Handbook for general Missouri
Western policies. If you have a learning or physical need that will require special
accommodation, please let me know in writing by the end of week 2.

MWSU attendance policy reads as follows: Regular class attendance is expected and required. If
a student misses three or more classes in any one course during the quarter, he or she may be
dropped for lack of attendance at the discretion of the faculty member. The satisfactory
explanation of an absence does not relieve the student from responsibility for the course work
assigned and/or due during his or her absences. Students who fail to attend all classes on their
schedules for two consecutive weeks of the quarter will be automatically terminated from the
school by the Registrar's Office. Students who wish to appeal a drop or termination must submit
a formal request to the Academic School Director within one week of notification of their
drop/termination.

Specific deadlines are designed to help you keep abreast of your work, so please adhere to them
as carefully as possible. All assignments are due at the beginning of class. There are no "free
lates" in this class; if you must miss a class for any reason, please let me know ahead of time or
as soon afterward as possible by email. Whether or not you attend class, you are responsible for
submitting assigned work on time. Seminars cannot be made up, so if you are unable to attend on
the day you are scheduled to deliver your presentation, you must reserve an alternative date in
advance; the seminar must be presented before week 5. Your presence in this class is valued, and

                                                                                              162
faithful attendance provides a measurable indication of your professionalism.

Consult my classroom etiquette page for information on cell phone use and other civil issues.
01.07.08

ART 494: Senior Seminar & Exhibit




                                                                                                163
                                          SYLLABUS

                        ART 494 SR. SEMINAR AND EXHIBITION

                                      (Taught on Rotation)

A. CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Class session of professional topics; preparation and presentation of an exhibition of the
student‘s personal art work. Prerequisite: Consent of the Junior Review Committee.

B. COURSE OBJECTIVES

   1. To introduce the student to the workings of the gallery system.

   2. To assist the student in the mounting of a solo or group exhibition of their work with
      special attention to selection, presentation and publicity.

C. EVALUATION

   Since the work itself has already been graded in class, grades are based on the presentation
   and installation aspects of the exhibit, to include publicity, design, punctuality, submission of
   slides, coordination of effort and completion of requirements. The Final grade will be a
   consensus of the department faculty.

D. GUIDELINES

   Students should work closely with the instructor in their area of concentration, especially in
   the selection of works to be exhibited. You are expected to meet with the professor in your
   major field of concentration and plan together which pieces you will exhibit. (See attached
   form that must be completed and turned in to the ART494 instructor at least 3 weeks prior
   to the hanging of your exhibit.) The number of works needed will vary depending on the
   size and media in which the student works, whether the student is participating in a group
   show or is exhibiting by themselves, and the exhibition area scheduled. As a general rule, a
   minimum of 5 – 15 pieces will be required.

   While all pieces need not be from the studio area in which the student has specialized, the
   exhibit should clearly reflect the student’s emphasis area.

   All works exhibited should be presented in a professional manner: 2-D works should be
   matted and appropriately presented. Frames are not necessarily needed.

   Students are responsible for the design, printing, and labeling of their invitations for bulk
   mailing. This phase should be completed approximately 3 – 4 weeks prior to the opening of
   the exhibit. Information for a press release should also be turned in at this time; the
   department will take care of actually writing the press release for the media.

                                                                                                 164
DESIGNING INVITATIONS

All students in each exhibit must work together as a group to do this project. Do not expect
one person to do it all. Your final copy for printing can be done at our Campus Printing
Department. The Art Department will pick up charges up to a maximum of $25.00 per each
group invitation exhibit. (If two groups print one invitation together, the charge is still
$25.00.) You may also choose an off campus printer at your own expense, however, the
department will not pay any expenses.

If you choose to use Campus Printing, your design can be as large as 11 ½‖ x 17‖ however it
can only be printed on paper. Should you prefer cardstock, your design can only be as large
as 8 ½‖ x 11‖. Campus Printing has a variety of paper colors and weights you can choose
from and they also do folding and cutting of paper. Please keep in mind they are not a print
shop, so only expect a copy of whatever you have prepared. Your design needs to be in
camera-ready format for them to print.

You are welcome to look at past invitations from previous graduates which are kept in the
Art Office.

MAILING INVITATIONS

This is also a group project. Since the Art Department picks up the mailing cost, you will
need to use the bulk rate mailing system. You must have no less than 200 pieces per mailing
and they must all be the same item. We cannot combine two different invitations as one
mailing, they must be mailed separately. The Art Department has a list of people and
organizations we mails to regularly in addition to your personal list, you should request to
have 500 pieces printed, this would be sufficient to cover your list and ours. Any excess
cards will be distributed evenly to participating students for their portfolios. You will need to
submit to the secretary a list of names and addresses you wish to have your invitations sent
to. The secretary will type labels for you however you may hand address your personal
invitations if you wish. You will be responsible for labeling and stamping, (if needed) your
own invitations and getting them back to the secretary. You should have your invitations
complete and ready to mail at least 3 – 4 weeks in advance of your opening. This will allow
time for the secretary to sort and prepare the bulk mailing and also allow for any delays or
problems in postal service.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

Each Senior Seminar student must turn in a press release to the instructor in charge listing
publicity information such as hometown, degree earned, etc. You may include a black/white
photo of the exhibit of yourselves hanging the exhibit, etc. We cannot guarantee this
information will be printed, we can only submit it to the appropriate media. This information
is usually given to the Public Relations/Marketing office for submission to the St. Joseph


                                                                                             165
News-Press and Griffon News. You will be responsible for supplying information to any of
the smaller, hometown publications. Publicity should be turned in at least three weeks prior
to exhibit opening.

USING GALLERY 206

You will need a student building pass to work in the gallery after hours and on weekends to
hang and take down your exhibit. Call Security at 271-4438 and they will unlock the room
and storage closet for you but you must have your building pass and photo ID with you, they
will lock up when you are done. Gallery or hall spotlights may be temporarily moved, but
must be returned when show is over (check with your instructor before moving the lights).
Check for any bulbs that need to be replaced if necessary. The high can lights in the foyer
gallery must be replaced by the maintenance department so you will need to plan ahead to
allow sufficient time for their people to do the work – don‘t wait until the day of your
opening.

Openings for your exhibit are optional however students are encouraged to have one unless
doing so would impose undue financial hardship. Openings may be catered through campus
food services, an outside caterer or may be put together by the students themselves. If you
wish to use the department‘s punch bowl, please get permission first. Coordination in this
area is important and students should check things carefully. (Do not kill yourself preparing
fancy or expensive food. Those attending the opening come to see you and your work, not to
see what kind of food you have.)

Tools needed for the installation of the exhibit are available from the department but the
actual hanging and installation of the exhibit is the responsibility of the student. Special
attention should be paid to the actual installation with the idea of achieving some kind of
unity. You will need to prepare labels for your exhibit as indicated.

   1. TITLE

   2. MEDIA

   3. STUDENT‘S NAME

All labels should be uniform in size and font.

Remember, you will be held responsible for any breakage, loss or damage to any tools,
lights, equipment, etc.

SLIDES OF STUDENT WORK

Each student is expected to provide the department with 5 – 15 slides of their best work for
the departmental slide files. All slides must be clearly marked with the student’s name, title,
media, dimensions, and year completed. Labeling slides is your responsibility and not that of

                                                                                               166
the secretary or slide librarian. Slides should be turned in two weeks prior to your exhibit
opening to the instructor in charge of the Senior Seminar & Exhibit for that semester.
STUDENTS WHO DO NOT TURN IN SLIDES WILL RECEIVE AN INCOMPLETE
GRADE.

If you are encountering problems, i.e. locating materials, personality conflicts with other
exhibitors, etc., see your Senior Seminar instructor immediately – do not wait until the last
minute!




                                                                                           167
RESUME


James R. Estes
13472 Heritage Drive
St. Joseph, MO 64505
Home Phone: (816) 233-2816
Work Phone: (816) 271-4424


   I. Academic Preparation
      B.S. (Art Education) Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri (1969).
      M.A. (Sculpture Major/Ceramics Minor) Fort Hays Kansas State University, Hays,
           Kansas (1971).
                      Major studio work done under the direction of Mr. James Hinkhouse and
                      Mr. Darrel McGinnis.
      Post Graduate Work. (Sculpture) University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas (Summers
      1973 and 1974). Major studio work done under the direction of Dr. Frank Young
      (currently teaching at Minneapolis School of Art and Design).
      M.F.A.          (Sculpture) Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona (1978 while on
                      Sabbatical leave from Missouri Western State College). Major studio
                      work done under the direction of Mr. Ben Goo and Mr. Bruce Rod.
      II.      Professional Activities


      1972-1974       Area Representative to Missouri Crafts Council
      1974-1975       Vice-President of Missouri Crafts Council (statewide crafts organization).
                      Duties included grant application for ―1975 Missouri Crafts Exhibit‖
                      (from Missouri state Council on the Arts. Complete management of this
                      exhibit (publicity, shipping, catalog photography, printing, jurors, opening
                      and related conference).
      1974-1977       Area Consultant for Missouri State Council on the Arts (Visual Arts
                      Division).
      1977-2000       Member of National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts
                      (NCECA).
            1986      Article published in the April issue of Ceramics Monthly magazine titled
                      ―Missouri Roots.‖
            1992      Presentation ―Through A Glass Darkly‖ Distinguished Faculty Lecture
                      Series, Missouri Western State College.


                                                                                               168
          1998     Received an Undergraduate Research Summer Institute Grant (URSI) for
                   research titled ―Research of Flux Variations of Cone 10 Oxidation –
                   Reduction Glazes‖.
          1999     Received second Undergraduate Research Summer Institute Grant (URSI)
                   for continued research titled ―Verification Study of 1998 Research of Flux
                   Variations of Cone 10 Oxidation – Reduction Glazes‖.
          2004     Received a Summer Research Institute Grant (SRI) for research titled
                   ―Research into the Development of Color in Cone 9/10 Oxidation –
                   Reduction Glazes‖.
          2007     Received Foundation Grant from Missouri Western State University, for
                   creation and installation of large sculpture for MWSU campus ―Passages‖.
III. Teaching Experience (Past to present)
     1969-1970     Instructor of Art – New Market Community Schools, New Market, Iowa
     1971-1972     Instructor of Art – Jennings Community School System, Jennings,
                   Missouri (St. Louis)
     1972-1975     Instructor of Art – Missouri Western State College, St. Joseph, Missouri
                   (During the 1973-1974 year was chosen as coordinator for the Department
                   of Art.)
         1975      Promoted to rank of Assistant Professor, Missouri Western State College.
     1975-1979     Chairperson, Department of Art, Missouri Western State College.
          1980     Promoted to rank of Associate Professor of Art, Missouri Western State
                   College.
          1985     Promoted to rank of Professor, Missouri Western State College.
          2000     Received Liberal Arts & Sciences Council Of Chairpersons Award
          2004     Received Board of Governors ―Distinguished Professor Award‖,
                   Missouri Western State University


IV. Exhibition Record (Past to Present)
            1971   ―Century II‖, Exhibition Hall, Wichita, Kansas.M.A. Thesis Exhibit, Fine
                   Arts Gallery, Fort Hays Kansas State University, Hays. Kansas.
            1972   Two Person Exhibit, Albrecht Museum of Art, St. Joseph, Missouri.
                   ―Missouri Crafts Exhibition‖, Maryville, Missouri, ―Jurors Award.‖
            1974   ―13th Midwest Biennial Exhibit‖, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska.

                                                                                          169
      ―50th Annual Art Exhibit‖, Springville, Utah.
1975 ―Mid-South Biennial‖, Memphis, Tennessee.
      ―Art for Architecture‖ Exhibit, Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City,
      Missouri. Sponsored by E & E Gallery.Northwest Missouri State
      University Alumni Exhibit, Maryville, Missouri.
1976 Two Person Exhibit, Park Central Gallery, Springfield, Missouri.
1977 ―Wood-in-Art‖ Competition, Matthews Hall Gallery, Tempe, Arizona.
      Crown Center Art Festival, Kansas City, Missouri. (First Place: Sculpture
      Award).

1978 ―Southwest Fine Arts Biennial‖, Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, New
     Mexico.

      ―National Small Sculpture and Jewelry Invitational‖, Weber State College,
      Ogden, Utah.

      One Person Exhibit, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State
      College, St. Joseph, Missouri – October.

      M.F.A. Thesis Exhibit, Art Gallery, Arizona State University.
 1979 ―Objects ‗79‖ Juried exhibit, Western Colorado Center for the Arts,
      Grand Junction, Colorado.

      One Person Exhibit, Fort Hays Kansas State University, Hays, Kansas –
      October.
 1980 No juried exhibits – new sculptural work in clay was being explored.
 1981 ―15th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Show‖, Del Mar
      College, Corpus Christi, Texas. Ivan C. Karp of the OK Harris Gallery,
      New York, Juror.
      ―31st Annual May Competitive‖, Spiva Art Center, Joplin, Missouri. Dan
      Howard, University of Nebraska, Juror.
      ―Clay Workers Guild Invitational‖, Northern Illinois University, Western
      Illinois University. A.R.T. Studio Gallery, Blackburn College. Jurors:
      Robert Blue, Susan Galloway, Judy Rochette, Lena Wells.
 1982 ―17th Joslyn Biennial Art Exhibit‖, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska,
      April. Juror: Peter Plagens, University of North Carolina.
      ―Potters ‗82‖, A National Competitive Exhibit, Springfield Art
      Association of Springfield, Illinois – June.


                                                                                170
      Two Person Exhibit (Jeannie Harmon-Miller and myself), Fine Arts
      Gallery of Northeast Missouri State University – November.
1983 ―National Small Sculpture Invitational Exhibit‖, University of North
     Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina – November.

      ―Summer Show‖, Dorry Gates Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri –
       August/September.

1984 ―60th Shreveport Art Guild national Juried exhibition‖. Fritz Scholder,
     Juror. Meadows Museum of Art, Shreveport, Louisiana.
      ―17th Annual Juried Show‖, Muscatine Art Center, Muscatine, Iowa.
      Faculty Show, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State College,
      St. Joseph, Missouri.

 1985―La Grange National X Exhibition‖, Lamar Dodd Art Center, La Grange,
     Georgia. Juror: Roy Slade, President, Cranbrook Academy of Art.
      ―Lenexa / National 3-Dimensional Art Show‖, Lenexa, Kansas. Jurors:
      Tony Hepburn, Dianne Van Derlip, Louis Cork Marcheschi.
      ―Missouri Multimedia Exhibition‖, Southeast Missouri State University,
      Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Jurors: Win Bruhl, Lane Fabrick, Edwin
      Smith.
      ―Six St. Joseph Artists‖, Group Exhibit, Bedyk Gallery, Kansas City,
       Missouri.

 1986 ―45th Celebration‖ Exhibition, Cedar City, Utah, Briathwaite Fine Arts
     Gallery.

      ―Lenexa National 3-Dimensional Exhibit‖, Lenexa, Kansas – May.
      Commission sculpture piece, ―Intersection I‖, installed at the home of
      Teresa Taliaferro, St. Joseph, Missouri – January.

      ―Faculty Exhibit‖, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State
      College, St. Joseph, Missouri.


      ―Group Exhibit‖, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville,
      Missouri – September.

      ―New Moon Rising‖, Wood Sculpture piece at the Bedyk Gallery,
      Westport, Kansas City, Missouri – February – December.


                                                                               171
1987   Bedyk Gallery, Westport, Kansas City, Missouri
1988   ―Greater Midwest International Exhibit‖, CMSU, Warrensburg, Missouri,.
       Juror: Roy Slade, President, Cranbrook Academy of Art. 2,622 entries,
       80 pieces.
       ―Faculty Exhibit‖, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri – March.
1989   ―Topeka 13‖ Four State Craft Exhibit, Topeka, Kansas – April. Jurors
       Award in Clay, Juror: Heikki Seppa.
       ―Dimensions 13‖, Lenexa‘s National 3-D Art Exhibit – May. Jurors:
       James Ballinger, Lawrence Fane, Harriet Traurig. Received Honorable
       Mention Award.
       Central Park Gallery ―Group Exhibit‖, Kansas City, Missouri.
1990   ―Faculty Exhibit‖, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri – April.
       ―Fifty-fifth Annual National Art Exhibition‖, Cooperstown Art
       Association Galleries, Cooperstown, New York.
       ―Dimensions ‗90‖ Lenexa‘s National 3-Dimensional Art Exhibition.
       Jurors: Hugh Lifson, Dan Douke, and Richard Armstrong.
       ―Plaza Art Fair‖, Sponsored by the Plaza Association, Kansas City,
       Missouri.
       ―Two Person Exhibit‖, Highland Community College, Highland, Kansas

1991   One Person Exhibit, Barton County Community College, Great Bend,
       Presentation to Kansas Artists Craftsman Conference, Great Bend, Kansas

       ―Materials: Hard and Soft Exhibition 1991‖, Meadows Gallery, Center for
       the Visual Arts, Denton, Texas.
1992   ―32nd Annual Mid-States Craft Exhibition 1992‖, Evansville Museum of
       Art, Evansville, Indiana
       ―Albrecht Art Museum Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph,
       ―Topeka Competition 16‖, Gallery of Fine Arts, Topeka Library, Topeka,.
       ―La Grange National XXII‖, Lamar Dodd Art Center, La Grange, Georgia
       ―Faculty Biannual Art Exhibit‖, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri
       Western State College, St. Joseph, Missouri


                                                                              172
       ―Dimensions ‗92‖, Lenexa‘s National 3-Dimensional Art Exhibition,
       Lenexa
1993   ―Albrecht Art Museum Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri.
       One of a Kind Gallery, St. Joseph, Missouri.
       Central Park Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri.
       ―Crafts Regional 93‖, John A. Logan College Museum and Art Gallery.
       Six State Regional Exhibit
1994   ―Topeka XIII Competition‖, Topeka Public Library, Topeka, Kansas.
       ―Faculty Art Exhibit‖, Potter Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri
       ―Albrecht Art Museum Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. 1st and 2nd Place, 3-Dimension Award.
       Heartland Art Festival, Lenexa, Kansas.
1995   ―Albrecht Art Museum Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art,St. Joseph, Missouri. 1st Place Sculpture Award.
       ―Topeka XIX Competition‖, Topeka Public Library, Topeka, Kansas.
       One Person Exhibit, Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas.
1996   ―Albrecht Art Museum Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. Honorable Mention: Sculpture.
       ―Topeka XX Competition, Topeka Public Library, Topeka, Kansas.
       ―Eleventh Annual San Angelo National ceramic Competition‖, San
       Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, San Angelo, Texas.
       ―Faculty Biennial Exhibition,‖ Gallery 206, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri.

1997   ―48th Mid-States Art Exhibition‖, Evansville Museum of Arts & Sciences,
       Evansville, Indiana. Juror: Nancy Hoffman.
       ―Topeka Competition 21‖. Topeka and Shawnee Public Library, Topeka,
       Kansas.
       ―Midwest Visions‖ at the Clayton Staples Gallery at Wichita State
       University, Wichita, Kansas.




                                                                             173
       ―35th Mid-States Craft Exhibit.‖ Evansville Museum of Arts and
       Sciences, Evansville, Indiana. Received the ―Bob and Sara Davies Merit
       Award.‖
       ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit.‖ Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. Second Place in Ceramics/Sculpture Division.

1998   ―Earthenware: Landscapes in Clay.‖ Tulsa Ceramic Arts Gallery, Tulsa,
       Oklahoma. Honorable Mention Award.
       ―Ceramics USA 1998 Exhibit.‖ University of North Texas, Denton,
       Texas.
       ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit.‖ Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. First Place in Ceramics/Sculpture.

       ―Faculty Biennial Art Exhibit.‖ Gallery 206, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri.
       ―Topeka Competition 22‖, Mulvane Art Museum, Washburn University,
       Topeka, Kansas. Purchase Award.
1999   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. 3rd Place Sculpture Award.

       ‗Texas National 99‖ Exhibition, Stephen F. Austin University,
       Nacogdoches, Texas.
       ―36th Mid-States Craft Exhibition‖, Evansville Museum of Arts and
       Sciences, Evansville, Indiana.
2000   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. 2nd and 3rd Place in Ceramics/Sculpture.
       ―Faculty Biennial Art Exhibition‖, Gallery 206, Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri.
       ―13th Annual National Ceramic Competition‖, San Angelo Art Museum,
       San Angelo, Texas.
       Van Deusen Gallery, ―Group Exhibit,‖ Prairie Village, Kansas.
       ―Ceramics USA 2000‖ National Juried Exhibition, University of North
       Texas, Denton, Texas. Juror: Ellen Shanklin
       ―Ceramic International Juried Exhibition‖ at Zanesville Art Center,
       Zanesville, Ohio. Juror Ron Kuchta: Editor of American Ceramics
       Magazine and Director of Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York
       ―Faculty Exhibit‖ at Highland Community College, Highland, Kansas


                                                                             174
       ―Clay Times Magazine,‖ work titled ―Geode Series #3,‖ published in
       November/December issue.
2001   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. 1st Place Ceramics/Sculpture.
       ―Origins in Clay II‖ National Juried Exhibit, University of Texas At San
       Antonio Fine Arts Gallery. Jurors: Howard Taylor and Nancy
       Goldsberry.
       ―Topeka Competition 23‖. Juror: Seo Eo
       ―66th National Juried Exhibition‖, Evansville Museum of Arts and
       Sciences, Evansville, Indiana. Juror: Holly Hotchner.
2002   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. 1st Place Award in ceramics/sculpture.
       ―Missouri Western State College Faculty Art Exhibit‖, January –
       February. Seven new works exhibited.
       ―Topeka Competition 24‖, Topeka Shawnee Library, Topeka, Kansas.
       Juror: Victor Spinski.
       ―La Grange National Biennial XXII‖, Lamar Dodd Art Center, La Grange,
       Georgia. Juror: Robert F. Lyon (1,706 entries).
       Three-person exhibit at the Van Duesen Gallery, Prairie Village, Kansas.
       Held in conjunction with NCECA Conference in Kansas City, KS.
       52nd Annual Quad-State Juried Art Exhibition‖, Quincy Art Center,
       Quincy, Illinois. Juror: J. P. Begley.
       ―Texas National 2002‖, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches,
       Texas. Juror: Sandy Skogland (2,300 entries).
       ―MOAK 2002‖ Four-state Regional Juried Exhibit. Received Juror‘s
       Award. Juror: Marcia Manhart.
2003   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri.
       ―Topeka Competition XXV‖, Topeka Shawnee Public Library, Topeka,
       Kansas. A seven-state regional competition. Juror: Matthew Zupnick.
       ―Del Mar 37th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Exhibition‖,
       Del Mar College,Corpus Christi, Texas. Juror: Brian Paulson.
       ―Texas National 2003‖ Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches,
       Texas. Jurors: Jerry Helsmann and Maggie Taylor. 700 artists from 48
       states entered with 128 artists chosen.


                                                                              175
       ―The 53rd Annual Quad-State Juried Art Exhibit,‖ at the Quincy Art
       Center, Quincy, Illinois. Juror: J. William Meek, III.
       ―Ceramics USA Juried Exhibit‖ at the University of North Texas Gallery
       of Art, Denton, Texas.
       ―Craftforms 2003 National Juried Exhbition of Fine Contemporary
       Crafts.‖ 85 works chosen by juror: Paul J. Smith from 674 entries,
       Wayne Art Center, Wayne Pennsylvania.
2004   ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit,‖ Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri. 1st place sculpture award.
       ―Missouri Western State College Faculty Art Exhibit,‖ March – six new
       works exhibited.
       ―Topeka Competition 24,‖ Topeka Shawnee Library, Topeka, Kansas.
       Juror: Elaine Coleman.
       ―Crafts National 38‖ Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, Penn State
       University, Juror: Gail M. Brown.
       ―54th Annual Quad State Juried Exhibition‖, Quincy Art Center, Quincy,
       Illinois. Juror: Katherine Degn, Director of Kroushaar Gallery, New
       York.
2005   ―52nd Mid-States Art Exhibition‖, Evansville Museum of Arts & Sciences,
       Evansville, Indiana. Juror: Michael Bergt.
       ―Albrecht-Kemper Members Exhibit‖, Albrecht-Kempers Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri.
       ―Red Heat: Contemporary Work in Clay‖, University of Tulsa, Tulsa,
       Oklahoma, Juror: Patti Warishino.
       ―Missouri Western State University Faculty Art Exhibit‖ Gallery 206, St.
       Joseph, Missouri.
       ―2005 Earth, Wheel And Fire‖ International Museum of Art and Science,
       McAllen, Texas Juror: Juan Granados.
       ―48th Annual Delta Art Exhibition‖ at the Arkansas Arts Center, Little
       Rock, Arkansas. Juror: Roger Shimomura.
       ―27th Annual Topeka Competition, Sabitini Gallery, Topeka & Shawnee
       Public Library, Topeka, Kansas. Juror: Isabel Barbuzza.
       ―Wichita National 2005‖ Wichita Center For The Arts, Wichita, Kansas.
       Juror: Harold Nelson.




                                                                                176
                  ―Alterations & Manipulations‖ - Two-Person Exhibit, Albrecht-Kemper
                  Museum of Art, St. Joseph, Missouri.
           2006   Albecht-Kemper Museum of Art ―Members Exhibit‖, January/February,
                  St. Joseph, Missouri.
                  Missouri Western State University, ―Faculty Art Exhibit‖. March –
                  Gallery 206, St. Joseph, Missouri
                  108th Midwest Art Exhibition, Birger Sandzen Memorial Gallery,
                  Lindsburg, Kansas-18 works exhibited.
                  Missouri Western State University, created and installed welded metal
                  sculpture ―Beyond 2010‖, June 2006.
           2007   Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art ―Members Exhibit‖ January/February,
                  St. Joseph, MO
                  Missouri Western State University, created and installed welded metal
                  sculpture work titled ―Passages‖ on grounds of Western, St. Joseph, MO




1/31/07)




                                                                                          177
                                    ARTIST STATEMENT




              The forms and surfaces I have developed in my work have their genesis in nature. I
           continue to be moved by nature‘s order, subtleties and grandeur. Lines, circles and added
           shapes that are integrated into the surface of these works are visual metaphors for
           mankind‘s impression upon our earth. I leave the viewer to judge if these markings are
           blemishes or beauty marks upon our world.



                                                                        Jim Estes




     Sculptor/Ceramist Jim Estes is a professor of Art at Missouri Western State College where
he has taught ceramics and sculpture since 1972. Estes received his B.S. degree in art from
Northwest Missouri State University in 1969 and his M.A. degree in 1971 from Fort Hays
Kansas State University. In 1978 he received a M.F.A. degree in sculpture and ceramics from
Arizona State University. As a native Midwesterner, Estes has always been infatuated with the
textures, forms and colors of our ever changing landscape. He works primarily in clay and
hardwoods. These materials provide a direct reference to the landscape as well as being
materials, which abound with irregular surface patterns reminiscent of topographical views of the
earth. To these forms he often adds decorative lines or accents which are suggestive of roads,
paths and even vapor trails. Since 1972, Estes‘ work has been exhibited in over one hundred
thirty national and regional exhibits throughout the United States. He resides in St. Joseph with
his wife Judy and son Jarrett. He also has a daughter, Mrs. Jolynn Atoe of St. Joseph.
Estes‘ works are constructed of stoneware clay with porcelain slip and fired to cone 10 in an
oxidation-reduction atmosphere.




                                                                                                178
ARTIST’S STATEMENT




             In a symbolic and subconscious way, my sculptural forms pay homage to
     the perfection of nature. As a native Mid-westerner, I have long been infatuated
     with the area landscape and this infatuation manifests itself, sometimes subtly,
     sometimes in more obvious ways, in the materials I use and the forms I create. I
     work primarily with wood and clay, since these are materials which provide a
     direct reference to the landscape, as well as being materials which abound with
     changing and irregular surface patterns reminiscent of topographical views of the
     earth. My forms frequently utilize symmetrical shapes, especially the circle,
     which are reflective of the orderly, controlled, and predictable movement of the
     earth. The circle itself is a recurring motif in much of my work, and it epitomizes
     the concept of the self-contained form with its natural properties of harmony and
     closure while also providing a symbolic reference to the earth on a more
     elementary level. The circle likewise refers to the cyclic nature of life and man‘s
     need for continuity. Subsequent circles, actual or implied, make reference to
     microcosms within a larger world. Surface lines and alterations suggest man‘s
     ever changing social order and his longing for the undiscovered. In all my work, I
     make a concerted effort to respect the integrity of the natural materials with which
     I work and strive to maintain a level of craftsmanship that is commensurate with
     that found in nature, the perfect builder. My work does not exist to merely mimic
     nature, but to reflect the visual and textural properties of the landscape and the
     earth‘s surface variations. I want my work to be quiet, even understated, yet
     enigmatic enough to remind the viewer that the earth changes much more slowly
     than those of us who inhabit it.




                                                                                            179
              Eric Fuson
              2225 Eugene Field Avenue
              Saint Joseph, MO 64505
              (816) 390-8949

Employment
2005-Present Twin Bridges Studio
             St. Joseph, MO
             Owner
                     Creating, manufacturing, wholesaling, and retailing a line of jewelry and
             artwork.


1989-present Missouri Western State College
             St. Joseph, MO
             Part Time Instructor
                     Beginning Drawing, Two Dimensional Design Three Dimensional Design
             and Intermediate Drawing are the classes I am currently teaching, however I have
             taught others over the years. Classes have included, Beginning Drawing,
             Beginning Drawing II, Introduction to Art, Two Dimensional Design, Three
             Dimensional Design, Beginning Photography, Intermediate Photography,
             Advanced Photography and Beginning Cycling.

1989-2006     Ride Bicycles
              St. Joseph, MO
              Manager
                      All aspects of running a family owned bicycle retail store. Duties included
              inventory control, scheduling, ordering, sales, and mechanic work. Other duties
              such as racing team director, race promoter, and bicycle club board member were
              also included.

1997 Spring   Highland Community College
              Art Department
              Highland, Kansas
              Instructor
                      Filling in for a professor out on maternity leave classes included,
              Beginnng Drawing, Beginning Drawing II, Beginning Painting, Graphic Design,
              and Renaissance to Modern Art History.


1983-1989     Education
              Missouri Western State College
              St. Joseph, MO
                      Received Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, with an emphasis in photography
              and graphic design.



                                                                                              180
       Exhibitions

2005   Missouri Western Faculty Exhibit
2004   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
2002   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
2000   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1999   Albrect-Kemper Museum of Art, Members Exhibit, honorable mention mixed
       media.
1998   Highland Community College Gallery, Two person show
1998   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1996   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1995   Albrect-Kemper Museum of Art, Members Exhibit, honorable mention, drawing
       and sculpture
1994   Albrect-Kemper Museum of Art, Members Exhibit, best of show, painting and 2nd
       place drawing.
1994   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1992   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1990   Missouri Western Biannual Faculty Exhibit
1990   Missouri Western Alluni Exhibit
1989   East Texas State University, International Photographic Competition, 3rd place.
1987   Photo Spiva photographic competitive, 3rd place.




                                                                                  181
Jeannie Harmon-Miller
       3608 E. Colony Square, St. Joseph, MO 64506 – (816) 390-8016, (816) 271-4549


Education

     1986    The Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, Computer Art, Summer

     1980    University of California, Berkeley, California, Photography, Summer

1973-1976    University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, M.F.A., Design, with emphasis in
             Design and Photography, 60-hour program, graduated with honors.

1967-1971    University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, B.A.E., Bachelor of Art in Education


Workshops and Conferences_______________________________________________

    2005     Society of Photographic Education Midwest and South Central Regional
            Conference, ―Down by the Riverside: Politics, Propaganda and Pixels‖.
             St. Louis, Missouri.

    1999     Society for Contemporary Photography, Kansas City, Missouri, Photography
             workshop taught by Keith Carter, Fall

    1998     5th annual International Exposition of Sculpture; Objects and Functional
             Art or SOFA Conference, Chicago, IL.

    1996     Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, ―Photographic Painting‖
             workshop taught by Holly Roberts, Winter

    1994     Santa Fe Photo Workshop, Santa Fe, New Mexico, ―Creative Workshop for
             Photographers‖ taught by Sean Kernan, Summer

    1992          1992 How Design Conference, National Design Conference in San Diego,
             California

    1985     Anderson Ranch Photography, Aspen, Colorado, Workshop taught by Ralph
             Gibson, Summer

    1981     Visual Studies Workshop, Rochester, New York, Photography taught by John
             Wood, Summer




                                                                                            182
Teaching Experience

1983 - Present Associate Professor, Art Department, Missouri Western State College,
              St. Joseph, Missouri. Teaching responsibilities include:
              1983– 1985 2-Dimensional Design, and 3-Dimensional Design, Beginning and
              Advanced Graphic Design and Beginning and Advanced Photo (1985.)
              1986– 1994 2-Dimensional Design, 3-Dimensional Design, and Beginning
              Intermediate and Advanced Graphic Design, Beginning Intermediate and
              Advanced Photography plus Internships in Art.
              1994– 1999 2-Dimensional Design, 3-Dimensional Design, Beginning and
              Intermediate and Advanced Photography and Internships in Art.
              1999– Present: 2-Dimensional Design, 3- Dimensional Design, Beginning,
              Intermediate and Advanced Photography. Also, when needed, responsible for
              supervising Internships in Art for Graphic Design Art Majors.

1975- 1982    Assistant Professor, Art Department, Missouri Western State College, St. Joseph,
              Missouri. Teaching responsibilities include: 2-Dimensional Design, and 3-
              Dimensional Design, Composition in Art, Beginning and Advanced Photography
              (new classes in 1976) and Beginning and Advanced Graphic Design (new classes
              in 1978.)

1973-1975     Assistant Instructor, Design Department, University of Kansas, Lawrence,
              Kansas. Teaching responsibilities included: 2-Dimansional Design and Color and
              Light Theory classes.

1971-1972     Art Teacher, Bonner Springs Jr. High School, Bonner Springs, Kansas Teaching
              responsibilities included drawing, painting, design & ceramics.

Exhibition Record
2007/2008 ―TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL FIVE STATE COMPETITION AND
              EXHIBITION‖ Hays, Kansas. Juror: Greg Cradick, fine art photographer and
              Executive Director of Working with Artist School and Flash Gallery. ―Storm
              Shadow‘ and ―Midwest Space‖, two color triptych collages were accepted into
              this exhibit.

    2007      ―PHOTO SPIVA 2007 NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION‖ ―The
              oldest continuous national photographic competition‖, George A. Spiva Center
              for the Arts, Joplin, MO. Juror: John Paul Caponigro, photographer, painter,
              editor and author. ―Still‖ and ―Boxed‖, two color triptych collages were accepted
              into this exhibition.

2007-2006     ―TWENTY –THIRD ANNUAL FIVE STATE COMPETITION AND
              EXHIBITION‖, Hays Kansas. Juror: Dan Burkholder, photographer and author
              of the book titled, ―Making Digital Negatives for Contact Printing‖. ―Still‖ and



                                                                                            183
       ―Dark Light‖, two color triptych collages were accepted into this exhibition.

2006   ―12 X 12‖, NATIONAL JURIED SHOW, Todd Gallery, Middle Tennessee State
       University; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Juror: Mark Scala, Exhibition Curator,
       First Center for the Visual Arts. ―Dark Light‖, a color triptych collage was
       accepted into this exhibition.

       ―ANNUAL FACULTY ART EXHIBITION‖ Fine Arts Gallery, Art Department,
       Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph, Missouri. Three new color
       triptychs collages and three new black and white photographs were exhibited.

2005   ―TPS (Texas Photographic Society) 13: THE NATIONAL COMPETITION
       Center for Contemporary Art in Abilene, Texas. Juror: Sue Brisk, Editorial
       Director for North American Magnum Photos, N.Y. ―Blues‖, a color triptych
       collage was accepted.

       ―20TH ANNUAL GREATER MIDWEST INTERNATIONAL
       EXHIBITION, Art Center Gallery, Central Missouri State University,
       Warrensburg, Missouri. Juror: Randall R. Griffery, Associate Curator of
       American Art at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. ―Blues‖, a color triptych
       collage was accepted. Sixty three works of art were exhibited from 846 entries.
.
       ―FIVE-STATE 21ST ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION AND
       EXHIBITION‖, Hays, Kansas. Juror: Keith Davis, Curator and Director of
       Hallmark Photographic Collection and author. ―Distant Memory‖, a photo-
       graphic painting and ―Ethereal Space‖, a color triptych collage, were accepted
       in this exhibition.

       ―TRI-STATE NATIONAL 43RD ANNUAL JURIED EXHIBITION‖,
         Beaumont, Texas. Juror: Judie Betts, painter. ―Structure‖, a color triptych
        collage from the ―Relationships Series‖, was accepted.

       ―31ST ALBRECHT-KEMPER MUSEUM OF ART ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP
       EXHIBITION‖, St. Joseph, Missouri. Juror: Anonymous. ―A Distant
       Memory‖, a photographic painting, and ―Ethereal Space‖, a photographic
       collage, were exhibited. ―A Distant Memory‖ received a Third Place Award.

       ―ANNUAL FACULTY ART EXHIBITION‖, Fine Arts Gallery, Art
       Department, Missouri Western State University. Three new color triptych
       collages and three new black & white photos were exhibited.


2004   ―TPS (Texas Photographic Society) 13: THE NATIONAL COMPETITION‖,
       Center for Contemporary Art in Abilene, Texas. Juror: Sue Brisk, Editorial
       Director for North American Magnum Photos, N.Y. ―Blues‖, a Photographic
       collage was accepted. The exhibition traveled throughout the state of Texas.


                                                                                        184
       ―PHOTOGRAPHY MIDWEST 2004‖, a seven-state juried exhibition at the
       University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin. Juror: Keith Carter,
        internationally recognized photographer and educator. ―Hope‖, a photographic
        painting and collage was accepted.

       ―30TH ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum
       of Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. Juror: Anonymous. ―Hope‖, a photographic
       painting and collage received First Place Award in the photography category.

       ―ANNUAL FACULTY ART EXHIBITION‖, Fine Arts Gallery, Art
       Department, Missouri Western State University. Five new color triptychs and
        black and white photos were exhibited.

2003   ―53rd ANNUAL QUAD-STATE JURIED ART EXHIBITION‖ at the Quincy Art
       Center in Quincy, Illinois. Juror: William Meek III, Director, Harmon-Meek
       Gallery, Naples, Florida. ―Remembering September 11th,‖ a color triptych
       collage was accepted into this juried exhibition. One hundred and eleven works
       of art were selected from 758 entries.

       ―19TH ANNUAL FIVE-STATE PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION &
       COMPETITION‖. Hays Arts Council, Fort Hays, Kansas. Juror: R.Skip
       Kohloff, president of Colorado Photographic Art Center in Denver Colorado.
       Also, a professional reviewer for Photofest, Houston Photo Americas of Portland
       Oregon. Abby’s Journey‖ and ―Remembering September 11th‖, both a color
       triptychs collages, were accepted into this juried exhibition. ―Abby’s Journey‖
       also received a Third Place Award.

       ―29TH ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. Juror: Anonymous, ―Natalie’s Bliss‖ and ―Solitude‖
       two-color photographs exhibited.

2002   ―17TH ANNUAL GREATER MIDWEST INTERNATIONAL‖ Exhibition,
       Central Missouri state University Art Center, Warrensburg, Missouri, Juror:
       Raechell Smith, Director of the H&R Block Artspace at the Kansas City Art
       Institute. Sixty-nine works of art were selected from 1,029 entries. There were
       18 artists from outside the U.S. ―Boxed‖ a color triptych from the ―Relationship‘s
       Series‖ was accepted into this juried exhibition.

       ―18TH ANNUAL FIVE-STATE PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION &
       COMPETITION,‖ Hays Arts Center, Fort Hays, Kansas. ―Vulnerable‖ from the
       photographic painting series was accepted in this juried exhibition.

       ―SPIRITUAL ART V INTERNATIONAL,‖ Point Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska.
       ―Hope‖, from the photographic painting and collage was accepted into this juried
       exhibition.


                                                                                      185
       ―28TH ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION,‖ Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. ―Abby‘s Journey‖ a color photographic series received
       ―Best of Show‖ award.

       ―BIENNIAL FACULTY ART EXHIBITION,‖ Fine Arts Gallery, Art
       Department, Missouri Western State College, St. Joseph, Missouri. Several color
       triptych collages, and black & white photographs were exhibited.


2001   ―27th Annual Membership Exhibition, at the Albrecht Kemper Museum of Art, St.
       Joseph, Missouri ―Relationship Series #3‖ received FIRST PLACE AWARD IN
       PHOTOGRAPHY.

2000   ―50ST ANNUAL QUAD-STATE JURIED ART EXHIBITION‖, June 2000. The
       Quincy Art Center, Quincy, Illinois; Juror: Mary Ann Wilkinson, Curator of
       Modern and Contemporary Art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. ―Carmel Collage‖
       from the Photographic and Collage Series was accepted into this juried exhibition.

       ―12TH ANNUAL NATIONAL ART COMPETITION", at Truman State
       University, Kirksville, Missouri. Juror: Donald Kuspit, Art Critic.
       ―Interior/Exterior Collage‖ a photo collage was accepted into this juried
       exhibition.

       ―BI-ANNUAL FACULTY ART EXHIBIT‖, Art Department, Missouri Western
       State College, St. Joseph, Missouri. Several new color triptych collages were
       exhibited.

       ―26TH ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION‖, at the Albrecht-Kemper
       Museum of Art, St. Joseph, Missouri. Second Place Photography Award,
       ―Interior/Exterior Collage‖.

1999   ―LAWRENCE AND KANSAS CITY AREA JURIED EXHIBITION‖, Lawrence
       Art Center, Lawrence, Kansas, Summer 1999.

       ―REGIONAL ADDY AWARD‖, ―Best of Show.‖ Art Direction for Missouri
       Western State College Art Gallery Exhibition Schedule 1998 – 1999.

1998   ―INVITATIONAL GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION‖, Albrecht-Kemper
       Museum, St. Joseph Missouri. Several photographs shown from the Photographic
       Painting and Collage Series.

       ―14TH ANNUAL FIVE STATE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION &
       EXHIBITION‖, regional juried exhibition at the Hays Arts Center, Hays, Kansas.
       Cash award for ―Dream On‖ from Photographic Painting Series.



                                                                                     186
1997   ―MIDWEST VISIONS‖, invitational exhibition at the McKnight Center Gallery,
       Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas. Showed with Jim Estes, Jack
       Hughes, Debe Riley and Byron Williamson. Several photographs shown from the
       Photographic Paintings Series.

       ―24TH ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of
       Art, St. Joseph, Missouri, Honorable Mention Award, ―Twenty Years Gone
       By‖, from the Photographic Painting Series.

1996   ―AMBIANCE‖, juried regional show sponsored by the Society of Contemporary
       Photography, Kansas City, Missouri. The photograph selected was ―Dream On‖
       from the Photographic Painting Series.

       ―MOAK 4-STATE REGIONAL EXHIBITION‖ in Springfield, Missouri
       sponsored by the Springfield Art Museum. The two photographs selected were
       ―Twenty Years Gone By‖ and ―Save/Give Away,‖ both from the Photographic
       Painting Series.

       ―BIENNIAL FACULTY ART EXHIBIT‖ at Missouri Western State College, St.
       Joseph, Missouri. Exhibited black and white photographs and photographic
       paintings.

1993   ―22ND ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP EXHIBIT‖, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art,
       St. Joseph, Missouri, Honorable Mention Award – Quilt ―Kalahari Strips‖.

1991   ―IMAGES 1991‖ – Highland, Kansas, ―The Girls‖ from the series titled,
       ―Daughters‖, black and white photos were selected into this regional exhibition.

1990   ―PHOTOSPIVA ‗90‖ Spiva Art Center, Joplin, Missouri, ―Natalie‖, from the
       series titled, ―Daughters‖, one black and white photo selected into this national
       exhibition.

1989   ―19th Annual Membership Exhibit,‖ Albrecht-Kemper Museum, St. Joseph,
       Missouri, two black and white photos were exhibited.

1988   ―JAMES ESTES AND JEANNIE HARMON-MILLER SCULPTURE AND
       PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION‖ – Northeast Missouri State University,
       Kirksville, Missouri; fifteen black and white photographs exhibited.

1986   ―15TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION‖ at
       East Texas State University – two black and white photos selected in this
       international exhibition. ―Crossed‖, received Honorable Mention Award.

1985   ―SIX ST. JOSEPH ARTISTS,‖ Bedyk Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri.
       ―AUTUMNFEST 85‖ University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas-one color
       photograph selected.


                                                                                           187
1984   ―ANNUAL QUILT EXHIBIT,‖ Savannah, Missouri.

1983   ―PLAZA ART SHOW,‖ Kansas City, Missouri – twenty color photographs
       exhibited and some sold.

1982   ―MIDWEST PHOTOGRAPHY INVITATIONAL II,‖ University of Wisconsin –
       Green Bay, Green Bay, Wisconsin (Exhibited in October in Gallery, on tour until
       April 1983, ―Beverly Rodeo‖ was selected, exhibited and on tour.

       ―JAMES ESTES AND JEANNIE HARMON-MILLER SCULPTURE AND
       PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION‖, Northeast Missouri State University,
       Kirksville, Missouri, sixteen color photographs were exhibited.

       ―PHOTOSPIVA ‘82,‖ Spiva Art Center, Joplin, Missouri, Judge: Olivia Parker,
       ―L.A. Section‖ a color photograph accepted into this national and touring
       exhibition. Out of 1558 photographs, 101 were selected to be in this exhibition.
       ―GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION‖, Gallery 291, Kansas City, Missouri,
       twenty color photographs exhibited.

1980   ―CONTEMPORARY SURVEY‖, NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR
       PHOTOGRAPHIC EDUCATION CONFERENCE, Swan Lake, New York,
       several color photographs selected to be shown in slide survey.

       ―REALISM ‗80S STYLE,‖ Galesburg Civic Art Center, Galesburg, Illinois,
       ―Double Corner‖ and ―Beyond Pink‖ selected for this group exhibition.

       ―PAPER / FIBER II,‖ Old Brick Sanctuary, Iowa City, Iowa; Award of Merrit
       $150, ―Wichita Wall‖.

       ―TWO-PERSON PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION‖, Art Department, Frostburg
       State College, Frostburg, Maryland.

1979   ―AMERICAN VISION,‖ New York University‘s 80 Washington Square East
       Galleries, New York, New York, ―Beyond Pink‖ and ―Blue Against Black‖, color
       photographs were accepted into this national exhibition.

       ―20TH DIXIES ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER,‖ Montgomery Museum of Fine
       Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; Judge: Jay Belloli, Curator of Modern Art at the
       Detroit Institute of Arts, ―Blue_ _ _ _‖ and ―YWCA‖ color photographs accepted
       into this 13 state exhibition. Out of 456 entries, 59 works were selected.

       ―WOMEN ARTIST ‘79 PAPERWORKS,‖ University of Kansas, Lawrence,
       Kansas; ―Studebaker‖ a color photograph accepted into this regional exhibition.




                                                                                    188
       ―WOMEN IN THE VISUAL ARTS,‖ Missouri Western State College, St.
       Joseph, Missouri, several color photographs selected into this regional exhibition.

       ―PHOTOSPIVA ‘79,‖ Spiva Art Center, Joplin, Missouri; two color photographs
       accepted into this national exhibition.

1978   ―NATIONAL PRINT, DRAWING AND PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION,‖
       Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, Virginia; Juror: Elke Soloman, ―Blue on
       Brick‖ a color photograph accepted into this national exhibition.

       ―11TH ANNUAL PRINT DRAWING AND CRAFT EXHIBITION,‖ Arkansas
       Arts Center, Little Rock, Arkansas; William Harper, Associate Professor of Art at
       Florida State University, Tallahassee-Purchase Award,
       ―Wichita Wall,‖ Honorable Mention, ―Double Corner ‖accepted into this
       regional exhibition.

       ―PHOTOSPIVA ‘78‖, Spiva Art Center, Joplin, Missouri; John Sexton,
       Photographer and author ―Beyond Pink‖ received $100 Second Place Cash
       Award in this national exhibition.

1977   ―WOMEN ARTIST ‘77,‖ University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City,
       Missouri; one black and white photograph accepted into this regional exhibition.

       ―10TH ANNUAL PRINT DRAWING AND CRAFT EXHIBITION,‖ Arkansas
       Arts Center, Little Rock, Arkansas; two black and white photographs accepted
       into this regional exhibition.

1976   ―KANSAS UNIVERSITY DESIGN MAJORS SHOW,‖ Missouri Western State
       College, St. Joseph, Missouri, several black and white photos and sculptures
       exhibited.

1975   ―BI-DIMENSIONAL AND TRI-DIMENSIONAL LIGHT REFLECTIONS AND
       SHADOWS,‖ Thesis Exhibition, one person show, Lawrence Art Center,
       Lawrence, Kansas, numerous black and white photos, reliefs and sculptures
       exhibited.

1973   ―ANNUAL DESIGN FACULTY ART EXHIBITION,‖ Kansas Union Gallery,
       University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, several black and white photos
       exhibited.

       ―ANNUAL PHOTOJOURNALISM EXHIBITION,‖ Kansas Union Gallery,
       University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; Second Place Award; one black and
       white photograph accepted into this university exhibition.




                                                                                       189
Student Exhibition and Award Record

2007/2008   Starr Gann, Harvey Jackson and Sam Perkins, students in the Intermediate and
            Advanced Photography class had their photographs accepted into the ―TWENTY
            FOURTH ANNUAL FIVE STATE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION &
            EXHIBITION‖ in Fort Hays, Kansas. Star had two photos accepted, Harvey had
            one and Sam‘s photographs are titled ―Spires‖, won Juror’s Merit Award. The
            judge was Greg Cradick, a fine art photographer end Executive Director of Flash
            Gallery, and working with Artist School of Photography.

2007        Three Intermediate Photography students, Starr Gann, Steven Pauley and Kristin
            Wampler, had their photographs accepted in the juried exhibition titled, ―Artist of
            the 21st Century‖. This is a collegiate competition for students attending
            southeastern colleges and universities. The judge was Renee Nunez.

            Harvey Jackson, a Beginning Photography student, had his photograph selected
            for inclusion in the 27th Annual Student Photography Contest and publication
            sponsored by Nikon U.S.A. There were over 28,000 entries with only 5%
            selected for inclusion in the publication titled, ―The Best of College
            Photography 2007‖. The judges were Steve RaVoie, Art Center College of
            Design, Pasedena; Karen Sinsheimer, Curator of Photography, Santa Barbara
            Museum of Art; and Armando Flores, representing Nikon U.S.A.

2006        Lauren Spencer. An Advanced Photography student, won ―Best Portfolio in
            Graphic Design‖ for her photography at the AIGA (American Institute of
            Graphic Arts.) The Regional Graphic Kansas and Missouri Design Student
            Forum was held in Wichita Kansas. She was competing with students from
            much larger schools like Kansas University of the University of Missouri of
            Kansas City and Columbia

2005        Susan McCarthy and Mary (Sullwold) Cobb, Advanced Photography Students
            had their photographs selected for inclusion in the 25th Annual Student
            Photography Contest and Publication sponsored by Nikon USA. There were
            over 30,000 entries with only 5% selected for inclusion in the publication titled
            ―The Best of College Photography 2005.‖ Judges were Dennis Kesley, Chair of
            the Photography Department, Art Center College of Design, Pasadewna; Linda
            Lowell, Chair of Photography Department, Santa Barbara City College, And
            Armando Flores from Nikon. Mary (Sullwold) Cobb also won Honorable
            Mention Award and her name appeared in the May/Summer 2005 issue of
            Photographers Forum Magazine for her photograph titled ―Scott In the Field‖.

            Shelly Black, Jennifer Jones, Rebecca Lewin, Susan McCarthy, Kristin Wampar,
            Jeff Wim and Grant Wittstruck included their photographs in the 31st Annual
            Membership Exibition at the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art.




                                                                                           190
2004   Four students had their work selected for inclusion in the 20th Annual Five State
       Photography Competition & Exhibition. This is a juried exhibition in Hayes,
       Kansas. Judge was Angie Buckley. Sarah Fisher had three photos accepted. Her
       photo entitled ―Unidentified‖ won First Place People $250.00 Cash Award.
       Sandy Scott had three photos accepted. Matt Stauss had one photo accepted and
       Mary (Sullwold) Cobb had four photos accepted into the competition and exhibit.

       Sarah Fisher and Jackie Roy also had their photographs accepted Photo Midwest
       2004, a seven state juried exhibition. Judge was Keith Carter into. This
       exhibition is also a professional juried exhibition at the University of Wisconsin –
       Madison.

       Sarah Fisher also had two photographs accepted into PHOTOSPIVA 2004 30th
       Annual National Professional Photography Competition in Joplin, MO. In
       addition, the photo entitled ―Rose and Burnadette‖ won a Merit Award. Judge
       Terese Mulligan, Ph.D, coordinator, MFA Program Imaging Arts–Photography,
       Rochester Institute of Technology.

       Tiffany Bosessen and Jackie Roy received Honorable Mention Awards for their
       photographs entered in the 30th Annual Membership Exhibition at the
       Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art.

       Jackie Roy‘s photograph entitled ―Big Top‖ received the 1st Place Award for
       two-dimensional art in the Artist of the 21st Century (an eight-state juried
       exhibition of student art) at the University of Tennessee at Martin. Judge was
       Susan W. Knowles. Independent Curator of Artists in the Airport and the First
       Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN.
       Kristen Wampler and Jackie Roy had their photographs included in the 24th
       Annual Student Photography Contest and Publications sponsored by Nikon
       USA. There were over 31, 000 entries with only 5% selected for inclusion in the
       contest and publication. Judges were Nick Dekker, faculty, Brooks Institute of
       Photography Santa Barbara; Everand Williams, Interim Chair of the Photography
       Department, Art Center College of Design, Pasadena; Armando Flores from
       Nikon USA.

       Eight Intermediate and Advanced Photo students had the honor of having
       photographs selected for inclusion in the 19th Annual FIVE STATE
       Photography Competition and Exhibition. This is a professional juried
       exhibition in Hayes, Kansas. Mary Adams, Sarah Fisher, Kimberly Posch, Sandy
       Scott, Kristin Wampler and Rita Zimmerman each had one photograph selected.
       Both Naomi Denning and Heather Sanstede had two photographs selected into
       the competition and exhibit.

2002   Six Intermediate and Advanced Photo students had the honor of having
       photographs selected for inclusion in several juried exhibitions. Kristen Eaton,
       Nick Poirier and Kristy Coy had one photo selected for 18th ANNUAL FIVE


                                                                                        191
       STATE PHOTOGRAPHY Competition and Exhibition in Hayes, Kansas. Sara
       Fisher had three photos accepted and Kelly Stanton had two photos accepted, plus
       the added honor of receiving a cash award for 3rd Place in the PEOPLE category
       for her photograph entitled ―Self-Portrait W/Mask.‖

       Kristin Eaton‘s Self Portrait photograph was selected as a finalist in the 22nd
       Annual Student Photography Contest sponsored by Nikon USA. Her work
       was published in ―Best of College Photography Annual 2002. There were over
       25,000 entries and it was a real honor for Kristin.

       Sarah Caldwell, another advanced photo student, had a photograph selected for
       inclusion in the 2002 13th Annual Missouri 50 Competition and Exhibition
       which is a professional juried show.

2001   Seven Advanced Photography students had the honor of having photographs
       Selected for inclusion in two regional juried exhibitions. Ashley Cruz, Brandon
       Jennings, Rachel McCrary, Nick Poirier, Angela Russell and Kelly Stanton had
       Photos accepted in the 17th Annual Five State Photography Competition and
       Exhibition in Hays, Kansas.

       Brandon Jennings and Andrea Hirter also had photos accepted in the
       Undergraduate College Student Exhibition hosted by the Kansas City Artist
       Coalition.

2000   Four Advanced Photography students had the honor of having photographs
       selected for inclusion in regional juried exhibitions. Jennifer Sandvoss and
       Aaron Steiner had photos accepted in the 16th Annual Five State Photography
       Competition and Exhibition in Hays, Kansas.

       Brandon Jennings and Verna Shinneman had their photos accepted in the
       Annual Quad State Juried Exhibition in Quincy, Illinois, in the spring.

1999   Amy Wright, a photography student was a finalist in the 19th Annual College
       Photography Contest sponsored by Nikon. Her photograph was published
       In the Best of College Photography Annual 1999. 26,448 entries were
       Submitted and only the top 4% were selected.




                                                                                     192
                                       Teresa J. Harris
                                         2910 Renick
                                 St. Joseph, Missouri 64507
                                        816-233-0765
                               tharris@missouriwestern.edu

EDUCATION
1999 • Fort Hays State University Hays, Kansas MFA, 4.0
1982 • Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri BA, Cum Laude
Additional Studies:
2001 • Ottawa University Ottawa, Kansas (Graphics Workshop)
2000 • Rockhurst University Kansas City, Missouri (Graphics Workshop)
1990 • Kansas City Art Institute Kansas City, Missouri (Summer Workshop)
1987 • University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas 1987

WORK EXPERIENCE
2004 - Present • Missouri Western State University St. Joseph, Missouri
Assistant Professor, Graphic Design
2004 - 1989 • Highland Community College Highland, Kansas
2004 - 1990 Art and Design Instructor
               2004 - 1990 Graphic Designer, Office of Institutional Advancement (Summer)
1990 - 1989 Artist-in-Residence
1988 - 1986 • Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri
1988 (Fall Semester) Adjunct Drawing and Painting
1988 (Spring Semester) Adjunct 3-D Design and Graphic Design
1986 (Fall Semester) Adjunct Design and Photomedia
1986 - 1983 • Clay and Paper Works Private Studio, Ceramics and Papermaking
Full time studio artist
1983 - 1982 • Kathryn Hanks Agency St. Joseph, Missouri
Freelance design work, logo design, artwork

WORKSHOPS CONDUCTED/LECTURES GIVEN
2000 - Minnesota State University, Moorhead, Minnesota
Three-Day, All State Symposium; Hands-on Workshops, Lecture, Critique
2000 - Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri Lecture
1999 - Emporia State University Emporia, Kansas Artist Series - Lecture and Workshop
1996 - Culver-Stockton College Canton, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1995 - Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1994 - Emporia State University Emporia, Kansas Workshop and Lecture
1992 - Barton County Community College Great Bend, Kansas Lecture
1990 - Heartland Art Association, St. Joseph, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1988 - The Albrecht Art Museum St. Joseph, Missouri Lecture
1988 - Kansas Artist-Craftsman Conference Emporia State University Emporia, Kansas
Lecture
1987 - St. Joseph Art Association St. Joseph, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1986 - Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri Workshop and Lecture


                                                                                        193
1986 - Conception Seminary College Conception, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1985 - Northwest Missouri State University Maryville, Missouri Workshop and Lecture
1982 - Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri Workshop and Lecture


CONFERENCES ATTENDED
2007 Third Annual National Student
    Design Exhibition and Conference Dallas, Texas
2006 HOW Design Conference Las Vegas, Nevada
2006 AIGA Student Design Forum Wichita, Kansas
2005 HOW Design Conference Chicago, Illinois
2005 AIGA Student Design Forum Wichita, Kansas
2004 HOW Design Conference San Diego, California
2003 HOW Design Conference New Orleans, LA
KACA Annual Conference Emporia, Kansas
KACA Annual Conference Manhattan, Kansas
Southern Graphics Council Conference Ames, Iowa
Southern Graphics Council Conference Tulsa, Oklahoma

CORPORATE COLLECTIONS
McDougal, Littel & Company (Publishers) Evanston, Illinois
Saks Fifth Avenue New York, New York
Impressions, Inc. Madison, Wisconsin
Jesup Group Sarasota, Florida
Ann Arbor Art Association Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sandusky Art Center Sandusky, Ohio
Topeka Public Library Topeka, Kansas

COMMISSIONS
Jesup Group (Uniroyal) Sarasota, Florida
Provident Life Insurance Company Birmingham, Alabama
Mr. John McGarry Grand Rapids, Michigan
Ms. Donna Livingston San Antonio, Texas
A,T & T Kansas City, Missouri
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Boyaski Wichita, Kansas

JUROR

2008 Women‘s Federation High School Art Exhibition Highland, Kansas
2007 Highland Community College Art Day Competition Highland, Kansas
2007 Women‘s Federation High School Art Exhibition Highland, Kansas
2006 Delaware Valley League Art High School Art Competition Wathena, Kansas
2006 Doniphan County Bicentennial High School Art Competition Troy, Kansas
2006 Reflections Art Competition Parkway Elementary School St. Joseph, Missouri
2006 Midwest Artists 22nd Annual Membership Exhibition St. Joseph, Missouri
2005 Members Art Exhibition Saxton Retirement Center St. Joseph, Missouri


                                                                                      194
2004 Art for the Health of It Allied Arts Council St. Joseph, Missouri
2003 Hidden Glen Art Festival Shawnee Mission, Kansas
2003 (1994 - 2003) Women‘s Federation High School Exhibition Highland, Kansas
2002 Columbian Art Center Membership Juried Exhibition Wamego, Kansas
2001 Albrecht-Kemper Museum Membership Exhibition St. Joseph, Missouri
2001 (1996 - 2001) Prairie Art Guild High School Art Exhibition Atchison, Kansas
2000 Smoky Hills River Festival Salina, Kansas
1992 Albrecht-Kemper High School Art Exhibition St. Joseph, Missouri
1993 Kansas High School Art Exhibition Horton, Kansas
1994 Kansas Art Commission Individual Grant Award Salina, Kansas
1989 Art Day Highland, Kansas
1987 Ann Arbor Art Festival Ann Arbor, Michigan
1986 Plaza Art Fair Kansas City, Missouri
1986 Conception Seminary Art Exhibition Conception Junction, Missouri

PUBLICATIONS

2000 Off-Hours, St. Joseph Newspress St. Joseph, Missouri Cover, article 2000
1994 Sandusky Register Sandusky, Ohio Article, review 1994
1994 Forum Magazine Kansas City, Missouri Review 1994
1994 St. Joseph Newspress Photographs and article 1994
1998 St. Joseph Newspress Photograph and article 1988
1987 St. Joseph Newspress Photograph and article 1987
1985 St. Joseph Newspress Photograph and article 1985
1986 The Kansas City Star 1986
1985 The Kansas City Star 1985
1987 Cimmaron Review National journal of arts, letters, and opinions
   Stillwater, Oklahoma Cover, article, photographs



EXHIBITIONS

       2008 • ―Recent Work‖
       Solo Exhibition
       Yost Gallery, Highland Community College Highland, Kansas
       • ‖MWSU Faculty Exhibition‖
       Group Exhibition
       Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University St. Joseph, Missouri

       2007 • ―25th Annual National Small Works Exhibition‖
       National Juried Exhibition
       Gallery 107 Cobleskill, New York
       • ―Quincy Biennial Quad-State Exhibition‖
       Four-State Juried Exhibition
       Quincy Art Center Quincy, Illinois


                                                                                   195
       • ―TEXAS NATIONAL 2007 Exhibition‖
       National Juried Exhibition
       Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, Texas
       • "12th Oklahoma Biennial: Centerfold"
       National Juried Exhibition *Juror‘s Award
       Leslie Powell Gallery Lawton, Oklahoma
       The University of Arts and Sciences Chickasha, Oklahoma
       November 2006, January 2007

2006 • "MWSU Faculty Exhibition"
       Group Exhibition
       Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University St. Joseph, Missouri
       • "Rocky Mount Arts Center‘s 7th Annual Juried Art Exhibition"
       National Juried Exhibition
       Rocky Mount Art Center Rocky Mount, North Carolina
       • "Americas 2000: Paper Works Exhibition"
       International Juried Exhibition - 35th Annual Exhibition
       Harnett Hall Gallery, Minot State University Minot, North Dakota
         • "Albrecht-Kemper Membership Exhibition"
       Group Membership Exhibition * 1st Place Award - Mixed Media
       The Albrecht-Kemper Museum St. Joseph, Missouri
       • "Greater Midwest International XXI Competition"
       International Exhibition
       Art Center Gallery, Central Missouri State University Warrensburg, Missouri
       2005 • "Kansas Artist-Craftsman Exhibition‖
       Juried Membership Show *1st Place Award
       Sabatini Gallery Topeka, Kansas
       • "MWSC Faculty Exhibition"
       Group Exhibition
       Gallery 206, Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri
       • "Albrecht-Kemper Membership Exhibition"
       Membership Exhibition * 2st Place Award - Mixed Media
       The Albrecht-Kemper Museum St. Joseph, Missouri

2002 • "Recent Work - Teresa Harris and David Harris"
       Two-Person Exhibition
       The Columbian Art Center Wamego, Kansas

2001 • "FHSU - Looking Towards a New Century"
       Invitational Group Exhibition
       Moss-Thorns Gallery of Art, Fort Hays State University Hays, Kansas

2000 • ―In Spirit‖
       Solo Exhibition
       Gallery 206 Missouri Western State College   St. Joseph, Missouri
       • ―Faculty Exhibition‖


                                                                                     196
       Group Exhibition
       Highland Community College Highland, Kansas
       • ―Recent Work‖
       Three-Person Exhibition
       Roland Dille Center for the Arts, Moorhead State University Moorhead, Minnesota
       • ―Recent Work‖
       Two-Person Exhibition
       Emporia Arts Center Emporia, Kansas

1999 • ―In Spirit‖
       Graduate Thesis Exhibition
       Moss-Thorns Gallery of Art, Fort Hays State University Hays, Kansas
       • ―Topeka Competition 22‖
       Juried 7–State Fine Crafts Exhibition *Award
       Mulvane Art Museum, Washburn University Topeka, Kansas
       Sponsored by the Topeka & Shawnee Public Library Gallery of Fine Art
       November 1998 - January 1999


1998 • KACA Kansas Artist-Craftsman Association Exhibition
       Juried Membership Exhibition
       Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas
       October 1998 - January 1999
       • Albrecht-Kemper Museum Membership Exhibition
       Group Membership Exhibition *Award
       Albrecht-Kemper Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri

1997 • Albrecht-Kemper Museum Membership Exhibition
        Group Membership Exhibition * First Place Award - Mixed Media
       Albrecht-Kemper Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri

1996 • ―Teresa J. Harris: Book Series‖
       Solo Exhibition
       Marion Gardner Jackson Room, Culver-Stockton College Canton, Missouri
       • ―Paper, Paint and Word‖
         Three-Person Exhibition
         The Columbian Art Center Wamego, Kansas
       • Albrecht-Kemper Museum Membership Exhibition
       Group Membership Exhibition
       Albrecht-Kemper Museum St. Joseph, Missouri
       1995 • ―Recent Work‖
       Group Exhibition
       Campbell/Steel Gallery Marion, Iowa
       • ―Faculty Show‖
       Group Exhibition
       Yost Gallery, Highland Community College Highland, Kansas


                                                                                         197
          291, Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri

1994 • "Paper and Clay"
       Two-Person Exhibition
       Norman P. Eppick Gallery, Emporia State University Emporia, Kansas
       • "More Paperworks"
       Invitational Group Show
       Sandusky Art Center Sandusky, Ohio
       • "New Relics"
         Three-Person Exhibition
       Kansas City Artists‘ Coalition Gallery Kansas City, Missouri

1993 • "Fiber Invitational"
          Invitational Group Show
       Topeka Public Library Gallery Topeka, Kansas

1993 • Highland Community College Faculty Show
       Group Exhibition
        Yost Gallery Highland, Kansas

1992 • "Paperworks"
       Solo Exhibition
       Shafer Memorial Gallery
       Barton County Community College, Great Bend, Kansas
       • Kansas Artist-Craftsman Touring Exhibition
       Group Membership Exhibition           * Best of Show Award
       Manhattan, Kansas
       Yost Gallery, Highland, Kansas

1991 • Kansas Artist-Craftsman Touring Exhibition
       Group Membership Exhibition *Honorable Mention
       Ottawa, Kansas
       Hutchison, Kansas
       Great Bend, Kansas
       • "Clay and Paper"
         Two-Person Exhibition
       Hutchison Art Association Gallery Hutchison, Kansas

1990 •"Topeka Competition 14"
       Juried 7-State Fine Crafts Exhibition
       Gallery of Fine Arts, Topeka Public Library Topeka, Kansas
       • "20th Anniversary Alumni Exhibition"
       Group Exhibition
       Fine Arts Gallery, Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri




                                                                                198
1989 • "Gifts of Art"
       Group Exhibition
       University of Michigan Hospital Ann Arbor, Michigan
       • "Porcelain and Paper"
       Two-Person Exhibition
       Highland Community College Gallery Highland, Kansas

1988 • "Clay and Paper"
       Two-Person Exhibition
       Gallery 206, Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri
       • "Paper/Fiber XI"
       National Juried Exhibition
       The Arts Center Iowa City, Iowa
       • "MWSC Faculty Exhibition"
       Group Exhibition
       Thompson E. Potter Gallery, Missouri Western State College St. Joseph, Missouri

1988 • "Clay and Paper"
        Two-Person Exhibition
        Barton County Community College       Great Bend, Kansas

1988 • "Teresa J. Harris"- Handmade Paper"
       Solo Exhibition
       Norman R. Eppink Art Gallery, Emporia State University Emporia, Kansas
       • "New Trends in Fiber"
       National Fiber Exhibition
       Mulvane Art Center, Washburn University Topeka, Kansas

1987 • "Smoky Hills Art Exhibition"
       Juried Exhibition    *Juror's Award Distinction
       Hays Art Council Gallery Hays, Kansas
       • "Topeka Crafts Competition 11"
       Juried 7–State Fine Crafts Exhibition * Juror's Award
        Topeka Public Library Gallery Topeka, Kansas

1986 • "Teresa Harris - Handmade Paper"
       Solo Exhibition
       Wichita Art Association Gallery
       Wichita, Kansas
       • "Cool Stuff"
       Invitational Group Exhibition
       Jan Wiener Gallery Kansas City, Missouri
       • "Clay and Paper"
       Two-Person Exhibition
       Haymarket Art Gallery Lincoln, Nebraska
       • "MSWC Faculty Invitational"


                                                                                         199
       Invitational Group Exhibition
       Olive DeLuce Gallery, Northwest Missouri State University Maryville, Missouri
       • "Four Women in Fiber"
       Three-Person Exhibition
       Jan Weiner Gallery Central Exchange, Kansas City, Missouri
       • "Smoky Hills Exhibition"
       Regional Juried Exhibition *Juror's Award of Excellence and Purchase Award
       Hays Art Council Hays, Hays, Kansas
       • "Topeka Craft Competition 10"
       Regional Juried Exhibition * Juror's Award
       Topeka Public Library Gallery Topeka, Kansas
       • "Santa Fe Railway Collection"
       National Group Touring Collection
       Jan Wiener Gallery

1985 • "Papermaking: One Women Show"
       Solo Exhibition
       Olive DeLuce Gallery, Northwest Missouri State University Maryville, Missouri
       • "Topeka Craft Competition 9"
       Regional Juried Exhibition * Purchase Award
       Topeka Public Library Topeka, Kansas

1985 • "Six St. Joseph Artists"
        B edyk Gallery Kansas City, Missouri

1984 • "Topeka Craft Competition 8"
       Regional Juried Exhibition *Purchase Award and Juror's Award
       Topeka Public Library Topeka, Kansas

1982 • "Women Art 5"
       Juried Art Exhibition
       Wichita Art Association Wichita, Kansas
       • "National Photo Exhibition 1982"
       National Juried Exhibition
       University of California   Riverside, California




                                                                                       200
                                      Dr. Allison Houston Sauls
                                                    1308 North Eleventh Street
                                                  Saint Joseph, Missouri 64501
                                                                          
                                           816.387.8159 (h) 816.271.4422 (o)
                                                           816.271.8141 (FAX)
                                                   sauls@missouriwestern.edu

EDUCATION   Doctor of Philosophy    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia,
                                    1992
      
                    Major Field:    Modern Humanities
                                    Specialty in 20th century art history and the
                                    history of film

                    Minor Field:    Interdisciplinary study in literature,
                                    philosophy and aesthetics

                    Dissertation:   The Ineluctable Modality of the Visible:
                                    Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo and the
                                    Theories of Time, Space and
                                    Dimensionality

                                    The University of Georgia, Athens,
                 Master of Arts:    Georgia

                    Major Field:    American art history with an emphasis on
                                    French colonial military architecture and
                                    19th and 20th century painting and
                                    sculpture

                                    Fort Toulouse: An Interpretation of
                                    Documentary Evidence for Architectural
                         Thesis:    Reconstruction

                                    Huntingdon College, Montgomery,
               Bachelor of Arts:    Alabama

                    Major Field:    Double Major in English and art history



                                                                             201
AWARDS   2006   Outstanding Instructor , Presented by
              Disabilities Services Missouri Western
                State University (Student Nomination)

         2003   Outstanding Honors Program Faculty
                Selected by SHO (Student Honors
                Organization)

                Mayor’s Award for the Arts: Arts
                Educator, Presented by Mayor David J.
                Jones, City of

                Nomination Missouri Awards for the Arts:
                Arts Educator, Jefferson City, Missouri

         2002   Promotion to Associate Professor,
                Missouri Western State College, Saint
                Joseph, Missouri

                Undergraduate Summer Research Grant,
                student participants, Brian Clark and Jane
                Travis ―Exploration and Replication of
                Salt-Firing Methodology by Early Midwest
                Potters‖ Missouri Western State College,
                Saint Joseph, Missouri

         2001   Funding for Results, Recognition for
                innovative teaching techniques, Missouri
                Western State College, Saint Joseph,
                Missouri

                City of Saint Joseph Civic Recognition
                Award, for ―dedicated and unselfish
                volunteer service to the citizens of St.
                Joseph‖. Presented by Mayor Larry Stobbs
                for Historic Preservationist Work for the
                City

         1997   Tenure, Missouri Western State College,
                Saint Joseph, Missouri

                Funding for Results, Recognition for
                innovative teaching techniques, Missouri
                Western State College, Saint Joseph,
                Missouri

                                                    202
               1991-1992    Graduate Assistantship, Research
                            Assistant, Dr. Dana White, The Graduate
                            Institute of Liberal Arts, Emory University,
                            Atlanta, Georgia

               1986-1987    Graduate Assistantship, Editorial assistant,
                            Ethos Journal, Emory University, Atlanta,
                            Georgia (Declined to accept assistant
                            professorship for a year at the University of
                            Tennessee) Sabbatical replacement.

               1983-1991    Tuition Scholarship, Graduate School,
                            Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

                            Departmental Fellowship, The Graduate
                            Institute of Liberal Arts, Emory University,
                            Atlanta, Georgia

                            Internship, The International Student
                            Organization, Division of Campus Life,
                            Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

               1976-1979    Graduate Departmental Assistantships,
                            Department of Art, The University of
                            Georgia, Athens, Georgia

               1969-1971    Undergraduate Assistantships,
                            Huntingdon College, Montgomery,
                            Alabama

  TEACHING   1997-present   Chair, Department of Art, Missouri
EXPERIENCE                  Western State University, Saint Joseph,
                            Missouri
      
             2002-present   Associate Professor, Missouri Western
                            State University, Saint Joseph, Missouri

             2000-present   Director, Studies Abroad Italy Program,
                            Department of Art, Missouri Western State
                            University, Saint Joseph, Missouri

               1993-2002    Assistant Professor, Missouri Western
                            State College*, Saint Joseph, Missouri


                                                                  203
                                1995     Acting Chairperson, Department of Art,
                                         Missouri Western State College, Saint
                                         Joseph, Missouri

                          1989-1991      Instructor of Art History, Kennesaw State
                                         College, Marietta, Georgia

                          1989-1991      Instructor of Art Education, Brenau
                                         College, Gainesville, Georgia

                          1986-1987      Visiting Assistant Professor of Art
                                         History, The University of Tennessee,
                                         Department of Art, Chattanooga,
                                         Tennessee (Sabbatical replacement)

                          1983-1985      Mary Wallace Kirk Visiting Scholar of Art
                                         History, Agnes Scott College, Atlanta,
                                         Georgia

                          1983-1986      Guest Lecturer, Reinhardt College,
                                         Waleska, Georgia

                          1982-1983      Off -Campus Instructor of Record, Adult
                                         Degree Program, Mary Baldwin College,
                                         Staunton, Virginia
                          1981-1983      Instructor, Georgia Center for Continuing
                                         Education, University of Georgia, Athens,
                                         Georgia

                          1979-1980      Instructor of Art History, University of
                                         Georgia, Department of Art, Athens,
                                         Georgia

PUBLICATIONS   Design Guideline For      Reviewing and Editing with Ron Petersen,
            St. Joseph, Missouri     Roger Martin, Marylyn Maxwell, Morton
                    Historic Districts   Nelson, Dennis Brewer, Tim Stites, Steve
                                         Carrilli, Scott Johnson, Diana Midyett,
                                         Mark Mikkelsen, Denise Denman, Terry
                                         Jimenez, Allison Sauls, Harrison Hartley,
                                         Joan Sweet, Dan Moore, Thomas Kirschner
                                         and Donna Farrow-Ball, reviewers and
                                         editors. St. Joseph Landmarks
                                         Commission. Published Fall 2001, Adopted
                                         October 2, 2001.


                                                                               204
                 Gilbert’s Living With     by Mark Getlein. Sixth Edition. Review.
                                   Art     McGraw-Hill Higher Education, a division
                                           of McGraw Hill publications, New York.
                                           2001

                   “Art Appreciation:      submitted to the Journal on the Art of
                  An Interdisciplinary     Teaching, sponsored by the Florida
                   Approach to a New       International University in Miami, Florida
                           Pedagogy”       2001

                     ―The Pilgrimage       The Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century
                   Church at Neviges”      Architecture, Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers,
                                           Chicago 2001

                   “The Museum of          The Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century
               Modern Art, Frankfurt       Architecture, Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers,
                                           Chicago 2001.

                 The Italians And The      by Susan Zuccotti. Book Review. The
               Holocaust: Persecution,     Journal of the Association for the
                 Rescue And Survival       Interdisciplinary Study of the Arts
                                           accepted

                Visualizing Boccaccio:     by Jill Ricketts. Book Review. The
                Studies on Illustrations   Journal of the Association for the
               of the Decameron, from      Interdisciplinary Study of the Arts Vol.
                      Giotto to PasolinI   XVIII, No. 2, Fall 2001

                      About Atlanta: A     Dana White, PhD, Allison Sauls, editorial
                       Research Guide      assistant, 5th edition, (Atlanta, Georgia),
                                           1988

                    Frederic Guitheim      Dana White, PhD, Allison Sauls, research
               at Eighty: A Festschrift    assistant, (Atlanta, Georgia), 1988

                     Historic Places in    with Anne Hancock, (Montgomery,
                  Central Alabama: A       Alabama) 1973
                Preliminary Inventory

     PAPERS,                      2001     Two Guys In Search Of An Author:
   PANELS &                                Brando, Peckinpah And The Vision Of
CONFERENCES                                The True West, New York College English
                                         Association Fall Conference, Bridges and
                                           Borders in Literature and Film, Canisius


                                                                                 205
       College, Buffalo, New York




2001   Narrative Technique In Novel And Film,
       Panel Chair, New York College English
       Association Fall Conference, Bridges and
       Borders in Literature and Film, Canisius
       College, Buffalo, New York

1998   The Power Of Light: Color Theory From
       Goethe To Helmholtz, Presented to the
       Prairie Arts League, Atchison, Kansas

1997   Under The Influence: Alfred Hitchcock,
       H.G. Wells And Modern Physics,
       European Studies Conference, Omaha,
       Nebraska

1997   The English Patience: The British
       Ramble in Post-Industrial England,
       European Studies Conference, Omaha,
       Nebraska

1996   Death As Topic In The Arts And Politics,
       Panel Chair. Panel Members: Dora
       Dumont, Boston College, Norma J.
       Humphreys, Ohio University and Rodney
       Marchant, Cloud State University.
       European Studies Conference, Omaha,
       Nebraska

1996   Max Ernst’s Bedroom: It’s Worth
       Spending a Night There, International
       Conference on Despair and Desire, Atlanta,
       Georgia

1996   The Cutting Edge: Alfred Hitchcock And
       The 20th Century Aesthetic, European
       Studies Conference, Omaha, Nebraska

1995   Vienna In The Age Of Freud, Presented at
       the Albrect-Kemper Museum of Art, St.
       Joseph, Missouri

                                           206
WORKSHOPS             2001    Weeklong Teaching Online Courses
                            through Learning Resources Network,
                              River Falls, Wisconsin.

    GRANTS    1996-PRESENT    Foundations Grants, for Gallery 206
                            operational budget, Missouri Western State
                              University Foundation, Saint Joseph,
                              Missouri

                      2002    Undergraduate Summer Research
                              Grant, student participants, Brian Clark
                              and Jane Travis ―Exploration and
                              Replication of Salt-Firing Methodology by
                              Early Midwest Potters‖ Missouri Western
                              State College, Saint Joseph, Missouri

                  1989-1990   Georgia Endowment for the Arts Grant,
                              for the Public Broadcast System Television
                              Documentary series on the urbanization of
                              Atlanta, Georgia entitled The Making of
                              Atlanta. After the series aired it received
                              an Emmy nomination and was renewed and
                              funded for a second year

                  1984-1985   National Endowment for the Arts Grant,
                              “Lest We Forget.‖ An exhibition of
                              portraits of major leaders of the Civil
                              Rights Movement intended to mark the
                              first national observance of the Reverend
                              Martin Luther King‘s birthday. Exhibited
                              at the Schatten Gallery, Emory University,
                              Atlanta, Georgia

                  1982-1983   Department of the Interior Grant,
                              Administered through the Alabama
                              Historic Commission and the Central
                              Alabama Planning and Development
                              Commission for a tri-county survey of all
                              historical sites, structures and buildings in
                              Autauga, Elmore and Montgomery
                              counties

EXHIBITIONS   1997-PRESENT    Faculty Bi-Annual Exhibition, Gallery
                            206, Missouri Western State College, Saint
                              Joseph, Missouri


                                                                      207
2008   Albrecht-Kemper Museum 34th Annual
       Membership Exhibition AWARD 2nd
       Place Printmaking

2007   Albrecht-Kemper Museum 33h Annual
       Membership Exhibition. AWARD 1st
       Place Printmaking; Honorable Mention
       Photograph

2006   Albrecht-Kemper Museum 32h Annual
       Membership Exhibition. AWARD 2nd
       Place Photography

2005   Nature’s Web Exhibition sponsored by the
       Columbia Art League, Columbia, Missouri
       Curator

2002   Albrecht-Kemper Museum 28th Annual
       Membership Exhibition. AWARD 1st
       Place Photography

2001   Art For the Health of It. Heartland Health
       Association. AWARD: 2nd Place in


2000   Art For the Health of It. Heartland Health
       Association. Photography

2000   Missouri Western State College Faculty
       Exhibit, Yost Art Gallery, Highland
       Community College, Highland, Kansas,
       Photography

2000   Timely Timeless Art, Albrect-Kemper
       Museum of Art in association with The
       Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas
       City. Sculpture

1999   Albrect-Kemper Museum 25th Annual
       Membership Exhibition. Saint Joseph,
       Missouri. Photography

1999   Art For the Health of It. Heartland Health
       Association. AWARD: 2nd Place In


                                           208
                              Photography.


                       1999   Albrect-Kemper Museum 24h Annual
                              Membership Exhibition. Saint Joseph,
                              Missouri. Photography

                       1998   Albrect-Kemper Museum 23rd Annual
                              Membership Exhibition. Saint Joseph,

   RELATED   2000 - PRESENT   Board Member, David H. Morton
EXPERIENCE                    Memorial Fund for the Arts, Saint Joseph,
                            Missouri

                       2005   Participant, Boston College, Lynch
                              School of Education, requested
                              participation in study focusing on visual art
                              and design in higher education. The
                              purpose of the research is to gather
                              important data concerning the role of the
                              artist and design professionals as
                              professors.

                  1995-2000   Commissioner, City of St. Joseph
                              Landmarks Commission (5 year
                              government appointment) St. Joseph,
                              Missouri

                       1989   Member, State of Missouri, Missouri Arts
                              Council, Grant Application Review, Saint
                              Louis, Missouri

                  1996-1998   Chair, Steering Committee Fine Arts
                              Program. Trails West! Festival, Saint
                              Joseph, Missouri


                  1987-1990   Archivist Technician, Department of the
                              Interior, National Park Service, Southeast
                              Regional Office, Historic Architecture
                              Division. Chief Responsibility:
                              Establishment and development of
                              southeast regional library serving fifty-two
                              (52) national parks in the southeast United
                              States, Costa Rico and the Virgin Islands.


                                                                    209
                    1983-1984   Gallery Manager, The McIntosh Gallery,
                                Atlanta, Georgia

                         1983   Gallery Manager, Fay Gold Gallery,
                                Atlanta, Georgia


                    1981-1983   Director, Slide Library and A/V Resource
                                Department, The University of Georgia,
                                Athens, Georgia

                    1978-1979   Museum Director and Gallery
                                Coordinator, Madison-Morgan Cultural
                                Center, Madison, Georgia


                                Research Assistant/Writer, Central
                                Alabama Planning and Development
                                Commission, Montgomery, Alabama

PROFESSIONAL   1982 - PRESENT   CAA: College Art Association of America
ASSOCIATIONS
         
               2001 - PRESENT   National Council for Art Administrators


               1993-PRESENT     MAHA: Mid-West Art History Association

                    1995-1997   Society for Nineteenth-Century Studies

                    1992-1995   Society for Cinema Studies

                    1992-1994   University Film and Video Association

                    1978-1979   National Museum Director’s Association




                                                                     210
REFERENCES   Dr. David Cook, Chair    Dr. Martin Johnson, Dean
           Department of Theatre    College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
             Studies                  Missouri Western State University
             Humanities Building      4525 Downs Drive
             Emory University         Saint Joseph, Missouri 64507-2294
             Atlanta, Georgia         (816) 271-4510
             (404) 727-6463


             Dr. Dana White, Chair    The Reverend Provost Robert A. Terrill
             The Graduate Institute   Grace Cathedral
             of Liberal Arts Emory    701 SW Eighth Street
             University Atlanta,      Topeka, Kansas 66603
             Georgia 30332 (404)      (785) 235-3457
             727-4228


                                      *Missouri Western State College became
                                      Missouri Westerns State University 2005




                                                                             211
                                    Geo Sipp
                                   415 North Third Street
                                             # 701
                                    Saint Joseph, Missouri
                                            64501
                                   Home: (816) 279-9637
                                    Work: (816) 271-4451
                              e-mail: sipp@missouriwestern.edu


Education:

MFA          Clemson University, Clemson, SC                     1999-2000
BFA          University of Florida, Gainesville, FL               1976-1982

Teaching Experience:

Associate Professor, Missouri Western State University           2001-Present
 Responsible for teaching all levels of drawing, painting, printmaking and illustration.
 Provide instruction and demonstrate printmaking techniques in the following disciplines:
   Intaglio (copper and zinc), Serigraphy, Relief, Collagraph, Vitreography, Solarplate,
   Photoetch processes and Lithography
 Maintain Painting, Drawing and Printmaking studios
 Responsible for designing all course curriculum for my teaching disciplines

Visiting Assistant Professor, Georgia Southern University     2001
 Responsible for teaching two sections of foundations design courses
 Responsible for teaching one section of drawing
 Evaluated and guided students‘ conceptual development

Instructor, Clemson University                                   2000-2001
 Responsible for teaching foundation drawing courses
 Demonstrated materials and processes
 Evaluated and guided students‘ conceptual development

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Clemson University               1999-2000
 Responsible for teaching printmaking classes in Intaglio,
   Silkscreen, Relief, Mono-Printing, Photoetch Processes,
   Collagraph and Lithography.
 Responsible for maintaining equipment and chemicals
 Evaluated and guided students‘ conceptual development

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Clemson University                1999
 Responsible for teaching drawing principles to


                                                                                             212
    Beginning Drawing class
   Demonstrated materials and processes
   Evaluated, critiqued and graded students‘ work

Vero Beach Museum of Art, Vero Beach, Florida                     1996-99
 Instructed courses in Advanced Drawing,
   Advanced Painting, Advanced Pastels and
   Conceptual Image-Making
 Demonstrated techniques with materials and processes
 Evaluated and critiqued students‘ work

Indian River Community College, Vero Beach, Florida              1996-1999
 ( Associated with the Center for the Arts ) – taught
    Freshman and sophomore drawing and painting courses
 Demonstrated techniques with materials and processes
 Evaluated and critiqued students‘ work

Bauder College, Atlanta, Georgia                                   1991-1992
 Taught courses in illustration and fashion illustration

The Portfolio Center, Atlanta, Georgia                            1988-1991
 Taught advanced illustration programs
 Created assignments that focused on the fulfillment of
   Design problems through all stages of the illustration process

Teaching Expertise:

Drawing: Foundation, Figure, Graphite, Charcoal, Pastel
Printmaking: Intaglio, Silkscreen, Relief, Mono-Printing, Collagraph, Solar Plate
Painting: Acrylic, oil – Familiar with all mediums and techniques
Illustration: Concept development, Analogy, Metaphor, Professional
               Presentation, Client Relations, Contracts and Negotiations,
               Portfolio Presentation

Professional Experience:

Commercial Illustrator                                           1982-Present

Advertising Agencies                                                      Client

   BBDO Atlant                                                    Delta Airlines
   Grey , New York                                                TV Storyboards
   McCann-Erickson, Atlanta                                       Coca-Cola
   Ogilvy & Mather , Atlanta                                      Atlanta Ballet
   J. Walter Thompson, Atlanta                                    General Electric


                                                                                      213
   Tucker Wayne Luckie, Atlanta                                   BellSouth
   Wells,Rich & Greene, New York                                  TV Storyboards

Corporations
 Beefeater Gin-
     Designed and illustrated a point of purchase display and poster for the
       Los Angeles Olympic games.
 BellSouth-
       Illustrated two service capabilities campaigns, 1993.
 Bloomingdale‘s-
       Designed beach towels for the Domestics department.
 Blue Cross & Blue Shield-
        Created a series of illustrations that ran as double-page spreads in
        Consumer magazines. Illustrations depicted Olympic sporting events.
 Coca-Cola-
      Illustrated numerous campaigns for sporting events. Designed and
      Illustrated point of purchase displays. Designed national championship
     Commemorative cans for the University of Washington and the
     University of Miami.
 The Convention & Visitors Bureau of Atlanta-
       Designed and illustrated three direct mail campaigns with accompanying
       Posters to promote Atlanta‘s business and recreational capabilities.
 General Electric-
         Illustrated corporate capabilities brochures for General Electric‘s
         Subsidiary, Hughes Systems.
 Harris Corporation; Melbourne, Florida-
          Illustrated capabilities brochures and corporate magazines, 1996-2000.
 Lotus Corporation-
           Illustrated a magazine illustration and poster depicting the racing
           History of the manufacturer.
 Trans-Siberian Railroad; Saint Petersburg, Russia-
           Illustrated a poster and magazine advertisement promoting
           Technological improvements within the company, 1997.
 Tribune Media Company; Chicago, Illinois-
           Illustrated advertisements for consumer and trade magazines
           Promoting Tribune‘s media holdings.
 Turner Broadcasting-
            Illustrations for several broadcast-related projects for Turner Classic
            Movies.
 United American Hebrew Congress; New York, New York-
           Regularly contribute editorial illustrations to Reform Judaism magazine.
 United States Postal Service -
             Illustrated a special stamp distributed to military personnel during
             Desert Storm.
 Walt Disney Corporation; Orlando, Florida-
              Created comprehensive sketches for new animal theme park.

                                                                                      214
Entertainment

   Alliance Theater; Atlanta, Georgia
       Illustrated a poster for the play A Man For All Seasons, 1990.
   Atlanta Ballet -
       Illustrated a multimedia campaign for The Nutcracker, 1989.
   Atlanta Symphony -
       Designed and illustrated a fundraising direct mail campaign, 1996.
   Metropolitan Opera; New York, New York
       Created an illustration for Rigoletto, multiple use campaign, 1991.
   Motown Records; Detroit, Michigan
       Illustrated album cover for a compilation recording, 1992.
   Sony Records -
       Illustrated album cover for recording artist, Ray Boltz, 1994.



Publications

   Atlanta Journal & Constitution-
       Newspaper and magazine supplement illustrations, 1987-1990.
   Bantam, Dell, Doubleday -
       Book jacket designs, 1995.
   Boston Globe -
       Illustrations for newspaper‘s travel section, 1989.
   Chicago Tribune -
       Illustrations for the Chicago Cubs baseball team, 1988 & 1989.
   Fortune Magazine -
       Illustrations for promotions department, subscription solicitations, 1998.
   Los Angeles Times -
       Frequent contributions to the book review & magazine sections.
   McGraw-Hill -
        Illustrations for children‘s textbooks, 1990.
   Newsweek -
        Illustrations for promotions department, unpublished, 1995.
   New York Times -
        Illustrations for promotions department, 1983-1984.
   Peachtree Publishers; Atlanta, Georgia
        Cover illustration for the novel, A Lamb in His Bosom, 1993.
   Reader‘s Digest -
        Created comprehensive sketches for direct mail campaign, promoting
        Classic music collections.
   Saint Martin‘s Press -
        Created a large number of cover illustrations for mysteries, 1995-present.
   Sports Illustrated -


                                                                                     215
        Collaborated with the advertising department to create posters for
        Kobrand importers to promote the 1984 Olympics, 1983.
   Time-Warner -
        Promotions department illustrations, 1995.
   U.S. News & World Report -
        Cover illustration sketches, unpublished, 1997.


Sports

   ABC Television -
       Sketches and illustrations for the Los Angeles Olympic Games, 1983.
   Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games -
       Created designs and illustrations used for a wide variety of applications:
       Posters, direct mail, clothing and other merchandise, 1990-1996.
   Masters Golf Tournament -
        Illustrated a poster for Blue Cross & Blue Shield, depicting the approach
       To the 13th green.
   Major League Baseball -
       Created an illustration for the Tribune Broadcasting Company that ran as
       The center spread in the program for the All-Star game played at
       Wrigley Field.
       Created an illustration for the Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau that
       Was used as the Atlanta Braves schedule cover and billboards, 1996.
   National Football League -
       In cooperation with Coca-Cola, ABC‘s Monday Night Football and
       Hardee‘s restaurants, created illustrations used as promotional
       Merchandise, 1993-1994.
   Palm Beach Polo -
        Illustrated a poster, unpublished, 1996


Collections:

Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas
 Mr. Ray Boltz, Nashville, Tennessee
Blue Cross & Blue Shield Atlanta, Georgia
Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina
Coca-Cola Corporation Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. & Mrs. Lynn Friedman Atlanta, Georgia
Harris Corporation Melbourne, Florida
Jacksonville State University Jacksonville, Alabama
King & Spalding Atlanta, Georgia
Sharjah Museum of Art, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Sony Music Corporation Nashville, Tennessee
Tribune Broadcasting Company Chicago, Illinois


                                                                                    216
Tuskegee Institute Tuskegee, Alabama
University of Wisconsin – Parkside, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Vero Beach Museum of Art Vero Beach, Florida


Gallery Representation:
 The Dennis Morgan Gallery
   114 Southwest Boulevard
   Kansas City, Missouri 64108
   (816) 842-8755
   Website: morgangallery.com



Awards:
Honorable Mention           Bradley International Drawing & Print            2007
                            Exhibition, Bradley University

Lindquist Purchase Award    Delta National Small Print Exhibition            2005
                             Arkansas State University, Jonesboro Arkansas

Honorable Mention           Americas 2000 Competition                        2004
                            Minot State University
                            Minot, North Dakota

Honorable Mention           Texas National Exhibition                        2003
                            Stephen F. Austin State University
                            Nacogdoches, Texas

Best in Category/           Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art                    2003
Drawing                     Saint Joseph, Missouri – Group Show

Best in Category/           Albrecht- Kemper Museum of Art                   2002
Mixed Media &               Saint Joseph, Missouri -- Group Show
Printmaking

Graduate Citation           Clemson University                               2000
                            Outstanding Student
                            In Art and Architectural History

Gold Addy Award             Florida Advertising Society                      1998
                            The Harris Corporation

Silver Addy Award           Florida Advertising Society                      1998
                            The Harris Corporation

Gold Addy Awards            Florida Advertising Society                      1997

                                                                                    217
                            The Harris Corporation

Gold Addy Award             Atlanta Advertising Club                  1991
                            Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games

Silver Addy Award           Atlanta Advertising Club                  1990
                       Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau
References:

Ms. Sydney Cross,    Professor of Art, Clemson University
                      e-mail: csydney@clemson.edu
                     phone: home (864) 646-8337
                             work (864) 656-3893

Dr. William Lew,     Professor of Art, Clemson University
                      e-mail: wlew@clemson.edu
                     phone: home (864) 654-4479
                             work (864) 656-3880

Mr. Mike Vatalaro,   Professor of Art, Clemson University
                     e-mail: vatalam@clemson.edu
                     phone: home (864) 646-9417
                             work (864) 656-3891

Mr. Richard Tichich, Chair, Department of Art and Design
                     Western Carolina University
                     Cullowhee, North Carolina
                     phone: (828) 227-7210


Ms. Chris Dockery,   Associate Professor of Art
                     Piedmont College
                     165 Central Avenue
                     Demorest, Georgia 30535
                     e-mail: cdockery@piedmont.edu
                     phone: (706) 778-3000

Mr. Craig Subler,    Professor of Art
                     University of Missouri – Kansas City
                     Department of Art & Art History
                     205C Fine Arts Building
                     Kansas City, Missouri 64110
                      e-mail: sublerc@umkc.edu
                      phone: (816) 235-1501

Mr. Michael Krueger, Associate Professor of Printmaking


                                                                             218
                     University of Kansas
                     School of Fine Arts
                     Lawrence, Kansas 66045
                      e-mail: michaelk@ku.edu
                     phone: (785) 864-3695
Exhibitions:

Faculty Exhibition    Gallery 206                                           2008
                      Missouri Western State University

Group Exhibition      Delta National Small Print Exhibition                 2008
                      Arkansas State University

Group Exhibition      The Russian Experience, Gallery 206                   2007
                      Missouri Western State University

Solo Exhibition        Piedmont College, Demorest, Georgia                  2007

Group Exhibition      31st Bradley International Print & Drawing Biennial   2007
                      Heuser Art Center, Bradley University
                       Peoria, Illinois

Group Show            Professors / Printmakers                              2007
                      Gallery 206, Missouri Western State University

Group Show            XXI Greater Midwest International Exhibition          2006
                      Central Missouri State University
                      Warrensburg, Missouri

Group Show            Parkside National Small Print Exhibition              2006
                      University of Wisconsin-Parkside

Group Show            Girls, Girls, Girls                                   2005
                      Lawrence Lithography Workshop Gallery

Group Show            Delta National Small Print Exhibition                 2005
                      Arkansas State University

Solo Exhibition        Thornhill Gallery                                    2005
                       Avila University; Kansas City, Missouri

Comprehensive          Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art                        2005
Exhibition             Saint Joseph, Missouri

Group Exhibition           XXth Annual Greater Midwest International               2005
                           Central Missouri State University,


                                                                                      219
                         Warrensburg, MO

Group Exhibition         Sharjah Museum of Art                       2005
                         Sharjah, United Arab Emirates


Faculty Exhibition       Gallery 206                                 2005
                         Missouri Western State College

Group Exhibition         Dennis Morgan Gallery                       2004
                         Kansas City, Missouri

Faculty Exhibition       Gallery 206                                 2004
                         Missouri Western State College

Group Show               Americas 2000 Paperworks Competition        2004
                         Northwest Art Center; Minot, North Dakota

Group Show               Parkside National Small Print Exhibition    2003
                         University of Wisconsin-Parkside

Solo Show                Munchnic Gallery                            2003
                         Atchison, Kansas

Group Show               Texas National                              2003
                         Stephen F. Austin State University
                         Nacogdoches, Texas

Group Show               Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art               2003
                         Saint Joseph, Missouri

Group Show               Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art               2002
                         St. Joseph, Missouri

Gallery 206              Missouri Western State College              2002
                         Faculty Art Exhibition


Gallery 303              Georgia Southern University                 2001
                         Group Show

MFA Thesis Exhibition    Lee Gallery, Clemson University             2000


Rudolph E. Lee Gallery   Awards and Honors Exhibition                2000
                         Clemson University


                                                                        220
Clemson Graduates             Blue Ridge Arts Council Gallery                              2000
                              Seneca, South Carolina

Recent Graduate Work          MFA Gallery, Clemson University                              2000

Art For The Printed Page       Forum Gallery Saint Petersburg, Russia                      1997


University Service:

Missouri Western State University Gallery Coordinator

   Coordinate Visiting Artists Series lectures and workshops. Responsible for acquiring art for
    permanent collection.
   Recruit all artists to exhibit at Missouri Western State University. Arrange all lectures and
    workshops.
   Assist with research, organization, lectures and workshops for Gallery 206 exhibitions and
    events.
   Maintain contact with all artists concerning show schedules, contractual obligations and
    exhibition design.
   Design, install and light all exhibitions.

Missouri Western State University Faculty Senate

       Elected to a two – year term in spring 2007.
       Review reports from faculty and staff committees. Deliberate issues of importance to the
        Missouri Western community and make recommendations to the provost and president of
        the institution.
       Faculty Senate Liaison to the Academic Honesty Committee.

Missouri Western State University – Master of Applied Arts Committee

   Wrote and developed the curriculum for the Master of Applied Arts in Integrated Media
    degree program. Teamed with Deny Staggs (Theater and Communications), Matt Gilmour
    (Music) and Ken Rosenauer (English, Foreign Languages and Journalism).
   Co-designed brochure and web page advertising the M.A.A. degree.
   Wrote the web page leader introducing the program.
   Assisted in determining faculty workload.
   Assisted in determining new spatial requirements for the M.A.A. program, with construction
    and renovation to begin in Potter Hall in the spring of 2008.
   Assisted in determining systems requirements for the implementation of the M.A.A.,
    including cost estimates.


Missouri Western State University Professional Leave Committee: 2002-2003



                                                                                               221
Chair of committee that evaluates sabbatical leave proposals submitted by faculty.

   Read, review and evaluate leave proposals from faculty members. Coordinate meetings with
    fellow faculty members to assess the merits of proposals to each faculty‘s department,
    student body and community at large.
   Interview each candidate who applies for Professional Leave.
   Collect and organize presented materials. Write and submit reports to the Chair of the
    Faculty Senate, Vice-President of Academic Affairs and President of the college ranking the
    candidates‘ proposals.

Missouri Western State University Audit Committee

   Propose and structure curriculum and departmental standards and guidelines for non-
    traditional students taking classes in the Art Department.

Missouri Western State University Beautification Committee:

   Review and evaluate proposals for landscaping of campus.
   Plan for future site-specific sculpture to create a visual continuity between buildings and
    open areas of campus.

Missouri Western State University Salary and Benefits Committee: 2003-2005

   Review salary and wage structures as they relate to peer institutions. Make recommendations
    to the Faculty Senate as to recruiting and retaining adjunct instructors.

Missouri Western State University Fringe Benefits Committee: 2005- 2006

   Review benefit issues as they relate to current faculty and retirees from Missouri Western
    State University. Make recommendations to the Faculty Senate as to how Missouri Western
    State University‘s benefits balance with peer institutions.




                                                                                                  222
                                             Resume

                                        Calvin L. Smith
                                       2509 Shirley Drive
                                    Saint Joseph, MO 64503
                                          816-279-9771


EDUCATION

1979 Received State Certification in Secondary School Administration from Northwest
     Missouri State University.

1975 Master of Science in Education in Industrial Arts from Northwest Missouri State
     University.

1968 Bachelor of Science in Education in Industrial Arts from the University of Missouri at
     Columbia.


EMPLOYMENT

1985 –Present          Adjunct Instructor for Missouri Western State University Art Department-
                       Teaching Art 130-Tools and Techniques

1972-1998              Teacher in the St. Joseph School District-Benton High School,
                       Industrial Arts Subjects: Woodworking, General Shop, Basic Electricity,
                       Metals, Plastics, and crafts.

1968-1972              United State Air Force, Air Training Command, Avionics
                       Instructor for 3 ½ years

HONORS AND AWARDS

1983-1997       Executive Board Member of the Northwest Missouri Industrial Arts Association

1980-1982       President of the Northwest Missouri Industrial Arts Association.

1972 -1998      Member of Missouri State Teacher‘s Association
                Member of St. Joseph City Teacher‘s Association

1984            Nominated as a Teacher of the Year candidate for the St. Joseph School District.

1982            Industrial Arts Teacher of the Year for the Northwest Missouri Industrial Arts
                Association



                                                                                                 223
                             Diana Lynn Wood
                            17454 hwy 169 Cosby, MO 64436
                                  Phone: 816-662-2079
                                   Cell: 816-752-0401
                           E-mail: diana.wood@sjsd.k12.mo.us

Objective                 To use my knowledge as an educator and practicing artist to teach
                          education students the importance of art throughout the
                          curriculum, and to arm these students with the materials,
                          knowledge, personal skills to walk confidently into their future
                          classrooms and awaken young minds.


Education/Certification   National Board Certification, Expected 2008
                          Emphasis: Early Adolescence through Young Adulthood Art

                          AP Southeast Missouri State University, 2001

                          AP Vertical Teaming, Southeast Missouri State University, 2005

                          M.A.Ed., Baker University, 2004
                          Emphasis: Curriculum Development and Design

                          Certification, Missouri Western State University, 1995
                          Emphasis: K-12 Art

                          B.A., Art, Missouri Western State University, 1984
                          Emphasis: Graphic Design and Photography


Work Experience           Lafayette High School
                          Instructor, 1996-2007
                          Courses: AP Drawing, AP 2-D Design, AP 3-D Design,
                          Photography, Sculpture, Painting, Drawing, Computer Graphics,
                          Ceramics, Foundations in Art.

                          St. Joseph District
                          Summer School Instructor, 2006
                          Courses: High School Art

                          Hyde Elementary School/Lindbergh Elementary School
                          Instructor, 1995-1996
                          Courses: Art



                                                                                         224
                            St. Joseph District
                            Summer School Enrichment Instructor, 1996-1998
                            Courses: Elementary Art

                            Art Scape
                            Instructor, 1998-2006
                            Courses: Mask Making, Origami, Painting

                            St. Joseph School District
                            Curriculum Writing, 1998, 2007
                            Web base Curriculum, 2007

                            KLM 1986-1987
                            Graphic Artist
                            Responsibilities included silk screening, photography, and art work
                            Reason for leaving—Company Relocation

Skills and Qualifications   Curriculum Writing
                            Assessment Strategies
                            Learning Theories
                            Vertical Teaming

Professional Affiliations   MSTA
                            Missouri Art Education Association
                            National Art Education Association
                            Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art
                            National Art Honor Society

References                  Dr. Tyran Sumy, Lafayette High School Principal
                            Lafayette High School
                            412 Highland Ave.
                            St. Joseph, MO 64505
                            816-671-4220

                            Kevin Griffin, SJSD Fine Arts Coordinator
                            St. Joseph School District
                            3401 Renick
                            St. Joseph, MO
                            816-671-4390

                            Thomas Schneider
                            4908 NE County Line Rd.
                            St. Joseph, MO 64505
                            816-233-0488




                                                                                                  225
                        APPENDIX E

PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE COURSES SYLLABI AND CURRICULUM VITAE




                                                             226
           EDU 202-01— Introduction to Education
                   3 credit hours                     219 Murphy Hall
                             9:30-10:50 a.m. (Tues. & Thurs.)


Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Hendrix
Office: Murphy 111 I
Office Hours: TR 11:00-12:00 & MW 12:00-3:00 & By Appointment
Office Phone: 271-4301 Home Phone: 689-1760
E-mail: mhendrix4@missouriwestern.edu


Welcome to the Missouri Western State University Teacher Education Program. The following
graphic is offered to help clarify where you are in the program.




                                                                                       227
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK – The MWSU
philosophy of teacher education has as its focus the early and gradually intensifying
identification of self with the teaching profession through performance-based learning
experiences and assessments. In this course, you are entering Phase I (awareness) of your
development as a potential teacher.
CATALOG DESCRIPTION: Basic introduction to professional education; on-campus
exploratory course to aid participants in deciding whether or not to become teachers. The course
also provides the basic information and attitude development necessary for successful teaching.
This course is taken the same semester and time as EED 203. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108,
or 112.
COURSE RATIONALE/ OVERVIEW:
Teaching in the public schools is not just about you and a group of children/students engaging in
enjoyable activities. Schools are social institutions that have been created in certain ways, not
always because people actually intended them to be that way but because certain choices were
made about money, organization, and control which then resulted in the schools we have today.
Schools reflect the society in which they exist, and it is important for you to understand that
relationship and how it came about so that you can begin to think about how you might work for
change when you are one of the actors within a school setting. Thus, in this course we will
examine the role that philosophical, historical, and sociological inquiries play in educational
theory and, subsequently, our approaches to schooling. We will also begin to imagine ways in
which schools can be transformed to meet the changing social, political, and cultural context of
the 21st century.
Teachers need to be able to evaluate critically the multitude of suggestions for how schools
should be run, reformed, and restructured. To do this, you need to be clear about your own
philosophies of teaching and learning and your own beliefs about how race, class, gender,
disability, and sexual orientation impact the ways students experience schooling in today‘s
society. We will spend considerable time in this course reading, discussing, and writing about
such issues.
Finally, you will need to have certain skills and attitudes to become a successful teacher: a sense
of the great responsibility which a teacher undertakes, concern with the quality of your work and
a habit of reflecting on it, a desire to learn and improve yourself, curiosity about new ideas, an
interest in developing collegiality and working cooperatively with others, punctuality,
organization, dependability, and respect for those involved in the hard work of providing formal
education. This course is intended to help you develop these as well.


COURSE METHODS:
Lecture, small and large group discussions, group and individual presentations, experiential
learning, reflective journals, projects, videos, and guest speakers


COURSE OBJECTIVES & RELATED STANDARDS


                                                                                                228
Standards: Standard 3 – Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs – The teacher candidate
understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional
opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
Standard 9 – Reflection and Professional Development – The teacher candidate is a reflective
practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others
(students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out
opportunities to grow professionally
Standard 11 – Knowledge of Educational Foundations – The teacher candidate knows the
historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education and can make connections between
the foundations and current practice to include awareness of the individual, ethical, and legal
responsibilities.
COURSE OBJECTIVES: Students are expected to know and be able to demonstrate their
understanding of:
Schools are representative of our society‘s diversity. (INTASC 2, 3, 5, 6, 7)
The historical, economic, sociological, philosophical aspects of education and schooling.
(INTASC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9)
The legal issues facing teachers and students. (INTASC 2, 5, 6, 7)
The role of a professional educator. (INTASC 9, 10)
The impact of technology on student learning. (INTACS 7, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10)
The philosophical foundations that have shaped American education. (INTASC 1, 2 ,3 , 4, 5, 7,
8, 9, 10)
The components of effective instruction and teacher effectiveness. (6, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
 TEXTS: Hall, G., Quinn, L., & Gollnick, D. (2008). The Joy of Teaching: Making a Difference
in Student Learning. NY: Pearson.
Adams, N. et.al. (2005). Learning to Teach: A Critical Approach to Field Based Experiences
(2nd Edition). NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.


You will choose four of the group project books, but you will read only ONE of the group
project books in your groups. You may break up the reading into chapters among your
group members. I will let you know which one of your four choices that you will read. You
may bring in other book titles (along these same themes) for me to consider for your group as
well.
Collaborative Group Project Books for Book Ads and Presentations:
RACE (Group 1)



                                                                                               229
Why Are So Many Minority Students in Special Education?: Understanding Race & Disability in
Schools by Beth Harry & Janette K. Klingner
Making Choices for Multicultural Education: Five Approaches to RACE, CLASS, and GENDER
by Christine E. Sleeter & Carl A. Grant
Faces at the Bottom of the Well by Derrick Bell
Push by Sapphire
Because of the Kids by Jennifer E. Obidah and Karen Manheim Teel
The Dream Keepers by Gloria Ladson-Billings


GENDER (Group 2)
Connecting Girls and Science: Constructivism, Feminism, and Science Education Reform (Ways
of Knowing in Science and Math, 18) by Elaine V. Howes
Making Choices for Multicultural Education: Five Approaches to RACE, CLASS, and GENDER
by Christine E. Sleeter & Carl A. Grant
Schoolgirls by Peggy Orenstein
Educated in Romance by Dorothy C. Holland, Margaret A. Eisenhart, and R. W. Connell
Reviving Ophelia by Mary Pipher
Failing at Fairness by Myra Sadker and David Sadker
The Men and the Boys by R.W. Connell
Herculine Barbin by Michel Foucault
From Dweeb to Adonis by Peter H. McCusker (to Critique)
Women, Class and Education (Women and Social Class (G. Routledge & Co.) by Jane
Thompson
Early Leaving by Judy Goldman


(DIS)ABILITY (Group 3)
The Body Silent by Robert F. Murphy
Thinking in Pictures by Temple Grandin
Holler if you Hear Me by Gregory Michie



                                                                                        230
Staring Back by Kenny Fries
Beyond Ramps by Marta Russell
The Social Meaning of Mental Retardation by Robert Bogdan and Steven J. Taylor
Complete Learning Disabilities Handbook: Ready-to-Use Strategies & Activities for Teaching
Students with Learning Disabilities, New Second Edition by Joan M. Harwell


ETHNICITY (Group 4)
The Inner World of the Immigrant Child by Cristina Igoa
Latino High School Graduation by Harriett D. Romo, Toni Falbo, and Charles M. Bonjean
Learning and Not Learning English by Guadalupe Valdes
Subtractive Schooling by Angela Valenzuela
Teaching Immigrant and Second-language Students: Strategies for Success (Harvard Culturally
Contested Pedagogy: Battles Of Literacy And Schooling Between Mainstream Teachers And
Asian Immigrant Parents (Suny Series, Power, Social Identity, and Education) by Guofang Li
(Author) & Lee Gunderson (Foreword)
Teacher Man by Frank McCourt


SEXUAL ORIENTATION (Group 5)
Reflections of a Rock Lobster by Aaron Fricke
Dead Boys Can’t Dance by Michel Dorais, Simon L. Lajeunesse, and Pierre Tremblay
So you want to be a Lesbian by Liz Tracey and Sydney Pokorny (to Critique)
"Unleashing the Unpopular": Talking About Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity in
Education by Isabel Killoran & Karleen Pendleton Jimenez
Sexual Orientation and School Policy: A Practical Guide for Teachers, Administrators, and
Community Activists (Curriculum, Cultures, and (Homo)Sexualities) by Ian K. Macgillivray
School Days by Robert Parker




SOCIO-ECONOMIC CLASS (Group 6)
Learning to Labor by Paul Willis and Stanley Aronowitz

                                                                                            231
Learning to Labor in New Times by Dolby & Dimitri
Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison
Savage Inequalities by Jonathon Kozol
Tearing Down the Gates: Confronting the Class Divide in American Education by Peter Sacks
Late to Class: Social Class and Schooling in the New Economy (Suny Series, Social Identity, and
Education) by Michael W. Apple (Foreword), Jane A. Van Galen (Editor), & George W. Noblit
(Editor)
Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings by Cybelle Fox , David J. Harding, Jal Mehta,
Wendy Roth, & Katherine S. Newman (Ed.)


WORLD RELIGIONS (Group 7)
Introduction To World Religions by Christopher H. Partridge
A Concise Introduction to World Religions by Willard Oxtoby (Ed.) & Alan Segal (Ed.)
World Religions in America: An Introduction (3rd Edition) by Jacob Neusner (Ed.)
Encountering Religion: An Introduction to the Religions of the World by Ian Markham (Ed.) &
Tinu Ruparell (Ed.)


CELL PHONES, I-PODS, and/or PAGERS: Cell phones, I-Pods, and/or pagers should not be
on in class.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Fire: Emergency exits are marked in the hallways. Go to the nearest exit and evacuate the
building. University personnel will direct you when it is safe to return to the building. Disabled
students (who are on the second or third floor and who cannot use the stairs) should go to the
stairwells (some may be marked AREAS OF RESCUE ASSISTANCE). University personnel
will assist in exiting the building.
Tornado: A continuous horn will be heard for 30 seconds. All faculty, staff, and students should
proceed to the first floor and seek shelter in an interior hallway or office away from the windows.
Individuals should not go to their cars. Everyone should stay inside until a University
representative has notified you that the danger has passed.




DESCRIPTION of ASSIGNMENTS/RELATED REQUIREMENTS:
(For rubrics and additional information, please go to the end of the syllabus)

                                                                                                232
1. Class participation/Discussion Cards                                      70 points
Students are expected to complete reading assignment before class, bring a copy of them to class,
and consistently contribute meaningfully to class discussions. Conversely, behavior that detracts
from class discussions will negatively impact your class participation grade. Your participation
grade will be based on your discussion cards and your active participation in class discussions.
For every class meeting, you need to prepare in advance two index cards with the following
information. Be sure that your name appears on your card:

              a question you want to raise based on the readings
              a quote from the readings you would like to discuss
              an information fact that you found interesting in the readings


I will pick up one of the cards at the beginning of each class; the other card will be for your use
during our discussions. I will ask different class members to begin our discussions with an item
from their card. Note: I will keep your cards, so make 2 cards if you want to keep them for
review.
If I perceive that you are not completing the readings, I will (at my discretion) begin giving
pop quizzes on the readings.
2. Attendance for the Course                                                 200 points
Obviously, you must attend class in order to participate. Consequently, attendance will be taken
every class period. Students are permitted one (1) unexcused absence during the semester
(e.g. overslept, car won’t start, had to attend a wedding, etc.). Excused absences include:
death in the immediate family, illness requiring hospitalization or doctor‘s visit, religious
holidays, and attendance at certain university functions. Documentation must be provided for an
absence to be excused. Arriving late to class (i.e. after attendance has been taken) will be
counted as ½ an absence. It is the student‘s responsibility to see that he/she is marked present.
Leaving early will count the same as arriving late!


The following scale will be used to determine attendance points at the end of the semester:


               1 absence (beyond your ―freebie‖)             180
               2 absences (beyond your ―freebie‖)            160
               3                                             140
               4                                             120
               5                                             100
               6                                             80
               7                                             60
               more than 7                                    0

UNIVERSITY ATTENDANCE POLICY:


                                                                                                 233
In order to improve student learning and retention as well as to achieve compliance with federal
financial aid policies, Western has implemented a mandatory attendance policy all 100- and 200-
level courses beginning Fall Semester 2007. Instructors are required to monitor and track student
attendance. A student will be given an excused absence when acting as an official representative
of the university, provided the student gives prior written verification from the faculty/staff
supervisor of the event. Any additional excused absences are at the complete discretion of the
instructor. Maximum allowed unexcused absences accrued before the reporting of midterm
grades, March 19, are:
Class meetings/week Maximum unexcused absences

                             1                                         1

                             2                                         3

                             3                                         5

                             4                                         7

                             5                                         9



When a student exceeds the maximum number of unexcused absences, instructors must report
the student to the Registrar‘s Office, who will administratively withdraw the student from the
course and notify the Financial Aid Office to reduce financial aid as appropriate. From the
midterm to the end of the course, faculty will assign grades according to their grading policies
with regard to absences and record an FA when a student fails due to absences.


If you have more than 3 unexcused absences before midterm, I will report you to the
Registrar’s Office.


3. Four Reflective Journals in Class                         50 points each
You will write reflective journals at times in class, and these will be collected at times. You must
be in class to do these journals. They will be collected throughout the semester at various times
for 50 points each. You may not make these up unless you have an excused absence. You will
use the I-S-E-E-I method for these journals. I = an illustration that you weave into the
paper that shows abstract thinking (the illustration makes/represents your point) S= State
your point E=Elaborate about your point E= Give examples to show proof of your point I =
Illustrate your point again


Journal 1
Gender Identity Journal

                                                                                                234
You will discuss how your gender identity was formed with reflections about your childhood,
education, family structures, and community influences. You will also reflect on any
discrimination or stereotypes that you faced.

Journal 2
Your identity journal
This journal should be an in-depth, autobiographical exploration of who you believe you are.
The purpose of the assignment is to support your examination of your own history, assumptions,
and perceptions of yourself an others. Recognizing how you perceive yourself is the first step in
understanding how others may see you. Teaching is more than imparting information with
students. It is a sharing of self that you cannot fake or camouflage. In this essay, you will take a
―critical‖ look at yourself. Please remember that this is an academic journal, not a short answer
assignment.


The following is by no means a comprehensive list. Please add topics or issues to your essay
that I may not have considered.
How and with what do you identify yourself? What is your family like? What had the greatest
influence upon you?
How did growing up in your community affect you? Was it urban, suburban, rural, traditional,
progressive, etc. How did your geographic environment affect your thinking and attitudes about
life?
How do the media (television, movies, books, videos, internet) impact your likes and dislikes?
What are your beliefs in life? Do you have a moral system that guides your decision-making?
What shaped that moral system? How would you explain your moral code to someone who had
no concept of your beliefs?
What conflicts and/or life changing moments have happened to you and how have you changed
as a result?


Journal 3
What do you think the goals and purposes of U.S. public education should be?


Journal 4
Philosophy of Education Journal




                                                                                                 235
The course text addressed various cultural attitudes toward education such as who should receive
an education, what was the purpose of education in the society, and what was the role of the
teacher. Further, by now you have completed or are completing your observations, which should
provide significant insights into the ―real world‖ of teaching. As you begin to consider your
philosophy of education, you also will need to consider your beliefs about the role of education
and educators in transmitting the knowledge of the culture to the net generation. This is an
enormous responsibility, not to be taken lightly. In your journal, you will need to link your
observations insights, your personal beliefs, and the knowledge you have gained from your
readings and discussions.
This is an academic journal, not just a personal opinion. Anchor your approach with references
to the text information and your observation experiences. The following questions may help
guide the development of your journal. Use them or your own approach to complete this
assignment.
How would you describe American education? What is its purpose in our society?
Do we provide an equal education for all? If so, how? If not, why not?
How do you fit into this idea of American education? Is the reality you confronted in your
observations compatible with your vision of teaching?
What does it mean ―to teach‖? What obligations and responsibilities will you have based on your
philosophy?
Does teaching mean meeting the needs of the student, community, and country?
Are significant changes needed to make education more effective?


Furthermore, your paper should consist of three (3) main parts: Introduction, Body, and
Closure as you follow the I-S-E-E-I method.


4. Diversity Assignment/ ―Justics‖ in Groups
(Social Justice Comics Project)                Due Feb. 19th          175 Points


You and your group members will think of a social justice situation that you might encounter as
a teacher for each group topic listed for the book ads (race, gender, etc.), such as a racial slur
situation that could arise. At the top left of your sheet, you will list your members, topic, and date
for the comic. You will draw, use clip art, or cut out magazine pictures of your choice to depict
the class situation in the middle of the sheet, and under your comic illustration, you will list 3
strategies that you have for dealing with the situation in class (for the whole class not just the
two students who are misbehaving) and a mnemonic device so that you can remember how to
handle the situation as a teacher. Be specific with your strategies. You will receive a model of


                                                                                                  236
this assignment at the end of the syllabus. You will do a total of 7 (one on gender, race, ethnicity,
sexual orientation, ability, religion, and socio-economic class), and they will count 25 points
each. Tip—Go to Rethinking Schools and Teaching Tolerance for ideas or plans. Those
websites will help you with teaching strategies. I want whole class strategies here! Do not just
deal with the two students or send them to the office or counselor!!!! The goal is to show
how you will teach the whole class about the issue.


5.) Observation Essay in Groups       Due April 10th                  100 pts
This assignment will come from your participation in EDU 203.
As a potential or future teacher candidate, you have had the opportunity to learn about yourself
and the foundation of educational philosophy. Another component in increasing your knowledge
during this Phase I (awareness) course occurs in your in-school observations. The principal and
teacher of the school have agreed to let you enter into their place of learning to observe and
participate in their daily activities. You must respect the teacher and the students, their
comments, actions, interactions, and thoughts. You are there to gain an understanding of their
cultural environment, the way their philosophy of education is revealed in the classroom. The
teacher will have free access to review your observations if he or she desires. He or she will sign
a weekly accountability sheet to verify that you were there for the allotted time and conducted
yourself appropriately within their school environment. Finally, the cooperating teacher or
principal will evaluate your conduct during this experience.
Your task is to make notes on your observations that can assist you in addressing the following
four topics and to refer to in our class discussions. You must also see how the teacher embodies
the M.W.S.U.’s four dispositional domains (self awareness, self management, relationship
management, and social awareness) and tie these domains into your paper.
Observation Assignment – Structure of the Classroom (Pedagogy and Discipline):
Does the way we construct/structure the classroom environment (the way the desks are
organized, where the teacher‘s desk is placed, access to materials, etc.) reveal something about
our pedagogy of teaching and our attitudes toward learning? With that question in mind,
consider the following: Since we cannot know the thoughts of most teachers and students, we
can only infer and draw conclusions from their actions and interactions. Remember, pedagogy
means ―the art and science of teaching.‖ After describing the geography of the classroom, now
you will want to focus your attention on how people operate within that space, the culture and
customs of the classroom, how the teacher handles discipline issues. Also, can you make
assumptions about the manner in which the teacher conducts the class and his/her philosophy
about teaching and children? Can you make connections between the concepts taught, how they
were taught, and find ―proof‖ of some kind of ―positive‖ impact the teacher had on the students‘
learning?
Many researchers believe that effective classroom management can reduce discipline issues.
However, it takes some experience for a teacher to be comfortable with the rules and
consequences they establish. Discipline is frequently the first concern of beginning teachers and
continues to be a concern for many teachers throughout their careers. How a teacher approaches

                                                                                                 237
student behavior can make a significant difference in the atmosphere and stress in the classroom.
In this writing, you need to focus on the manner in which the teacher has chosen to establish
rules and procedures and what happens when those rules and procedures are not followed. You
should first begin by describing the discipline approach of the teacher and whether that approach
is successful in supporting uninterrupted learning for the students involved.
Remember with this assignment you are not being judgmental. Rather, you are seeking to
understand the acts of teaching that occur and how they occur in the classroom.
The following questions can serve as a guide but you are not limited to only these questions:
Briefly describe the geography of the classroom. This may include: How was it organized? What
was on the walls? What was the arrangement of the student/teacher desks? What colors caught
your eye in the room? Are there windows for natural light? What audio-visual equipment was
present? Did the teacher use the chalkboard or other equipment? Was the temperature of the
room comfortable for the students? Where did the teacher stand when delivering instruction? Did
he/she use a podium or desk when teaching?
Theorize as to what all of your observations tell you about the teacher‘s approach to learning. Is
the approach intentional or the result of convenience? In what ways does the geography of the
classroom affect the mood or learning of the students? Would you construct the classroom
differently? Why or why not? What does the geography of the classroom say about power
relations between student and teacher?
Describe how the teacher interacts with students and how students interact with each other. Is the
teacher the focus of the classroom or is something else?
Describe the pedagogy of the teacher. How does it relate to the geography of the classroom?
Does the way he or she teaches seem to fit with how the classroom is arranged? Why do you
think the teacher uses the approaches (pedagogy) in the way he/she does?
What is the response of students to the teacher‘s pedagogy? What are they doing verbally or non-
verbally?
In what ways does the teacher begin the class? Why does he/she have this approach?
Does the teacher clearly tell the students what they are to learn that day? Or do the students have
to ―discover‖ their learning throughout the class?
Does the teacher enter into discussions with students? Ask questions? Ask higher order
questions? Give feedback on answers or assignments? What kinds of questions and/or feedback
are used?
How does the teacher make sure understanding is taking place? Does he/she check for
understanding with several students? Was there a performance or activity that confirmed
understanding independent of the teacher‘s questions?
How does the teacher evaluate the learning? Does he/she use points, feedback, scoring criteria, a
show of hands, etc.?



                                                                                                238
How does the teacher define discipline?
What does the teacher consider a disruption? Does this surprise you? Why or why not?
Can you identify when a ―disruption‖ is about to take place? What precipitated the ―disruption‖?
Could an intervention by the teacher have prevented the disruption?
What does the teacher do when he/she decides a ―disruption‖ is taking place?
How do the students respond to the teacher‘s actions or lack thereof?
Do you agree with the student‘s reactions? Explain your answer.
Now ask yourself: What would I do if a student was interrupting the learning in the classroom?


6. Learning to Teach Observation Work                    75 Points Total/25 for Each Set
These assignments will come from the Learning to Teach textbook and will accompany
your EDU 203 participation.
While you are out in the school, keep a notebook with notes about your observations. Let the
textbook guide your notes here. Read a section and those activities (starting with section 2) in
the Learning to Teach textbook before you go out to the school. Each week that you are out, you
should change to the next section in the textbook and do those activities. Choose one activity if
there are multiple ones listed for the assignment.
I am just looking to see that you did this work. If you did all of the assignments for the set, you
will get the points.


1st Set of Observations Due March 6th
This set is section 2 and the first half of section 3.
2nd Set of Observations Due March 20th
This set is the rest of section 3 and the first half of section 4.
3rd Set of Observations Due April 17th
This set is the rest of section 4 and 5.


7. Group Book Ad Presentation           Due April 1-24th               200 Points
Collaborative Group Presentation of Book Ads
During the first week of class, students will be organized into a group and assigned a book to
read. Each group should anticipate meeting a minimum of three times throughout the semester.

                                                                                               239
During this time, group members should critically discuss the book and the relevance of the
course materials to issues raised in the book and to prepare for the presentation of the book to the
class. Each group will have approximately 45 minutes present its book. Each group will
provide a one-page (front and back) handout. On the front page, you should include a
summary of the book. On the back page, you should explain the educational importance of
the book. Care should be given to discuss and present the book in the context of the course
readings. You will also turn into me (as a group) a one page paper that addresses the
following:



              Identify the dates that you met, where you met, how long you met, who was
               present, and what you accomplished at each meeting
              Identify the roles each person was given to prepare for the presentation and how
               these roles were decided
              Identify what went well with your group (including both the discussions of the
               book and the preparations for the presentation) and what did NOT go so well.
              What did your group learn from the collaborative group process itself (NOT THE
               BOOK) that will help you in becoming a better teacher?


More details about the presentation can be found at the end of the syllabus.


Due April 1-24th (Due date depends on group no. Group 1 will go first, and the other
groups will follow.)
Please see the rubric for this assignment at the end of the syllabus.


8. Take-home Final Exam               Due April 30th                 100 Points
(To get you ready for your exit interview for EDU 203)


You must do the exit interview with your M.W.S.U. supervisor in order to pass the 203 part.
You must have copies of your “Justics” and Group Observation Essay with the Dispositional
Domains to give your supervisor. Set up the appointment the week before finals or during
finals week. Your cooperating teacher must send in your time form and evaluation before the
interview takes place.
Make-Up Policy
Please note that I do not give incompletes unless there is a medical emergency. All papers and
assignments should be turned in on time and should reflect college-level competencies in
writing. Any assignment turned in late will be deducted 5 points for every day late.



                                                                                                240
Written Assignments All materials for the course should be carefully prepared, processed, and
proofread. APA style should be followed (refer to the Publication Manual of the American
Psychological Association (5th Ed.). Please set up appointments in The Center for Academic
Support for writing help and/or see me.

STUDENT ASSESSMENT
Each assignment will be given a number grade. I adhere to the following grading scale in
determining your final grade for the class:
92-100 (A)
84-91.9 (B)
76-83.9 (C)
68-75.9 (D)
Below 68 (F)

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY & DUE PROCESS
Academic honesty is required in all academic endeavors. Violations of academic honesty
include and instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work, falsifying
documents or academic records, or any other fraudulent activity. Violations of academic honesty
may result in a failing grade on the assignment, failure in the course, or expulsion from the
University. When a student‘s grade has been affected, violations of academic honesty will be
reported to the Provost or designated representative on the Academic Honesty Violation Report
forms.
Please see the Western Student Handbook and Calendar on for specific activities identified as
violations of this policy and the student due process procedure. This handbook is available
online at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf . All acts of dishonesty in any
work constitute academic misconduct. Please note that I read all assignments thoroughly.
Quotation marks should be used if the material is copied directly from the readings and text
citations should be used. Quotations are followed by the author, year, and page number in
parenthesis of the source of the quote (Petrovic, 1998, p. 15). If you paraphrase something, you
put just the author and year after the paraphrased material (Petrovic, 1998). You will be in
violation of MWSU’s policies if you fail to follow standard referencing rules. Submitting work
done for another class, submitting someone else’s work as your own, copying and pasting from
the internet, are all violations. (Internet sources may be used, but you must follow standard
referencing rules.) The consequence for plagiarism is a zero on the given assignment and
referral to the Dean for any further action he might wish to take. Rewriting such assignments is
not an option.

II. STATEMENT of EQUAL TREATMENT and (Dis)ABILITIES The instructor and students
in this course will act with integrity and strive to engage in equitable verbal and non-verbal
behavior with respect to differences arising from age, gender, race, socio-economic class, sexual
orientation, ethnicity, physical ability, and religious preferences.




                                                                                              241
If you are registered with the Office of Disability Services, please make an appointment with me
as soon as possible to discuss any course accommodations that may be necessary. Before
accommodations can be granted, students must provide an Accommodation Request Form
from the Office of Disability Studies. It is imperative that arrangements be made as soon as
possible. If you have a disability but have not contacted the Office of Disability Services, please
call (816) 271-4330 or visit Mr. Michael Ritter (The Disabilities Services Coordinator) in EDER
Hall Room 203 N to register for services. His e-mail is: mritter@missouriwestern.edu .


                                    Tentative Course Outline
―This course outline and the dates established therein are tentative, and the instructor
reserves the right to change them.‖
Jan. 15th (T)          Today‘s Teachers and Students
                       Course Introduction/ Visual Stories/ Do personal information index cards.
                       HW = Read Chapter 1 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                       card. Also, pick out 4 of the book ad titles that you would like to read in 4
                       different areas.




Jan. 17th (TH)         Today‘s Teachers and Students
                       Turn in book ad choices and card to me.
                        HW= Read Chapter 2 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                       card.

Jan. 22nd (T)          Today‘s Teachers and Students
                       Turn in card to me.
                       Journal 1 in class (Your gender identity)
                       HW= Read Chapter 3 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                       card.
                       Get your book ad, observation, and “Justics” groups assigned.

Jan. 24th (TH)         Today‘s Schools
                       Turn in your card to me.
                       HW= Read Chapter 4 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                       card.

Jan. 29th (T)          Today‘s Schools
                       Turn in your card.
                       Do journal 2 in class (identity journal).
                       HW = Read Chapter 5 in The Joy of Teaching and do your
                       discussion card.



                                                                                                 242
Jan. 31st (TH)   No Class (Dr. Hendrix is presenting a paper at S.E.P.E.S. in Baton
                 Rouge, LA) Work on the group projects!!!! (= ―Justics‖ Group Work
                 Day)

Feb. 5th (T)     Foundations of Education
                 Turn in your card.
                 History of American Schools DVD
                 HW = Read Chapter 6 in The Joy of Teaching and do your
                 discussion card. Work on your ―Justics‖ project.

Feb. 7th (TH)    Foundations of Education
                 Turn in your card.
                 Do journal 3 in class (purposes of U.S. public schools).
                 HW = Read Chapter 7 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                 card. Work on ―Justics.‖

Feb. 12th (TH)   Foundations of Education
                 Turn in your card.
                 HW = Read Chapter 8 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                 card. Finish “Justics.”

Feb. 19th (T)    Foundations of Education
                 Turn in card and Group ―Justics‖ Project.
                 History of the American School Experience: An Overview
                 Echoes of Brown DVD
                 HW = Read Chapter 9 in The Joy of Teaching and do your
                 discussion card.

Feb. 21st (TH)   Teaching Today
                 Turn in card.
                 HW = Read Ch. 10 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion card.

Feb. 26th (T)    Teaching Today
                 Turn in card.
                 Do journal 4 in class (your own philosophy of education).
                 HW = Read Ch. 11 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion card.
                 Work on Observation Work from Learning to Teach!

Feb. 28th (TH)   Teaching Today
                 Turn in card.
                 HW = Read Ch. 12 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                 card. Work on Observation Work from Learning to Teach!

March 4th (T)    Education for Tomorrow
                 Turn in card.
                 HW = Read Ch. 13 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion


                                                                                     243
                    card. Finish first set of observation work from Learning to Teach.

March 6th (TH)      Education for Tomorrow
                    Turn in card. (Turn in first set of observation work from
                    Learning to Teach).
                    HW = Read Ch. 14 in The Joy of Teaching and do your discussion
                    card. Work on observation work!

Note: March 9-16 = Spring Break Week at M.W.S.U.

March 18th (T)      The Teaching Profession
                    (Contemporary Issues and Inequalities)
                    Turn in card.
                    Freedom Writers DVD
                    HW = Work on observation work!
                    Midterm Grades = March 19th

March 20th (TH)     The Teaching Profession
                    (Contemporary Issues and Inequalities)
                    Turn in second set of observation work!
                    Freedom Writers DVD Continued
                    HW = Work on observation work!

March 25th (T)      No Class Group Project Work Day
                    Group Book Ad Presentation and Group Essay Work Together

March 27th (TH)     No Class Group Project Work Day
                    Group Book Ad Presentation and Group Essay Work Together

Note: Last day to withdraw = March 28th & March 31 pre-registration advisement begins!

April 1 (T)         Group Project Presentations Begin (All projects should be done now!)
                    (Group 1 goes/ Group 2 is ready to begin)
                    HW = Work on Group Essay

April 3rd (TH)      Dr. Hendrix will present a report to the
                    AAUW of AL State Convention No class—Work on group essay!!!
April 8th (T)       Group Presentations Finish Group 2/ Start Group 3.
                    HW = Finish group essay!

April 10th (TH)     Presentations Finish Group 3/ Start Group 4
                    Group Observation Essay = Due
April 15th (T)      Presentations Continued/ Finish Group 4/ Start Group 5

April 17th (TH)     Presentations Continued/Finish Group 5/ Start Group 6/
                    Turn in third set of observation work!


                                                                                           244
                       Get Take-home Final Exam!

April 22nd (T)         Presentations Continued/ Finish Group 6/ Start Group 7

April 24th (TH)         Presentations Continued/ Finish Group 7
                       (Set up exit interview with M.W.S.U. supervisor—do it before the
                       semester ends!)

April 29th = Study Day (No classes) Work on your final exam!

Finals = April 30th---May 6th

Take-home Final Due April 30th to Me (Drop it off in my box.)


―Justic‖ Model
Susie or Sam Student
EDU 202-001          Class Section: Gender and Education
1/3/06
―Justic‖ #1




                  Situation: The male just sexually harassed the female in class.
                   He touched her buttocks, and she turned around to slap him.

Strategies:
1. Use this situation as a teachable moment for the entire class. Discuss the sexual harassment,
the consequences, and what happens in the work place with the students. Then, warn the male
and let the female choose his punishment (within reason). Discuss famous women leaders and
their impact on society and innovation as well. For instance, Marie Curie with the x-ray could be
used for science or Alice Paul could be used with examples from her work with the voting rights
act.
2. Write up the male and send him to the office and/or write up both students. (Do not just send
them to the office though. I will count off points for this strategy. You can do that as a teacher,
but I want you to think about how it can be memorable and meaningful for the whole class!)

                                                                                               245
3. After class, send both students to the counselor to discuss the sexual harassment and the slap
and have them both stay after school to discuss the situation. After school, have copies of real-
life sexual harassment stories and/or books with lessons about why you shouldn‘t harass others
available. One book might be Push by Sapphire for seniors or college students. In this book, the
main character is sexually harassed and raped by her father, while her mother never deals with
the situation, and he gives her HIV. The students would read chapters or stories about the
harassment and write about the injustice of it and how it hurts everyone involved and share the
information with the whole class the next day in class. (Use a book or stories for the level you
plan to teach!)


Mnemonic device:
I will remember how to deal with this situation as a teacher by thinking of the time when 2 males
grabbed my buttocks at a football game (when I was twirling), and I turned around and slapped
one.
Note: These ―justics‖ can be humorous too; this one is serious.


                             Collaborative Group Book Ad Project


During the first week of class, students will be organized into a group and assigned a book to
read. Each group should anticipate meeting a minimum of three times throughout the semester.
During this time, group members should critically discuss the book and the relevance of the
course materials to issues raised in the book and to prepare for the presentation of the book to the
class. Each group will have approximately 45 minutes present its book. Each group will
provide a one-page (front and back) handout. On the front page, you should include a
summary of the book. On the back page, you should explain the educational importance of
the book. Care should be given to discuss and present the book in the context of the course
readings. This summary handout will be given to every class member. Additionally, you
will also turn into me (as a group) a one page paper that addresses the following:



              Identify the dates that you met, where you met, how long you met, who was
               present, and what you accomplished at each meeting
              Identify the roles each person was given to prepare for the presentation and how
               these roles were decided
              Identify what went well with your group (including both the discussions of the
               book and the preparations for the presentation) and what did NOT go so well.
              What did your group learn from the collaborative group process itself (NOT THE
               BOOK) that will help you in becoming a better teacher?




                                                                                                246
Group Book Ad Presentation
Each group will prepare at least a 45 minute presentation of the book you read. The purpose of
the presentation is for your group to give an overview of the book‘s arguments and the
implications for teaching and to make the other students in the class interested in reading the
book. DO NOT GIVE A CHAPTER BY CHAPTER SUMMARY. THAT IS BORING, AND
POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED IF YOU TAKE THIS APPROACH. Think of a more creative
way to teach your classmates the main points of the book (e.g. role playing, short skits, talk show
format, etc) and to make them want to read the book. Power Point presentations can certainly be
utilized, but, these, too, are often boring. The presentation should include a variety of teaching
strategies to present the material (e.g. lecture, video, small group discussion, artwork, role
playing, etc.). You might use:

      Advertising posters
      An informative book jacket of your own design
      Advertising fliers to distribute to the class
      Bumper stickers
      Lapel buttons or magnets for a refrigerator
      Bookmarks with information from your presentation
      A colorful magazine spread and article
      Your own videotaped advertisement or documentary
      An object that represents your book in some way


The following is the suggested format for your presentation:

      Set up props and materials and get handouts ready.
      Introduce the book and provide some background about the author.
      Briefly summarize the book.
      Have some significant excerpts from the book.
      Review and critique the book (show the arguments, educational significance, and
       implications of the book for teachers).
      Explain the practical advice that the book gives teachers and learners.
      Show the advertisement that you created for the book/project.
      Have resources to help teachers with the issue(s) that the book raised (hotline numbers,
       statistics, websites, articles that link the issue with pedagogy and schools, community
       agencies for the issue etc.). See Educational Studies: A Journal of the American
       Educational Association from 2003-Present and Rethinking Schools for articles that you
       might use and/or copy for your peers.
      Have a one-day or one period lesson plan (depending on whether your group chooses
       secondary or elementary levels) that teachers could use and/or modify for their
       curriculum that relates to the topic and issues the book raises. Have copies of the plan to
       pass out to your peers.


Each member of the group is expected to participate fully in the presentation. Teach the book
and the issue to the class.


                                                                                                247
Additionally, your group should prepare a one-page handout for each member of the class. On
one side of the handout, you should include the bibliographic information and a summary of the
arguments made in the book. On the other side of the book, you should discuss the educational
importance of the book. In particular, address what groups of educators would most benefit from
reading the book and explain why. What practical advice does this book give about teaching and
learning?
All of you will receive the same grade for this project. In the unforeseen event that someone did
not participate equally in the discussion and presentation of the book, I will depend on you as
professional, ethical future teachers to inform me of this, so that I can make adjustments in the
grading process.
                                           RUBRICS:
"Justics" Rubric


I Content--Comic (or visual), situation, whole class strategies, and mnemonic device
100 Points
Below Basic 0-69 Basic 70-80 Proficient 81-89 Advanced 90-100
Below Basic means that a student did not follow the directions for the assignment. There were
missing elements (no visuals, no mnemonics, no situations, and no whole class strategies or an
incomplete "justic" with many missing parts). It was confusing, and the project was not detailed.
Basic means that the student followed directions, but the student may not have had whole class
strategies for each one dealing with the "ism." The student had most of these parts on the project,
but they were not detailed or specific.
Proficient means that the student followed the directions and had whole class strategies for each
one dealing with the "ism." The topics lead to discussing and dealing with the "isms." The
student also had each part of the project. They were specific with the strategies too.
Advanced means that the student went above and beyond the requirements for each part of the
project and really researched the strategies and were detailed in the approach. The student went
to Rethinking Schools and/or Teaching Tolerance, and they used lesson topics from those
sources for each strategy, and they varied their strategies with each "ism." They did not use the
same strategies and modify them just a little when changing from one to the next.

II Strategies                                   40 Points
Below Basic 0-15 Basic 16-24 Proficient 25-34 Advanced 35-40
Below Basic means that the student did not have all of the strategies.
The strategies were not well developed, and they lacked specifics and details. Also, the strategies
were not whole class strategies or did not lead to work on the "isms."




                                                                                               248
Basic means that the student did three strategies, but they may not have had whole class
strategies for each one. They were not as specific and developed as the proficient and advanced
levels.
Proficient means that the student had three whole class strategies that were well developed and
specific, and the strategies dealt directly with the "isms."
The student may have used the same types of strategies for all the "isms" with slight
modifications here.
Advanced means that the student went above and beyond with their three whole class strategies
by having detail, specifics, and different lessons for each "ism."

III Grammar                                        35 Points
Below Basic 0-15 Basic 16-25 Proficient 26-30 Advanced 31-35


Below Basic means that the student's writing needs a lot of improvement. It is hard to
understand. There are many errors such as: comma splices, run-ons, fragments, and agreement
problems with the subject and verbs and pronouns and antecedents.
Basic means that the writing has errors, but the overall meaning is communicated. The errors are
not as serious as the below basic errors. Here, the student may have problems with using commas
after their introductory phrases or clauses. The problems do not affect the meaning.
Proficient means that the student's writing is clear and smooth. There are few errors. The
transitions help with the smoothness overall.
Advanced means that there are basically no errors, and the writing is refined and polished. It is
ready for publication almost.

Group Book Ad Project
120 Points Content
Did the presentation reflect a thorough understanding of the content presented in the book?
Below Basic 0-35 Basic 35-45 Proficient 46-55 Advanced 56-60 (Multiplied by 2)
Below basic means that the group was missing parts of the assignment. They were not clear
when they presented the information, and some information was incorrect.
Basic means that the group followed the directions and had each part, but they were not thorough
with their work. They did not go into detail about the content of the book and the issues that the
book raised with regard to the "isms."
Proficient means that the group was thorough with each part of the presentation, and the group
did go into the issues that the book raised.



                                                                                                249
Advanced means that the group exceeded my expectations, and they were thorough with each
part. They went above and beyond with their lesson plan and resources. They were advanced
with their presentation of the issues that the book raised as well.

60 Points Creativity
Did the presentation incorporate a variety of teaching strategies and/or visual aids to present the
material to the audience?
Below Basic 0-15 Basic 16-20 Proficient 21-26 Advanced 27-30 (Multiplied by 2)
Below Basic means that the students did not have a variety. They just lectured.
Basic means that the students had a Power Point presentation and/or just a video with their
information. There was not much variety.


Proficient means that there was variety in the presentation (for example and activity for the class
to do as well as a video clip, documentary, game, and/or guest speaker)
Advanced means that the group went above and beyond for the variety. They were innovative
and creative with games, activities, posters, bookmarks, guest speakers, video clips,
documentaries, and/or stickers etc. to get across the information in their presentation.

20 Points Organization
Was the presentation well organized and well prepared?
Below Basic 0-4 Basic 5-7 Proficient 8-9 Advanced 10 (Multiplied by 2)
Below basic means that the group did not have an agenda or flow from one element to the next.
Presenters did not know when to come in and stop, so there were pauses. Presenters were
confused about what they were doing. It was not well orgazized or planned. The materials for the
class were not together, and it took extra time for the handouts due to the lack in organization.
Basic means that presenters knew what part they were doing and when they were speaking. The
information for the class was also ready in advance, and there was a structure to the presentation
that flowed.
Proficient means that the presenters knew what part they were doing and when they were
speaking. In addition, the class materials were prepared and passed out quickly, but with this
level, the students were polished. They practiced their presentation before hand.
Advanced means that the presenters looked like professional speakers. They went above and
beyond with their organization and preparations. It was a seemless presentation, and it was
polished with no pauses. You could tell that the presenters practiced a couple of times before
their book ad presentation as well.
Total Points   /200



                                                                                                 250
Paper Rubric
Low Basic = 0-60 Points out of 100
For this grade, a student did not follow the directions for the assignment. There are major
grammatical problems (such as fragments, comma splices, run-ons, improper word choice, and
poor punctuation) that lead to confusion and a lack of comprehension by the reader. The content
and ideas are also weak here and not specific either. It is hard to follow both in terms of the
grammar and the content.
Basic = 61-80


For this grade, a student followed the directions for the most part. The student had many errors
with his or her grammar though, but overall, these mistakes did not cause a problem with the
reader's comprehension of the work. The ideas were more focused than the below basic though,
but they were still weak and incomplete. The student is using concrete examples and analysis,
but he or she is not using abstract reasoning and critical thinking skills here.
Proficient = 81-95
For this grade, there were few grammatical errors, and the student followed the directions well.
The ideas were clear and focused, and the writing was smooth. The student was specific and
detailed in the analysis as well, and he or she is moving into using more abstract thoughts and
critical thinking here.
Advanced = 96-100
For this grade, the student went above and beyond my expectations. There were no (or very few)
grammatical errors. It was smooth, comprehensible, and detailed. The student was specific and
even tied in research from outside of my class materials. The student uses a lot of critical
thinking and abstract ideas as well.




                                                                                              251
                             Missouri Western State University
                 College of Professional Studies – Department of Education
                            Participation in Teaching I EDU 203
                                    Spring 2008 Arranged

Dr. Debby Bogle, Coordinator of Clinical Placement    Education Office: Murphy Hall 111 - L
Department Phone: 816 - 271 – 4332 Dr. Bogle's Phone: 816 - 271 - 4304
Email: mailto:bogleds@missouriwestern.edu Office Hours: By appointment
Website: http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds/

Welcome to the Missouri Western State University Teacher Education Program. The following
graphic is offered to help clarify where you are in the program:




Department of Education Conceptual Framework - The MWSU philosophy of teacher
education has as its focus the early and gradually intensifying identification of self with the
teaching profession through performance-based learning experiences and assessments. In this
course you are entering Phase I (awareness) of your development as a potential teacher.



                                                                                                  252
CATALOG DESCRIPTION: EDU 203 is a laboratory course taken concurrently with EDU
202. During this off-campus experience, the participant serves as a teacher assistant. This
exploratory course provides concrete exposure to teaching, students, and the school. Taken the
same semester as EDU 202.

MWSU Department of Education Standards Addressed by This Course:

Standard 3 – Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs – The teacher candidate understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are
adapted to diverse learners.

Standard 9 – Reflection and Professional Development -The teacher candidate is a reflective
practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others
(students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out
opportunities to grow professionally.

Standard 11 - Technology - The teacher candidate is able to use technology resources for class
activities, assignments and research.

Course Objectives Linked to Standards: Students are expected to know and be able to
demonstrate their understanding of:

1. the differences of individuals, their learning styles, and culture uniqueness (INTASC/MWSU
Standard 3).

2. utilizing technology for class activities, assignments and research (INTASC/MWSU Standard
11).

3. utilizing reflective thinking and writing approaches to record their observations and learning
(INTASC/MWSU Standard 9).

Professional Behaviors Linked to this Course:

   1. Attendance – The future teacher candidate attended the experience as assigned. If an
      absence was necessary, advance notice was given to the host school and the MWSU
      supervisor. Any absence was made up pending the approval of the Coordinator of
      Clinical Placement.
   2. Punctuality – The future teacher candidate reported to the host school at the assigned time
      and stayed for the assigned time. The teacher candidate completed any assigned tasks
      within the prescribed time and recognized how punctuality affects others.
   3. Appropriate Appearance – The future teacher candidate‘s appearance in dress, personal
      hygiene and physical behavior was appropriate for the classroom and complied with the
      host school‘s policies regarding dress and behavior.
   4. Self-confidence – The future teacher candidate exhibits appropriate confidence and poise
      in working with teaching professionals and students for an initial field experience.



                                                                                                253
   5. Positive Attitude – The future teacher candidate exhibits a positive attitude toward the
       teaching profession and those engaged in it, respecting the diversity of all individuals.
       He or she seeks or accepts tasks or assignments in a positive, pro-active manner.
   6. Professional written communications – The future teacher candidate demonstrates the use
       of standard English in written communications with teaching professionals, parents and
       students.
   7. Professional oral communications - The future teacher candidate demonstrates the use of
       standard English in oral communications with teaching professionals, parents and
       students.
   8. Ethical behavior – The future teacher candidate conducted him or herself in a
       professional and ethical manner during this experience. He or she respected the issues of
       personal property, personal space, personal differences related to working with others.
       Further, the future teacher candidate respected issues of confidentiality related to student
       information and followed all MWSU and host school policies.
   9. Mature reasoning or judgment – The future teacher candidate demonstrated an
       understanding of the role and boundaries of a teaching professional. He or she remained
       objective in dealing with emotional issues and could recognize the complexity of
       situations.
   10. Personal Mannerisms – The future teacher candidate displayed personal mannerisms that
       were compatible with a teaching professional. These mannerisms included appropriate
       facial and physical behaviors as well as gestures and language.

Grading Scale: This course is evaluated on a Credit/Fail basis. Future teacher candidates must
have a satisfactory rating on at least 8 of the 10 professional behaviors to receive a ―Credit‖
rating. However, a significant weakness identified by the host school or MWSU supervisor in
any one category may result in a failing grade. In addition, the four essay assignments must be
completed and receive a passing score.

Click here for a copy of the 203 school experience evaluation form.

See your 202 professor for the scoring guides for the in-school and Diversity essays.

Course Methodology: In order to assist you in accomplishing the objectives and professional
behaviors stated above, you will participant in an off-campus placement in a school. You will
demonstrate your progress toward the standards and professional behaviors by observation
essays and supervisor and cooperating teacher evaluation.

Meeting Times: Initial information regarding the 203 placement will be given during your 202
class during the first week of classes. All students should to go to
http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds/ scroll down to EDU 203 and click to bring up that
page. This webpage has the variety of forms that are needed in the 203 course. After accessing
the syllabus, the most important form is your application for the 203 experience. Click on that
link (203 application form). Once you have the form before you, you can highlight the form and
copy/save to your computer. This will allow you to complete the form at your convenience.
Once you have completed the application form, save the form to your computer, print two copies



                                                                                                254
of the form and give one to Dr. Bogle by the due date. If I am not in my office, please leave the
form in the box outside my door.

After completing the 203 application information, you will be assigned to a school. If you do not
complete an application, you will not be assigned a school.

You will observe at your assigned school approximately two hours per day, two days per week
for eight weeks for a minimum of 30 hours - Further you are required to complete a diversity
paper, and disposition paper. These will be turned in to your 202 instructor for a grade
and given to your supervisor during your exit interview. You will observe MWSU's schedule
so you will not have to attend during Spring Break.

The diversity interview and paper, disposition paper and your timesheet for your experience
should all be given to your Western supervisor at your final evaluation meeting held between
April 20-25, 2008.

Text: There is no text for this course.

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Attendance: Learning is a social activity. Someone has said that education is caught, not taught.
It is in the context of participation and cooperation that one really learns, for learning does not
come solely by reading an assignment or by writing. Learning is full, rich and rewarding when
the learner is fully engaged, engaged with the teacher, the text, the assignments, and with other
learners. Surely, it is this kind of learning you desire for your students when you are teaching in
your own classroom. Therefore, it is important that you start your career as an educator in a
responsible and professional manner. Attend all assigned observations and be on time. If you
miss class due to circumstances beyond your control, please notify me and your supervisor as
soon as possible at 816-271-4304 or mailto:heider@missouriwestern.edu All experience times
must be completed by November 25, 2007. Please see the course schedule for a summary of due
dates and experience times.

Assignments: At this stage of your coursework it is vitally important that you view each
assignment as an opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience that may be
crucial for your success and satisfaction as a teacher. Teaching is a relational activity and how
relationships are built and nurtured can determine success or failure, satisfaction or
discouragement. Much of what you do now can preclude problems later, when more is at stake.
Your assignments are due to your 202 professor and your MWSU supervisor on the date
due. The following outlines the assignments for this course:

1. Observation essays:

a) Structure, Discipline and Pedagogy of the Classroom - Due -

b) Working with Diverse Learners – Due



                                                                                                255
2. Final evaluation meeting – Please schedule this meeting with your Western supervisor
sometime between April 21-25, 2008. You must meet with your MWSU 203 supervisor to
review your evaluation, disposition paper, and diversity interview. You cannot pass 203 without
verification that this meeting occurred. You will receive an "F" in 203 if this meeting is not
verified by April 28, 2008. This "F" will prevent you from being accepted into the Western
Teacher Education Department.

IMPORTANT: Time management is a crucial skill for an educator. You should plan your time
so you are able to meet assignment and meeting deadlines.

Web Page: All items in this syllabus are also available through a link on my website:
http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds/

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building (Hearnes
Center - 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The Center offers
help primarily for writing and math. Should you need help, you may wish to call staff at the
Center at 271-4524 or stop by Hearnes Center 213 to make an appointment.

Special Needs: If you have a special need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires
special arrangements, please inform the instructor after the first class meeting so that proper
arrangements can be made. Please be sure you have contacted Michael Ritter, Director of Special
Needs/Disability Services in Eder Hall 202B.

Appeals: If at any time you feel that I have treated you or your work unfairly, first make an
appointment with me to discuss the issue or provide me with a written description of your
perceptions and position. If discussions with me fail to resolve the matter, please make an
appointment with the chairperson of the Education Department.

Academic Honesty: Cheating of any sort is not tolerated and, if caught, will result in a zero
being given on a test or assignment. Check your student handbook for your rights regarding any
disciplinary procedures.

DIVERSITY: This course will address the diverse nature of today‘s classrooms. You will be
expected to address diversity issues in your discussions and writings.

GRADES: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher knowledge, skills,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected. A Credit
or Fail grade will be given at the end of the semester. The 10 professional behavior criteria and
the essay assignments have been identified for you. Specific expectations for the essay
assignments will be given by your 202 professor. If you have any further questions, see or email
me.




                                                                                                 256
                           EDU 303 – Experience in Teaching II
                              Spring 2008 Course Syllabus

Dr. Debby Bogle, Coordinator of Clinical Placement
Office:   Murphy Hall 111 L Phone: 816 - 271- 4304
Office Hours: By appointment
Email:    mailto:bogleds@missouriwestern.edu
Website: http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds




The MWSU philosophy of teacher education has as its focus the early and gradually
intensifying identification of self with the teaching profession through performance-based
learning experiences and assessments. In this course you are entering Phase III
(Investigation) of your development as a potential teacher. The purpose of this course is to
enable the teacher candidate to investigate his or her own behavior as a teacher (theory)
found in EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching combined with the actual classroom setting of
experience (practice) in EDU 303.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II is a continuation of the
off-campus experiences in a cooperating school as teacher associates. To be taken concurrently


                                                                                            257
with EDU 304. Prerequisite: EDU 203 and approved admission to the MWSU Teacher
Education Program. Elementary and middle school candidates must have completed and
successfully passed content methods courses. Secondary candidates should have successfully
completed a content methods course and been admitted into the education program. All
candidates must maintain a 2.5 GPA.

COURSE OBJECTIVES LINKED TO STANDARDS: Experience in Teaching II is an in-
school experience that provides the teacher candidate with an opportunity to work with a skilled
professional and classroom students.

This course will aid in preparing you for your career in teaching by providing you with
opportunities to:
   1. understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the discipline(s) within
       the context of a global society and create learning experiences that make these aspects of
       a subject matter meaningful for students (INTASC/MWSU Standard 1),

   2. understand how students learn and develop, and provide learning opportunities that
      support intellectual, social, and personal development of all students (INTASC/MWSU
      Standard 2).

   3. understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional
      opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners (INTASC/MWSU Standard 3).

   4. recognize the importance of long-range planning and curriculum development and
      develop, implement and evaluate curriculum based upon student, district, and state
      performance standards (INTASC/MWSU Standard 4)

   5. use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical
      thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills (INTASC/MWSU Standard 5).


   6. develop an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
      learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
      learning and self-motivation (INTASC/MWSU Standard 6).


   7. model effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active
      inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom
      (INTASC/MWSU Standard 7).


   8. understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and insure the
      continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner
      (INTASC/MWSU Standard 8).
   9. develop your skills as a reflective teacher who continually assesses the effects of choices
      and actions on others INTASC/MWSU Standard 9).



                                                                                                258
   10. foster relationships with school colleagues, parents, and educational partners in the larger
       community to support student learning and well being (INTASC/MWSU 10).


   11. understand the theories and applications of technology in educational settings and has
       adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students
       (INTASC/MWSU 11).


   12. know the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education and can make
       connections between the foundations and current practice to include awareness of the
       individual, ethical, and legal responsibilities (MWSU 12).


In addition, you will be evaluated on your ability to demonstrate professional behaviors. The
Western The Western Teacher Education professional behaviors require that you demonstrate
the behaviors needed for the education profession. Please refer to the Western Teacher
Education Handbook and the Phase III Experience in Teaching evaluation form for additional
information.

COURSE METHODOLOGY: In order to help you accomplish the standards/objectives stated
above, you will work closely with a practicing K-12 cooperating teacher in your assigned content
and grade area. You will participate as fully as possible in the classroom activities and develop a
unit of study from the approved district curriculum. You will implement the unit of study and
provide evidence of reflection upon your skills to address learning needs in the experience.

MEETING TIMES: Host school placements are made during the first week of classes and
announced during your regular 304 Psychology in Teaching class meeting. You are assigned to
an in-school experience for approximately fourteen weeks –January 28 until April 25, 2008.
You are expected to participate for one hour per day each day of the fourteen weeks of the
experience. If you are a secondary student assigned to a block schedule of courses you may have
an alternating day assignment. This means that to meet the experience requirements you must
add 20 minutes to each block day. This can be accomplished by going early or staying after the
block ends. Regardless, you are expected to attend the experience on a regular basis and to
immediately inform your cooperating teacher, building principal and MWSU supervisor if an
emergency arises. Absences will affect your final grade in this experience. They should be
made up if at all possible.

SUPERVISION: You will have an MWSU supervisor for this experience. Upon notification of
your assigned supervisor, you should make an appointment to introduce yourself to your
supervisor. Your supervisor will use the Host School Information Sheet to learn about your
school assignment. School schedule and to contact you. Make sure this information is correct.
Further, you should confirm communication arrangements between you and your supervisor.
Will you communicate through appointments, phone messages, email, etc? Also, as a part of
that communication, you should clarify how and when you will be providing the weekly
schedule sheets to your supervisor. Failure to provide this information and to keep your
supervisor informed of changes in your schedule (early outs, changes in the daily schedule, etc.)


                                                                                                259
can result in missed observations and can affect your grade. Avoid this situation by
communicating regularly with your supervisor. Your supervisor and cooperating teacher will
determine your grade for Junior Experience. It is very important that you keep an open channel
for communication between these persons and yourself.

TEXT: There is no text for this course. Students are encouraged to review the Western Teacher
Education Handbook for clinical placement information or to review the Phase III Clinical
Experience evaluation form to understand the specific expectations for this experience.

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Attendance: Learning is a social activity. Someone has said that education is caught, not
taught. It is in the context of participation and cooperation that one really learns, for learning
does not come solely by reading an assignment or by writing. Learning is full, rich and
rewarding when the learner is fully engaged, engaged with the teacher, and the assignments.
It is important that you start your career as an educator in a fully engaged, responsible and
professional manner. Attend all experience classes and be on time. If you miss a clinical
experience class due to an emergency, the time that you miss must be made up before a final
grade will be given. If you miss the experience class due to circumstances beyond your control,
please notify your building principal, cooperating teacher, MWSU supervisor and me as soon as
possible. An absence beyond your control would be a death, car wreck or severe illness.
Sleeping late, faulty alarm clocks, and appointments are not emergencies and are under your
control.

Assignments: At this stage of your coursework it is vitally important that you view each
assignment as an opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience that may be
crucial for your success and satisfaction as a teacher. You are expected to have lesson plans for
all lessons that you conduct. Further, you will create, implement and evaluate a unit of
instruction. This unit must address district, state and national standards. You must show
evidence of impact on P-12 student learning. See the unit information from your Psychology
professor for further clarification of this assignment.
Your supervisor will expect to have a lesson plan handed to him or her when he or she enters
your classroom for observations. Further if you are using support materials (text books,
worksheets, tests, etc.,) have a copy of the materials available for your supervisor. Be sure you
have reviewed all lesson and unit plans with your cooperating teacher to confirm that you are
addressing the district curriculum. You should only be teaching the School Board approved
curriculum during this experience. Elementary junior experience students are expected to create
and keep a record of at least 30 lesson plans during this experience (some of these may be part of
your unit). Secondary junior experience students in a block schedule are expected to keep a
record of at least 15 lesson plans (some may be a part of your unit). These lesson plans should be
kept in a three ring binder and shared with your MWSU supervisor.

Do not ask the host school and cooperating teacher to adjust the schedule to fit your needs. You
should be adjusting to fit the demands of the school schedule. Also please be aware that the
school schedule may change with little or no notice. You must be flexible and able to adjust
your teaching schedule. This is the reality of teaching.


                                                                                               260
As noted above, the main assignment for this course is the development, implementation and
reflection upon a five-lesson unit that you actually teach. Please view this as a minimum rather
than a maximum length for the unit. This unit must be developed under the supervision of your
cooperating teacher, content methods instructor and MWSU supervisor. The unit must be from
the approved district curriculum, directly tied to the Missouri Show Me Standards, GLE's (where
available) and address the MWSU unit requirements. The MWSU supervisor, your content
methods professor and cooperating teacher should see and approve of your unit before
implementation. Further your MWSU supervisor should observe you as you teach the unit.
A caution: as soon as possible begin a discussion with your MWSU supervisor and cooperating
teacher about the possible content and timing of this unit. Do not plan your unit so it is being
taught over parent teacher conferences or holidays. Do not wait until the last three weeks of the
experience to implement your unit.
Also, as you proceed through your Experience in Teaching II placement, you are required to
write journal articles and reflections some directly related to the MWSU dispositions. Your
journals/reflections are to be provided to your Psychology in Teaching professor and to your
MWSU supervisor. You can submit your journals to your MWSU supervisor using email or by
providing paper copies to the supervisor.

Please note: students who transferred in coursework substituting for the 202/203 courses as well
as any student who completed 202/203 at MWSU prior to fall 2002 will be required to complete
a diversity assignment/structured interview. See me for further instructions.

Web Page: All items in this syllabus are also available through a link on my website:
http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes Center 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The
Center offers help primarily for writing and math. Should you need help, you may wish to call
staff at the Center at 271-4524 or stop by Hearnes Center 213 to make an appointment.

Special Needs: If you have a special need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires
special arrangements, please inform the instructor after the first class meeting so that proper
arrangements can be made. You should plan on meeting with the Western Special
Needs/Disability Services Coordinator, Mr. Michael Ritter, who is located in Eder Hall 202B.

Appeals: If, at any time, you feel that your cooperating teacher or MWSU supervisor have
treated you or your work unfairly, first make an appointment with them to discuss the issue or
provide them with a written description of your perceptions and position. If discussions with
them fail to resolve the matter, please make an appointment with me. If that does not resolve
your concern or address the issues related to your placement, then you should contact the
chairperson of the Education Department, Dr. Richard Porr.
Academic Honesty: Cheating of any sort is not tolerated, and if caught will result in a zero
being given on a test or assignment. Check your student handbook for your rights regarding any
disciplinary procedures.




                                                                                                 261
DIVERSITY: This course will address the diverse nature of today‘s classrooms. You will be
expected to address diversity issues in your lessons, classroom discipline/rules policy and to
understand the legal issues protecting the rights of teachers and students with respect to
differences.

GRADES: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher knowledge, skills,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected.
You will be evaluated on the twelve standards listed at the beginning of this syllabus as well as
the Western professional behaviors. A mid-term and final evaluation will be jointly completed
by your cooperating teacher and your MWSU supervisor. Go to my website to download a copy
of the evaluation instrument.

Please note that all Experience in Teaching II students receive an “C if doing well, or a D or
F” for the mid-term grade.

The following descriptors are examples of performance indicators commensurate with the
overall course grade:

Advanced Performance Level: ―A‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has performed
above and beyond the stated course objectives and has required minimal supervision. On the
evaluation form 92-100% of the possible points were earned.

Proficient Performance Level: ―B‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has fulfilled all
stated course objectives and has responded well to supervision. On the evaluation form 84-91%
of the possible points were earned.

Basic Performance Level: ―C‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has fulfilled most of
the stated course objectives but at a minimum level of performance that required close
supervision. On the evaluation form 76-83% of the possible points were earned.

Below Basic Performance Level: ―D/F‖ level performance means that the teacher candidate
has major weaknesses and has required very close supervision. Additional coursework or
maturity will be required before a teacher candidate can apply for student teaching. On the
evaluation form 0 - 75% of the possible points were earned.

A Caution: Many of the teaching artifacts created in the Psychology in Teaching (304) course
and the Experience in Teaching II placement (303) will be used to create your certification
portfolio for student teaching. Please keep a print and electronic copy of all artifacts from these
experiences. Remember: Save Everything.




                                                                                                 262
                            EDU 304 – Psychology in Teaching

                                          Spring 2008

Debby Bogle, Ph.D. Hours: Posted outside of office
Office: Murphy Hall Rm 111 L Office Phone: 816-271-4304
E-mail: bogleds@missouriwestern.edu


WELCOME TO WESTERN TEACHER EDUCATION: The following graphic is
offered to help clarify where you are in the program:




CATALOG DESCRIPTION: Studies psychological principles as applied to educational
settings. To be taken concurrently with EDU 303. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and EDU 203.
Elementary majors must have completed their methods courses before enrolling in this class.
Students wishing to become certified in secondary areas must have taken at least one of their
methods courses before enrolling in this class. Secondary students who have not taken all of
their methods courses could experience difficulty in completing the lesson and unit plan
requirements. It is recommended that they seek advisement from their academic advisor.

                                                                                                263
Major Course Competencies in the MWSU Teacher Education Model along with Missouri
Beginning Teacher Competencies and National Standards:

The purpose of the course is to enable the prospective classroom teacher to investigate one's
own behavior as a teacher [theory] while in the actual classroom setting of Experience II
[practice], including, but not limited to, those areas found in Phase III of the MWSU model.

Organization of the Course with the MWSU Standards/Missouri Competencies/NCATE
Standards:

Performance-Based Authentic Assessment Outcomes (a National and State Mandate)

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) has created standards
(guidelines) that measure the successful preparation of beginning teachers. Both the State of
Missouri Beginning Teacher Competencies and the NCATE Standards have been blended here to
present the Performance-Based Assessments for the Psychology in Teaching course. The
success of a college’s program and its individual courses is measured by the quality of
performances exhibited by its prospective teachers. Each course must assess the performances
deemed necessary for success and evaluate the degree of achievement each pre-service teacher
attains on each performance. Evidence of this is required by the State of Missouri in a
Certification Portfolio for each teacher candidate. These outcomes also align to the MWSU
Education Department Standards that go along the state and national standards. They are listed
by letter and number below along with the documented evidence that you will be keeping for
your certification portfolio.

       DOCUMENTED EVIDENCE = Junior Experience Journals [signature piece],

         Daily & Unit Lesson Planning and Reflections

       (Exp II),

         Course Tests Items

Course Units:

1. Background and Lesson Planning/Assessment for Learning Text, Chapters 1, 3, 11, 14
MoStep Standard #2—Human Development and Learning, ways to organize concepts with age
level characteristics of learners and using learning theories to address child/adolescent
development, introduced but in-depth understanding is developed in your methods courses

MoStep Standard #4—follow MWSU lesson & unit format, connecting to

local/state/national standards for students, create lessons and activities that recognizes needs of
diverse learners and variations in learning styles and performances




                                                                                                  264
MoStep Standard #1 & 5—knows and uses [Exp II] a variety of instructional strategies in
lessons/unit and presents the subject in multiple ways

MoStep Standard #3 – lessons adapted to prior knowledge, learning styles, Multiple Intelligences

MoStep Standard #8—use of classroom assessments to evaluate student learning

2. Classroom Management and Discipline      Text, Chapter 13

MoStep Standard #6—knows and promotes these standards with leading discipline theories

MoStep Standard #7—models effective communication skills while working with student
discipline

3. Human Development and Learning       Text, Chapters 2, 7, 8

MoStep Standard #2—knows theories and can provide scaffolding to new concepts

MoStep Standard #3—knows how students differ in light of theories


4. Motivation, Retention & Information Processing Text, Chapters 8, 12

MoStep Standard #6—promotes positive social interaction, self-motivation of students

MoStep Standard #7—demonstrates sensitivity cultural, intellectual, gender issues in

the classroom

5. You, as the Reflective Teacher   Text, Chapter 16

MoStep Standard #9—uses self-assessment & problem solving to reflect on your own teaching

Pacing of the Course:

Examinations

Unit 1 – 4 weeks Exam #1 ……March 3

Unit 2 – 4 weeks

Unit 3 – 2 weeks Exam #2 ……April 21

Unit 4 – 3 weeks

Unit 5 – 2 weeks Final is Cumulative


                                                                                            265
Final Time……………………….Friday, May 2 at 11:30

COURSE METHODOLOGY: In order to help you accomplish the objectives stated above, we
will use a variety of activities to include: lectures, whole class discussions, cooperative groups,
role playing, demonstrations, written assignments, lesson planning, exams, and journal writing.

MEETING TIMES: Mondays and Wednesdays 11:00-12:50

TEXT: Biehler, Robert F. & Jack Snowman. (2006). Psychology Applied to Teaching

11th Ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Attendance: Learning is full, rich and rewarding when the learner fully engaged, engaged with
the teacher, the text, the assignments, and with other learners. Surely, it is this kind of learning
you desire for your students when you are teaching in your own classroom. Therefore, it is
important that you start your career as an educator in a responsible and professional manner.
Attend all classes and be on time. Since many of our activities are cooperative, the entire class
will suffer if you miss. Furthermore, absences cannot, in reality, be made up since the missed
class can never be duplicated. However, if you miss class due to circumstances beyond your
control, check with another class member regarding class notes and assignments and then talk
with me about possible make-up work.

Evaluation:

[Theory]--You will be evaluated on the basis of your depth of understanding of learning
processes and teaching procedures discussed in the Psychology in Teaching class through course
exams written to prepare you for the Praxis II exam for teacher certification.

[TheorytoObservationtoAnalysis]--You will be evaluated on your ability to write entries
in the journal which demonstrates your understanding of how the theory discussed in the
Psychology in Teaching class is observable and usable in the Experience in Teaching 11
classroom. A research study has shown that the journal format has helped MWSC students have
higher scores on the Praxis II exam.

[TheorytoObservationtoAnalysistoPractice]--You will be evaluated on the ability to
identify specific learning processes and teaching procedures observable in the Experience in
Teaching II classroom through exams and short assignments/critiques in the course.

*This course must be taken concurrently with Experience in Teaching II. Assignments are
geared to go along with one's actual classroom teaching. This has made the course unique and
viable as a beginning practice ground to see yourself as an investigator of real teaching
techniques as shown in the MWSU Conceptual Model




                                                                                                 266
All courses at MWSU may be taken only two times. The prospective teacher candidate must
pass this course with at least a grade of C in order to continue in the MWSU professional
sequence of education courses leading to teacher certification.

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes Center Rm 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The
Center offers help primarily for writing and math. If you need help, you may wish to call the
Center for an appointment at 271-4524 or drop by to make an appointment.

Special Needs: Michael Ritter is the Special Needs/ Special Services Coordinator at MWSU.
He is located in the Disability Services office located in Eder Hall 202B. If you have a special
need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires special arrangements, please meet
with Mr. Ritter, and then inform the instructor so that proper arrangements can be made. His
phone number is 271-4330.

Appeals: If at any time you feel that I have treated you or your work unfairly, first make an
appointment with me to discuss the issue or provide me with a written description of your
perceptions and position. If discussions with me fail to resolve the matter, please make an
appointment with the chairperson of the Education Department, Dr. Richard Porr, at 271-4332.

Academic Honesty: Academic honesty is required in all academic endeavors. Violations of
academic honest include any instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking credit for another‘s work,
falsifying documents or academic records, or any other fraudulent activity. Cheating of any sort
is unacceptable behavior, and if caught will result in a zero being given on a test or assignment.
Check your student handbook for your rights regarding any disciplinary procedures.
http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf

Late Papers: Late papers will have 10% of the total grade deducted each class period they are
late.

DIVERSITY: The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum for candidates to acquire
and apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. These
experiences include working with diverse higher education and school faculty, diverse
candidates, and diverse students in P-12 schools.

Some of the topics covered in this class include Maslow‘ Hierarchy of Needs, Kohlberg‘s Moral
Reasoning Theory, Erickson‘s Psychosocial Development, and Howard Gardner‘s Multiple
Intelligences. Students are given opportunities in this class to use these theories in activities and
to create lesson plans that incorporate that information.



GRADES: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher skills, knowledge,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected. Keep in



                                                                                                     267
mind that prospective employers will look at grades in order to forecast future success. The
following describe the overall Missouri Western Education Department‘s scoring:

Below Basic – one aspect of task is used or understood serially; there is no relationships of facts / ideas.

Basic – two or more aspects of a task are used or understood serially, they are not interrelated.

Proficient – several aspects are integrated so that the whole has a coherent structure and meaning.

Advanced – the coherent whole is generalized to a higher level of abstraction.

Education department percentage grade values have been set as indicated below.

A - 92% - 100%, B - 84% - 91%, C -76% - 83%, D - 68% - 75%, F - Below 68%

Tentative Assignments:

1. Two exams and the final. (20 % each - total of 60%)

The final is cumulative.

 2. Journal. Two entries per week. Topics must be those being discussed in current unit and may not be
used more than once. You will keep a running list of topics used to be turned in with the last journal
entries. At least two of your journal entries will address and include artifacts of dispositions. You will
need to address one disposition from the domain of self-awareness and one disposition from the domain
of self-management. The journal entries addressing dispositions should be labeled as dispositions.
Journals may address MoStep standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10, depending on the topic chosen. (20
% of final grade)

 3. Unit. Specific instructions and a scoring guide will be provided for you. This unit addresses MoStep
standards 1,4,5 and 8. The unit is Due April 16, 2008 (20% of final grade)

 About Assignments: It is vitally important that you view each assignment as something more than just
an assignment. Each assignment is an opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience
that may be crucial for your success and satisfaction as a student teacher. In essence, you will be
practicing your chosen profession. Some of our activities will be very similar to the types of discussions
you will eventually have with your teaching peers. Some of what we do will closely mirror in-service
training you will be expected to participate in as a professional educator. Your participation should
include thoughtful contributions to class discussions and activities. And, your preparation for class
activities should not be limited to attention to content only, but to your relationships with class members
and me. Teaching is a relational activity and how relationships are built and nurtured can determine
success or failure, satisfaction or discouragement. Much of what you do now can preclude problems
later, when more is at stake.

                                        Please note the following:

(1) Attendance and participation in the class will affect your grade when it is borderline.


                                                                                                         268
(2) Spelling and/or grammatical errors in writing assignments will result in lowered grades. In all
ways, teachers should communicate using proper English.

 (3) Late journals will lose 10% if turned in after class on Wednesday, and 10% each class period
after that.

 A Caution: Please read and listen to the particulars of each assignment very carefully. Ask questions if
you are unsure of what is required. Note that when an assignment outlines points that must be included
you will lose credit if ANY of the required parts of the assignment are missing or were not given
appropriate attention.




                                                                                                      269
                     Missouri Western State University
         College of Professional Studies – Department of Education
      SED 311 Secondary Reading Techniques for Content Area Reading
Mr. Mike Flowers Education Phone – 816-271-4448
Murphy Hall Office P Flowers Phone – 816-271-4367
Office Hours: By appointment. Email: mailto:flowers@missouriwestern/edu
Website: staff.missouriwestern.edu/~mflowers/ Fax: 816-271-4513

Welcome to the Missouri Western State University Teacher Education Program. The
following graphic is offered to help clarify where you are in the program:




Department of Education Conceptual Framework - The MWSU philosophy of teacher
education has as its focus the early and gradually intensifying identification of self with the
teaching profession through performance-based learning experiences and assessments. In this
course you are entering Phase II Developing Theoretical Knowledge of your development as a
potential teacher. The conceptual framework focuses on identifying, developing and
demonstrating leadership traits.




                                                                                             270
CATALOG DESCRIPTION: Techniques of teaching upper-level reading. Prerequisite: ENG
104 and 108, or 112. Admission to the Education Department.

MWSU Department of Education Standards Addressed by This Course:
The MWSU teacher candidate will:
   1. understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the discipline(s) within
      the context of a global society and create learning experiences that make these aspects of
      a subject matter meaningful for students (INTASC/MWSU Standard 1),
   2. understand how students learn and develop, and provide learning opportunities that
      support intellectual, social, and personal development of all students (INTASC/MWSU
      Standard
   3. understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional
      opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners (INTASC/MWSU Standard 3).
   4. recognize the importance of long-range planning and curriculum development and
      develop, implement and evaluate curriculum based upon student, district, and state
      performance standards (INTASC/MWSU Standard 4).
   5. use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical
      thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills (INTASC/MWSU Standard 5).
   6. develop an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
      learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
      learning and self-motivation (INTASC/MWSU Standard 6).
   7. model effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active
      inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom (INTASC/MWSU
      Standard 7).
   8. understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and insure the
      continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner
      (INTASC/MWSU Standard 8).
   9. develop your skills as a reflective teacher who continually assesses the effects of choices
      and actions on others (INTASC/MWSU Standard 9).

Course Methodology: The professor for SED 311 Secondary Reading Techniques will use
lecture, cooperative learning, current articles, modeling of reading strategies, class activities,
assessments and authentic assignments to support the teacher candidate understanding of
secondary reading strategies and their application in the classroom.

Meeting Times: This course has an arranged meeting time. Weds 4:30PM –6:20PM

Text: Buehl, D.(2001).Classroom Strategies for Interactive Learning. InternationalReading
Association. Newark, Delaware.

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Attendance: Learning is a social activity. Someone has said that education is caught, not
taught. It is in the context of participation and cooperation that one really learns, for learning
does not come solely by reading an assignment or by writing. Learning is full, rich and
rewarding when the learner is fully engaged, engaged with the teacher, the text, the assignments,


                                                                                                     271
and with other learners. Surely, it is this kind of learning you desire for your students when you
are teaching in your own classroom. Therefore, it is important that you start your career as an
educator in a responsible and professional manner. Attend all classes and be on time.
Furthermore, absences cannot, in reality, be made up since the missed class can never be
duplicated. If you miss class due to circumstances beyond your control, please notify me as soon
as possible at 816-271-4367 or mailto:flowers@mwsu/edu Please contact a fellow classmate for
notes and class information.

Assignments: At this stage of your coursework it is vitally important that you view each
assignment as an opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience that may be
crucial for your success and satisfaction as a teacher. Teaching is a relational activity and how
relationships are built and nurtured can determine success or failure, satisfaction or
discouragement. Much of what you do now can preclude problems later, when more is at stake.
Your assignments are due to your professor at the beginning of the class on the date due. Late
work is not accepted..

Assignments for this course:

_____ one journal review linked to comprehension support for students in your content area
(must relate to a secondary content area, be from a reading research journal with the article
attached to the review) (20 points).
_____ one lesson plan demonstrating your ability to infuse comprehension strategies into your
content area using the Western lesson plan format (30 points).
_____ one philosophy essay explaining your understanding of the research and strategies that
support comprehension within your content area. The philosophy of teaching reading in the
content areas will be a two-three page (single-spaced, 12 point font, one inch margin, title, name
and date at the top) essay (20 points).
  _____ three RAS ( Reading Analysis Studies) application to reading strategy selections
attached to strategy ( 20)
  _____ one disposition paper from Frank McCourts, ―Teacher Man‖-(two to three single
spaced, 12 point font, one inch margin, title, name, and date). 30pts
 ______Three Reading Series papers for Reading Techniques Applications. 30 ea.

Exams : During the semester, students will have three SEE-I quizzes, and a final exam.

Web Page: All items in this syllabus are also available through a link on my website:
http://academic.mwsc.edu/flowers

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes Center 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The
Center offers help primarily for writing and math. Should you need help, you may wish to call
staff at the Center at 271-4524 or stop by Hearnes 213 to make an appointment.




                                                                                               272
Special Needs: If you have a special need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires
special arrangements, please inform the instructor after the first class meeting so that proper
arrangements can be made. Please make arrangements to meet with Michael Ritter, Special
Needs/Disability Services Coordinator who is located in Eder Hall 202B.

Appeals: If, at any time, you feel that I have treated you or your work unfairly, first make an
appointment with me to discuss the issue or provide me with a written description of your
perceptions and position. If discussions with me fail to resolve the matter, then you should
contact the chairperson of the Education Department, Dr. Richard Porr.

Academic Honesty Policy and Due Process: Academic honesty is required in all academic
endeavors. Violations of academic honesty include any instance of plagiarism, cheating, seeking
credit for another‘s work, falsifying documents or academic records, or any other fraudulent
activity. Violations of academic honesty may result in a failing grade on the assignment, failure
in the course, or expulsion from the University. When a student‘s grade has been affected,
violations of academic honesty will be reported to the Provost or designated representative on the
Academic Honesty Violation Report forms.
Please see the Western Student Handbook and Calendar for specific activities identified as
violations of this policy and the student due process procedure or visit the Student Development
website at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/StudentDev and click on Code of Conduct. This
handbook is also available online at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/handbook/index.pdf.

DIVERSITY: This course will address the diverse nature of today‘s classrooms. You will be
expected to address diversity issues in your approaches to reading instruction.

GRADES: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher knowledge, skills,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected.
You will be evaluated on the standards noted at the beginning of this syllabus. You will
demonstrate your progress toward these standards through the journal reviews, lesson plans,
philosophy essay and disposition paper. Each assignment is due at the beginning of the identified
class and based on your ability to discuss or explain your assignment during the class.
The following descriptors are examples of performance indicators commensurate with the
overall course grade:

Advanced Performance - In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses cover from 92%
to 100% of the total possible points. This ―A‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has
performed above and beyond the stated course objectives.

Proficient Performance - In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses cover from 84%
to 91% of the total possible points. This ―B‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has
fulfilled all stated course objectives.

Nearing Proficient Performance - In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses cover
from 76% to 83% of the total possible points. This ―C‖ level work means that the teacher



                                                                                                  273
candidate has fulfilled most of the stated course objectives but at a minimum level of
performance.
Progressing Performance - In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses cover from
68% to 75% of the total possible points. This ―D‖ level performance means that the teacher
candidate has major weaknesses.

Starting Performance - In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses cover below 68%
of the total possible points. The teacher candidate did not demonstrate the knowledge needed to
continue satisfactorily complete this course.

A Caution: Some of the teaching artifacts created in this course can be used to create your
certification portfolio for student teaching. Please keep a print and electronic copy of your future
use.




                                                                                                274
                   EED 315 Psychology & Education of the Exceptional Child

                                            Spring 2008

                                     Lisa A. Robbins, M.S.Ed.

Missouri Western State University                                             office: 271-5629
Department of Education
Email: lrobbins@missouriwestern.edu                                             fax: 271-4513

TEXT

Smith, D.D. (2005). Introduction to Special Education: Teaching in an Age of Opportunity (5th
ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

COURSE           Designed to give all teachers background and experience

DESCRIPTION in working with the exceptional child in the regular classroom by discussion
and activities that analyze the similarities and differences among the cognitive, physical, cultural,
social and emotional learning needs of individuals and the implications for education and
families.

WELCOME TO WESTERN TEACHER EDUCATION: The following graphic is offered to
help clarify where you are in the program:




                                                                                                 275
COURSE

           1) Give an overview of the legislation and litigation

   1. OBJECTIVES            that have shaped special education services in the U.S. (mwsc
      goal 1, 11; cec goal cc1k1)

           2) Understand the legal responsibility of the classroom teacher in serving and
                    individual with special needs. (mwsc goal 9,10; cec goal 3k3, cc6k1)
           3) Create and maintain successful integrated classrooms. (mwscgoal
                       1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)
           4) Apply pre-referral intervention strategies. (mwsc goal 3,5,6,8,9,10; cec goal
                       cc3k4)
           5) Describe referral and due process procedures. (mwsc goal 9,10; cec goal
                       cc1k4,cc3k4)
           6) Identify effective instructional strategies for all students. (mwsc goal 5)
           7) Define and identify characteristics of the 9 federal categories of disability.
           8) Identify the curricular needs of the individual student. (mwsc goal 2,3,4,8;cec
                       goal 2k2)
           9) Discuss and develop curricular adaptations and modifications. (mwsc goal
                       2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10)
           10) Identify and demonstrate positive, not aversive classroom management strategies.
                       (mwsc goal 2,3,4,5,6) Describe ways to increase desirable and decrease
                       undesirable behaviors in students and self. (mwsc goal 6; cec goal 6,3)
           11) Discuss effective ways to involve families, culture, and values inj the educational
                       process and child relationship. (mwsc goal 11; cec goal cc1k2, cc4k7)
           12) Discuss effects exceptionality has on the child and the family including sibling
                       and marital relationships. (cec goal cc2k4)
           13) Analyze the relationship between poverty, abuse, cultural diversity including
                       language and neglect with disability. (cec goal cc2k5)

TEACHING           Class lectures
METHODS                Class discussions
                       Reading of current special education literature
                       Audio-visual aids
                       Cooperative Learning
                       Observations

Course Policies:

Attendance: Class periods will include lecture, discussion, case studies, presentations, and
activities. To gain full benefit from the course content, attendance is required. Please let the
instructor know in advance if you are unable to attend. In-class activities and small group
discussions, case studies, video reactions, etc., will count as part of your attendance participation
grade. Since many of our activities are cooperative, the entire class will suffer if you miss. If


                                                                                                  276
you miss class due to circumstances beyond your control, check with another class member
regarding class notes and assignments and then talk with me about possible make-up work.
Missing more than 2 class periods will automatically result in a reduced grade.

Assignments: Assignments are to be typed and turned in on-time. On-time refers to the
beginning of class on the date the assignment is due. Ten percent (10%) of the points possible
for an assignment will be deducted for each weekday the assignment is late.

Text and Reading: In order to participate in discussions and activities, it is important that you
have read the chapters and additional readings assigned prior to the assigned class session. Class
quizzes will also be taken from the assigned text and reading assignments.

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes Center Rm 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The
Center offers help primarily for writing and math. If you need help, you may wish to call the
Center for an appointment at 271-4524 or drop by to make an appointment.

Special Needs: Michael Ritter is the Special Needs/ Special Services Coordinator at MWSU.
He is located in the Disability Services office located in Eder Hall 202B. If you have a special
need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires special arrangements, please meet
with Mr. Ritter, and then inform the instructor so that proper arrangements can be made. His
phone number is 271-4330.

Disability: Any student in the course who has a disability which requires modification of
instruction and/or alternative testing procedures, should contact me within the first week of class
to discuss requirements and adaptations, if necessary.

Appeals: If at any time you feel that I have treated you or your work unfairly, first make an
appointment with me to discuss the issue or provide me with a written description of your
perceptions and position. If discussions with me fail to resolve the matter, please make an
appointment with the chairperson of the Education Department, Dr. Richard Porr, at 271-4332.

Diversity: The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum for candidates to acquire
and apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. These
experiences include working with diverse higher education and school faculty, diverse
candidates, and diverse students in P-12 schools.

Academic Honesty: Since honesty in the classroom is required-cheating, plagiarism, or
knowingly furnishing false information to the instructor constitutes a violation and will be
handled according to the procedure outlined in the Student Handbook and Policy Guide for
Faculty and Administrators.

Grades: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher skills, knowledge,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected. Keep in
mind that prospective employers will look at grades in order to forecast future success. The


                                                                                                 277
following describe the overall Missouri Western Education Department‘s SOLO [MAP]
scoring:

Below Basic [Unistructural] – one aspect of task is used or understood serially; there is no
relationships of facts / ideas.

Basic [Multistructural] – two or more aspects of a task are used or understood serially, they are
not interrelated.

Proficient [Relational] – several aspects are integrated so that the whole has a coherent structure
and meaning.

Advanced [Extended Abstract] – the coherent whole is generalized to a higher level of
abstraction.

Education department percentage grade values have been set as indicated below.

Students receive an "A" grade for outstanding performance. Meeting minimum
requirements for an assignment or examination results in a "C". Because this is a
professional course, professional performance is expected.

A = 92-100%     B = 84-91%     C = 76-83% D = 68-75% F = Below 68%

COURSE           Your course grade will be determined on the following

GRADING           basis:

           a. Class attendance/participation and interaction/in-class evaluations/daily
              assignments (5 pts. each day)
           b. Quizzes (20 pts. each)
           c. Article Review(s) & Presentations (50 pts. each)
           d. Strategy Presentation (100 pts.)
           e. Medical/Handicapping Condition Presentation (100 pts.)
           f. In-class activities (25 pts. each)

There will be a 20 point quiz given at the beginning of each class period. The quiz will cover the
class discussion from the previous class time as well as the assigned reading material. Please
understand that assigned reading material may be included on the quiz even if it was not
discussed during our class discussion of a particular topic. You may drop your lowest quiz grade
at the end of the semester. If for some reason you miss a quiz that will be considered your
dropped quiz. There will be no make-up quizzes.

Each student will be assigned an intervention strategy. You will become the ―expert‖ on this
strategy and prepare a presentation/training for the rest of the class. A more detailed description
of the requirements of the assignment will be provided when the assignment is given.



                                                                                                278
Each student will be assigned a medical/handicapping condition. You will become the ―expert‖
on this condition and prepare a presentation/training for the rest of the class. A more detailed
description of the requirements of the assignment will be provided when the assignment is given.




                                                                                             279
                                    Syllabus - SED 404
   Education                        Seminar in Secondary Education
                                    and Human Relations

                                    Dr. Terry Barmann · Assistant Professor
   Times                            Office: Murphy 111 D
   Texts                            Hours: Posted Outside of Office
   Grades                           Office Phone: 271-5952
   Assignments                      e-mail: tbarmann@missouriwestern.edu
   Micro                            http://staff.missouriwestern.edu/~tbarmann


COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course will aid in preparing you for your student
teaching experience by providing you with opportunities to:

   1. examine, refine, and articulate your beliefs and assumptions about teaching, learning,
      and students and to record your conclusions in the form of a philosophy statement.
      Thus, you will draw upon your accumulated knowledge and skills addressed by MW
      Teacher Education Goals 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 and the professional
      goals embraced by your major discipline. Your refined philosophy should inform
      decisions you make concerning micro teaching, class discussions, and writing
      assignments and extend into your student teaching experience..
   2. synthesize the content knowledge and pedagogical skills gained from your majors
      classes and education classes (to include technology) into class discussion, writing
      exercises, and simulated teachings. Since this is a culminating course, you will
      draw from all of your upper division coursework in order to demonstrate and refine
      your knowledge and skills. Therefore, you will draw upon your accumulated
      knowledge and skills addressed by MW Teacher Education Goals 1, 7, 9, 11 and the
      professional goals embraced by your major discipline.
   3. prepare yourself for certification by the completion of your hard copy certification
      portfolio. This will again require you to make choices based upon the knowledge
      and skills learned from both your major discipline and education coursework. [MW
      Goals All]
   4. understand and be able to articulate the reasoning behind legal decisions that affect
      the classroom teacher through the use of case studies [MW Teacher Education Goal
      12]
   5. be exposed to and reason through multicultural issues and accompanying
      alternative explanations to diverse student behavior in the classroom by an exposure
      to critical theory and current research [MW Teacher Education Goals 3, 6, 7, 10]
   6. explore human relations issues and teacher dispositions as they directly impact
      teacher success and student learning.
   7. review professional behavior expectations prior to embarking on the student


                                                                                           280
      teaching field experience.
   8. review curriculum design and assessment.

As noted in the objectives, this course does not introduce new material as much as it
consolidates knowledges and skills from both your major coursework and the education
coursework in order to further encourage the reflective blending of both in preparation of
your student teaching experience.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Study of philosophical, ethical, and legal problems related to secondary education
instructional strategies, including classroom and laboratory experiences; considers
interpersonal relations as applied to teaching. To be taken concurrently with EDU 409.
Prerequisite: EDU 303 and EDU 304.

MEETING TIMES: 8:00 - 12:00 Daily for approximately the first three weeks of the
semester

TEXTS: We will be studying Ruby Payne's Understanding a Framework for Poverty and
materials supplied by the instructor

COURSE METHODOLOGY: In order to help you accomplish the objectives stated
above, we will use a variety of activities to include: lectures, whole class discussions,
cooperative groups, interviews, role playing, simulations, demonstrations, and journal
writing.




                                                                                             281
GENERAL INFORMATION:

Attendance: Learning is a social activity. Someone has said that education is caught, not
taught. It is in the context of participation and cooperation that one really learns, for
learning does not come solely by reading an assignment or by writing. Learning is full, rich
and rewarding when the learner is fully engaged, engaged with the teacher, the text, the
assignments, and with other learners. Surely, it is this kind of learning you desire for your
students when you are teaching in your own classroom. Therefore, it is important that you
start your career as an educator in a responsible and professional manner. Attend all classes
and be on time. Since most of our activities are cooperative, the entire class will suffer if
you miss. Furthermore, absences cannot, in reality, be made up since the missed class can
never be duplicated. However, if you miss class due to circumstances beyond your control,
check with another class member regarding class notes and assignments and then talk with
me about possible make-up work.

Assignments: At this final portion of your coursework it is vitally important that you view
each assignment as something more than just an assignment. Each assignment is an


                                                                                            282
opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience that may be crucial for
your success and satisfaction as a student teacher. In essence, you will be practicing your
chosen profession. Some of our activities will be very similar to the types of discussions you
will eventually have with your teaching peers. Some of what we do will closely mirror
inservice training you will be expected to participate in as a professional educator. Your
participation should include thoughtful contributions to class discussions and activities. And,
your preparation for class activities should not be limited to attention to content only, but to
your relationships with class members and myself. Teaching is a relational activity and how
relationships are built and nurtured can determine success or failure, satisfaction or
discouragement. Much of what you do now can preclude problems later, when more is at
stake.

Please note the following:

(1) A portion of your grade (10%) will be assessed on your classroom participation. This
will involve attendance, punctuality, thoughtful contributions to class discussions,
participation in group activities, micro-teaching, and in-class writings centering around your
reading assignments.
(2) Spelling and/or grammatical errors in writing assignments will result in lowered grades.
In all ways, teachers should be professionals. Moreover, sloppy or shallow thinking will not
be accepted and may result in returned papers or a reduced participation grade. Any students
who fall into this kind of unprofessional behavior will be warned by the instructor before the
grade is reduced.

A Caution: Please read and listen to the particulars of each assignment very carefully. Ask
questions if you are unsure of what is required. Note that when an assignment outlines points
that must be included you will lose credit if ANY of the required parts of the assignment are
missing or have not been given appropriate attention.

GRADES:

Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the degree
of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher skills, knowledges,
and strategies. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected.
Keep in mind that prospective employers will look at grades in order to forecast future
success. The following descriptors are examples of performance indicators commensurate
with each assignment grade and with the overall course grade:

Exemplary Performance: When there exist a numbers of correct "facts", "propositions",
"steps" or "points" that could be included in an answer, the pre-service teacher mentions
more than one, and in addition each is presented in correct relationship or connection with
the others, and in addition the student demonstrates their grasp of some larger model, or
body of theory, or perspective from which the whole can be viewed, or correctly extends the
central principle of the answer into additional areas of relevant application not explicitly
stipulated in the question. In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses are cover



                                                                                               283
from 92% to 100% of the total possible points.

Superior Performance: When there exist a numbers of correct "facts", "propositions",
"steps" or "points" that could be included in an answer, the pre-service teacher mentions
more than one, and in addition each is presented in correct relationship or connection with
the others, in explaining, justifying, or establishing the outcome. In breadth, depth, and
connectedness, the responses are cover from 84% to 91% of the total possible points.

Acceptable Performance: When there exist a numbers of correct "facts", "propositions",
"steps" or "points" that could be included in an answer, the pre-service teacher mentions
more than one, but each is presented in isolation from the others, as though they were all
unrelated or unconnected in explaining, proving, or establishing the outcome. In breadth,
depth, and connectedness, the responses are cover from 76% to 83% of the total possible
points.

Sub-standard Performance: When there exist a numbers of correct "facts", "propositions",
"steps" or "points" that could be included in an answer, the pre-service teacher mentions
only one, as though it were all that was necessary to explain, prove, or establish the
outcome. In breadth, depth, and connectedness, the responses are cover from 68% to 75% of
the total possible points.

Unacceptable Performance: When there exist a numbers of correct "facts", "propositions",
"steps" or "points" that could be included in an answer, the pre-service teacher fails to
address any and misses the main idea(s) of the assignment/course. In breadth, depth, and
connectedness, the responses cover below 68% of the total possible points.

Exemplary work is the professional expectation for all students at this point in their
coursework.

Web Page: All items in this syllabus are also available linked off of my web site:
http://staff.missouriwestern.edu/~tbarmann

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The Center
offers help primarily for writing and math. Should you need help, you may wish to call the
Center for an appointment at 271-4524 or drop by to make an appointment.

Special Needs: If you have a special need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that
requires special arrangements, please inform the instructor after the first class meeting so
that proper arrangements can be made.

Appeals: If at any time you feel that I have treated you or your work unfairly, either make
an appointment with me to discuss the issue or provide me with a written description of your
perceptions and position. If discussions with me fail to resolve the matter, please make an
appointment with Dr. Richard Porr, Education Department Chairperson..



                                                                                               284
Academic Honesty: Cheating of any sort is not tolerated, and if caught will result in a zero
being given on a test or assignment. Check your student handbook for your rights regarding
any disciplinary procedures.

                Summary of 404 Course Assignments
1. Classroom Participation Grade - (10%)

So much of what is gained through this course is the result of lecture and discussion during
class time. Furthermore, many of the intended outcomes of this class are difficult to measure
within the course since much of the purpose of this class is to help prepare you for not only
your student teaching experience but also your first year teaching. Since missing one class
session of four hours is like missing four class sessions of a regular three hour class, it is
vital that you be present, on time, and actively engaged in all that we do. There are roughly
10 four-hour class sessions that contribute to your classroom participation grade. The
remainder of the class sessions are devoted to micro teaching and computer lab time.
Therefore, a 1% participation grade is allocated per four-hour class session. Again,
unexcused tardiness, absence, or lack of participation may cause one to lose classroom
participation grades.

2. Microteaching Participation Grade - (20%)

There will be four microteaching lessons in which you will prepare and present a
strategically-planned lesson based on in-class discussion and modeling. The four
microteaching assignments are as follows:

      Set Induction (also called anticipatory set)
      Teaching Concepts I
      Teaching Concepts II
      Questioning

In order to receive the full participation grade, you must teach every lesson assigned,
participate in peer review, and hand in any required critique papers. You must consider
connections to life in a global society and incorporate (at some point) a multicultural
prospective. In addition, you must incorporate into your teaching an understanding of
students‘ prior knowledge, engage students (your peers) in the methods of inquiry for your
discipline, create at least one interdisciplinary aspect to your teaching mini-lesson, and
present material in multiple ways. Perhaps the best way to accomplish all of the above is to
consider all of the microteachings as different parts of a larger learning unit. It might also
help you to ask your advisor in your major if he or she can provide you with the professional
society guide that spells out ―Knowledge of the Subject Matter‖ for your discipline. For
example, for P.E., this would be the NASPE/NCATE guideline for the initial preparation of
Physical Education teachers. For math, it would be the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics Standards.




                                                                                             285
3. Discipline-specific Web Resource Page - (10%)

For this assignment, you will search the web to find pages you can point to in order to create
your own discipline-specific web resource page. You may wish to include links to your
professional learned society, research tools, vendors, research findings, etc. You must have
at least four distinct categories of links that would aid students of your discipline to
accomplish objectives you may set for homework assignments and projects. Make this a
quality project that you could really use when you student teach and in your first year of
teaching. The course schedule provides a link to a page that details the requirements of this
assignment.

This section of the course should give you the opportunity to grow in:
· Familiarity with web search engines
· A feel for the broad range of resources available for your discipline
· A realistic view of the reliability and usefulness of web resources
· Exposure to some important primary and secondary sources in curriculum
· Elements of good web page design

If you have created such a web page in the past, please review, refine, and submit it for this
assignment.

This assignment will create an artifact for your portfolio (both hard copy and electronic) that
would be appropriate (based upon content you have chosen) for helping you meet the
following:

       Standard One - Knowledge of Subject Matter

       Standard Two - Human Development and Learning

       Standard Three - Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs

       Standard Five - Multiple Instructional Strategies

       Standard Six - Classroom Motivation and Management Strategies

       Standard Seven - Communication Skills

       Standard Ten - Partnerships

       Standard Eleven - Technology in Teaching and Learning

       Standard Twelve – Foundations of Education, Ethics and Law

4. WebQuest (20%)

"A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by


                                                                                                 286
learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners' time well, to focus
on using information rather than looking for it, and to support learners' thinking at the levels
of analysis, synthesis and evaluation" (http://edweb.sdsu.edu/webquest/webquest.html). You
will be creating a WebQuest for inclusion in your electronic portfolio. I'll supply you with a
rubric to aid you in meeting the requirements for this assignment.

This assignment will create an artifact for your portfolio (both hard copy and electronic) that
would be appropriate (based upon content you have chosen) for helping you meet the
following:

       Standard One - Knowledge of Subject Matter

       Standard Two - Human Development and Learning

       Standard Three - Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs

       Standard Four- Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating the Curriculum

       Standard Five - Multiple Instructional Strategies

       Standard Six - Classroom Motivation and Management Strategies

       Standard Seven - Communication Skills

       Standard Eight - Assessment of Student Learning

       Standard Nine - Reflective Practitioner

       Standard Ten - Partnerships

       Standard Eleven - Technology in Teaching and Learning

5. Address Emotional Intelligences and Teacher Dispositions in a Writing Assignment
(10%)

 Refine and email to me (for possible comments and follow up responses) your claims and
pieces of evidence for the two Western Teacher Education dispositions you have chosen
for your Student Teaching experience. These two dispositions are ones that you did not
address in Junior Experience and typically are from the or chose for your Junior Experience.
Please think this through deeply. It is the dispositions that you demonstrate that determine
how well students bond with you, if they respect you, if colleagues stick up for you, etc.
Attention here not only completes this assignment but can pay off with huge dividends by
increasing your worth to the school community you are in. INCLUDE ALL FOUR
DISPOSITIONS ENTRIES IN YOUR HARD COPY PORTFOLIO.




                                                                                               287
6. Hard Copy Portfolio (30%)

You have been working on your portfolio through all phases of the education program,
beginning with your philosophy statement in the introduction class. During the seminar
portion of your student teaching semester (Phase Four), you will complete the assembly of
your portfolio, rewrite some portions to better reflect a more mature perspective, and
identify deficiencies that you will correct during the student teaching experience.

Please spend some time reviewing the Portfolio Scoring Guide in order to meet all
requirements for this assignment (Secondary and K-12.

*Note that each portfolio is scored by two professors - one from the seminar course and one
from your discipline. Your final score is determined by the average of the two scores.

Please note: Because of the upcoming accreditation and program approval visits in the
spring of 2008, we will need to keep your hard copy portfolio until the end of the spring
2008 semester so please keep a duplicate if you need it for job interviews.


            Introduction to Microteaching
            The clinical teaching part of the seminar is designed to help you
            increase your understanding and skill level of several teaching
            strategies and to practice constructive criticism. Most of you
            already have a working knowledge and use of a broad range of
            strategies. As effective teachers, you will be called upon to use
            these skills and strategies consistently and effectively while
            continuing to reflect and assess your ongoing development. To
            help you in this life-long professional process, the microteaching
            sessions are designed to develop and refine your capabilities to
            prepare, present, and assess instruction and student learning.

            Each of you will teach on videotape, and before your peers, four (4)
            microteaching lessons (possibly one other if time permits). Each
            lesson will be relatively short since each is a portion of a full
            lesson. Each will focus on a specific skill/strategy/concept.
            Following the teachings, there will be a feedback period for the
            sharing of ideas and issues. During the teaching and feedback
            sessions, you will be the teacher and critique the teaching of your
            peers. As the teacher, your role will be to fulfill the requirements
            of the microteaching assignment. Your responsibility as a student
            and peer will be to observe, think, imagine, ask questions, actively
            participate and support your colleagues in their quest for
            improvement. Schedules for these teaching and feedback sessions
            will be completed during the first few days of the seminar. You
            may be asked to provide one blank videotape with which to record


                                                                                            288
your microteachings. One requirement of the microteaching
participation grade will be a reflection upon your growth in skills
and insights throughout this process.

It is important to keep in mind that microteaching is a
clinical/laboratory experience where each of you can and should
risk errors within a safe environment. Although this is a required
component of the seminar that must be completed before you begin
your school experience, the purpose is not for you to prove your
teaching strategies but to improve them. Therefore, the grading for
this part of the course will be pass/fail.

Preparations

Each clinical (micro) teaching episode will be planned and written
up in an abbreviated teacher plan format. We will discuss this in
class.

The role of a peer reviewer is to help you clarify your work.
Therefore, work with some of your classmates to pick good topics
for microteaching and to develop your lesson. Collaborative
practice is an issue at the forefront of current school reform
literature and research. Begin now to form this type of relationship
with your peers.

Plan to do as much written preparation as necessary to ensure that
you will demonstrate the skills and strategies required. This record
of your ongoing development will be important to you in the future
as a model. ―Winging it‖ will not be acceptable. If you do not have
a teaching plan you will not be allowed to micro teach. Highly
talented and effective teachers plan, plan, plan! Furthermore, it is
that planning which so prepares them that they make teaching look
easy, as if they were ―winging it.‖ Please be patient with yourself,
others, and me as we learn together. It is good to have high
expectations; it is not good to expect perfection.

Teaching

Most important during this process is to relax and focus on the goal
of your work and not on yourself. This is easier said than done.
This is not a performance but a learning goal. There is no failure
here unless you are failing to learn about yourself and from others.
Focus on skills. Ask yourself what you need to make the teaching
successful? Who can help me? These are questions we want our
students to ask themselves in the face of challenging learning



                                                                       289
           exercises.

           In this teaching process, keep in mind that everyone is in the same
           situation. We are all required to do our best and obligated to assist
           each other. There is no competition, only support and
           encouragement. There is no evaluation or criticism, only positive
           suggestions and helps.

           Time is critical to ensure that each person has ample opportunity to
           practice and receive/give feedback. Your instructor may wish to
           use a timer to help ensure equal time for all. Don‘t let the time be
           your central focus but it is important to gain a sense of pacing
           yourself and learning how long it takes to teach concepts and skills
           of varying levels of difficulty.

           Feedback

           Feedback is information, generally drawn from previous
           experience, that lets individuals make knowledgeable predictions
           about the probability of achieving some objective. The sources of
           feedback may be internal or external. Internal feedback sources are
           ―gut feelings,‖ experiences from previous performances at this task
           or a similar one. Internal feed back is rarely objective and can
           certainly be faulty. For that reason, it is important to avail
           ourselves of external feedback from the observations of our
           teaching by others.

           After the microteaching session for each group, there will be a
           feedback session. Each teacher will complete the micro teaching
           self-evaluation and turn it in at the next class meeting.

           For feedback to be effective it must be given with care; be task
           focused---not person focused, and immediate. Praise and feedback
           are not the identical. What you know about giving and receiving
           feedback to students must also apply to what you do with your
           colleagues. Being open to feedback means finding out how good
           you can be. It helps you to determine your risk choices and is
           important to your understanding of the learning process. Spend
           some quality time thinking and working with feedback.

                        EDU 409 – Experience in Teaching III
                           Spring 2008 Course Syllabus

Dr. Debby Bogle, Coordinator of Clinical Placement
Office: Murphy Hall 111 L Office Hours: By appointment



                                                                                   290
Office Phone: 816 – 271-4304 Email: bogleds@missouriwestern.edu
Website: http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds Fax: 816-271-4513

WELCOME TO THE MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY TEACHER
EDUCATION PROGRAM: The following graphic is offered to help clarify where you are
in the program:




The MWSU philosophy of teacher education has as its focus the early and gradually intensifying
identification of self with the teaching profession through performance-based learning
experiences and assessments. In this course you are entering Phase IV (Finding Voice) of
your development as a potential teacher. The Western conceptual framework focuses on
your development as a teacher leader who is taking responsibility for student learning. The
purpose of this course is to enable you to further develop and demonstrate your knowledge,
skills and dispositions as a teacher leader.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: EDU 409 Experience in Teaching III is a semester of clinical
experience in an off-campus situation under a certified cooperating teacher. To be taken
concurrently with EDU 404. Prerequisites: EDU 203, 303 and 304, special methods course in


                                                                                          291
the major, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the major field of study, passing score on the appropriate
PRAXIS II content test and approval from the major department.

COURSE OBJECTIVES LINKED TO STANDARDS: Experience in Teaching III is an in-
school experience that provides the teacher candidate with an opportunity to work with a skilled
professional and classroom students.

This course will aid in preparing you for your career in teaching by providing you with
opportunities to:

   1. understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the discipline(s) within
       the context of a global society and create learning experiences that make these aspects of
       a subject matter meaningful for students (INTASC/MWSU Standard 1),
   2. understand how students learn and develop, and provide learning opportunities that
       support intellectual, social, and personal development of all students (INTASC/MWSU
       Standard 2).
   3. understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional
       opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners (INTASC/MWSU Standard 3).
   4. recognize the importance of long-range planning and curriculum development and
       develop, implement and evaluate curriculum based upon student, district, and state
       performance standards (INTASC/MWSU Standard 4)
   5. use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical
       thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills (INTASC/MWSU Standard 5).
   6. develop an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
       learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
       learning and self-motivation (INTASC/MWSU Standard 6).
   7. model effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active
       inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom
       (INTASC/MWSU Standard 7).
   8. understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and insure the
       continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner
       (INTASC/MWSU Standard 8).
   9. develop your skills as a reflective teacher who continually assesses the effects of choices
       and actions on others (INTASC/MWSU Standard 9).
   10. foster relationships with school colleagues, parents, and educational partners in the larger
       community to support student learning and well being (INTASC/MWSU 10).
   11. understands the theory and application of technology in educational settings and has
       adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students
       (INTASC/MWSU 11) .
   12. know the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education and can make
       connections between the foundations and current practice to include awareness of the
       individual, ethical, and legal responsibilities (MWSU 12).

COURSE METHODOLOGY: In order to help you accomplish the objectives stated above,
you will work closely for 12 weeks with a practicing K-12 cooperating teacher in your assigned
content and grade area. You will participate as fully as possible in the classroom activities


                                                                                                292
assuming the full responsibilities of the classroom for six-seven weeks. You will implement a
unit of study from the district-approved curriculum and provide evidence of reflection upon your
skills to address the learning needs of students in the experience. At all times when teaching
you will provide evidence of lesson preparation, implementation, assessment and reflection.

MEETING TIMES: You are assigned to an in-school experience for twelve weeks – February
4 – April 25, 2008 You are expected to participate as fully as possible in this experience
assuming the full responsibilities of the classroom for six to seven weeks. You are expected to
attend the experience on a regular basis and to immediately inform your cooperating teacher,
building principal and MWSU supervisor if an emergency arises. Absences will affect your final
grade in this experience.

SUPERVISION: You will have an MWSU supervisor for this experience. Upon notification of
your assigned supervisor during the seminar course, you should make an appointment to
introduce yourself to your supervisor by February 1. Your supervisor will use the Host School
Information Sheet to learn about your school assignment, school schedule and to contact you.
Make sure this information is correct. Further, you should confirm communication arrangements
between you and your supervisor. Will you communicate through appointments, phone
messages, email, etc? Also, as a part of that communication, you should clarify how and when
you will be providing the weekly schedule sheets to your supervisor. Failure to provide this
information and to keep your supervisor informed of changes in your schedule (early outs,
changes in the daily schedule, etc.) can result in missed observations and will affect your grade.
Avoid this situation by communicating regularly with your supervisor. Your supervisor and
cooperating teacher will determine your grade for student teaching. It is very important that you
keep an open channel for communication between these persons and yourself.

TEXT: There is no text for this course but teacher candidates are encouraged to refer to the
Western Teacher Education Handbook and the evaluation form for this course for guidance.

GENERAL INFORMATION: Attendance: It is important that you start your career as an
educator in a fully engaged, responsible and professional manner. Attend all student teaching
activities and be on time. If your cooperating teacher is required to be at the school or if a
substitute is covering the class for the day, you are expected to be in attendance. Any absences
for conferences or meetings with your cooperating teacher should be approved by your
supervisor in advance. Under no circumstances should you be absent from this experience
without notifying the appropriate supervisors (MWSU supervisor, cooperating teacher, school
principal and Dr. Bogle). Absences cannot, in reality, be made up since the missed class can
never be duplicated. However, if you miss a clinical experience class due to an emergency, the
time that you miss must be made up before a final grade will be given. If you miss the
experience class due to circumstances beyond your control, please notify your building principal,
cooperating teacher, MWSU supervisor and Dr. Bogle as soon as possible. An absence beyond
your control would be a death, car wreck or severe illness. Being tired, faulty alarm clocks, car
repairs and appointments are not emergencies and are under your control. Unexcused absences
will affect your final grade.




                                                                                               293
Assignments: At this stage of your coursework it is vitally important that you view student
teaching as an opportunity to participate in and benefit from a learning experience that may be
crucial for your success and satisfaction as a teacher. You are expected to have lesson plans for
all lessons that you conduct. Your supervisor will expect to have a lesson plan handed to him or
her when he or she enters your classroom for observations. Further if you are using support
materials (text books, worksheets, tests, etc.,) have a copy of the materials available for your
supervisor. Be sure you have reviewed all lesson and unit plans in advance with your cooperating
teacher to confirm that you are addressing the district curriculum. You should only be teaching
the School Board approved curriculum during this experience. Also please be aware that the
school schedule may change with little or no notice. If this happens, please remember to contact
your supervisor to alert him or her to the schedule change. You must be flexible and able to
adjust your teaching schedule. This is the reality of teaching.

Secondary school student teachers (K-12, 9-12) are expected to create lesson plans using the
MWSU format for the first five lessons of each subject that they are responsible for teaching.
You should keep these lessons in a notebook or folder so your MWSU supervisor can review
them. After completing this requirement, secondary student teachers may adjust their lesson
plan format to a more streamlined format for the remaining portion of the experience.
Regardless of the format, you should always have a lesson plan available for yourself, your
cooperating teacher and your MWSU supervisor whenever you are conducting a lesson.

Criminal Background Check/Confidentiality Agreement - To reinforce your understanding of
expected professional conduct and behavior and to assure host school districts that you have been
informed of the importance of these issues, you are required to complete and have on file a
Missouri Highway Patrol Criminal Background Check that includes the Name Search and DFS
Central Registry Child Abuse Search. This search confirms for host school districts that you
have no criminal convictions and have not been added to a child abuse registry. In addition, you
will need to thoroughly read and then sign the Western confidentiality agreement which states
that you understand the issues related to student, parent and professional right to privacy issues.
Further that you will not engage in unprofessional conduct or discussions related to school
professionals, parents or students.

Please note that many districts are beginning to require the FBI fingerprint checks prior to
student teaching as well as health screenings. You should be prepared to comply with those
requests.

Web Page: All items in this syllabus are also available through a link on my website:
http://academic.missouriwestern.edu/bogleds.

Center for Academic Support: Located in the Northeast corner of the library building
(Hearnes Center 213), the Center for Academic Support is a free service of the college. The
Center offers help primarily for writing and math. Should you need help, you may wish to call
staff at the Center at 271-4524 or stop by Hearnes 213 to make an appointment.

Special Needs: If you have a special need, e.g. hearing loss, learning disability, etc. that requires
special arrangements, please inform the instructor after the first class meeting so that proper


                                                                                                 294
arrangements can be made. Also please contact Michael Ritter, Director of Special Services to
assure that all support for your needs is provided. Mr. Ritter can be reached in Eder Hall.

Appeals: If, at any time, you feel that your cooperating teacher or MWSU supervisor have
treated you or your work unfairly, first make an appointment with them to discuss the issue or
provide them with a written description of your perceptions and position. If discussions with
them fail to resolve the matter, please make an appointment with Dr. Bogle. If that does not
resolve your concern or address the issues related to your placement, then you should contact the
chairperson of the Education Department, Dr. Richard Porr.

Academic Honesty: Cheating and/or unethical use of materials of any sort is not tolerated, and
if caught will result in removal from your placement. Check your Western student handbook for
your rights regarding any disciplinary procedures.

DIVERSITY: This course addresses the diverse nature of today‘s classrooms. You will be
expected to address diversity issues in your lessons, classroom discipline/rules policy and to
understand the legal issues protecting the rights of teachers and students with respect to
differences.

GRADES: Grades can alert you to areas of strength and areas of weakness and can indicate the
degree of professional effort you are investing into the development of teacher knowledge, skills,
and dispositions. This is a professional course and professional performance is expected. You
will be evaluated on the twelve standards listed at the beginning of this syllabus. In addition,
ten professional behaviors will be assessed by the cooperating teacher and MWSU supervisor.
A mid-term and final evaluation will be jointly completed by your cooperating teacher and your
MWSU supervisor. A copy of the evaluation form has been provided in your materials and is
available on my website.

Please note that all Experience in Teaching III students receive an “Incomplete, D or F” for
the mid-term grade.

The following descriptors are examples of performance indicators commensurate with the
overall course grade:

―A‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has performed above and beyond the stated
course objectives and has required minimal supervision. The candidate's performance earned
from 92-100% of the total points possible.

―B‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has fulfilled all stated course objectives and has
responded well to supervision. The candidate's performance earned from 84-91% of the points
possible.

―C‖ level work means that the teacher candidate has fulfilled most of the stated course
objectives but at a minimum level of performance that required close supervision. The
candidate's performance earned from 76-83 % of the points possible.



                                                                                                 295
―D‖ level performance means that the teacher candidate has major weaknesses and has required
very close supervision. Additional coursework or maturity will be required before a teacher
candidate can apply for student teaching. The candidate's performance earned from 68-75% of
the points possible.

"F" level performance means that the teacher candidate did not demonstrate the knowledge,
skills or dispositions needed to continue in the MWSU Teacher Education Program. The
candidate's performance earned 67 % or below of the points possible.

Course Schedule: EDU 409 will begin on September 17 and finish on December 7, 2007.
You are expected to be at your school assignment each day with adjustments for your host
district‘s schedule. You should plan on introducing yourself to your supervisor by Tuesday,
September 18, 2006 Finally, you are required to attend a final student teaching meeting on
Monday, December 10 from 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM in Murphy Hall 110. This time and location
may change. Be sure to check with your seminar teacher to confirm.

A Caution: Many of the teaching artifacts used in your student teaching experience may be
useful in your portfolio and for job interviews. Please be sure you have observed all copyright
and privacy laws when using or keeping any materials.




                                                                                              296
                                    Terrence Barmann


Education

1989 Ed.D. University of Northern Colorado

1986 M.S.Ed. Northwest Missouri State University

1977 B.S.Ed. Northwest Missouri State University


Professional Employment

2006-Present Asst. Professor Missouri Western State University

2001-2006 Teacher Park Hill High School

2000-2001 Teacher St. Therese Middle School

1988-2000 Asst. Professor Northwest Missouri State University

1986-1988 Teaching Asst. University of Northern Colorado

1985-1986 Teaching Asst. Northwest Missouri State University

1977-1985 Teacher Kearney Elementary School


Professional Organization Membership

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 1996-2000 2006-Present

Missouri Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 1995-2000 2006-Present

National Education Association   2001-2006

Am. Alliance of Health, Phys. Ed., Rec., and Dance 1988-2000

National Association for Sport and Physical Education 1988-2000

North American Society for the Sociology of Sport 1988-2000




                                                                                297
Professional Service

2006-Present NCATE Coordinator Missouri Western State University

1995-2000 NCATE Coordinator Northwest Missouri State University

1997-2000 Task Force Member MO Dept. Elem. & Sec. Education

1995-2000 Institutional Rep. MO Advisory Council of Certification for Ed.

1995-1997 Chair Central District AAHPERD

Professional Publications

Stoll,S., Beller,J., and Barmann,T. (1997) ―Fair Play-The Purpose of the Game: Responsibility
in Action. Strategies Nov/Dec p5

Barmann,T. (1991) ―Should Secondary Coaches be Required to Teach During the Season of
Their Sport?‘ Issues Response Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Vol.82
No. 2




                                                                                           298
                                  DEBORAH SUE BOGLE

                             Home Address: Business Address:
                            5004 NW Frontier 111L Murphy Hall
                                Northmoor, MO 64151 MWSU
                              (816) 746-7928 4525 Downs Drive
                 e-mail: bogleds@missouriwestern.edu St. Joseph, MO 64507

Education
      Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
      Major: Curriculum and Instruction
      Minor: History.
      May 1994
      Dissertation Topic: Effects of School Based Community Service Programs on Students'
      Perceptions of Social and Personal Responsibilities

       Education Specialist, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas
       Major: Community College and Higher Education.
       July 1993

       Master of Art, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas
       Major: History.
       July 1984

       Bachelor of Science in Education, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas
       Major: History.
       Minor: Sociology.
       July 1975

Professional Experiences
       Associate Professor of Education, Missouri Western State College, Fall 1994 - present.

       Taught Psychology in Teaching, Elementary Social Studies Methods, Middle School

       Philosophy, Middle School Methods, and Introduction to Education. Director of
       ClinicalPlacements 2005 - present

       Graduate Teaching Assistant, School of Education, University of Kansas, Spring 1991 -
       Spring 1994.

       Taught Elementary Social Studies Methods and Instructional Strategies and
       Models.

       Supervisor, Middle and Secondary Undergraduate and Graduate Student Teachers,

       University of Kansas, Fall 1991 - Spring 1994.


                                                                                            299
       Research Consultant, Summer 1993. Member of intercollegiate team. Worked on
       project funded by the Kansas Office of Community Service. Developed an action plan
       for the City of Lawrence concerning ways to house and educate homeless children.

       Instructor: Upward Bound, University of Kansas, Summer 1992. Designed and taught
       American history courses.

       Operations Manager: Microcomputer Lab School of Education, University of Kansas,
       Summer 1990 - Spring 1991.

       Teacher, Bartlett Grade School, Bartlett, Kansas, USD #506, Altamont, Kansas. 1977 -
       1989. Taught grades 7-8, American history, government, reading, and English.

Honors and Professional Memberships
       2002 Teacher Scholar, MWSC Faculty Learning Community
       Kappa Delta Pi, Education
       Phi Delta Kappa, Education.
       Phi Alpha Theta, Honors History Fraternity
       National Council for the Social Studies
       National Middle School Association
       Missouri Middle School Association
Publications and Grants

Ellis, J., and Bogle D. Kansas City School District Announces Transformation of Middle
Schools to K-8 Configuration: A Response. The Transescent. (May 2007) Volume 31,
Issue 4.

Bogle, D. and Ellis, J. Short-Cuts to Missouri Middle Level Teacher Certification May
Border on Malpractice. Current Issues in Middle Level Education. (Spring/Summer,
2007). Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 49-55.

Bogle, D. The ―State‖ of Middle Level Education: Missouri. (February, 2005).
NAPOMLE Newsletter, National Association of Professors of Middle Level Education.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition: American Expansion and the Indigenous
Nations: Project Co-Director. Submitted to the National Endowment for
Humanities Landmark Grants for $229,449, August 2003. Not funded.

Students Enrolled in Elementary Social Studies Methods Collaborating with Students
from the MWSC Office of Unity Services to Collect Oral Histories from Minorities in
Order to Develop a Better Understanding of the 1960's and the Impact of the Civil Rights
Movement Grant funded through MWSC Funding For Results, June 2000.

Breck, S., Bogle, D. and Baird, K. Linking Global Hunger to a Local Community Service
Project for Middle Level Learners The Transescent. (May, 1998). pp. 24-29.


                                                                                            300
Reviews

Reviewed social studies textbook, Teaching Elementary Social Studies by James Duplass,
Houghton Mifflin, June 18, 2005

National and State Presentations

Southeastern Regional Association of Teacher Educators Conference, St. Louis, Missouri
November 2007, Title: An Assessment of the Depth and Frequency of the Social Studies
and Science Curriculum at the Elementary Level: A National Study. (Co-presented with
Dr. John Ellis).

National Middle School Association‘s Symposium for Middle Level Teacher Preparation,
Destin, Florida February 9, 2007, Title: Praxis II – Not the Appropriate Route to Middle
Level Licensure: The Missouri Dilemma. (Co-presented with Dr. John Ellis).

Carnegie Meeting with AACTE for Student Learning to Teacher Preparation,
Washington D. C., November 19-20, 2002. Title: Using a Common Rubric Approach,
SOLO, to Help Teacher Candidates Succeed with Student Learning (Co-presented with
Dr. Nancy Edwards).

Missouri Middle School Association, Osage Beach, Missouri, 1998. Title: Linking
Global Hunger to a Local Community Service Project for Middle Grade Learners. (Copresented
with Dr. Susan Breck).

Professional Development Schools Annual National Conference, Kansas City, Missouri,
1998. Title: Implementing and Evaluating a Site-Based Course and Extended Field
Experience.

Missouri Middle School Association, Osage Beach, Missouri, 1998.
Title: Working Together to Meet Missouri Middle School Certification Requirements
(Co –presented with Holliday, J, Haggard, L, Halley, B. and Breck, S.

National Professional Development Schools Conference, Kansas City, Missouri 1997.
Title: Issues and Challenges of Establishing a Professional Development School at the
Middle Level.

National Academic Advising Association, presented information about MWSC's
Freshman Advising Pilot at Kansas City, Missouri, 1996.

Missouri Middle School Association, Osage Beach, Missouri, 1996. Title: Taking
Current Events Across the Curriculum. (Co-presented with Dr. Susan Breck).
National Middle School Association, New Orleans, 1995. Title: A Case Study of
Practitioners.

National Council for the Social Studies, Phoenix, 1994. Title: Developing an


                                                                                           301
Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit on Environmental Issues with a Community Service
Component. (Co-presented with Dr. Susan Breck).

Other Presentations and Workshops

Missouri Western State University Teacher Education Advisory Board, April 17, 2007
Title: Placement Procedures and Issues.

Understanding Poverty Seminar at Elwood School, August 18, 2003

Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Community Workshop in St. Joseph, MO. September 25,
2002. Title: Student Lewis and Clark Projects at the College Level.

Attended the 5th Annual Symposium on the Recruitment & Retention of Students of
Color in Kansas City, MO April 28-30, 2002.

16th National Conference on Undergraduate Research, University of Wisconsin –
Whitewater, April 25-27, 2002.

Student Teacher Cooperating Teacher Workshop, March 1, 2002
Title: New supervision requirements for social studies student teachers.
Junior Cooperating Teacher Workshop, February 7, 2002.
Title: Required changes in the Junior Experience assignments/unit.

Attended Faculty Learning Community retreat January 10-12, 2002
Montana Science Institute, Helena Montana. July 29-August 5, 2000. Studied Lewis and
Clark Expedition.

Attended Missouri Middle School Association Annual Conference, Fort Osage, Missouri,
March 17-19, 2000.

MWSC Cooperating Teacher Meeting, March 3, 2000. Title: "Conferencing with
Incompetent Student Teachers"

Jr. Experience Orientation Meeting at MWSC, February 1, 2000. Title: Designing,
Implementing, and Evaluating Effective Units

Attended MWSC workshop, "Test Construction for Critical Thinking", October 5, 1999.

Attended Missouri State Social Studies Assessment Meeting on September 29, 1999.

Attended "Social Skills" training sponsored by Goals 2000 on August 26-27, 1999 at
MWSC.

Attended Student Teacher Supervisors Training workshop sponsored by Goals 2000
August 16, 1999.


                                                                                       302
Attended Seminar on "Logic and Teaching Methods for Professors" on June 11-12, 1999.

Attended Missouri Middle School Association Conference, Fort Osage, Missouri, March
17-19, 2000.

Attended MWSC Faculty Colloquium "Understanding and Challenging Today's College
Students, March 30, 1999.

Attended eight hours of instruction in "Integrating Academic Curriculum" sponsored by
Northwest Missouri Goals 2000, March 6, 1999.

Student Teacher Supervisor Seminar at MWSC, March 7, 1997.
Title: Evaluation Procedures.
Title: Professional Development School Partnerships

Student Teacher Supervisor Seminar at MWSC, October 24, 1997.
Title: Giving Negative Feedback in Positive Ways: A Case Study.

St. Joseph, Missouri School District, September, 19, 1997.
Title: Benefits from Establishing a Professional Development School.

Works in Progress

Nation wide survey of elementary science and social studies curriculum goals being
conducted with Dr. John Ellis.

Service

Coordinator of Clinical Placement 2006-2008

Developed new Bachelor of Science in Middle School degree for MWSC
approved in August 2000.

Served on Team 4 of Goals 2000 grant. 1998-2000

Faculty Counselor for Kappa Delta Pi, International Honor Society in Education
1997-present

Search committees: nine education faculty positions and one secretarial position for
freshman academic advising. Chair of two education faculty search committees.
1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2006, 2007

University Committees

Promotion and Tenure Committee 2004-present


                                                                                        303
Education department curriculum committee 2001-2002

Chair of MWSC Evaluation Committee 1998-1999

Division of Professional Studies Honor Convocation Committee 1996-present

MWSC Salary Committee 1999-2000

Served on sub-committee for Student Services for prepare for North Central
Accreditation spring 1999

MWSC search committee for Director for the Center for Excellence spring 1999

MWSC Evaluation of Faculty 1997-1998

MWSC Cultural Events Committee1997-1998

MWSC Freshman Advisor1995-2004

MWSC General Studies Committee 1995-1996


Department Committees/Service

Chair of Education Department Scholarship/Minority Recruitment Committee,
1998-2006

Served on committee to create Jr. Unit Requirements. 1999

Chair of Professional Development Schools 1996-1998

Teacher Education Admission and Retention (TEARC) 1997 –1998, 2005-2007

Evaluation Committee1994-1996

Curriculum Committee 1994-1995




                                                                               304
                                 Michael Flowers
                                Professional Vita
                                       August 2007
Institutions and Locations

1970 NWMSU                                           B.S. Elementary Education
1974 NWMSU                                           M.S. Elementary Administration
1974-1978 NWMSU                                      +45 Hours

Professional Experience

Elementary Principal 1992-2004 (retired)             Hyde Elementary – SJSD
Middle School Teacher 1977-1987                      Bode Middle School -SJSD
Ele Teacher and Vice-Principal 1971-1977             Skaith Elementary School - SJSD
PE Teacher 1969-1971                                 Hosea Elementary School - SJSD

Total Years Teaching                                 17
Total Years Administration                           18
Total Years with SJSD                                35

Professional Activities

NAESP                                                1987-2004
MAESP                                                1989-2004
MSTA                                                 1970-2004
IRA                                                  1996-2000
Phi Delta Kappa                                      1996-2000
St. Joseph Outstanding Teacher award                 1997
St. Joseph PE Teacher of the Year                    1979
Director of Northwest Regional Prof Development      1996-1998
Assessment Center                                    1996-1998

Community Service

Our Lady of Guadalope Church and Cathedral Church    1974-Present


                                                                                       305
Sunrise Optimist Club                           1979-1993
East Hills Optimist Club                        1991-1993
Southside Rotary                                1993-Present
MSHSAA                                          1970-Present
State Athletic Playoffs (football)              1970-Present
Caring Communities Task Force                   1996-2004
Sara-Lee Corporate School Sponsorship           1996-2004

Current 2004-2007

Missouri Western State University
      Introduction to Education                 2004-2007
      Educator Instititute                      2004-2006 (summers)
      ECE Practicum                             2004
      Student Teacher Supervision               2004-2007
      EDU 311 Sec Reading Techniques            2005-2007
      EDU 312 Sec Reading Lab                   2005-2007
      EDU 308 Multicultural Education           2007-2008

Current Professional Development

Pacific Learning Associates 2003                Guided Reading – 32 Hours
Guided Reading Workshops 2004-07                Northwest Missouri Public Schools
Home Bound Tutoring 2004-06                     St. Joseph Region

Achievements

St. Joseph Elementary Principal of the Year     1996-1997
St. Joseph PTA Principal of the Year            2000-2001
MO. State Principal of the Year                 1997
St. Joseph ―Top Twenty Who Count‖               1997
St. Joseph Outstanding Citizen Award            1997
Key to the City of St. Joseph                   2004
Recognized by MO House of Representatives       1997 and 2004
VFW Educator of the Year                        2004
Missouri Air National Guard Commander‘s Medal   2004
Director of Learning for Life – BSA             2007-2008



                                                                                    306
                                  Mary Elizabeth Hendrix
                                       2913 Teal Court
                                    St. Joseph, MO 64506
                                        (816) 689-1760
                                        (816) 271-4301
                                mhendrix4@missouriwestern.edu
I EDUCATION

     Ph.D., Instructional Leadership
     Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies College of
     Education, The University of Alabama
     Dissertation research: ―Minding‖ Knowledge: Leaving the Body Behind
     Major: Instructional Leadership (Curriculum & Foundations of Education)
     Minors: Research (Qualitative and Quantitative) & English
     Research Interests: Women in Leadership, Social Foundations of Education, Embodiment Issues
     and Body Theory, Social Justice and Education, The Digital Divide and Instructional
     Technology, Curriculum Theory, Gender Issues and Feminist Theory, Disability Studies,
     Multicultural Education, Reading and Literacy, Qualitative Research Methods,
     Phenomenology
     Degree Received: Aug. 2007

     Master of Arts, Secondary Education, English/ Language Arts
     College of Education, The University of Alabama
     Research: Multiple Intelligence Theory & Literacy Instruction
     Degree Received: May 2000

     Bachelor of Arts, English & Dance
     The University of Alabama
     Degree Received: May 1998, Cum Laude (With Honor‘s in English)

II WORK EXPERIENCE

     Graduate Research Assistant/Graduate Teaching Assistant, The University of Alabama (fall
     2003-2007)
     Assisted with data collection, research, data analysis, and publications in instructional
     leadership and foundations; guest lectured in BEF 362 courses, taught BEF 362 courses
     for 3 semesters

     Language Arts Teacher, Exploring Alabama Outdoors: The Greene County Math and
     Science Day Camp (June of 2007)
     Co-taught 5th-7th grade students in Greene County, AL language arts within a science unit
     focusing on Hurricane Katrina and marine biology
     Students were a majority African American and were impoverished (according to the AL
     standards for poverty).

     Coordinator, Central Region, Greater Birmingham Ministries (2005-2006)
     Developed, organized, and taught training sessions and town hall meetings for
     the constitutional reform educational campaign throughout the central region of
     Alabama
     Adjunct English Teacher, Shelton State Community College, (2001-2003) Tuscaloosa, AL


                                                                                                 307
       Taught English 101 and Reading 114 Fall 2003, Basic Writing II (English 093) Spring
       2003, Reading 114- Assisted the Assistant Dean of Students, Susan Mohun, with Reading
       085 and with the dance line Fall 2002, Taught Basic Writing I and II in Fall 2001 and
       Spring 2002

       English Teacher, The Capitol School, (2001- 2002) Tuscaloosa, AL
       Taught 50 students English at an International School and created lesson plans to reach
       all learning styles based on Howard Gardner’s ―Multiple Intelligences‖; assisted 4
       students in publishing works

       English Teacher, Meadowcreek High School, (2000 – 2001) Norcross, GA
       Taught 150 inner-city students English, majority ESL; assisted one student with
       completing a publication.

       English Intern, Collins-Riverside Junior High, (Spring Semester 2000) Northport, AL
       Taught 85 ninth-grade students and created lesson plans to reach all learning styles

       Graduate Assistant, Student Employment Services (March - September 1999)
       Responsible for Training Reading Tutors and Serving as a Liaison with the Public
       Schools for the America Reads Challenge Program

       Counselor, American Ballet Theatre, The University of Alabama (summer, 1998)
       Escorted ballet dancers around campus and served as a chaperone and dorm mother.

       Home Nurse, Northport, AL (1993-1996)
       Provided home health care for the disabled

III GRANTS
      American Association of University Women Community Action Grant Recipient (Approx.
      $10,000 from national office/ Approx. $75,000 total)
      Co-wrote/ Co-chaired grant to provide programs to promote and train women for elected
      leadership positions

IV PUBLICATIONS

       Hendrix, E. (future publication—Jan. 2008). The economic status of women in Alabama, The
       Alabama Women‘s Initiative and A.A.U.W. of AL.

       Hendrix, E. (in press). A teacher‘s reach: Ute Winston, my mentor, my moirae, Prairie Lands
       Writing Center, M.W.S.U., St. Joseph, MO.

       Hendrix, E. (in press). Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Encyclopedia of the Social and Cultural
       Foundations of Education.

       Hendrix, E. (in press). Madeleine Grumet, Encyclopedia of the Social and Cultural Foundations
       of Education.

       Hendrix, E. (in press). Matthew Arnold, Encyclopedia of the Social and Cultural Foundations of
       Education.

       Hendrix, E. (in press). No child left behind: Behind child left, no?, Far Western Philosophy of


                                                                                                         308
     Education Society.

     Hendrix, E. (2006). Woman-to-woman: Changing the world, AAUW of AL
     Fall Daybreak.

     Hendrix, E. (2005). Permanent injustice: Rawls‘ theory of justice and the digital
     divide, Educational Technology and Society, 8(1), 63-68.

V PATENT

     Hendrix, E. (2007). Game for Stimulating Reading Interest, Patent Held as of
     Jan. 16, 2007, U.S. Patent Application Serial Number 7,163,402. (Patent
     Application No. 10/965,395 filed Oct. 14, 2004)

VI OTHER PUBLICATIONS

     Hendrix, E. (1998). Public Eye?, a poem, Lynx Magazine, May 1.

     Hendrix, E. (1995). Walk into modern art, The Crimson White, Oct. 4, 1995.

     Hendrix, E. (1995). Sean Curran and Soundance Repertory Company, Writing for Dance Harvard
     University Summer School, Boston, Mass. July.

VII PRESENTATIONS

     Professional Meetings/Conferences

     Hendrix, E. (February 2008). With discipline and justice for all, SEPES Annual Conference,
     Baton Rouge, LA.

     Hendrix, E. (June, 2007). ―Minding‖ knowledge, 6th Annual Hawaii International Conference on
     Social Sciences, Honolulu, HI.

     Hendrix, E. (April, 2007). Packing bodies into schools: Policing leakages through containment,
     AERA Annual Conference, Chicago, IL.

     Hendrix, E. (February 2007). Body theory for the future, SEPES Annual Conference,
     Birmingham, AL.

     Hendrix, E. (November 2006). Leaving justice and the body behind, AESA 2006 Annual
     Meeting, Spokane, WA

     Hendrix, E. (November 2006). Eros and education, AESA 2006 Annual Meeting, Spokane, WA

     Hendrix, E. (February 2006). ―Minding‖ knowledge: Leaving the body behind, SEPES Annual
     Conference, Decatur, GA

     Hendrix, E. (January 2006). ―Minding‖ knowledge: Leaving the body behind, QUIG Annual
     Conference, Athens, GA

     Hendrix, E. (January 2006). Body talk and learning: ―Mis(s)‖ education, QUIG Annual


                                                                                                  309
Conference, Athens, GA

Hendrix, E. (November 2005). Making (disabled) bodies matter: Embodying educational policy
AESA 2005 Annual Meeting, Charlottesville, VA

Hendrix, E. (November 2005). ―Minding‖ knowledge: Leaving the body behind, AESA 2005
Annual Meeting in Charlottesville, VA

Hendrix, E. (November 2005). Cyber-segregation, AESA 2005 Annual Meeting, Charlottesville,
VA

Hendrix, E. & Erevelles, N. (April 2005). Making (disabled) bodies matter: Embodying
educational policy, AERA Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada

Hendrix, E. (February 2005). ―Minding‖ knowledge, Southeast Philosophy of Education Annual
Conference, Orlando, FL

Hendrix, E. (February 2005). Body talk, SEPES Annual Conference, Orlando, FL

Hendrix, E. (January 2005). Body talk and ―mis(s)‖ education, QUIG Conference, Athens, GA

Hendrix, E. (January 2005). Mystic mind readers: An innovative approach with the directed
reading thinking activity, QUIG Annual Conference, Athens, GA

Hendrix, E. (November 2004). Muted margins: Systematic silencing, AESA Annual Meeting in
Kansas City, KS

Hendrix, E. (November 2004). Cyber-segregation: The digital divide fifty years after Brown vs.
The Board of Education of Topeka, AESA Annual Meeting, Kansas City, KS

Hendrix, E. (September 2004). Permanent injustice, The Patterson Research Conference,
Washington D.C.

Hendrix, E. (April 2004). Multicultural or monocultural?: Multicultural myths and markers in a
top ten fine arts school, AERA Annual Conference, San Diego, CA

Hendrix, E. & Briggs, S. (April 2004). Embodied philosophies: Disability, difference, the
disruptive body, and voice in education, AERA Annual Conference, San Diego, CA

Hendrix, E. (February 2004). The permanence of injustice and inequalities: Rawls’ theory of
justice & the digital divide, SEPES Annual Conference, Tuscaloosa, AL

Hendrix, E. (January 2004). No child left behind: Behind child left, no?, Far Western Philosophy
of Education Society Annual Conference, Orem, UT


Hendrix, E. (November 2003). Panoptic pedagogy, power, and the production of norms:
(Disability) disrupting dance education, AESA Annual Meeting in Mexico City, Mexico

Hendrix, E. (April 2003). The lies/laws of language— words fail: Rethinking ironic rethinking,
UVA Graduate English Conference, Charlottesville, VA


                                                                                              310
     Hendrix, E. (November 2002). The blame game: Gender warfare, AESA Annual Meeting in
     Pittsburgh, PA.

     Invited Presentations

     Hendrix, E. (November 2007). Advising tips, M.W.S.U. dorm 4th floor, St. Joseph, MO.

     Hendrix, E. (October 2007). Ruby Payne, poverty, and public education forum, M.W.S.U., St.
     Joseph, MO.

     Hendrix, E. (September 2007) Banned Book Readings, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,
     M.W.S.U., St. Joseph, MO.

     Hendrix, E. (August 2007). Ready to run, AAUW of AL Leadership Conference, Birmingham,
     AL.

     Hendrix, E. (April 2007). Ready to run, AAUW of AL State Convention, Huntsville, AL.

     Hendrix, E. (April 2007). Equity: Pay equity, AAUW‘s Birmingham Branch Meeting,
     Birmingham, AL.

     Hendrix, E. (March 2007). Pay equity: Gateway to financial security for women, Women in AL:
     yesterday & today, Montevallo, AL

     Hendrix, E. (October 2006) A.C.C.R.’s grassroots effort & the 1901 AL constitution. AAUW‘s
     Montevallo Branch Meeting, Montevallo, AL

     Hendrix, E. (August 2006) Public policy: Opportunity for change. AAUW AL Leadership
     Conference, Samford University, Birmingham, AL

     Hendrix, E. (April 2006). Health care reform in AL, The University of Alabama

     Hendrix, E. (April 2006). Alabama students: Our future leaders, American Association of
     University Women State Convention, Mobile, AL

     Hendrix, E. (February 2006) Racism and the AL 1901 constitution, Sumter County Retired
     Educators Association, Livingston, AL

     Hendrix, E. (February 2006). Alabama’s 1901 constitution, Focus on Senior Citizens, Foster
     Grandparents, Tuscaloosa, AL

     Hendrix, E. (January 2006). Constitutional reform forum, Brown Memorial, Tuscaloosa, AL


     Hendrix, E. (April 2005). Alabama’s 1901 constitution & human rights, Federation of Child Care
     Centers of Alabama‘s (FOCAL‘s) Semi-annual Southern Rural Black Women‘s Initiative for
     Economic and Social Justice in Selma, AL

VIII SELECTED HONORS AND AWARDS



                                                                                                  311
     Excellence in Teaching by a Doctoral Student, College of Education, The University of AL 2007
     Who‘s Who in the World 2007
     Who‘s Who Among Emerging Leaders 2007
     Who‘s Who in America 2006 & 2007
     Who‘s Who in American Education 2006 & 2007
     Most Outstanding Graduate Student in Instructional Leadership in Educational Leadership,
     Policy, and Technology Studies, The University of Alabama 2006
     Sarah L. Healey Graduate Scholarship Recipient 2005 & 2006
     Most Outstanding Graduate Student in Research and Scholarship in Educational Leadership,
     Policy, and Technology Studies, The University of Alabama 2005
     Alpha Epsilon Lambda Honorary
     PINNACLE Honor Society
     Merlin Duncan Scholarship Recipient 2003
     Phi Delta Kappa, Graduate Education Honor Society
     Kappa Delta Pi, International Education Honor Society
     The National Society of Collegiate Scholars
     Sigma Tau Delta, The International English Honor Society
     The Blackburn Institute
     Club XXXI, Women‘s Honorary
IX SERVICE

     University Service
     M.W.S.U. Faculty Mentor
     M.W.S.U. T.E.A.R.C. Member
     M.W.S.U. Faculty Senate General Studies Committee
     M.W.S.U. Faculty Advisor
     The University of AL Graduate Student Association Conference Referee, March 2007.
     Student Advisory Board for Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
     Student Advisory Board to the Dean, College of Education
     The University of Alabama, Alabama Arise Student Chapter Founder and President
     Graduate Student Association Board Member
     The University of Alabama Advisory Board for Community Service and Volunteerism
     The Elliott Society (Service-based society)
     U.A. SGA Graduate Senator
     The Blackburn Institute


                                                                                                312
Community Service
     A.A.U.W. of Alabama Co-director of Grant
       The New Eastern Hills Baptist Church Advisory Board
       AAUW of Alabama Public Policy Chair & Treasurer
       Lifesouth Blood Drive Organizer
       Alabama Citizens for Constitutional Reform (A.C.C.R. State Board Member)
       Moundville Native American Festival Volunteer
       AL ARISE Volunteer (Founder and president of U.A. chapter)
X PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
       American Educational Research Association (AERA)
       SIGS: Arts-Based Educational Research, Critical Educators for
       Social Justice, Critical Examination of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and
       Gender in Education, Critical Issues in Curriculum and Cultural
       Studies, Disability Studies in Education, Education and the World
       Wide Web, Research in Reading and Literacy, Research on
       Women and Education
       American Educational Studies Association (AESA)
       Phi Delta Kappa International
       Kappa Delta Pi
       National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)
       Southeast Philosophy of Education Society (SEPES)
       American Association of University Women (AAUW)
       AL ARISE
       Alabama Citizens for Constitutional Reform
XI ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
     Languages: English, Spanish
       Technology: NUDIST, INVIVO, WebCT, SPSS
REFERENCES

       Dr. Natalie Adams, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of The Graduate School
       The University of Alabama
       Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
       102 Rose Administration Building, Box 870118,
       Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
       (205) 348-1161 E-mail: nadams@bamaed.ua.edu

       Mrs. Audrey Salgado, President of AAUW of AL

                                                                                          313
P.O. Box 383053
Birmingham AL 35238-3053
(205) 249-7788 & (205) 437-0951 E-mail: audrey5190@yahoo.com

Ms. Carole Johnson, Former Department Chair
English/Language Arts & Current Arts Instructor
Shelton State Community College
Martin Campus
9500 Old Greensboro Road
Tuscaloosa, AL 35405
(205) 391-2290

Mr. Mark Berte, Former G.B.M.
Constitutional Reform Education Campaign Director
18 Demouy Ave.
Mobile, AL 36606-1415
(251) 476-2111
(205) 266-3371

Dr. Angela Benson, Associate Professor,
Educational Leadership & Policy Studies
The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa
Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
209 Wilson Hall, Box 870302
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0302
(205) 348-7824 E-mail: abenson@bamaed.ua.edu




                                                                       314
    APPENDIX F

C BASE TEST RESULTS




                      315
C-BASE Summary Report For:
Art K-12

              Summary of Data Findings
  The majority of teacher candidates in Art K-12 do not pass
 the C-BASE test on the first try.

  Teacher candidates in Art K-12 do not generally retake the
 test in the same year as their first try.

  When candidates do retake the C-BASE in the same year
 as their first test, the percentage of those passing doubles.
 (ex. 2004)

  The scores in the writing subtest show consistently good
 pass rates in comparison with the other subtest scores over
 the six-year report period.


           Plans For Program Improvements

      Council first-time teacher candidates to take the C-
       BASE after any mandatory review courses are
       completed
      Require candidates who have not passed to retake the
       the test in the same year while the material is fresh.




                                                                 316
           APPENDIX G

PRAXIS SUMMARY REPORT FOR ART K-12




                                     317
 Praxis Summary Report For:
  Art K-12
                 Summary of Data Findings
While there is a 100% pass rate for program completers on the
Praxis II, an analysis of the subtests show areas of strength and
areas for improvement:

• Subtest 1 shows better scores on averabe than the other
   subtests in almost all years.

• Subtest 3, ―the making of art,‖ shows less correct responses
   than do the other subtest averages with some years having
   no one answering the subtest correctly.




                                                                    318

								
To top