Marne_Whitaker_Tuttle_Personal_History by G9gT74

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									Marne Whitaker Tuttle Personal History
                        3/20/00




   ATT & Marne W. Tuttle March, 1961




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MY MOTHER, DORA EDITH BOYCE WHITAKER, was born on Flag Day, 14
June, 1896, in Granite, Utah to John Boyce and Ella Eugenia Despain, on an 80-acre
fruit and berry farm, and is next to the youngest daughter of 15 children.
Unless berries were to be picked early in the morning, she would take care of
morning duties, then with a book would climb up in a big tree to read undisturbed.
Her blond hair, often worn in ringlets, could be seen shining among the branches
when her brother was sent to find her.
She was a delightful, happy-go-lucky girl, singing and humming as she worked. She
graduated from Jordan High School, on State Street and 9400 South. If she should
miss the school wagon, she would have to walk the five miles from her home in
Granite, at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. (The school is now, 2000,
replaced by a huge building complex known as the Jordan Commons, with movie
theatres, The Mayan restaurant experience etc.) The front of the High School with
pillars and steps was kept for historic value.
Dora was teaching school in Kanosh, as her first assignment, when she first saw the
man who would become her husband. She sat in the audience at Sacrament Meeting
in the old meeting house on Main Street, and asked her companion if the man who
was singing so beautifully was married to the woman he was singing a duet with.
No, she is his sister! And about that same time he was looking down where the sun
shone on her hair, making it look as though she were wearing a halo, and wondering
who she was.
Wilford Woodruff Whitaker had received a mission call to New Zealand during the
summer while he worked on a farm in Brigham City and living with his older brother,
Bert, and family. Not until he arrived home, had a fine farewell party, and had time
to ask Dora to wait for him, and had traveled to Salt Lake City to report in, did he
find out that there should have been paper work taken care of, passport and visa
obtained, etc. What a disappointment, but he refused to return home to wait for the
paperwork to be ready, after such a fine farewell, and said he would go anywhere. He
met Elder Melvin J. Ballard, a mission President in the Northwestern States, who put
his arm across Elder Whitaker‟s shoulders and asked him to serve with him. Wilford
served most of his mission in Montana—Billings and Missoula.
[[I have many of Wilford‟s letters to Dora while he served his mission. I just
happened to visit him after mother died and saw all these letters from him she had
saved, in the fireplace! I retrieved them and they are a tangible proof of their love
and his dedication as a missionary.]]
Wilford returned from his mission in January. They were married in the Salt Lake
LDS Temple on 9 July 1919. Dora‟s sister, Jean Boyce Clark lived in Morgan, Utah.
Their parents had moved there from Granite after John Boyce lost his farm and home
to taxes, since none of his boys wanted to remain on the farm. Both Dora and
Wilford secured a job teaching at a small school in the town of Croyden, which they

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reached by taking the train from Morgan to Devil‟s Slide, then walking the almost
three miles to the town of Croyden. In the wintertime Dora hung on to her husband‟s
belt, walking in his footsteps through deep snow, heading back to Croyden after a
family visit in Morgan.
Marne‟ was born in Morgan, Utah, 6 Aug 1920. She weighed just over 5 pounds and
the folks in Croyden didn‟t realize Dora was expecting when she left there in May.
Dora‟s mother was there to help and said that this baby is a “child of destiny.” There
was a soft film over her face, which seemed to prompt such a statement. Shortly after
the birth of their baby and working on the Clark farm during the summer, the family
moved to Salt Lake, where her Dad worked at the Magna Smelter.
Ballard Whitaker was born 28 March 1922, in Morgan, Utah. Yvonne Whitaker was
born in Morgan, Utah, also, 11 December 1923. Grandpa John Boyce died 23
December 1923, just twelve days after birth of Yvonne. I recall sitting by my mother
on a leather couch in our apartment in Salt Lake, trying to comfort her and telling her
not to cry.
Dad was not happy working inside a hot and smelly foundry, and in 1924 moved to a
small adobe home in Kanosh, his hometown. Here was where I enticed bees to eat the
dandelions I had picked and tried to get them to come out of their hives, by poking a
stick in the hole. My screams brought my mother running and she dunked me in the
water trough to get the bees off me. After flipping out stingers, she doused me with
rubbing alcohol. I attended my first three grades in a two-story, red brick
schoolhouse; (still standing in 1998, across the main street from the old home, which
is not there now).
 Friends: Thora Abraham, Arvilla Penney, Lloyd George, (who was teased
  because he stuttered), Milo Watts (who was teased because he was slow), Grace
  Stott, Reba Kimball, etc.
 Memory Snatches: First grade teacher, Mrs. Bird. Little hunched-back girl who
  sat across from me, was and has been my goad to sit and stand tall all my life. I
  knew about pruning trees, so my answer to what is a plumber, was one who
  pruned plum trees. I recall the thrill of pulling on a string to light the bare bulb
  hanging in the bedroom.
 I can recall reoccurring dreams that I could fly, and how I learned by jumping off
  the white picket fence in front of the old Whitaker home we moved to, when
  Dad‟s parents moved to Salt Lake. Soft, feather bed—being tucked in, perhaps by
  my Grandma Whitaker, with such a feeling of peace and safety.
I recall clearly a Technicolor dream that I was walking to Lloyd George‟s home on a
clear, sunny day, along the sidewalk from our home. (He later became a General
Authority in the Second Quorum of Seventy and he called me his little sweetheart as
he introduced me to his wife). He was very special to me from the first grade until he


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passed away in 1995 or 6, even though we had very little communication throughout
the intervening years.
When I was eight years old, a violin teacher, John Hilgendorf, recently arrived in
Utah from Germany, taught me for one year. I really enjoyed learning to play and
was to perform at the school the very next day after I punctured my left foot on a nail
in a 2x4, while running a race over at the Abraham home. I recall Florence Abraham,
Thora‟s mother, carrying me in to her house, and after pulling the nail out, soaking
my foot in lysol water. I was pulled in a little red wagon to the school, where I was
to play the “Minuet in G”. I think I played it, but can‟t remember for sure. I still
play it almost as well as I did then!! I am more sorry than I can say that I didn‟t
pursue that desire.
Thomas, the number four child, was born 20 May 1925. John Orson was also born in
Kanosh on 28 Feb l927.
The summer of 1927, Dad went into the soft drink business with another fellow, by
borrowing $1300 from a Bank with his father signing. He thought he would make it
big in Omaha, Nebraska. He was gone almost one year, but the summer was wet and
cold, and he tried to find odd jobs there to just make a living. Mother was left at
home to tend the five children and try to make ends meet there. She milked a cow,
we had chickens and a garden and fruit trees. I recall she had terrific headaches. Dad
did send her a lovely, maroon colored velvet dress for Christmas.
A girl friend, possibly Vilate Kimball, wished a ring on my finger, that Dad would
come home within two weeks, and my wish came true as he arrived in Kanosh early
in April of 1928.
After horses wrecked his 100 stands of bees * (On a tape by my Dad, he tells how he
started as a young boy raising calves, and then turned his interest to bees) on the old
Hickerson farm in Hatton, where he was born, Wilf went with his brother, Mose, to
sell Maytag washers. He was attracted to a 320-acre hay and cattle ranch in
Lamoille, Nevada, which was for lease. Wilford moved his family to the ranch in the
spring of 1929. Frank Strange was the owner, a man who made his own whiskey, as
I found out later when running on top of the chicken coop and discovering hidden
under the straw long copper tubing and a big copper tub of some sort. Also later we
children discovered, behind the heavy locked door on the hillside cellar, long vats of
fermenting grains.
Mother taught her four children, Marne, Ballard, Yvonne, Tom and later, John, and
three or four neighboring children for two of the three years we lived on the Strange
ranch—1929-30, and again in 1931-32. She was my fourth and sixth grade teacher in
the small yellow schoolhouse with a red roof, across the cow pasture from the ranch
house. There was a small artesian well, with sulfur mineral water on the school
grounds, surrounded by a fence to keep the cattle out.



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One evening as some of us children were racing from the home of the Badgers
family, who lived about ½ mile from our home, I ran into a strand of barbed wire and
seriously cut my upper left lip which had to be stitched. After the neighbor helped me
home, Ballard rode a horse to the Reinken‟s ranch, a couple of miles away, and
alerted them. Mr. Reinken came in his car and with Dad drove me to Elko, 25 miles
away, as I held a wet towel to my face. As I recall, the Doctor, put merthiolate in the
wound and stitched, without any deadening, on the inside, then on the outside of the
lip, which had been cut through. I am fortunate and ever thankful, that, even though
there is a scar, it did not distort my looks nor my smile. It was painful to smile for
quite a while thereafter.
 Bunk houses, School house, Teachers‟ small home, outhouses—sketches of same.
  Horseback riding, Church in Elko when we had a car
 Cooking for hay crew
 Birth of sister, Jean, in SL and wheel coming off car enroute home, Oct. 24, 1930.
 Our first radio (RCA) Amos „n Andy Show


Almost tempted to try smoking by couple tending us (Jack and ¿)? My Mom and Dad
came home at that very moment from Salt Lake City, with new baby! (wheel came
off back of car, fortunate no accident, just a 4-mile walk back to a service station for
help). Miss Avis Valencour was the teacher that year—1930-31.
My mother, Dora, spent about 6 weeks at normal school in Reno, returning home to
find me scrubbing out dirty diapers for my blonde, blue-eyed baby sister, age 9
months, on a Sunday afternoon July, 1931. Mom wore a pretty yellow dress and
matching hat. I was so embarrassed, but happy to see her. She was brought out from
Elko to the ranch, by the Arvid Law couple. I was in charge of lighting and tending
the fire for a roast in oven, peeling potatoes, etc., and for mixing and baking the
bread, while Dad was with the hay crew.
One of the workers needed to sleep in the Teacher‟s little home, and I was eager to
clean it up. One afternoon I was there sweeping, and the fellow put his arm around
my shoulders and touched my newly developing breasts. I remember that we were
standing on the west side of the yellow schoolhouse, with the sun shining in my face.
I felt very uncomfortable and made a hurried excuse that my mother was calling, and
ran home. He called after me, “Don‟t tell your mom!” It so happened that Dad was
in town and I slept with my mother, and thank goodness, I told her what that man had
done. I awoke in my own bed and learned that Dad had fired him, in no uncertain
terms. He stole Dad‟s good saddle and bridle, missing when the horse he rode away
on returned home. Dad did say it was worth it to have that kind of a worker gone
from the ranch.



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THE GREAT RUNAWAY!
Sometime in August, 1930, we five children eagerly rode out to gather sagebrush as
wood for our winter supply. Ballard (?) drove the team, old Tom and Prince, hitched
to a flatbed wagon. Ballard and Yvonne had gotten off the wagon to open the gate at
the top of the long lane, almost one mile from the home. Tom and John, ages about
five and three, stayed with the wagon, and I was to drive the team through the gate.
Our Dad was in the field, near by, hunting Jack rabbits.
About the time they dragged the wire gate (?) open, there came a noisy black car over
the hill and right up to our big gate. Meanwhile, I had pulled the wagon (team) to the
right so the car could pass, but the team turned on around and started running back
down the road toward the house. I was unable to hang on to anything and was
bounced off quickly, with the wheels running over my left ankle. The folks in the car
picked me up, after picking up Ballard and Yvonne (¿) and raced after the runaway
team. The noise of the big engine made the horses run even faster! The commotion
caused my Dad to run back toward the house. The team turned at the top of the hill
to the left and headed into the big round corral, where they were stopped abruptly
because the wide wagon bed could not enter the gate.
Mom heard the commotion as she stepped outside to throw out some water, and
dropping everything, she hurried up the hill. She was close to eight months pregnant
and almost fainted when she saw her youngest son hanging on to boards in the wagon
floor, with his back directly in front of the front wheel, the only wheel with no
protective box over it.
Tom, was on his knees, and had clutched onto a crack in the wagon boards and was
unhurt. (Tom recalls that he tried to hold on to John). John had been bounced down
in front of the iron-rimmed wheel and received bruises and scrapes from the wagon
wheel grazing his back. How fortunate he did not let go, or wheels would have run
over his body. Dad took his fear and frustrations out on the two horses, until his
anger and fright were exhausted. We were all so thankful that nothing more than a
sprained ankle was the result of something that could have been more serious. I was
taken to Elko by our neighbor, Reinken, and checked for breakage and given
crutches, which I tried to manage the next day while attending a Circus in town. I
don‟t recall much of the circus because of pain in trying to hobble with the crutches.
I have visions of Dad skinning a drowned skunk, that revived during the process;
placing poisoned wheat in squirrel holes; a poisoned dog, with black blood pouring
out of cutoff tail, saving his life because of Dad‟s quick action; a large animal bone
pile used for building Roman cities by Marne‟ and a little help from sister Yvonne.
A big, fat sow, Old Scoop Jaw, who ate baby chicks, was not mourned when she got
a bone crosswise in her throat and had to be slaughtered. Other Memories: Santa‟s
visit (by plane), A school play, (I in squirrel costume, Ballard as donkey, Yvonne as a
kitten, I believe.. (We have a picture showing some of us.) Dad trying to teach me

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arithmetic; and the large pot-bellied stove in the schoolhouse that had to be fired each
morning to heat the one-room school.
 Miss Avis Vallencour, teacher for my 5th grade class who lived in our home in
  1930-31. (We called her Miss Applecore—not to her face).
 Riding palomino pony through fields to Lamoille for 4H class. Clear stream,
  quick sand, fences and cattle crossing.
The drought hit about the time the lease had run out in the Fall of 1932, and we
moved to Elko, Nevada, where I have very few good memories. The depression
years hit us hard there, where it was almost impossible for my Dad to find work. At
least on the ranch, we had a garden, milk, meat, eggs and chickens and didn‟t go
hungry. Even though we didn‟t go hungry in Elko, our living conditions were
minimal and we were glad for beans and potatoes, fixed in every conceivable way by
my enterprising mother. There was no bathroom or running water in the first house.
Few friends. What to wear was a worry that carried over into my dreams even after I
was married. (Check Cassette tape #2 in a series of three of WWW telling his
attempts to earn money while in Elko. Carol H. L. made copies of these).
I will mention briefly word pictures that can be elaborated on later:
 Shell of a home, no facilities
 Walking to school across the bridge over the Humbolt River
 What to wear, uncomfortable shoes
 Move to home on Silver Street where we witnessed RR accident. Planted trees
  and lawn and had indoor plumbing with bathtub!
 Followed home by a drunk man!
 Grandma Boyce came, d. 8 Jan.1935
 Eighth Grade graduation
 First date. Asked mother how do I act, what do I talk about, etc. She said just be
  your sweet self and remember who you are. I trust you!
Alice Gardner, high school friend, invited me to help her during two summers at their
hay ranch in Ruby Valley in1936 and 1937. We were responsible for getting
breakfast, peeling potatoes for hash browns for breakfast and mashed for dinner;
cooking beef steaks, hot oatmeal cereal, baking powder biscuits, etc. Peeling
potatoes, and some vegetables, for lunch and dinner. We even made Jell-O and
pudding a few times, but the Indians didn‟t much like it. Put large roast in oven right
after breakfast. Her mother made the bread, Alice‟s sister did dishes, etc. Her
brothers worked in the fields. Watching an Indian woman do the washing by boiling
the clothes in an oval copper kettle on a fire outside a small shed, and bouncing them
up and down with a big plunger, is vivid in my memory. I recall watching her slice

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pieces from a bar of Fels Naptha-like soap. A not-to-be-forgotten open air shower—
cold water, with painful cramps as a result.
While I was there the summer of 1936, Mr. Gardner died while feeding the chickens.
I found him lying on his side in the chicken coop. It was a sad time. I tried to tell
Alice that she would see him some day again, but I lacked sufficient gospel
knowledge to really explain about resurrection and temple marriage. We slipped out
to some dances with neighboring kids to Wells, Nevada a few times.
I remember the depression years as being a gray time. As the oldest, I felt my
responsibilities early, and knew it was up to me to “pull myself up by my bootstraps”.
I remember tears shed when I wanted to take more violin lessons, but was too proud
to work for my teacher for them, at 50 cents per lesson. As I was just beginning to
date, I would ask my mother how I should act, what I should say. She would answer,
“Marne‟, I trust you. You know what is right. I‟m sure you will make the right
decisions.” And I would venture out, wrapped securely in her confidence in me.
President McKay: “It‟s better to be trusted than to be loved.”
At home we heard the English language spoken correctly and I learned early from
Miss Schultz, my eighth grade teacher, the meaning and usage of a prepositional
phrase, and that any form of the verb “to be” always used the nominative case. (It is
I, we are they, Joe is he who was wanted, etc). Whenever I hear “Clair de Lune” or
“Rustles of Spring” I see my mother sitting at the old up-right piano playing, before
arthritis crippled her fingers. As a family our singing together helped over many
rough spots and makes for happy memories. “Wise mothers are worth their weight in
gold.”
 Your smile is the light in the window of your face, that tells people that your heart
  is at home.
When I think of Mother, I think of Father, and to have heard him sing so beautifully,
will give you a glimpse of happy family gatherings, where singing was, and is, an
enjoyable part of my life. There were times when we did not feel like singing, but
with Dad „s insistence, singing cleared the air and put us all in a better mood. Mom
made very delicious lemon pies, and cakes. She canned fruit by the hundreds in one
and two-quart jars, with rubber bands and lead lids lined with white glass. Many
bottles could be processed in the oven at once.
We graduated from the gasoline motor-driven Maytag washer to an electric one some
time before we moved to the ranch in Ellensburg, but it still required two rinse water
tubs and a rubber wringer that would swing from one tub to the other. One summer
while I was at the Kittitas ranch, I helped Mom wring out Levi overalls and heavy
shirts and pants by hand, because the wringer was worn-out or broken. She was
suffering from arthritis in her hands at that time—perhaps in about 1948 or 49. It
didn‟t take long to get that one repaired—or a new one!


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During the winter of 1933, when I was about 13 years old, I half-heartedly
accompanied mother from Elko to the Airport those dark, cold frosty mornings. As I
recall, we had to have the mail out there by 5:00 a.m. Mom would be up earlier and
built the fire in the stove. We warmed the old Model A Ford truck by pouring boiling
water in the radiator. I would crank it while mother worked the throttle and pulled
out the choke. We traveled the back roads and I drove, because Mother was very
timid to get behind the wheel. Dad was away on a job with his dump truck during
that time.
Birth of Dora Melissa Whitaker, 4 March 1932 was a sad day because she died after
about 12 hours. She had dark hair and a lovely clear complexion. Dad blamed the
hospital nurses, as she was left in a cold room unattended her first night.
 Birth of Wilford Woodruff Whitaker, Jr. 29 June 1934
Uncle Ben and Aunt Maud Boyce, brought Mother‟s mother, Ella Eugenia Despain
Boyce, in the fall to live with us. She was very crippled with arthritis. I remember
her lovely white hair and her soft voice as she admonished us from her rocker,
“Hush, children.” Shortly after Christmas she caught a bad cold that turned to
pneumonia and she died in our home in the middle of the night, with Mom at her side
on 8 January 1935. Such a valiant, sweet soul to have had to endure our roughness at
the end of a long, rewarding, fruitful and dedicated life. She left a posterity, which
now numbers in the many hundreds.
Our year in Salt Lake, 1936 and 7, without our Dad was not easy. Mom bundled us
all up and said, “Elko is no place to raise a family,” and I think Dad drove us to Salt
Lake, where we lived in a small apartment on Simons Place, about 448 So. and 801-
900 E.. I lived and worked for the Frank McGanney family, taking care of their one
son, Buddy, and attended East High School my Junior year, where I took a Spanish
class under Miss Boetcher, a German teacher. Didn‟t learn about Seminary until the
year was almost over. That would have given me greater happiness and gospel
knowledge, I lacked! We all returned to Elko after school was out and I spent the
summer at the Gardner ranch and it was there Dad found me, near where he was
Foreman of a Cricket crew working in the CCC‟s, (Civilian Conservation Corps) as
he began gathering his family around him in preparation for a migration away from
Nevada. (Much more detail can be found in the Boyce and Whitaker books telling of
his various jobs to keep his family fed and clothed.
Dad had asked his former Mission President, Melvin J. Ballard, where a fellow with a
young family might go to get a start in life. At the suggestion of his President, the
decision was made to move the whole family to the Northwest, either to Oregon or
Washington.
Gathering Tom from Reinken‟s Ranch, in Lamoille Valley and arranging to meet
Yvonne and John in Reno as they came by train from Morgan, Utah, we pulled out of
Elko in a large dump truck (¿) loaded with the old upright piano, Maytag washer,

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bedsteads, bedding, mattresses, clothing, dishes, utensils, everything we owned that
we could load high. We also traveled in a big old Buick touring car. In 1937 there
were seven children in our family ranging in ages from 17 to 3. It was adventurous
traveling to our future home, sleeping on mattresses in the open, finding scorpions
underneath the canvas on the ground as we made up our beds prior to traveling
another day; going to swimming pools for showers and eating picnic style.
The terrifying ride down Grant‟s Pass, with 15 yr. old Ballard driving loaded truck
and Tom and John with him, ended with everyone safe. The rest of us rode in the old
Buick trying to catch up to them. We were a very grateful family and a prayer of
thanksgiving was uttered as we found them safely at bottom of that narrow, winding
road. When the brakes want out, Ballard attempted to shift down to slow the loaded
truck. (de gran golade! French for “swift downward course”). Fortunately he met no
oncoming cars!
Dad found a home near Springfield, Oregon, and loaded up the belongings of the
squatters who had been living in the home. However, as they were leaving they
showed Dad the high water mark on the fireplace, where most every spring the
Willamette River flooded over. We unloaded their things, and loaded ours again and
drove on to Yakima Valley after Dad located a home for sale near Wapato,
Washington. To arrive there we picked Hops along the way. An agitator for higher
wages (I bane come from Minnesota) tried to get all of us to strike for 1& ½ cent per
pound, instead of just 1 cent. I don‟t remember where we slept while working in the
hops— maybe in tents. We did have the truck with us.
While we picked hops, Dad, Ballard and a friend who knew the Yakima Valley,
drove there and found a white frame home for sale. They returned and we migrated
on up north and arrived at the home, three miles west of Wapato, just about dusk.
Not very inviting, with no trees and with grass growing high around the house, but a
place to call our own for a while. Many of the necessary essentials, like an outhouse,
to replace the old one, and a well with a hand pump had to be repaired to supply
water for the house. There was electricity there, and a coal and wood stove. There
were two bedrooms upstairs and the front and back screened porches were used as
bedrooms.
August 1937 I picked apples up until six weeks after school started, and made enough
money to buy a new flowered dress and red shoes to enter Wapato High as a Senior.
The year was enjoyable. I took shorthand and typing and was able to work part-time
for Frank Mitchell, Principal of the school. I became a Monitor on the school bus,
which another Senior boy drove, by the name of Vance Setbacken. He was a fine
fellow and we became good friends. I made many friends, even had dates, some of
which I recall: Henry Wertenburger, Bob Harris, Freddie Calahan, who would have
proposed if I had given him any encouragement. [(As a side note, when Jean and
Lewis Griffin and I rode up to Washington for my 50th year High School Reunion in


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1988, I met the brother of Freddie Calahan, Bob, and his wife, Esther. I was amazed
that out of about 110 graduates, there were over 70 at the Reunion, and many
remembered me. Vance Setbacken was there with his wife and I had to smile when I
saw him with a long curved pipe in his mouth. If he had worn an English cap he
certainly would have looked the part of an English country gentleman.
My brother, Ballard, became friends with the Berg family, who lived next door, and
he learned to prune trees. He fell in love with Lydia, who was a number of years
older than he, and they were married about the time of his 18th birthday. The children
came early and quickly, and caught an immature father unprepared to make a good
living for the family. He worked hard in the orchards, and later at various jobs, but
was always struggling. Lydia was a good mother and an excellent cook.
Yvonne, now about 15, would not be content to remain at home and after perhaps one
year of school in Wapato, insisted on living with her Aunt Jean in Morgan, where she
finished high school. Dad‟s history is written elsewhere, but briefly, he learned
Truck gardening by working for the Japanese neighbors, at minimal wages. Then he
leased an Indian farm where he grew crops that began bringing in money, especially
during the war years.
In October of 1938, after graduating from High School, I stayed home to tend mother
and twin boys who were born 20th and 21st of October, at home with the Doctor, Dad
and me assisting. I worked during the summer months packing cherries, sorting
potatoes, even picking cherries for a few weeks. I began going steady with Merle
Dean Layman from Toppenish. I met him through my girl friend, Dorothy Willis.
He was a fine, clean-cut young man and we enjoyed many different activities. He
always treated me with respect and at one time I really thought I loved him.
However, I‟d made a vow early in my life to marry a returned missionary in the
temple, like my Mom did, and he didn‟t fit. He had no bad habits, and perhaps I
could have converted him to the gospel, if I had tried. His folks were active in the
Christian Congregational Church in Toppenish, and were very kind to me.
Many of the graduating seniors decided to take a post-graduate course at the High
School, and I signed up for Bookkeeping and Chemistry—both challenging subjects
for me. I believe I started with the classes in December, after Mother was able to be
up and take care of the twins. They each weighed over 7 pounds—we call them Bob
and Dick. It cost Dad $35 to have them delivered. It was only $10 more for Bob.
When we first arrived in Wapato, our family made up the Branch my father presided
over, with each of us taking turns with the various assignments. After a few months
we were able to drive to Toppenish, where a regular Branch was already established.
As I recall, the Branch President was a Brother Murdock. Our earlier meetings were
held in a building where I.O.O.F. activities took place and it was necessary to sweep
and clean the cigarettes, ash trays and floors before beginning our meetings every
Sunday.


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This only takes me to the year 1938. Early in 1939 I began working for Dr. and Mrs.
Unsell in their home in Wapato. I lived in the home during the week, helped clean,
and was a receptionist. I was there one Saturday, while the Unsell‟s were at Church—
Seventh Day Adventists. A pounding on the door revealed a disheveled man holding
a bleeding arm, needing treatment immediately. I had him stand over the sink
holding a towel on the wound while I ran to the nearby service station, where a friend
of the Unsells was able to notify them. It was a scary time, because I soon realized
that that man was rather drunk. Thank goodness, nothing serious happened and the
Dr. was able to stitch up the wound, received in a knife fight at the local bar.
I found a job in Yakima working for the Currey family for my board and room, who
had one young son. For a while I worked at Woolworths. While working there, I had
an unexpected visit from Willard Gardner, the brother to Alice, with whom I had
worked on their Ruby Valley ranch. I was really surprised that he wanted to marry
me. I had not the least intention of doing so, but Yvonne and I were able to get a ride
back to Utah with him the summer of 1939. I stayed with my Uncle Mose and Aunt
Minnie for a couple of months and worked at Kresses, in Salt Lake. While working
there, a tall, fine looking man asked if I would consider working in his home and
helping with the children. The Smyths lived in a lovely home on about 4 th West and
4th North, as I recall. I was glad to move from Uncle Mose‟s home to the Smyth
home from July 28th to last of Sept. I was very undecided as to what I should do.
Mrs. Smyth offered me $5 per week, plus board and room, then upped it to $2 more if
I would stay. I guess I wanted to see Dean again. On 5 Sept 1939 I received a special
delivery letter from Dean Layman, wanting me to return home.
I did have an opportunity to meet with J. Spencer Cornwall, when my cousin, Erma
Whitaker, went to audition with him for Tabernacle Choir. While there, he asked if I
would let him hear me sing. He said I had a “straight” voice and could sing with the
Tabernacle Choir if I would like to. There must really have been a need for singers!
Yvonne couldn‟t go to East High without a lot of red tape. I advised her to go home,
but she decided to go to Morgan for a spell, where she could live with Aunt Jean
Clark, then we lost track of her for a while. Working selling magazines later, she
somehow ended up in Corpus Christi, Texas, before finally going to live in Chicago
with Uncle Dan, mother‟s younger brother.
I was fortunate to get a ride home with an acquaintance of Uncle Ben, my mother‟s
brother, on 26 Sept 1939. I worked at Woolworths in Yakima and Dad helped me
pay for tuition at Yakima Business College, which I attended at night. After
becoming proficient in Shorthand and Typing and learning some office skills, I got a
job at H. R. Spinner & Company, a fruit growers supply firm. I had much to learn
and I enjoyed working with a Mr. Leslie Tripp, who was either an LDS and/or a fine
Christian gentleman. He taught me how to operate a huge old Burroughs Book-
keeping machine. Mr. Spinner and Mr. Smith were my bosses. They both smoked


                                          12
big cigars and I developed a bad cough every time I went in to their office to take
dictation. They finally installed a fan for ventilation, which helped a great deal. I
lived at the YWCA and enjoyed getting acquainted with some of the girls there. It
was there that I learned more than I had ever known before about how girls related to
and chased after boys.
With money now, making $60 a month, I felt I could purchase some things I had only
dreamed of before. My first purchase was a $100 Lane Hope chest, on layaway. I
also bought a two-piece luggage set and a bed and dresser. I was able to help pay for
the new sink in the kitchen and pay down on the metal shower, which we installed in
the dining room, behind a curtain in the old Indian home near Wapato. What a luxury
to graduate from the round tub, on the kitchen floor to a shower heated by coils in the
cook stove and run into a hot water tank!
When the family moved to this Indian farm, the ramshackle house needed much
repair. The floor in the living room slanted at least 7 inches from one side to the
other, there was no sink nor cabinet in the kitchen. Our new (?) stove had a hot water
jacket, but was not hooked up to a tank, and there was no shower in the house. The
toilet was out behind a little bunkhouse, and needed repair. All of these things were
repaired, with a little financial help from me and also much encouragement. Dad
even built a closet in the girl‟s bedroom. I recall a time when I hid in that closet
when some folks came to visit from Ellensburg, because I couldn‟t find anything to
wear. I was found and did come out dressed in something, but it has always been a
recurring nightmare that I am out in public either not dressed or not wearing the right
clothes.
In August of 1941, after working a little over a year at H. R. Spinners, Dad offered to
pay for one year‟s tuition of $86.50 at BYU if I would like to go. Would I? It was
answer to prayers. Up until that time, it seemed like I was just drifting, with no real
goal in sight. He also gave me $60 for board and room at Aunt Paloma‟s home for
three months. Mom paid me $25 for my hope chest. I left the bed and dresser, packed
up my new suitcases with all I possessed and took the bus to Provo, Utah. My sister
Jean inherited my Lane Hope Chest.
September 21, 1941 I arrived in Provo, Utah, and was met at the bus station by Uncle
Jesse Stott, husband to Paloma, my Dad‟s sister. I lived with them for three months,
and roomed with Wilma Earl from Bunkersville, Nevada. My cousin, DeVere
Staples, lived there also, sharing a room with cousin Doug Stott. Paloma was a
gourmet cook and after running home from upper campus for a fine lunch, I would
rush back up to the hill and invariably go to sleep in Prof. Ralph Britch‟s English
class. He took pity on me and gave me credit, anyway.
January 1942 Wilma and I found an apartment and enjoyed the next few months
getting acquainted with BYU, and all the fine boys, many of whom were returned
missionaries. I got a NYA job shortly after arriving in Provo, working for Dean


                                          13
Wesley P. Lloyd filing things at $.35 cents an hour. This did pay for the rent, food
and some clothing. I became a member of Lamba Delta Sigma and Y Calcares, a
service organization, thus getting acquainted with many fine folks. I had no dream of
joining a Sorority, but knew many of the girls who had enjoyed a very different life
style than I had.
I must record my first week at BYU. I attended Mutual at the old Fourth Ward in
Provo with Wilma. There was an after-Mutual dance where I met Wilma‟s brother,
Ken Earl, and a missionary from his mission named Ted Tuttle. Ted asked me to
dance, and I thought that he was a fine dancer and had a lovely smile. He and Ken
had returned from the Northern States Mission just a few months prior. Ted had
graduated from Snow College in Ephraim, so returned as a Junior. We didn‟t run in
the same crowd that first year, but I knew who he was and was aware of his activities.
I dated a number of different young men, but no one special that first year. June 15,
1942 I took a bus home and helped on the farm. Yvonne did come home later that
summer. I had encouraged her to return from Chicago, where she had ended up at
Uncle Dan Boyce‟s home after a short-lived career as a magazine salesgirl. She has
written her own story, so suffice it to say that she and I roomed with 5 other girls at
BYU the fall of 1942. Dad was able to buy a 1939 Plymouth, and I rode to Provo
with my folks, Yvonne, Jean, and with the 4-year-old twins on my lap most of the
way, with very few stops for food and rest!
September 1942 Our roommates were Florence Lindsey (Lovell), Wilma Smith (from
Wyoming), Beth Burgon, Yvonne Whitaker, Beth Bushnell, Ida Allen (Smithson).
We had a great year, busy in every way. On returning to BYU I was offered a job as
part-time Secretary to President Franklin S. Harris, which gave me a chance to
become acquainted with more upper classmen. I began running around in the same
crowd that Ted Tuttle was in. We went on steak roasts up under Squaw Peak above
where the Temple now stands—never dreaming that one day we would be President
and Matron there for 2 years!
I recall a swimming party in Springville with the group and being conscious of Ted
looking at me very appraisingly. I dated many different boys, some whose names I
do not recall. In the winter months Rulon Bradley began getting serious about my
accepting a ring and I just couldn‟t feel good about it. I said, “If I don‟t see you for a
week or so maybe I can think more clearly.” However, prior to this, Ted and I
practiced for a Lamba Delta Sigma ballroom dance for a program. He had helped me
with a talk, and my roommates helped persuade him to stay for supper, as it was my
turn to cook. I had a big roast in the oven, mashed potatoes and gravy, salad, freshly
baked bread, etc. You would think I had set my cap for him. But we did eat well,
when I cooked. In other words, I learned later that Ted was now going steady with
me, and I didn‟t know it. When I mentioned to Ted that I felt I had to get away to the
mountains to think things through, he thought he was the one I was concerned about.


                                           14
I felt bad that I had to tell Rulon that I could not accept his ring, because he was a
fine man, with a beautiful speaking voice, was an announcer on radio station KOVO,
and had me take a part in a school play he directed. He also played a bass viol
beautifully. All this before I knew that Ted was thinking seriously of me.
Other dates with Ted prior to the Rulon ring episode were: Lyceums, with George
Merrill and his date for banana splits, walking home and I learned later he wondered
why I would not let him hold my hand. I also wondered, but I had begun to be aware
of his presence and must have felt my interest growing and didn‟t want to be
disappointed if he were not feeling the same.
One morning early in 1943, after a vocal lesson in the Ed. Building on Lower
Campus from Florence Jepperson Madsen, I found George Merrill in the hall waiting
to inform me that I was one of the candidates for Dream Girl of Delta Phi. You could
have pushed me over with a feather. That was one of the most unexpected, and I felt,
undeserved compliments of my whole life. Ted did ask me to go with him to the
Delta Phi dance, and I had to tell him I had already accepted an invitation from a fine
redhead named Clyde Dixon. I even asked, “Why didn‟t you ask me sooner?” I was
really disappointed, and all during the lovely evening I was aware of Ted‟s laughter,
and where he was on the dance floor, enjoying the company of Jean Swensen, (who
later married Paul, the father of D. Todd Christoffersen, born in 1945 and who
became a Seventy—years later). The candidate who won as Dream Girl of Delta Phi
was Blanche Peterson. President McKay was there to present the crown, and I was
one of the attendants along with Elsie McKay.
Spring time, 1943! The most important Spring of my whole life, because then is
when I made the decision that has brought me much happiness, when Ted asked if I
would wear his Delta Phi pin, and I said, “I‟ll wear it tomorrow to see how it feels!”
He said he was about to take it back, but must have known I was teasing, but serious.
It was graduation day, June 9th, and I sang in the chorus and could look down on the
Graduates and Ted would wink at me! I‟m sure everyone there could see me
blushing! Word spread quickly that we were engaged, but everyone was leaving for
home, or for the service, so not many were around to share my excitement. I roomed
with some girls next door, as my apartment was vacated. Janie Thompson was one of
the girls there. She was an excellent pianist, singer, and composer, who majored in
programming events at BYU for the rest of her career. She did not marry, but
contributed much to the recognition of the Church throughout the world with dance
and singing groups she directed.
The War years were hard on everyone! There were about 1300 students on the
campus. I am still amazed and thankful that Ted found me, because there were so
many more girls on campus than eligible men.
                   MY MARRIAGE TO A. TED TUTTLE



                                          15
2nd Lieutenant A. Theodore Tuttle and Marne` Whitaker Tuttle, taken 1944


I was with Ted at the Senior Banquet and was thrilled to be there. I believe he gave a
talk representing the Senior Class and I was so proud of him. Instead of taking me
directly home, as was usual, because he had borrowed June and Cliff‟s little coupe
(with a rumble seat), he drove around a while and then up the hill toward Squaw
Peak. We looked at the city lights, talked and walked around on the hill a bit.
Finally Ted began to tell me what it meant for a Delta Phi to give his pin to someone.
That to offer it meant that he was asking if the girl would consent to be his wife. I
was really thrilled, but so taken by surprise, that I said, “This is so sudden, I must
think about it.” We talked more about what I don‟t recall.
I did get a flashback of a dream I had vividly remembered sometime after the first of
the year. In my Technicolor dream I was sitting on a sunny hill under a big tree, and
someone had his arm across my shoulders. I couldn‟t see who it was. I remember,
almost to this day, the feeling of safety and warm comfort I experienced in my
dream. I then recalled how comfortable and at peace I was and joyously happy when
with Ted, even at this crucial time. I believe I told him of my dream. We finally
returned to my apartment in the wee hours of the morning. At the door Ted asked,
“Well, will you wear my pin?” and I replied, cockily, but with my heart in my throat,
“Well, I‟ll wear it today to see how it feels!” After a quick kiss, he ran to the car and
I ran down the stairs, hardly touching the steps! (He later told me that he almost took
the pin back after my reply!)



                                           16
I accepted Ted‟s Delta Phi pin on his graduation day from BYU on 9 June 1943. O
Happy Day, Caloo, callay! As I looked down at him in the new Joseph Smith
Building from my choir seat, he would wink at me and I knew that everyone in the
audience could see me blush! But everyone was leaving for home and only a few
knew of my happiness. Clarice & Bert Tuttle took their son home to Manti that
evening and we wrote letters back and forth. I continued working at the Office of
President Franklin S. Harris at BYU. I moved over to the next-door apartment where
Janie Thompson and four other girls roomed, because all of my roommates left for
their homes. My sister, Yvonne, was engaged to Gordon Hawkins and they were
married in June in the Mesa Temple.
We were concerned when to set the date. Ted was awaiting his USMC orders to join
the active duty roster and was reluctant to leave a bride, and possibly, one who might
be pregnant, to be gone away, who knew how long? When Ted received his orders to
report within about two weeks, he phoned me and I went to Manti Friday, I believe it
was with Jay deGraff, who was visiting Clara Jensen there. We were really sad kids,
not knowing which way to turn. Sunday morning his Dad brought home from the
mailbox new orders, rescinding the first, which gave us time to plan a wedding,
quickly, and to have time to be together after July 26 th for about 10 days before he
had to report for active duty. I was willing to chance it, and one afternoon while
getting ice from his folks‟ basement in Manti, after he tried to put ice down my back,
we became serious about this vital question and with my feeling of optimism, we
decided to get married. He has always said I was the one who proposed!
I returned to Provo and our correspondence by mail and phone kept us close as to
details and getting better acquainted. I continued working at BYU in President
Harris‟ office and was involved in many details prior to my wedding. I recall clearly
the day of the 25th of June when Ted came to Provo with his Dad and presented me
with a lovely, small diamond engagement ring!
OUR MARRIAGE IN THE MANTI TEMPLE
His sweet folks began turning the wheels because there were only a few short weeks
before he had to leave. I returned to Provo, told President Harris of our plans and
received his best wishes and a leave of absence from job as Secretary. I then bought
a wedding dress for $33.50, which cost $36.50, but the owner of the store said this
difference would be a wedding present from her, since I had no more money.
(Incidentally, my former roommate, Florence Lindsey (Lovell) borrowed the dress
after I used it. And then a few years later my sister, Jean, used it for her wedding to
Lewis Griffin. They both looked elegant in it because they were taller than I. [Then
in August of 1977, my daughter, Clarissa Marne‟, wore it to be sealed in the Salt
Lake Temple to Brian Reed Smith. She was lovely in the elegant satin gown with a
long train, and small covered buttons down the back and on the sleeves. I still have
it, but it is now (1999) quite ecru in color.]


                                          17
Our wedding in the Manti Temple shortly before noon, Monday July 26th was
preceded by a court appearance requiring Ted to swear that A. Ted Tuttle was one
and the same as Albert Theodore Tuttle. I was to affirm that my blood test (which
spoiled en route by train from Manti to Salt Lake), was supplanted by an official
letter from my Doctor in Provo that I was healthy and there was no reason I should
not be married. Judge Hougaard questioned the validity of the Doctor‟s letter and
will not be remembered fondly by me. Ted‟s sweet mother was my guardian angel
and guided me every step of the way and I felt as though I floated through the rooms
of that lovely temple.
After the wedding Aunt Euphrasia Day let us stay at her home for a rest. Every 5 or
10 minutes she would pass through to the other part of the house! We were on two
cots and really needed the rest. Our reception on the Tuttle lawn, occurred as though
in a dream. Ted‟s Mom and Aunt Lucile were busily involved, while I felt I was
floating on a cloud, again! Kind friends and town-folks brought gifts and wished us
well. We were able to slip away before Ted‟s boy friends were able to “shiverie” us!
After two nights at Hotel Utah (hot weather), we returned to Manti and spent a night
in the mountains on the Huntington side, with Ted‟s good friend, Bill Grange and his
wife, Penny, sleeping on pine boughs high in the mountains. We later drove alone to
Leland E. Anderson‟s cabin, Ted‟s admired Seminary teacher, expecting to have a
comfortable night‟s sleep on a real bed! We had just finished supper, I believe, when
lo and behold! here came Ted‟s folks and the Andersons just to visit. En route up the
mountain rain had started and they found the roads becoming slick and muddy, just
barely making it to their cabin. Guess who slept on a single cot in the kitchen? Ted
& I had to sleep „spoons‟ and woke up to turn over. We enjoyed their visit and wit
and wisdom.
PFC. TUTTLE ENTERED BOOT CAMP
Too soon we parted! Somehow, I can‟t remember the details of his leaving. He
caught a train somewhere out of Manti, and I rode home with his sweet parents,
hardly realizing I was really married. I returned to Provo and continued working in
President Harris‟ office, living with four other girls, including Janie Thompson, the
whiz on a piano. She worked at BYU for many years, with the Program Bureau and
directing travel groups of students to many parts of the world. She was talented
musically. She never married but enjoyed her work with young people and
contributed much to the recognition of the Church throughout the world with the
dance and singing groups she directed.
Ted was sent to Parris Island, So. Carolina for his Boot camp training. He said that
area was hot, humid, mosquito-ridden—a real hell hole! Many letters passed
between us as I waited. He survived the rough treatment, passed the tests and was
able to begin his officers‟ training at Quantico, Va. I was taking classes at BYU part-
time. By the middle of November I received word that I could join him there, and


                                          18
quickly packed my few belongings and rode a bus for about three days and nights,
arriving in Triangle, Va. November 20, 1943.
QUANTICO, VIRGINIA
Since no one was there to meet me, I caught a taxi and while en route asked the
driver if he knew of any place for rent. He did, and it was in Triangle, a small town
about three miles from Quantico. I got the name of the owners, with telephone
number and rode on to the Base. I saw a sign, “Photo Studio Receptionist needed”
and while I was looking at it, I asked a small man there where the Studio was. He
said he was the photographer and after a few moments in an interview, he said I was
hired! His name was Gene Raeburn.
I spent the night at the Guest House on the Base after being told by a Marine in
officers uniform, Ted Toomey, that my Ted was out on bivouac and would be home
the next morning. When I finally saw this handsome Marine, who had grown taller
and heavier, I not only had an apartment for us, but a job on the Marine Base!! I was
over-joyed to be with my sweetheart again after about three months apart. Now we
could begin to get acquainted—but still not really alone. A couple by the name of
Geraldine and Cassidy Wright were looking for a place and moved in with us for a
few weeks. Geraldine and I were with our husbands mostly on the weekends only.
They would spend their days and nights in training and on maneuvers and bivouacs.
I was able to see what Ted had gone through during Officers‟ training, as I could look
out the windows of the Photo Studio and see other Marines practicing with bayonets,
climbing up rope ladders over high walls, running through tires, and obstacle courses,
etc. One afternoon a couple of Marines came in for a sitting, picked up the portrait of
Ted and me, and remarked: “What a lovely portrait of a Marine and his mother.” I
just smiled when they discovered that it was I in the photo.
AN ANSWER TO PRAYER
There have been only a few times when I have been frightened, really scared, in my
life, and one was when I decided to walk to Quantico from Triangle, about 3 miles,
rather than pay 50 cents for a taxi. One morning was sunny and birds were singing in
the woods that lined the side road I walked along. Thinking I was all alone, I began
singing “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” at the top of my lungs, and almost delirious
with joy, thinking of my many blessings. I became aware of someone off to my
right, walking through the woods paralleling me. I kept singing, but realized that he
had crossed the main road and was following me! I felt a tightening of awareness,
knowing that a Marine in his dungarees had no business out by himself at that time of
day. Continuing to sing, but praying with all my heart that nothing serious would
happen, I felt a warm, comforting glow envelope me and knew that all would be well.
In a few minutes I noted that the Marine had gone on to my left back into the woods.
My prayers of thanks were very sincere that night after Ted told me that, yes, it was
very unusual that a Marine would be out there at that time of day, probably AWOL.

                                          19
Whenever I hear that song, I‟m reminded of how the spirit of comfort and assurance
feels in answer to prayer.
We enjoyed some few weekends in Washington, D. C. where we attended Church in
the lovely chapel. (This building was long ago sold to another church). We met
some folks we had known at BYU and also my cousin, Jack Whitaker, who was in
the Army at the time. I recall wearing my fox fur coat that I bought while in Provo,
and it felt good during the snowy weather there. I have kept that coat through the
years and now Clarissa in Anchorage says she has put it to good use. In fact, she also
still wears the mouton (sheepskin made to look like mink) coat I inherited from Clair
Tuttle. I had it remodeled by shortening it and making a flair back and wider sleeves
while I was in Montevideo, sometime in 1963. In my basement storage room in a big
trunk are more mouton (sheep skins with rich brown wool) pelts, which I would like
to make some-thing with some day. At this writing, 1999, that coat is now at least 50
years old! I trust it has no moth eaten areas and is still serving Clarissa well!
SHORT HOME LEAVE ENROUTE TO SAN DIEGO, CA.
Because I could not get permission to fly, Ted and I took the train from the East to
the West to Utah, leaving the last part of February, 1944. After spending a few
precious days with his folks in Manti, we left Salt Lake for San Diego, via Las Vegas
and Los Angeles. As we landed in LA, I felt sick to my stomach and made a beeline
for the Terminal, when I was suddenly grabbed by strong arms at the door and there
were my Dad and mother, Uncle Bert and two of his sons to greet us. What a thrill to
see my folks, who until this very moment had not met their new son-in-law!
Spending a couple of days with Uncle Bert and Aunt Clara Whitaker, I bid my folks
goodbye, and we traveled on to San Diego, I‟ve forgotten how. We made it to the
small apartment of Gordon and Yvonne Hawkins, where we crowded in with then
until Gordon left on Marine duty and Yvonne returned to Utah. I found a job at
Walkers big department store in the Photo studio and was doing fine, until I
wondered why I felt so badly in the mornings and couldn‟t look gravy in the face. It
was good I could begin my work at 11 a.m. for by then I could function better. I
found I was expecting, as one might guess! We were thrilled, but knew we would be
separated, possibly when the baby was born. I have a hard time thinking of the “war
years”, because mostly all I remember doing was praying that my sweetheart would
return home safely. I could not fathom even for an instant that he would not. I would
repeat almost constantly, “I love you, I love you, I love you, Ted, and I love you,
Heavenly Father, for watching over him.!”
In August of 1944, enroute to Utah to return me to Manti, Ted and I took a bus to Los
Angeles, where we met the Gilberts. He had grown up with Mary Dean Peterson in
Manti. I met with my cousin, Naomi Judd---then we traveled by bus on to Salt Lake
City, and somehow got to Manti. Perhaps Cliff and June drove us down, or we went
by train. Ted enjoyed getting in his farm clothes and working hard to help his folks in


                                          20
the garden, fixing things around the home, etc. Time passed too quickly and he was
off “to the wars” once again. It was so much harder saying „goodbye‟ this time,
realizing what a wonderful life marriage is and with a baby due in December.
THE BATTLE OF IWO JIMA
However, it was almost another month before Ted “shipped out”, having been in an
intensive training of shore landings from an LST, and other assignments involving
running through sand with heavy gear strapped on his back, etc. out from Oceanside,
along the California coast..
Ted has written his own account of the Battle of Iwo Jima, which is attached here-to.
The Fifth Marine Division and 28th Battalion fought on that pork chop-shaped island
from 19 February through March 26 (D plus 35) 1945. Fortunately, and by divine
intervention, and I am sure by my many and constant prayers, he made it back to
Hawaii safely. As duty as Headquarters (Liaison) Officer under the direction of Lt.
Colonel Johnson, on the Island of Iwo Jima, he endured many horrors and tragic
events during the weeks of intense fighting.
Lt. Tuttle, without insignia, was asked to go to one of the ships to secure a large
battle flag, since the first flag flown on Mt. Suribachi was not large enough to be seen
from the northern end of the Island. When he arrived on board, the Officer asked
who he was and Ted replied, “If you want to see your flag flying on that Mount, you
will find a large Battle flag for me.” He was brought a battle flag that had been at
Pearl Harbor, which Ted tucked in his dungaree jacket along with fresh sandwiches
and apples, which were a treat to his men, who had been surviving on C-rations for
weeks. Ted met Gordon Hawkins on the ship (3 rd Marine Division (floating reserve)
and as brothers-in-law greeted each other warmly.
When Lt. Tuttle reached the foot of Mt. Suribachi he started on up with the flag, on D
plus 4, (Feb. 23), but was called back because Pfc. Rene A. Gagnon was on his way
with fresh batteries for the walkie-talkies and he was given the flag. Gagnon was
consequently one of the men in the famous photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal as the
second flag was being raised.
A few days later Ted was near the spot where one of our 50 mm. shells fell short and
made a direct hit on Lt. Colonel Chandler W. Johnson and his runner, Corporal
Brown, both having walked to the top of the hill together to survey the area.. About
the only identification found for Colonel Johnson was his Annapolis ring on his
severed ring finger! As the medics were carrying Corporal Brown down on a
stretcher, Ted ran alongside and cried, “You‟ll be ok, Brownie, you‟ll be ok!” Then
he looked down and saw that one of his legs was blown off. Brownie died that same
day.
A CRUISE REFUSED—GROUP LEADER CALL



                                          21
Both Lt. Tuttle and Lt. Stoddard were evacuated from the Island -- George because of
a bullet wound through his hip as he jumped into a foxhole, and Ted because of
dysentery. After a few days recuperation on the ship, they opted to return to their
Company, rather than spend a 3-week cruise to the Marianas Islands. When they
returned to Iwo they engaged in some of the most fierce fighting on the north end of
the Island, routing the Japanese who had infiltrated the lines near the airport and at
night slipped into air pilots‟ tents and slit many of their throats.
After more than five long, bloody weeks on the Island, Iwo Jima was declared
secured, the Army came in for mopping up and the Fifth Battalion was ordered to
Hawaii. Word of Germany‟s surrender reached them through a walkie-talkie mix-up
while on the Island of Iwo Jima (Sulphur Island). Shortly thereafter, the Fifth
Division of the 28th Marines was ordered to Japan as part of the Army of Occupation.
Sleep and recuperation, with Navy food aboard the transport ship, showers and news
that they would return to Hilo and CampTarawa in Hawaii, lifted their morale.
„HOME‟ TO HILO HAWAII
While on Hilo Tent Camp, the dry side of the mountain in Hawaii, Ted received word
that Chaplain John Boud was coming there. He assigned Ted to be Group Leader of
the 75 Marines in his Battalion. They held services in a small white frame church
there. Lt. Tuttle tells of encouraging Lt. George Stoddard to give a talk, his first one,
at one of the meetings. George became reactivated because of that talk. They
discovered each other were members when one of the Marines, at a meal, exclaimed
to Ted, “You must be a Mormon like Stoddard over there,” because Ted had turned
his coffee cup upside down, also.
Word was received that Elder Harold B. Lee would be visiting the Church in Hilo.
Ted sent notices to his Group. As they lined up to shake Elder Lee‟s hand, Ted stood
at his side and introduced each one by name to Elder Lee. When he came to the last
one of the 75 men, Ted said, “And this is meanest cuss of them all, George Stoddard,
my buddy!” Later on Elder Lee repeated this story at a Stake Conference in Idaho
and we received a letter reporting it from Sister Rosella Baker, wife of Newell Baker,
the Stake President.



ARMY OF OCCUPATION
Planning and training for OPERATION OLYMPIC—the landing on Japan—
continued through June and July of 1945, knowing that mountainous Japan would be
difficult for fighting and supply. Then on 10 Aug 1945 a rumor spread that the City
of Hiroshima had been destroyed by a single bomb! Then news that it had been an
atomic bomb and many hundreds of Japanese had been killed, alerted the men. On
August 14, 1945 Japan surrendered unconditionally.


                                           22
“At early dawn of September 22, 1945, seven months and three days after the assault
on Iwo Jima, the 5th Marine Division arrived in its transports off northwestern
Kyushu, the southernmost of the four large islands that form the country of Japan.
As the ships began to twist from the open sea through the narrow land-locked
channels into sheltered bays, the green and mountainous land seemed untouched by
war.” (page 133, THE SPEARHEAD)
Landing in Sasebo, Ted was in charge of a crew of Marines who were given
assignment of unloading ships. Unloading continued through the night and all the
next day. Because of lice and other vermin the men were driven out of the Sasebo
Fortress and only after gallons of DDT had been sprayed by the sanitation squad,
were the shabby barracks habitable. All service men had to be doused with lice
powder. What a sad plight of the Japanese people, with poverty and so much
destruction. It did not take long to realize that the city of Sasebo‟s business,
manufacturing and residential centers were “on a level with those common in
America a half century before.” “Men and women alike labored days to accomplish
what one American bulldozer could do in minutes.” (page 157, THE SPEARHEAD,
5th Marine Division).
“Changes in civilian life had come to Japan. Secret societies and “thought police”
had been rooted out and suppressed. Reconstruction of cities and towns, hastened by
American engineering equipment, factories reconverted to peacetime production, etc.,
and farmers began to plant rice on airfields.” “The rank and file of the people had not
yet begun to appreciate. . .changes in their form of government and new civil
liberties. ….Their problem was to exist. In time, however, the people could make
their democracy work.” (page 173)
While in Japan Lt. Tuttle was asked to speak to a group of Japanese business men on
the subject of Democracy. I do have his talk, on which he worked diligently every
spare minute. He felt it was well received.
WELCOME VOYAGE HOME
Because of points received by being married and having a son, Ted was eligible to
return home by Christmas time, 1945. What joy! As they steamed toward USA the
Captain of his troop transport ship, even in high seas, lifted the rudders or stabilizers
and gave it full steam so as to arrive in San Diego by Christmas eve. A thrill to see
Old Glory waving in the breeze! A stampede for the nearest phones, found Ted out
in front to make that beautiful, long awaited call to Manti, Utah, to his loved ones,
wife and parents.
He had been on active duty in the Marine Corps since August, 1943, and overseas
from September 1944 to December 1945. His son, David Merrill, was 13 months old
when he saw him for the first time on 26th of January, 1946. Since Ted was not
issued discharge papers for two weeks, his wife, Marne‟, took a bus to Camp
Pendleton at Oceanside, Ca. to be with him until he could come home two weeks

                                           23
later. My sister, Yvonne, and Gordy in Provo tended Davy. On Jan. 24 th we were
packed and ready to leave the Quonset Hut and travel home by bus, arriving 26 th
when Ted will see his son for the first time! I surely have missed our baby these two
weeks. We visited Uncle Dave Beal in Long Beach and Aunt Ruby Tuttle Armstrong
in Los Angeles en route.
Stopping in Salt Lake City to let Dr. Franklin D. West know that he was ready and
eager to teach seminary, he was told, “This is January 26 th. We do not hire teachers
in the middle of the winter!” We were only home a couple of weeks when Brother J.
Carl Wood drove from Salt Lake City out to Manti to ask Ted to teach a Seminary in
Menan, Idaho. We were unable to locate Menan on a map. Later found out it was a
farming community 8 miles west of Rigby, which is between Idaho Falls and
Rexburg.
I will always remember the look my two men gave each other—incredulity on Ted‟s
part to realize he was a father and bewilderment on Davy‟s face to see the picture he
had called “Daddy” come to life. We went (with Yvonne and Gordy?) on to Manti
for a sweet and grateful expression of Thanks for answering fervent prayers on all our
parts. His sweet parents were overwhelmed with joy. How I love all these dear
folks!
Ted is to be the new Seminary teacher at Midway High school, located between
Menan and Lewisville.
FIRST SEMINARY EXPERIENCE
With all our possessions piled in his Dad‟s Chevrolet coupe, including our little boy,
his father drove us to Menan, a farming community west of Rigby. We were driving
up and down Main Street, without realizing we were already there. We lived in
Brother W. W. Selck‟s home with him for the rest of the school year, 1946. Ted was
thrilled to be teaching, even though he would stay up late every night to get ahead of
the students, and spent the first week or so telling Marine Corps tales, dressed in his
Marine uniform, because he was not officially released until that spring. Ted was
able to restore order and respect for the teacher and he enthused the students to take
Seminary seriously. They learned to love him and he returned that love. What a
blessing for us to be a united family, finally!
My husband reacted strangely whenever David would cry, clutching his back and
exclaiming over the pain that struck him so intensely. I am sure it was a result of
having been in the war, and the cry touched an injured nerve, somehow. In Feb. we
received a package from Yvonne containing a lb. of butter and ½ pint of Salad
dressing. “We can‟t buy flour now, which will curtail my intention to do a lot of
baking. Shortening is also a thing to be wished for. Still we can‟t complain, as we
are far from starving.”




                                          24
Our second year in Menan at Midway High School was enjoyable, and eventful. Ted
was asked to be an Area Dance Director by Brother Robinson, who came to our little
white frame home from Salt Lake for that purpose. Ted and Pete Peterson (Doran)
wanted to make money by growing chicks, and hens for eggs. Many of the chicks,
who were under a heat canopy, died when the electricity went out during a cold
winter night.
The hens laid eggs that had to be gathered, cleaned and boxed. I have never made
better angel food cakes than those baked in the old Home Comfort range from all the
broken eggs. That range had many features, so we could hook up to the hot water
tank and have hot water in the sink and in the shower we built in a small closet, along
with a tiny sink and toilet. The trips to the outhouse in the cold were eliminated.
However, to dry the diapers in windy Idaho in Feb and Mar. was not pleasant. Ted‟s
mother came to help when Diane was born February 24 th, 1947. After coming in with
frozen stiff diapers, announced, “I would not trade one square inch of Sanpete for all
of Idaho!”
I “taught” Seminary a few times for Ted when he was not well, and would come
home to nurse Diane at noon and fix a lunch for us. Ted loved to hunt, and with our
dog, Tico, a brown hunting dog, would come home right after school, don his boots
and outfit to hunt ducks on the river that ran by the school. One winter evening he
came in soaking wet, changed clothes and was heading out again, when I asked what
happened? He said he had fallen through the ice on racing for the shore after having
gone after a duck, on his stomach and had thrown it to the bank. The ice kept
breaking after each footstep and finally let him down!!
During the past summer of 1947, Ted attended Stanford University, working on his
Master‟s degree, and I stayed with my folks in Kittitas, Washington, on the farm with
our two little ones, David, age 3 and Diane, age about 3 months. In August I left them
with my Mom and rode a bus to Palo Alto, California, to come home with him in our
big, old Terraplane car, which had, fortunately, taken us from Manti, to Washington,
California and back without any serious trouble!! I think we prayed it through all
those miles. Then even on to Manti, where we traded it to his Dad, Bert Tuttle for a
$200 small deep freeze.
SEARS COLDSPOT & TITHING
In Menan I learned to appreciate the principle of tithing. We really needed a
refrigerator, because in the winter, even the bottles of fruit froze under our bed, and
the summers were hot. A few months before Diane was due in February, I had
located a $200 Sears Coldspot refrigerator and was intent on buying it, when Ted
said, “We had better pay our tithing first!” I was really upset, but he was unmoved,
and paid the tithing. That very week a letter arrived from the Marine Corps
containing about $200 that was due him a number of months ago. I was subdued and
have never since begrudgingly paid my tithing. That Sears refrigerator, which we


                                          25
purchased later, served us well from 1947 until 1961, when we stored it in an old
shed in Pleasant Grove, while we spent 4 years in Uruguay. In 1965 we plugged it in
and it still worked. I think we gave it away before moving to Boyd K. Packer‟s home
while they served as President of the New England Mission for three years.
Our two years in Menan were a learning time and enjoyable, as we met many fine
folks who became dear friends. To name a few: Principal Waddoups, Mac Fullmer
and wife, Bro. Ole Hansen with a family of lovely blonde girls. Janice Hansen
came and tended Davy while Ted and I gave the sacrament meeting program. We
also sang a duet, “Teach Me to Pray” and Evelyn Rennie accompanied. At Mutual
we had just sung “Let the Rest of the World Go By” when my friend, Florence, came
in and sat by me unexpectedly. She expects her second baby in May and stayed
overnight. Ted gave the Gleaner class lesson. About mid March in 1946 for supper I
fixed baked potatoes, white sauce with hard-boiled eggs over asparagus, lettuce with
mayonnaise, bread and milk and Custard chiffon Banana pie. Bro. Selck ate dinner
with us.
Other songs we sang at various programs were: “The Desert Song” and “The World
is Waiting for the Sunrise” at a school assembly. Ted did a good job at the Senior
Banquet as toastmaster at Midway High. In Lewisville Ted gave a fine Easter talk.
At a program by Seminary students in Rigby I sang “The Ninety & Nine”—a song I
sang at BYU Assembly with Florence Jepperson Madsen accompanying.
“Ted is busy building a baby crib and came late for supper.” He also built a single
bed with 2x4‟s and strips of innertube woven for the “springs”, which lasted us for a
number of years. At the school shop he built a fine desk. (I wonder if it is still at
Bob‟s?) In April we attended the M-Men and Gleaner Banquet and Dance at Rigby.
Ted was one of the main speakers. I love to dance with my Sweetheart. We had a
lovely time. I began a painting of a beautiful sunset.
In May we drove to Rexburg and danced in the Tabernacle till 11:30. Aunt Bessie
Beal tended Davy. We enjoyed a banquet at the Girls‟ Dorm at Ricks. We met and
shook hand of President George Albert Smith. There was a meeting from 2 to 4 then
we ate a fine dinner at Uncle Sam Beal‟s home and slept overnight. Time is drawing
nearer each day „til we leave for Utah and then go our sundry ways! I left for Manti
May 18th with Ted‟s dad and stayed there till June 16, 1947. Ted left for California.
I came to Washington with Davy via Airlines, Inc.
I was Drama teacher in MIA and also Ted‟s partner for the June, 1948 Dance Festival
in Idaho Falls, which was a big and successful event. We made fine friends in
Menan, and were sorry to leave the spring of 1948. On May 15 th we enjoyed a steak
roast with some of the faculty, the Petersons, Fugates, Barnetts, Ossmens and
children. A Barnett boy stepped smack into the steaks. They were a bit gritty, but
otherwise excellent. I took carrot and pineapple salad, homemade bread and butter.
An enjoyable time. On Monday evening we enjoyed a dinner at Verla Ellis‟ home.


                                         26
OUR MOVE TO BRIGHAM CITY
May 19 we had boxes packed in our trailer and a 4:30 am., a thunder storm brought
Ted out in his pajamas to protect things. At 5:15 final packing and by 11:30 we
headed for Brigham City. I drove the Chevrolet behind Ted in the Terraplane,
without any trouble. We unloaded some things in Brigham City and arrived in Salt
Lake by 7:30, then on to Provo. We lost Tiko between Salt Lake and Provo. He
jumped out of the trailer. Shucks. By midnight arrived in Manti, very tired. Davy is
croupy and feverish. On the 6th of June Gordon and Yvonne came to Manti for
dinner. We are planning to drive to Washington, but concerned about floods in the
Northwest. We left early 10 June for long journey, hoping to be able to cross the
raging Columbia River. We arrived at the ranch by 5:00 p.m. After family
gathering, including Tom with fiancée Marjorie Rath, on 14 June, Ted left early for
Stanford U. I find it harder to let him go each time—such an empty lost feeling.
June 20th is Father‟s Day. I love my Dad but don‟t know how to really show it
because he‟s never shown me the way. I offer prayers for him often.
YAKIMA VALLEY and RETURN TO MENAN
I made $125 packing this summer and I really earned it. I was on my feet so much
that when I came in at night I could hardly move. Many nights I‟d go to sleep soon
as I hit the bed and someone would have to put Davy down. I had very little morning
sickness with this baby. My main trouble was leg and hip pains and cramps. Davy &
I returned to Menan Aug. 23, 1946. We lived in the F. Rotweiler home until we
returned from the Beet Harvest vacation and moved into the Clifford‟s shell of a
house. No insulation, spider webs blew from the ceiling near the windows. We had
dug a trench for the water pipes and had cleared the small pantry of shelving and
lined the walls of a to-be shower with lath and plaster, but nothing had been done
while we were gone in installing indoor plumbing! It was finished barely by
Christmas and such a cozy feeling. Our Old Home Comfort stove, which we had
shipped up from Manti by rail, was hooked up to the water tank. We had a sink and
toilet in a small bathroom with a tight-fitting shower, especially when both of us tried
to shower at once for the first time, as I was expecting in a few weeks!
Still waiting for the baby to come, 19 Feb. 1947 when Ted and I sang, “Love Came
Calling” and “Hills of Home” for Bill Raymond‟s Farewell. Well done!!
“When I started with the baby I weighed 132 lbs. I hope to get back to that! Ted‟s
mother will come to tend Davy when I have the baby in McKee‟s Nursing Home
with Dr. Asael Tall as my doctor.” Just before Thanksgiving in 1946 we got our first
car, a 1938 Chevrolet coupe. In Feb. we picked up Clarice Tuttle in Idaho Falls when
she came by bus to help us in cold, windy Idaho. Ted had a harder time than I did at
the birth, because he could take no ether to deaden his imagination! I had no upset
stomach this time, and got along fine! Mom Tuttle stayed one more week after I got
home. I was so thankful she could come.


                                          27
Ted left for San Diego a week before school let out for a Marine refresher course. I
stayed in Manti and then at Yvonne‟s in Provo while he was gone. We returned to
Manti and one day Ted came with what we termed “our old Terrapart”, an old
Terraplane sedan, with a mashed flat square oil can covering a hole in the front seat
floorboards. We had to use faith & prayer that it would carry us through—heading
for Washington through Menan, Blackfoot, Arco, Gooding, Boise, etc., arriving at the
Ranch near Ellensburg by 7:30 pm., dogged tired, first time Ted had ever been to my
folks‟ home.
My next entry was made June 29, 1947. “We now have our little dark-haired doll,
Diane, born on Tues., Feb. 24 in Rigby, Idaho.” Four mos. old and black curls
showing up.
On July 4th I stayed home with Mom while others drove to Toppenish for the
celebration. We washed and tinted blue curtains, which looked fine. My folks with
Jean headed for Salt Lake on July 16th for the big July 24th celebration. I was kept
busy tending, canning and feeding kids, mine and Mom‟s. I went through some
problems for a few days after they left. I drained the pump as Mom told me and it
wouldn‟t work again. The plumber knew nothing about his job or he would have
primed it as did some others who came the next day. In the meantime we hauled
water in 2-qt. jars from the neighbors on the hill. To add to my discomfort, the pot of
macaroni I had cooking on the electric stove boiled over and blew out a switch,
which had to be repaired the next day. The grain became ripe ready to bind. I even
shocked some before the folks returned.
One week before Ted‟s school let out, I took a bus to Palo Alto, Ca. to look the
country over and surprised Ted from a sound sleep about 5 a.m. at the John
Fitzgerald home. We returned home via the Redwoods of California, along the
coastal route, so winding and foggy. We followed a car down a mountain pass, doing
50 mph around sharp curves in the fog in our old Terraplane, we called Moriah.
Diane was now 6 months old and when I returned to the farm home in Kittitas, she
would have nothing to do with me! We learned we have a new 1947 Chev waiting
for us in the Falls.
January of 1948 Ted Tuttle as drummer, Pete Peterson, Dale Adamson and Glenn
Sanders, the music teacher at Midway High, formed an orchestra and played a few
times at Mutual dances. I was on the Mutual board as Stake Gleaner leader and
missed some of their dances as we traveled to Terreton, etc. Ted shoveled snow off
the chicken coop (Davy says “tikken toop”). It is surely wet inside. The eggs are a
tedious job to clean. We had bad luck when the electricity went out on the baby
chick warmer and a couple of hundred or more died. This project was one Ted and
Doran (Pete) Peterson ventured on. In fact, Ted was out in the chicken coop when
Brother Robinson called by from Salt Lake to ask him to be the District Dance
Instructor. Feb. 25th was the District Dance meet in Idaho Falls, practicing for the big


                                          28
dance Festival in the spring. In March the Stake Green and Gold Ball at Riverside
was a lovely affair. I had a corsage and danced in the floorshow, the Fox Trot and
“My Dream” Waltz, such fun dancing with my man!
March 18, 1948 we left for Manti at 7:30. An enjoyable trip except for snow and a
flat tire. Returned to Menan. In April we made a decision on our move to Brigham
City—we won‟t be in Menan another year! April 23 rd we left for Manti again and
returned after a short visit. We practiced for the Festival at Rigby and at the Falls.
On May 2nd, Fast Sunday, both Ted and I bore testimonies and heard fine things said
of us. Most everyone knows we are leaving and not returning.
May 3rd, the District Dance Festival at Highland Park was held. A beautiful
spectacle, even though it was raining torrents by the time we did our last Ensemble
number “My Dream.” A large crowd attended in spite of the weather. There was
splendid cooperation from all concerned. Tues. evening we enjoyed a delicious
supper at the Ole Hansen‟s, even had cream puffs. On May 10 th we invited Pete and
Ellen Peterson, Martha and Ralph Fugate and the Sanders to a turkey supper and
enjoyed the evening showing slides. On May 12 th I left early with Joe Tucker for the
Temple in the Falls. I sang “The Ninety and Nine” at the opening meeting. It went
well and I was thrilled for the opportunity. Joe bought our dinner at the Temple. We
saw the cattle auction for a while.
MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH
In July of 1948 I drove with Brother and Sister Christensen in their car most of the
way to the Cardston Temple. He had an incurable blood disease, and so courageous
to make this last trip to the temple, Mrs. Christensen and I trading driving turns.
Only had one flat tire, which I was changing when a kind truck driver completed the
job for me. We held a reception for Tom and Marjorie and about 70 people came.
We served ice cream, candy and nuts and a beautiful 4-tiered pink and white cake. It
cost me about $30 altogether. Marjorie‟s folks came from Moclips. A slight rain
brought everyone in. We had a big light outside. On July 25 we went to Ballard‟s
home and ate delicious chicken, corn on the cob, salad, and cake with whipped
cream. We brought Jimmy back with us. Diane says “o de do” (open the door) and
“hawaii” (why). Both she and Davy are brown as little Indians. In August I took a
bus to Palo Alto again and Ted met me at the station in San Francisco. Really
enjoyed the stay. We visited the Probst family—who ended up very tragically. It
was a love of a trip back to Washington through parks, lakes, etc. We left Ellensburg
through Montana, Yellowstone, visiting friends and stayed at Pete and Ellen‟s in
Idaho and on to Utah. Mom tended my two tykes. I appreciate her so much.
BRIGHAM CITY
My dear Ted spent three summers at Stanford University after his return home from
the Marine Corps, working on his Master‟s Degree. Dr. John C. Almack wrote that
“This thesis has the qualities of a Doctoral Dissertation.” It is entitled “RELEASED

                                         29
TIME RELIGIOUS EDUCATION PROGRAM OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS
CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS”, submitted October, 1949. I typed the major
portion of this work, with my sister, Yvonne W. Hawkins, helping toward the last in
Brigham City.
We enjoyed our two years in Brigham City, living in the Clark home, while they
were on an Hawaiian Mission. There were many fruit trees with lovely peach trees
on the place and a garden area, also a chicken coop and a large lot needing much
work. We grew a beautiful long row of celery, which we covered in the Fall with
straw and dirt and could dig out from under the snow the crisp, white bunches after
the first of the year. In June Ted started work at Bushnell and working on material for
his Thesis. In July we started our third child. In August we made a fun fishing trip to
Vernal with Yvonne and Gordy, Jay and Shirley Ann, Lamar Hawkins and Davy.
We spent two nights in the mountains with 10 in a wide bed of mattresses on the
ground. It seems we were under a big tent.
In the fall of 1949 on our lot in Brigham City, there were more peaches than I could
handle and many fell on the ground. Ted‟s mom, Clair, came to visit us and picked
up and bottled, and ate as many as she could, bemoaning the waste and the fact that
they could not grow peaches in Sanpete County. Meantime Ted went to a Marine
Corps refresher course in Pendleton, Ca. while I taught his Seminary class for two
weeks. I was so glad to see him come home. In January of 1950 at the Gold and
Green Ball, Diane was a sweet flower girl. All watched while Davy danced with her.
Pondering our yearly spring decision-making time: Ted to go to College for
Doctorate? Shall we build a home in Brigham City? It will mean saving and
scrimping, but will be possible. Ted and I enjoyed our Bailemos Valentine‟s Dance
in mid February. Ted‟s Mom came Mar. 9 to visit. So glad to see her.
Waiting for baby due end of March. March 31 st Dr. Merrill says it can be any time.
Pains began at midnight and continued 5 min apart „til 6 a.m. Straightened the house
next day and slept, with no more pains. It will be soon, I‟m sure. Baby has lowered.
By breathing deeply with contractions I was able to almost completely alleviate pain.
Relaxed as much as possible, had slight showing. Sunday I taught the class and came
home to dinner Ted prepared. Good to eat someone else‟s cooking. We haven‟t
gone “out” for a dinner yet. Again 5-minute pains from 1 a.m. „til 7 a.m., lower
down. Albon and Mary stopped by for a visit. I ironed until noon. At 1 p.m.
contractions began, lower and intense. Couldn‟t get a breath so as to have much
effect easing it. Finished packing suitcase and phoned Ted at 3:20. Ted came by
3:45, even though they had not informed him of my call. He went to Maddox and
back by 4:30. Contractions were more severe and 5 min. apart. I phoned Dr. Merrell
and we left home at 5:30. I went through preliminaries at hospital before Ted
returned from taking Davy and Diane to Edith Forsgren‟s. By now pains were
beyond my control. To the delivery room at 6:35 and our baby Bob was born at 7:00
p.m. at 8 ½ pounds. All went well. After I began pushing with the contractions it


                                          30
wasn‟t as painful. I was conscious all the time. Ted, bless his heart, would wink at
me when I glanced back at him, reassuring to have him home. Our third child was
born 3 April 1950 and we named him Robert Theodore, as close as Ted would let me
name a child after him. He looks like a little pixie and is so fair! Dr. Merrell is an
excellent OB Dr. He led me through the birth calmly and serenely with wisdom and
patience.
On the 4th of April Gordon and Ted came in with roses and sweet peas. Gordy took
Davy and Diane to Provo in his plane. Then Davy went on to Manti by bus. I got up
and was much better off not staying in bed so long, although I really perspired just
getting dressed and dressing the baby, ready to leave the hospital April 9 th, Sunday.
Tom and Marge came over for the evening. I was exhausted caring for baby,
answering phone and door so was happy to see a plane circling again about noon and
Ted went after our kids at the airport. Glad to see help come as Yvonne stayed. I
worked some on her dress. On Sat. Gordy, Lewis and Jean, my other sister, came in
time for supper. They all drove over to Tom and Marge‟s for dinner on Sunday.
Gordy and Lewis left with Yvonne and my other sister, Jean stayed. I‟m really
fortunate having all this help.
On April 18th we went to the Green and Gold Ball at the High School in my formal
and danced twice around! Beautiful decorations. I worked on Jean‟s dress. Marge
came over from Logan and Jean gave her a Toni. (Preparation for Tom and Marge‟s
wedding?) Baby is fussy after being circumcised yesterday. Then Ted and I packed
boxes for our move. He and Jean left at 1 pm for Provo and points south with our
trailer loaded with stuff and junk on Sat. 22nd. Ted returned Sun. eve before dark but
with no Davy. I surely miss my biggest boy. He is to have his tonsils removed this
next week with Mom Tuttle taking all the responsibility. At 23 days old, Bobby
weighs 9 lbs. 6 oz.
On Thursday we went to the Temple (Logan?) No decision as yet!! On Sun. 30 th
Ted, Diane, Bobby and I, with Earl and Lucy Wright, (part of the quartet) drove to
Salt Lake. I tended the children at June‟s. Diane became lost for a few frantic
moments. Home by midnight. May 4th the Packers and the Abel S. Rich‟s, with us
saw the school play, “Ramona” and came here afterwards for pie and ice cream.
Robert Poulson stopped in. On Friday, I picked up Zula Kelly and Leda Lee for a
sewing club at Helen Jeppsen‟s. Our baby, Bobby, was blessed by his Daddy on
Sunday 7 May 1950. Bob and Barbara Poulson came to dinner. Ted to a Fireside. On
Monday Ted drove to Honeyville for meeting. At a Fireside Party, the Quartet Ted
sings in, with the Bass singer, Gene Wright, Earl and Lucy Wright, and
gave a good performance. At times, I would sing the “Water” part in the “Cool
Waters” song. On Friday was the Seminary Graduation.
A MOVE FROM BRIGHAM CITY TO SALT LAKE CITY



                                         31
On Friday 26th of May Dr. West phoned as Ted was making a bid for a building lot in
Brigham City! Dr. Franklin D. West, Commissioner of Education, offered Ted
opportunity to teach Seminary part time and attend the University of Utah in Salt
Lake. The decision was to move to Salt Lake! Sunday Ted went to Conference all
day. I went with Donna Packer to Primary Conference. Memorial Day, May 30 th, we
called by the home of Frank and Edith Forsgren, not home. Our little family drove to
Box Elder camping grounds and had delicious picnic with chicken, buns, tom. and
lettuce, and strawberry shortcake. We put Dave and Diane to bed and took Bobby to
a Drive In and saw “Wake of the Red Witch”, a good show. The next day Ted drove
to Corinne on missionary work, and visit Gene Wright.
June 13th we moved. Our new car is ready today. Willard Gardner, from Ruby
Valley, came and helped truck load to Salt Lake. Unloaded and on to Manti. July 1 st
Diane is feverish and by next day we knew she had measles. By July 8 th we left for
Washington 7:30 at night, drove to Meridian, Idaho and awakened Pete and Ellen at
5am where we had breakfast and on the road by 7 am. Jean had her baby 3:30 July 9,
a big boy. We didn‟t know that Jean had a baby until we met Ballard and Lydia on
the road, with oil trouble. They had learned of Jean‟s baby from my folks via a
telegram. We arrived at the ranch by 6:30 p.m., a bunch of tired people. Then to
work in the hay!!
While in Brigham City I served in the M I A as a Counselor and Drama Director. We
presented a play, “Nine Ladies” which was a challenge, but was well received. One
winter evening while we were at play practice, two little children came wandering in
to the Cultural Hall. They were dressed in coats, hats, boots and pulling a little sleigh.
I had left them home asleep and David had awakened, dressed them both and came to
find me. I had expected Ted to be home shortly after I left, but I don‟t recall why he
was not. I was scolded by those who learned of this and have been careful ever since
to have my children safely supervised, at least with a sibling older than five years!
Our next Ward play, “The Stars Hung Low” was very successful when we performed
at Bear River in December of 1949. Our Bailemos Dance, this time sponsored by us,
was semiformal and we all had a lot of fun.
Our two years had been very enjoyable, making fine friends. A joy getting to know
John P. Lillywhite and family, also Abel S. and Sister Rich, in the Seminary work.
Boyd and Donna Packer were newly-weds when Ted pleaded for Boyd to be allowed
to teach Seminary with him, even though he was still attending the Utah State
University in Logan. From that time to this writing, they have been loyal friends and
closely aligned with the Seminaries and Institutes of the LDS Church, and we even
have lived near each other since Brigham City, in Pleasant Grove and in Salt Lake
County.
The phone call from Dr. West moved us in another direction, so that Ted could begin
his work on a Ph.D. at the University of Utah, since there were Seminary openings in


                                           32
the Granite and Davis School Districts. 13 Sept 1950 Ted took the “Toonerville
Trolley” to Davis High to teach Seminary, 23 miles north of Salt Lake. The
Bamberger is handy when roads are bad. We rented a home near Ted‟s sister, June
and husband Clifford Gee, in Salt Lake on Windsor Ave. at about 9th E. and 9th S. in
the summer of 1950, with Bobby only about 3 months old.
 With three children and not much money teaching Seminary, and working on his
Doctorate at the U of U, Ted found that he could make a little extra working at Hart
Brothers Music, cutting down old upright pianos, putting on a mirror and making
them look more modern. We bought one and it is at Bob and Deb‟s right now
(1999)! I became a Fuller Brush Girl selling Daggett and Ramsdell cosmetics. Not
easy but I am learning. Then I found a job as a waitress at Leighton‟s Café on 21 st So.
and 9th East, working from about 7 pm. until midnight. I had some rather interesting
experiences there.
In November I started singing with the Stake Singing Mothers. A fun learning time.
Ted is a dear not to complain. Thanksgiving at June‟s with each furnishing half of
food, enjoyable. Wish the folks could have come up. Last weeks of tests due in
December. Ted knows now that his two language classes could have been put on GI
Bill to his credit! I plan to quit as Fuller Brush girl after Christmas. Lorraine
Richmond is now tending Diane and Bob three hours in the morning for $1.25. War
is awful. Korea is changing hands again! Enroute to Manti for Christmas, we drove
to Provo and greeted Yvonne, Gordy, Jean and Lewis. Florence Lovell is in Salt
Lake, expecting baby any day.
1 March 1951 Ted received a beautiful birthday letter from his Mother. I quote one
paragraph: “We ever pray for you and yours. If anyone was ever entitled to blessings
it is you and Marne‟. So keep growing, giving, helping, living up to the highest
standards, that your example may influence others to better live. If and when
opportunity affords, there are two people who dearly crave seeing you and your
brood—little ink bottles, milk bottles, crockets, pickapies, shaftoo and what have
you. Love to you, dear boy. You have always been a blessing and joy to your Mom
and Dad.”
About this time Sterling Sill, who was with New York Life Company, contacted Ted,
on the suggestion of Gordy Hawkins, enticing him to join them. We had a very
upsetting time trying to make a decision to leave the Seminary system, with the very
real temptation of more money. We finally decided to join New York Life and told
Brother Sill so. Then we went through great turmoil and couldn‟t sleep or find peace
even through prayer. So we decided not to do it and we were at peace with that
decision. However, when we told Sterling Sill we had changed our minds, he was
very upset and used pleadings, resentment and anger. He told us, in no uncertain
terms, we were missing a golden opportunity. We were unmoved and to this day,
thankful for an answer to prayer not to leave the Seminary System. We struggled on,


                                          33
raising Chinchillas in the basement, and a beaver project, hoping to make a fortune!
Even raising rabbits for the meat to help out.
4 July 1951 with Paul and Afton Felt and Tom Whitaker, we enjoyed a picnic at the
Park. Yvonne and Gordon were at the Park, perhaps Liberty in Salt Lake. I plan to
go with Tom to Washington through Eugene, Oregon where his family has moved.
After a big washing and packing, Tom phoned me and wants to leave the 5 th. We met
him in Brigham City at 11 pm. Thurs., transferred all from our car to Tom‟s. Ted
stayed in S.L. at the U of U. I must have had our three with me. Arrived Eugene,
picked up Marge, Doran and Annette and Tom drove us up to Washington. Enroute
stopped to say Hello to my brother, Ballard, and family. Glad to have a chance to stay
with my folks.
I must have had something to do with the 24 th Celebration with the Church at Swauk
Park, in Washington, to see a number of pages of notes regarding dress, artifacts,
wagons, hand carts, guns, bow and arrow and a brief outline of History, with names
of those who came in the first Wagon train.
Ted might have been at a Navy Chaplain program in California, as I have a July letter
to him mentioning that Paul Felt said something about “rehabilitation” of a Navy girl
there! He and Paul did go down for some training. And I was anxious for his return.
“I need you, the kids need you and the rabbits do, too. Can‟t tell for sure which date
goes to what rabbit. Davy said Reed‟s doe (the one by Harvey) was scratching. I
will have to shift them, I guess. Glad you‟re studying French. Hit it a lick.”
I have another letter to Ted about thunderstorm that frightened Diane. Afton must
have been living with me. She says: “Paul keeps talking of our coming down to see
you.” Bob was lost for over an hour and one half, having crossed 9th East. I called
the police with description of a blonde, brown-eyed two-year-old boy. I was fighting
frantic moments for awhile, and weak with relief when they finally brought him
home.
In August of 1951, Ted, Jeanne, baby Richard and Lewis‟ sister came up to bring us
home. Ted has had a busy summer session at the U of U. We slept for 6 hours on the
ground in a little park, long enough to make it home without staying in a Motel. So
very tired when we arrived home by about midnight.
On 25 Aug 1951 I inquired at Leighton‟s Fine Foods re a waitress job at night, we
saw listed in the paper. Amelia said she would phone me. I worked at Leighton‟s
half shift for the second time, four days later. Quite enjoy it, lots to learn. I worked
steady at Leighton‟s for 3 ½ months (835 E. 21 st So.) Ted would tend children when
he could. Baby sitters were expensive.
In November of 1951 we traveled with Yvonne and Gordon to Willard Gardner‟s
ranch in Ruby Valley, Nevada for meat. Fun traveling together. In the hot pots the pig
was scalded and cleaned there in the snow and cold. There were icy roads out of


                                          34
Wells. We made it home after midnight. I have three pages where my Dad wrote the
verses to “Lucy Jones.” I continued working at Leightons till Dec 10th and then
occasionally thereafter 2 or 3 nights a week until they closed in March for
remodeling.
January, 1952 we held a New Year‟s Eve Party here at 838 Windsor, with Robert &
Leone Carpenter, Ralph & Martha Fugate, Bill & Penny Grange, Robert & Barbara
Poulson, Norm & Gwen Johnson. We invited Paul & Afton Felt, but she was in the
hospital having their fourth deduction! We all had lots of fun and good food to eat
with turkey & dressing, salad, hot rolls, celery with cheese stuffing, little open face
sandwiches (brought by Penny), fruit cocktail and fruit cake.
March 22nd Saturday Ted worked from 9 am till 7:30 and brought lovely desks for
Davy and Diane. They are like school desks, with top that lifts up for storing things
under and an attached seat, made from old piano parts. They are really thrilled with
them. Bob has already bitten a mark on the front of our “new” piano. I visited Jr.
Sun. School and watched Diane hold a picture while Dave gave the sacrament gem.
Bob didn‟t see me and was being good. Snow and more snow. Washed and hung
clothes in basement. Song practice with Ina Johnson and Jean Anderson here. Later
saw a magnificent show, “Quo Vadis” with Ted. Song practice, lectures and baking
bread, children and working at Leighton‟s keeps me busy. Ted attended Navy Drill
class.
April 3rd Bob‟s 2nd birthday. Says, “Doogan, ni, ni (Night, night, Moma, Daddy). He
makes animal noises of all kinds, but does not even try to repeat words we coach him
on. Just not interested. He‟s a lovable little brown eyed, blonde, curley-headed
pixie.
April 25th Afton, Paul Felt, Ruth Moss and Ted and I went to Blanche and Coy Miles‟
house for a delicious supper. They live on 13th East and 18th So. The Spring thaw is
bringing down more water than the city can handle. A stream backed up and ran over
the road, threatening their property. Dynamite was used to clear the debris.
In May Tom, Marge and children came from Oregon to go through the Temple in
Salt Lake and have their children sealed to them. So thrilled for them. Yvonne, Jean
and etc., came up Sunday. I cooked rabbit, made jello, salad, spaghetti (from
Leightons) and hot rolls. To Temple without recommends which were at Richmond.
They got in somehow. Because the whole ordinance must be performed at one
Temple they were married (sealed) that day. Then the next day I went with Tom and
Marge and family at 10 am. to Salt Lake Temple to have the children sealed. Doran
and Annette cried so loudly we could hardly hear what President Young said, but it is
accomplished anyway.
30th May 1952 Afton, Paul, Ted and I left S.L. for San Francisco at 10 pm.. Arrived
Sat. at 6 pm., having driven straight through. We were there for the fellow‟s service
time from then until mid June. We visited tourist sights such as Alameda Air Base for

                                          35
smorgasbord and dancing. Treasure Island where we waited one hour for the boys,
who were also waiting but in the wrong place! China Town, Fairmont Hotel, Golden
Gate Park, Arboretum, Japanese Tea Garden, and we visited Aunt Maze, Ted‟s
mother‟s sister. For some reason we spent a lot of time on Treasure Island.
LOST BRIEFCASE AND EARNEST PRAYER
Early in 1952 Ted and I stopped briefly at the State Capitol, and inadvertently left his
briefcase at the side of the car and drove away. We had not gone far when we
realized we did not have it and returned and it was gone! We were devastated and
offered fervent and very humble prayers over the next few days for its return. Ted
had completed all requirements for his Doctorate, had passed language tests, orals
and in the briefcase were pages of research and notes for his dissertation. In a phone
call from Marion Duff Hanks who worked at Temple Square, Ted was asked, “Did
you loose something?” What a relief! A young Latino boy had found it, took it
home and his mother suggested he take it to Temple Square! Great rejoicing.
A phone call from Dr. Franklin L. West informed Ted of an opportunity to be the
Institute Director at Reno, University of Nevada. He is to leave in July or August.
While working at Leightons, Ted came in about 10 and asked, “Guess what?” I
asked, “Does it involve a move?” When he answered „Yes”, I guessed almost every
other place than Nevada. Now what to do about his Doctorate? From the moment he
told me, I knew we would answer yes. No regrets about leaving, except for his folks
in Manti.
4th July 1952 David has a fever and vomited. Next day was diagnosed with mumps.
Still working as Hostess at Leighton‟s. July 25 th Ted and Paul Felt leave for San
Francisco and Treasure Island for two weeks‟ training cruise. Afton and 4 children
pulled up by our house in a trailer, as we plan to stay together till men return. Will
work out fine. I still work four nights a week and Afton is willing to tend the
children.
On the 6th of September Deb and Leda Lee came to see us. Busy getting our trailer
loaded with bottles of fruit and books, etc. to go with Ted to Reno tonight with Joy
Dunyon. They returned Tues. the 9th, having held meetings all along the way, tired
but thrilled with the setup.
NEVADA INSTITUTE OF RELIGION at RENO
After two years in Salt Lake, with Ted‟s course work and most of his research
completed for his Doctorate, he received an assignment to teach at the new Institute
of Religion near the University of Nevada at Reno. We gladly accepted this
opportunity. We had not accumulated much in household goods. We hauled what we
felt we needed, plus our three children and arrived in Reno on Virginia Street in
August of 1952. The new Institute building was ours to inaugurate. We were excited
as we uncrated tables, chairs, desks, sofas, opened up cartons of new lamps, books,


                                          36
supplies, etc., to get the Institute ready for classes. Ted did quite a bit of recruiting as
he visited the Stakes in Nevada, Las Vegas, Sparks, Carson City, Fallon, Ely and of
course Reno. I designed and ordered a set of heavy earthenware plates and utensils
for the Institute kitchen. It showed “The Glory of God is Intelligence” surrounding a
lighted torch with RIR above, signifying “Reno Institute of Religion.” We also
bought a set of 12 for ourselves. I still have 10 of the large plates.
Ted left the first of October 1952 for General Conference and meetings with the CES
Brethren. I received a phone call from him on the 4th of October telling me that his
Mother had died and for us to catch the first train to Salt Lake. It was a sad time in
our lives, for her to go before we really had a chance for the children to know her. Or
for me to get to know her, as I wanted to—she was so wise and could have been a
great mentor for me. 7th November “I am happy the Republicans are in after 20 years
of Democratic control. All my men won! Hope they can follow through on
campaign promises.”
My folks came in for a few days. I hated to see them go, heading back to
Washington. 11th November is Armistice Day, with school as usual. I wrote letters
for Ted. He had stomach disturbance and came home at 11:00 am for a short rest.
We both have been staying up too late, with sleep eluding us. I ironed and typed
more letters tonight. „Tis midnight here at Ted‟s office and he is waiting for me
finish up the correspondence and come home so he can turn off the lights.
“A little man in a basket, rowing around my kitchen floor,“
A little man in a basket using my broom for his oar”
Now Bob is putting on his shoes, backwards. “Eh, me, eh me (let me) is his hue and
cry now. Wants to put clothes on, at least to zip up alone. “Uh dote dis” (here coat
is). “Doos and docks” (shoes and socks). “eo” (ear) “no” (nose) “num” (some) “hi”
(hair) “doob” (good) “deep” (please) “Babbo” (Bobby) “Nanna” (Diane) Dodo
(David) “tedue” (duty) “huh neeno” (milk give me.)
Ted went to Stake Board of Ed. Meeting regarding a Seminary class in Reno. On 14
November, 1952, the Lamba Delta Sigma organization had a skating party then came
to the Institute to eat spaghetti and meatballs, play games and dance. I took our three
to watch the skating at the old Gym on the campus of the University of Nevada. We
are troubled with vermicularis (pin worms). „Tis a constant fight and a noisy one
each night to give children an enema. I to bed by 2:30 a.m. Late nights continue with
baking, meetings, and 4 missionaries to dinner Sun. eve. Met President and Sister
Harvey Dahl from Elko. Fine people. (Years later we stayed in their home and Ted
shot two turkeys with one shot, twice (four turkeys) there, and I saw him do it! They
were managing the Deseret Ranches in Orlando, Florida).
More baking of date nut loaf, and bread. I gave one loaf to the missionaries and a
loaf to Jerry Cox and one to Clair Earl. On Sun. after classes and snacks for children


                                            37
we left for Carson City and Gardnerville to eat a delicious meal at Lee and Ann
Robison‟s. Afterwards we rode up the mountain pass and looked over Carson
Valley. Ted gave an excellent talk in Sacrament meeting. Next days were full with
ironing, mending, looking for “lost” Diane who was just sauntering along after
school! Ted cut Davy and Bob‟s hair. After enemas and baths, we finally all got to
bed.
26th November, 1952, I baked brown and white breads, dressing for turkey, pumpkin
pie filling, and jello for tomorrow. Hemmed Diane‟s new coat. We have so much to
be thankful for, such as our health, wonderful assignment here, opportunities to learn,
and security, love and happiness as a family. We had a delicious meal, but all by
ourselves. We have enjoyed ice skating on the lake on the nearby campus. A young
couple came here looking for Bishop Johnson. I gave them breakfast. Sunday there
was no Sunday School here at the Institute, so Ted went to Priesthood at Reno Ward
and I took the children there to Church as per usual. I invited Marjorie and Fred
Johnson to eat Sunday dinner. Served meat loaf, baked potatoes, etc. Afterwards
Ralph and Myrna Thomas took our family riding out to feed ducks on Lake Virginia.
After Sacrament meeting Myrna took my children home with her while Ted and I
dashed to Sparks where Ted gave a truly wonderful talk on the “Gospel”, so he
wouldn‟t get off the subject. I‟m teaching the Blazer boys in Primary. Ted and I
shopped for an electric train for Davy and found a big “diesel”. Saturday I cleaned,
waxed, scrubbed and Ted spent the day at Sparks‟ recreation hall, pouring cement.
Tired and bruised when he got home. Diane‟s hair is getting so long! I washed
punch cups at the Institute tonight and put 12 dozen glasses away.
On 7th December Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Liveth” tonight at church. If I do
say so myself, our song was lovely. Practicing for Primary program. Dave is to be a
lone traveler in the story of “Artiban—4th Wise man”. On Dave‟s birthday I had 6
Blazer boys here to make gifts for Christmas. I made a cake for Davy. Dec. 18 th I
was late to Relief Society because Dolores Wadsworth, a student, and her folks came
to visit. Davy did well in the Christmas Program. There was a Lamba Delta Sigma
dance at the Institute.
19th December Dad Tuttle came in on a late train. Glad to see the sweet, lonely man.
I baked today and brought the Christmas tree over from the Institute. Sun. eve the
combined Choir sang the Cantata. Happy Christmas time. We invited a few couples
over after a teenage Funival at the Institute: Humpherys, Waldos, Garretts,
Bowmans, Monsons, Terrys, Maughns, Mangus, Len Jones, Harris‟, Roundys. We
all had a fun time as Ted entertained with his “mental telepathy” game. Served
punch and cookies.
1st January 1953. We spent the evening and part of the morning dancing, eating and
being entertained. Bishop Jamieson and Gladys took us out to the Riverside Hotel
for frozen eclairs ($3.00 for only 4 eclairs)! Floor show with Mickey Rooney as


                                          38
M.C. The acrobatic act and dancing was very lovely. Home by 3:30 am. The next
day Dad Tuttle left for Salt Lake via United Airlines. I wished he would have stayed
longer. He seems so alone. He was reluctant to fly, but I‟m sure he enjoyed it, even
though the plane had to circle at least one hour before fog lifted enough to land in
Salt Lake. Our son, David, was baptized by his father Jan. 3. I helped Ted with files
in the p.m. Ballard and Lydia came in unexpectedly, and are looking for a place to
settle. We rode to Fallon to see the welfare farm. The house is in sad condition. We
met Erma Whitaker and husband Dennis Sorensen and others who are on an advisory
committee. Ballard and Lydia left for home on Jan. 6 th, since no job prospects
opened up. Hope that there can be a reconciliation made.
Singing Mothers practice. I am to sing a solo for Easter Cantata, entitled “I glory
only in the Cross”. Stake choir practice at the Ward. Brother Woodbury asked me
to sing a solo and a duet with Yerda Robertson, “How Beautiful Upon the Mountain”
as part of the Choir number. 12 January 1953 I attended 7:00 PM. Sacrament
meeting here at the Institute and was called on to give the closing prayer by my
husband. I ironed some and sewed letters on the T-shirts for the Institute Basketball
boys. I did chase my children around a bit. 30 Jan. I danced with Ted in the
floorshow of the Gold and Green Ball to theme and tune of “June in January.” I
revamped my white net skirt and black top formal in time. (In 1999 I still have it,
just can‟t get in it!) Good time by all.
DAVY‟S BROKEN LEG
Saturday, Jan. 31st our family went with Ted to Mt. Rose where about 30 Seminary
students were sleighriding and tobogganing. Then down the canyon via Galina Creek
where David, on a toboggan, met with rocks and broke his little left shinbone. Ted
and I had just gone down on a sled and were heading back when we heard him
scream. I tried to run, but feet felt like stone!! We brought him to Washoe
Emergency as quickly as possible. After we got Davy settled I phoned Janice
Roundy, 2nd Counselor in the Stake Primary Presidency, that I would be late for the
meeting. I am the 1st Counselor to Fairlene Golding. The Doctor was about an hour
in coming and when I stepped into the hall there Janice, Fairlene and Virginia were.
Hope our first meeting isn't an omen, being in the hospital. Dave spent a rather fitful
night. On Sunday many came by to see Davy and autographed his cast. David had
nightmares in middle of night. By 2nd Feb. Dave was feeling better and sat up and ate
alone tonight, even tried his crutches a little. Choir and Singing Mother practices,
Church meetings, baking bread, etc. Davy went outside on his crutches for a while.
One day he suddenly cried with excruciating pain and could not turn his head. His
Dr. was not available and someone suggested a Chiropractor. With one simple
adjustment, his back was realigned. Dave was free of pain and could move about, still
on crutches. That proved to me that Doctors, M.D., don‟t have all the skills needed.




                                          39
Sunday, 8th Feb. Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Lives” at Sparks West and at the
Institute. Sat. 14th Ted bought for me a lovely red and white rose corsage for the Mt.
Rose Green and Gold Ball at the 20th Century Club. Sun. 22nd Feb. We drove to
Fallon right after Sunday School, where we enjoyed a delicious dinner at my cousin
Erma‟s home. Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Lives” and he gave a wonderful talk
on the Gospel. In March Ted and I were on a panel “Extending our Opportunities
Religiously and Educationally” for Speech Festival in Mutual. I could have done
better.
As noted from the above, our year in Reno was very full with Institute activities and
Ted speaking at the various Wards in the state. My activities kept me occupied, to
say the least.
In April of 1953 we were still going strong. Baking bread and banana nut loaf, Choir
practice, Stake Officer‟s meetings, dancing, Stake Conference with Bishop Wirthlin
as speaker. We also had overnight guests and prepared many meals. Events at the
Institute kept us alert, with “Culture Kraft Club” party and square dancing afterwards.
We were preparing for the Easter Cantata, with combined choirs practices. I
practiced “my song” “Once in Gethsemane” (tune: “None but the Lonely Heart.”)
Diane had a part at her Orvis Ring School, in “Wedding of the Flowers.” It was a
lovely little Opera put on by the Kindergarten. Of course, Diane was the cutest and
sweetest one of the little girls up on stage!
On 9 May, Dr. and Sister West and a couple stopped on their way to Tahoe. They
return in the morning to Sunday School. Bobby is not feeling well. Could be the
measles, since Davy had them a few weeks ago. Our trio sang “Mother” for
Mothers‟ Day in Sunday School. I prepared dinner for the West‟s‟, et al. At a
graduation for seven Institute students, Dr. West gave an excellent speech on
“Personal Attributes of the Savior”. In the evening of May 10th, the Combined
Church Choirs performed at the State Building. I sang the solo part to “My
Redeemer Lives,” by Gates, right after the Catholic Choir finished singing, “Come, O
Glorious Death”. I wonder where our recording of the whole program is?? I have
another headache!
On May 14th Ted flew to Salt Lake to see his Dad, who had a heart attack on May
11th, and to give an address to the graduates at a Baccalaureate program in Brigham
City.
I am cleaning out the cupboards and closets for a trip away this summer. “Squeak”
Pulsipher gave us some trout! Delicious. I miss my hubby already. I took the
Blazers along with Dave, Diane and Bob to an early bird breakfast at the Mt. Rose
Ward. I think Diane is now catching the measles, sore throat, fever, cough, red eyes,
but not broken out. Monday, 18th I was at the Institute only a few minutes when here
came Bobby in his pajamas. Bob had answered the phone at home and Ted, at the



                                          40
airport, was trying to get him to say where I was. Three students, Bobby and I all
drove to the airport during a hard rain. So glad to have Ted home again.
22 May 1953 Brother Woodbury phoned to tell me of a letter of praise he had
received from the Secretary of the Combined Church Choirs Music Committee,
saying our songs were lovely. “The soloist performed with professional artistry,
beautiful voice, etc.” I can‟t recall exact words. I know my prayers in behalf of my
ability to “produce” at the crucial moment, were answered. Sunday 24th May, Ted,
Bill Law and his Dad, Orvid, Clair Earl, Rosemary Goss, and ¿? drove to Ely to
present a program and Ted to speak about the Institute Program, returning home
about 4:00 a.m., tired, but happy over success of trip and program. It seems as
though I am often washing Diane‟s and my hair, mending, ironing, sewing. We left
Reno with a trailer load by 11:30, Sat. May 30th, arriving in Manti about 10:00 p.m.,
children asleep, we sleepy too. Aunt Lucile was here. June had left for Salt Lake in
the afternoon. Glad to see Dad Tuttle up and about the next day. During this
summer Ted was attending the University of Utah, coming to see me whenever he
could on the weekends. I spent time with Yvonne and Gordy in Provo and visited my
sister, Jean W. Griffin, who has a new baby. Yvonne and Gordy drive me and Diane,
plus Jeanne and Lewis to Manti.
Bobby, age 3 plus 3 months, still blonde with brown eyes, still not really talking:
Knot—neck                  huh leo—a little (or eye blough—eye brow
                           leelu)
Blant—pants                bloyck—fork                nee new—finger
hut—hurt                   Heah uh ope—doesn‟t bite—bike
                           open
oowah‟—wash


Ted enjoyed visiting in Manti with Beauregard Kenner (89) about prospecting. We
enjoyed the Dance Festival at the Stadium in Salt Lake. A magnificent sight seeing
7,000 performers all at once. Saturday, June 13 I cleaned at June‟s and got ready for
the Despain Family Reunion at Murray Park, where we greeted Aunts Leona, Jean,
Mabel, Disc and Uncle Joel Boyce. Uncles Laron and Ben and also my cousin,
Avalon, daughter of my mother‟s brother, Joel.
My father had gone to Michigan to bring back a truck. With our children I walked to
the Joseph Smith Building to hear Elder Harold B. Lee give an address. After supper
at Jeanne‟s we caught a bus for Manti, arriving by 9 pm. when Grandpa Tuttle met
us. Glad to see him and to be home. Washed, cleaned, baked bread, washed Diane
and my hair, made sponge cake. Ted came home and we enjoyed strawberry
shortcake. I finished cleaning strawberries for the freezer locker. We had a busy


                                           41
summer, with picnics in the canyons, darning socks, working on Diane‟s red
corduroy coat, going to shows, ironing, fighting headaches. Auntie Lucile helped me
sew a dress, finally turned the skirt to correct position and all went smoothly.
Our family spent the night in the canyon at Alec‟s Camp, getting there just in time to
fix our beds before too dark to see. A beautiful night! On July 4 th, dynamite was set
off at Yearns Reservoir at 4:30 in the morning. Ted and I went for an early walk.
Diane was awake in the trailer when we left. I bore my testimony in church, thankful
for so many blessings. I fried chicken for dinner. I helped Afton Felt with cleaning
the Motel. It seems we have a venture with them to run a Motel in Nephi. I‟m not
sure why we did this, because at this point I thought we would be returning to Reno
in the fall. Ted did carpenter work and built a counter and blind in the office and
started to repair a room. Returned to Manti by 9:00 p.m. I received a letter from my
Mom saying that Dick is there also Thelma is there at the ranch while John is in Fort
Lewis in the Army. Ted left for Salt Lake again about 6:30 p.m. After breakfast I
baked a double sized batch of bread, made oatmeal cookies, washed clothes. I
weeded the garden again with Davy. Dad Tuttle and I saw John Wayne in the show
“Trouble Along the Way.”
18 July 1953. I had my hair cut, and also Diane‟s. Her long curls were mercilessly
whacked off!! I almost wept when I saw her. Of course, it‟s cooler, but she doesn‟t
look the same! I stayed at June‟s (Ted‟s sister) while in Salt Lake. We were invited
to Joy and Eilene Dunyon‟s home where Ted showed slides of Institute and Seminary
work. We enjoyed punch and cantaloupe with scoop of ice-cream inside. Back in
Manti I washed clothes, cleaned house, ditched out the garden for irrigating, and
picked four boxes of raspberries. After ironing, I baked cookies and a mutton roast.
Norm and Gwen Johnson stopped by in time for breakfast on their way to the Parks.
They returned with their girls and Brother Johnson, Sr. After we had supper Sat.,
Ted came home as we were finishing. Johnsons slept in the south bedroom.
26 July1953. We were in Manti on our tenth Wedding Anniversary. Mixed bread,
got dinner started and went to Sunday School with Ted and chilluns. It was a very
interesting class, especially when Ted contributes. Gwen and Norm finished dinner,
rolled out the rolls, peeled potatoes, etc. Aunt Lucile came with Reed, June‟s son.
On Tues. evening John and Ruby Armstrong came in from Los Angeles. Ruby is
Dad Bert Tuttle‟s sister. I baked bread, cake and cookies. The next morning I picked
more raspberries. Afton Felt came and we all, except Davy and Reed, came back to
Nephi and stayed overnight in the unfinished cabin.
I took a few classes in watercolors from Mrs.Wooley in Manti. I attempted a
painting at Palisade Lake while Ted cooked delicious steaks. Later in the week Bert
Perry (son of Aunt Ruby by first husband) and his son Reed came to town from Los
Angeles. When Ted came home he had a 25-minute talk assigned for Friday morning
at the Institute Convention at BYU. We got ready to take our little brood to Provo.


                                         42
Aug. 20th we received word that Uncle Bert Whitaker, my Dad‟s oldest brother, had
died of a heart attack. Ted gave a wonderful inspirational talk at the Seminary
Convention the morning of Aug. 21. I stayed all day and ate with Ted at the
Cafeteria. Many words of praise he received on his talk. On Saturday, there were
Institute meetings all day, with a banquet at night for all wives, too. We saw Boyd
and Donna Packer also. My Mom and Dad arrived for Uncle Bert‟s funeral.
We slept at Jeanne‟s. Ted was interviewed by BYU President Ernest J. Wilkinson
and by Ed Berrett, in charge of Seminaries and Institutes, and passed by the same.
Monday, 24th August, 1953 Uncle Bert‟s funeral was held in Heber City. Ted drove
to Salt Lake to be interviewed by General Authorities, portending great changes in
our lives. Ted is now to be a Supervisor of Church Seminaries and Institutes under
Brother William E. Berrett. These decisions! So many problems at once to solve.
Shall we take the Motel in Nephi? We certainly regret leaving Reno. It was a grand
experience. (I have 8 small pages of notes taken at the Convention on August 21st.)
The last line of notes reads “A good teacher affects eternity. He can never tell where
his work stops.” Some speakers were Pres. Wilkinson, quoting statistics and Elder
Harold B. Lee outlining the Mission of Church Schools. “The Church School system
is an auxiliary arm of the Church, set up by God to meet the needs of the youth of the
Church. . .” Among Five Objectives of Purpose and Mission of the Church Schools
is #3. So teach the gospel that students may not be led to vain doctrines.
“I will now commence to elucidate on that which the Lord has revealed very little”!
And quoting Karl B. Maeser, “Rather I would my child be in a den of serpents than in
the hands of a teacher who has no faith in God.” Others who spoke were Boyd K.
Packer: “Teachings on Apostasy” and Ken Sheffield. “The New Testament”; Church
History, Dr. Clarke and M. Lynn Bennion: “Guide students in the development of a
testimony of the truthfulness of Joseph Smith and his calling,” working in a great
cause to build up Kingdom of God on earth.
OUR MOVE FROM RENO TO NEPHI
26 Aug 1953. Ted and I left Nephi for Reno to pack up and return within four days or
so. We arrived by 6 p.m. and met with Joy Dunyon at 8 p.m. After a meeting with
the Stake Board, we picked up Eilene at the Motel and hit the high spots of town,
Harold‟s Club, Mapes, Riverside Hotel. (Our decision is to live at the Motel in
Nephi—O, woe is me!) All is well here, except someone broke in and jimmied the
lock on big desk drawer of the Institute office. For the next four days we packed,
cleaned, scrubbed, and had help with cleaning of Institute by the M-Men and
Gleaners. Ted and I both gave short talks in Sunday School. A sad farewell it was,
for Ted, for me and for our friends. I didn‟t think we could become so attached to a
place, people, and situation in nine short months. The most difficult part of this
whole hurried move was telling those fine people „goodbye‟, almost before we had a



                                         43
chance to say “Hello”. 1952-3 was a Busy school year, joyful, with much to learn.
We had many fine students who quickly developed a great love for Ted.
Even now, Aug. 30th, a big lump gathers in my throat and tears slip through. I
sincerely hope we find the challenge, the satisfaction and enjoyment in our new
work, that we experienced working in the Institute at Reno. We just plowed ground
the first year, with little opportunity to see the fruits of our labors. At 4:30 we left
with trailer and carload of stuff. We went through Ely to return the tire we borrowed
from Pres. Lambert after a rear wheel blew out on our trip to Reno. We stayed in
Eureka, Nev. overnight on a most uncomfortable bed, arriving to Manti shortly after
noon Monday. Dad Tuttle was surely relieved to see us. The children were a handful
for him, I know, and although we had a young girl come in to tend them, he still had
the responsibility. On Tuesday, 1 Sept., I baked bread and meat loaf, etc., cleaned
house, packed clothes and kids and returned to Nephi after dinner. What a mess to
clean up here at the Motel!! Very rundown.
I was able to coax the folks to let Bob and Dick come to live with us and help run the
Motel and go to school! They were fifteen in October. It took a lot of extra cooking
to keep them fed and happy. They learned to make beds and clean units in a hurry.
Ted goes to Salt Lake, still working on his Doctorate and would come home most
weekends.
The month of October is almost past—a lovely Indian Summer. A couple of weeks
ago a flurry of snow, but today, Oct. 29th is warm and sunny. Very fortunate for us
because we are only now getting our heating apparatus set up at the Motel. What a
busy month, from early till late. Ted has been on the road most of the time, either at
the U of U or on Seminary business. I did go with him through Bryce Canyon and
Zion National Parks toward the last of October. Very enjoyable to get away for a few
nights, although I mostly waited while Ted visited with the Seminary teachers along
the way.
At General Conference time Ted gave a fine teaching demonstration to Quorum
leaders in a special Friday evening meeting under the direction of Elder Adam S.
Bennion. I‟m so proud of him and love him dearly. Wish I had the opportunity of
getting used to having him around more!!
8 Nov 1953. Ted is in Globe-Miami, Arizona as a special speaker for a statewide
Seminary convention for teachers and students. He left here early to be there (over
600 miles away) by the next morning. He might be home a week from next
Wednesday. It is now 10 p.m. and not one car has come in! This is our first night
like this. We have turned off the lights and heat. At Bailey‟s Motel across the way,
there are only 2 cars.
Aunt Lucile has undergone a very serious operation on her cheek and neck for
cancer. This summer she had felt only a little bump in her cheek, and it has
developed into serious proportions, spreading through neck glands! She is such a

                                          44
talented lady. She taught English and Drama at Jordan High School for many years.
She lived at the Belvedere Apartments in Salt Lake City the last years of her life.
Sweet June, Ted‟s sister, spent a lot of time with her. I was very negligent, living
farther away. (This is the same school my mother graduated from when she lived in
Granite; a five mile walk, if she missed the school wagon!)
Only two cars checked in by 1 a.m. At 2 a.m. I went to bed!
Well, I haven‟t written since November. Already I‟m counting the months until next
September. I sincerely hope we accomplish our purpose here—namely, to make
enough money to pay a substantial down payment on a new home for us in Provo or
Orem. It seems almost too good to be true. But I‟m going to put all my energy,
determination and faith in this venture and it will have to turn out for our best good.
My twin brothers, Bob and Dick, are in the school play “Rest Assured” to be
presented the middle of February. I have sung “My Redeemer Lives” here in Nephi
three times already. Business at the Motel has been very slow. There is a heavy pall
of fog and trees are coated with white down to the smallest twig, even wires and
blades of grass, giving a fairyland feeling. I have written to Tom and Marge and
Mom and Dad. I inquired as to Mom and Dad‟s plans for next April General
Conference and whether they could come about two weeks early so I could
accompany Ted to Canada. It would be a grand trip to travel together. Ted has never
been to Canada. Last night we filled up on account of fog and low visibility. I have
notes from a class in Home Nursing Care that was informative.
TRIP TO CANADA
My folks did come to Utah and stayed to help at the Motel with their boys and my
three. Friday, 19 Mar 1954 Ted and I left Nephi for Canada through Provo, Salt Lake
and Idaho Falls. Saturday we left Idaho at 8:00am. through Butte, Great Falls
Montana, and over the Great Divide in a snow storm. We crossed the border before
dark, without any delay, arriving in Raymond, Alberta by 7:00pm. Ted went to
Priesthood Meeting while I visited with Sister Walker and daughter, Jane. Ted
returned by 11:00 p.m.and we watched a big group square dance in the large, new
(uncompleted) Recreation Hall that Taylor Stake is building. On Sunday we attended
Stake Conference all day. Brother Antone R. Ivins of the First Council of the
Seventy was the visiting authority. Ted spoke at every meeting, also. I spoke a few
minutes in the evening MIA meeting. Returning via Banff we noted that someone
had skied across Lake Louise. Snow was piled higher than a car along the sides of
the roads and only roofs and gables of cabins were visible. I‟m sure it must be lovely
in the summertime. We enjoyed riding the ski lift at Banff. Snow clad pines covered
the mountains, looming in every direction.
On March 22, 1954, we stayed at the Hotel Cahoon in Cardston, Alberta. Ted visited
Hill Spring, (where my mother‟s sister, Ella Mehetable Boyce and husband, George
Butler lived), and Glenwood Seminaries with Brother B. H. Smith and I tagged

                                          45
along. We drove to Raymond to see a Stake play, “Them Also Must I Bring”, very
excellently cast and played. The scenery and costumes were exceptional. Returned
to the Hotel by 11:30 p.m..
The next day we returned to Glenwood and while Ted visited with Brother Smith I
visited with a sister to Gladys Forsyth (Scott), Jean (Vern) Archibald (related to me
through the Boyce/Butler family. We enjoyed some lovely meals while there. Ted
has a 6:00 meeting and I went to the Cardston Temple. Ted came later. We met
Leon and Edna Cahoon at the very enjoyable Temple session, then were invited to do
some sealings.
On Wednesday, March 24th we arrived in Raymond by 8:30 a.m. Later we enjoyed a
delicious meal at Bill and Marva Nalder‟s home, where we stayed overnight. While
I‟m talking of visiting with the wives and the meals we have eaten, Ted has been
visiting with the Seminary teachers at these Canadian towns. The next day I visited
with Mrs. Ken Gibb in McGrath. After a fine dinner we left for Lethbridge, Calgary
and Edmonton where we met Paul and Afton Felt. He was the Institute Director and
our weekend there was very enjoyable. It was a wonderful trip and such a relief to
leave the responsibility of the Motel in such capable hands as my Father and Mother!
En route home through Washington, we brought Carol Whitaker, Ballard‟s daughter
on with us to Utah. When my folks left, soon after General Conference for their
ranch in Kittitas, they took Carol back with them. I had little time to visit. How
generous of them to spend ten days working day and night at the Motel for me!
April to August, 1954 passed quickly, with much hard work and not much to show
for it. My brother, Bob, returned to the ranch in June to help, and Dick left mid
August. I surely appreciated having him here that long, as we were packing up ready
for our next move, this time to Provo.
A FIRE AT THE MOTEL
Just four days before we were to move from Nephi, a catastrophic fire caused near
panic on my part. I was headed for the Church to sing in a trio for a funeral when I
noticed smoke coming from behind the Motel units on the south end. Running back
there I could see a real fire burning on an old shed and on hay in the corral next door,
with flames coming very close to a tank of heating oil, just behind the #10 Unit. I ran
back, screaming, “Fire!” Someone phoned the Fire Department while I tried to
contact or get a message to Ted. That fire ended my thoughts of singing as I wrestled
with mattresses, dressers, bedding, etc., with strength I didn‟t know I possessed!
Others soon came to help and when all was quiet and Ted finally got there, from Salt
Lake City, we found that two units (rooms) were uninhabitable and smoke had
filtered into some of the rooms at the south end. We were so fortunate that the fire
did not hit the oil tank. Our neighbor‟s haystack was most all burned and I believe
their barn was damaged. As we learned later our boys and a neighbor boy had been
lighting papers in bottles that had landed in an old couch in the shed that must have

                                          46
smoldered all night, finally bursting into flames in the morning. By evening we had
put everything back, cleared away evidence of a fire and we were open for business.
Some of the first customers commented that they could smell smoke. I replied, “Yes,
so can I!”
(See OUR MOVE FROM NEPHI TO PROVO)
Continuation of personal History (MWT RS Talk)
(See TALK GIVEN to REL. SOCIETY,. with about 30 lines available on page 13,
under heading MY MARRIAGE to A. TED TUTTLE)
Now to MARRIAGE TO ATT I was with Ted at the Senior Banquet and was thrilled
to be there. I believe he gave a talk representing the Senior Class and I was so proud
of him. Instead of taking me directly home, as was usual, because he had borrowed
June and Cliff‟s little coupe (with a rumble seat), he drove around a while and then
up the hill toward Squaw Peak. We looked at the city lights, talked, walked around
on the hill a bit. Finally Ted began to tell me what it meant for a Delta Phi to give his
pin to someone. That to offer it meant that he was asking if the girl would consent to
be his wife. I was really thrilled, but so taken by surprise, that I said, “This is so
sudden, I must think about it.” We talked more about what I don‟t recall.
I did get a flashback of a dream I had vividly remembered sometime after the first of
the year. In my Technicolor dream I was sitting on a sunny hill under a big tree, and
someone had his arm across my shoulders. I couldn‟t see who it was. I remember,
almost to this day, the feeling of safety and warm comfort I experienced in my
dream. I then recalled how comfortable and at peace I was and joyously happy when
with Ted, even at this crucial time. I believe I told him of my dream. We finally
returned to my apartment in the wee hours of the morning. At the door Ted asked,
“Well, will you wear my pin?” and I replied, cockily, but with my heart in my throat,
“Well, I‟ll wear it today to see how it feels!” After a quick kiss, he ran to the car and
I ran down the stairs, hardly touching the steps! (He later told me that he almost took
the pin back after my reply!)
I accepted Ted‟s Delta Phi pin on Ted‟s graduation day from BYU on 9 June 1943.
O Happy Day, Caloo, callay! As I looked down at him in the new Joseph Smith
Building from the choir, he would wink at me and I knew that everyone in the
audience could see me blush. But everyone was leaving for home and only a few
knew of my happiness. Clarice & Bert Tuttle took their son home to Manti that
evening and we wrote letters back and forth. I continued working at the Office of
President Franklin S. Harris at BYU. I moved over to the next door apartment where
Janie Thompson and four other girls roomed, because all of my roommates left for
their homes. My sister, Yvonne, was engaged to Gordon Hawkins and they were
married in June in the Mesa Temple.




                                           47
We were concerned when to set the date. Ted was awaiting his USMC orders to join
the active duty roster and was reluctant to leave a bride, and possibly, one who might
be pregnant, to be gone away, who knew how long? When Ted received his orders to
report within about two weeks, he phoned me and I went to Manti Friday with Jay
deGraff, who was visiting Clara Jensen there. We were really sad kids, not knowing
which way to turn. Sunday morning his Dad brought home from the mailbox new
orders, rescinding the first, which gave us time to plan a wedding, quickly, and to
have time to be together after July 26th for about 10 days before he had to report for
active duty. I was willing to chance it, and one afternoon while getting ice from his
folks‟ basement in Manti, after he tried to put ice down my back, we became serious
about this vital question and with my feeling of optimism, we decided to get married.
He has always said I was the one who proposed!
I returned to Provo and our correspondence by mail and phone kept us close as to
details and getting better acquainted. I continued working at BYU in President
Harris‟ office and was involved in many details prior to my wedding. I recall clearly
the day of the 25th of June when Ted came to Provo with his Dad and presented me
with a lovely small diamond engagement ring!
OUR MARRIAGE IN THE MANTI TEMPLE
His sweet folks began turning the wheels because there were only a few short weeks
before he had to leave. I returned to Provo, told President Harris of our plans,
received his best wishes and a leave of absence from my job as Secretary. I then
bought a wedding dress for $33.50, which cost $36.50, but the owner of the store said
this difference would be a wedding present from her, since I had no more money.
(Incidentally, my former roommate, Florence Lindsey (Lovell) borrowed the dress
after I used it. And then a few years later my sister, Jean, used it for her wedding to
Lewis Griffin. They both looked elegant in it because they were taller than I. Then
in August 1977, my daughter. Clarissa Marne‟, wore it to be sealed in the Salt Lake
Temple to Brian Reed Smith. She was lovely in the elegant satin gown with a long
train, and small covered buttons down the back and on the sleeves. I still have it, but
it is now (1999) quite ecru in color.
Our wedding in the Manti Temple shortly before noon, Monday July 26th was
preceded by a court appearance requiring Ted to swear that A. Ted Tuttle was one
and the same as Albert Theodore Tuttle. Also to swear, before Judge Hougaard, that
my blood test (which spoiled en route by train from Manti to Salt Lake), was
supplanted by an official letter from my Doctor in Provo that I was healthy and there
was no reason I should not be married. Judge Hougaard questioned the validity of
the Doctor‟s letter and will not be remembered fondly by me. Ted‟s sweet mother
was my guardian angel and guided me every step of the way as I floated through the
rooms of that lovely temple. We were sealed by President O. A. Anderson.



                                          48
After the wedding, Aunt Euphrasia Day let us stay at her home for a rest. Every 5 or
10 minutes she would pass through to the other part of the house! We were on two
cots and really needed the rest. Our reception on the Tuttle lawn, occurred as though
in a dream. Ted‟s Mom and Aunt Lucile were busily involved, while I felt I was still
floating on a cloud. Kind friends and town folks brought gifts and wished us well.
We were able to slip away before Ted‟s boy friends were able to “shiverie” us!
After two nights at Hotel Utah (hot weather), we returned to Manti and spent a night
in the mountains on the Huntington side, with Ted‟s good friend, Bill Grange and his
wife, Penny, sleeping on pine boughs high in the mountains. We later drove alone to
the Anderson cabin, Ted‟s admired Seminary teacher, expecting to have a
comfortable night‟s sleep on a real bed! We had just finished supper, I believe, when
lo and behold, here came Ted‟s folks and the Leland E. Andersons, just to visit. En
route up the mountain rain had started and they found the roads becoming slick and
muddy, just barely making it to their cabin. Guess who slept on a single cot in the
kitchen? Ted & I had to sleep „spoons‟ and woke up to turn over. We enjoyed their
visit and wit and wisdom.


PFC. TUTTLE ENTERED BOOT CAMP
Too soon we parted! Somehow, I can‟t remember the details of his leaving. He
caught a train somewhere out of Manti, and I rode home with his sweet parents,
hardly realizing I was really married. I returned to Provo and continued working in
President Harris‟ office, living with four other girls, including Janie Thompson, the
whiz on a piano. She worked at BYU for many years, with the Program Bureau and
directing travel groups of students to many parts of the world. She was talented
musically. She never married but enjoyed her work with young people and
contributed much to the recognition of the Church throughout the world with the
dance and singing groups she directed.
Ted was sent to Parris Island, So. Carolina for his Boot camp training. He said that
area was hot, humid, mosquito-ridden—a real hell hole! Many letters passed between
us as I waited. He survived the rough treatment, passed the tests and was able to
begin his officers‟ training at Quantico, Va. I was taking classes at BYU part-time.
By the middle of November I received word that I could join him there, and quickly
packed my few belongings and rode a bus for about three days and nights, arriving in
Triangle, Va. November 20th.
QUANTICO, VIRGINIA
Since no one was there to meet me, I caught a taxi and while en route asked the
driver if he knew of any place for rent. He did, and it was in Triangle, a small town
about three miles from Quantico. I got the name of the owners, with telephone
number and rode on to the Base. I saw a sign, “Photo Studio receptionist needed”


                                         49
and while I was looking at it, I asked a small man there where the Studio was. He
said he was the photographer and after a few moments in an interview, he said I was
hired! His name was Gene Raeburn.
I spent the night at the Guest House on the Base after being told by a Marine in
officers uniform, Ted Toomey, that my Ted was out on bivouac and would be home
the next morning. When I finally saw this handsome Marine, who had grown taller
and heavier, I not only had an apartment for us, but a job on the Marine Base!! I was
over-joyed to be with my sweetheart again after about three months apart. Now we
could begin to get acquainted—but still not really alone. A couple by the name of
Geraldine and Cassidy Wright were looking for a place and moved in with us for a
few weeks. Geraldine and I were with our husbands mostly on the weekends only.
They would spend their days and nights in training and on maneuvers and bivouacs.
I was able to see what Ted had gone through during Officers‟ training, as I could look
out the windows of the Photo Studio and see other Marines practicing with bayonets,
climbing up rope ladders over high walls, running through tires, and obstacle courses,
etc. One afternoon a couple of Marines came in for a sitting, picked up the portrait of
Ted and me, and remarked: “What a lovely portrait of a Marine and his mother.” I
just smiled when they discovered that it was I in the photo.
AN ANSWER TO PRAYER
There have been only a few times when I have been frightened, really scared, in my
life, and one was when I decided to walk to Quantico from Triangle, about 3 miles,
rather than pay 50 cents for a taxi. One morning was sunny and birds were singing in
the woods that lined the side road I walked along. Thinking I was all alone, I began
singing “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” at the top of my lungs, and almost delirious
with joy, thinking of my many blessings. I became aware of someone off to my
right, walking through the woods paralleling me. I kept singing, but realized that he
had crossed the main road and was following me! I felt a tightening of awareness,
knowing that a Marine in his dungarees had no business out by himself at that time of
day. Continuing to sing, but praying with all my heart that nothing serious would
happen, I felt a warm, comforting glow envelope me and knew that all would be well.
In a few minutes I noted that the Marine had gone on to my left back into the woods.
My prayers of thanks were very sincere that night after Ted told me that, yes, it was
very unusual that a Marine would be out there at that time of day, probably AWOL.
Whenever I hear that song, I‟m reminded of how the spirit of comfort and assurance
feels in answer to prayer.
We enjoyed some few weekends in Washington, D. C. where we attended Church in
the lovely chapel. (This building was long ago sold to another church). We met
some folks we had known at BYU and also my cousin, Jack Whitaker, who was in
the Army at the time. I recall wearing my fox fur coat that I bought while in Provo,
and it felt good during the snowy weather there. I have kept that coat through the


                                          50
years and now Clarissa in Anchorage says she has put it to good use. In fact, she also
still wears the mouton (sheepskin made to look like mink) coat I inherited from Clair
Tuttle and had remodeled by shortening it and making a flair back and wider sleeves
while I was in Montevideo, sometime in 1963. In my basement storage room in a big
trunk are more mouton (sheep skins with rich brown wool) pelts, which I would like
to make some-thing with some day. At this writing, 1999, that coat is now at least 50
years old! I trust it has no moth eaten areas and is still serving Clarissa well!
SHORT HOME LEAVE ENROUTE TO SAN DIEGO, CA.
Because I could not get permission to fly, Ted and I took the train from the East to
the West, and Manti, UT., leaving the last part of February, 1944. After spending a
few precious days with his folks, we left Salt Lake for San Diego, via Las Vegas and
Los Angeles. As we landed in LA, I felt sick to my stomach and made a beeline for
the Terminal, when I was suddenly grabbed by strong arms at the door and there were
my Dad and mother, Uncle Bert and two of his sons to greet us. What a thrill to see
my folks, who until this very moment had not met their new son-in-law!
Spending a couple of days with Uncle Bert and Aunt Clara Whitaker, I bid my folks
goodbye, and we traveled on to San Diego, I‟ve forgotten how. We made it to the
small apartment of Gordon and Yvonne Hawkins, where we crowded in with then
until Gordon left on Marine duty and Yvonne returned to Utah. I found a job at
Walkers big department store in the Photo studio and was doing fine, until I
wondered why I felt so badly in the mornings and couldn‟t look gravy in the face. It
was good I could begin my work at 11 a.m. for by then I could function better. I
found I was expecting, as one might guess! We were thrilled, but knew we would be
separated, possibly when the baby was born. I have a hard time thinking of the “war
years” because mostly all I remember doing was praying that my sweetheart would
return home safely. I could not fathom even for an instant that he would not. I would
repeat almost constantly, “I love you, I love you, I love you, Ted, and I love you,
Heavenly Father, for watching over him!”
In August of 1944, en route to Utah to return me to Manti, Ted and I took a bus to
Los Angeles, where we met the Gilberts. He had grown up with Mary Dean Peterson
in Manti. I met with my cousin, Naomi Judd---then we traveled by bus on to Salt
Lake City, and somehow got to Manti. Perhaps Cliff and June drove us down, or we
went by train. Ted enjoyed getting in his farm clothes and working hard to help his
folks in the garden, fixing things around the home, etc. Time passed too quickly and
he was off “to the wars” once again. It was so much harder saying „goodbye‟ this
time, realizing what a wonderful life marriage is & with a baby due in December.
We really expected to be together again, in this life!
                   THE BATTLE OF IWO JIMA
However, it was almost another month before Ted “shipped out”, having been in an
intensive training of shore landings from an LST, and other assignments involving

                                         51
running through sand with heavy gear strapped on his back, etc., out from Oceanside,
along the California coast.
Ted has written his own account of the Battle of Iwo Jima, which is attached here-to.
The Fifth Marine Division and 28th Battalion fought on that pork chop-shaped island
from 19 February through March 26 (D plus 35) 1945. Fortunately, and by divine
intervention, and I am sure by my many and constant prayers, he made it back to
Hawaii safely. As duty as Headquarters (Liaison) Officer under the direction of Lt.
Colonel Johnson, on the Island of Iwo Jima, he endured many horrors and tragic
events during the weeks of intense fighting.
Lt. Tuttle, without insignia, was asked to go to one of the ships to secure a large
battle flag, since the first flag flown on Mt. Suribachi was not large enough to be seen
from the northern end of the Island. When he arrived on board, the Officer asked
who he was and Ted replied, “If you want to see your flag flying on that Mount, you
will find a large one for me.” He was brought a battle flag that had been at Pearl
Harbor, which Ted tucked in his dungaree jacket along with fresh sandwiches and
apples, which were a treat to his men, who had been surviving on C-rations for
weeks. Ted met Gordon Hawkins on the ship (3 rd Marine Division (floating reserve)
and as brothers-in-law greeted each other warmly.
When Lt. Tuttle reached the foot of Mt. Suribachi he started on up with the flag, on D
plus 4, (Feb. 23), but was called back because Pfc. Rene A. Gagnon was on his way
with fresh batteries for the walkie-talkies and he was given the flag. Gagnon was
consequently one of the men in the famous photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal as the
second flag was being raised.
A few days later Ted was near the spot where one of our 50 mm. shells fell short and
made a direct hit on Lt. Colonel Chandler W. Johnson and his runner, Corporal
Brown, both having walked to the top of the hill together to survey the area.. About
the only identification found for Colonel Johnson was his Annapolis ring on his
severed ring finger! As the medics were carrying Corporal Brown down on a
stretcher, Ted ran alongside and cried, “You‟ll be ok, Brownie, you‟ll be ok!” Then
he looked down and saw that one of his legs was blown off. Brownie died that same
day.
A CRUISE REFUSED—GROUP LEADER CALL
Both Lt. Tuttle and Lt. Stoddard were evacuated from the Island—George, because
of a bullet wound through his hip as he jumped into a foxhole, and Ted, because of
dysentery. After a few days recuperation on the ship, they opted to return to their
Company, rather than spend a 3-week cruise to the Marianas Islands. When they
returned to Iwo they engaged in some of the most fierce fighting on the north end of
the Island, routing the Japanese who had infiltrated the lines near the airport and at
night slipped into air pilots‟ tents and slit many of their throats.



                                          52
After more than five long, bloody weeks on the Island, Iwo Jima was declared
secured, the Army came in for mopping up and the Fifth Battalion was ordered to
Hawaii. Word of Germany‟s surrender reached them through a walkie-talkie mix-up
while on the Island of Iwo Jima (Sulphur Island). Shortly thereafter, the Fifth
Division of the 28th Marines was ordered to Japan as part of the Army of Occupation.
Sleep and recuperation, with Navy food aboard the transport ship, showers and news
that they would return to Hilo and Camp Tarawa in Hawaii, lifted their morale.
„HOME‟ TO HILO HAWAII
While on Hilo Tent Camp, the dry side of the mountain in Hawaii, Ted received word
that Chaplain John Boud was coming there. He assigned Ted to be Group Leader of
the 75 Marines in his Battalion. They held services in a small white frame church
there. Lt. Tuttle tells of encouraging Lt. George Stoddard to give a talk, his first one,
at one of the meetings. George became reactivated because of that talk. They
discovered each other were members when one of the Marines, at a meal, exclaimed
to Ted, “You must be a Mormon like Stoddard over there,” because Ted had turned
his coffee cup upside down, also.
Word was received that Elder Harold B. Lee would be visiting the Church in Hilo.
Ted sent notice to his Group and as they lined up to shake Elder Lee‟s hand, Ted
stood at his side and introduced each one by name to Elder Lee, and when he came to
the last one of the 75 men, Ted said, “And this is meanest cuss of them all, my
Buddy, George Stoddard!” Later on Elder Lee repeated this story at a Stake
Conference in Idaho and we received a letter reporting same from Sister Rosella
Baker, wife of Newell Baker, the Stake President.
ARMY OF OCCUPATION
Planning and training for OPERATION OLYMPIC—the landing on Japan—
continued through June and July of 1945, knowing that mountainous Japan would be
difficult for fighting and supply. Then on 10 Aug 1945 a rumor spread that the city
of Hiroshima had been destroyed by a single bomb! Then news that it had been an
atomic bomb and many hundreds of Japanese had been killed alerted the men. On
August 14 Japan surrendered unconditionally.
“At early dawn of September 22, 1945, seven months and three days after the assault
on Iwo Jima, the 5th Marine Division arrived in its transports off northwestern
Kyushu, the southernmost of the four large islands that form the country of Japan.
As the ships began to twist from the open sea through the narrow land-locked
channels into sheltered bays, the green and mountainous land seemed untouched by
war.” (page 133, THE SPEARHEAD)
Landing in Sasebo, Ted was in charge of a crew of Marines who were given
assignment of unloading ships. Unloading continued through the night and all the
next day. Because of lice and other vermin the men were driven out of the Sasebo


                                           53
Fortress and only after gallons of DDT had been sprayed by the sanitation squad,
were the shabby barracks habitable. All service men had to be doused with lice
powder. What a sad plight of the Japanese people, with poverty and so much
destruction. It did not take long to realize that the city of Sasebo‟s business,
manufacturing and residential centers were “on a level with those common in
America a half century before.” “Men and women alike labored days to accomplish
what one American bulldozer could do in minutes.” (page 157, THE SPEARHEAD,
5th Marine Division).
“Changes in civilian life had come to Japan. Secret societies and “thought police”
had been rooted out and suppressed. Reconstruction of cities and towns, hastened by
American engineering equipment, factories reconverted to peacetime production, etc.,
and farmers began to plant rice on airfields.” “The rank and file of the people had not
yet begun to appreciate. . .changes in their form of government and new civil
liberties. Their problem was to exist. In time, however, the people could make their
democracy work.” (page 173)
While in Japan Lt. Tuttle was asked to speak to a group of Japanese business men on
the subject of Democracy. I do have his talk, on which he worked diligently every
spare minute. He felt it was well received.
WELCOME VOYAGE HOME
Because of points received by being married and having a son, Ted was eligible to
return home by Christmas time, 1945. What joy! As they steamed toward USA the
Captain of his troop transport ship, even in high seas, lifted the rudders or stabilizers
and gave it full steam so as to arrive in San Diego by Christmas eve. A thrill to see
Old Glory waving in the breeze! A stampede for the nearest phones, found Ted out
in front to make that beautiful, long awaited call to Manti, Utah, to his loved ones,
wife and parents.
He had been on active duty in the Marine Corps since August, 1943, and overseas
from September 1944 to December 1945. His son, David Merrill, was 13 months old
when he saw him for the first time the 26th of January, 1946. Since Ted was not
issued discharge papers for two weeks, his wife, Marne‟, took a bus to Camp
Pendleton at Oceanside, Ca. to be with him until he could come home two weeks
later. My sister Yvonne and Gordy in Provo tended Davy. On Jan. 24 th we were
packed and ready to leave the Quonset Hut and travel home by bus, arriving 26 th
when Ted will see his son for the first time! I surely have missed our baby these two
weeks. We visited Uncle Dave Beal in Long Beach and Aunt Ruby Tuttle Armstrong
in Los Angeles en route.
Stopping in Salt Lake City to let Dr. Franklin D. West know that he was ready and
eager to teach seminary, he was told, “This is January 26 th. We do not hire teachers
in the middle of the winter!” We were only home a couple of weeks when Brother J.
Carl Wood drove from Salt Lake City out to Manti to ask Ted to teach a Seminary in

                                           54
Menan, Idaho. We were unable to locate Menan on a map. Later found out it was a
farming community 8 miles west of Rigby, which is between Idaho Falls and
Rexburg.
I will always remember the look my two men gave each other—incredulity on Ted‟s
part to realize he was a father and bewilderment on Davy‟s face to see the picture he
had called “Daddy” come to life. We went (with Yvonne and Gordy?) on to Manti
for a sweet and grateful expression of Thanks for answering fervent prayers on all our
parts. His sweet parents were overwhelmed with joy. How I love all these dear
folks!
Ted is to be the new Seminary teacher at Midway High school, located between
Menan and Lewisville.
FIRST SEMINARY EXPERIENCE
With all our possessions piled in his Dad‟s Chevrolet coupe, including our little boy,
his father drove us to Menan, a farming community west of Rigby. We were driving
up and down Main Street, without realizing we were already there. We lived in
Brother W. W. Selck‟s home with him for the rest of the school year, 1946. Ted was
thrilled to be teaching, even though he would stay up late every night to get ahead of
the students, and spent the first week or so telling Marine Corps tales, dressed in his
Marine uniform, because he was not officially released until that spring. Ted was
able to restore order and respect for the teacher and he enthused the students to take
Seminary seriously. They learned to love him and he returned that love. What a
blessing for us to be a united family once again.
My husband reacted strangely whenever David would cry, clutching his back and
exclaiming over the pain that struck him so intensely. I am sure it was a result of
having been in the war, and the cry touched an injured nerve, somehow. In Feb. we
received a package from Yvonne containing a lb. of butter and ½ pint of Salad
dressing. “We can‟t buy flour now, which will curtail my intention to do a lot of
baking. Shortening is also a thing to be wished for. Still we can‟t complain, as we
are far from starving.”
Our second year in Menan at Midway High School was enjoyable, and eventful. Ted
was asked to be an Area Dance Director by Brother Robinson, who came to our little
white frame home from Salt Lake for that purpose. Ted and Pete Peterson (Doran)
wanted to make money by growing chicks, and hens for eggs. Many of the chicks,
who were under a heat canopy, died when the electricity went out during a cold
winter night.
The hens laid eggs that had to be gathered, cleaned and boxed. I have never made
better angel food cakes than those baked in the old Home Comfort range from all the
broken eggs. That range, which we purchased in Manti and had shipped by train to
Idaho Falls, had many features. We could hook up to the hot water tank and have hot


                                          55
water in the sink and in the shower which we built in a small closet, along with a tiny
sink and toilet. The trips to the outhouse in the cold were eliminated. However, to
dry the diapers in windy Idaho in Feb and Mar. was not pleasant. Ted‟s mother came
to help when Diane was born February 24th, 1947. After coming in with frozen stiff
diapers, announced, “I would not trade one square inch of Sanpete for all of Idaho!”
I “taught” Seminary a few times for Ted when he was not well, and would come
home to nurse Diane at noontime and fix a lunch for us. Ted loved to hunt, and with
our dog, Tico, a brown hunting dog, would come home right after school, don his
boots and outfit to hunt ducks on the river that ran by the school. One winter evening
he came in soaking wet, changed clothes and was heading out again, when I asked
what happened? He said he had fallen through the ice on racing for the shore after
having gone after a duck, on his stomach and had thrown it to the bank. The ice kept
breaking after each footstep and finally let him down!!
During the past summer of 1947, Ted attended Stanford University, working on his
Master‟s degree, and I stayed with my folks in Kittitas, Washington, on the farm with
our two little ones, David, age 3 and Diane, age about 3 months. In August I left them
with my Mom and rode a bus to Palo Alto, California, to come home with him in our
big, old Terraplane car, which had, fortunately, taken us from Manti, to Washington,
California and back without any serious trouble!! I think we prayed it through all
those miles. Then we traveled even on to Manti, where we traded it to his Dad, Bert
Tuttle for a $200 small deep freeze.
SEARS COLDSPOT & TITHING
In Menan I learned to appreciate the principle of tithing. We really needed a
refrigerator, because in the winter, even the bottles of fruit froze under our bed, and
the summers were hot. A few months before Diane was due in February, I had
located a $200 Sears Coldspot refrigerator and was intent on buying it, when Ted
said, “We had better pay our tithing first!” I was really upset, but he was unmoved,
and paid the tithing. That very week a letter arrived from the Marine Corps
containing about $200 that was due him a number of months ago. I was subdued and
have never since begrudgingly paid my tithing. That Sears refrigerator, which we
purchased later, served us well from 1947 until 1961, when we stored it in an old
shed in Pleasant Grove, while we spent 4 years in Uruguay. In 1965 we plugged it in
and it still worked. I think we gave it away before moving to Boyd K. Packer‟s home
while they served as President of the New England Mission for three years.
Our two years in Menan were a learning time and enjoyable, as we met many fine
folks who became dear friends. To name a few: Principal Waddoups, Mac Fullmer
and wife, Bro. Ole Hansen with a family of lovely blonde girls. Janice Hansen
came and tended Davy while Ted and I gave the sacrament meeting program. We
also sang a duet, “Teach Me to Pray” and Evelyn Rennie accompanied. At Mutual
we had just sung “Let the Rest of the World Go By” when my friend, Florence, came


                                          56
in and sat by me unexpectedly. She expects her second baby in May and stayed
overnight. Ted gave the Gleaner class lesson. About mid March in 1946 for supper I
fixed baked potatoes, white sauce with hard-boiled eggs over asparagus, lettuce with
mayonnaise, bread and milk and Custard chiffon Banana pie. Bro. Selck ate dinner
with us.
Other songs we sang at various programs were: “The Desert Song” and “The World
is Waiting for the Sunrise” at a school assembly. Ted did a good job at the Senior
Banquet as toastmaster at Midway High. In Lewisville Ted gave a fine Easter talk.
At a program by Seminary students in Rigby I sang “The Ninety & Nine”—a song I
sang at BYU Assembly with Florence Jepperson Madsen accompanying.
“Ted is busy building a baby crib and came late for supper.” He also built a single
bed with 2x4‟s and strips of innertube woven for the “springs”, which lasted us for a
number of years. At the school shop he built a fine desk. (I wonder if it is still at
Bob‟s?) In April we attended the M-Men and Gleaner Banquet and Dance at Rigby.
Ted was one of the main speakers. I love to dance with my Sweetheart. We had a
lovely time. I began a painting of a beautiful sunset.
In May we drove to Rexburg and danced in the Tabernacle till 11:30. Aunt Bessie
Beal tended Davy. We enjoyed a banquet at the Girls‟ Dorm at Ricks. Met and
shook hand of President George Albert Smith. There was a meeting from 2 to 4 then
we ate a fine dinner at Uncle Sam Beal‟s home and slept overnight. Time is drawing
nearer each day „til we leave for Utah and then go our sundry ways! I left for Manti
May 18th with Ted‟s dad and stayed there till June 16, 1947. Ted left for California.
I then came to Washington with Davy via Airlines, Inc.
I was Drama teacher in MIA and also Ted‟s partner for the June, 1948 Dance Festival
in Idaho Falls, which was a big and successful event. We made fine friends in
Menan, and were sorry to leave the spring of 1948. On May 15th we enjoyed a steak
roast with some of the faculty, the Petersons, Fugates, Barnetts, Ossmens and
children. A Barnett boy stepped smack into the steaks. They were a bit gritty, but
otherwise excellent. I took carrot and pineapple salad, homemade bread and butter.
An enjoyable time. On Monday evening we enjoyed a dinner at Verla Ellis‟ home.
OUR MOVE TO BRIGHAM CITY
May 19 we had boxes packed in our trailer and a 4:30 am., a thunder storm brought
Ted out in his pajamas to protect things. At 5:15 final packing and by 11:30 we
headed for Brigham City. I drove the Chevrolet behind Ted in the Terraplane,
without any trouble. We unloaded some things in Brigham City and arrived in Salt
Lake by 7:30, then on to Provo. We lost Tiko between Salt Lake and Provo. He
jumped out of the trailer. Shucks. By midnight we arrived in Manti, very tired.
Davy is croupy and feverish. On the 6th of June Gordon and Yvonne came to Manti
for dinner. We are planning to drive to Washington, but concerned about floods in the
Northwest. We left early 10 June for long journey, hoping to be able to cross the

                                         57
raging Columbia River. We arrived at the ranch by 5:00 p.m. After family
gathering, including Tom with fiancée Marjorie Rath, on 14 June, Ted left early for
Stanford U. I find it harder to let him go each time—such an empty lost feeling.
June 20th is Father‟s Day. I love my Dad but don‟t know how to really show it
because he‟s never shown me the way. I offer prayers for him often.
YAKIMA VALLEY and RETURN TO MENAN
I made $125 packing this summer and I really earned it. I was on my feet so much
that when I came in at night I could hardly move. Many nights I‟d go to sleep soon
as I hit the bed and someone would have to put Davy down. I had very little morning
sickness with this baby. My main trouble was leg and hip pains and cramps. Davy &
I returned to Menan Aug. 23, 1946. We lived in the F. Rotweiler home until we
returned from the Beet Harvest vacation and moved into the Clifford‟s shell of a
house. No insulation, spider webs blew from the ceiling near the windows. We had
dug a trench for the water pipes and had cleared the small pantry of shelving and
lined the walls of a to-be shower with lath and plaster, but nothing had been done
while we were gone in installing indoor plumbing! It was finished barely by
Christmas and such a cozy feeling. Our Old Home Comfort stove, which we had
shipped up from Manti by rail, was hooked up to the water and we had a sink and a
small bathroom with a tightfitting shower, especially when both of us tried to shower
at once for the first time, as I was expecting in a few weeks! (This is mentioned
before but worth two mentionings!)
Still waiting for the baby to come, 19 Feb. 1947 when Ted and I sang, “Love Came
Calling” and “Hills of Home” for Bill Raymond‟s Farewell. Well done!!
“When I started with the baby I weighed 132 lbs. I hope to get back to that! Ted‟s
mother will come to tend Davy when I have the baby in McKee‟s Nursing Home
with Dr. Asael Tall as my doctor.” Just before Thanksgiving in 1946 we got our first
car, a 1938 Chevrolet coupe. In Feb. we picked up Clarice Tuttle in Idaho Falls when
she came by bus to help us in cold, windy Idaho. Ted had a harder time than I did at
the birth, because he could take no ether to deaden his imagination! I had no upset
stomach this time, and got along fine! Mom Tuttle stayed one more week after I got
home. I was so thankful she could come.
Ted left for San Diego a week before school let out for a Marine refresher course. I
stayed in Manti and then at Yvonne‟s in Provo while he was gone. We returned to
Manti and one day Ted came with what we termed “our old Terrapart”, an old
Terraplane sedan, with a mashed flat square oil can covering a hole in the front seat
floorboards. We had to use faith & prayer that it would carry us through—heading
for Washington through Menan, Blackfoot, Arco, Gooding, Boise, etc., arriving at the
Ranch near Ellensburg by 7:30 pm., dogged tired, first time Ted had ever been to my
folks‟ home.



                                         58
My next entry was made June 29, 1947. “We now have our little dark-haired doll,
Diane, born on Tues., Feb. 24 in Rigby, Idaho.” Four mos. old and black curls
showing up.
On July 4th I stayed home with Mom while others drove to Toppenish for the
celebration. We washed and tinted blue curtains, which looked fine. My folks, with
Jean, headed for Salt Lake on July 16th for the big July 24th celebration. I was kept
busy tending, canning and feeding kids, mine and Mom‟s. I went through some
problems for a few days after they left. I drained the pump as Mom told me and it
wouldn‟t work again. The plumber knew nothing about his job or he would have
primed it as did some others who came the next day. In the meantime we hauled
water in 2-qt. jars from the neighbors on the hill. To add to my discomfort, the pot of
macaroni I had cooking on the electric stove boiled over and blew out a switch,
which had to be repaired the next day. The grain became ripe ready to bind. I even
shocked some before the folks returned.
One week before Ted‟s school let out, I took a bus to Palo Alto, Ca. to look the
country over and surprised Ted from a sound sleep about 5 a.m. at the John
Fitzgerald home. We returned home via the redwoods of California, along the coastal
route, so winding and foggy. We followed a car down a mountain pass doing 50 mph
around sharp curves in the fog in our old Terraplane, we called Moriah. Diane was
now 6 months old and when I returned to the farm home in Kittitas, she would have
nothing to do with me! We learned we have a new 1947 Chev waiting for us in the
Falls.
January of 1948 Ted Tuttle as drummer, Pete Peterson, Dale Adamson and Glenn
Sanders, the music teacher at Midway High, formed an orchestra and played a few
times at Mutual dances. I was on the Mutual board as Stake Gleaner leader and
missed some of their dances as we traveled to Terreton, etc. Ted shoveled snow off
the chicken coop (Davy says “tikken toop”). It is surely wet inside. The eggs are a
tedious job to clean. We had bad luck when the electricity went out on the baby
chick warmer and a couple of hundred or more died. This project was one Ted and
Doran (Pete) Peterson ventured on. In fact, Ted was out in the chicken coop when
Brother Robinson called by from Salt Lake to ask him to be the District Dance
Instructor. Feb. 25th was the District Dance meet in Idaho Falls, practicing for the big
dance Festival in the spring. In March the Stake Green and Gold Ball at Riverside
was a lovely affair. I had a corsage and danced in the floorshow, the Fox Trot and
“My Dream” Waltz, such fun dancing with my man!
March 18, 1948 we left for Manti at 7:30. An enjoyable trip except for snow and a
flat tire. Returned to Menan. In April we made a decision on our move to Brigham
City—we won‟t be in Menan another year! April 23rd we left for Manti again and
returned after a short visit. We practiced for the Festival at Rigby and at the Falls.



                                          59
On May 2nd, Fast Sunday, both Ted and I bore testimonies and heard fine things said
of us. Most everyone knows we are leaving and not returning.
May 3rd, the District Dance Festival at Highland Park was held. A beautiful
spectacle, even though it was raining torrents by the time we did our last Ensemble
number “My Dream.” A large crowd attended in spite of the weather. There was
splendid cooperation from all concerned. Tues. evening we enjoyed a delicious
supper at the Ole Hansen‟s, even had cream puffs. On May 10 th we invited Pete and
Ellen Peterson, Martha and Ralph Fugate and the Sanders to a turkey supper and
enjoyed the evening showing slides. On May 12 th I left early with Joe Tucker for the
Temple in the Falls. I sang “The Ninety and Nine” at the opening meeting. It went
well and I was thrilled for the opportunity. Joe bought our dinner at the Temple. We
saw the cattle auction for a while.
MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH
In July of 1948 I drove with Brother and Sister Christensen in their car most of the
way to the Cardston Temple. He had an incurable blood disease, and so courageous
to make this last trip to the temple, Mrs. Christensen and I trading driving turns.
Only had one flat tire, which I was changing when a kind truck driver completed the
job for me. We held a reception for Tom and Marjorie and about 70 people came.
We served ice cream, candy and nuts and a beautiful 4 tiered pink and white cake. It
cost me about $30 altogether. Marjorie‟s folks came from Moclips. A slight rain
brought everyone in. We had a big light outside. On July 25 we went to Ballard‟s
home and ate delicious chicken, corn on the cob, salad, and cake with whipped
cream. We brought Jimmy back with us. Diane says “o de do” (open the door) and
“hawaii” (why). Both she and Davy are brown as little Indians. In August I took a
bus to Palo Alto again and Ted met me at the station in San Francisco. Really
enjoyed the stay. We visited the Probst family—who ended up very tragically. It
was a love of a trip back to Washington through parks, lakes, etc. We left Ellensburg
through Montana, Yellowstone, visiting friends and stayed at Pete and Ellen‟s in
Idaho and on to Utah. Mom tended my two tykes. I appreciate her so much.
BRIGHAM CITY
My dear Ted spent three summers at Stanford University after his return home from
the Marine Corps, working on his Master‟s Degree. Dr. John C. Almack wrote that
“This thesis has the qualities of a Doctoral Dissertation.” It is entitled “RELEASED
TIME RELIGIOUS EDUCATION PROGRAM OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS
CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS”, submitted October, 1949. I typed the major
portion of this work, with my sister, Yvonne W. Hawkins, helping toward the last in
Brigham City.
We enjoyed our two years in Brigham City, living in the Clark home, while they
were on an Hawaiian Mission. There were many fruit trees with lovely peach trees
on the place and a garden area, also a chicken coop and a large lot needing much

                                         60
work We grew a beautiful long row of celery, which we covered in the Fall with
straw and dirt and could dig out from under the snow crisp, white bunches after the
first of the year. In June Ted started work at Bushnell and working on material for his
Thesis. In July we started our third child. In August we made a fun fishing trip to
Vernal with Yvonne and Gordy, Jay and Shirley Ann, Lamar Hawkins and Davy.
We spent two nights in the mountains with 10 in a wide bed of mattresses on the
ground. It seems we were under a big tent.
In the fall of 1949 there were more peaches than I could handle and many fell on the
ground. Ted‟s mom, Clair, came to visit us and picked up and bottled, and ate as
many as she could, bemoaning the waste and the fact that they could not grow
peaches in Sanpete County. Meantime Ted went to a Marine Corps refresher course
in Pendleton, Ca. while I taught his Seminary class for two weeks. I was so glad to
see him come home. In January of 1950 at the Gold and Green Ball, Diane was a
sweet flower girl. All watched while Davy danced with her. Pondering our yearly
spring decision-making time: Ted to go to College for Doctorate? Shall we build a
home in Brigham City? It will mean saving and scrimping, but will be possible. Ted
and I enjoyed our Bailemos Valentine‟s Dance in mid February. Ted‟s Mom came
Mar. 9 to visit. So glad to see her.
Waiting for baby due end March. March 31st Dr. Merrill says it can be any time.
Pains began at midnight and continued 5 min apart „til 6 a.m. Straightened the house
next day and slept, with no more pains. It will be soon, I‟m sure. Baby has lowered.
By breathing deeply with contractions I was able to almost completely alleviate pain.
Relaxed as much as possible, had slight showing. Sunday I taught the class and came
home to dinner Ted prepared. Good to eat someone else‟s cooking. We haven‟t
gone “out” for a dinner yet. Again 5 minute pains from 1 a.m. „til 7 a.m., lower
down. Albon and Mary stopped by for a visit. I ironed until noon. At 1 p.m.
contractions began, lower and intense. Couldn‟t get a breath so as to have much
effect easing it. Finished packing suitcase and phoned Ted at 3:20. Ted came by
3:45, even though they had not informed him of my call. He went to Maddox and
back by 4:30. Contractions were more severe and 5 min. apart. I phoned Dr. Merrell
and we left home at 5:30. I went through preliminaries at hospital before Ted
returned from taking Davy and Diane to Edith Forsgren‟s. By now pains were
beyond my control. To the delivery room at 6:35 and our baby boy was born at 7:00
p.m. at 8 ½ pounds. All went well. After I began pushing with the contractions it
wasn‟t as painful. I was conscious all the time. Ted, bless his heart, would wink at
me when I glanced back at him, reassuring to have him home. Our third child was
born 3 April 1950 and we named him Robert Theodore, as close as Ted would let me
name a child after him. He looks like a little pixie and is so fair! Dr. Merrell is an
excellent OB Dr. He led me through the birth calmly and serenely with wisdom and
patience.



                                          61
On the 4th of April Gordon and Ted came in with roses and sweet peas. Gordy took
Davy and Diane to Provo in his plane. Then Davy went on to Manti by bus. I got up
and was much better off not staying in bed so long, although I really perspired just
getting dressed and dressing the baby, ready to leave the hospital April 9 th, Sunday.
Tom and Marge came over for the evening. I was exhausted caring for baby,
answering phone and door so was happy to see a plane circling again about noon and
Ted went after our kids at the airport. Glad to see help come as Yvonne stayed. I
worked some on her dress. On Sat. Gordy, Lewis and Jean, my other sister, came in
time for supper. They all drove over to Tom and Marge‟s for dinner on Sunday.
Gordy and Lewis left with Yvonne and my other sister, Jean stayed. I‟m really
fortunate having all this help.
On April 18th we went to the Green and Gold Ball at the High School in my formal
and danced twice around! Beautiful decorations. I worked on Jean‟s dress. Marge
came over from Logan and Jean gave her a Toni. (Preparation for Tom and Marge‟s
wedding?) Baby is fussy after being circumcised yesterday. Then Ted and I packed
boxes for our move. He and Jean left at 1 pm for Provo and points south with our
trailer loaded with stuff and junk on Sat. 22nd. Ted returned Sun. eve before dark but
with no Davy. I surely miss my biggest boy. He is to have his tonsils removed this
next week with Mom Tuttle taking all the responsibility. At 23 days old, Bobby
weighs 9 lbs. 6 oz.
On Thursday we went to the Temple (Logan?) No decision as yet!! On Sun. 30 th
Ted, Diane, Bobby and I, with Earl and Lucy Wright, (part of the quartet) drove to
Salt Lake. I tended the children at June‟s. Diane became lost for a few frantic
moments. Home by midnight. May 4th the Packers and the Abel S. Rich‟s, with us
saw the school play, “Ramona” and came here afterwards for pie and ice cream.
Robert Poulson stopped in. On Friday, I picked up Zula Kelly and Leda Lee for a
sewing club at Helen Jeppsen‟s. Our baby, Bobby, was blessed by his Daddy on
Sunday 7 May 1950. Bob and Barbara Poulson came to dinner. Ted to a Fireside. On
Monday Ted drove to Honeyville for meeting. At a Fireside Party, the Quartet Ted
sings in, with the Bass singer, Gene Wright, Earl and Lucy Wright, and
gave a good performance. At times, I would sing the “Water” part in the “Cool
Waters” song. On Friday was the Seminary Graduation.
A MOVE FROM BRIGHAM CITY TO SALT LAKE CITY
On Friday 26th of May Dr. West phoned as Ted was making a bid for a building lot in
Brigham City! Dr. Franklin D. West, Commissioner of Education, offered Ted
opportunity to teach Seminary part time and attend the University of Utah in Salt
Lake. The decision was to move to Salt Lake! Sunday Ted went to Conference all
day. I went with Donna Packer to Primary Conference. Memorial Day May 30th we
called by the home of Frank and Edith Forsgren, not home. Our little family drove to
Box Elder camping grounds and had delicious picnic with chicken, buns, tom. and


                                         62
lettuce, and strawberry shortcake. We put Dave and Diane to bed and took Bobby to
a Drive In and saw “Wake of the Red Witch”, a good show. The next day Ted drove
to Corinne on missionary work.
June 13th we moved. Our new car ready today. Willard Gardner, from Ruby Valley,
came and helped truck load to Salt Lake. Unloaded and on to Manti. July 1st Diane is
feverish and by next day we knew she has measles. By July 8 th we left for
Washington 7:30 at night, drove to Meridian, Idaho and awakened Pete and Ellen at
5am where we had breakfast and on the road by 7 am. Jean had her baby 3:30 same
day, a big boy. We didn‟t know that Jean had a baby until we met Ballard and Lydia
on the road, with oil trouble. They had learned of Jean‟s baby from my folks via a
telegram. We arrived at the ranch by 6:30 pm., a bunch of tired people. Then to
work in the hay!!
While in Brigham City in 1948-49 I served in the M I A as a Counselor and Drama
Director. We presented a play, “Nine Ladies” which was a challenge, but was well
received. One winter evening while we were at play practice, two little children
came wandering in to the Cultural Hall. They were dressed in coats, hats, boots and
pulling a little sleigh. I had left them home asleep and David had awakened, dressed
them both and came to find me. I had expected Ted to be home shortly after I left,
but I don‟t recall why he was not. I was scolded by those who learned of this and
have been careful ever since to have my children safely supervised, at least with a
sibling older than five years!
Our next Ward play, “The Stars Hung Low” was very successful when we performed
at Bear River in December of 1949. Our Bailemos Dance, sponsored by us, was
semiformal and we all had a lot of fun.
Our two years had been very enjoyable, making fine friends. A joy getting to know
John P. Lillywhite and family, also Abel S. and Sister Rich, in the Seminary work.
Boyd and Donna Packer were newly-weds when Ted pleaded for Boyd to be allowed
to teach Seminary with him, even though he was still attending the Utah State
University in Logan. From that time to this writing, they have been loyal friends and
closely aligned with the Seminaries and Institutes of the LDS Church, and we even
have lived near each other since Brigham City, in Pleasant Grove and in Salt Lake
County.
The phone call from Dr. West moved us in another direction, so that Ted could begin
his work on a Ph.D. at the University of Utah, since there were Seminary openings in
the Granite and Davis School Districts. 13 Sept 1950 Ted took the “Toonerville
Trolley” to Davis High to teach Seminary, 23 miles north of Salt Lake. The
Bamberger is handy when roads are bad. We rented a home near Ted‟s sister, June
and husband Clifford Gee, in Salt Lake on Windsor Ave. at about 9 th E. and 9th S. in
the summer of 1950, with Bobby only about 3 months old.



                                         63
 With three children and not much money teaching Seminary, and working on his
Doctorate at the U of U, Ted found that he could make a little extra working at Hart
Brothers Music, cutting down old upright pianos, putting on a mirror and making
them look more modern. We bought one and it is at Bob and Deb‟s right now
(1999)! I became a Fuller Brush Girl selling Daggett and Ramsdell cosmetics. Not
easy but I am learning. Then I found a job as a waitress at Leighton‟s Café on 21 st So.
and 9th East, working from about 7 pm. until midnight. I had some rather interesting
experiences there.
In November I started singing with the Stake Singing Mothers. A fun learning time.
Ted is a dear not to complain. Thanksgiving at June‟s with each furnishing half of
food, enjoyable. Wish the folks could have come up. Last weeks of tests due in
December. Ted knows now that his two language classes could have been put on GI
Bill to his credit! I plan to quit as Fuller Brush girl after Christmas. Lorraine
Richmond is now tending Diane and Bob three hours in the morning for $1.25. War
is awful. Korea is changing hands again! En route to Manti for Christmas, we drove
to Provo and greeted Yvonne, Gordy, Jean and Lewis. Florence Lovell is in Salt
Lake, expecting a baby any day.
1 March 1951 Ted received a beautiful birthday letter from his Mother. I quote one
paragraph: “We ever pray for you and yours. If anyone was ever entitled to blessings
it is you and Marne‟. So keep growing, giving, helping, living up to the highest
standards, that your example may influence others to better live. If and when
opportunity affords, there are two people who dearly crave seeing you and your
brood—little ink bottles, milk bottles, crockets, pickapies, shaftoo and what have
you. Love to you, dear boy. You have always been a blessing and joy to your Mom
and Dad.”
About this time Sterling Sill, who was with New York Life Company, contacted Ted,
on the suggestion of Gordy Hawkins, enticing him to join them. We had a very
upsetting time trying to make a decision to leave the Seminary system, with the very
real temptation of more money. We finally decided to join New York Life and told
Brother Sill so. Then we went through great turmoil and couldn‟t sleep or find peace
even through prayer. So we decided not to do it and we were at peace with that
decision. However, when we told Sterling Sill we had changed our minds, he was
very upset and used pleadings, resentment, anger and told us in no uncertain terms we
were missing a golden opportunity. We were unmoved and to this day, thankful for
an answer to prayer not to leave the Seminary System. We struggled on, raising
Chinchillas in the basement, and a beaver project, hoping to make a fortune! Even
raising rabbits for the meat helped out.
4 July 1951 with Paul and Afton Felt and Tom Whitaker, we enjoyed a picnic at the
Park. Yvonne and Gordon were at the Park, perhaps Liberty in Salt Lake. I plan to
go with Tom to Washington through Eugene, Oregon where his family has moved.


                                          64
After a big washing and packing, Tom phoned me and wants to leave the 5th. We met
him in Brigham City at 11 p.m. Thurs., transferred all from our car to Tom‟s. Ted
stayed in S.L. at the U of U. I must have had our three with me. Arrived Eugene,
picked up Marge, Doran and Annette and Tom drove us up to Washington. En route
stopped to say Hello to my brother, Ballard, and family. Glad to have a chance to stay
with my folks.
I must have had something to do with the 24 th Celebration with the Church at Swauk
Park, in Washington, to see a number of pages of notes regarding dress, artifacts,
wagons, hand carts, guns, bow and arrow and a brief outline of History, with names
of those who came in the first Wagon train.
Ted might have been at a Navy Chaplain program in California, as I have a July letter
to him mentioning that Paul Felt said something about “rehabilitation” of a Navy girl
there! He and Paul did go down for some training. And I was anxious for his return.
“I need you, the kids need you and the rabbits do, too. Can‟t tell for sure which date
goes to what rabbit. Davy said Reed‟s doe (the one by Harvey) was scratching. I
will have to shift them, I guess. Glad you‟re studying French. Hit it a lick.” I have
another letter to Ted about thunder storm that frightened Diane. Afton must have
been living with me. She says “Paul keeps talking of our coming down to see you.”
Bob was lost for over an hour and one half, having crossed 9 th East Street in Salt
Lake City. I called the police with description of a blonde, brown-eyed two-year-old
boy. I was fighting frantic moments for awhile, and weak with relief when they
finally brought him home.
In August of 1951, Ted, Jeanne, baby Richard and Lewis‟ sister came up to bring us
home from the farm in Washington. Ted has had a busy summer session at the U of
U. We slept for 6 hours on the ground in a little park, long enough to make it home
without staying in a Motel. So very tired when we arrived home by about midnight.
On 25 Aug 1951 I inquired at Leighton‟s Fine Foods re a waitress job at night, we
saw listed in the paper. Amelia said she would phone me. I worked at Leighton‟s
half shift for the second time, four days later. Quite enjoy it, lots to learn. I worked
steady at Leighton‟s for 3 ½ months (835 E. 21 st So.) Ted would tend children when
he could. Baby sitters were expensive.
In November of 1951 we traveled with Yvonne and Gordon to Willard Gardner‟s
ranch in Ruby Valley, Nevada for meat. Fun traveling together. In the hot pots the pig
was scalded and cleaned there in the snow and cold. There were icy roads out of
Wells. We made it home after midnight. I have three pages where my Dad wrote the
verses to “Lucy Jones.” I continued working at Leightons till Dec 10 th and then
occasionally thereafter 2 or 3 nights a week until they closed in March for
remodeling.
January, 1952 we held a New Year‟s Eve Party here at 838 Windsor, with Robert &
Leone Carpenter, Ralph & Martha Fugate, Bill & Penny Grange, Robert & Barbara

                                          65
Poulson, Norm & Gwen Johnson. We invited Paul & Afton Felt, but she was in the
hospital having their fourth deduction! We all had lots of fun and good food to eat
with turkey & dressing, salad, hot rolls, celery with cheese stuffing, little open face
sandwiches (brought by Penny), fruit cocktail and fruit cake.
March 22nd Saturday Ted worked from 9 am till 7:30 and brought lovely desks for
Davy and Diane. They are like school desks, with top that lifts up for storing things
under and an attached seat, made from old piano parts. They are really thrilled with
them. Bob has already bitten a mark on the front of our “new” piano. I visited Jr.
Sun. School and watched Diane hold a picture while Dave gave the sacrament gem.
Bob didn‟t see me and was being good. Snow and more snow. Washed and hung
clothes in basement. Song practice with Ina Johnson and Jean Anderson here. Later
saw a magnificent show, “Quo Vadis” with Ted. Song practice, lectures and baking
bread, children and working at Leighton‟s keeps me busy. Ted attended Navy Drill
class.
April 3rd, 1952 is Bob‟s 2nd birthday. Says, “Doogan, ni, ni (Night, night, Moma,
Daddy). He makes animal noises of all kinds, but does not even try to repeat words
we coach him on. Just not interested. He‟s a lovable little brown eyed, blonde,
curley-headed pixie.
April 25th Afton, Paul Felt, Ruth Moss and Ted and I went to Blanche and Coy Miles‟
house for a delicious supper. They live on 13th East and 18th So. The Spring thaw is
bringing down more water than the city can handle. A stream backed up and ran over
the road, threatening their property. Dynamite was used to clear the debris.
In May Tom, Marge and children came from Oregon to go through the Temple in
Salt Lake and have their children sealed to them. So thrilled for them. Yvonne, Jean
and etc., came up Sunday. I cooked rabbit, made jello, salad, spaghetti (from
Leightons) and hot rolls. To Temple without recommends which were at Richmond.
They got in somehow. Because the whole ordinance must be performed at one
Temple they were married (sealed) that day. Then the next day I went with Tom and
Marge and family at 10 am. to Salt Lake Temple to have the children sealed. Doran
and Annette cried so loudly we could hardly hear what President Young said, but it is
accomplished anyway.
30th May 1952 Afton, Paul, Ted and I left S.L. for San Francisco at 10 pm.. Arrived
Sat. at 6 pm., having driven straight through. We were there for the fellow‟s service
time from then until mid June. We visited tourist sights such as Alameda Air Base for
smorgasbord and dancing. Treasure Island where we waited one hour for the boys,
who were also waiting but in the wrong place! China Town, Fairmont Hotel, Golden
Gate Park, Arboretum, Japanese Tea Garden, and we visited Aunt Maze, Ted‟s
mother‟s sister. For some reason we spent a lot of time on Treasure Island.
LOST BRIEFCASE AND EARNEST PRAYER



                                          66
Early in 1952 Ted and I stopped briefly at the State Capitol, and inadvertently left his
briefcase at the side of the car and drove away. We had not gone far when we
realized we did not have it and returned and it was gone! We were devastated and
offered fervent and very humble prayers over the next few days for its return. Ted
had completed all requirements for his Doctorate, had passed language tests, orals
and in the briefcase were pages of research and notes for his dissertation. In a phone
call from Marion Duff Hanks who worked at Temple Square, Ted was asked, “Did
you loose something?” What a relief! A young Latino boy had found it, took it
home and his mother suggested he take it to Temple Square! Great rejoicing.
A phone call from Dr. Franklin L. West informed Ted of an opportunity to be the
Institute Director at Reno, University of Nevada. He is to leave in July or August.
While working at Leightons, Ted came in about 10 and asked, “Guess what?” I
asked, “Does it involve a move?” When he answered „Yes”, I guessed almost every
other place than Nevada. Now what to do about his Doctorate? From the moment he
told me, I knew we would answer yes. No regrets about leaving, except for his folks
in Manti.
4th July 1952 David has a fever and vomited. Next day was diagnosed with mumps.
Still working as Hostess at Leighton‟s. July 25 th Ted and Paul Felt leave for San
Francisco and Treasure Island for two weeks‟ training cruise. Afton and 4 children
pulled up by our house in a trailer, as we plan to stay together till men return. Will
work out fine. I still work four nights a week and Afton is willing to tend the
children.
On the 6th of September Deb and Leda Lee came to see us. Busy getting our trailer
loaded with bottles of fruit and books, etc. to go with Ted to Reno tonight with Joy
Dunyon. They returned Tues. the 9th, having held meetings all along the way, tired
but thrilled with the setup.
NEVADA INSTITUTE OF RELIGION at RENO
After two years in Salt Lake, with Ted‟s course work and most of his research
completed for his Doctorate, he received an assignment to teach at the new Institute
of Religion near the University of Nevada at Reno. We gladly accepted this
opportunity. We had not accumulated much in household goods. We hauled what we
felt we needed, plus our three children and arrived in Reno on Virginia Street in
August of 1952. The new Institute building was ours to inaugurate. We were excited
as we uncrated tables, chairs, desks, sofas, opened up cartons of new lamps, books,
supplies, etc., to get the Institute ready for classes. Ted did quite a bit of recruiting as
he visited the Stakes in Nevada, Las Vegas, Sparks, Carson City, Fallon, Ely and of
course Reno. I designed and ordered a set of heavy earthenware plates and utensils
for the Institute kitchen. It showed “The Glory of God is Intelligence” surrounding a
lighted torch with RIR above, signifying “Reno Institute of Religion.” We also
bought a set of 12 for ourselves. I still have 10 of the large plates.


                                            67
Ted left the first of October 1952 for General Conference and meetings with the CES
Brethren. I received a phone call from him on the 4 th of October telling me that his
Mother had died and for us to catch the first train to Salt Lake. It was a sad time in
our lives, for her to go before we really had a chance for the children to know her. Or
for me to get to know her, as I wanted to—she was so wise and could have been a
great mentor for me. 7th November “I am happy the Republicans are in after 20 years
of Democratic control. All my men won! Hope they can follow through on
campaign promises.”
My folks came in for a few days. I hated to see them go, heading back to
Washington. 11th November is Armistice Day, with school as usual. I wrote letters
for Ted. He had stomach disturbance and came home at 11:00 am for a short rest.
We both have been staying up too late, with sleep eluding us. I ironed and typed
more letters tonight. „Tis midnight here at Ted‟s office and he is waiting for me
finish up the correspondence and come home so he can turn off the lights.
“A little man in a basket, rowing around my kitchen floor,“
A little man in a basket using my broom for his oar”
Now Bob is putting on his shoes, backwards. “Eh, me, eh me (let me) is his hue and
cry now. Wants to put clothes on, at least to zip up alone. “Uh dote dis” (here coat
is). “Doos and docks” (shoes and socks). “eo” (ear) “no” (nose) “num” (some) “hi”
(hair) “doob” (good) “deep” (please) “Babbo” (Bobby) “Nanna” (Diane) Dodo
(David) “tedue” (duty) “huh neeno” (milk give me.)
Ted went to Stake Board of Ed. Meeting regarding a Seminary class in Reno. On 14
November, 1953, the Lamba Delta Sigma organization had a skating party then came
to the Institute to eat spaghetti and meatballs, play games and dance. I took our three
to watch the skating at the old Gym on the campus of the University of Nevada. We
are troubled with vermicularis (pin worms). „Tis a constant fight and a noisy one
each night to give children an enema. I to bed by 2:30 a.m. Late nights continue with
baking, meetings, and 4 missionaries to dinner Sun. eve. Met President and Sister
Harvey Dahl from Elko. Fine people. (Years later we stayed in their home and Ted
shot two turkeys with one shot, twice (four turkeys) there, and I saw him do it! They
were managing the Deseret Ranches in Orlando, Florida).
More baking of date nut loaf, and bread. I gave one loaf to the missionaries and a
loaf to Jerry Cox and one to Clair Earl. On Sun. after classes and snacks for children
we left for Carson City and Gardnerville to eat a delicious meal at Lee and Ann
Robison‟s. Afterwards we rode up the mountain pass and looked over Carson
Valley. Ted gave an excellent talk in Sacrament meeting. Next days were full with
ironing, mending, looking for “lost” Diane who was just sauntering along after
school! Ted cut Davy and Bob‟s hair. After enemas and baths, we finally all got to
bed.



                                          68
26th November I baked brown and white breads, dressing for turkey, pumpkin pie
filling, and jello for tomorrow. Hemmed Diane‟s new coat. We have so much to be
thankful for. Our health, wonderful assignment here. Opportunities to learn,
security, love and happiness as a family. We had a delicious meal, but all by
ourselves. We have enjoyed ice skating on the lake on the nearby campus. A young
couple came here looking for Bishop Johnson. I gave them breakfast. Sunday there
was no Sunday School here at the Institute, so Ted went to Priesthood at Reno Ward
and I took the children there to Church as per usual. I invited Marjorie and Fred
Johnson to eat Sunday dinner. Served meat loaf, baked potatoes, etc. Afterwards
Ralph and Myrna Thomas took our family riding out to feed ducks on Lake Virginia.
After Sacrament meeting Myrna took my children home with her while Ted and I
dashed to Sparks where Ted gave a truly wonderful talk on the “Gospel”, so he
wouldn‟t get off the subject. I‟m teaching the Blazer boys in Primary. Ted and I
shopped for an electric train for Davy and found a big “diesel”. Saturday I cleaned,
waxed, scrubbed and Ted spent the day at Sparks‟ recreation hall, pouring cement.
Tired and bruised when he got home. Diane‟s hair is getting so long! I washed
punch cups at the Institute tonight and put 12 dozen glasses away.
On 7th December Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Liveth” tonight at church. If I do
say so myself, our song was lovely. Practicing for Primary program. Dave is to be a
lone traveler in the story of “Artiban—4th Wise man”. On Dave‟s birthday I had 6
Blazer boys here to make gifts for Christmas. I made a cake for Davy. Dec. 18 th I
was late to Relief Society because Dolores Wadsworth, a student, and her folks came
to visit. Davy did well in the Christmas Program. There was a Lamba Delta Sigma
dance at the Institute.
19th December Dad Tuttle came in on a late train. Glad to see the sweet, lonely man.
I baked today and brought the Christmas tree over from the Institute. Sun. eve the
combined Choir sang the Cantata. Happy Christmas time. We invited a few couples
over after a teenage Funival at the Institute: Humpherys, Waldos, Garretts,
Bowmans, Monsons, Terrys, Maughns, Mangus, Len Jones, Harris‟, Roundys. We
all had a fun time as Ted entertained with his “mental telepathy” game. Served
punch and cookies.
1st January 1953. We spent the evening and part of the morning dancing, eating and
being entertained. Bishop Jamieson and Gladys took us out to the Riverside Hotel
for frozen eclairs ($3.00 for 4 eclairs only)! Floor show with Mickey Rooney as
M.C. The acrobatic act and dancing was very lovely. Home by 3:30 am. The next
day Dad Tuttle left for Salt Lake via United Airlines. I wished he would have stayed
longer. He seems so alone. He was reluctant to fly, but I‟m sure he enjoyed it, even
though the plane had to circle at least one hour before fog lifted enough to land in
Salt Lake. Our son, David, was baptized by his father in Reno, Jan. 3 rd . I helped
Ted with files in the p.m. Ballard and Lydia came in unexpectedly, and are looking
for a place to settle. We rode to Fallon to see the welfare farm. The house is in sad


                                         69
condition. We met Erma Whitaker and husband Dennis Sorensen and others who are
on an advisory committee. Ballard and Lydia left for home on Jan. 6th, since no job
prospects opened up. Hope that there can be a reconciliation made.
Singing Mothers practice. I am to sing a solo for Easter Cantata, entitled “I glory
only in the Cross”. Stake choir practice at the Ward. Brother Woodbury asked me
to sing a solo and a duet with Yerda Robertson, “How Beautiful Upon the Mountain”
as part of the Choir number.
12 January 1953 I attended 7:00 PM. Sacrament meeting here at the Institute and
was called on to give the closing prayer by my husband. I ironed some and sewed
letters on the T-shirts for the Institute Basketball boys. I did chase my children
around a bit. 30 Jan. I danced with Ted in the floorshow of the Gold and Green Ball
to theme and tune of “June in January.” I revamped my white net skirt and black top
formal in time. (In 1999 I still have it, just can‟t get in it!) Good time by all.
DAVY‟S BROKEN LEG
Saturday, Jan. 31st our family went with Ted to Mt. Rose where about 30 Seminary
students were sleighriding and tobogganing. Then down the canyon via Galina Creek
where David, on a toboggan, met with rocks and broke his little left shinbone. Ted
and I had just gone down on a sled and were heading back when we heard him
scream. I tried to run, but feet felt like stone! We brought him to Washoe
Emergency as quickly as possible. After we got Davy settled I phoned Janice
Roundy, 2nd Counselor in the Stake Primary Presidency, that I would be late for the
meeting. I am the 1st Counselor to Fairlene Golding. The Doctor was about an hour
in coming and when I stepped into the hall there Janice, Fairlene and Virginia were.
Hope our first meeting isn't an omen, being in the hospital. Dave spent a rather fitful
night. On Sunday many came by to see Davy and autographed his cast. David had
nightmares in middle of night. By 2nd Feb. Dave was feeling better and sat up and ate
alone tonight, even tried his crutches a little. Choir and Singing Mother practices,
Church meetings, baking bread, etc. Davy went outside on his crutches for a while.
One day he suddenly cried with excruciating pain and could not turn his head. His
Dr. was not available and someone suggested a Chiropractor. With one simple
adjustment, his back was realigned. Dave was free of pain and could move about, still
on crutches. That proved to me that Doctors, M.D., don‟t have all the skills needed.
8 February 1953 Sunday, Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Lives” at Sparks West and
at the Institute. Sat. 14th Ted bought for me a lovely red and white rose corsage for
the Mt. Rose Green and Gold Ball at the 20th Century Club. Sun. 22nd Feb. We drove
to Fallon right after Sunday School, where we enjoyed a delicious dinner at my
cousin Erma Whitaker Sorensen‟s home. Ted and I sang “My Redeemer Lives” and
he gave a wonderful talk on the Gospel. In March Ted and I were on a panel
“Extending our Opportunities Religiously and Educationally” for Speech Festival in
Mutual. I could have done better.


                                          70
As noted from the above, our year in Reno was very full with Institute activities and
Ted speaking at the various Wards in the state. My activities kept me occupied, to
say the least.
In April of 1953 we were still going strong. Baking bread and banana nut loaf, Choir
practice, Stake Officer‟s meetings, dancing, Stake Conference with Bishop Wirthlin
as speaker. We also had overnight guests and prepared many meals. Events at the
Institute kept us alert, with “Culture Kraft Club” party and square dancing afterwards.
We were preparing for the Easter Cantata, with combined choir practices. I practiced
“my song” “Once in Gethsemane” (tune: “None but the Lonely Heart.”) Diane had a
part at her Orvis Ring School, in “Wedding of the Flowers.” It was a lovely little
Opera put on by the Kindergarten. Of course, Diane was the cutest and sweetest one
of the little girls up on stage!
 9 May 1953 Dr. and Sister Franklin West and a couple stopped on their way to
Tahoe. They return in the morning to Sunday School. Bobby is not feeling well.
Could be the measles, since Davy had them a few weeks ago. Our trio sang
“Mother” for Mothers‟ Day in Sunday School. I prepared dinner for the West‟s‟, et
al. At a graduation for seven Institute students, Dr. West gave an excellent speech on
“Personal Attributes of the Savior”. In the evening of May 10th, the Combined
Church Choirs performed at the State Building. I sang the solo part to “My
Redeemer Lives,” by Gates, right after the Catholic Choir finished singing, “Come, O
Glorious Death”. I wonder where our recording of the whole program is? I have
another headache!
14 May 1953 Ted flew to Salt Lake to see his Dad, who had a heart attack on May
11th, 1953, and to give an address to the graduates at a Baccalaureate program in
Brigham City.
I am cleaning out the cupboards and closets for a trip away this summer. “Squeak”
Pulsipher gave us some trout! Delicious. I miss my hubby already. I took the
Blazers along with Dave, Diane and Bob to an early bird breakfast at the Mt. Rose
Ward. I think Diane is now catching the measles, sore throat, fever, cough, red eyes,
but not broken out. Monday, 18th of May I was at the Institute only a few minutes
when here came Bobby in his pajamas. Bob had answered the phone at home and
Ted, at the airport, was trying to get him to say where I was. Three students, Bobby
and I all drove to the airport during a hard rain. So glad to have Ted home again.
22 May 1953 Brother Woodbury phoned to tell me of a letter of praise he had
received from the Secretary of the Combined Church Choirs Music Committee,
saying our songs were lovely. “The soloist performed with professional artistry,
beautiful voice, etc.” I can‟t recall exact words. I know my prayers in behalf of my
ability to “produce” at the crucial moment, were answered. Sunday 24 th May, Ted,
Bill Law and his Dad, Orvid, Clair Earl and Rosemary Goss drove to Ely to present a
program and Ted to speak about the Institute Program, returning home about 4:00


                                          71
a.m., tired, but happy over success of trip and program. It seems as though I am often
washing Diane‟s and my hair, mending, ironing, sewing. We left Reno with a trailer
load by 11:30, Sat. May 30th, arriving in Manti about 10:00 p.m., children asleep, we
sleepy too. Aunt Lucile was here. June had left for Salt Lake in the afternoon. Glad
to see Dad Tuttle up and about the next day. During this summer Ted was attending
the University of Utah, coming to see me whenever he could on the weekends. I
spent time with Yvonne and Gordy in Provo and visited my sister, Jean W. Griffin,
who has a new baby. Yvonne and Gordon Hawkins drove me and Diane, plus Jeanne
and Lewis to Manti.
Bobby, age 3 plus 3 months, still blonde with brown eyes, still not really talking:
Knot—neck                  huh leo—a little (or Eye blough—eye brow
                           leelu)
Blant—pants                Bloyck—fork                Nee new—finger
hut—hurt                   Heah uh ope—doesn‟t bite—bike
                           open
oowah‟—wash
Ted enjoyed visiting in Manti with Beauregard Kenner (89) about prospecting. We
enjoyed the Dance Festival at the Stadium in Salt Lake. A magnificent sight seeing
7,000 performers all at once.
Saturday, June 13th I cleaned at June‟s and got ready for the Despain Family
Reunion at Murray Park, where we greeted Aunts Leona, Jean, Mabel, Disc and
Uncle Joel Boyce, Uncles Laron and Ben and also my cousin, Avalon, daughter of
my mother‟s brother, Joel.
My father had gone to Michigan to bring back a truck. With our children I walked to
the Joseph Smith Building to hear Elder Harold B. Lee give an address. After supper
at Jeanne‟s we caught a bus for Manti, arriving by 9 pm. when Grandpa Tuttle met
us. Glad to see him and to be home. Washed, cleaned, baked bread, washed Diane
and my hair, made sponge cake. Ted came home and we enjoyed strawberry
shortcake. I finished cleaning strawberries for the freezer locker. We had a busy
summer, with picnics in the canyons, darning socks, working on Diane‟s red
corduroy coat, going to shows, ironing, fighting headaches. Auntie Lucile helped me
sew a dress, finally turned the skirt to correct position and all went smoothly.
Our family spent the night in the canyon at Alec‟s Camp, getting there just in time to
fix our beds before too dark to see. A beautiful night! On July 4 th, dynamite was set
off at Yearns Reservoir at 4:30 in the morning. Ted and I went for an early walk.
Diane was awake in the trailer when we left. I bore my testimony in church, thankful
for so many blessings. I fried chicken for dinner. I helped Afton Felt with cleaning
the Motel. It seems we have a venture with them to run a Motel in Nephi. I‟m not


                                           72
sure why we did this, because at this point I thought we would be returning to Reno
in the fall. Ted did carpenter work and built a counter and blind in the office and
started to repair a room. Returned to Manti by 9:00 p.m. I received a letter from my
Mom saying that Dick and also Thelma are there at the ranch while John is in Fort
Lewis in the Army. Ted left for Salt Lake again about 6:30 p.m. After breakfast I
baked a double sized batch of bread, made oatmeal cookies, washed clothes. I
weeded the garden again with Davy. Dad Tuttle and I saw John Wayne in the show
“Trouble Along the Way.”
18 July 1953. I had my hair cut, and also Diane‟s. Her long curls were mercilessly
whacked off!! I almost wept when I saw her. Of course, it‟s cooler, but she doesn‟t
look the same! I stayed at June‟s (Ted‟s sister) while in Salt Lake. We were invited
to Joy and Eilene Dunyon‟s home where Ted showed slides of Institute and Seminary
work. We enjoyed punch and cantaloupe with scoop of ice-cream inside. Back in
Manti I washed clothes, cleaned house, ditched out the garden for irrigating, and
picked four boxes of raspberries. After ironing, I baked cookies and a mutton roast.
Norm and Gwen Johnson stopped by in time for breakfast on their way to the Parks.
They returned with their girls and Brother Johnson, Sr. After we had supper Sat.,
Ted came home as we were finishing. Johnsons slept in the south bedroom.
26 July1953. We were in Manti on our tenth Wedding Anniversary. Mixed bread,
got dinner started and went to Sunday School with Ted and chilluns. It was a very
interesting class, especially when Ted contributes. Gwen and Norm finished dinner,
rolled out the rolls, peeled potatoes, etc. Aunt Lucile came with Reed, June‟s son.
On Tues. evening John and Ruby Armstrong came in from Los Angeles. Ruby is
Dad Bert Tuttle‟s sister. I baked bread, cake and cookies. The next morning I picked
more raspberries. Afton Felt came and we all, except Davy and Reed, came back to
Nephi and stayed overnight in the unfinished cabin.
I took a few classes in watercolors from Mrs.Wooley in Manti and attempted a
painting at Palisade Lake while Ted cooked delicious steaks. Later in the week Bert
Perry (son of Aunt Ruby by first husband) and his son Reed came to town from Los
Angeles. When Ted came home he had a 25-minute talk assigned for Friday morning
at the Institute Convention at BYU. We got ready to take our little brood to Provo.
Aug. 20th we received word that Uncle Bert Whitaker, my Dad‟s oldest brother, had
died of a heart attack. Ted gave a wonderful inspirational talk at the Seminary
Convention the morning of Aug. 21. I stayed all day and ate with Ted at the
Cafeteria. Many words of praise he received on his talk. On Saturday, there were
Institute meetings all day, with a banquet at night for all wives, too. We saw Boyd
and Donna Packer also. My Mom and Dad arrived for Uncle Bert‟s funeral.
We slept at Jeanne‟s. Ted was interviewed by BYU President Ernest J. Wilkinson
and by Ed Berrett, in charge of Seminaries and Institutes, and passed by the same.
Monday, 24th August, 1953 Uncle Bert‟s funeral was held in Heber City.


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Ted drove to Salt Lake to be interviewed by General Authorities, portending great
changes in our lives. Ted is now to be a Supervisor of Church Seminaries and
Institutes under President William E. Berrett. These decisions! So many problems at
once to solve. Shall we take the Motel in Nephi? We certainly regret leaving Reno.
It was a grand experience. (I have 8 small pages of notes taken at the Convention on
August 21st.) The last line of notes reads “A good teacher affects eternity. He can
never tell where his work stops.” Some speakers were Pres. Wilkinson, quoting
statistics and Elder Harold B. Lee outlining the Mission of Church Schools. “The
Church School system is an auxiliary arm of the Church, set up by God to meet the
needs of the youth of the Church. . .” Among Five Objectives of Purpose and
Mission of the Church Schools is #3: So teach the gospel that students may not be
led to vain doctrines.
“I will now commence to elucidate on that which the Lord has revealed very little”!
And quoting Karl B. Maeser, “Rather I would my child be in a den of serpents than in
the hands of a teacher who has no faith in God.” Others who spoke were Boyd K.
Packer: “Teachings on Apostasy” and Ken Sheffield. “The New Testament”; Church
History: Dr. Clarke and M. Lynn Bennion: “Guide students in the development of a
testimony of the truthfulness of Joseph Smith and his calling,” working in a great
cause to build up Kingdom of God on earth.
OUR MOVE FROM RENO TO NEPHI
26 Aug 1953. Ted and I left Nephi for Reno to pack up and return within four days or
so. We arrived by 6 p.m. and met with Joy Dunyon at 8 p.m. After a meeting with
the Stake Board, we picked up Eilene at the Motel and hit the high spots of town,
Harold‟s Club, Mapes, Riverside Hotel. (Our decision is to live at the Motel in
Nephi—O, woe is me!) All is well here, except someone broke in and jimmied the
lock on big desk drawer of the Institute office. For the next four days we packed,
cleaned, scrubbed, and had help with cleaning of Institute by the M-Men and
Gleaners. Ted and I both gave short talks in Sunday School. A sad farewell it was,
for Ted, for me and for our friends. I didn‟t think we could become so attached to a
place, people, and situation in nine short months. The most difficult part of this
whole hurried move was telling those fine people „goodbye‟, almost before we had a
chance to say “Hello”. 1952-3 was a Busy school year, joyful, with much to learn.
We had many fine students who quickly developed a great love for Ted.
Even now, Aug. 30th, a big lump gathers in my throat and tears slip through. I
sincerely hope we find the challenge, the satisfaction and enjoyment in our new
work, that we experienced working in the Institute at Reno. We just plowed ground
the first year, and then no opportunity to see the fruits of our labors. At 4:30 we left
with trailer and carload of stuff. We went through Ely to return the tire we borrowed
from Pres. Lambert after a rear wheel blew out on our trip to Reno. We stayed in
Eureka, Nev. overnight on a most uncomfortable bed, arriving to Manti shortly after


                                          74
noon Monday. Dad Tuttle was surely relieved to see us. The children were a handful
for him, I know, and although we had a young girl come in to tend them, he still had
the responsibility. On Tuesday, 1 Sept., I baked bread and meat loaf, etc., cleaned
house, packed clothes and kids and returned to Nephi after dinner. What a mess to
clean up here at the Motel!! Very rundown.
I was able to coax the folks to let Bob and Dick come and live with us and to help run
the Motel and go to school! They were fifteen in October. It took a lot of extra
cooking to keep them fed and happy. They learned to make beds and clean units in a
hurry. Ted drives to Salt Lake, still working on his Doctorate at the U of U, and
comes home on the weekends.
The month of October is almost past—a lovely Indian Summer. A couple of weeks
ago a flurry of snow, but today, Oct. 29th is warm and sunny. Very fortunate for us
because we are only now getting our heating apparatus set up at the Motel. What a
busy month, from early till late. Ted has been on the road most of the time, either at
the U of U or on Seminary business. I did go with him through Bryce Canyon and
Zion National Parks 19th-23rd or so of Oct. Very enjoyable to get away for a few
nights, although I mostly waited while Ted visited with the Seminary teachers along
the way.
At General Conference time Ted gave a fine teaching demonstration to Quorum
leaders in a special Friday evening meeting under the direction of Elder Adam S.
Bennion. I‟m so proud of him and love him dearly. Wish I had the opportunity of
getting used to having him around!!
8 Nov 1953. Ted is in Globe-Miami, Arizona as a special speaker for a statewide
Seminary convention for teachers and students. He left here at 6am. and had to be
there (over 600 miles away) by the next morning. He might be home a week from
next Wed.. It is now 10 pm., and not one car has come in! Our first night like this.
We have turned off the lights and heat. Bailey‟s Motel across the way, has only 2
cars there.
Aunt Lucile has undergone a very serious operation on her cheek and neck for
cancer. This summer she had felt only a little bump in her cheek, and it has
developed into serious proportions, spreading through neck glands! She is such a
talented lady. She taught English and Drama at Jordan High School for many years.
She lived at the Belvedere Apartments in Salt Lake City the last years of her life.
Sweet June, Ted‟s sister, spent a lot of time with her. I was very negligent, living
farther away. (The same school my mother graduated from when she lived in Granite;
a five mile walk, if she missed the school wagon!)
Only two cars checked in by 1 a.m. At 2 a.m. I went to bed!
Well, I haven‟t written since November. Already I‟m counting the months until next
September. I sincerely hope we accomplish our purpose here—namely, to make


                                         75
enough money to pay a substantial down payment on a new home for us in Provo or
Orem. It seems almost too good to be true. But I‟m going to put all my energy,
determination and faith in this venture and it will have to turn out for our best good.
My twin brothers, Bob and Dick, are in the school play “Rest Assured” to be
presented the middle of February. I have sung “My Redeemer Lives” here in Nephi
three times already. About enough on that. Business at the Motel has been very
slow. There is a heavy pall of fog and trees are coated with white, down to the
smallest twig, even wires and blades of grass, giving a fairyland feeling. I have
written to Tom and Marge and Mom and Dad. I inquired as to Mom and Dad‟s plans
for General Conference and whether they could come about two weeks early so I
could accompany Ted to Canada. It would be a grand trip to travel together. Ted has
never been to Canada. Last night we filled up on account of fog and low visibility. I
have notes from a class in Home Nursing Care that was informative.
TRIP TO CANADA
My folks did come to Utah and stayed to help at the Motel with their boys and my
three. Friday, 19 Mar 1954 Ted and I left Nephi for Canada through Provo, Salt Lake
and Idaho Falls. Saturday we left Idaho at 8:00am. through Butte, Great Falls
Montana, and over the Great Divide in a snow storm. We crossed the border before
dark, without any delay, arriving in Raymond, Alberta by 7:00 p.m. Ted went to
Priesthood Meeting while I visited with Sister Walker and daughter, Jane. Ted
returned by 11:00 p.m. and we watched a big group square dance in the large, new
(uncompleted) Recreation Hall that Taylor Stake is building. On Sunday we attended
Stake Conference all day. Brother Antone R. Ivins of the First Council of the
Seventy was the visiting authority. Ted spoke at every meeting, also. I spoke a few
minutes in the evening MIA meeting. Returning via Banff, we noted someone had
skied across Lake Louise. Snow was piled higher than a car along the sides of the
roads and only roofs and gables of cabins were visible. I‟m sure it must be lovely in
the summertime. We enjoyed riding the ski lift at Banff. Snow clad pines covered
the mountains, looming in every direction.
On March 22nd we stayed at the Hotel Cahoon in Cardston, Alberta. Ted visited Hill
Spring, (where my mother‟s sister, Ella Mehetable Boyce and husbsand, George
Butler lived), and Glenwood Seminaries with Brother B. H. Smith and I tagged
along. We drove to Raymond to see a Stake play, “Them Also Must I Bring”, very
excellently cast and played. The scenery and costumes were exceptional. Returned
to the Hotel by 11:30.
The next day we returned to Glenwood and while Ted visited with Brother Smith I
visited with a sister to Gladys Forsyth (Scott), Jean (Vern) Archibald (related to me
through the Boyce/Butler family). We enjoyed some lovely meals while there. Ted
has a 6:00 meeting and I went to the Cardston Temple. Ted came later. We met



                                          76
Leon and Edna Cahoon at the enjoyable Temple session, then were invited to do
some sealings.
On Wednesday, March 24th we arrived in Raymond by 8:30 a.m. Later we enjoyed a
delicious meal at Bill and Marva Nalder‟s home, where we stayed overnight. While
I‟m talking of visiting with the wives and the meals we have eaten, Ted has been
visiting with the Seminary teachers at these Canadian towns. The next day I visited
with Mrs. Ken Gibb in McGrath. After a fine dinner we left for Lethbridge, Calgary
and Edmonton where we met Paul and Afton Felt. He was the Institute Director and
our weekend there was very enjoyable. It was a wonderful trip and such a relief to
leave the responsibility of the Motel in such capable hands as my Father and Mother!
En route home through Washington, we brought Carol Whitaker, Ballard‟s daughter,
on with us to Utah. When my folks left, soon after General Conference, for their
ranch in Kittitas, they took Carol back with them. I had little time to visit with them.
How generous of them to spend ten days working day and night at the Motel for me!
April to August, 1954 passed quickly, with much hard work and not much to show
for it. My brother, Bob, returned to the ranch in June to help, and Dick left mid
August. I surely appreciated having him here that long, as we were packing up ready
for our next move, this time to Provo.
A FIRE AT THE MOTEL
Just four days before we were to move from Nephi a catastrophic fire caused near
panic on my part. I was headed for the Church to sing in a trio for a funeral when I
noticed smoke coming from behind the Motel units on the south end. Running back
there I could see a real fire burning on an old shed and on hay in the corral next door,
with flames coming very close to a tank of heating oil, just behind the #10 Unit. I ran
back, screaming, “Fire!” Someone phoned the Fire Department while I tried to
contact or get a message to Ted. That fire ended my thoughts of singing as I wrestled
with mattresses, dressers, bedding, etc., with strength I didn‟t know I possessed!
Others soon came to help and when all was quiet and Ted finally got there from Salt
Lake City, we found that two units (rooms) were uninhabitable and smoke had
filtered into some of the rooms from the south end. We were so fortunate that the fire
did not hit the oil tank. Our neighbor‟s haystack was most all burned and I believe
their barn was damaged. As we learned later our boys and a neighbor boy had been
lighting papers in bottles that had landed in an old couch in the shed that must have
smoldered all night, finally bursting into flames in the morning. By evening we had
put everything back, cleared away evidence of a fire and we were open for business.
Some of the first customers commented that they could smell smoke. I replied, “Yes,
so can I!”
FROM NEPHI TO PROVO




                                          77
Looking back with a perspective of almost fifty years, that year in Nephi was a
proving ground, a testing time, a challenge, using all my physical, intellectual,
emotional, and spiritual strengths. My ability to function in multiple capacities and
to rise to emergencies and to keep 5 children (including my Twin Brothers) fed and
happy, kept me busier than I had ever been prior to that time. I was very glad and
relieved to make a move from the Motel business. Don‟t let anyone tell you all you
have to do is to sit out on a chair in the shade and watch customers stream in and you
will rake in the dough, because it is not like that at all!
29 September 1954 “Almost a month has passed since we moved from Nephi, and a
pleasant and busy one it has been. I‟ve almost got things in order. We moved into a
white frame home situated at the top of the hill on the BYU Campus, where a large
iris garden had been planted. There was a small yellow barn and corral to the North.
(Located where now—2000—the red brick Alumni building stands. We painted and
papered furiously the first week after moving our stuff here. Since then I have
bottled close to 200 quarts of peaches, pears, tomatoes, plums and some jam, and 20
pints of fruit cocktail.
Last Friday I registered for four morning classes: The Pearl of Great Price—139
Script., Home Planning, Stewart; Art 174 Oil Painting, Roman Andrus and Ed.
Orientation 25. My sister, Jeanne is going to tend Bobby mornings. It will keep me
hopping to get all these things accomplished. I note that I have just returned from an
Arts and Crafts class in Mutual, taught by our Bishop and Art Teacher, Roman
Andrus. It‟s going to prove interesting and educational. I‟m so glad to have June‟s
little car to chase around in. „Tis late and I must read “Tomorrow‟s House” for
Home Planning Class.
September 1954 Ted is in Wyoming this week, due home tomorrow night. I‟m so
anxious to have him home over this Conference weekend. He will leave for Canada
right after Conference and will be gone until after the deer hunt in Brigham City, I
think. Lewis just took the sleeping bag. Ted may need it before Lewis gets back if
Ted does not come home again until after the hunt! Dad Tuttle stayed with us during
the winter until after April. He was my Bobby tender most of the time.
The last of the Spring Quarter 1955 was not easy to complete. After going to
Arizona with Ted in April, I had much makeup work to do. I had wondered why it
was getting more difficult to haul my paints up stairs in the old Ed building on the
Lower Campus to the art class and why the turpentine was bothering me. Well, I‟m
going to have a baby after all these years, around the last of December. We are really
thrilled. In the thick of my „challenges‟ I had blurted out once that I didn‟t want any
more kids until my teeth just ached!! I began to fear I might lose them if much more
time went by, with hopes unfulfilled. Dad Bert Tuttle came to stay with us again in
the late summer. He is slowing down, likes company but does not say much. He is a
sweet, uncomplaining Father-in Law to me.


                                          78
In August I was busy canning again, Church duties and children. We have a colt,
Ginger, that Gordy Hawkins rounded up on the desert with his plane. We also have
some laying hens, and a small garden here on the northern edge of BYU campus.


DEATH OF ALBERT MERVIN TUTTLE
9 September 1955 Ted and I enjoyed a fine dinner at Leland E. and Blanche
Anderson‟s home. They are close friends of Ted‟s folks in Manti where Leland E.
was Ted‟s favorite Seminary teacher and the one who set Ted on the course to want
to emulate him as a Seminary teacher. A telephone call from Gordon Hawkins
informed us that Grandpa Tuttle had died! Our children were home alone with him
and had finally reached Gordon, who called us. We rushed home to find that an
ambulance had already taken him away. He must have headed for the bathroom and
become disoriented and got in the closet instead and it must have been a heart attack.
The children heard him groan and a loud crash when he fell. They were really
frightened. David was almost eleven years old and Diane eight. I am so sorry we
were not there at that crucial time. A lovely funeral was held in Manti, with a
viewing in the Tuttle home.
25 October 1955 Ted‟s Secretary, Hermine Briggs, offered to stay with Dave and
Diane when she heard Ted was planning a trip to Washington and Oregon. We took
her up on that quickly and left Provo at 2:00 p.m. with Bobby. We reached Burley,
Idaho after making several stops and stayed in a Motel there. Ted visited Seminaries
and Stake Presidents then we drove on to Twin Falls arriving in the evening. Stayed
in Covey‟s Motel and while Ted was in meetings, Bobby and I saw “Red Mountain”
and walked to the Motel in a cold wind, after shopping for Halloween candy to send
to our children and Hermine. The next day we drove on to Baker and LeGrande,
Oregon, really barreling over the mountains to reach there by 8:00 p.m. Bobby and I
slept in the car until 11:00 p.m., when Ted‟s meeting let out. A cousin of Ted‟s,
Walter (Jim) Bean invited us to stay at his place, which we gladly accepted. We left
there after a delicious breakfast Linda Bean fixed and arrived in Richland,
Washington by 4:00 p.m. Again Bob and I saw a show “Seven Cities of Gold”. We
walked about one mile back to the Desert Inn Hotel. I feel fine, just must watch my
diet as I‟m not supposed to gain any more for two months. I‟m so thrilled about this
coming baby!
29 October 1955 after lunch at the Hotel we drove to Pullman and Moscow, arriving
in the early evening. It was raining and very cool. We stayed at Dale and Janette
Tingey‟s overnight. Dale and Ted drove to Moscow for a meeting, arriving home by
midnight. To Sunday School in the morning and a fine dinner at noon. Brother
Tanner (?) came over from Moscow and returned in the evening with Ted where he
spoke in a meeting. I was so proud of him again. We drove through a very heavy
snow storm on the way over, which was all gone by morning. Janette Tingey fixed a


                                         79
lovely dinner for us. We returned home to the Whitaker ranch via Moses Lake and
past my Dad‟s new land at Quincy. It was good to see that all is well at home. I
stayed with the folks while Ted drove on to Seattle and Portland. Mom and I cooked,
baked, washed, and I got some Genealogical data. We had a pleasant visit. Because
of the rain and snow, causing mud it was difficult to get the sugar beets out of the
field. The tractor had to pull the truck and only half a load was taken out. Mary
Jane, Wilford‟s wife, and I went to town and I Christmas shopped for Ballard and
Lydia‟s family.
Ted arrived from Portland in the afternoon of Nov. 3, 1955. The boys and Dad sang
some fun songs for us. The next morning we headed home through Klamath Falls,
Oregon, stopping only for gas and water intake and output. Finally found an old
Motel for $5.50 but the bed was comfortable. Ted had meetings and returned about
midnight. Bob and I showered, read and to bed early. We drove hard and fast,
arriving in Reno by 4:15 after a short stop in Susanville, Ca. We met at least five
different couples we knew in Reno. We bought Channel #5 Cologne for Hermine
and a Sunday suit for Bobby. We were invited to stay at Brother Elmo Humphries‟
lovely home. Attended Sunday School at the Reno Ward and at the Institute. The
same lovely spirit exists there among the students and teachers. As we headed home
we found a lovely new motel in Winnemucca for only $7.00. After a stop at the
office in Salt Lake we arrived in Provo by 7:00p.m. We were all really happy to be
together again. Hermine was at a class in S. L. We surely appreciated her staying
with D & D. We bought her a $20 gift certificate at Auerbachs.
Ted and I enjoyed a delicious turkey dinner at the Entre Nu gathering. He left for
Brigham City for a pheasant hunt at 10:00 p.m.! When I took the children window-
shopping, they either wanted all they could see or nothing. Ted came home next day
with three pheasants. He had a fun time, as he enjoys the association with Max Bott
and Frank Forsgren, and their wives. As I catch up on our busy doings, I am waiting
to start another batch of clothes in our washer. We have a wringer washer and use
two big tubs for the rinse water. Our first big snow began this morning, Nov. 14 th
and it is still going strong. Tree branches are heavily laden—a winter fairyland. Ted
will go to Ephraim for a meeting tonight! Things really froze up, then a few days
later it thawed and rained.
Those attending a baby shower the end of November, 1955 given for me by Hermine
Briggs, were: Sister Eleanor Berrett (wife of William E., Ted‟s boss), Blanche
Anderson, Martha Proctor, Kathleen Bentley, Katherine Broadbent, Candy Draper,
Mary Brooks, Lois Gulbrandsen, Aunt Paloma Stott, Jeanne W. Griffin, Vivian
Symons, Barbara Taylor, Emma Lou Briggs, and Maurine Wilkins (daughter of Elder
Harold B. Lee). I received some lovely and useful gifts.
3 December 1955 Ted was here to help me give a birthday party for David (11) with
8 boy friends, who watched “Huckleberry Finn”.


                                         80
12 December 1955 The following is a page written this day, Monday morning: “Just
11 years ago today David Merrill was born, his Daddy being about 3,000 miles away
in Hawaii, just prior to his going into battle on Iwo Jima. In two weeks, or maybe
three, our fourth child will be born, but under very different circumstances. Ted will
be home, I hope, and all will be well. Ted is in Arizona and will be home this
coming Friday night or Saturday, having been gone two weeks. I‟m feeling fine. I
have been working on Christmas Cards—we made our own this year. . . . I have a
new Westinghouse washer and a drier which certainly simplifies washing and
drying.”
Christmas Day, 1955 is beautiful and warm with no snow. We are all well and happy
and thoroughly blessed and grateful for all that is ours. Diane came into our bedroom
about 7:00am. with a stomach ache and shaking, but it didn‟t last long after all were
gathered around the Christmas tree, unwrapping many nice presents and seeing what
Santa had brought. We all went to Sunday School, where Leland E. Anderson gave a
fine talk. Elder Harold B. Lee was visiting his daughter, Maurine Wilkins and spoke
to us Sunday morning, with a fine message on the True Spirit of Christmas. After the
evening meeting we drove around looking at the Noel lights. I made stuffing for
turkey, also a salad. Monday morning busy preparing dinner and baking rolls. Ted
went over to our lot in Mapleton and tightened the fence for pasturing the horse. A
neighbor there by name of Coleman introduced himself and asked if we wanted to
come into the city area, as some were in favor of doing. Perhaps we will want to
later, but would like to get our taste of rural life first, with horses, chickens, etc.
June, Cliff, Helen and Reed came about 4:30 and we ate good food.
27 December 1955 „Tis a beautiful sunlit day, warm with a soft breeze blowing. It
seems like early spring. I am washing. Ted says, no chore now. It really is a
wonderful change to put clothes in the washer and take them out and put them in the
drier. No lugging heavy loads outside to dry, no messy tubs to empty. I had better
get busy and fix some cold turkey sandwiches for Ted, Boyd Packer and Dale
Tingey, if they come. The kids are out playing. Our old cat is about due to litter.
We are still in the white frame home on the BYU campus.
My sister, Yvonne, sent a lot of lovely things for Christmas: house slippers for me,
hose and pants for Diane, socks for Davy, and Bob, and shirt and tie for Ted. Also a
lovely white knit sweater set for the baby to be. We phoned them Sunday evening to
wish them a Merry Christmas. All‟s well in New York at the Hawkins'. Mom and
Dad made some delicious candy, which they sent along with toys for the children.
My brother, Ballard, also sent a box with brush and combs, a small book and hair
tonic for David.
29 December 1955. On Thursday I baked bread then shopped with Jeanne from
10:30 to 12:30. I bought Diane a coat ($14), skirt ($5), hat $1.50), shoes ($2.50)



                                          81
David Levis ($1.69), Bob shoes ($2.50), Marne‟ shoes ($2.50), baby lotion and Qtips
($.88).
Boyd Packer and Ted came home from work about 6:40,and ate steak supper here.
We were expecting Clyde and Anna Belle Davis, but they are not here as of 9:10 p.m.
30 December On Friday I began to have little indications of labor. Took bath,
cleaned up, went with Ted to BYU Faculty Women's dance to see floorshow and
decorations. We drove out to the Utah Valley Hospital to get our bearings. Home by
11:30. Didn‟t get much sleep until around 4:00 a.m. Phoned the Doctor around l0:00
a.m. Saturday and saw him at 11:30. He said I‟d dilated two fingers and was
definitely in labor, but things were moving slowly. Got dinner and tried to rest Sat.
afternoon. Contractions continued irregularly and got pretty intense sometimes.
Finally at 10:30p.m. Ted drove me to hospital. I phoned and found that Dr. Merrill
was still out there. After I got prepped, at midnight the Dr. gave me a shot of
Pertussin which had me going strong by 12:30. At twelve midnight I had one real
McCoy to celebrate the arrival of the New Year! After hard labor our baby girl was
born at 1:3l a.m. at 9lbs. 5½oz. I was tired to say the least.
NEW YEAR‟S DAY 1956 Sunday at three a.m. Ted left the hospital for home. It
was so good to have had him here to help me quiet down. I felt like my legs would
fly up to the ceiling and he held them down for me. I had practically no nausea from
the ether. Stitches were unavoidable because of size and position of the baby. She
came out face up and the Doctor was unable turn her over. She is perfect in every
detail.
At 2:00 p.m. Sunday, Jimmy Lawrence of KOVO came to the hospital to interview
the proud parents. It seems we have won the Baby Derby sponsored by KOVO
Radio Station and have won about $40 worth of gift certificates from various local
stores. We were both blank when asked what we had named her. Then I said, “Her
grandma Tuttle was Clarice and her great grandma Whitaker was named Clarissa.
Why not Clarissa Marne‟?” What shall we call her for short? Clari, Lissa, Rissa,
Rice‟, Clissa, Clar, Clarice, Lari, etc? I felt drained out when they left. I walked to
the bathroom at three in the afternoon, and was really weak and woozy, but I have
found it is best not to lie in bed too long. I stayed in the hospital, eating good food I
did not prepare, until Jan 6th. Hoping to nurse without any problem, but
uncomfortable because of hemorrhoids. Ted came in each evening. I love him so
much and am so thankful for all our blessings, and especially now for our lovely little
daughter. Ted will be leaving for Idaho next Monday to return Friday. I hope I have
the strength to do what must be done. The birth of a baby will always remain a
miracle to me. A perfect little girl with rosebud lips. She looks like a little bird the
way she holds her mouth open for food. Long fingers and plump cheeks. I was
reminded of her Grandpa Whitaker at first. I‟m wondering what spring will be like,



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since the clear, sunny weather is unusual for January. I would rather have my winter
now.
19 January 1956 Baked bread, cleaned house. Saw “Viva Zapata”, a good show
which the kids saw at the McKay Building in the afternoon. Ted had a meeting as
soon as he returned from Tooele and Grantsville.
5 Feburary Clarissa was blessed today by her father. She slept through Fast meeting
and looked so sweet. Bobby stayed home alone all day in bed with a cough. After
dinner we all had a nap then we dashed out to see the ice on the Boat Harbor—good
skating. All had a turn since we just happened to have our skates along. Ted, Dave
and Diane went to evening meeting.
I have a keen desire to get busy on genealogy, but so far not time to get much done.
In the Improvement Era an article by Archibald F. Bennett on Solomon Mack Family
tells that his daughter, Lovina, married a Tuttle.
5 March 1956 Monday evening and I have had a bath, children all asleep and Ted is
back at his office in the Maeser Building. (The same building in


which I was Secretary to President Franklin S. Harris in his office in the eventful year
of 1943).
I had fixed a chicken dinner with hot rolls, mashed potatoes, green salad, fruit
cocktail, which Ted took to President Berrett. He just phoned to tell us thanks, and
said it was good. Ted will go to Salt Lake in the morning.
25 March I left for St. George with Ted, Boyd Packer, Bob and Clari baby. Checked
in at a Motel, attended a Temple session. Held meetings Saturday with a delicious
meal at noon. We enjoyed the lovely ride, the warm day with blossoms and flowers
and green lawns. We left St. George at 5 pm. arriving home at 11:00 p.m. Dave and
Diane were at Bob Bingham‟s where Pat Bingham “tended” them.
1 April 1956 Easter Sunday. “Power of Speech” program, combined Speech and
Music Festival, went very well. Ted and I, Bentley‟s, Ashbys, and Wilkins (Ernie
and Maurine) sang “Prayer”. I had planned to ask to be released, but the next night
or so Bishop Andrus and Counselors called on me to ask me to be Mutual Young
Ladies President!! I had been sick all day with a cold, weak resistance, so couldn‟t
say no!
8 May 1956 My first night as Mutual President. All went well. Gene Poll is my
Manual Counselor and Maurine Wilkins is Activity Counselor. She spoke a few
well-chosen thoughts. With these ladies on my team we can‟t lose. They won‟t see
us for dust!




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June was a lovely, colorful month. We picked cherries toward the end of June at
Mapleton, where Ted (and I) bought five acres of land with cherry and peach trees on
it.
July 1956 My period was due the 15th, but nothing happened! I was busy with the
24th Program, “A Handcart Heritage”.
August 1956 MIA is keeping me very busy. I must learn to delegate better. Baby
Clari is growing so fast. She sits up alone. Eyes are slowly showing brown tints. I
have experienced some early morning nausea, but not too bad if I eat something
almost before I get up. Because of my real concern when no babies came after Bob
for so many years, I now have made up my grateful heart to accept as many more
little spirits from Heaven as the good Lord will send down and on His own time
table!
September 1956 I have been elbow-deep in beautiful big peaches: Early and Late
Alberta Peaches, Hales and other varieties. Seems as though I had 100 phone calls
on peaches after we put an ad in the paper. We picked at least 140 bushels and
hardly saved enough for me to bottle.
14 September 1956 I saw Dr. Kartchner briefly and got a polio shot and capsules,
also car-sick pills. I weighed 151 and shouldn‟t gain more than 15 pounds. He
figured me to be about 13 weeks along. A trip to the Northwest with Ted and Clari,
while Hermine tends the other three, began on the 17th of September. Again we made
the rounds, going to Twin Falls the first night. After a trip back to Burley in the
morning, we will fly low—80 or 90 mph., with seat belts fastened and on to Boise.
Clari is a good little traveler and has two bottom teeth in. She says “su bye bye-ites”
for baby kittens and “my maimi keet” for mother cat. And “O my pure rat-o,”
meaning Pepper-dinky-two-tyke—the little black dog we have. In Boise I bought a
red pair of shoes for me! Then through Nyssa, Oregon then Richland, and Pullman,
Washington with Janette and Dale Tingey where we enjoyed a steak supper.
By the 22nd we were at my folks home in Ellensburg area. They are fine, working
hard and showing their years. While Ted and I drove to Seattle, my Mom tended
Clarice. It was rainy weather. We returned the next day, picked up Clari and then
drove on to Portland, Klamath Falls, Oregon and on to Reno, Nevada.
The trip was very enjoyable, but it was good to get home again. Sweet Hermine
cleaned and tended my house and kids so well. I wish I had half her efficiency and
energy and drive.
10 October 1956 I must help more on the Road Show to be put on next Tuesday. I
have told no one here my physical condition. It will be, if not now, self-evident. I
must be close to 17 weeks along. Ted has left with President Berrett and Boyd
Packer for Idaho to a Convention, with a fishing trip planned on the side, making it
all the more fun. They really enjoy being together and make such a fine team to


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administer the work of all the Seminaries and Institutes of the whole Church, which
are located in the eleven Western States. I will bake the bread and clean the kitchen
before Hermine comes for lunch. How can I muster up more energy and strength? I
plan to go see about house plans, etc. for our acreage in Mapleton, in such a beautiful
setting, with peach and cherry trees.
Entre Nou, (Among Friends) is a group of BYU Faculty wives who meet once a
month. I am in awe of the talent displayed among these folks. Jeanne, Lewis and
family, now four children, I believe, arrived around 4:30. I was glad to see them. I
had fixed beans and chile, so was all prepared for them. They live in Escalante,
Lewis‟ home town, where he is the High School coach, also teaching Civics and
History. The next day Jeanne and I went to Anderson Lumber Company to talk to
Mr. Fred Cook about house plans. I gave him a sketch of what I thought I would like
and estimating the cost between $16,000 and $18,000. I guess I had better lower that
to $13 or $14,000 to begin with.
12 October 1956 I tended Jeanne‟s children, except the baby whom she left in
Escalante while they went to Salt Lake and through the Temple again for the first
time since they were married. Lewis‟ brother, Gerald and wife, Barbara, were then
sealed, having been married earlier in Philadelphia, Pa. Jeanne and Lewis left in the
afternoon of the 13th.
Ted came home late Saturday, about midnight. I had been watching TV (on Jeanne‟s
set, since there is no TV hookup in Escalante). I just turned the lights off, looked out
the window and there he was! So glad he is home safe and sound with some big
whoppers of fish, besides. We all went to Church. I left early to tend baby, but she
was asleep so came back to class. Ted is one of the Seven Presidents of Seventy so
he won‟t be teaching Gospel Doctrine class on Life and Teachings of Paul, since he
has a meeting at that time. I‟m sorry for that, not only because he won‟t be teaching
where I can sit and listen and pop a button with pride, but also I will be separated
from him, even on Sunday, our one day together!
I had occasion to speak to Bishop Childs regarding my coming confinement, saying I
would stay on until Christmas as President of YWMIA in the Oak Hills Second
Ward, and longer if I felt up to it. Our Road Show went well, but I had quite a hectic
time holding up the scenery and singing behind. We were given an Excellent rating.
Just before Deer season Ted left for meetings in S. L., Ogden, Logan and Brigham
City, where he, Max Bott and Frank Forsgren met to go hunting.
While he was gone I cleaned out drawers, etc., and took 2 boxes of stuff to Deseret
Industries. Hermine and I saw a stage play at the lovely Joseph Smith Building. Ted
came home with no deer, which is unusual. He is a good hunter and shot. Monday
night the MIA classes can have a party if they want. We are all staffed. More work
on Plans for our home in Mapleton. After a Quartet practice at our place, Ted and I
enjoyed a dinner at Park‟s Café with the “Singing Mothers” and spouses. He plans to


                                          85
go to Vernal Wednesday and return Friday night. Monday early he and Boyd head
for Burley meetings and pheasant hunting. Clari is such a little doll with hair curling
at the base of her fat little neck. Her two bottom teeth are surely sharp! Dave and
Diane are taking tap dancing and creative ballet classes, respectively. Both are taking
piano lessons from Vera Clark.
27 November Clari has two top teeth in now. Time Flies! Christmas has come and
gone. Ted gave me an electric mixer, blender and an electric Fry pan—such a
pleasant surprise. Our nicely shaped tree was pretty. I made our own cards this time,
telling of coming event about April first.
1 January 1957 After a potluck supper at Henry (Ted‟s missionary companion) and
Amy Isaksen‟s home we attended their Stake dance for a while. I‟m working on a
“Meet Me at Mutual” Program for the end of January. I hope to be released by then.
Also planning music for the Relief Society Shakespeare Lesson.
10 January 1957 A Trip to Los Angeles with Ted, Boyd, Donna, our two babies and
Hermine, began today. Two of the Seminary Secretaries, Edie Weinheimer and
Elaine Pappenfus, will stay with Dave, Diane and Bob. In Las Vegas we saw a show
with Jimmie Durante and had dinner at the Riviera, while Jerry Cox‟s folks tended
our babies. In Bakersfield I left Clarissa with my sister, Yvonne. In Los Angeles
Ted and I stayed at Paul and Jean Dunn‟s home, after a banquet, and meeting with
Seminary teachers in the area. Our Los Angeles Temple experience was lovely after
Conference with Seminary men until 3:00 p.m. I was very impressed with the
paintings there. With Boyd and Donna we thrilled to see the movie “The Ten
Commandments”. After leaving Boyd and Donna at Berrett‟s, Ted and I we got lost
and I got soaked trying to read street signs with window down in a pouring rainstorm.
Didn‟t get to bed until after 2:30 a.m. What would my Doctor have said? My cough
is still persistent and wears my resistance down.
We visited Ted‟s Aunt Vio Beal, Dave‟s wife (Dave was a brother to Ted‟s mother).
We attended Church at Brother Lyman Berrett‟s Ward where Ted and Boyd each
gave fine talks. Ted says Brother Berrett will be a fine Institute Director. We also
visited the Forest Lawn Memorial and saw the huge 200‟ x 40‟ mural painting of the
Crucifixion by Van Styka, where we met Hermine. Our first visit to Knotts‟ Berry
Farm was enjoyable, also a delicious steak dinner. All is well as we returned home,
picking up Clarissa from Yvonne and Gordy‟s house. Hermine, Edie and I sang “It
Was a Lover and His Lass” for the Relief Society program. I also sang a solo, “Tell
Me, Where is Fancy Bred?”
February 1957 I was relieved to be out of Mutual Presidency. I had enjoyed the
labor, up until the last month or so. Lucy James is the new President. On February
23 I had 12 girls here for food after the show. It was for my sweet Diane‟s tenth
birthday, Feb. 24th..



                                          86
23 March 1957. Our visitor for our MIA meeting this Monday evening was Dr.
Henry J. Nicholes, a Professor at BYU, who spoke on answers the Prophet Joseph
Smith gave to questions posed as to which Church is true. What is Godliness and
what is Power? Two creeds: Nycene Creed: God is everywhere present,
omnipresence, Omniscience, and Omnipotent. Joseph Smith: God has a form, a
body. Man is created in His image.
THE BIRTH OF JONATHAN WHITAKER TUTTLE
The month of March came in like a lamb, but out like a lion. BIRTH OF
JONATHAN WHITAKER TUTTLE. Ted postponed his trip to Wyoming until the
crucial day, expecting to return Saturday evening. The Doctor was at a Square Dance
and would call me every half-hour or so. Finally, when all the children were asleep
and pains were more intense and closer, I phoned the hospital and Dr. Kartchner was
there. I decided I could drive myself and not bother Hermine, but as I drove alone,
tears began to flow and I said to myself, “This isn‟t the way it‟s supposed to be!” At
12:27 a.m. March 31st our third boy made his appearance, with relative ease. Ted
missed his plane from Cody, Wyoming by minutes, when they ran out of gas en route
to the airport. He phoned home just after I left for the hospital, in our 1947 Chevy.
He then called there and talked to the Doc. who said that things were progressing
nicely. Ted arrived Sunday afternoon with the rest of the visitors, when all the tumult
and shouting were over! Because the children were out of school Monday, Ted took
them with him and he left Clari at Aunt June‟s. I miss my little girl already! It‟s hard
to believe I have another baby so soon! Clari will be 15 months old Monday April
lst. However, this is what I prayed for. I want to have as many more of these
precious spirits as the Lord will allow.
April 1957 The name we have chosen for our baby is Jonathan Whitaker Tuttle. We
had considered Roger, but that didn‟t seem to fit. He is handsome, with black hair,
weighing 7# 14 oz. We are planning a move to Pleasant Grove into a little white
frame home on a 7 acre fruit farm, with apple, peach, pear, and cherry trees. What
happened to our land in Mapleton? I guess it was too far away from Ted‟s office, and
he got a good offer from a Dr.         . In the meantime we had become acquainted
with John and Elma Fugal through the Seminary system and John knew of a fruit
farm in Pleasant Grove, where he lived, that might be available when a pending
divorce went through. And that is what happened.
May 1957
I spent as much time as I could, helping on the remodeling of the old farm home.
With a new baby and being a mom now to five growing children, my time was
limited. Much was required to make the place livable. The floor in the front room
had a real slant that had to be jacked up and repaired, a new roof was required on the
old part of the house. A new kitchen was necessary when the wall where the old
sooty chimney stood, fell when Brother William C. Smith knocked it down with


                                          87
some hefty hits with a sledge hammer. We ordered new kitchen cabinets from
Amherst Mills. Color schemes, carpet, flooring, tile for bathroom, linoleum, painting
and wallpapering etc., kept us up many late nights. We installed a new furnace in the
small basement room that we enlarged, so we would have central heat. We cleaned
out and painted a detached storage room for a bedroom for the boys. Our kind friend,
Brother Smith, even painted much of the home on the outside!
One evening, while I was in Pleasant Grove we received word from a neighbor that
there was a fire at our place in Provo. I raced over there in our old ‟47 Chevrolet,
with my heart pounding, hoping I would be stopped by a policeman so I could say,
“Yes, I am going to a fire!!” When I arrived at the top of the hill no evidence of the
fire truck, the burned toast, or mattresses and bedding on the lawn was visible. Diane
had put bread in the oven to toast and forgotten about it and when she opened the
door to the oven flames came out. Dave called the fire department and then Diane
put mattresses and blankets on the lawn for the babies and everyone was outside
when the Firemen arrived. They opened the oven, threw the blackened toast in the
sink and departed, with a stern question: “How could your mother leave you all here
alone? What kind of parents do you have?”
27 May 1957. This evening late Ted has returned from Pleasant Grove where he has
been working on our “new” home. Joni baby is growing well and filling out. His
Dad is noticing him more lately.
June 1957 was a busy month (aren‟t they all?). Jon was blessed by his father on June
2nd. I gave a talk in Sacrament meeting on the 9 th of June on “The Value of the
Priesthood in the Home.” This was a talk that was easy for me to give because I
know what blessings accrue by having a Priesthood holder in the home. Ted and
Boyd were the speakers at Stake Conference in Pleasant Grove. On June 23 rd at 2:15
a.m., I finished making covers for the porch swing pads. (The swing is one that was
on Ted‟s folk‟s little front porch in Manti). Ted went to Pleasant Grove to irrigate
from 10:30 until 6:00 a.m. We, the Singing Mothers Nucleus Group, practice every
Friday for General Conference and will support the California Choir under Sister
Florence Jepperson Madsen in October.
19 July 1957 After much hard work and many late nights, even a few all-nighters, we
were finally ready to move. One early morning eleven fine, stalwart Seminary men
came and moved us all at once! They almost took my baby bed, etc. before I realized
how fast they moved. We were really unceremoniously dumped here and it was
some time before I got out from under and found where everything was and where it
should go. Happy, however, to finally be in a home of our own, after 14 years of
marriage and many moves.
In August we were busy getting settled, acquainted and picking fruit, irrigating,
weeding and cleaning around the yard and farm. During the next year Ted, with help
from David and others, built a fine barn and corral, chicken coop and pig pen.


                                         88
Fruit harvest has added work and a little extra money as we have sold some cherries
first of all, then peaches are ready in September. At $2.00 a lug, packed with cups
and liners with 40‟s and 48‟s (size) per lug, we could make a little profit. Then the
pears came on and I know I picked bushels of „em. Hardly no time for housework
beyond tending babies, cooking and picking.
ANOTHER TRIP TO CANADA WITH A NEW BABY
On the 20 September 1957, after taking Clari to Donna to tend and Hermine staying
with the other children, Ted and I with baby Joni were on our way for a trip to
Canada, similar to the one we took about a year ago. The weather was beautiful and
with fine company what more can you ask for on a trip? We visited briefly with
Franke and Vernald Johns in Garland en route to Twin Falls. Franke Beal is a cousin
of Ted‟s, daughter of Ted‟s mother‟s brother, George Beal. We drove on to Lovell,
Wyoming and points north and visited with Seminaries along the way. When we
arrived at the Canadian border, we were not allowed to take the books in (Seminary, I
believe). We headed to Lethbridge, then to Edmonton, etc. All was well on our
return home. Diane is ½ inch taller than David and weighs only ½ pound less. He
will be 13 in December and she will be 11 in February. We hope he will hurry and
start growing. He weighs 71½ pounds. Diane‟s hair is long, brown with dark brown
eyes and long legs. Such a cute girl and sweet disposition. We have practiced for
Ward Conference in the choir. I am Speech Director in MIA in the Grove Ward.
David is a good student, if we can turn off the TV more often. I want to teach him to
typewrite. He is a very obedient and a sweet young boy.
In December Ted and Boyd made a trip to Arizona, and on through Los Angeles, San
Diego, New Mexico and back through Arizona, returning about 2 weeks later. Came
home with oranges, grapefruit, nuts, lemons, dates and mistletoe-- a real treat! They
arrived home at 2:00 in the afternoon having left Navajo Bridge early the same day.
Both boys were so tired.
On David‟s 13th birthday I went to Entre Nu party at Jean Poll‟s. During the day I
baked bread, cake and cut out silhouettes for the BYU Women evening on the 14 th.
Both affairs turned out very well. I met Hermine‟s fine friend, Phares Horman.
On March 3, 1958. in Mutual John Josephson taught about the early civilizations in
the Americas: Jaredites, 2200 BC, perhaps earlier, and early Maya, Toltecs, Aztecs.
The March 18th Literature lesson was on King Lear (Shakespeare). On March 27th
Ted and I enjoyed a trip to Gridley, California with Diane, Clari and Joni. We visited
with Ted‟s Uncle Ray Beal in Marysvale, California then stayed at a Motel. We
enjoyed a delicious Chinese dinner at President Pappas‟, whom Ted knew in the
Mission Field. We returned home over Donner, which was closed one hour after we
passed, for 8 hours.




                                         89
March 31st was an “Evening of Charmony” for mothers and daughters of our Ward.
We gave flowers made by the officers and teachers of Mutual. We served supper and
Maurine Wilkins came as our guest speaker. There were close to 100 present.
CALL TO FIRST COUNCIL OF THE SEVENTY
Sunday, 6 April 1958 Never before in my life have I felt the full impact of my sins of
commission, ommission, procrastinations, missed opportunities, slothfulness, and my
inabilities and human and spiritual weaknesses so keenly. Nor have I been so
humbled; yet so proud of my sweet husband, Ted. Over and over we have repeated
in unison, and alone—too soon and too quick; we are not prepared for so awe-
inspiring and tremendous a responsibility to serve in the capacity of one of Thy
servants along with the great and inspirational souls in Thy Church here on earth.
We have prayed, (at least I did!) during the brief hours between the Call and the
implementation of it, that this thing might pass from us. We prayed that we might be
given more time in which to prepare ourselves mentally, physically and spiritually for
so great an honor. Perhaps some mistake had been made and we could continue
serving in a way in which we felt we were capable of contributing in some small
measure to Thy great cause. Yes, Thy will be done—and if this calling in reality is
meant for us, we prayed that Thy spirit be with us in our hour of weakness to
strengthen us beyond our own comprehension and abilities, that we might be ever
humble and teachable. Why to the least of these, this great honor? Oh, dear Lord,
give me strength to do my part; to accept graciously whatever Thou hast in store for
me and for us. Help me to ever be a true help meet and companion to my dear
husband.
I know there will be those who will question Thy choice, and with good cause, but,
Oh, help us to prove worthy of Thy faith and trust in us and in our abilities to serve
Thee.     Yesterday we thought we were doing fairly well to keep Thy
commandments—we were prayerful and doing what we believed to be right, but
Today we realize we were not doing our utmost—we were letting opportunities to
DO slip by. We were not diligent in doing right. It is now 4:30 a.m. Monday
morning. I now resolve to be not the same person who met her trembling and shaken
husband at the door last Saturday evening. Help me to truly serve in my capacity as a
wife of one of thy chosen servants—a General Authority.
As I put my arms around my husband I felt his whole body trembling. I knew some
great calamity had just occurred. Like a flash, pictures rose before me of a tragic
accident that he must have just witnessed, or that a loved one must have died
suddenly. What can it be, I questioned him? We sat on the couch in our little frame
home, he, with his head on my shoulder, sobbing uncontrollably. Finally he said,
“Marne‟, I have just had an interview with President McKay.” Could he have lost his
job, I wondered. Then he said, “I have been asked to be one of the First Council of
the Seventy, filling the vacancy left by the death of Brother Oscar A. Kirkham!” No,


                                         90
surely it can‟t be so! We (I am not) are not ready, nor worthy, too soon and too
quick! My thoughts, repeated over again.
No time for retrospect, no time to clean the cobwebs from our minds and house. No
time to even think about what this call might mean in the hustle to get ready for
Conference, leaving our sweet children to fare for themselves on Easter Sunday. No
time for the Easter Bunny to surprise them, not sufficient preparation and planning
for anything we will be called to do hence forth and forever.
When we returned home last evening about 6:30 after having visited June and Cliff
and seeing there Bob and Leone Carpenter, we found the children all well. They had
seen their Daddy on TV, as he spoke from the Tabernacle after his name had been
read as one of the Presidents of the First Council of the Seventy and sustained therein
by the congregation.
Monday, 7 April 1958 Ted and I arrived at the Relief Society Building at 7:30 for a
Banquet and program for all General Authorities and their wives. This is done twice
each year, after each General Conference in April and October. Ted had phoned me
from Salt Lake and said he would come and get us. I said I would drive in and we
made a flying trip to be there by 5:00 for a reporter and pictures to be taken of the
whole family for the Church Section. We left the children at June‟s until about 11:00
p.m. when we headed home.
President McKay had held my hand and looked deep into my eyes. I hope what he
saw there was good and that he felt my determination to do my part. The BYU
Student program was entertaining and enjoyable. One dance offended President
Wilkinson, but Sister McKay soothed his ruffled feathers.
Friday, 11 April 1958 Ted left by train with Spencer W. Kimball for Reno, Nevada.
He returned on Monday after a very fine conference. I have notes written the 13 th of
April during Fast Meeting. “The expressions of faith and confidence have given us
courage to face up to this great privilege and responsibility. The initial shock is
wearing off. We are getting back to earth and find that these everyday challenges
must still be met. It is times like this when you feel you really need a friend to hold
your hand. Those of you who are close to us know our many weaknesses and failings.
But I shall try harder to do my best as a wife and mother in representing our Church,
as Ted travels throughout the world. President McKay‟s keen, blue eyes were like
searchlights shining right into my very soul, revealing my thoughts and feelings.
This call is a most humbling experience. I love my husband dearly and realize that
we as a family must learn to share his energy, time and sweet spirit with others. I
Pray I may be given the strength and ability to carry my part of the load. I don‟t
know when I have felt so unprepared. Wouldn‟t we live differently if we knew what
the future holds in store?




                                          91
On April 19 and 20 Ted accompanied Brothers Kimball and Peterson to Bountiful for
the division of a Stake. On 26-27 of April Ted attended a Conference in Las Vegas,
alone. Elder Richards was to have gone along.
25 April Ted was invited to be the guest speaker at the Spring Banquet of the Lamba
Delta Sigma and Herauders of L.D.S. Business College in Salt Lake City. I might
have gone along.
MAY DAY Thursday 1 May 1958 I spent the afternoon in the Salt Lake Temple
after a delicious luncheon at the plant nursery on the North side of the Tabernacle,
with some of the wives of the General Authorities. The luncheon was provided by
the Temple Presidency. Maxine Hanks was so sweet and kind to me and made me
feel welcome. What a grand privilege to have such honored associations.
6 May 1958, Surprise of surprises! 15 Seminary men, good and true, raked, hoed,
dug, and planted a fine lawn that is soon going to have to be mowed! In the next two
or three weeks Ted traveled to the following Stakes: to Bend Lomond Stake with
Brother Mark E. Petersen, to Springville with Brother Walter Stover on the Welfare
Committee, who told of losing his “very own mutter” at birth. (On Mother‟s Day
Mae Bezzant, Helen Hall and I sang a trio “Mother” in Sunday School.) Ted was in
Ogden.
Ted drove alone to Colonia Juarez, Mexico and en route gave talks to the graduates at
the Safford and Thatcher Institutes in Arizona. Ted reports of a memorable wild
turkey hunt with Brother Herman Hatch, where Ted shot two turkeys with one shot!
He stayed with President D. S. Brown. President Claudius Bowman was killed in a
highway collision this Sunday. (I had met him years ago through his youngest son,
Keith, at BYU), so sad!
24-25 May 1958 Ted drove alone for the Liberty Ward Ground Breaking Ceremony
where he was on the program. I have a note re an assignment at Bear Lake Stake.
He left Thursday for Seminary Graduation exercises at Soda springs, Idaho, where
the carbonated water actually fizzes. My sweetheart returned Sunday night late. On
Tuesday I rode with him to Snow College for the Baccalaureate. We enjoyed a
delicious meal at President Cameron‟s home. Ted gave a fine talk on “The Upward
Reach.” My sister, Jeanne, took Bob, age 8, to Escalante with her for a couple of
weeks, until they move up to Provo for the summer.
31 May Our son, Joni, is now 14 months old. Ted left for Ogden Riverdale Stake.
The irrigation is a big job here on our fruit ranch, which comes at all odd hours of the
night. For our Mutual party I made a second cake because the first one fell flat, and
sauce for weiners. I painted cardboard wagon wheels at the last minute. I took Diane
with me. Elma Fugal led the group in her fun song, “Eisch bin Gutten Doctor, come
from Shoymalon” Eisch con spiele” on der : jews harp, viola, tuba, bagpipe, piano,
etc.



                                          92
3 June 1958 On Tuesday Ted and Boyd Packer left at 8:00 a.m. for Los Angeles
regarding Seminary, then to the Reseda Stake Conference on the weekend. I had my
hair done by Clair Tuttle, a cousin of Ted‟s, in Provo and bought a blue dress I plan
to wear to the Wives luncheon tomorrow. I hope it is suitable. Diane took a lunch to
Primary for a picnic. I am looking forward to seeing Mom and the boys at the end of
June. She has not been able to be with me for any of our children‟s birth. Our Trio
practiced here for our Stake song. We have the old piano Ted refurbished at Hart
:Brothers Music. Brother Irwin Jensen came out and we sang until 10:30. I cleaned
and polished the car. (I don‟t remember which one we had at that time, perhaps I had
the „47 Chev while Ted drove a newer one.) I intended to drive to Salt Lake for the
Wives‟ Luncheon, when Donna phoned to say I could take her car. So glad, and
rushed around getting the kids ready. I took Diane, Clari and Jon to June‟s, arriving
just as Helen was coming from school for lunch. I had time to meet only a few of
those already at the Lion House for the luncheon. I met Sister Adam S. Bennion for
the first time; also Sister Kirkham, whose husbands have passed away quite recently.
I sat by Sister Antoine R. Ivins and Maxine Hanks. After our delicious meal we
retired to a downstairs room and heard the two main stars of “The Barber of Seville”
sing songs from that opera being presented at Kingsbury Hall currently. Very
beautifully done. Then a Sister Huggins, who is very talented with ceramics and who
conducts classes at the State Industrial School in Ogden in clay work, introduced a
Senor Jesus Huerta, who is very talented with wood carving, also painting in oils and
watercolors. We were led to believe that he had had very little formal education or
classes in those arts. It was an interesting class. Sister Huggins stressed the need for
us and for our youth to learn to use our hands more.
Clari says: “lay me, mommy” (let me, Mommy). Joni doesn‟t say much yet, but he
makes his wants known! I drove to the Baccalaureate services at BYU , arriving at
8:30 and heard most of Elder Gordon B. Hinckley‟s address. He spoke on the “Seven
Pillars of Truth.” Brother Eldon Beck gave me his seat. Later I moved by Dale
Tingey and Paul Felt. I met my former Bishop (and art teacher) J. Roman Andrus
and his wife, Irva, and son, who both graduated.
Friday June 6 1958 I feel lazy today. I am up too many late nights. It is now 10:30
p.m. I planted peas after a hailstorm, the likes of which I‟ve never seen before, with
hail the size of marbles. It came so furiously, lasting about ten minutes but did a lot
of damage. The wind blew down a big tree at the ditch in the bottom of the field. It
also split off a large limb at the chicken coop and broke the top out of a cherry tree
and the cherries are almost all bruised or pitted. The apples don‟t look good with
leaves knocked off, broken and split. Diane left with Primary group at 9:00 a.m. to be
baptized for the dead, and returned about 4:15. David went swimming tonight with
Bob Bingham, however the pool was not open. Bobby sent a letter from Escalante
and sounds fine. Ted phoned from Paul Dunn‟s home in Downey, CA and plans to



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bring pigeons and a couple pair of geese home from Beaver, at Walt Kerksick‟s
ranch. (He is the Seminary teacher there). I love and miss my hubby very much.
I helped Diane with a paper about “Jacob, A Man of Peace.” Dave and Diane went to
Sunday School, but the babies have colds. At 2:00 I picked up Helen Hall, met Mae
Bezzant at Church and practiced “O Lord, Most Holy” and sang it at a 2:30 Stake
Leadership (Union) meeting. Attended choir practice then church at 5:00. Mel
Lemon and wife gave fine talks on Temple marriage. (Later in their lives Mona
Lemon had to spend some time at the Mental Institution then later when she returned
home, she killed herself). It was such a sad time for the family. Charles Harper also
gave a good talk. Monday evening I taught a class of MIA Maids, which went fairly
well. There were two visitors with only one regular girl and two new ones in my
class. On June 20th Ted and I left for Salt Lake and bought a saddle on the way in.
Ted picked out a lovely new suit at ZCMI and I bought eight glasses. There was a
meeting and dinner at Sugar House Stake. President Riser, former Mission President
in England and wife are lovely folks.
21 June 1958 at midnight I wrote, “I have just come home from frying hamburgers at
a Stake stand for Strawberry Days. The boys went to the Rodeo and Diane and Clari
were with me. All had fun. I‟m so sleepy.” The next day was Quarterly Conference
with Elder Antone R. Ivins as the General Authority. I attended both enjoyable
sessions, and sang in the Choir under direction of Irvin Jensen. Ted came home
shortly after I brought David home from Youth Conference at 9:00 p.m. We all rode
to Polar (Bear) King for ice cream cones. „Tis late and we have to pick strawberries
at 6:00 a.m. Ted leaves for Provo at 6:15. Jeanne may come out, if so maybe she can
put up my hair for me and I‟ll cancel my appointment at 8:30. (She didn‟t come). I
picked a case of strawberries in an hour, with Dave‟s help. Hurried home and fed
babies and to American Fork at Mary‟s Beauty Shop. I had my first manicure, a
bright pink to match a little bit of pink in the blue flowered dress! Home shortly after
11, fixed lunch and cleaned house until 4 p.m. I expected Ted at 2:00 but he came at
5:00. We left for Salt Lake and Bruce McConkie‟s home for a lovely dinner served
buffet style on their patio. A few drops of rain didn‟t bother us. We had such a very
enjoyable evening.
28th and 29th of June 1958 I took all the children to Sunday School. Ted was in
Kolob Stake in Springville Saturday and Sunday, arriving home by 5:00p.m. We
both went to the First Ward in Pleasant Grove where Mae Bezzant, Helen Hall and I
sang, “O Lord Most Holy”. The next day we had an MIA outing in Little Mill with
the girls (Young Women). There were 22 of us all together and enjoyed a Gypsy
Treasure Hunt. We are expecting Mom and Yvonne within a few days.
 The next morning I picked cherries from 6:30 until 10 a.m. I fixed a lunch for Ted
that he forgot to take to Salt Lake when he stopped for the cherries at 10:00. At 11
a.m. Clari and I had a bath and I washed Diane‟s hair. We all plan to go to Aspen


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Grove this evening about 5 p.m. with Donna Packer. Ted will come up as soon as he
can get there from Salt Lake. This was a Seminary Wiener roast with those men who
attended BYU Summer School.
We had an enjoyable time. Joni and Clari were wrapped in a sleeping bag with
bottles before we finally left and came home via American Fork Canyon. On Friday
we all enjoyed a Parade in Provo for the 4th of July. Shortly after we returned from
John Fugal‟s pea patch, Yvonne and Gordy arrived with their cute little baby boy
who looks a lot like his Daddy, and yet I see Whitaker written all over him. Debbie
has grown into quite a little lady who will go to Kindergarten this fall. I‟m so sleepy
I keep dropping my head down and making ink splotches on the paper. All are
asleep. Mom stayed at Jeanne‟s overnight. They will be here for dinner at 2:00
tomorrow. Must get to bed!
Saturday I baked rolls, turkey with stuffing and cleaned. Mom came with Jeanne and
family a little before 2p.m. I so enjoyed seeing her again. Bobby was so anxious, he
kept asking how long to night time, when we thought Mom would be here Friday
night.
Sunday 6 July 1958 Dave and Bob went to Sunday School. My Mom, Diane, babies
and I went to Fast Meeting. I just got Ted out of the Cherry orchard, where he had
been studying, in time to go also. My mother bore a sweet testimony; Ted and I did
also. In the evening Ted was the main speaker at the Sunset Services held at the
American Fork Amphitheater. He gave an excellent talk, which should have been
recorded. I sang in the Chorus. Jeanne and Lewis came over and afterwards, with
Yvonne and Gordy, we all went to Marcelle‟s home (Gordon‟s mother) for a short
visit.
It seems that we held MIA on Monday evening because I tell of plans for a Sat. night
dance, a survey of Girls, Softball, etc., all to be done within the next few weeks. The
Church History tour with Seminary and Institute couples is scheduled to begin July
31st. One day, while Mom was here we bottled 24 quarts of cherries. Dave is out
picking off hail-damaged pears. Bob is still asleep and Diane is washing dishes at
6:30 a.m. She goes to dancing class this morning. I will make root beer and get the
fruit salad dish ready for Wednesday eve at Packer‟s. Forty people, Seminary
Coordinators and families are invited. Yvonne and children and Mom slept here.
Diane slept at Judy Brimley‟s. I wonder where I put everyone? Mom leaves on
Wednesday for Washington. I really enjoyed visiting for a little while. The party in
Boyd Packers grove was a fine affair.
Ted mowed the hay on a Saturday and we ordered an aluminum porch to go over the
front step to the tune of $149.00. Ted is such a dear, fine fellow and someday I will
tell him so! On Monday 14 July I taught the Second Year Beehives and attended a
Bishop‟s meeting afterwards. I had an appointment with Dr. Webster. All is fine.
Ted and Dave brought in the baled hay that John Fugal baled. Wednesday July 16th


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Ginger had a colt in the night, very cute with three white legs and a blaze down his
nose.
Friday July 18th shortly after 10 a.m. the whole family drove to Aspen Grove and
watched a good variety show before a Timp hike in the morning, all hiking up to the
first big falls. Beautiful scenery appeared at every turn. We slept there over night, I
believe in the “Harris” cabin, and because the children kept getting uncovered, I
didn‟t get much sleep. On Saturday Diane went out to a Donkey Ball game with
Bliss and Judy Brimley.
SEMINARY TEACHERS CHURCH HISTORY TOUR
Elder A. Theodore Tuttle had been planning and organizing this tour for almost one
year before being called as a member of the First Council of Seventy. He was
allowed to continue as the Tour Director of a total group of 82, mostly Seminary men
and their wives. The bus tour began July 31st and ended August 22nd, 1958. I have
taken notes along the way and have covered on both sides about 18 small pages
telling of the history of the sites and cities, and some of my impressions, while
reports were given as we traveled.
Many fine friendships were made and feelings and stories shared. To quote from
sketchy notes some of my thoughts regarding our experience:
Never have I traveled so far, seen so many varied and interesting sites, nor tried to
learn so much in so seemingly short a space of time, than on our recent tour, covering
about 6,000 miles across 18 or more states and the eastern Province of Canada. (We
stayed at Niagara Falls on my 38th birthday (August 6th). The purpose of this tour
was to enhance the teaching of religion, especially Church History, among the
Brethren, and to feel the spirit of what our Pioneer ancestors endured for our sakes.
As we traveled back along the trail, we relived in some degree, through very
interesting on-the-scene reports and comments, the experiences many of our great
grand fathers and mothers endured. We breathed the same air, brisk and invigorating
through the mountains. We saw wind swept corn tassels of the plains and felt the
warm, damp closeness of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. We began to realize
the distances between valleys and forests and flat lands and tried to envision travel
with no roads or bridges in rain storms, mud, cold, heat, and walking most of the
way! We stood in ruts worn in rocks that were almost waist deep, bringing closer our
understanding of the rugged terrain over which they labored.
Two highlights of the trip for me were 1) Winter Quarters and 2) The Sacred Grove
where Ted gave such an inspiring and spiritual talk. (Elder Hugh B. Brown was at
the Pageant and for a Conference). At Winter Quarters I found names of my
ancestors who had died on the trail. For example: Luther Tuttle, age 7 months;
Edward Tuttle, age 54; Joseph Hickerson, age 2 years. After I attempted to sing
“Come, Come Ye Saints,” through tears, Ted said, “There should be a sequel verse


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too that song.” I believe the following is carved on the monument: “That the
struggles, the sacrifices and sufferings of the faithful pioneers and the cause they
represent shall never be forgotten, this monument is erected and dedicated.”
Benjamin Boyce, the father of my grandfather John Boyce, is buried at Mt. Pisgah,
having died of beatings and incarceration in a filthy jail in Missouri after being
kidnapped from Nauvoo. To add to his weakened condition, he helped many across
the River in cold weather and caught the ague and died at age 34 yrs.
There are about 14 pages of notes on small 6-ring binder pages of the trip to New
York from Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Chicago, (a boat trip around, skyline),
traveled on the Ohio Turnpike, Cleveland, big industrial city, Notre Dame University
(6 August, my birthday), then to Kirtland Temple, Newell K. Whitney Store, etc., on
to Rochester, N.Y., with visits to Palmyra and Hill Cumorah Pageant in the evening.
Sacred Grove, Niagara Falls. at sunrise!. 8 August 1958 we were in Albany, N. Y. 9
August on to Sharon, Vt. To Sacrament meeting with 2 buses loaded, at Cambridge.
New York, My Fair Lady. And much to see. St. Paul‟s Church, Wall Street, Old
Federal Courthouse, Bowling Green Park, Island of Manhattan was bought for $24.00
and a barrel of rum from the Indians (the first real estate swindle in history!) China
Town, Bowery(sad to see men who have lost hope, derelicts and alcoholics—lost
men, no address, no right to vote, etc. To Music Hall to see Cary Grant and Ingrid
Bergman in “Indiscreet”, also the Rockettes in a beautiful dance festival. On
streetcar we visited the USS Queen Elizabeth at dock. It is hard to imagine the
immensity of such a ship, 38 feet below water, two blocks long—a city within her
hulls.
On to Washington, D. C. through Philadelphia, PA, toured historic places such as
Liberty Bell (sealed off so as not to ring). We saw the Betsy Ross home, tall and
narrow, with bedrooms and play room for children and basement. This is only a
sketchy part of what we did and saw.
The LDS people have interest in the State of Vermont. In 1638 Robert Smith came
to America, married and settled in Topsfield, Mass. His first son Samuel also lived in
Topsfield. He had a son, Asael, and Asael had a son Joseph. Asael moved to
Windham, N. H. Asael was known as “crooked neck Smith.” The Smith family
settled in Tunbridge where Asael made a prophecy. He is the grandfather of the
Prophet Joseph Smith, Jr.
We visited the Senate on August 14th.1958. I later learned I should not have been
taking the following notes: “The Senator from Alabama gave a proposal to extend
money allocated to three or four colleges to study housing needs for small farmers.
($75,000). “. . .The reason hog sties and barns are built with no problem or
discussion is that pigs and cows have monetary value and people and children do
not!” (Off the record) Call for a roll call. Senator Capehart. . . .



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14 August 1958. Our first night in Washington, D. C., since fifteen years ago this
winter when we were here and stayed at Hotel 2400. Ted was in OCS School in
Quantico, Va. where he was an officer in the Marine Corps. Our life together has
been one long honeymoon, plus lots of hard work and many surprises. Our blessings
have been a hundred-fold. Our cup of happiness is brimming full. How can we
contain these many blessings, let alone be worthy of them?
Tis now 6:00 a.m. Ted leaves for Kansas City, Mo. for his Stake Conference
assignment. (It is a crucial time to leave me—possibly no May baby!) We saw many
more sites in Washington, D.C., then on to Gettysburg, the world‟s most accurately
marked battle field. We learned many sad facts about that war, father against son and
men on both sides from the State of Maryland. I have a note here that I believe
indicates that Abraham Lincoln checked out the following books from the Library of
Congress from Nov. 18, 1861 to July 29, 1862: “ Hydes Mormonism”, “Book of
Mormon”, “Mormonism in all Ages”, and “Mormons or LDS”
We drove, in two large buses, on to Youngstown, Ohio, a noisy night. Ted left for
flight to Chicago at 8:00 a.m., transferring from one airport to another via helicopter
and on to Kansas City, Mo. for Conference. The Tour group left for Chicago at 8:00
in the morning, also, traveling on the Ohio Indiana Turnpike almost all the way. John
and Elma Fugal (from Pleasant Grove) invited me to share breakfast, lunch and
breakfast with them. We rode the elevated and subway after shopping briefly at
Marshall Field‟s. To bed shortly after 10p.m. and slept well. I love Ted and will
miss him even more, now that I‟m getting used to having him with me day and night.
Sunday 17 August We are all ready to board buses to Springfield, Illinois and more
church history sites. All are well on the trip and are enjoying the experience. But I
do miss my dear hubby. At Lincoln Tomb we walked through beautiful marble halls,
read the inscriptions on the walls and signed our names. We visited New Salem
where Lincoln spent six years as postmaster, farmer, surveyor, log splitter, etc.
(Chicago is an Indian name, perhaps meaning Onion, as onions grow wild in that
vicinity). M.D. Beal
I have many brief notes taken as reports were given as we traveled. For instance,
“Emma Smith married Lewis Biddeman in 1847. He was an opportunist who moved
into Nauvoo. The following is a quote attributed to an old woman who knew Emma
and Biddeman: “When married to Joseph, Emma was a Saint. When married to
Biddemon, she was a dragon.” Brother Wendell Johnson.
Boggs: born in 1796, died 1860, preceded Brigham Young to Fort Laramie by l day.
Colonel Alexander William Doniphan was of immense stature, noble appearance,
brilliant mind, fearless and of great moral courage. He was sanguine, faithful, just,
and poetic in temperment. He was a champion of the down trodden, eloquent beyond
description and, without doubt, entitled to be classed among the greatest orators and



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lawyers that ever lived. Salaratus: the basis for salt rising bread with a terrific odor,
but nut-like in flavor when cooked.
20 August 1958 Wednesday, 6:30 a.m. Only two more days of being together day
and night. My Ted leaves for Coalville, Summit Stake Conference Saturday. I will
not be with him on Sundays until next July, 1959! Unless the assignment is close by
and I go to Conference. We are happy to be together and glad it is only the Gospel
work that separates us.
21 August Thursday the buses leave at 7:40 a.m. for a long ride to Denver, Colorado
from Hayes, Kansas. We are on our way home. In spite of three flat tires the
harmony among members of our tour is thrilling. John Fugal‟s word in describing
the experience: “Gratifacatious!” His sister, Alda Gardner, a Seminary teacher said,
“This bus is so long that you can feel the curvature of the earth!”
2 October 1958 7:15 a.m. at the Salt Lake City Airport. The weather is overcast and
the whole family is standing out in the breeze, watching a big United Airlines plane
taxi up. I hope this is Ted‟s plane, because it is landed safely. We are so anxious to
see him after such a long time. He has toured the Southern United States, including
New Mexico and Mexico.
7 October Tuesday. I drove in to the S. L. Tabernacle for a movie produced by my
cousin, Wetzel (Judge) Whitaker. The next morning at 7:30 Ted and I are enroute to
the Tabernacle for me to practice with the Singing Mothers, the Southern California
group. My Mother, Dad, Lydia and four children came in at 3:30 this morning. I am
so glad to see them, but sorry to have to leave. We plan to go to the Homestead in
Midway this Thursday for a Whitaker family reunion. Ted is in his office all day for
a Coordinators Conference and interviews with Seminary men until late. I may drive
home alone. I am now (9:30 a.m.) waiting at ZCMI Beauty Parlor for my hair
appointment. Should I get a manicure, also? I plan to go over to Ted‟s office in the
Education Department at noon and eat a box lunch with him.
Yvonne and Gordy and Debi surprised us at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday night, and they in
turn were very surprised to see the folks from Washington. On Thursday I baked
bread, fried chicken, made salad, etc. to prepare for the Reunion. We all reached the
Homestead by 5:15 p.m. We have learned that Bob Whitaker has received his call to
the Gulf States Mission, to be in the Mission Home October 21 st. Diane Tuttle and
Judy Brimley did a little dance at the Reunion, “I Don‟t Want to Play in Your Yard.”
10 October 1958. I rode in with Edna Pack and group to practice at the Tabernacle
from 7:00 a.m. until 8:30. We were back in our seats by 9:30. President McKay has
just walked in with the First Presidency and other General Authorities. Brother
Darley is about to conclude the prelude music. I pray I will sing clearly and
correctly. I‟m seated second row back behind the organ. Sister Florence Jepperson
Madsen is our director.



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20 October. Ted flew to Canada the weekend of deer season. (He would like to have
been hunting!)
4 November found me at Mary‟s Beauty Shop in American Fork at 10:30. I took the
three little ones for Dad to watch while my Mom was teaching a Relief Society
Theology lesson. I‟m getting beautiful for Thursday at the Lion House for a
delicious dinner. Sister Hunter and Maxine Hanks were hostesses.
4 December 1958. Sister Wirthlin called to invite me to the Wives Luncheon at the
Lion House. Sister Issacson‟s daughter fixed the lovely decorations. Those two
sisters must have been the hostesses. I should have gone to Entre Nu on the 11 th.
Dave turned 14 on Dec. 12th.
January 1, 1959. At 8:30 p.m. I wrote that I must pen at least a few words before the
first day of the New Year is past. Ted and I took Donna and Boyd Packer to the
Stake New Year‟s Eve Dance, where we had fun even though the orchestra wasn‟t
first rate. A big group of neighbors met at Bill Gardner‟s for hors d‟voures then went
to the dance together.
Clarissa Marne‟ Tuttle is three years old today. She is a sweet little girl with honey-
colored curls, who is a real chatterbox. She likes her kittens and has to pay for too
close an association with them. She weighs 35 pounds. Joni weighs 28 pounds.
They have fun and fights together. She had a cake and three candles, and toys.
2 January Ted spent Friday at the Provo Office. It is located in the Maeser Building
on the North end and one floor down from where I was Secretary to President
Franklin S. Harris before and briefly after I married. Dave and Diane caught the
11:00 a.m. bus to Salt Lake and stayed over night at June Tuttle Gee‟s home. They
are fairly close in age to Reed and Helen.
3 January, our cow had a bull calf in the night. Ted brought him into the utility room
to warm him up. We burned incense for an hour afterwards! Ted spent all day fixing
a warm place in the corral, among other outdoor tasks. Dave and Diane came home
on the 5:00 bus, having spent almost $9.00. We won‟t do that often. Ted and John
Fugal administered to Elma who is in the hospital again.
4 January Fast Sunday. All went to Sunday School. Ted sits on the stand. He gave a
sweet and powerful testimony. I about burst with pride. Diane and Bob took Joni to
the cry room! Choir practice is at 4:00 and Genealogy meeting at 5:00. Ted and I sat
together this time.
5 January, 1959 Elma Fugal is home. I took her three children in the morning and
fixed food for all at noon and again in the evening. At 6:30 went to Officer's‟
meeting before prayer meeting at 7:00. I‟m on the committee in charge of Programs
and Advertising for the Gold and Green Ball to be held January 31 st.
22 January 1959 When we awakened Joni looks fine this morning. Last night we
were afraid he had a case of measles that would keep me home from the Mt.

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Rubidoux Stake Conference in Riverside, California. We left home about 2:00 p.m.,
stopping a minute at Beaver and visited Brother Walter Kirksick‟s interesting,
expansive farm. He is a Seminary teacher there. He has pigeons, geese, chickens,
Gueanie hens, peacocks, cattle, a greenhouse, a workshop, and his son, Sam, is into
photography. His boys were out doing chores when we stopped. We ate at Cedar
City. Ted couldn‟t eat his salmon! We stayed in a fine motel in Las Vegas with
extra wide, comfy bed. Saturday left Las Vegas at 8:30, arriving in Pomona by 3:30.
We are treated very kindly at the homes of Stake Presidents.
Ted has assignments most every weekend now that the New Year has begun in
earnest. I have been out climbing cherry trees north of the little home to plan where
to orient our new home, where the front door should be, and how the sun will shine
into the house. The builder was ready to dig the foundation shortly after Ted left for
an assignment in February, so I must make some big decisions by myself. Ted left
February 11-21 for a Spanish American Mission Tour. His Stake assignments have
averaged at close to four each month since April, 1958
In March we learned that baby #6 will arrive the first part of October! We are
thrilled. There are many fruit trees in the orchard that need pruning as soon as
weather permits. The springtime brings much outdoor work, with garden to plant,
irrigate then weed and farm animals to tend, including milk cow, pigs, chickens,
horses, rabbits, etc. The hours to irrigate seem to come in the dead of night more
often than not. I was out with Ted after 10:00 one night helping to herd the water,
when I just suddenly fainted. That was the first time in my life and I don‟t know why
I did! Ted was very concerned.
Clari says: lad heats (leg hurts), feenah (finger), haun (hand) Joni says: Caw Caw
(Clari), geena (soft G) finger. Wah wah (water or milk), bain (pencil).
1 July 1959 A beautiful morning after a few days of rain, which broke the heat wave!
You might guess I am baking bread, frying chicken, etc., getting ready to go to Manti
Canyon a couple of days before the 4th of July when Ted speaks. We planned to get
away by 8:00 a.m. but eleven big loads of topsoil were hauled in that morning to the
new home under construction on Locust Avenue in Pleasant Grove.
As the fruit ripened we all picked cherries, with some hired help, then came some
apricots. The huge Early Elberta peaches were packed for selling with liners
separating each layer. I could handle the tall ladders with the rest of them, and really
enjoyed working outside. But I was also thrilled to be deciding colors of walls,
carpets, kinds of fireplace stone for the fireplace up stairs and the big one in the
basement. I chose new front room furniture with Danish Modern design. New
appliances for the kitchen were a must. We have a home with space for as many
more children as will come to us.
We began our move across lots when the pears ripened. We carried great numbers of
boxes of things to our new home toward the last of September. I remember dashing

                                          101
out to pick a bushel of pears when friends came to get them. It was quicker to return
along the road where my neighbor stopped me and insisted on carrying the loaded
bag of pears. He asked, “What is your husband thinking, letting you do this manual
labor and you expecting a baby any day!?”
We did make the final move to our first new home two weeks before our baby girl
arrived, October 4, 1959. As soon as Melissa was finally born, Ted left hurriedly for
an assignment that Sunday morning at Deseret Stake. All was well. From October
12-26 Ted toured the Southern States Mission.
My folks had moved from Washington State to American Fork over a year ago.
When my Dad first saw Melissa (Lisa) he said that she would have blue eyes and she
did. Blonde hair gave her a very distinct look from her black eyed, brown-haired
sister, Diane. Clari has light brown hair and brown eyes. Then the late peaches,
pears and later on, apples were ready to be picked.
It is interesting to note that for the next ten months my husband‟s assignments will be
in the following western states, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah, with about 40
different Stake Conferences.
In November Ted and Boyd Packer hunted pheasants with President Newell Baker in
Idaho. They each came home with a horse. Ted‟s is “Queen”, a registered Quarter
horse. „Tis good we have a barn, fence and corral to hold all our livestock. Ted
works on his Doctoral Thesis as he can and hopes to have it finished by June or
August. Our little old home is being rented in exchange for work. (Walt Bowen and
then Dale LeBaron and families lived there for the four years we were in South
America).
There have also been other births: our horse had a colt, a new calf was born, as well
as piglets and chicks within the past year.
In March of 1960 Ted wrote in his “Missionary Journal” that we “look forward to a
trip to the Hawaiian Islands November 16-December 4 to visit Seminaries and to
conduct two conferences there. George and Carma Merrill will go with us.”
President Newell Baker sent down a truckload of hay to help feed the horses. Ted
and Boyd Packer enjoy riding and learning from them. President Moyle called Ted
to leave the LDS Dept. of Education and work for him in the Missionary
Department!! Ted accepted with mixed emotions. No Hawaiian trip. “It means the
end of a 14 year association that has been extremely enjoyable and rewarding. It
means, also, the opportunity to meet with Pres. Moyle more often and to work with
Gordon Hinckley, who has worked in the Missionary Department for twenty five
years.”
Continuing to quote from Ted‟s Journal, he wrote in April, 1960 that “For the last
two years I have had the feeling that someday I will follow Matthew Cowley‟s



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footsteps out in the Pacific. I can‟t get over the feeling that I am to go on a mission
out there.”
For the 24th of July we all, except baby Melissa, drove to Yellowstone Stake where
Ted spoke, then we visited with Albon and Mary Smith at their cabin at Lake Hebgin.
Very enjoyable company, with whole wheat bread, etc.
15 August 1960 Ted says, “Busy days. The mundane presses hard. Very
discouraging. Can't seem to get even or ahead. Always pressures, pressures,
deadlines, appointments, schedules, meetings.” We did take a week‟s trip with
President Newell and Rosella Baker to their ranch in Bend, Oregon. Lots of fun, but
not easy to vacation. The Seminary Teachers, at the conclusion of Summer School,
gave Ted a beautiful saddle ($200). It was most kind of them.
TRIP TO SOUTH AMERICA WITH JOSEPH FIELDING SMITH
Ted Tuttle‟s whole family waved goodbye as the Smiths and he boarded the plane for
New York, the beginning of a three-month tour of all of the areas in South and
Central America where there are missions. He was privileged to study the scriptures
each day for two weeks with President Smith on the ship to Brazil. They toured
Brazil, South Brazil, Uruguay. Argentina, Andes and Central American Missions.
They interviewed half , (some 765) of all the Missionaries, and met with many of the
Saints. “I shed many tears over their plight in these nations. I had two spiritual
manifestations that I would go back to these countries to help out in the missionary
efforts—one on the boat going down and one later.” It was a marvelous experience.
The family was all well while I was gone.”
Meanwhile, back at the Ranch, Marne‟ found that she had many duties to perform,
being Mother and man of the house, except for Dave‟s good help. Diane pitched in
and did her share, also. We really enjoyed cleaning and decorating our new home. It
was so comfortable and modern!
I find that we are expecting a baby in the Spring! We are working on the planting of
a lawn and some shrubs, with flowers around the big rocks at the south of the home.
There is much to do before winter sets in.
One day I chased an errant pig and caught him in the ditch at the west end of the
property. The only way I could get him home (pigs do not herd) was to catch him by
his two back legs and “wheelbarrow” him home. Whether the weather was cold or
colder, there were still outside chores to keep us busy, morning and night.
Ted and I did correspond as often as possible, with mail not very reliable to and from
the South American countries. I got the message that we might be making a move, so
began cleaning out drawers and sorting things, even though no one else knew of this
possibility, except Ted! Neither of us wanted to think we would be leaving our new
home after just 18 months. We were finally settled in a home that we would be
happy to stay in for the rest of our lives and fill it with babies. However, sometime


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during this pregnancy I had the distinct thought that “Baby, you got in just under the
wire!” I didn‟t want to believe I had really had that thought!


GREATEST ENTOURAGE IN THE HISTORY OF MISSION TOURS
By A. Theodore Tuttle
We had left home the 13th of October, 1960. Elder Joseph Fielding Smith and wife,
Jesse Evans, and I, to carry their luggage and look after them, so I presumed, as we
boarded the ship bound for South America. We had toured missions in Brazil and
had arrived in the Uruguayan Mission around the middle of November. I was alone,
chaffing at the bit, and wanted to get home for Christmas.
The Smiths were having a great time, especially Sister Smith. We were a group of
three couples y “Tambien Tuttle”. With the Smiths were Arthur and Geniel Jensen
and Tom and Helen Fyans, the new President of the Uruguayan/Paraguayan Mission,
and I, heading out to Isla Patrulla by plane, since it was the best way to get there
because of bad roads.
We went to the airport and there was the nice, new plane all dismantled. Art was sick
about that, but they showed us an old red plane (looked like a German Falkner (?). It
was decided that President and Sister Smith would go with Geniel and Art Jensen in
the plane. When they got in, a door flew open and the pilot wired it together. The
plane then bounced out and over the hill and down, and back. It revved up again, and
I could see that they were not going to make it.
Again over the hill they went and the sound of the motor faded away. We could hear
nothing but a drone. Pretty soon the plane came putting up to where we were. Out
came Art. President Smith had cut himself on the head and was bleeding. He got
out. The pilot said he could make it by going clear to the end of the runway.
I said, “Why not let Tom and me ride out?” President Smith exclaimed, “Nobody is
going in this ___ plane!” Then I said, “Damn plane!” President Smith said, “Thank
you!”
We took two cabs and finally arrived at Isla Patrulla, where people were waiting for
our arrival and the meeting. Everyone spoke once again, as we had done in previous
meetings. After the meeting we experienced a “gaucho asado”.
A fire outside near a shelter was blazing with an iron grill perpendicular and next to it
with meat hung on it with the hide and hair still on it. As it cooked fat dripped into
the fire. Finally it was cooked and smelled delicious.
As you know, President Smith is a vegetarian, but he was a good sport. He ate some
along with others, by holding the hair, putting the meat in his mouth and cutting it off
with a very sharp knife! The meat was delicious, if you didn‟t let a little hair and
hide bother you. (A. T. Tuttle)


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They traveled by bus in the rain in one of their trips and even had to push the bus out
of a big mud hole. Sister Smith was a good sport all the way. At Christmas time in
1960, Ted left the Smiths in Peru to fill in briefly for a Mission President in Central
America who fell ill suddenly. While Ted was away Sister Smith fell and broke her
arm. She blamed him for deserting her. All in all, it was really an historic tour.
Feeling he would be closely involved with the work there, Ted looked at the various
situations wherever he went with real interest, noting the many fine women and
children and few men in the congregations.
On Ted‟s arrival home in mid January, he was dismayed to find that his 5-month
pregnant wife had sold a prize mare and her colt for a pittance. (Not forgiven, yet?)
Ted flew to South America again right after General Conference in April, returning
just two weeks prior to the birth of his baby #7, born 11 May 196l. We named him
Boyd Jeremy Tuttle, after Ted‟s close friend, Boyd Packer.
The very day of his son‟s birth Ted came into the hospital room and read the call to
Marne‟: to travel to South America as a family, and to leave as soon as possible.
When Baby Boyd was two weeks old, President Henry D. Moyle came out to our
home in Pleasant Grove to visit and then walked out to the barn with Bob, Clari and
Jon to see a new colt. President Moyle was a strong-willed man. When he became a
Counselor in the First Presidency he asked himself: “How do you counsel a Prophet
of God? I decided that when an opinion was discussed I would state my own. As
soon as the Prophet of the Church said, „Brethren, I feel that this is what we ought to
do‟, instantly that became my opinion.”
We sorted, gave away, disposed of, packed, wrapped, stored, etc., a house full of
stuff, said goodbye to friends, family, dog and cat and sold our home the very last
week. We left Pleasant Grove when Boyd was 21/2 months old. Our oldest was
David, age almost 17, leaving High School and friends without a lot of protest.
[DMT says I left my horse, my car and my girl, but it‟s true I felt almost relieved to
be “snatched” from my too-early, too serious relationship!] Diane was 14, looking
forward to a new adventure.
      FLIGHT OF FAMILY FROM SALT LAKE CITY TO NEW YORK
After a tour of Church History sites and the Hill Cumorah Pageant, for about two
weeks, the family of nine sailed on the SS Argentina from New York 11 Aug 196l.
No sleeping on deck with a four and a two-year-old anxious to watch water from
between rails at the front of the ship. We won a prize for having the most children
and for our pumpkin costumes we hand stitched out of an orange burlap-type
material, with crepe paper green hats and a green vine with a blossom at the end and
a sign, “Utah‟s Best Crop.”
We were met in Santos by Grant and Geri Bangerter. They drove all of us
throughout the area, with new sights and sounds at every turn. We ate delicious


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bananas until we about burst! Then back on board ship and on to Montevideo,
Uruguay, arriving August 25th, a national holiday. Therefore, the Tuttles
disembarked with only their suitcases. The household goods, appliances, cars, etc.
sailed on to Buenos Aires to return later. Some things were in the Aduana quite a
few weeks. We were met at the dock by President Thomas and Helen Fyans,
daughters and members. They had the rented home ready for us with flowers, food in
the refrigerator, and even the beds were turned down. A welcome sight and so very
kind and thoughtful of them. Our warm welcome was the beginning of our four
busy, eventful and learning years in South America.
At that time five missions encompassed a great area of South America, with
missionaries in Uruguay-Paraguay, Argentina, Peru, and Sao Paulo and Curitiba,
Brazil. On the 8th of October, 1961 the new Chilean Mission was formed, with A.
Delbert and Mable Palmer as first Mission Presidents. Prior to this Chile had been a
part of the Andes Mission, presided over by Vernon L. and Faun Sharp, with
headquarters in Lima, Peru. The missionaries in Chile were visited by President
Sharp once a month. A “Mission Home”, with office and sleeping quarters for the
Office Elders and the Sharps, was set up in Santiago on Ave. El Bosque. Talk about
long distance supervising! (That same home is now the Mission Home for the
Santiago Chile North Mission. It is beautifully refurbished, modernized, and
tastefully decorated).
Saturday, September 30, 1961. At 8:00 a.m. a Missionary meeting was held in Lima,
Peru with President and Sister Vernon Sharp, President and Sister Delbert Palmer and
President and Sister A. Theodore Tuttle. President Palmer said, quoting Elder Lee,
“The church stands or falls on the Joseph Smith story. Without it we are nothing,
with it we have everything.” Sister Sharp spoke on keeping healthy, being wise in
eating habits, explaining what a balanced diet consists of. President Tuttle said that
the Gospel will save South America.
25 November, 1961 I was with my husband in Miraflores, Peru. President Sharp
welcomed new missionaries and they were instructed by Zone Leaders on
presentation of the new plan, method of delivery, how to help Elders memorize. Try
to anticipate opposition and have answers ready. How to use the small flannel board.
A testimony meeting was held and Elders were encouraged to build a strong
foundation in the gospel while in the Mission field, to build on all the rest of your
life. Sister Sharp said that a testimony and wisdom must be self earned. You can
earn the spirit of the Lord.
On the 16th of September, 1962, the Argentine Mission was divided and the
Argentina, Cordoba Mission was created, with President Ronald V. and Patricia Judd
Stone presiding. Laird and Edna Snelgrove presided in the Buenos Aires Mission
and Finn and Sarah Paulsen presided in the Curitiba, Brazil Mission.



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Countless times Ted would express his thankfulness for and confidence in each of the
Mission Presidents and their wives, as he appreciated (and envied) their being on the
front lines, facing challenges and responsibilities, with an opportunity to teach the
hundreds of young men and women in their charge. It seemed that each couple there
at that time brought particular gifts and abilities unique to the needs of their area.
Many were the prayers, as a group and individually, that ascended heavenward in
behalf of the country as South America as a whole, and in each mission, where
specific challenges had to be met.
Uprisings and revolutions in the various countries, specifically in Argentina and Peru,
then later in Chile when President Allende came into power, put fear of Communism
in the hearts of everyone. The Jewish people were the first to immediately leave
Chile, taking only a minimum of possessions. We later learned that employees of the
United States government, and then the Mormon Missionaries were on a list to be
“eliminated.” We felt that Satan was aware of the potential for growth of the Church
on this continent, and was using every possible means to thwart the work of the Lord.
For over 400 years the indigenous people, in Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, etc. where the
Catholic church was powerful, not only religiously, but politically, were kept
ignorant. That is, with few schools, no access to the Bible, they were easily swayed
to fight against the Mormon Church and do anything possible to hinder the spreading
of the Gospel. Politically they had power to deny visas for Elders to enter from the
United States, which often occurred.
With the use of “Labor Missionaries” many churches were built, and as they learned
a trade and studied the gospel, they became missionaries from their own country and
often to one of the other S. A. Missions. Each Mission had as a goal to make every
District look and function like a Stake. Although while Elder Tuttle was there no
Stake was formed, when the first Stake was formed in Brazil, it set in motion Stakes
being formed in every mission just after 1966. The second Stake was formed in
Buenos Aires.
President Tuttle and those working with him as Mission Presidents, were aware of the
many challenges posed in bringing more Fathers into the Church and the training of
Priesthood leadership as the work began to blossom. A new feeling of optimism,
brightness and hope gave impetus to the spreading of the gospel. One of the other
great challenges was in housing the new converts in Churches more easily accessible
to the members. An open look needed to be taken as to the type of Church buildings
needed, especially in the outlying areas. Smaller, less expensive buildings were
needed nearer to members, who had no cars, nor money for buses. This concept
would need to be approved by the Church Building Committee, who could only
envision Wasatch type chapels at that time.
Another challenge was faced when it became evident that materials in Spanish were
not easily translated and shipped from the United States as needed. During some


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early Mission Presidents‟ Seminars this problem was temporarily solved by each
Mission assuming responsibility for a specific Auxiliary, Priesthood, Gospel
Doctrine, Relief Society manuals and other materials, which came in English and
were translated into either Portuguese or Spanish, then distributed to the other
missions.
Experiences in the American-Uruguayan and British schools for our children proved
to be challenging. Our youngest two learned Spanish, and a little French, along with
English! David was the first North American to leave our fledgling Carrasco Branch
for the Andes Mission, having been called and set apart by President Hugh B. Brown,
who was touring the South American Missions in 1962. President Sterling
Nicolaysen assigned David to Cuzco, Peru, where he served for almost 13 months.
On returning home the capillaries in his cheeks and hands remained red and visible
for a long time, because of exposure to cold at such a high elevation.
Our Diane became my right-hand helper, taking on much responsibility as a 14 to 18-
year-old when I would leave for Mission Tours, Seminars and General Conference
with my husband. My plump, blonde baby boy was an attraction wherever we went
with mothers, especially in Brazil, wanting to touch and hold him. After our first
year in Uruguay, Missionary Assistants were chosen. They were very vital to the
smooth running of the office and also the home when both President and Marne‟
were away.
On Sunday, April 15, 1962 when we were home for General Conference, Ted spoke
in the Grove Ward in Pleasant Grove. He said, “I dreamed I was in Salt Lake without
being invited. I felt very uncomfortable and not welcome. I dreamed the same
dream when in the Mission field; that I was home and no one wanted to talk to me. I
counsel you to learn another language. Because of who we are and what we will be,
we must be able to instruct them in their own language. There are 120 million people
in South America and 872 missionaries. We must speed up the means of
communication. One reason that I am there is to fulfill prophecy. None is
automatically fulfilled without work! The hastening process is to be hastened by our
efforts. The unity of the members of this Church, no matter where they are in the
world, is amazing to me. A new convert thinks, talks, acts like an LDS. They leave
their old life, take on a new life and become a new person. The same gospel is taught
wherever it is found.” He then quoted Doctrine & Covenants, Section 1 (which is
really #70, but is used as the preface). “He knew that his children, once they were
touched by His spirit, would obey him.”
June 16, 1962: A personal note finds me sitting in a dentist‟s office in Montevideo
with Bob, Clari, and Jonathan. We also brought Dave and Diane, Dianne Tipton,
from the Canal Zone, and Elder Woodward. They caught a bus and will try to go on
out to El Cerro, “Montevideo”. Just the bus ride will be interesting.



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Irma Cobes was a fine seamstress who made a couple of suits and some dresses for
me. She married our Choir director, Hermano Piedras, and they later made their
home in Canada. I noticed that she used a very low wattage bulb to sew by, because
of the high cost of electricity.
Ted returned after 9:30 last night from Buenos Aires, and Cordoba, Argentina, after
conferring with President Snelgrove and Brother Arthur F. Smith on the purchase of
land for a Mission home and rental of a home for Mission headquarters in Cordoba.
Ted had spent three weeks in Peru and Chile, arriving home Wednesday afternoon.
He left again Thursday for Argentina, returning Friday evening.
A more detailed account is found in the Church Historians‟ Office, of which I have a
copy, for the years 1961-1965.
      RETURN TO SALT LAKE CITY FROM SOUTH AMERICA
We left South America with heavy hearts in the fall of 1965, after many growing and
spiritual experiences, feeling that we would not see our many friends again. We did
leave part of our hearts in that vast, diversified land.
In the summer of 1965, Boyd K. Packer, (who in 1961 was called as a General
Authority, as Ted predicted would happen), contacted Ted by phone in Chile. He
asked if we wanted to rent their home on Forest Bend Drive in Salt Lake County,
while they presided over the New England Mission, with headquarters in Boston. It
answered our question of where to house a now grown-larger family than when we
had left our brand new home four years ago. The little old rented home in Pleasant
Grove on the seven acres of fruit orchard was available, but not adequate now.
We spent three busy, delightful years on their small farm, able to have a milk cow,
chickens, a dog, and a big garden, etc. A horse and a Pony of the Americas Ted got
from our Best Man, Robert Poulson, a Veterinarian, as a Christmas present for our
children. They were certainly pleased and excited when they saw the cart the pony
was hitched up to.
Ted Tuttle‟s assignment on our return from Montevideo, Uruguay, in August of
1965, was to be involved with all of the Spanish-speaking Missions North of South
America, including Central America, Mexico, New Mexico, Texas, etc.
When the Packers returned we rented the home of Elder Thorpe B. Isaacson, (a
cousin to Ted‟s mother, Clarice Beal Tuttle). The home was located at 6681 South
Highland Drive on 20 acres of pastureland, with a duck pond and space for a garden,
a long red-roofed barn, a shed and a chicken coop. Of course, we had a big Holstein
milk cow, our Pony of the Americas, named Sherah, and chickens, etc. We tended
Brother Issacson‟s fancy horses, including a Paint and a Tennessee Walker and a
beautiful big colt.
I spent a very frightening and exhausting early morning after everyone had left for
school, one cold March in 1969. I discovered that the big colt had slipped and caught

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his head in the hay feeder. He was lying on his side in an awkward position. I had
no one I could call. No close neighbors, Ted was away. What to do? First, I prayed
for inspiration, then realized I would need to saw a 2x6 board to free his head. The
weather was cold and it was icy underfoot. The horse had ceased struggling and I
knew that time was of the essence. My arms ached as I sawed with all my strength
and with a prayer. I kept hitting the colt with a board to keep him alert. Finally, I
could pry the 2x6 board apart. Then I did lie down on the icy ground and I wedged
my shoulder under his and pried his head up and hit him again, until he began to
realize that he was free. Then I yanked and pulled on the halter as he struggled to get
his front feet on the solid ground. Then I beat him on the rump until he stood on
shaky four legs. I must have pulled and walked around with him for over 30 minutes
before he had the will to walk on his own. I gave him some grain and a bucket of
warm water to drink. I don‟t know how long he had been down. I offered a prayer of
gratitude when I finally realized that he was out of danger. I fully realized the
responsibility we had caring for those very expensive animals!
While on the subject of animals, and at the same farm, our big Holstein cow became
bloated on too much fresh alfalfa. I don‟t recall how I happened to call John
Whiteley, a Veterinarian, who was able to come over quickly to access the situation.
He required a helper and I was the one who held up the cut flap of skin by the hair to
make it possible for John to make an incision in her stomach so that the air and
pressure, etc., could be released. She was fine and healed quickly.
We finally decided to build a home on an acre on Forest Bend Drive. As before,
when I climbed in the cherry tree to determine where the front door should be in the
Pleasant Grove home, I climbed in some old apple trees on Forest Bend Drive to
make sure the sun would come in the kitchen and the study from the east. In just the
nick of time I had the builders put a couple of vents in the cement foundation for the
fruit room, since we had learned that “root cellars” didn‟t work without them.
Just before we made the move I broke my left ankle while checking the drainage
ditch, from the old duck pond, that ran under the house on the 20 acres on Highland
Drive. I thought what a pity if someone should fall in that black sludge and at that
moment I slipped on the wet grass, turned my ankle and fell into it. Pulling myself
up and crawling on hands and knees, I made slow progress toward home. A close
neighbor man, who happened to be home, helped me in to my bathroom. I knew it
was broken, but had to get into the tub to clean up before going to the Doc. I have a
picture of me handing a jug of water to a roofer on our new home, standing on the
third rung of a ladder with a cast on.
I am wondering if that was the same big Holstein cow who got herself into trouble in
our new barn that we had built that next spring (1971) on half an acre we acquired
from the Proctors for $8,000. Ted had built a “root pit” under the floor of the tack
room. We had some big sacks of oats stored in the room. The door to the pit was


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opened by lifting it up from the floor. One day we heard some loud mooing; that big
cow had gotten in the barn, found the oats and had fallen through the door on the
floor, broken down because of her great weight, and landed in the root pit, with only
her head showing! We considered many possible ways to get her out. Too heavy to
lift, unless with a crane. How to get a crane into the barn? We could feed her where
she is, but how to milk her? Finally I wondered, “If we put bales of hay down there
and she stands on some, then add more she may be able to climb out on her own.”
This plan worked! Luckily, we had quite a stack of baled hay on hand. Not only
hay, but also the barn contained tons of wheat, some cleaned and in a leak-proof bin,
and some for chickens, etc. My dear Ted was providing for our need to be self-
sufficient. There were also many tons of hay cubes stored in a big bin inside the
barn. After repairing the door to the “root cellar,” which did not work as such
because no ventilation was provided, Ted had a couple of tons of coal stored there.


From a letter dated 19 Nov 1970, I find I traveled with Ted to Bogota, Cali, Cucuta
and Pereira, in Colombia, and to the cities of Caracas and Maracaibo in Venezuela,
on a special assignment. Missionary meetings were held in each city and he
interviewed 112 missionaries all together. Evidently that was one mission, extending
over an area of nearly 2,000 miles from the Guianas to the Ecuadorian border. By jet
we arrive in these cities in 35 to 55 minutes. It would take 12 to 24 hours of hard
travel over rough and dangerous roads by car. We spent a few hours at the airport
waiting for flights or for the fog to lift, but generally we were right on schedule. This
land is green and lush and beautiful. The fruits are especially delicious: papaya,
pithaya (a cactus-type fruit with little black seeds in it), bananas, pineapple,
grapefruit, oranges, etc. The sad part is to see tiny little children begging and trying
to sell little things with no adults around, early in the morning and late at night.
When a new city was being opened recently and after the missionaries had visited the
Mayor and Chief of Police, the Catholic Bishop called a meeting of all the city
officials and warned that something should be done to stop the Mormons. One of the
men said, “You really shouldn‟t worry. Do you know they require their members to
quit smoking, drinking, to live morally clean, etc.?” The conclusion was that there
was no need to be concerned because people would not give up all that for religion!
There is a good spirit here in this part of South America.
On February 25, 1973 I was Music Director for the Union 8 th Ward. The Bishop was
Wayne E. Saunders with Robert Haight as a Counselor.
September 23, 1973 found me picking apples in Pleasant Grove with Ted, son Bob,
and David Tuttle. We had loaded many bushels into an enclosed truck we borrowed
from Albon Smith, and were about ready to return to Salt Lake. I was high on the top
of a ladder reaching for that last Red Delicious when the ladder got out from under
me and I fell, landing on my left leg and causing a serious break. Dave had just


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driven away in his car to Orem. I knew I couldn‟t stand. While I lay there my
husband and son, Bob, gave me a Priesthood blessing. They found a wide board,
slipped it under me and carried me to the back of the truck. They then loaded the rest
of the apples and closed the door. As Bob sped toward home, Ted was in the back
with me, moving the bushels of apples from in front of the door, to behind me, so that
I could be taken out when we arrived at the Doctor‟s. I was fearful that he would trip
over my broken leg! We unloaded me at Dr. Fogg‟s office at the Cottonwood Mall.
I was hospitalized and an operation was necessary to screw the bones together in the
spiral break on both the tibia and the fibia. Luckily, my leg healed and has stood me
in good stead all these years.
However, I was on crutches until the following June, first with a cast to my hip that I
wore on a trip to California for Bob and Debra‟s Open House, after their wedding on
October 12th. Diane made a long dress for the wedding, which hid the cast. Then a
couple of months later I accompanied Ted as he toured the Australia and New
Zealand Missions. He was patient with me, wheeling me around, and arranging for
me to be “fork lifted” into the airplanes. I enjoyed experience of seeing a new land,
but was sorry to be a burden to Ted. He never said a word of complaint. Moral:
Don‟t reach too dangerously for that “red” apple! By the month of June I was able to
put my full weight on that leg.
Ted and I did a lot of traveling during the next few years. My passport read:
“Occupation, housewife, unemployed.” Yet to see the pages of inserts, stamped in
and out of countries seems to belie that description.



In August of 1974 Ted and I toured the Vancouver, British Colombia Mission.
From 22-24 October, 1974 a Mission Presidents‟ Seminar was held in Singapore with
seven Mission Presidents and their wives present. The following persons met in
meetings in the Shangri-La Hotel: President & Sister A. Theodore Tuttle, First
Council of Seventy. Regional Representative: President & Sister Brent Hardy; Hong
Kong Mission: Pres. & Sister Jerry D. Wheat; Korea Mission: Pres. & Sister Eugene
P. Till; Philippines Cebu City Mission: Pres. & Sister Carl D. Jones; Philippines
Manila Mission: Pres. & Sister Raymond Goodson; Taiwan Mission: Pres. & Sister
Thomas P. Nielson; Thailand Mission: Pres. & Sister Paul D. Morris. Our Hosts
were Pres. & Sister Miller F. & Alice Shurtleff: Singapore Mission. Conrad H.
Burgoyne of Murdock Travel joined us.
Some few weeks before the fall of Saigon, Vietnam, Ted and I traveled to Singapore
and met with President Wheat. Among other places we visited, we had the rare
opportunity of holding a Church meeting in a lovely little building in Saigon. There
were so many members present that many had to stand outside and/or listen through


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open windows. The weather was warm and pleasant as we walked under a long vine
covered bowery to reach the building. President The (Tay) took very capable charge
of the meeting. It was a pleasure to meet him, as he spoke very fine English. We
stayed in the home of a lovely couple, and I went shopping for an hour or so, to get
the flavor of the city. When we left, we didn‟t know the danger that would befall
these sweet people. Within just a few weeks, most all the members of the Church
were helped to leave the country through the diligence of President The. Because he
stayed to assist others to leave on the last planes out, he had no way of escaping. He
did manage to help some family members flee. Almost two years passed before
anyone heard from him. A letter to President Wheat from Brother The said he was in
a concentration camp for over 14 months “to be reformed into a good citizen.” He
knew not when he would be released. He asked that an enclosed letter be mailed to
his fiancee. Brother The (Tay) must have been imprisoned early in 1975.


On July 29, 1975 Marne‟ gave a talk at the Erda Ward in Tooele for the MIA Maids‟
Rose Evening.
Between many other assignments, Ted was called to be Area Supervisor of the Andes
South American Area in October of 1975, to live in Quito, Ecuador. His area
encompassed Ecuador, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, and for a time, Chile.
Our two youngest children accompanied us to Quito, Ecuador. Lisa, age 16, and
Boyd, age 14.
We have been close to the workings of the Church as regards the moving of
missionaries from a country. As the North Vietnamese ran rampant down the coast
and as province after province fell to them, many refugees fled before the terror of
war. No help came from any source. Ted Tuttle said, “My heart went out to these
people and especially to our members in Saigon, as the enemy moved in closer. I
could not get them from my thoughts. I dreamed I was there trying to help them get
to safety.”
Ted talked to President Wheat in Hong Kong, advising missionaries to leave Saigon.
Seven missionaries left Thursday, April 3, 1975. The two remaining there were
contacted by David C. Hoopes, calling from Palm Springs directly through Pan Am,
and talked to Elder Bowman, advising him to bring the records out or burn them. On
Friday the last two Elders got out, miraculously. The plane in front of them blew up
(bomb) on which many orphans and wives of Embassy officials boarded. This
delayed the missionaries‟ flight by four hours. They brought the records out! The
only way we can get a message to Saigon is through the American Government.
The two years we lived in Quito, Ecuador were filled with experiences unique to that
part of South America. We learned to love the members, and became better
acquainted with the Otavalanos by going to Brother Rafael Tobango‟s home one
evening to ask him to be the District President. Brother Tobango spoke Quechua and

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Spanish. He says he learned to read the Book of Mormon by the aid of an angel. We
went with President David Ferrel, along a hidden path to the humble home, with only
a wick in a tin for a light to show the kernels of corn on the table that represented a
District President, his two counselors and the Branch Presidents, which comprised his
District. When asked if he would be willing to serve as District President, and told
that the Lord had chosen him, Brother Tobango said, “I will pray about it tonight and
meet you early in the morning at the Chapel.” He was there when we arrived from
our hotel at 7:00 a.m. to the almost completed new building. Brother Tobango said,
“Yes, I prayed about it and I will do my best.”
His story is told elsewhere, but I would like to say that he was the first to organize a
bus trip to the Sao Paulo Temple, an arduous ride for at least five days each way. He
invited the Latinos in Quito and other cities to go with the folks from Otavalo. When
they arrived at the Temple the travelers were dirty, hungry and penniless. They were
taken in and loved by the Temple workers, fed, cleaned and housed. They stayed
there for a number of days performing temple ordinances for themselves and their
loved ones. Then the long, bumpy ride home again didn‟t seem so hard for they
knew that they had served in the house of the Lord.
We traveled throughout the countries under Elder Tuttle‟s direction, working with the
six Mission Presidents: President David Richards of Colombia, Pres. Marsh of
Venezuela, President Bishop of Peru, President McAlliste of Bolivia, Pres. Bradford
of Chile (until Chile was put with the South American South Area) and President
David Ferrel of Ecuador. We learned much during our stay there. Most meaningful
for us was our growing love for people regardless of their station or circumstance in
life.
My mother died May 23, 1976. When I bid her „goodbye‟ in April as we returned
from General Conference to Quito, I felt I would not see her again. She had earned a
final rest as her sweet spirit escaped from her arthritis- ridden body.
While living in Quito daughter Clarissa was able to come and visit us. David and
Billie also came to teach reading, writing and music and to begin the process of
adopting a baby from Chile.
I could recite a story about the Alliance Academy in Quito, Ecuador where we lived
for 2 years from 1975-1977. The history is written in a more detailed manner in the
Historians Office, of which I have a copy. Also see years 1975-1977.




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