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COURSE CATALOG 2011 – 2012

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COURSE CATALOG 2011 – 2012 Powered By Docstoc
					Clarke County High School


     COURSE
     CATALOG

  2011 – 2012



        240 Westwood Road
     Berryville, Virginia 22611
          540-955-6130
       www.clarke.k12.va.us
                                   Clarke County High School
Telephone                            240 Westwood Road                          FAX
540-955-6130                      Berryville, Virginia 22611                    540-955-6139



                                                                February 2011

Dear Students,

Once again, it is time to contemplate your goals and future plans. Each year you choose courses for
the following year that reflect your interests, future plans, and your goals for your post high school
options.

The course catalog contains important information to help you plan your high school course of studies
and your schedule for the coming year. There are a wide variety of courses and options from which to
choose. In selecting courses for your schedule, it is important to consider your academic, business,
technology, and career interests and strengths as well as your goals and plans after high school.

Guidance counselors and teachers will help you make the best plan for meeting graduation
requirements and preparing for a successful future. The scheduling process offers ample opportunities
to seek their advice. In addition, teachers may make recommendations for classes you should take
next year. Please use these resources at any time to help you with scheduling decisions.

Once you have made your course selections, we are then able to determine our staffing needs and
schedule our teachers for next year. Please note that some courses may not be offered if they do not
have sufficient enrollment. You will be notified of this as soon as possible so you can plan accordingly.
Schedule changes in the fall are discouraged as they are extremely disruptive to balanced class loads
that have been carefully developed during the spring and summer months.

Please read this course catalog carefully. Use the four-year plan worksheet to set goals and revise,
refine, or develop your 4-year plan. We encourage you to challenge yourself in high school by
obtaining the Advanced Studies Diploma and awards for student achievement such as the Governor’s
Seal, Board of Education Seal, Career and Technical Education Seal, Seal of Advanced Mathematics
and Technology, and the Civics Seal.

Clarke County High School offers a variety of different programs that can be both challenging and
rewarding. Our aim is to develop a connected learning community that C.A.R.E.S. about the
achievement and personal growth of all students by focusing on Communication, Articulation,
Responsibility, Enthusiasm, and Safety.

If you have any questions about the programs offered at the high school, please do not hesitate to call
me. I look forward to another successful year at Clarke County High School.


                                                                Sincerely,


                                                                ]É{Ç jA jxÜÇxÜ
                                                                John W. Werner, Ed.D.
                                                                Principal




                                                   1
                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

PURPOSE OF COURSE CATALOG AND FOUR-YEAR PLANNING CHART.............................................. 3
VIRGINIA GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS ENTERING 9TH GRADE 2010 - 11............... 4
       Standard Diploma ......................................................................................................... 5
       Standard Technical Diploma ........................................................................................... 6
       Advanced Studies Diploma ............................................................................................. 7
       Advanced Technical Diploma .......................................................................................... 8
VIRGINIA GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS ENTERING 9TH GRADE 2003 – 2010........... 9
       Standard Diploma ........................................................................................................10
       Advanced Studies Diploma ............................................................................................12
       First-Time Transfers to a Virginia Public School................................................................13
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OFFERED AT CCHS .................................................................................14
       Career and Technical Education .....................................................................................15
       Agriculture ..................................................................................................................15
       Technology .................................................................................................................16
       Health Services Classes ................................................................................................16
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE INFORMATION.......................................................................18
       The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma..................................................................18
       Typical IB Diploma Schedules ........................................................................................18
       IB Certificates .............................................................................................................19
       IB Testing ...................................................................................................................20
       IB College Credit..........................................................................................................20
DUAL ENROLLMENT .................................................................................................................20
VIRTUAL VIRGINIA..................................................................................................................21
THE BRIDGE PROGRAM............................................................................................................21
       Frequently Asked Questions about the Bridge Program .....................................................21
       Sample Four-Year Plan for Early IB Diploma and Bridge Scholars .......................................22
STANDARDS OF LEARNING ......................................................................................................23
       Standards of Learning Tests ..........................................................................................23
       Standard and Verified Credits ........................................................................................23
GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION .............................................................................................24
       Activity/Athletic Eligibility..............................................................................................24
       Course Descriptions .....................................................................................................24
       Credit Opportunities .....................................................................................................24
       Diploma Seals .............................................................................................................24
       Dropping Courses ........................................................................................................24
       Pass/Fail Options .........................................................................................................25
       Promotion ...................................................................................................................25
       Report Cards and Interims ............................................................................................25
       Schedule and Adjustments ............................................................................................25
       Subject Load ...............................................................................................................25
       Summer Course Opportunities.......................................................................................25
       Testing Fees................................................................................................................25
GRADING SCALES ...................................................................................................................26
GRADE POINT AVERAGE ..........................................................................................................26
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ..........................................................................................................27
       English .......................................................................................................................27
       Mathematics................................................................................................................31
       Science.......................................................................................................................35
       Social Studies..............................................................................................................39
       World Languages .........................................................................................................43
       Health and Physical Education .......................................................................................47
       Fine Arts .....................................................................................................................49
       Career and Technical Education .....................................................................................53
SPECIAL EDUCATION...............................................................................................................62
       Modified Standard or Special Diploma Options .................................................................62
       Special Education Functional Curriculum Program ............................................................63



                                                                   2
                                    PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE

This course catalog is designed to help students and their parents make informed choices about high
school courses, understand Virginia graduation requirements, and plan for their high school career.
Students should study this course catalog and consult with their parents, school counselors and
teachers to plan their individual program of studies. The 4-year plan chart can help organize an
individualized program of studies. This catalog only represents the classes that could be
offered. However, many courses, especially electives may not “run” because of low
enrollment and staffing allocations within the district.


                                         FOUR-YEAR PLAN

Proper planning will ensure that students will complete all of the required courses and be able to enroll
in Career and Technology, Fine Arts or other electives of their choice. The following four-year plan
should be completed by students and their parents using the course catalog as a guide. Note that
there are certain English, Math, Science, Social Studies, Physical Education, and World Language
requirements. In addition to these required classes, one credit in a Fine or Practical Art class must be
taken sometime during high school.


       Grade 09                   Grade 10                   Grade 11                   Grade 12




                                                   3
        VIRGINIA

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

     EFFECTIVE FOR

STUDENTS WHO ENTER THE

        9TH GRADE

           IN

 SCHOOL YEAR 2011 – 2012

      AND BEYOND

     See Pages 5 – 8



            4
These are the diploma requirements for the Standard Diploma for students
who enter the 9th grade in School Year 2011 – 2012 and beyond.

                                          Standard Diploma
          Discipline Area               Standard Units of Credit           Verified Credits Required
                                               Required
English                                           4                                       2
                   1
Mathematics                                       3                                       1
                       2,6
Laboratory Science                                    3                                   1
                                 3, 6
History and Social Sciences                           3                                   1
Health and Physical Education                         2
Foreign Language, Fine Arts or                        2
Career and Technical
               7
Education
Economics and Personal                                1
Finance
           4
Electives                                             4
                             5
Student Selected Test                                                                     1
Total                                                22                                   6

1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include at least two different course selections
from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra Functions and Data Analysis, Algebra II, or other
mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. The board shall approve courses to satisfy this
requirement.
2
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least two
different science disciplines: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion of the
sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The board shall
approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and one course in either world history or geography or both. The board shall
approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
 Courses to satisfy this requirement shall include at least two sequential electives as required by the
Standards of Quality.
5
  A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career and technical education, economics, or other areas as prescribed by the board in 8 VAC 20-
131-110.
6
  Students who complete a career and technical education program sequence and pass an examination
or occupational competency assessment in a career and technical education field that confers
certification or an occupational competency credential from a recognized industry, or trade or
professional association or acquires a professional license in a career and technical education field
from the Commonwealth of Virginia may substitute the certification, competency credential, or license
for (i) the student selected verified credit and (ii) either a science or history and social science verified
credit when the certification, license, or credential confers more than one verified credit. The
examination or occupational competency assessment must be approved by the Board of Education as
an additional test to verify student achievement.
7
 Pursuant to Section 22.1-253.13:4, Code of Virginia, credits earned for this requirement shall include
one credit in fine or performing arts or career and technical education.




                                                     5
These are the diploma requirements for the Standard Technical Diploma for
students who enter the 9th grade in School Year 2011 – 2012 and beyond.


                                     Standard Technical Diploma
          Discipline Area                 Standards Units of              Verified Credits Required
                                           Credits Required
English                                            4                                      2
                1
Mathematics                                        3                                      1
                        2,5
Laboratory Science                                   3                                    1
                              3, 5
History & Social Sciences                            3                                    1
Health and Physical Education                        2
Fine Arts, or Foreign Language                       1
Economics and Personal                               1
Finance
Career and Technical                                 4
            4
Education
Electives                                            1
                    6
Student Selected                                                                          1
Total                                               22                                   6

1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include at least three different course selections
from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra Functions and Data Analysis, or Algebra II or other
mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. The board shall approve courses to satisfy this
requirement.
2
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three
different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics, or completion
of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The board
shall approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and one course in either world history or geography or both. The board shall
approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement must include a career concentration as approved by
the board. If a career concentration includes a specific assessment approved by the board and the
student is eligible to take the assessment, then the student must take this assessment.
5
  Students who complete a career and technical education program sequence and pass an examination
or occupational competency assessment in a career and technical education field that confers
certification or an occupational competency credential from a recognized industry or trade or
professional association or acquires a professional license in a career and technical education field
from the Commonwealth of Virginia may substitute the certification competency credential or license
for (i) the student selected verified credit and (ii) either a science or history and social science verified
credit when the certification license or credential confers more than one verified credit. The
examination or occupational competency assessment must be approved by the board as an additional
test to verify student achievement.
6
  A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career and technical education, economics or other areas as prescribed by the board in 8 VAC 20-131-
110.




                                                     6
These are the diploma requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma for
students who enter the 9th grade in School Year 2011 – 2012 and beyond.


                                    Advanced Studies Diploma
          Discipline Area             Standard Units of Credit                Verified Credits
                                             Required                            Required
English                                         4                                     2
               1
Mathematics                                     4                                     2
                        2
Laboratory Science                                4                                  2
                                3
History and Social Sciences                       4                                  2
                    4
Foreign Language                                  3
Health and Physical Education                     2
Fine Arts or Career and                           1
Technical Education
Economics and Personal                            1
Finance
Electives                                         3
                            5
Student Selected Test                                                                1
Total                                            26                                  9

1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include at least three different course selections
from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or other mathematics courses above the level of
Algebra II. The board shall approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
2
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three
different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion
of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The board
shall approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or geography or both. The board shall
approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include three years of one language or two years
of two languages.
5
  A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career or technical education, economics, or other areas as prescribed by the board in 8 VAC 20-131-
110.


Any student who meets the requirements for both the Advanced Studies and the Advanced Technical
diploma may choose between these two diplomas.




                                                   7
These are the diploma requirements for the Advanced Technical Diploma
for students who enter the 9th grade in School Year 2011 – 2012 and
beyond.


                                    Advanced Technical Diploma
          Discipline Area              Standard Units of Credit                Verified Credits
                                              Required                            Required
English                                          4                                     2
                1
Mathematics                                      4                                     2
                        2
Laboratory Science                                  4                                 2
                                3
History and Social Sciences                         4                                 2
                    4
Foreign Language                                    3
Health and Physical Education                       2
Economics and Personal                              1
Finance
Fine Arts or Career and                             1
Technical Education
Career and Technical                                3
            5
Education
                            6
Student Selected Test                                                                 1
Total                                              26                                 9
1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include at least three different course selections
from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or other mathematics courses above the level of
Algebra II. The board shall approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
2
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three
different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion
of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The board
shall approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or geography or both. The board shall
approve courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include three years of one language or two years
of two languages.
5
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement must include a career concentration as approved by
the board. If a career concentration includes a specific assessment approved by the board and the
student is eligible to take the assessment, then the student must take this assessment.
6
  A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career or technical education, economics, or other areas as prescribed by the board in 8 VAC 20-131-
110.


Any student who meets the requirements for both the Advanced Studies and the Advanced Technical
diploma may choose between these two diplomas.




                                                   8
                           GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The expectation of Clarke County Public Schools is that all Clarke County High School
students will earn a Virginia diploma. Diploma options are described on the following pages.
High school credit earned prior to grade 9 in Algebra, Geometry or World Languages may
count in meeting both credit and subject area graduation requirements.



                               VIRGINIA
  GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

                       EFFECTIVE FOR

  STUDENTS WHO ENTERED THE

                              9TH GRADE

                                          IN

                       SCHOOL YEARS

     2003 – 2004 to 2010 – 2011

                   See Pages 10 – 12

                                             9
These are the diploma requirements for the Standard Diploma for 9th grade
students who entered the 9th grade in School Years 2003 – 2004 to 2010-
2011.

To graduate with a Standard Diploma, students must earn at least 22 standard units of credit by
passing required courses and electives, and earn at least six verified credits by passing end-of-course
Standards of Learning (SOL) tests or other assessments approved by the Board of Education. The
table below displays the minimum course and credit requirements for a Standard Diploma.

                Standard Diploma Course Requirements [8 VAC 20-131-50.B]
Discipline Area                               Standard Credits                 Verified Credits
                                         Effective with ninth graders   Effective with ninth graders in
                                                       in                   2003 – 04 and beyond
                                                   1998 - 99
English                                                4                              2
                  1
Mathematics                                            3                              1
                      2
Laboratory Science                                      3                             1
                              3
History and Social Sciences                             3                             1
Health and Physical Education                           2
Fine Arts or Career & Technical                         1
Education
            4
Electives                                               6
                          5
Student Selected Test                                                                 1
Total                                                22                               6

1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall
include at least two course selections from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or other
mathematics courses above the level of algebra and geometry. The Board may approve additional
courses to satisfy this requirement.
2
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least two
different science disciplines: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics. The Board may approve
additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and one course in either world history or geography or both. The Board may
approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
 Courses to satisfy this requirement shall include at least two sequential electives as required by the
Standards of Quality.
5
 A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career and technical education or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8 VAC 20-131-110.

Electives

Beginning with the graduating class of 2003, at least two sequential electives are required for the
Standard Diploma. See Superintendent’s Memorandum, Interpretive, No. 3, May 25, 2001 and
Guidelines Governing Sequential Electives – Approved by the Board on February 5, 2002 – Attachment
A to Superintendent’s Memorandum, Interpretive, No. 1, March 8, 2002.

    ♦     Sequential electives may be in any discipline as long as the courses are not specifically
          required for graduation.
    ♦     Courses used to satisfy the one unit of credit in fine arts or career and technical education
          course may be used to partially satisfy this requirement.
    ♦     An exploratory course followed by an introductory course may not be used to satisfy the
          requirement.



                                                   10
   ♦   An introductory course followed by another level of the same course of study may be used.
   ♦   Sequential electives do not have to be taken in consecutive years.

Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education

The Standard Diploma contains a requirement for one standard unit of credit in a fine arts or career
and technical education course. The Standards of Accreditation do not require that courses used to
satisfy the requirement of a fine arts or career and technical education course be approved by the
board. Therefore, local school officials should use their own judgment in determining which courses
students take to satisfy the requirement of a unit of credit in fine arts or career and technical
education for the Standard Diploma.




                                                11
These are the diploma requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma for
9th grade students who entered the 9th grade in School Years 2003 – 2004
to 2010- 2011.

To earn an Advanced Studies Diploma, students must earn at least 24 standard units of credit and at
least nine verified units of credit. The table below displays the course and credit requirements for an
Advanced Studies Diploma.

    Advanced Studies Diploma Course Requirements [8 VAC 20-131-
                               50.C]
Discipline Area                              Standard Credits                 Verified Credits
                                             Effective with ninth            Effective with ninth
                                           graders in 1998-99 and          graders in 2000-01 and
                                                     later                           later
English                                                4                               2
             1
Mathematics                                            4                               2
                    2
Laboratory Science                                     4                               2
                            3
History and Social Sciences                            4                               2
                            4
World [Foreign] Languages                              3
Health and Physical Education                          2
Fine Arts or Career & Technical                        1
Education
Electives                                               2
                       5
Student Selected Test                                                                  1
Total                                                  24                              9
1
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall
include at least three different course selections from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or
other mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. The Board may approve additional courses
to satisfy this requirement.
2
  Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three
different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or physics or completion
of the sequence of science courses required for the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The Board
may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
3
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and
Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or geography or both. The Board may
approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
4
 Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include three years of one language or two years
of two languages.
5
 A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science, technology,
career or technical education or other areas as prescribed by the Board in I VAC 20-131-110.




                                                  12
              FIRST TIME TRANSFERS TO A VIRGINIA PUBLIC SCHOOL

                      Advanced Studies Diploma or Advanced Technical Diploma
                     Verified Credit Requirements [8 VAC 20-131-60.G.2 and H]
Beginning = First 20 hours of instruction       During = After the first 20 hours of instruction
Students transferring into a Virginia public school for the first time
During Grade 09 OR Beginning of Grade 10               Must Earn           Ninth Graders in 2000-01 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                                9 Verified Credits:
                                                English                                  2
                                                Mathematics                              2
                                                Science                                  2
                                                History & Social Science                 2
                                                Student Selected                         1
During Grade 10 OR Beginning of Grade 11                Must Earn          Ninth Graders in 2000-01 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                                6 Verified Credits:
                                                English                                  2
                                                Mathematics                              1
                                                Science                                  1
                                                History & Social Science                 1
                                                Student Selected                         1
During Grade 11OR Beginning of Grade 12                 Must Earn          Ninth Graders in 2000-01 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                               4 Verified Credits:
                                               English                                 1
                                               Student Selected                        3
During Grade 12               Students should be given every opportunity to earn a diploma; if this is not
                              possible, arrange to have the previous school award the diploma; or seek a
                              waiver of the verified credit requirement from the DOE.

                           Standard Diploma or Standard Technical Diploma
                     Verified Credit Requirements [8 VAC 20-131-60.G.1 and H]
Beginning = First 20 hours of instruction       During = After the first 20 hours of instruction
Students transferring into a Virginia public school for the first time
During Grade 09 OR Beginning of Grade 10               Must Earn           Ninth Graders in 2003-04 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                                6 Verified Credits:
                                                English                                  2
                                                Mathematics                              1
                                                Science                                  1
                                                History & Social Science                 1
                                                Student Selected                         1
During Grade 10 OR Beginning of Grade11                 Must Earn          Ninth Graders in 2003-04 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                                4 Verified Credits:
                                                English                                 1
                                                Mathematics                             1
                                                Science                                 1
                                                History & Social Science                1
                                                Student Selected
During Grade 11 OR Beginning of Grade12                 Must Earn          Ninth Graders in 2003-04 and
                                                                                     beyond
                                               2 Verified Credits:
                                               English                                 1
                                               Student Selected                        1
During Grade 12               Students should be given every opportunity to earn a diploma; if this is not
                              possible, arrange to have the previous school award the diploma; or seek a
                              waiver of the verified credit requirement from the DOE.


                                                        13
   ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

        OFFERED

           AT

CLARKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

       2011 - 2012




            14
 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OFFERED AT CLARKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

                       Career and Technical Education Programs

MARKETING - The Clarke County High School marketing program prepares students for
postsecondary education and careers in marketing, management and entrepreneurship. Instruction in
the marketing cluster enables students to gain knowledge and skills in business law, channel
management, customer relations, economics, emotional intelligence, entrepreneurship, financial
analysis, marketing-information management, marketing planning, operations, professional
development, pricing, product/service management, promotion, selling, and strategic planning.

DECA - The co-curricular marketing student organization, DECA, is an association of marketing
students, designed to support and strengthen the marketing curriculum and instructional program and
reinforce academic concepts related to marketing. Through participation in local, state, and
international activities, DECA members develop a better understanding of the business world.
Students are able to ‘showcase’ their knowledge obtained in their marketing classes. Participation in
DECA provides a vehicle for students to employ higher order thinking skills, increase their awareness
of their civic obligations, develop social poise and interact with high-level business people while further
enhancing their leadership skills.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION - Cooperative Education is a method of instruction that combines career
and technical classroom instruction with paid employment directly related to the classroom
instruction. Both student instruction and employment are planned and supervised by the school and
the employer so that each contributes to the student’s career objectives and employability. Students
enhance their knowledge, skills, and attitudes by participating in supervised experiences that are not
possible to replicate in an educational setting.      The cooperative education method integrates
classroom instruction with supervised on-the-job training, the related career and DECA.

APPRENTICESHIP - An apprenticeship is the starting point of a career. It can lead to being a
licensed tradesperson or more. An apprenticeship is defined by the VA Department of Labor and
Industry (VDOLI) as “an individual of at least 16 years of age who is covered by a written employer
agreement that is approved by the Virginia Apprenticeship Council.”              A student may take
apprenticeship if they are looking to be trained in an approved apprenticeship as listed on the Virginia
Department of Labor and Industry’s Approved Apprenticeships list. Please see the following website:
(http://www.doli.virginia.gov/apprenticeship/registered_apprenticeship). An apprenticeship would
entail an approved job, a signed agreement between the state, the student, the parent/guardian, and
the school; an approved written plan of training by the employer, student, and school; and related
instruction in the form of a class or related reading and coursework based on a textbook covering the
basics of the career being pursued. Credit(s) for this course will be determined based on the minimum
standards as set forth by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry including the number of
hours, classes, etc.


                                             Agriculture

The Clarke County High School Agricultural Education program is dedicated to the development of an
educational environment that helps each person grow into a creative, sensitive and thinking adult. The
program’s goal is to prepare students to pursue, obtain and succeed at entry-level jobs or
entrepreneurship in agriculture or in their further education. Students develop awareness that work is
society’s way of creating, preserving, changing and improving their environment. Provisions are made
to allow for individual differences in all cooperative, on-the-job and classroom experiences.

It is essential to help each person develop self understanding and the ability to self-evaluate and, as a
result, to initiate change when necessary. The teacher strives to create in students, self-respect and
personal values that will help them become more effective and happy. The teacher acknowledges and
encourages student participation and interaction in accomplishing needed change while encouraging
students to accept responsibility for their actions.



                                                    15
Student participation and interaction are provided through planned leadership activities in the National
FFA organization, providing opportunities for cooperation, citizenship and leadership development at
the local, state and national levels. Students gain experience in decision making, learn to accept
responsibility and participate in activities that may lead to more purposeful use of work and leisure
time.

Horticulture is a subdivision of the broader topic of Agriculture. According to the National Gardening
Association horticulture is a multi-billion dollar industry offering a wide variety of career opportunities
in the Floriculture and Landscaping fields. The goal of the CCHS Horticulture Program is to present an
overview of the horticulture industry and the educational and career opportunities that are available in
the field.

Students learn about the industry through hands-on projects in the greenhouse, garden, and
classroom. The program also promotes personal growth through fostering an awareness of the
importance of environmental stewardship. Entry-level career opportunities include greenhouse/
nursery employees or groundskeeper. Careers requiring further education include landscape architect,
floral designer, soil scientists, or director of botanical/public gardens and arboretums.


                                             Technology

The CCHS Technology Education Department offers course work in Engineering Design, Engineering
Systems, Civil Engineering and Architecture, Electronics, and Information Technology. All of the course
work will prepare students pursuing technical certification and/or professional studies.

Students interested in the Mechanical Engineering field will benefit from the study of Engineering
Design and Engineering Systems. Engineering Design goes through the design process, problem
solving, manufacturing processes, and an understanding of material properties and uses. Engineering
Systems introduces the student to design, implementation, and use of manufacturing lines.

Civil Engineering and Architecture courses will benefit students interested in the building trades as well
as the design and systems course work. These courses explore soil sciences, surveying, wall systems,
structural systems, roof systems, building materials, supply and waste systems, electrical supply and
distribution, and road work.

Students working with communications, security systems, and information technology, will benefit
from electronics and Information Technology studies. These study the basic building blocks of digital
electronics (the basis of all electronic systems), computer and network systems, and computer
maintenance. This includes theory in the Digital Electronic and Information systems, as well as
practical application as computer and information technology system setup and maintenance.

Engineering, as a study of problem solving in general, utilizes aspects of all of the coursework. As a
result, taking course work in one field may easily overlap into other fields.

At this time, students taking Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, and Civil
Engineering and Architecture receive Dual Enrollment credit. Graduates of CCHS who have been
taken these courses have gone on technical jobs, military service, and two and four-year schools
pursuing degrees in these fields. The Technology Education courses also offer practical, real life
applications to math and science course work at CCHS.


                                    Health Services Classes

The Career and Technical education program at Clarke County High School offers a cluster of health
services classes to help students in grades 11 and 12 prepare for very rigorous health professions
programs in college.




                                                    16
At this time Basic Human Biology, Medical Terminology & Diet and Nutritional Therapy may be dual
enrolled through Lord Fairfax Community College and students will be able to earn college credits and
gain a basic understanding of medical terms and conditions that can improve their success in health
professions.

The CCHS Nurse Aide class is Virginia Board of Nursing accredited and prepares students for the
industry certification exam for Certified Nurse Aide. These students will be prepared to do basic
patient care in hospitals, nursing homes and other facilities under the supervision of licensed health
care professionals while they are completing their high school education.

Students who take the Shenandoah University/CCHS dual enrolled nursing classes can earn 7 BSN
credits. In Fundamentals of Nursing Practice students have an opportunity to learn basic patient care
skills, practice them in a clinical setting, and take the industry certification exam for certified nurse
aide. In Lifespan Development and Nutrition students will explore the concepts of human development
and nutrition.

Students who have hands on experience and a working knowledge of basic health care are better
prepared for health professions studies.




                                                   17
                  INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE INFORMATION

THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) DIPLOMA

Clarke County High School offers the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program, which is
recognized worldwide for its academic rigor and emphasis on developing capable, well-rounded high
school graduates. IB courses are among the most challenging classes offered at CCHS. They are open
to any student who is academically oriented and who possesses a strong work ethic. The IB program
provides an excellent preparation for college and for citizenship as a lifelong learner in our 21st century
world.

The usual path to the IB diploma begins in middle school, where students should have completed at
least Algebra I and the first year of a world language by the end of 8th grade. They then enroll in
honors classes in 9th and 10th grades as preparation for the IB Diploma Program as juniors and
seniors. The IB diploma is earned by successfully meeting the following requirements during the two
years of the program, usually 11th and 12th grades:

•   Complete IB coursework and pass exams in the six IB subject areas (English, World Language,
    Social Studies, Laboratory Science, Mathematics, and Arts/Electives). Three or four of these
    subjects must be taken at Higher Level (HL), a more intense and in-depth study; the remaining
    two or three courses must be taken at Standard Level (SL), a slightly less intense and in-depth
    study. Most IB classes, whether HL or SL, are two-year courses.
•   Complete the two-year Theory of Knowledge course (TOK), which aims to make connections,
    comparisons, and contrasts among all the different subject areas the students are studying.
•   Write a 4000-word Extended Essay, a research paper on a topic chosen by the student. (This
    project is monitored in the TOK class.)
•   Complete 150 hours of extracurricular activities following the IB Creativity, Action, and Service
    (CAS) guidelines. (This project is also monitored in TOK.)

Colleges and universities, especially the more selective ones, want to see that their applicants have
taken the most challenging academic program that their high school offers. Therefore, we strongly
encourage academically-oriented students to enroll in the full IB Diploma Program. Successful
candidates will earn an internationally recognized IB diploma in addition to their Virginia Advanced
Studies diploma.

TYPICAL IB DIPLOMA SCHEDULES

Choosing courses to meet the IB diploma requirements is a process that allows for some flexibility to
accommodate student strengths and interests. However, because there are a number of requirements
to be fulfilled, it is essential that diploma candidates plan their schedules with the IB
Coordinator in the spring of their sophomore year, before beginning the program. Likewise, any
proposed changes in IB diploma candidates’ schedules must be approved by the IB Coordinator. That
said, here are two typical IB diploma candidate schedules:

For students interested primarily in the humanities:
        Junior Year                                      Senior Year

        IB English 11                                    IB English 12 HL

        IB French V SL, or                              Elective if finished IB language
        IB Spanish V SL, or
        IB Latin V SL (these can be junior or senior year)

        IB Hist. Americas I HL                           IB Hist. Americas II HL

        IB Chemistry I SL, or                            IB Chemistry II SL, or
        IB Env. Syst. & Societies I SL                   IB Env. Syst. & Societies II SL




                                                    18
       IB Math. Studies I SL                            IB Math Studies II SL

       IB Visual Arts SL, or                            IB Visual Arts HL, or
       IB Philosophy SL                                 IB Philosophy HL
       (no tests this year, just as preparation for HL courses as a senior)

       Theory of Knowledge I                            Theory of Knowledge II

       Elective                                         Elective

For students interested primarily in the sciences:

       Junior Year                                      Senior Year

       IB English 11                                    IB English 12 HL

       IB French V SL, or                               Elective if finished IB language
       IB Spanish V SL, or
       IB Latin V SL
       (these can be junior or senior year)

       IB Hist. Americas I HL                           IB Hist. Americas II HL

       IB Biology I HL                                  IB Biology II HL

       Hon. Pre-Calc. & Trig.                           IB Mathematics SL

       Any IB elective, HL or SL                        Elective if finished IB elective requirement

       Theory of Knowledge I                            Theory of Knowledge II

       Elective                                         Elective

IB electives include a second world language in addition to the student’s first choice (French +
Spanish, French + Latin, Spanish + Latin); social studies courses, such as IB Business and
Management, IB Economics, and IB Philosophy; a second IB science in addition to the student’s first;
or arts courses such as IB Visual Arts.

There are many variations possible on the two sample schedules listed above. Note that whatever
specific IB courses students choose, it is essential that they:

   •   start world language study early enough to finish French, Latin, or Spanish V as a junior or
       senior; and
   •   complete Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry by the end of their sophomore year so that they
       can begin an IB math sequence as a junior.

In every case, it is essential that students plan their IB diploma programs in
consultation with the IB Coordinator.


IB CERTIFICATES

Not all students choose to pursue the full IB diploma. Students may also earn IB certificates just by
taking individual IB classes and sitting for their examinations in May. Many of our students follow this
route. IB coursework develops the thinking and communication skills necessary for success in higher
education, in the professional world, and in life, and the more IB classes a student can take, the
better.




                                                  19
Even though colleges and universities look most favorably on students who complete the full IB
diploma program, a transcript which includes individual IB courses taken for certificates will look very
impressive to admissions officers as well.

IB TESTING

All IB courses have externally-graded tests in May of each school year. IB testing is an integral part of
the IB course experience: it enables students to measure their academic knowledge and skills against
their peers all over the world, and it is the culmination of the course that they have spent so much
time and effort on for one or two years.

Taking the IB tests also means that an IB transcript can be sent to the college or university that
students attend. Even though the main purpose of IB is to provide an excellent preparation for further
education, for the professional world, and for life in the 21st century, it can also offer more concrete
benefits. Many colleges offer advanced standing (i.e., exemption from certain required courses) or
college credit based on IB scores; if students do not take the IB tests, they automatically disqualify
themselves from the possibility of advanced standing or college credits based on their IB classes!

Clarke County High School encourages and expects that students taking IB classes will
register for and take the IB tests in May. There are fees associated with IB testing; however,
need-based financial aid (and often non-need-based scholarship money) is available to help families
meet these expenses.

(Please note that the first year of two-year IB classes do not have tests; courses test at the end of the
second year only. Also, students are permitted to take a maximum of two SL tests at the end of their
first year of the IB Diploma Program, normally their junior year. At least four of the tests, including all
the HL exams, must be taken the year students finish the IB Diploma Program, usually as seniors.)

IB COLLEGE CREDIT

Many colleges offer advanced standing (i.e., exemption from certain required courses) or college
credit based on IB scores. Some schools are so eager to enroll IB students that they even waive their
application fees for full IB diploma candidates!

It is the students’ responsibility to find out the IB credit policies of the schools that they are interested
in. They can find this information by contacting the schools directly or by consulting the International
Baccalaureate’s College Database online at www.ibo.org. The IB Coordinator and the guidance
department are also available to assist students in finding college information.

It is important for students and parents to realize that Clarke County High School is an International
Baccalaureate school because we believe that IB is an excellent high school curriculum. Its purpose is
to prepare students for higher education and for life as responsible citizens in the 21st century world,
not to amass the most college credits possible before leaving high school. College credit can be a nice
benefit – and past CCHS students have been awarded up to a year’s worth of college credits because
of their IB coursework – but it is by no means the main point of the IB program.

                                        DUAL ENROLLMENT

Dual Enrollment is a joint plan of the Virginia Public Schools and Virginia colleges and universities
which allows a high school student to meet the requirements for high school graduation while
simultaneously earning college credits. These classes can be offered either at the college or be a
specially-scheduled college credit course taught at CCHS. Articulation agreements with Lord Fairfax
Community College, Shenandoah University, and James Madison University offer students in select
courses the opportunity for dual enrollment. Admission requirements vary yet college-level rigor and
demand are expected. No developmental or health and physical education courses may be approved
for dual enrollment arrangement. Courses and articulation agreements may vary from year to year.
A list of courses and tuition charges are available from the Dual Enrollment Coordinator. Dual
Enrollment promotes rigorous educational pursuits and encourages lifelong learning. The student who
earns college credit while in high school is more likely to continue education beyond high school. The



                                                     20
student must be prepared for the demands of a college level course and able to benefit from the
opportunity as determined by appropriate high school personnel. The principal or designee must
approve the registration of the student for the community college. Some colleges may require a
placement test.

                                      VIRTUAL VIRGINIA

Virtual Virginia offers online Advanced Placement (AP) courses through the Virginia Department of
Education. CCHS provides this opportunity to students who have strong work and study skills; are
responsible and committed to the course expectations; and have time to devote to work outside of
school hours. AP courses are college–level and require advanced analytical and reasoning skills. See
your guidance counselor for more information and specific restrictions about the program. You may
also want to visit www.virtualvirginia.org.

                                    THE BRIDGE PROGRAM

The Bridge Program is Clarke County’s initiative for accelerated students who have completed their
Standard, Advanced, and/or IB Diploma by the end of the 11th grade. Developed in partnership with
James Madison University, The Bridge Program is a course of studies designed to provide a variety of
college level opportunities. The aim of the program is to nurture scholars who will leave CCHS ready
to compete at any university in the nation and to prepare students to participate in rigorous, college
level coursework and challenging academic experiences during their senior year.

What is a Bridge Scholar? A Bridge Scholar is a student who has chosen to accelerate his or her
education in order to participate fully in our Bridge Senior Year. While all CCHS students have access
to college level [and college credit] coursework through the International Baccalaureate and Dual
Enrollment Programs, Bridge Scholars – by accelerating -- open up their senior year for a variety of
academic opportunities.

What makes up the Bridge Senior Year? Possible opportunities for Bridge Scholars include a wide
variety of college level experiences:

   ♦   A week-long “university immersion” summer camp;
   ♦   University credit courses team taught by JMU professors and CCHS staff;
   ♦   Senior Capstone Project;
   ♦   Continued IB elective and dual enrollment coursework;
   ♦   Access to university facilities, including labs, libraries and college and career counseling.

Who can participate? The Bridge Program is open to all Clarke County students. As with the IB
Program, students can opt to participate fully or in part, depending on individual strengths and
interests.

How to participate? Students can participate in the Bridge Program in three ways:

   ♦   finish the IB Diploma a year early and be a full Bridge Scholar in their senior year;
   ♦   finish the IB Diploma in grade 12 and take Bridge courses as electives;
   ♦   be a Bridge Scholar without the IB Diploma, taking a variety of IB and college credit courses.

The most rigorous plan is to finish the IB Diploma early. This should be done only by students who
have accelerated in more than one discipline.

Can you be both an IB Diploma candidate and Bridge Scholar? Yes. Students must complete the
IB courses and/or IB Diploma in a two-year cycle. If a student is accelerated in 2 or more courses, this
means the cycle will come in grades 10 and 11.

Can you be a Bridge Scholar only? Yes. Students may take as many advanced courses as the
student is qualified for in grades 9, 10 and 11, therefore opening the senior year for college credit
courses.



                                                   21
JMU BRIDGE CLASSES

These courses are likely to be offered, however, they are subject to change based on enrollment and
availability of JMU professors. The specific Bridge courses offered at CCHS are subject to change each
year depending on what is offered to us by JMU. However, each is a highly transferable JMU 3-credit
General Education course team-taught by a JMU professor and a CCHS teacher. Students enrolling
should be prepared to work at a college level, doing college readings and assignments created and
graded by the JMU professors. Bridge courses are dual enrolled so students will receive both high
school and university credit for the courses.

The courses are limited to seniors, and students must pay JMU tuition to take these classes. Since JMU
operates on the semester system, each CCHS course will earn students credit for two JMU courses.

Bridge Philosophy/Literature: The first semester surveys the history of philosophy, focusing on the
study of primary and secondary writings from the Ancient Greeks to the present. The second semester
surveys classics of American literature from the Civil War to the present. (This course involves a
nonrefundable JMU tuition charge of approximately $600.)

Bridge Psychology/Future Studies: The first semester is a study of important topics in psychology: the
nervous system, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence,
motivation, emotion, life span development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social
psychology, and the scientific attitude. The second semester is an interdisciplinary look at the future,
examining projections of how our world will change during the next 50 years. (This course involves a
nonrefundable JMU tuition charge of approximately $600.)

            Sample Four-Year Plan for Early IB Diploma and Bridge Scholar
Grade 09       Honors Biology or Honors Chemistry             World Language 3
               Honors English 10                              Physical Education
               Honors Algebra II                              Elective
               Honors World History I                         Elective
Grade 10       IB Science I                                   Elective
               IB English I                                   IB World Language 4
               Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry               IB History of the Americas I
               TOK I                                          IB Elective [SL]
Grade 11       IB Science 2 [Biology HL/other SL]             IB World Language 5 [SL]
               IB English 2 [HL]                              IB History of the Americas 2 [HL]
               IB Math [SL]                                   TOK II
               IB Elective [HL]                               Elective
Grade 12       12-15 college credits from James Madison       Government and 2-4 electives, IB or Dual
               University or LFCC to be taken at CCHS         Enrollment classes at CCHS




                                                  22
                                  STANDARDS OF LEARNING

The State of Virginia has adopted instructional objectives - Standards of Learning (SOL) – for the core
academic areas of English, Math, Science and History. The Standards ensure high expectations for
achievement in every classroom throughout the Commonwealth. We believe that each student has
the responsibility to take seriously his or her own education, to prepare for class, to engage actively in
learning, to complete all required work to study for quizzes and tests, and to seek extra help from
teachers, if necessary. We trust that parents share the same high expectations for their students and
will promote and encourage the necessary commitment of time and energy required for student
success.

                                 Standards of Learning Tests

Students are required to take end of course tests in the following: English 11 Writing; English 11
Reading, Research, Literature; Algebra I; Biology; World History I; Algebra II; Chemistry; World
History II; Geometry; Earth Science; and U.S. History. The purpose of the tests is to measure learning
in these core areas. The test scores provide feedback to individual students on their levels of
understanding in the content areas and also provide important information to help determine which
students may need additional support.


                                Standard and Verified Credits

A standard credit is earned when a student passes a course. A verified credit is earned when a
student passes a course and the associated end-of-course SOL test. In some cases, students may
utilize substitute tests, certifications, or the appeal process to earn verified credits. State guidelines
prescribe the number of verified credits required for graduation for students entering a Virginia public
high school for the first time during the tenth grade or after. Consult your school counselor for
specific information. Middle school parents may request that grades for any high school credit-bearing
course taken in the middle school be removed from the student’s high school transcript, and therefore
the student will not earn high school credit for the course. The request to remove a course from the
transcript must be made in writing to the middle or high school the student will attend the following
year, prior to the end of the first nine weeks. The student will not be eligible for a verified credit
in any course which has been removed from the transcript.




                                                   23
                             GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION


                                   Activity/Athletic Eligibility

To be eligible for athletics and certain school activities, students must meet minimum grade-point
averages and citizenship requirements as set by the Virginia High School League. A student must be
enrolled in 5 credit subjects or their equivalent and must have passed 5 credit subjects or their
equivalent the previous semester. Repeat courses may be included in the five credit subjects only if
that course was previously taken and failed.

                                       Course Descriptions

Descriptions of the courses offered, subject to demand, possible fiscal restrictions, and
School Board review, are listed by department. It is important to note that any elective
course that does not have sufficient enrollment will be canceled.

                                       Credit Opportunities

Because of our 8-period schedule at CCHS, students have the opportunity to earn 32 or more credits.
The credits required by the State are considered minimum standards for Clarke County students.
Earning additional credits, by taking additional core area and elective courses, benefits students by
providing a stronger educational foundation in preparation for post secondary education and employment.

                                           Diploma Seals

Students who demonstrate academic excellence and/or outstanding achievement may qualify for one
of the following awards for student achievement. These seals are placed on the student’s diploma.

Governor’s Seal - Complete the requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma with an average
grade of “B” or better and successfully complete at least one Advanced Placement [AP] course or one
college dual enrollment course for credit.

Board of Education Seal - Complete the requirements for the Standard Diploma with an average
grade of “A” or a 3.5 grade point average.

Career and Technical Education Seal - Complete the requirements for a Standard or Advanced
Studies Diploma and complete a prescribed sequence of courses in career or technical education and
maintain a “B” or better in those courses or pass a certification or licensure exam.

Seal of Advanced Mathematics and Technology - Complete the requirements of either a Standard
or an Advanced Studies Diploma and satisfy the mathematics requirements for the Advanced Studies
Diploma with a “B” average or better and pass an approved examination.

Civics Seal - Satisfy each of the following four criteria: 1. Satisfy the requirement to earn a Standard
Diploma or an Advanced Studies Diploma; AND 2. Complete Virginia and United States History and
Virginia and United States Government course with a grade of “B” or higher; AND 3. Complete 50
hours of voluntary participation in community service or extracurricular activities; AND 4. Have good
attendance and no disciplinary infractions as determined by local school board policies.

                                        Dropping Courses

All students must take a minimum of eight credit classes each year unless enrolled in an approved
Work Release, Co-op, or Apprenticeship Program. Withdrawals are not permitted after three weeks
into an elective course and six weeks into a core course (English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and
World Languages). Any deviation from this policy must be approved by the Principal.




                                                  24
                                         Pass/Fail Options

Junior and senior students may elect to take one course pass/fail in order to earn a grade of passing.
Students who select that option are expected to complete all course requirements at C level or above
work. Students who select pass/fail are not eligible for Dual Enrollment credit through Lord Fairfax
Community College. The students must notify the guidance office in writing by the end of the first
nine weeks of the decision to take the course pass/fail.

                                             Promotion

In grades 9 through 11, students are eligible to advance only one grade level each year with the
successful completion of minimum credits, as follows:

9th to 10th grade. A 9th grade student shall advance one grade level by earning at least five (5) credits
before the start of the 10th grade year.

10th to 11th grade. A 10th grade student shall advance one grade level by having earned at least ten
(10) credits before the start of the 11th grade year.

11th to 12th grade. An 11th grade student shall advance one grade level by having earned at least
fifteen (15) credits before the start of the 12th grade year.

                                   Report Cards and Interims

Report cards and interims are each issued to students and parents four times a year. Interims are
distributed in the middle of each of the four grading periods.         Report cards are distributed
approximately eight to ten days after the end of a grading period. Mid year grade reports to colleges
and universities will reflect 1st semester grades. Only final grades are recorded on students’
permanent records [transcript].

                                   Schedule and Adjustments

The registration and scheduling process allows for ample time to make necessary adjustments prior to
the start of the school year. Only under unusual circumstances will a student schedule be altered
after the school year begins. All schedule changes must be initiated through the guidance office.

                                            Subject Load

All students shall maintain a full schedule of classes unless they are seniors in work programs or
enrolled in alternative education. Any variation will be subject to the permission of the Principal.

                              Summer New Course Opportunities

Check with your guidance counselor or Assistant Principal for opportunities.

                                            Testing Fees

Testing fees apply to IB tests, AP tests, and PSAT. Please see the IB Coordinator or the guidance
office for more details.




                                                   25
                                        GRADING SCALES

                           IB/Honors/AP/Dual Enrollment Classes

             A+             =         98 – 100                with 5.2 quality points
             A              =          95 – 97                with 4.9 quality points
             A-             =          92 – 94                with 4.5 quality points
             B+             =         89 – 91                 with 4.2 quality points
             B              =          86 – 88                with 3.9 quality points
             B-             =          83 – 85                with 3.5 quality points
             C+             =         80 – 82                 with 3.2 quality points
             C              =         77 – 79                 with 3.0 quality points
             C-             =         74 – 76                 with 2.8 quality points
                                    73 and below              regular quality points

                                           Regular Classes

             A+             =         98 – 100                with 4.7 quality points
             A              =          95 – 97                with 4.4 quality points
             A-             =          92 – 94                with 4.0 quality points
             B+             =         89 – 91                 with 3.7 quality points
             B              =          86 – 88                with 3.4 quality points
             B-             =          83 – 85                with 3.0 quality points
             C+             =         80 – 82                 with 2.7 quality points
             C              =         77 – 79                 with 2.4 quality points
             C-             =         74 – 76                 with 2.0 quality points
             D+             =         71 – 73                 with 1.7 quality points
             D              =          68 – 70                with 1.4 quality points
             D-             =          65 – 67                with 1.0 quality point
             F              =          64 – 0                 with no quality points




                                   GRADE POINT AVERAGE

GPA includes all 9th to 12th grade courses for which credit was earned or could have been earned. Also
included are high school courses completed at the middle school level [Algebra I, Geometry and World
Language]. When a course is repeated, both grades are included in the GPA. In determining grade
point average for a one year course, the grade point scale is listed above. A one semester course
counts one-half of the point value. If a year’s course is two or three periods in length, the point value
is doubled or tripled. To determine class rank, quality points for all courses for which a grade has
been recorded are totaled and divided by total number of credits in courses bearing an alpha-numeric
grade for which a student has received a semester or year’s grade.




                                                   26
                                   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


                                             ENGLISH
ENGLISH 09 [1130]                                                                      1.0 credit

Designed around Virginia’s SOL curriculum, this course serves as an introductory study of the English
language, its vocabulary, grammar, history, and proper use in various situations. Public speaking and
research skills are emphasized. Expressive forms of writing are a priority, along with development of
essay forms and techniques. All major literary genres are studied, with extensive units on literary
classics from World, English, and American authors.

HONORS ENGLISH 09 [11304]                                                              1.0 credit

The writing process is emphasized with written assignments complementing the study of literature.
The study of literature includes narrative and lyric poetry; world mythology; and Greek,
Shakespearean and modern drama and novels. The students examine the connection between the
classical tradition and modern thought through an analysis of literature. Emphasis is placed on higher
order thinking skills, cooperative learning activities, writing, and discussion skills. Throughout the
course, students are made aware of the interrelationship of the other disciplines through
interdisciplinary units of study.

ENGLISH 10 [1140]                                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: English 09

As in the ninth grade, this course is designed to meet Virginia’s SOL. This entails a review,
amplification and extension of grammar and composition with an emphasis on precise diction and
sentence formation. Students will study and practice the organization of expository and descriptive
paragraphs, interview skills and completion of applications. In addition, students will read and
interpret short stories, poetry, non-fiction, and drama by American and world authors.

HONORS ENGLISH 10 [11404]                                                              1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors English 09 or Permission of Instructor

Composition and speech assignments will focus on literature and provide an introduction to the
structure of the IB Higher Level oral and written assignments. The students study classic and
contemporary American literature, along with selections of classic British literature. The emphasis is
on meeting the curriculum of the Virginia SOL and enhancing independent learning skills in
preparation for the rigors of the IB English courses.

ENGLISH 11 [1150]                                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: English 09 and 10

Designed to meet Virginia’s SOL, English 11 consists of a review of basic grammar skills and a survey
of American literature. The grammar component is designed to teach the student how to write clearly,
effectively and correctly. The students will study classic American authors and works for their literary
value, as well as their place in history. Independent reading will be required. Students will take the
Standards of Learning tests for writing and reading/literature and research.

IB ENGLISH 11 [IB1150]                                                                 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors English 10 or Permission of Instructor

This course is the first year of a two-year IB English curriculum and prepares students for both IB
English 12 Higher Level and Standard Level. Students will complete in-depth studies of selected
works of fiction, drama, and poetry. Within the course of study, students will develop an awareness
and understanding of literature in its cultural context. In addition, students will gain deeper
proficiency in a variety of composition modes. All work is designed to prepare the students for the



                                                  27
written and oral IB English assessments. Students will take the Virginia SOL tests at the end of the
course.

ENGLISH 12 [1160]                                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: English 09, 10, 11

Based upon Virginia’s SOL, English 12 will be a review course of basic grammar skills as they apply to
editing and an extension of effective writing techniques. Students will study the classic works of
British, American and World authors for their literary and historical value. Independent reading will be
required, as well as much independent research using proper Modern Language Association (MLA)
formats. Oral communication skills will be studied, with a focus on seminar discussion and public
speaking.

IB ENGLISH 12 Standard Level, Part II [IB1160]                                         1.0 credit
Prerequisite: IB English 11SL or HL
Summer reading required

This Standard Level IB English 12 course is built upon the requirements for earning a Standard Level
certificate in IB English, but is not limited to this. The course focuses on a study of world literature
with an emphasis on poetry, novels, drama and short fiction. The course is open to seniors who have
passed the English end of course SOL tests, have displayed notable maturity and academic
independence, are pursing an Advanced Diploma, and are recommended by the English 11 teacher.
Students will take the Standard Level IB test in the spring.

IB ENGLISH 12 Higher Level, Part II [IB11602]                                          1.0 credit
Prerequisite: IB English 11HL
Summer reading required

The IB English 12 course is a college-level course in reading and critical analysis of literature. The
second half of the two-year IB curriculum, the course focuses on a study of world literature with an
emphasis on drama, poetry, novels, short fiction and non-fiction. All assignments are designed to
prepare students for writing the World Literature component of the IB exam and for taking both the
written and oral higher level English exams. Students will take the Higher Level IB test in the spring.
Students may also enroll for Lord Fairfax Community College dual enrollment credit.

VOICES OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY [1165]                                                    1.0 credit
Grades 10 -12

This course will focus on the literature, world philosophies, and history of the culturally diverse
peoples who make up America. Students will gain a thorough appreciation of the similarities and
differences of the groups studied.

INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM AND CREATIVE WRITING [1200]                                 1.0 credit
Grades 09 -10

This course is designed to introduce students to the modes of writing used in the publications courses
[newspaper, yearbook and literary arts magazine].The first semester of this course introduces
students to the journalistic style and forms and the basic elements of newspaper design. In the second
semester, students will develop personal and expository writing styles and become more proficient in
the process of composing. Moving from the simple to the complex, instruction begins with personal
narrative experiences and ends with the short story. In addition, the creative form of poetry is
explored. Class time is divided among formal teacher presentations, examinations of models, and the
reading and cooperative analysis and discussion of student writing and manuscripts.




                                                  28
ADVANCED JOURNALISM [1210]                                                             1.0 credit
Grades 10 -12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Journalism and Creative Writing and/or Application

Advanced journalism students will write extensively and publish The Talon Today. Students will also
extend their study of layout design, execution, and editing.          Students will have editorial
responsibilities.

YEARBOOK [1215]                                                                        1.0 credit
Grades 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Application Required

The Clarke County High School yearbook, The Talon, is published annually. Students not only learn to
write for a real audience from original research, they receive training in editing, layout and design,
photography, computer skills and business management. Beyond that, personal growth is achieved in
responsibility, dependability, leadership, teamwork and ethical decision making. The CCHS yearbook is
student produced, under the training and supervision of the adviser and other professionals. The staff
is chosen by the Yearbook Sponsor and Yearbook Editors and is limited to 15. See the guidance office
for an application

COMMUNICATION DESIGN AND LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE [1219]                                 1.0 credit
Grades 10 – 12

The focus of this course is to teach students the various skills and tasks needed to produce quality
media [magazines, WEB pages, video and audio recordings] showcasing the literary, visual and
performance arts. The staff, selected by the magazine sponsor, will create one or two competition
quality magazines per year, build a WEB page, and create a CD of student music and performance. In
addition to learning the publication process from concept to publication, students will study creative
writing, layout and design, and business. Students in the 2nd and 3rd year of this course will have
editorial responsibilities, with an emphasis on developing the skills of leadership, decision-making and
long-range planning.

IB THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE I [IB1197]                                                      1.0 credit
Grade 11
IB THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE II [IB1198]                                                     1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: IB TOK I and IB diploma candidate

Theory of Knowledge [TOK I and II] is one of the three core requirements for obtaining the IB
Diploma.     The    remaining     two    core    requirements,    the   Extended   Essay  and the
Community/Action/Service voluntary program are completed during the TOK courses. The TOK
courses span the last two years of your IB Diploma program. Students will examine the grounds for
the ethical, political, and aesthetic judgments that individuals must make in their daily lives.
Emphasis will be placed on the role of language and thought and on the development of critical
thinking skills. There are no testing fees for the TOK or the Extended Essay assessments.

PHILOSOPHY/IB PHILOSOPHY Standard Level/Higher Level Part I [IB1199]                   1.0 credit

For both non IB and IB students, an introduction to philosophy will deal with issues important for
humanity. This course will examine the fundamental questions that people have always asked such as
what does it mean to be a human being. The emphasis is on studying all aspects of philosophy and
requires an open, critical mind and a willingness to examine other points of view. Students may take
the IB Philosophy Standard Level exam in May.

PHILOSOPHY/IB PHILOSOPHY Higher Level Part II [IB11992]                                1.0 credit
Prerequisite: IB Philosophy, Standard or Higher Level Part I

A continuation of the study of philosophy which teaches and encourages students to deal with issues
which are profound, complex, challenging, and intellectual. Students will be able to use philosophical


                                                  29
language clearly, consistently, and appropriately, identify and formulate problems philosophically, and
examine concepts and questions philosophically. The course is organized around five philosophical
themes and two prescribed texts. In addition, there will be an emphasis on world religions. Students
will take the IB Philosophy Standard Level/Higher Level exam in May.

JMU BRIDGE CLASSES

BRIDGE PHILOSOPHY/LITERATURE [98823/98877]                                              1.0 credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade                                                       6.0 college credits

The first semester surveys the history of philosophy, focusing on the study of primary and secondary
writings from the Ancient Greeks to the present. The second semester surveys classics of American
literature from the Civil War to the present. (This course involves a nonrefundable JMU tuition charge
of approximately $600.)




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                                          MATHEMATICS


 Many paths are possible, but below are some typical options. Discuss your choices with your math
                                            teacher.
 Grade 09       Algebra I       Geometry          Honors           Honors        Honors Pre-Calculus
                                                 Geometry         Algebra II      and Trigonometry
 Grade 10      Geometry         Algebra II        Honors         Honors Pre-        IB Mathematics
                                                 Algebra II     Calculus and        Standard Level
                                                                Trigonometry
 Grade 11       Algebra,           IB           Honors Pre-          IB             AP Calculus-BC
               Functions,     Mathematical     Calculus and      Mathematics
               and Data         Studies        Trigonometry       Standard
                Analysis       Standard                             Level
                              Level, Part I
 Grade 12      Algebra II          IB               IB           AP Calculus-        AP Statistics
                              Mathematical      Mathematics       BC or AP
                                 Studies         Standard         Statistics
                                Standard           Level
                              Level, Part II


PRE-ALGEBRA [3131]              NOTE: NOT A MATHEMATICS CREDIT 1.0 elective credit

*If staffing allows, students in Pre-Algebra may also be required to double block with an Algebra I
class making 2 math periods for the student.
This course earns one elective credit - not a mathematics credit - that will count
for graduation. Pre-Algebra consists of part of the Algebra I curriculum. Topics include equations,
expressions, operations, matrices, relations, functions, linear equations, laws of exponents,
polynomials, square roots, measures of central tendency, and graphical representations of data.
Algebra topics involving real life applications will be presented. The Algebra I Standards require
students to use algebra as a tool for representing and solving a variety of practical problems.
Calculators and graphing utilities are used to assist in problem solving and verification. Graphing
calculators will be available for classroom use. Students are encouraged to purchase a graphing
calculator for use at home. Students will not take an Algebra I Standards of Learning Test at the end
of this course.

ALGEBRA I [3130]                                                                       1.0 credit

This course is designed to develop proficiency with Algebraic skills. Topics include equations,
expressions, operations, matrices, relations, functions, linear equations, laws of exponents,
polynomials, square roots, measures of central tendency, and box-and-whisker plots. Algebra topics
involving real life applications will be presented. The Algebra I Standards require students to use
algebra as a tool for representing and solving a variety of practical problems. Calculators and
graphing utilities are used to assist in problem solving and verification. Graphing calculators will be
available for classroom use. Students are encouraged to purchase a graphing calculator for use at
home. Students completing this course will take the Algebra I End-of-Course (EOC) test. Passing this
test will earn students a verified credit in math for high school graduation.

GEOMETRY Part II [3145]                                                                1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Geometry Part I

Geometry taught in two-parts has been phased out in the state of Virginia. This is the final
year Geometry Part II will be offered. This course is the second of two courses that covers the
2009 Virginia SOL for Geometry. There will be a review of the topics from Geometry Part I. In
addition the traditional geometric topics of volume of three-dimensional figures, similarity,


                                                  31
trigonometry, circle measurements, logic, and geometric proofs will be studied. Learning activities will
often involve Algebra and emphasize real life problem solving. The second semester will also include
review activities aimed at preparing students to be successful in Algebra II and on the SAT. Students
completing this course will take the Geometry EOC test. Passing this test will earn students a verified
credit in math for high school graduation.

GEOMETRY [3143]                                                                        1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I Part II or Algebra I

This course is designed to develop proficiency with geometric skills and to apply the understanding of
these skills to real life situations. Emphasis is on application of theorems to practical situations in
math and logical reasoning. This course consists of the 2009 Virginia SOL for Geometry which
emphasizes the traditional geometric topics of points, lines, planes, angles, polygons, circles,
constructions, solid figures, perimeter, area, volume, similarity, congruence, symmetry,
transformations, tessellations, inductive logic, and deductive logic. Learning activities will often
involve Algebra and emphasize real life problem solving. Formal and informal proofs will be covered.
Calculators and graphing utilities are used to assist in problem solving and verification. Graphing
calculators will be available for classroom use. Students are encouraged to purchase a graphing
calculator for use at home. Students completing this course will take the Geometry EOC test. Passing
this test will earn students a verified credit in math for high school graduation.

HONORS GEOMETRY [31434]                                                                1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I Part II or Algebra I

This course consists of the 2009 Virginia SOL for Geometry which emphasizes the traditional
geometric topics of points, lines, planes, angles, polygons, circles, constructions, solid figures,
perimeter, area, volume, similarity, congruence, symmetry, transformations, tessellations, inductive
logic, and deductive logic. Learning activities will often involve Algebra and emphasize real life
problem solving. Formal and informal proofs will be covered. Calculators and graphing utilities are
used to assist in problem solving and verification. Graphing calculators will be available for classroom
use. Students are encouraged to purchase a graphing calculator for use at home. An honors class will
increase emphasis on deductive proofs, coordinate Geometry, and basic Trigonometry. The scope will
be extensive and the pace rapid. Students completing this course will take the Geometry EOC test.
Passing this test will earn students a verified credit in math for high school graduation. NOTE:
Students may take both HONORS Geometry and HONORS Algebra II at the same time with teacher
recommendation. This allows students the opportunity to pursue higher-level mathematics classes
during high school.

ALGEBRA, FUNCTIONS, AND DATA ANAYLSIS [3134]                                           1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I Part II or Algebra I AND Geometry or Honors Geometry

Through the investigation of mathematical models and interpretation/analysis of data from real-life
situations, students will strengthen conceptual understandings in mathematics and further develop
connections between algebra and statistics. Students will study functions and their behaviors, systems
of inequalities, probability, experimental design and implementation and analysis of data. Data will be
generated by practical applications arising from science, business, and finance. Students will solve
problems that require the formulation of linear, quadratic, exponential or logarithmic equations. This
year there is no SOL test associated with this course. This course includes content above the level of
Algebra I and Geometry but it is less comprehensive than Algebra II.

ALGEBRA II [3135]                                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I Part II or Algebra I

This course is an extension of Algebra I. Emphasis will be placed on the 2009 Virginia SOL for Algebra
II including mastery of algebraic symbolic manipulation when simplifying expressions and solving
equations. Topics covered will include systems of equations and inequalities, polynomials, quadratics,
conic sections, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, sequences and
series, logarithms, polynomial functions and statistics. Graphing using a transformational approach of
quadratics and other polynomial functions will be emphasized. Technological and scientific


                                                  32
applications will be investigated when appropriate. Students will have access to a graphing calculator
during the class. It is highly recommended that students purchase a graphing calculator for out of
class assignments. Students completing this course will take the Algebra II EOC test. Passing this
test will earn students a verified credit in math for high school graduation.

HONORS ALGEBRA II [31354]                                                               1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I Part II or Algebra I

This course is an extension of Algebra I. Emphasis will be placed on the 2009 Virginia SOL for Algebra
II including mastery of algebraic symbolic manipulation when simplifying expressions and solving
equations. Topics covered will include systems of equations and inequalities, polynomials, quadratics,
conic sections, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, sequences and
series, logarithms, polynomial functions, and statistics. Graphing using a transformational approach
of quadratics and other polynomial functions will be emphasized. Technological and scientific
applications will be investigated when appropriate. The scope will be more extensive than regular
Algebra II and the pace rapid. Students will have access to a graphing calculator during the class. It
is highly recommended that students purchase a graphing calculator for out of class assignments.
Students completing this course will take the Algebra II EOC test. Passing this test will earn students
a verified credit in math for high school graduation.

IB MATHEMATICAL STUDIES Standard Level, Part I [IB3196]                                 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Geometry or Honors Geometry AND Algebra II or Honors Algebra II

Mathematical Studies targets the liberal arts directed students. Topics of study include number sets
and properties, measurement, coordinate geometry,         linear and exponential algebra, quadratic
algebra, sequences and series, financial mathematics, functions, descriptive statistics, and two
variable statistics. Students will be able to use math as a communication tool to identify, interpret
and solve math problems from an integrated curriculum including real life situations, science based
problems, business and social science problems. Students are required to have a graphing
calculator for out of class assignments.

IB MATHEMATICAL STUDIES Standard Level, Part II [IB31962]                               1.0 credit
Prerequisite: IB Mathematical Studies Standard Level Part I

This course is the second of two courses that covers the standards for IB Mathematical Studies. This
course is designed to prepare students for the IB Standard Level Examination for Mathematical
Studies. There will be a review of topics from IB Mathematical Studies Standard Level, Part I. Topics
including trigonometry, perimeter, area, volume, exponential and trigonometric functions, sets, logic,
probability, and introductory differential calculus will be studied. Students are required to have a
graphing calculator for out of class assignments. Students are expected to take Paper 1 and
Paper 2 of the IB Mathematical Studies exam in May. All students in this course will be required to
do a Mathematical Studies project. This project is a written in-depth report on a topic of the student’s
choice or a personal research paper involving collection, analysis and evaluation of data. The project is
completed independently. Testing fees apply.

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS AND TRIGONOMETRY [3162]                                             1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors Geometry AND Honors Algebra II

Topics of study include numbers and algebra, sequences and series, functions and equations,
exponentials and logarithms, trigonometry, and matrices. Students will use mathematics as a
language to explain, interpret, and predict events in the real world. Graphing calculators and
computers will be used for computation, explorations, and data interpretation. Students are
required to have a graphing calculator for out of class assignments. Mathematical modeling,
applications, and problem solving skills are integral parts of the curriculum.




                                                   33
IB MATHEMATICS Standard Level [IB3198]                                                 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry

At the end of this course students will be prepared for the IB Standard Level Exam for Mathematics.
Topics covered are vectors, probability and statistics, and elementary calculus. Students are
required to have a graphing calculator for out of class assignments. Students are expected to
take Paper 1 and Paper 2 of the IB Mathematics SL exam in May. As required by IB, the internal
assessment for Mathematics includes writing two portfolios. All portfolios are completed
independently. All students are required to complete the portfolios. The purpose of the portfolio is to
provide students with opportunities to be rewarded for mathematics carried out under ordinary
conditions and is without the time limitations and pressure associated with written examinations.
Consequently the emphasis should be on good mathematical writing and thoughtful reflection. The
material covered in these portfolio problems may be from Honors Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry.
Testing fees apply.

AP CALCULUS - BC [31774]                                                               1.0 credit
Prerequisite: IB Mathematics SL

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus is a course in single-variable calculus that includes techniques and
applications of the derivative, techniques and applications of the definite integral, and the
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It is equivalent to at least a semester of Calculus at most colleges
and universities, so it is intended for students that expect to take Calculus in college. Algebraic,
numerical, and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course. Students are
required to have a graphing calculator for out of class assignments. Students are expected to
take the AP Calculus exam at the end of the course. Testing fees apply.

AP STATISTICS [3192]                                                                   1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra II or Honors Algebra II

Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting,
reviewing, analyzing, and developing conclusions from data. This course is intended for seniors that
have completed their math requirements. Students are required to have a graphing calculator
for out of class assignments. Students are expected take the AP Statistics exam at the end of the
course. Testing fees apply.




                                                  34
                                             SCIENCE



              There are many pathways in science; two typical options are given below.

                 Algebra I in 9th
                                                        Algebra I in Middle School
                     Grade
  Grade 09         Earth Science                               Honors Biology
  Grade 10            Biology                                 Honors Chemistry
  Grade 11           Chemistry            Anatomy and
                                                                        IB Science Choices:
                                           Physiology
                                                                           IB Biology HL
               Environmental Science Honors Earth Science                 IB Chemistry SL
                     Biology II      Environmental Science
  Grade 12                                                         IB Environmental Systems SL
                      Physics              Biology II
                                                                  *All three options are two year
                  Forensic Science          Physics
                                                                              courses
                                        Forensic Science

BIOLOGY [4310]                                                                         1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Earth Science

This course follows the Biology Standards of Learning framework and meets requirements for the
verified credit through SOL testing. Independent research is taught and assessed with the production
of an independent research project. Students address the major topics of biology and learn to gather
and analyze data, measure, and use measurements in calculations. Labs within this course allow for
the hands-on exploration of each topic studied. Each student must keep a lab notebook. Students
completing this course will take the Biology EOC test. Passing this test will earn students a verified
credit in science for high school graduation. Lab fee required.

HONORS BIOLOGY [43104]                                                                 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I

Honors Biology follows the Biology Standards of Learning framework and meets requirements for the
verified credit through SOL testing. This program is designed to prepare students for advanced
biology coursework including IB Biology. Independent research is taught and assessed with the
production of an independent research project that students may choose to enter in the science fair.
Students address the major topics of biology and learn to gather and analyze data, measure, and use
measurements in calculations. Labs within this course allow for the hands-on exploration of each topic
studied. Each student must keep a lab notebook. Students completing this course will take the
Biology EOC test. Passing this test will earn students a verified credit in science for high school
graduation. Lab fee required.

EARTH SCIENCE [4210]                                                                   1.0 credit

Earth Science follows the Earth Science Standards of Learning framework and meets requirements for
the verified credit through SOL testing. Students continue their development of independent research
skills, while studying the forces that shape the earth. Frequent lab activities are a feature of this
course and an independent science project will be completed. A lab notebook is needed for record
keeping. Students completing this course will take the Earth Science EOC test. Passing this test will
earn students a verified credit in science for high school graduation. Lab fee required.

HONORS EARTH SCIENCE [42104]                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 11-12

Earth Science follows the Earth Science Standards of Learning framework and meets requirements for
the verified credit through SOL testing. Students will develop laboratory skills by exploring the major
topics of earth science in a laboratory setting. Independent research is taught and assessed with the



                                                  35
production of an independent research project that students may choose to enter in the science fair.
Students are required to provide a lab notebook for record keeping. Students completing this course
will take the Earth Science EOC test. Passing this test will earn students a verified credit in science for
high school graduation. Lab fee required.

CHEMISTRY [4410]                                                                          1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and Algebra II or Honors Algebra II
Or Co-requisite: Algebra II or Honors Algebra II with teacher recommendation

Chemistry is designed to address the Standards of Learning while still providing sufficient lab
experiences necessary for an academic science class. This course will meet the requirements for a
verified credit through SOL testing. Topic will include stoichiometry, periodicity, thermodynamics,
kinetics, gas laws, acids and bases, solutions, and modern atomic theory. An independent laboratory
project is required. Students completing this course will take the Chemistry EOC test. Passing this
test will earn students a verified credit in science for high school graduation. Lab fee required.

HONORS CHEMISTRY [44104]                                                                  1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and Algebra II or Honors Algebra II
Or Co-requisite: Algebra II or Honors Algebra II with teacher recommendation

Honors Chemistry covers the Chemistry Standards of Learning and covers introductory content for the
IB Chemistry course. This course will meet the requirements for a verified credit through SOL testing.
Topics will include stoichiometry, periodicity, thermodynamics, kinetics, gas laws, acids and bases,
solutions, and modern atomic theory. Independent research is taught and assessed with the
production of an independent research project that students may choose to enter in the science fair.
Students completing this course will take the Chemistry EOC test. Passing this test will earn students
a verified credit in science for high school graduation. Lab fee required.

IB CHEMISTRY STANDARD LEVEL, Part I [IB4480]                             1.0 credit
IB CHEMISTRY STANDARD LEVEL, Part II [IB4490]                            1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors Biology and One Other Honors Science, Honors Algebra II or teacher
recommendation
Co-requisite: Higher level math

Students will pursue a rigorous course of study of chemistry. Topics are developed for deeper
understanding and include kinetics, gas laws, stoichiometry, solutions, entropy, enthalpy, organic
chemistry, and equilibrium. IB special topics include Environmental Chemistry and Food Chemistry.
Students will complete an integrated science project with other group 4 IB Sciences during their
second year. An independent research project and participation in the science fair are required.
Students will take the IB Chemistry exam in the spring of their second year. Lab fee required.

IB BIOLOGY HIGHER LEVEL, Part I [IB4380]                                                  1.0 credit
IB BIOLOGY HIGHER LEVEL, Part II [IB4390]                                                 1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry or teacher recommendation

This is a two-year course that builds on learning from Honors Biology. Course topics include in-depth
examination of the chemistry of important organic compounds and energy relationships in cellular
reactions, expanded cell theory and organelle function, evolutionary trend, diversity, and patterns in
specialization and adaptation. Extensive lab work is an integral part of the course. Students will
complete an integrated science project with other group 4 IB Sciences. An independent research
project and participation in the science fair are required. Students will take the IB exam in the spring
of the second year. College credit may be earned for Part II through the dual enrollment program with
LFCC. The Dual enrollment offer is subject to change based on staffing. Lab fee required.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY [4330]                                                             1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry or teacher recommendation

Dual enrollment may be offered for this course through Lord Fairfax Community College. Students
should have a history of high success in sciences and be prepared for advanced coursework. Students


                                                    36
will be required to complete independent research and presentations. The curriculum is established
with LFCC and the grading will follow the Clarke County High School grading for dual enrollment
courses. The dual enrollment offer may be subject to change based on staffing. Lab fee required.

BIOLOGY II, BASIC HUMAN BIOLOGY [4320]                                                 .5 credit
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I [8383]                                                           .5 credit
Grades 11 and 12
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

In this semester course, Biology II presents basic principals of human anatomy and physiology. Cells,
tissues, and selected human systems will be studied. Dual enrollment may be offered for this course
through Lord Fairfax Community College.

In this semester course, Medical Terminology I introduces the student to the language used in health
records. A system-by-system review of anatomic disease, operative terms, abbreviations, radiography
procedures, laboratory tests and pharmacology terms will be studied. Dual enrollment may be offered
for this course through Lord Fairfax Community College.

PHYSICS [4510]                                                                   1.0 credit
Grades 11 and 12
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology, Chemistry or Honors Chemistry, and Algebra II or Honors
Algebra II

Physics is a mathematical approach to understanding the physical world around us. This course will
address topics including properties of matter, thermodynamics, mechanics, wave motion, sound, light,
electricity, magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. These topics will be developed through
various laboratory activities, and will include an independent research project. Lab fee required.

AP PHYSICS B [4571]                                                                    1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra II or Honors Algebra II, Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry

This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the
development of conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability using algebra and trigonometry,
but rarely calculus. In most colleges, this is a one-year terminal course including a laboratory
component and is not the usual preparation for more advanced physics and engineering courses.
However, the B course provides a foundation in physics for students in the life sciences, pre-medicine,
and some applied sciences, as well as other fields not directly related to science (taken from College
Board). Lab fee required.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE [4610]                                                  1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and Chemistry or Honors Chemistry or Earth Science or
Honors Earth Science

This course is designed to cover the basic aspects of ecology including historical and current issues in
environmental sciences and ecology. Ecology is the study of organisms and their interaction with their
environments. Topics covered will include populations, ecosystems, and dynamics of communities.
Lab fee required.

IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS STANDARD LEVEL, Part I [IB4280]                               1.0 credit
IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS STANDARD LEVEL, Part II [IB4281]
Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry or teacher recommendation

The intent of this course is to provide the student with a logical, comprehensive perspective of humans
and their impact on the environment. The course provides both an interdisciplinary understanding
and an international perspective on the global issues that affect us and the entire planetary
population. Coursework will count toward either the Group 4 or Group 3 (or both) requirement within
the IB program. All students will complete an integrated science project with other group 4 IB
Sciences during their second year. An independent research project is required for all students as well
as participation in the science fair. Students will take the IB exam in the spring of their second year.


                                                  37
College credit may be earned for Part II through the dual enrollment program with Lord Fairfax
Community College. The dual enrollment offer may be subject to change based on staffing. Lab fee
required.

INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE [4611]                                                  1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology and Chemistry or Honors Chemistry

This course is designed to introduce the basics of crime scene investigation by exploring various
techniques and procedures used by forensics scientists. By the end of this course, students will have
an understanding of the history of forensic science and the roles of different professionals in
evaluating a crime scene. In addition, they will learn the role of the senses in collecting data, how to
collect evidence without contaminating the evidence, and how to analyze evidence to assess the
relevant data. Lab fee required.




                                                  38
                                         SOCIAL STUDIES

WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY I PRE-HISTORY TO 1500 A.D. [2215]                             1.0 credit
Grade 09

Students will study the history of human cultures from the pre-literate societies to the Renaissance.
The chronological survey will trace the story of civilization focusing on the rise of social institutions,
the development of philosophy, religion, technology and the arts, and the contributions of individuals.
Analysis of historical documents, critical thinking and writing are emphasized. Students will take the
Virginia SOL exam for World History and Geography I at the end of the course.

HONORS WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY I                                                      1.0 credit
PRE-HISTORY TO 1500 A.D. [22154]
Grade 09

The coursework will cover the same period as above, but will have a greater emphasis on historical
readings, written analysis of source documents, and in-depth study of the development of civilization.
The course will emphasize examining people and events of the past through independent study and
interdisciplinary projects. Students are required to take the Virginia SOL exam for World History and
Geography I at the end of the course.

WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II                                                            1.0 credit
1500 A.D. TO THE PRESENT [2216]
Grade 10

Students examine the people and events of the past through independent study and cooperative
learning. The course follows the Essential Knowledge for the World History Part II Standards of
Learning exam closely. The course emphasizes basic social studies skills of map reading, key terms
and individuals, comparison making, and assessing cause and effect relationships. Analysis of
historical documents and primary source readings are incorporated throughout the curriculum.
Students will take the Virginia SOL exam for World History and Geography II at the end of the course.

HONORS WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II                                                     1.0 credit
1500 A.D. TO THE PRESENT [22164]
Grade 10
Prerequisite: Completion of Honors World History I or Permission of Instructor

Students examine the people and events of the past through independent study and interdisciplinary
projects. This course seeks to enhance students’ understanding of long term themes that have
developed since the Renaissance into the post World War II era. The course emphasizes higher
cognitive and critical thinking skills as well as the basic social studies skills of map reading, research,
comparison making and assessing cause and effect relationships. Reading excerpts from historical
novels, biographies or autobiographies, and documents is required. Students will take the Virginia
SOL exam for World History and Geography II at the end of the course.

HONORS US GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS [24404]                                                 1.0 credit
Grade 10
Prerequisite: Intended for IB Diploma Candidates

Honors Government is intended for sophomores in the IB diploma program and will fulfill the US
Government requirement for graduation. Students will take an analytical view of the branches of
government and their interaction as well as the role of politics. The class will also examine the role of
other non-governmental institutions such as political parties and interest groups. The course will also
emphasize research, writing skills and critical analysis.




                                                    39
VIRGINIA AND US HISTORY [2360]                                                          1.0 credit
Grade 11

Students will study American History from the Colonial Period to the present. Much of the focus is on
political and economic history as the student explores the development of U.S. culture through a
chronological survey of major issues, movements, people, ideas and events in the United States and
Virginia history. Students will expand social studies skills such as research, map/graph reading,
interpretation of historical documents, analysis of events and trends and understanding current issues
from a historical perspective. Students will take the Virginia SOL exam at the end of the course.

IB HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS Higher Level, Part I [IB2360]                                1.0 credit
Grade 11
Prerequisite: Completion of Honors Level World History or Permission of Instructor
Summer reading required

Students will study the history of the United States from colonial times to the present. In addition,
the course covers Latin American history from the independence movements of the 19th century to the
Mexican Revolution. The course fulfills the state requirement for US and Virginia History, and students
will take the Virginia SOL exam following completion. This course is Part I of an IB Higher Level
course, and as such, requires academic rigor.

IB HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS Higher Level, Part II [IB2361]                                1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of IB History of the Americas, Part I with a grade of C or higher
Summer reading required

This course involves a study of world history in the 20th century, with emphasis on the relationship of
the Americas to the events of that period. An independent research study is required. This course is
Part II of an IB Higher Level course, and as such, requires academic rigor. Students are encouraged
to take the IB Higher Level test at the end of the course. Students may also have the opportunity to
earn dual enrollment credit.

HONORS WORLD CIVILIZATIONS [23754]                                                      1.0 credit
Grade 12

This course provides one World Studies credit in Social Studies. This may be a dual-enrollment
college course that surveys the major events of world history from ancient times to the contemporary
period. Dual enrollment requires the payment of tuition. Students may possibly have the opportunity
to earn college credit.

SOCIOLOGY [2500]                                                                         .5 credit
Grades 10 - 12
PSYCHOLOGY [2900]                                                                        .5 credit
Grades 10 - 12

These 2 courses are required to be taken together. First semester students will study sociology,
the science that studies human society and social behavior. The study of sociology provides students
with the basic tools needed to develop a sociological imagination. Research, group related activities,
speakers and lectures will be the basis of this course.

Second semester students will study psychology. Psychology is designed to introduce students to the
study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to the
psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with psychology. Students also learn about
the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.




                                                   40
VIRGINIA AND US GOVERNMENT [2440]                                                      1.0 credit
Grade 12

Students will study the origins and workings of the American political system. Students will acquire a
working knowledge of the US and Virginia constitutions and study the structure and operation of
federal, state, and local government. The process of public policy making with an emphasis on
economics, foreign affairs, and civil rights issues will be studied. The impact of the general public,
interest groups, political parties and the media on policy making will be analyzed and evaluated. The
US political and economic system will be compared to other nations and students will study the role of
the US Government in the economy.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT US GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS [2445]                                   1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Students must have a B or better in previous Social Studies
course work or the recommendation of their previous teacher.
Summer reading required

The Advanced Placement (AP) US Government course is intended for 12th grade students. The
expectations for AP US Government are similar to those of an introductory college course in political
science. Emphasis will be on research, writing skills, and critical thinking. Students are encouraged to
take the AP US Government and Politics exam in the spring to possibly earn college credit for the
course.

IB ECONOMICS Standard Level [IB2806]                                                   1.0 credit
Grades 11 and 12
Prerequisite: Students must have a B or better in previous Social Studies
course work or recommendation of a teacher.

IB Economics is a one-year elective that fulfills the IB Group 6 requirement. Economics is a social
science, closely related to other academic disciplines such as sociology, political science, and
anthropology. History and geography also provide background material for the study of Economics.
The question of “what,” “how,” and “for whom” are central to the field of Economics. At the root of
Economics as a discipline is the search for a better understanding of the workings of human society.
The course includes the study of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, as well as International and
Developmental Economics. Students take the IB Standard Level exam at the end of the course.
Students may also earn dual enrollment credits (6) at Lord Fairfax Community College.

IB ECONOMICS HIGHER LEVEL [IB2807]                                                     1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: IB Economics Standard Level

This course explains in greater depth the topics included in the Standard Level course. The format is
primarily independent study of special interest Economic topics. Students take the Higher Level IB
Exam at the end of the course.

ECONOMICS AND PERSONAL FINANCE [6120]                                                  1.0 credit
Grades 09 – 12

Instruction in economics and personal finance prepares students to function effectively as consumers,
savers, investors, entrepreneurs, and active citizens. Students learn how economies and markets
operate and how the United States’ economy is interconnected with the global economy. On a
personal level, students learn that their own human capital (knowledge and skills) is their most
valuable resource.




                                                  41
JMU BRIDGE CLASSES

BRIDGE PSYCHOLOGY/FUTURE STUDIES [98876/98822]                                         1.0 credit
Prerequisite: 12th Grade                                                      6.0 college credits

The first semester is a study of important topics in psychology: the nervous system, sensation,
perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, life span
development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology, and the scientific
attitude. The second semester is an interdisciplinary look at the future, examining projections of how
our world will change during the next 50 years. (This course involves a nonrefundable JMU tuition
charge of approximately $600.)




                                                 42
                                     WORLD LANGUAGES
FRENCH I [5110]                                                                        1.0 credit

Classroom activities in French I seek to develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing skills. This course is a one-credit course that counts toward high school graduation. In
addition to their language study, students are introduced to the geography and culture of France and
the French-speaking world.

FRENCH II [5120]                                                                       1.0 credit
Prerequisite: French I

French II will further the student's knowledge of the language and culture of the French-speaking
world. The class reviews the main concepts taught in French I and presents a broader vocabulary and
more advanced grammatical structures. Culture study focuses both on France and other French-
speaking areas of the world. Instruction is given in both French and English. Classroom activities seek
to develop the listening comprehension, speaking reading, and writing skills.

FRENCH III [5130]                                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: French II

French III completes student introduction to the fundamental grammatical structures and vocabulary
of the French language. Students refine their listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing
skills, as well as expand their cultural knowledge of the Francophone world. Instruction is given
mainly in French. Completion of this course satisfies the world language requirement for the Virginia
Advanced Studies diploma and prepares students to continue their language study at the IB level and
in college.

IB FRENCH IV Standard Level [IB5142]                                                   1.0 credit
Prerequisite: French III

French IV students refine their language skills through the study of authentic texts such as press
articles, films, web sites, and literary works from the Francophone world, with a particular emphasis
on North American French language and culture. Student assignments include grammar tests,
compositions of various types, and individual and group oral presentations. Instruction is given in
French. Students may earn Lord Fairfax Community College dual enrollment credit for this course, but
students who intend to take the IB French Standard Level exam are expected to continue their studies
in IB French V.

IB FRENCH V Standard Level [IB5152]                                                    1.0 credit
Prerequisite: French IV

French V students refine their language skills through the study of authentic texts such as press
articles, films, web sites, and literary works from the Francophone world, with a particular emphasis
on North American French language and culture. Student assignments include grammar tests,
compositions of various types, and individual and group oral presentations. The final unit of the
course is devoted to preparation for the IB French Standard Level exam, which the students are
encouraged to take in May. Instruction is given in French. Students may earn Lord Fairfax Community
College dual enrollment credit for this course.

HONORS FRENCH VI [5160]                                                                1.0 credit
Prerequisite: French V

French VI aims to enhance the students' linguistic fluency, introduce them to the analysis of
Francophone literary works, and enable them to pursue areas of individual interest in their study of
French. Group instruction will be supplemented by independent study projects on topics chosen by the
students. French VI offers an excellent opportunity to earn a higher score on the IB exam and to
prepare for continued language study at the college level. Students planning to attend a liberal arts



                                                  43
college are strongly encouraged to continue their study of a world language during their senior year of
high school.

LATIN I [5310]                                                                         1.0 credit

This course introduces the student to grammatical forms and syntax of a new language. It requires
written and oral drill work leading to the reading and understanding of Latin literature. Careful
examination of Roman life is studied through research projects and readings. The life and times of the
Roman city of Pompeii are studied in detail.

LATIN II [5320]                                                                        1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Latin I with a final grade of C recommended

This course is designed to guide Latin students to the readings of Latin authors with the realization
that a true understanding of the reading requires a background of the basic forms and syntax covered
in Latin I. Therefore, a review is presented in the first few weeks together with new grammatical
syntax and vocabulary. Research projects and book reports are assigned at this level. Elements of
Roman and Greek culture (i.e. art, architecture) are studied.

LATIN III [5330]                                                                       1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Latin II with a final grade of C recommended

Latin III is a course in advanced grammar, vocabulary, and syntax that will round out the study of the
Latin language and prepare the student to read works of Roman authors in their original format.
Students will finish most of the language basics during first semester and use this knowledge to read
Roman works during second semester. Authors will include Ovid, Livy, Martial, and Caesar. Much of
the cultural emphasis will be on Roman history and legend. The class will also read a historical novel
and write a critical essay concerning it. Completion of this course satisfies the world language
requirement for the Virginia Advanced Studies diploma and prepares students to continue their
language study at the IB level and in college.

IB LATIN IV Standard Level [IB5340]                                                    1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Latin III with a final grade of C recommended

Latin IV is a course in Latin literature from the age of Caesar to the early Empire with emphasis on the
Golden Age of Roman literature. Students will use the knowledge obtained in Latin I, II, and III to
examine more challenging Latin works.            The primary author is Ovid.        Selections from his
Metamorphoses and Amores will be read and critiqued. Students will learn an array of literary devices
in order to analyze an author's style and purpose. During the second semester, students will begin the
Roman Epic unit which will concern Vergil's Aeneid, ancient Rome's most famous work. Emphasis will
be on translation, research, and analysis.

IB LATIN V Standard Level [IB5350]                                                     1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Latin IV with a final grade of C recommended

Latin V is a course in Latin literature from the age of Caesar to the early Empire with emphasis on the
Golden Age of Roman literature. Students will use the knowledge obtained in Latin I, II, III, and IV to
examine more challenging Latin works.           Students will conclude Vergil's Aeneid unit and then
concentrate on Roman poetry. The authors will include Catullus, Horace, and Ovid. Much concentration
will be devoted to the interpretation and critique of poetry. The effects of the cultural and historical
circumstances on the authors' works will be examined. Students will prepare themselves with the skills
needed to be successful on the IB Exam. IB Latin IV and V prepare the students for the IB Latin
Standard Level Exam.




                                                  44
HONORS LATIN VI [5360]                                                                    1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Latin V with a final grade of C recommended

Honors Latin VI is offered to those students who began the study of Latin prior to their 8th grade year.
It is a culmination of five years of study of the Latin language and ancient Roman civilization. It is a
literature course which emphasizes the careful study and interpretation of major Roman authors and
their most significant and influential works. The principal authors studied will be Vergil, Ovid, Catullus,
Livy, Propertius, and Caesar. In addition to translation and content understanding, much of the course
concerns analytical discussion of historical and cultural influences as well as relevance or parallels to
the modern world. Students will complete a year-long research dossier on a topic of their choice
concerning the ancient Roman world. Class presentations will involve a variety of topics and
technology. Students who successfully complete the course may be eligible to take or retake the SL IB
test, depending on their testing schedule.

SPANISH I [5510]                                                                          1.0 credit

Spanish I is an introduction to the language and Hispanic culture. Classroom activities focus on
listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Culture study will include the location of
Spanish-speaking countries and facets of daily life.

SPANISH II [5520]                                                                         1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish I with a minimum C end-of-course grade recommended

Spanish II will further students’ studies in the language and the Hispanic culture. Classroom activities
focus on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Culture study will include the
location of Spanish-speaking countries and a major project on a country or its people. Cultural study
compares Latin American and Spanish life.

SPANISH III FS [55301]                                                                    1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish II with a minimum C end-of-course grade recommended

Spanish III for Further Studies is designed for students intending to continue to IB Spanish
IV. This course will concentrate on developing the four skills needed for success on the IB exam:
speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Intensive grammar and vocabulary work will prepare
students for higher level reading and study of Spanish literature, as well as for extended writing
assignments. Group work and oral presentations will be part of the course. Instruction is given mostly
in Spanish.

SPANISH III WL [5530]                                                                     1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish II with final grade of C recommended

Spanish III as a World Language is designed for students who wish to pursue the Advanced
Studies diploma but will finish their study of Spanish with this course. Students will continue
the development of grammar and vocabulary begun in Spanish I and II. Listening and conversation
skills for business and practical situations will be stressed, as well as grammar and vocabulary for
career situations. The course will explore the role of Spanish in society and the cultural aspects of the
language and Spanish-speaking countries. Writing and reading assignments will focus on social and
business situations. Instruction will be in Spanish as much as possible.

IB SPANISH IV Standard Level [IB5542]                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish III FS with a final grade of C recommended

Spanish IV is a culmination of all skills learned in Spanish I, II, and III. Most instruction is given in
Spanish. Textbook assignments are supplemented by individual and group projects and the study of
selected works of Hispanic and Spanish literature and culture. Spanish IV prepares the student for the
Standard Level IB exam. Students will take the IB exam in the spring of the second year and complete
internal assessment requirements.




                                                    45
IB SPANISH V Standard Level [IB5552]                                                   1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish IV with a final grade of C recommended

Spanish V students maintain and increase fluency in Spanish by advanced listening, speaking, reading,
and writing practice. Literary and culture study completes the students’ preparation for the standard
level IB exam. Students will take the IB exam in the spring of the second year and complete internal
assessment requirements.

HONORS SPANISH VI [5560]                                                               1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Spanish V with a final grade of C recommended

Spanish VI is for students who have completed the IB Spanish program but wish to continue practicing
the language their senior year. The class will consist of further conversational practice with emphasis
on "real world" speaking and listening situations as well as improving students' reading and writing
ability in the language through use of authentic materials. Students planning to attend a liberal arts
college are strongly encouraged to continue their study of a world language during their senior year of
high school.

OTHER LANGUAGES - From time to time, CCPS is able to offer special courses in other world
languages, such as German, Japanese or Mandarin. These courses are intended to supplement our
regular language programs in French, Latin and Spanish. Please check with your counselor regarding
which other languages are available.




                                                  46
                           HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Health and Physical Education courses provide students the opportunity to develop an individual
optimal level of physical fitness, acquire physical fitness concepts and knowledge of the significance
lifestyle choices have on health and fitness.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 09 [7300]                                                 1.0 credit

Health and Physical Education 09 provides students with opportunities to develop an individual optimal
level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of physical fitness concepts, and understand the
significance of an active lifestyle on one’s health and fitness. The content emphasizes the importance
of physical fitness, assessment of health related components of fitness, health problems associated
with inadequate fitness levels, application of biomechanical and physiological principles to improve and
maintain fitness, safety practices and psychological values of fitness, including stress management,
and sound nutritional practices and consumer issues related to physical fitness.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10 [7405]                                                 1.0 credit

The purpose of this course is to develop awareness and enhance behaviors which influence lifestyle
choices for health and fitness. The content includes but is not limited to the application of fitness and
health concepts, risks and benefits of varying fitness levels, development of individual wellness plans,
completion of a behavior change project, analyzing of skill related fitness, mental and emotional
health (including depression and suicide), and tobacco, alcohol, and other drug misuse/abuse and risk
protective factors. The class provides students with opportunities to develop and enhance critical life
management skills necessary to make sound decisions and take positive actions for healthy and
effective living. The content offers positive emotional development, nutrition and weight management,
consumerism, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and first aid for airway obstruction. Students must
demonstrate competency of CPR and first aid skills.

Drivers Education with Behind the Wheel is taught as a part of PE 10. Students must attend all
classes, complete all assignments and maintain an above C average in order to be successful in this
program. Ninth grade students are not allowed to take this course.

Note: Health and Physical Education 09 and 10 are required for graduation. A standard
uniform is mandatory and students are expected to dress in the proper attire each day.
Failure to do so will result in a failing grade each marking period. Any student whose parent
makes a written request to the school principal shall be exempt from the HIV/AIDS and
human sexuality instruction activities and will be required to complete an alternative
assignment.

PHYSICAL FITNESS I [7640]                                                               1.0 credit
Grades 11 – 12
Prerequisite: Physical Education 09 and 10 and Permission of Instructor

The Physical Fitness I course provides students with opportunities to develop an individual optimal
level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of physical concepts, and the significance of lifestyle on
one’s health and fitness including team sports. Self discipline is stressed and students are expected to
take responsibility for their own improvement levels.

Activities provide students with opportunities in a variety of recreational settings that may be useful
today as well as in later life and maintain or improve their personal fitness. The content includes
application of skills, techniques, strategies, rules, and safety practices necessary to participate in
activities which may include, but not be limited to tennis, badminton, basketball, soccer, track, touch
football, Frisbee, Frisbee golf, table tennis, etc.




                                                   47
PHYSICAL FITNESS II [7650]                                                               1.0 credit
Grades 11 – 12
Prerequisite: Physical Fitness I and Permission of Instructor

This course provides students opportunities to acquire knowledge of strategies and develop skills in
selected sports, and maintain and/or improve personal fitness while working individually or with a
team. Content includes application skills, techniques, strategies, rules, and safety practices. Individual
and dual sports selected may include but not be limited to basketball, volleyball, table tennis, and
tennis. Off-season as well as in-season athletes are encouraged to enroll in this class to improve their
overall physical condition by working with the instructor to customize an individual program.

WEIGHT TRAINING [7651]                                                                   1.0 credit
Grades 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Weight Training provides students the opportunity to extend the acquisition of knowledge and the
development of skills which may be used in physical fitness pursuits today as well as in later life,
further improve strength and endurance, and enhance body image. Students will gain improvement in
their overall strength and flexibility, especially athletes during the off season. Students are
encouraged to work with a partner for optimal improvement and safety.




                                                   48
                                            FINE ARTS

ART I [9120]                                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

ART I is the foundation level course for the high school art program. Students focus on idea
development and visual literacy while they explore a wide range of art media and develop skills in
drawing painting, printmaking, and clay and sculpture. They study art history, aesthetics, and criticism
from a multicultural perspective. Students begin to learn ablout organizing a portfolio. Students will
become well versed in the Elements of Art. This course is the prerequisite for all future high school
studio art courses. Students study and produce artwork and have frequent sketchbook assignments.
Fee required - $10.00.

ART II [9130]                                                                          1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Art I

Students expand and refine knowledge and skills in art making, visual literacy, and art history
developed in ART I. New techniques and media are introduced. Students focus on drawing, painting,
printmaking and sculpture. Students study art history, aesthetics, and criticism from a chronological
perspective. Students will review The Elements of Art and become well versed in The Principles of
Design. They begin to build portfolios that exhibit expanded knowledge and improved skills. Students
have weekly sketchbook assignments. Emphasis is placed on developing each student’s personal style
in their artwork. Fee required - $10.00.

ART III [9140]                                                                         1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Art II

Students engage in advanced study of art production and communication, art history, aesthetics, and
art criticism. Students establish goals, develop individual styles, become familiar with art schools and
careers, and develop the work habits of the professional artist. Students select additional works for
portfolios based on technical quality, personal style, intended purpose, and evidence of growth over
time. Fee required - $10.00.

IB ART I Standard Level, Part I [IB9190]                                               1.0 credit
Grades 11 and 12
Prerequisite: Art II

The first in a two-year course involves personal research and appreciation of art history and design
and development of a personal body of studio work. Documentation is recorded in the Investigative
Research Workbook (IWB) on a daily basis. The IWB will contain both visual and verbal information in
the form of a working journal. One 180-page book will be completed by the end of each year as well
as 12 to 15 independent studio projects. Fee required - $25.00.

IB ART II Higher Level, Part II [IB91995]                                              1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: IB Art/SL Part I

Part II of a two-year course involving personal research, independent studio work and appreciation of
art history and design. Documentation is recorded in the Investigative Research Workbook (IWB) on a
daily basis. The book will contain both visual and verbal information in the form of a working journal.
One 180-page book will be completed by the end of each year as well. At the end of this course
students will be assessed by an outside IB examiner based upon their workbooks and individual art
show. Fee required - $25.00.




                                                  49
PHOTOGRAPHY I [9190]                                                                    1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Art I or Permission of Instructor

Students are introduced to standard black and white photographic processes through the use of
cameras, films, light effects, and application of basic darkroom techniques. Digital photographic
processes are introduced. Emphasis is placed on photographic production and self-expression. Study
includes an overview of the history of photography and the work of well known photographers. A
beginning portfolio is developed. Fee required - $50.00.

PHOTOGRAPHY II         [9191]                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Photography 1

Students are introduced to standard black and white photographic processes through the use of
cameras, films, light effects, and application of basic darkroom techniques. Digital photographic
processes are introduced. Emphasis is placed on photographic production and self-expression. Study
includes an overview of the history of photography and the work of well known photographers. A
beginning portfolio is developed. Fee required - $50.00.

EAGLE BAND [9234]                                                                     1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor. Course may be repeated for credit.

Students will be required to attend rehearsals and performances on a daily basis both during and after
regular school hours. Students will acquire and enhance skills on a woodwind, brass, or percussion
instrument through group and individual rehearsal and performance. Opportunities will be available
for students to audition for both All-District and All-State events. Eagle Band is the high school’s
marching band and concert ensemble all rolled up into one class. Eagle Band will act as the Marching
Band in the fall semester and as the concert band in the winter and spring.

JAZZ BAND [92340]                                                                       1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in regular band class (Eagle Band) or Percussion Ensemble to
be eligible for participation in Jazz Ensemble. Special exceptions are made only on director approval.

Jazz ensemble is a performance-based class with the emphasis placed on the jazz genre of
instrumental music. The students will rehearse and perform instrumental music arrangements
including Jazz Standards, Swing, Rock, Funk, and Latin to name a few. The Jazz Ensemble will perform
regularly.

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE [9298]                                                            1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students must have at least 2 years of experience in instrumental music to be eligible for
Percussion Ensemble. Special exceptions are made only on director-approved auditions.

Percussion is a select group of 10 to 20 musicians, who engage in the performance of percussion
performance literature. The repertoire ranges from classical transcriptions to contemporary jazz and
world music. Membership is open to all band students who have at least 2 years of experience in
instrumental music. The Percussion Ensemble will act as the drum section for the Marching Band in
the fall semester. In the spring, the Percussion Ensemble/Indoor Drum line will perform regularly.
For updated calendar of events go to www.cchsband.com and click on the calendar link.




                                                  50
COLOR GUARD [9296]                                                                      1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

This course is designed for the purpose of team building emphasizing physical conditioning, endurance
and motor skills in relation to color guard technique through the use of tall flags, short flags, rifles,
saber, shields/banners and dance for performances at civic events, parades, field shows and winter
guard competitions. Rehearsals and performances may be scheduled outside of the school day for
those wishing to join the Marching Band in the fall or Indoor Guard in the spring. The length of the
course is one year. Upon educator and counselor approval, this course may be repeated for credit.

MUSIC THEORY - INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY [9225]                                      1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

This course introduces written and aural music fundamentals including notation, scales, intervals,
chords, rhythm, and meter. The course will also provide an introduction to basic principles of tonal
music through listening, analysis and music making. Students study melody, harmony, voice leading,
figured bass and dissonance treatment, and will also undertake short composition projects.

MUSIC THEORY II [9226]                                                                  1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Music Theory I

This course continues the written and aural work of the previous course but focuses on chromatic and
atonal harmony while continuing the study of melody, counterpoint and figured bass.

IB MUSIC – MUSIC HISTORY AND CULTURES [IB9294]                                          1.0 credit
Grades 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Music Theory and/or Permission of Instructor

This course provides students with advanced musical study of all genres and cultures, listening and
writing about each. Students will participate in a wide and varied set of activities designed to help
them to identify, appreciate, analyze, discriminate, and hypothesize in relation to music of all periods,
styles, and origins. The course includes several field trips and guest presenters, as well as performing
concert-standard music in April. All students taking this course are encouraged to take the IB exam at
the end of the school year.

GUITAR [9246]                                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the skills outlined in the
Beginning Guitar syllabus. The course includes further development of the skills necessary to become
independent as a guitarist. This course emphasizes the development of style, articulation, dynamics,
rhythmic ability and skills inherent to performance. Students will receive guidance and direction in
solving problems related to playing the guitar on an intermediate level and will learn many of the
different styles, skills and techniques required to become a successful guitarist. Areas of
concentration include: note reading, aural skills, flat picking, rhythmic patterns, chord study, finger
picking styles, musical forms, improvisation, and performing experiences.

CONCERT CHOIR [9285]                                                                    1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor

Concert Choir is a mixed choir of students ranging from 9-12 grades. The choir sings 4- to 8-part
music from all musical style periods, including performances of small major works with wind ensemble
and chamber orchestra. An emphasis is placed on good vocal production and development, music
theory, sight-reading, and ensemble performance. Performance opportunities include two major




                                                   51
concerts [winter and spring] and all other local community events. Members of the Concert Choir will
have the opportunity to audition for All-District and State events.

CHAMBER CHOIR [9297]                                                               1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Students must have at least 1 year of vocal ensemble experience to be eligible for the
ensemble. Special exceptions may be made at the discretion of the director.

Chamber Choir is a small advanced mixed ensemble whose members are also members of the Concert
Choir. The Choir performs a variety of music of diverse style periods. An emphasis is placed on
independent and a cappella singing. There is a significant time commitment with after school
rehearsals and other performances, especially during the holiday season. Members of the Chamber
Choir will also have the opportunity to audition for All-District and State events. Performance
opportunities, in addition to those of Concert Choir, include a variety of community and area concerts,
as well as performances at home football games.

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS [1410]
Grades 09 - 12                                                                             1.0 credit

Students will learn the basics of acting, dramatic literature, directing, set design, and production.
Students will study and experience a wide range of theatre activities designed to provide a broad
understanding of drama and the theatre. This class meets at Johnson-Williams Middle School.

ADVANCED THEATRE ARTS [1448]                                                               1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I

Students will build on concepts and skills acquired in Introduction to Theatre Arts. Through various
modes of expression and performance, students will investigate dramatic literature, theatrical styles,
and historical periods. Students will study and respond to a variety of theatre experiences that will
refine their communicative, analytical, interpretive, and problem-solving skills. Students will expand
their artistic abilities and appreciation of the theatrical arts. Completion of Introduction to Theatre Arts
required. This class meets at Johnson-Williams Middle School. With teacher approval, this course may
be repeated for credit.




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                          CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

FOUNDATIONS OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND                                                     1.5 credits
NATURAL RESOURCES [8006] AG I
Grades 09 - 10

This course is designed to develop competencies in each of the career pathways as they pertain to
agricultural education, including the areas of Virginia’s agriculture industry; the global scope of
agriculture; scientific research concepts in plant, animal, and food science; principles of leadership and
opportunities within student organizations; agribusiness and Supervised Agricultural Experience
program opportunities; agricultural skills and safety in power, structural, and technical systems; and
natural resources and environmental systems.

AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS AND BASIC ANIMAL SCIENCE [8008] AG II                             1.5 credits
Grades 10 - 11
Prerequisite: AG I

This course is recommended as an introduction to advanced courses related to animal science,
production, and marketing, and may count toward a concentration sequence. Students continue to
learn agricultural mechanics, with emphasis placed on fundamentals of electricity, arc welding, gas
cutting and welding, small engines, power woodworking, and wood and metal preservatives. They also
receive instruction in animal science and further develop competencies in rural and urban living,
leadership, and resource conservation.

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY [8010] AG III                                         1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 11
Prerequisite: AG I or II

This course emphasizes one or more areas of plant science, animal science, soil science, agricultural
business management, and agricultural mechanization, based upon the student’s employment
objective. Local school divisions should select one of the following livestock enterprises: beef cattle,
dairy cattle, swine, horses, or sheep. The competencies for the selected livestock enterprise are
considered essential for the course. Supervised occupational experience programs and leadership
training are important parts of the course. When only single periods are provided, greater emphasis is
placed on individualized instruction and supervised occupational experience programs.

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT [8012] AG IV                                          1.0 credit
Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisite: AG I or AG II

Course includes instruction in agricultural mechanics, with emphasis placed on the application of
mechanical skills to farm power and machinery, soil and water management, supervised farming
programs, and leadership training.

AGRICULTURAL FABRICATION AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES [8019]                                1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 11
Prerequisite: AG I or AG II

Students will receive instruction providing career training in the areas of agricultural fabrication and
emerging technologies. The course content will focus on hot and cold metal fabrication and will also
include studies of emerging technologies utilized within the field of agriculture.

AGRICULTURAL POWER SYSTEMS [8018]                                                        1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 11
Prerequisite: Agricultural Fabrication and Emerging Technologies

Instruction in agricultural power systems will focus on increasing the depth of study in power,
structural, and technical systems. Areas of these systems to be addressed are engines, power trains,



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hydraulics, electrical, and fuels. Instruction will also be provided in precision measurement,
leadership, and career skills.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT [9097]                                                            1.0 credit
Grades 11- 12
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Students develop competencies in identifying individual aptitudes in relation to effective leadership
skills, understanding organizational behavior, using effective communication in the workplace,
handling human resources and organizational problems, supervising and training employees, resolving
conflict, and planning for the future. Continuing education in leadership is emphasized as well as
practical leadership experiences in cooperation with school and community leaders.

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES [8053]                             1.0 credit
Grades 09 – 12

Approximately one-half of this course is devoted to areas of horticulture, including growing and
reproducing plants, and investigating the landscaping and floriculture industries. However, as this
course is meant to be customized by the instructor, a wide variety of areas is represented, including
woodworking; agricultural science, mechanics, tools, and machinery; animal care; ecology and
environmental management; forestry; parks and natural resource management; and business
operations.

SMALL ENGINE [8021]                                                                      .5 credit
WELDING [8672]                                                                           .5 credit
Grades 09 – 12

The 18-week Small Engine course offers an intensive study of the operation, maintenance, and repair
of small gasoline engines. Instructional topics include principles of operation of gasoline engines, tune-
up and maintenance procedures, and disassembly, overhaul, and reassembly. Instruction may also
include the operation of two-cycle and four-cycle engines commonly found on lawn mowers, garden
tractors, snow blowers, rotary tillers, chainsaws, and other equipment. The course emphasizes
leadership activities and opportunities to participate in FFA functions.

During the 18-week Welding course, students learn to use gases and/or welding processes and to
braze and solder metal parts according to diagrams, blueprints, or written specifications. Equipment
that the students will be trained on are: basic arc welding AC/DC welding, MIG welding, TIG welding,
soldering, plasma cutting and oxyacetylene welding. The course also includes an overview of metals
and metal fabrication. The course emphasizes leadership activities and opportunities to participate in
FFA functions

EQUINE MANAGEMENT PRODUCTION [8080]                                                      1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

In this course, students learn how to care for and manage horses. Equine health, nutrition,
management, reproduction, training, evaluation, and showmanship are the major instructional areas.
In addition, course content includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for equine
enterprises. Business management topics include the economics of boarding, training, and
merchandising horses. Leadership development activities are included, and participation in FFA
activities is encouraged.

AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT V – AG COOP [8026]                                      1.0 credit
Must have a job to be enrolled in this course
Grade 12

This occupational preparation course will be operated on a cooperative on-the-job training basis with
local agricultural businesses. Much of the instruction may be individualized. The course provides
further opportunities for the development of business procedures, management techniques, and
agricultural product knowledge. Leadership skills continue to be developed.


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HORTICULTURE I [8034]                                                                     1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

Students in the Horticulture I class will explore the basic principles and practices of the horticulture
industry. Students will study plant sciences, principles and practices of floral design, landscape
design, and growing greenhouse crops. Students are also exposed to the world of business as they
create, market, and sell plants and products using skills developed in the classroom.

HORTICULTURE II [80342]                                                                   1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Horticulture I

Second-year students will continue their studies in plant sciences and practices. Additionally, students
will have opportunities to learn more about the business aspects of horticulture. Students will be
required to use their initiative to help make decisions about growing and maintaining greenhouse
crops, choosing flowers and creating designs for specific floral occasions.

FLORICULTURE/HORTICULTURE III [8038]                                                      1.0 credit
Prerequisite: Completion of Horticulture I and II or Permission of Instructor

The floriculture industry is involved with the production, distribution, and utilization of floral products
and related goods and services. Career opportunities in this field include greenhouse growers, floral
designers, wholesale suppliers, and marketing and business management. Teachers and researchers
are in demand within the industry. Education can be acquired through university programs, on-the-job
training, or both. Students in this course will build on skills acquired in Horticulture I and II as they
use their knowledge to research and develop new products, create unique floral designs, grow healthy
greenhouse crops and then market and sell their products.

HORTICULTURE CO-OP [80343]                                                                1.0 credit

This opportunity is offered to students who have completed Horticulture I and II. This course requires
independent study and approval of instructor.

MENTORSHIP [9828]                                                                      1.0 credit
Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisite: Application required - acceptance into program pending review of application

The mentorship program pairs high school students with professional educators. Mentors will work at
the discretion of the teacher. Duties may include but are not limited to, tutoring individual students,
assisting small groups of students, making bulletin boards, filing, copying. The program provides an
opportunity for high school students to earn an academic credit and recognition for community
involvement and civic responsibility. Younger students benefit by learning from role models who help
them to master their skills. Excellent attendance and behavior at CCHS is essential.

WORK RELEASE [9827]                                                                       0 credit
Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisite: Provide Guidance Office with verification of employment

This is a non-credit course that will allow practical work experience for students. Prior to enrolling in
this course, students must submit the appropriate paperwork to Guidance that verifies employment.
Students who are enrolled in this course may be granted an early release from school.




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WORD PROCESSING [6626]                                                                .5 credit
Grades 09 - 12
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS [6617]                                                          .5 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Word Processing

The Word Processing class will teach students to impress teachers and employers with great-looking
professional work. Develop or refine touch-typing skills for entering alphabetic, numeric and symbolic
information on the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on technique and accuracy of keyboard operation
and then on speed. Efficient operation at the keyboard leads to student confidence, pride in one’s
work and the accomplishment of the task at hand within a reasonable time. Learn to format reports,
letters and memorandums with style. Course work prepares the student to produce documents
needed in high school, college and the workplace.

The computer applications course is for students who have successfully completed the above
prerequisite. Students learn to use the features of Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft
PowerPoint. The course is appropriate for any students who will use computer technology in the
workplace, school, or home.

COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY I CST I [8622]                                            1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: None

Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled [ITN106 and 107]                 6.0 college credits

This is a 2-part course. The first semester course (ITN106) introduces the concepts, usage, internals
and applications of operating systems and hardware. Topics include resource management, shells, file
systems, networking, software considerations and other related topics. Upon completion, students
should be able to choose and evaluate operating systems and have basic knowledge of computer
hardware. Maps to A+ Certification. [3 Credits]

Part 2 of this course (ITN107) covers repairing, servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in
preparation for industry certification. Topics include resolving resource conflicts and system bus
specifications, configuration and troubleshooting peripherals, operating system configuration and
optimization, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and
resolve system conflicts and optimize system performance.

The A+/Computer Technician course is designed to provide entry-level training for computer
technicians. Successful students can gain A+ Certification through CompTIA, The Computer
Technology Industry Association.   The course will cover the Virginia Department of Education
competencies for Computer Systems Technology (8622) and CompTIA A+ Operating System
objectives (November 2003). A complete list of course competencies is attached or can be found on
the VDOE Career and Technical Education website.

COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY II (CST II) [8623]                                        1.0 credit
COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY COOP [8624]                                               1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Computer Systems Technology I
Co-requisite: Computer Systems Technology II [Work Experience]
Due to the limited number of spaces, application may be required

Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled (ITN109)                         3.0 college credits

This course provides a basic comprehension of Internet and network technologies including IT job
roles, connection methods, TCP/IP functionality and DNS.          Students will explore web server
technologies with security and project management concepts. Introduces network creation, physical
and logical topologies including media properties, server types, IP addressing and network security.
In addition, we will build on the foundation of Computer Systems Technology I as this advanced
course provides students with training in procedures for optimizing and troubleshooting concepts for


                                                 56
computer systems and subsystems.

Students explore wireless technologies (e.g., Bluetooth, Wi-Fi) and create and configure a network.
Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency, skill-building, and workplace readiness. The course
prepares students for postsecondary education and training and a successful career in information
technology. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine
classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing
supervision throughout the school year.

DESIGN, MULTIMEDIA AND WEB TECHNOLOGIES [6630]                                          1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: None

Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled [ITD110]                           3.0 college Credits

Have fun designing web pages using Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Flash. Learn the pros and cons of
web page design by evaluating existing web pages. Let your creative side show as you create
professional, up-to-date web sites that are pleasing to the eye and easy to use.

This course focuses on web site basics with particular emphasis on design elements involving layout,
navigation and interactivity. Hands-on web design exercises will be taught using Fireworks,
Dreamweaver, and Flash with some HTML. Teacher directed lectures, hands-on labs and projects will
comprise the majority of lessons.

Students will use the Internet as a resource for gathering information, understand and use copyright
and fair use guidelines, understand and use netiquette, download graphics and other types of files
available on the Internet, use e-mail to communicate with contact people and visitors to our web site,
create graphics for use on a web site, flyers, etc., operate all equipment including scanners and digital
cameras, add animation of both text and graphics, add sound and video, learn the basics of the
JavaScript language, and create a personal electronic portfolio.

ADVANCED DESIGN, MULTIMEDIA AND WEB
TECHNOLOGIES ADVANCED WEB DESIGN [6631]                                                 1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies

Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled [ITD210]                           3.0 college Credits

After successful completion of Web Design, students may take this course each year. It is for highly
motivated students and it focuses on the overall production process surrounding web site design with
particular emphasis on design elements involving layout, navigation, and interactivity. This course will
help prepare students for higher education or jobs in the Internet Economy. Student will also maintain
the school’s web site.

IB INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY                                           1.0 credit
Standard Level Part I [IB6613]
IB INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY
Standard Level Part II [IB6614]
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Basic computer knowledge, Grades 10-12

The information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impact
of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and
disadvantages of the use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a
framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social
contexts. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social
sciences, it also considers ethical questions found in the study of philosophy. Students come into
contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This
widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions about social and ethical issues that shape


                                                   57
out society today. ITGS offers an opportunity for a systematic study of these issues, whose range is
such that they fall outside the scope of any other single discipline.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY [83832]                                                             .5 credit
Grades 11 - 12                                                                  3 college credits
1 semester
Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled [HIT111]

This course introduces students to the language used in the health record. It includes a system-by-
system review of anatomic disease, and operative terms, abbreviations, radiography procedures,
laboratory tests, and pharmacology terms.

DIET AND NUTRITIONAL THERAPY [83945]                                                    .5 credit
Grades 11 - 12                                                                  2 college credits
1 semester
Lord Fairfax Community College Dual Enrolled [HLT130]

This course focuses on nutritional principles and their application. It includes the current direction of
health care and health promotion, nutrient groups, current food and nutrient guides, risk reduction for
disease prevention, nutritional needs throughout the life span and current clinical approaches to
nutritional management in various disease states

NURSE AIDE [8360]                                                                       1.0 credit
Grades 11 - 12
2 semesters
Virginia Board of Nursing Accreditation-Industry Certification

This course focuses on preparing students for direct patient care. Students who successfully complete
90 hours of classroom and campus learning lab, 40 hours of hands on patient care in a clinical setting,
and advanced nurse aide studies will be eligible to take the NNAAP Nurse Aide Certification exam

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING PRACTICE [8394]                                                  .5 credit
Grades 11 - 12                                                                  4.0 college credits
1 semester
Prerequisite-GPA of 3.0 or higher, conference and approval of teacher
Shenandoah University Dual Enrolled (N200)

This course introduces students to nursing as a profession and to the role of the nurse as provider of
care, coordinator of care, and member of the profession. Concepts related to provision of nursing care
and health promotion are introduced. The clinical component provides the student the opportunity to
learn basic skills in the campus learning lab and to provide direct nursing care to individuals in
selected health care settings. These students will be eligible to take the NNAAP Nurse Aide
Certification exam after completion of 40 hours of clinical.

LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT AND NUTRITION [83942]
Grades 11 - 12                                                                           .5 credit
1 semester                                                                        3.0 college credits
Prerequisite-GPA of 3.0 or higher, conference and approval of teacher
Shenandoah University Dual Enrolled (N216)

This course introduces the student to the knowledge, skills, values, meanings, and experiences
essential to understanding the development of individuals, families, and communities across the
lifespan. In addition to growth and development, the course examines nutritional wellness including
the relationship between food, nutrition, and health. Therapeutic nutrition for use in the treatment of
health alterations will be introduced.




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EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, BASIC I [8333]                                             .5 credit
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, BASIC II [8334]                                            .5 credit
Grades 11 - 12

Courses I and II must be taken together. Several outside-the-curriculum hours must be
completed on emergency calls with the local fire station. A $100.00 fee is required for
testing and the book. Emergency Medical Technician, Basic I prepare the students for certification
as a Virginia EMT-Basic. The course includes all aspects of pre-hospital basic life support as defined
by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for emergency medical technician
basic.

Emergency Medical Technical, Basic II continues student preparation for certification as a Virginia
EMT-Basic. The course includes all aspect of pre-hospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia
Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for emergency medical technician basic.

FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING [8110]                                                         1.0 credit
Grade 10
Prerequisite: Application required

This basic elective course offered in the three-year Marketing program is an introduction to marketing
concepts and functions. Focuses on the marketing principles of product, price, place (distribution) and
promotion and how these principles impact every company or organization. The student will explore
the roles of business and marketing in the free enterprise system and the global economy. The course
prepares students with valuable workplace skills for use in entry-level jobs as well as in future careers.

MARKETING [8120]                                                                         1.0 credit
Grades 11- 12

Students are introduced to the functions and foundations involved in the marketing of goods, services
and ideas and achieve competencies necessary for successful marketing employment. Students study
risk management, selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing, marketing information management,
product/service planning, distribution and financing. Foundation competencies include economics,
communication and interpersonal skills, business, management and entrepreneurship and professional
development.

MARKETING CO-OP [8121]                                                                   1.0 credit

This course may be offered for one credit. Marketing Co-Op requires 270 hours on the job.

ADVANCED MARKETING [8130]                                                                1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Marketing Competencies

Students will continue to learn management theory and will study in-depth marketing research,
business ownership, management and supervision techniques, merchandising and international trade.
It is the rigorous and critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic
business environment. The program is designed to give students an understanding of business
principles, practices and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and
day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management and finance. It is an
academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an
impact on internal and external environments.

ADVANCED MARKETING CO-OP [8131]                                                          1.0 credit

Advanced Marketing Co-op may be offered for one credit. Course requires 270 hours on the job.




                                                   59
IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT [IB6135]                                                          1.0 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Marketing Competencies

Students will continue to learn management theory and will study in-depth marketing research,
business ownership, management and supervision techniques, merchandising and international trade.
It is the rigorous and critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic
business environment. The program is designed to give students an understanding of business
principles, practices and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and
day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management and finance. It is an
academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an
impact on internal and external environments. Students are expected to take the IB exam in the
spring.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN [8439]                                                    1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12                                                                      4.0 college credits

IED is the study of engineering drawing and design. It is the basic course of Project Lead the Way.
Topics covered include measurement, sketching, drafting, geometric principles, and design principles.
Inventor Computer Aided Drawing [CAD] software is utilized as the primary drafting tool. Students
will design several projects throughout the course. This class is a dual enrollment class.

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS [8440]                                                                   1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I and Algebra I Part II

Digital Electronics is the study of basic principles of electronics, including circuitry and circuitry design.
Students will design and build simple digital circuitry, program digital chips, and work with basic
stamp circuitry.

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE [PLTW8431]                                                1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12                                                                      3.0 college credits
Prerequisite: Algebra I and IED/Permission of Instructor

CEA is a study of the basics of civil engineering and architecture including project design and planning,
site planning, and building design. Basic concepts of plats, building parts [e.g. beams, posts, stairs,
wall systems, etc.] and codes and requirements will be covered as well as the professional aspects of
Civil Engineering and Architecture. This is a dual enrollment class.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING [8441]                                                             1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12                                                                      1.0 college credit

This course helps students learn about the field of engineering/engineering technology. Exploring
various technology systems and manufacturing processes helps students learn how engineers and
technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem-solving process to benefit
people. The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological
change. This is a dual enrollment course.

ENERGY AND POWER [8448]                                                                      1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12

Energy and Power is the study of power sources and transmission. This course includes building,
programming, and analyzing power trains and robotic devices. Students compete in the FIRST
robotics competition, which will require after school and some weekend commitments during the game
times. Involvement in all aspects of building the robot and competition is required for successful
completion of the course.




                                                     60
APPLIED CARPENTRY I [8601]                                                            1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

Applied Carpentry I looks at the basics of carpentry. Students build basic structures to learn proper
and safe use of construction materials and associated tools. Through the building of structures and
projects, students will learn the safe use of tools and materials. All aspects of how homes and other
buildings function will be covered. Electrical, plumbing, HVAC and remodeling will also be explored.
This course will prepare students for Carpentry II.

APPLIED CARPENTRY II [8602]                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Applied Carpentry I

Students will refine basic skills from Carpentry I with a higher expectation for accuracy. Design,
planning, marketing and construction of projects are required of students. Upon completion of course,
students will have a solid base in trade related skills. Practical and career related knowledge can be
used for a lifetime. Applied Carpentry II prepares students to erect, install, maintain and repair
buildings and other structures using materials such as metal, wood, stone, brick, glass, concrete, and
composition substances. Students develop skills in estimating costs: cutting, fastening and fitting
various materials, using hand and power tools and following technical specifications and blueprints.

ECONOMICS AND PERSONAL FINANCE [6120]                                                 1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12

Instruction in economics and personal finance prepares students to function effectively as consumers,
savers, investors, entrepreneurs, and active citizens. Students learn how economies and markets
operate and how the United States’ economy is interconnected with the global economy. On a
personal level, students learn that their own human capital (knowledge and skills) is their most
valuable resource.




                                                 61
                                     SPECIAL EDUCATION

Students who have been identified through a formal evaluation process are eligible to receive an
individualized instructional program in the special education department. An IEP (Individualized
Education Plan) is developed each year specifying the amount of instructional time in the regular
education curriculum and the level of special education programming. Students’ IEP committees
determine the type of diploma program students will attempt to complete during their high school
career.

              MODIFIED STANDARD OR SPECIAL DIPLOMA OPTIONS

                  MODIFIED STANDARD DIPLOMA [8VAC 20-131-50.D]

This is intended for certain students at the secondary level who have a disability and are unlikely to
meet the credit requirements for a Standard Diploma. Eligibility and participation in the program is
determined by the student’s IEP team and the student, when appropriate. For more information, refer
to the VDOE website.

ENGLISH/READING [11307]                                                                1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students are identified for this course through the IEP process

This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students who require a direct developmental
and multi-sensory approach to reading instruction. The course has as its foundation a variety of
programs to teach basic reading and writing. Different modes of instruction are utilized to reinforce
word-attack, fluency, and comprehension skills.

READING RECOVERY [1180]                                                                1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students are identified for this course through the IEP process

This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on developmental reading
skills, literacy studies, written and oral language usage, writing mechanics and expression, research
and reporting skills, and use of library resources and electronic databases. The course has as its
foundation a variety of reading programs that include material from core academic subjects to
improve comprehension in the general education classroom.

GENERAL MATHEMATICS I [3200]                                                           1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students are identified for this course through the IEP process

Students’ individualized goals and objectives will focus on basic operational calculations, quantitative
concepts and applied problem solving skills, computation and estimation of decimals, fractions,
percent, and measurements. Students enrolled in this course are seeking a non-standard diploma.

GENERAL MATHEMATICS II [3201]                                                          1.0 credit
Grades 09 - 12
Prerequisite: Students are identified for this course through the IEP process

Basic algebraic concepts will focus on order of operations, signed numbers, exponents, scientific
notation, perfect squares, square roots, and solving one-step linear equations in one variable. Basic
geometry concepts will include classifying, measuring, and drawing geometric figures using
appropriate tools. Students enrolled in either of these courses are seeking a non-standard diploma.




                                                   62
ACADEMIC SUPPORT [7865]                                                                  1.0 credit

Students enrolling in these classes will receive individualized monitoring of their academic program,
supported skill instruction, and assistance in completing assignments for their regular education
classes. Students will be expected to maintain an assignment notebook. IEP goals and objectives
generally focus on the student’s development of effective time management skills, organizational
skills, research skills, specific skill instruction [such as writing essays or lab reports] and test
preparation. Accommodations for testing as outlined in the IEP may be implemented during this class
period. Students’ academic progress in the school environment will be monitored periodically.

           SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL CURRICULUM PROGRAM

This program is designed for students who need a highly specialized learning environment for
functional life-skills instruction and has an IEP (Individual Educational Plan). Courses in math,
language arts, vocational resource, life skills management, and community-based instruction are
taught. Courses are constructed to meet the individual students’ IEP goals. Students will participate
in learning, which shows access to and progresses in the fashion of the general curriculum; in a
variety of settings with social interactions; in a functional content; and with appropriate supports.

Students may spend a portion of each school day in a fine arts, recreational arts, or vocational arts
elective. Related educational services, such as speech/language development are provided by Pupil
Personnel Services through pull-out and pull-in applications. The IEP case manager coordinates
courses for students, as called for in the IEP: job coaching experiences, mentorship placement,
vocational training opportunities, and/or supported work placements. These work experiences may be
in school or community-based. Only students who have these specific or individual courses as a part
of the IEP may be enrolled in these courses.

MATH [31967]

Math is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on; functional money skills,
functional time skills, and functional general math skills (addition, subtraction). A strong emphasis is
placed on functional skills that will be used to further the student’s independence and potential for
post secondary employment or placement.

LANGUAGE ARTS [7892]

Language Arts is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on; functional reading
skills (decoding, comprehension, sight word recall, and vocational word recall), functional writing skills
(handwriting, composition of writings). A strong emphasis is placed on functional skills that will be
used to further the student’s independence and potential for post secondary employment or
placement.

VOCATIONAL RESOURCE [78987]

Vocational Resource is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on; work
readiness skills such as personal appearance, following multiple step directions, social skills, and
simulated work activities (cleaning, filing, classifying). A component of this class is community based
instruction, where students are able to transfer skills learned within the classroom to actual work place
situations.

LIFE MANAGEMENT SKILLS [7896]

Life Management Skills is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on; personal
safety, cooking, health and nutrition, time management, organizational skills, self care, social skills,
and leisure skills. A component of this class is community based instruction, where students are able
to transfer skills learned within the classroom to appropriate places within the community (grocery
store, department store, etc.)




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ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION [7700]

Adaptive Physical Education is designed to meet the individual needs of students by focusing on
personal health, physical strength, agility, individual and team sports and lifetime fitness. The course
seeks to involve, adapt, modify, or change a physical activity so it is as appropriate for the people with
a disability as it is for those without a disability. Adaptive Physical Education also helps students with
disabilities develop their fine and gross motor skills. Adaptive Physical Education is designed to meet
the individual needs of students by focusing on personal health, physical strength and agility,
individual and team sports, and lifetime fitness.




JWW/slh

January 2011


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