OUR

Document Sample
OUR Powered By Docstoc
					 Undergraduate Research
University of Central Florida

          Kimberly Schneider, Ph.D.
 Director, Office of Undergraduate Research
 Office of Undergraduate Research
               (OUR)
• Mission:
  – Strengthen and enrich the undergraduate
    research climate at UCF
  – www.OUR.ucf.edu
          What is Research at UCF?
• Inquiring to discover NEW information
• Slight Differences Between Disciplines*:
      – Sciences  Test predictions from hypotheses to
        generate NEW information
      – Humanities  Synthesis of knowledge to create
        NEW ideas
      – Fine Arts  Creation of NEW works and
        techniques from existing models

*This is not an inclusive list
        Accounting                Elementary Education              Legal Studies
     Actuarial Science              English (Various)               Mathematics
      Advertising/PR            Engineering Technology        Mechanical Engineering
  Aerospace Engineering        Environmental Engineering     Molecular Bio & Microbiology
         Animation                 Event Management                Music (various)
       Anthropology                        Film                        Nursing
        Art (various)               Forensic Science                 Philosophy
           Biology                        French                       Physics
       Biotechnology                 Graphic Design               Political Science
  Business Management           Health Information Mgmt              Psychology
         Chemistry                   Health Sciences             Radiologic Sciences
     Civil Engineering           Health Services Admin                Radio/TV
Comm Sciences & Disorders                 History                Science Education
  Computer Engineering          Hospitality Management               Social Work
    Computer Science              Industrial Engineering              Sociology
      Criminal Justice      Information systems Technology             Spanish
       Digital Media             International Relations         Sports and Fitness
        Economics               Interdisciplinary Studies             Studio Art
    Education (various)          Interpers/Organ Comm             Theatre (various)
   Electrical Engineering              Journalism
               Opportunities
         Office of Undergraduate
                 Research
–   Workshops (500 attendees)
–   Summer Research Academy
–   Travel Awards (55 students)
–   Student Research Grants (23 students)
–   Engagement in Undergraduate Research Symposium          (73
    faculty from 14 institutions)
– Showcase of Undergraduate Research Excellence (310
    students presenting 226 posters)
– Undergraduate Research Journal (19 manuscripts submitted, 8
    published)
               Opportunities
– Workshops (500 attendees)
– Summer Research Academy
– Travel Awards (55 students)
   • Florida, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Colorado,
     California, Oregon, Montana, Georgia, Delaware,
     North Carolina, Oklahoma, CROATIA
                   Opportunities
–   Workshops (500 attendees)
–   Summer Research Academy
–   Travel Awards (55 students)
–   Student Research Grants (23 students)
     • Shelter Environment for Homeless Fathers Caring for
       Children
     • Assessing Community Attitudes Abut Cultural Heritage
       Tourism in Red Bays, Andros Island, Bahamas
     • Study of the Effect of Tactile Stimulus in Inducing Behavior
       and Color Plasticity in a Sedentary Grasshopper
     • Current & Past Meanings of the Music of Capoeira
                        Opportunities
–   Workshops (500 attendees)
–   Summer Research Academy
–   Travel Awards (55 students)
–   Student Research Grants (23 students)
–   Engagement in Undergraduate Research Symposium          (73
    faculty from 14 institutions)
– Showcase of Undergraduate Research Excellence (310
    students presenting 226 posters)
– Undergraduate Research Journal (19 manuscripts submitted, 8
    published)
                     Opportunities

– Undergraduate Research Journal (19 manuscripts submitted, 8
  published)
    • Self-silencing in Response to Sexist Behavior: Exploring Women‟s Willingness to
      Confront Sexism
    • Consumers‟ Willingness to Pay and to Patronize According to Major Restaurant
      Attributes
    • Ex-votos from the Church Sao Larozo and the Votive Healing Process
    • Characterization of Cytokeratin 8 in Cancer
     New in the Office of
   Undergraduate Research
• Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
  (SURF)
• Learning Environment and Academic
  Research Network
  – National Science Foundation Sponsored
       Showcase of Undergraduate
       Research Excellence (SURE)
•   www.showcase.ucf.edu
•   Poster- or display-based forum
•   Research/creative projects (all disciplines)
•   April 1, 2011, 1:30-5 PM, please stop by!
    – Pegasus Ballroom

• $13,000 awarded in scholarships
          2010 Showcase Winners
• Aaron Godwin- Invasive Marine Mussels
  – Interdisciplinary Studies and Music
• Keon Vereen – Flow Boiling
  – Aerospace Engineering
• Amelia Carey- Religion and Domestic
  Violence
  – Sociology and Psychology
Understanding the Potential Impact of an Invasive
                Marine Mussel

 A Field Study Examining the
Growth and Survival of Mytella
          charruana

       Aaron Godwin
   Dr. Kimberly Schneider
          Research as an Undergraduate
• Summer Research Academy (OUR) – 2008
• Research with Dept. of Biology August 2008 – May
  2010
• National Presentations and Recognition
• Why should research be supported and encouraged
  for Undergraduates?
NCUR 2010
      What is an invasive species?

• National Invasive Species Information Center
• “a species that is non-native (alien) to an
  ecosystem where their introduction causes or is
  likely to cause economic or environmental harm”
          What are Mytella charruana?

• Native habitat
   – Coastal areas of
     Central and South
     America
• Method of
  Introduction
   – Ballast water
• Invasive range
   – East coast of FL to
     Southern parts of SC
• Why should we study
M. charruana Research at UCF


               • Lab studies
                  – Thermal tolerances
                  – Salinity tolerances

               • Field study component
                  – Growth rates and survival
                  – Data correlation with field
                    observations

               • Experimental Design
                  – Collect, label and cage
                  – Monthly data collection
                                  6 Month Growth of M. charruana
                                            Growth vs. Original Size
                        20

                        18

                        16
Six Month Growth (mm)




                        14                                                    R² = 0.4523
                        12

                        10

                        8

                        6

                        4

                        2

                        0
                             15       20     25            30            35          40     45
                                                  Starting Length (mm)
                            6 Month Average Growth

                   18

                   16

                   14
Avg. Growth (mm)




                   12
                        11.6
                   10

                   8

                   6
                                  7.3

                   4
                                                            3.9
                   2

                   0
                                                                     1
                        20-25     25-30                     30-35   35-40
                                          Size Class (mm)
                            6 Month Survival
             100%

             90%

             80%
                                               73%
             70%
                              59%
             60%
% Survival




                    51%
             50%
                                                                 48%
                                                                         40%
             40%

             30%

             20%

             10%

              0%
                    10-20     20-25            25-30             30-35   35-40
                                      Original Size Class (mm)
                         Results

GROWTH
•Mussels experienced the highest growth rates (~1.00-
5.00mm) during late Spring through the early Summer
(April – July)
•Different size classes experienced different growth rates,
with Medium size classes experiencing the highest growth
rates
                                     Average Growth of M. charruana vs. Average
                                                   Temperature
                                       Large (30+mm)




                                                                                          Average Monthly Temperature (°C)
                                       Medium (20-30mm)
Average Monthly Growth (mm)




                              6.00                                                35.00
                                       Small (10-20mm)
                                       Avg. Temp.                                 30.00
                              5.00

                                                                                  25.00
                              4.00
                                                                                  20.00
                              3.00
                                                                                  15.00
                              2.00
                                                                                  10.00

                              1.00                                                5.00

                              0.00                                                0.00



                                                          Month
                                       Average Growth of M. charruana and Average
                                                      Temperature
                              6
                                       Average Growth
                              5
Average Monthly Growth (mm)




                              4


                              3


                              2


                              1


                              0
                                  10               15                  20                25   30
                                                        Average Monthly Temperature (°C)
                      Results

SURVIVAL
•Over the 15 month study, all individuals died, with
the highest mortality occurring between December
2009 and February 2010 (Fig. 3).
•The average survival rate per month was 77%.
                   Average Survival M. charruana vs. Average Temperature


             100                                                           35

             90




                                                                                Average Monthly Temperature (°C
                                                                           30
             80

             70                                                            25
% Survival




             60
                                                                           20
             50
                                                                           15
             40

             30     Large (30+mm)                                          10
             20     Medium (20-30mm)
                    Small (10-20mm)                                        5
             10
                    Monthly Avg. Temp. (°C)
              0                                                            0



                                              Month
                        % Survival of M. charruana and Average Temperature

              1

             0.9

             0.8

             0.7

             0.6
% Survival




             0.5

             0.4

             0.3
                                                                             % Survival
             0.2

             0.1

              0
                   10              15                 20                25            30
                                        Average Monthly Tempeature (°C)
                             Results


ENVIRONMENT
•Temperatures at our study sites ranged from 0°C – 32°C with
average monthly temperatures ranging from 10.69 – 29.29°C (Fig. 2).
•Salinities observed in the field were ranged from 0 – 22ppt.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
•Analyzing growth data shows a three way interaction between size
class, salinity, and water temperature (F=3.313, P=0.0386)
•Analyzing survival data showed a two way interaction between salinity
and water temperature (P=<0.0001).
               What‟s the big picture?
• Better picture of M. charruana’s survival and growth patterns

• Water temperature may have a significant effect on growth rates

• Most growth in temperatures between 20 and 25°C.

• Survival rates in the field support previous lab experiments (e.g.
temperature and salinity lab trials)

• M. charruana can survive in temperatures at and below 9°C for
short periods of time (e.g. 5 – 10 days) but die after extended
temperatures of between 6 and 9°C.
                      Conclusions

•What does our data suggest?
   • Survival and persistence probable in normal field
   conditions for introduced environment

•What’s next?
   • Further analysis to better understand life cycle within
   invaded habitats.

•What have we learned?
   • Better understanding of biological limitations
   • Will assist with predicting future mortality events and the
   potential spread of the invasive species.
Questions?
   Heat Flux and Pressure
  Dependent Experiments in
   Flow Boiling of R-134a

            Presenter: Keon Vereen
        Mentor: Dr. Ranganathan Kumar
Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
          University of Central Florida
Examples
Examples
                                                         R-134a
                                                          Tank


Experimental Loop
                                                                                           Pressure
                                                                                          Transducer
                                                                  Charge
                                                                   Valve

                                                     Flow
                                                     Meter




                                                                                                       Test Section
        Heat
      Exchanger
                                                                  LED Lighting
                                    One way
                                   Check Valve
                                                                           B&W                           RGB

                                                                                 Camera          Sync Stand
            Pressure
             Gauge



                                      Bypass
                                                                                                               Monito
                                                    Pressure
                                    Flow control
                                       Valve       Transducer                                                  r
                                                                                                               Streampix
                                                                  Flow
                                                                  Meter
 Chiller                                                                                                       LabVIEW
             Evacuation
              Valve to             Pump
           Recovery system
                                                   Recovery
                                                    Suva
                              HVAC                  Tank
                             Recovery                                                                  Power
                               Unit
                                                                                                       Supply
TLC/Foil ROI
Thermochromic Liquid Crystal (TLC)
Bubble Generation at 45psi Using
     Intermediate Flow-rate
                                                                             Results
                                 Bubble Propagation                                                             •Bubble Size: 101um,
                                                                                                                220um, 250um, 290um
                                                                                                                •Constant Heat Flux:
                                                                                                                q’’=315 kW/m^2
                                                                                                                •Bubble Frequency: 110Hz
                                 Temperature vs Time, 4x4 Area Profile                                                   Bubble Size vs Time
                   41                                                                                 300

                  40.8                                                                                280

                                                                                                      260
                  40.6

                                                                                                      240
                  40.4

                                                                                   Bubble Size (µm)
Temperature (C)




                                                                                                      220
                  40.2
                                                                                                      200
                   40
                                                                                                      180
                  39.8
                                                                                                      160

                  39.6
                                                                                                      140

                  39.4                                                                                120

                  39.2                                                                                100
                         0   1   2       3        4         5        6   7     8                            0    1   2   3       4        5    6   7   8
                                              Time (ms)                                                                      Time (ms)
                 Future Research


 Wider Pressure Range
     40psi-120psi
 Use Three Flow-rates
     0.185GPM; 0.3GPM; 0.5GPM
– Applying Various Heat Conditions
– Calculate Critical Heat Flux (Burnout Point)
– Calculate Heat Transfer Coefficient (Efficiency)
Any Comments or Suggestions?
      Religious Affiliation
        and Religiosity:
Variations on the Perceptions of
      Domestic Violence



           By: Amelia Carey
        Department of Sociology
        Project Objective and Importance

• To look at the relationship between religious
  variables and people‟s perceptions of domestic
  violence.
• The project is important in light of the fact that:
   – The rate of domestic violence is still around 27% of violent crimes
     in the U.S.
   – Nearly 3,000,000 men and women are affected by domestic
     violence each year.
              What The Literature Says

• Patriarchal social structure is suggested to be
  inherent in religious institutions (Stacey & Gerard, 1990).
• These religious institutions are thought to justify
  gender roles that tend to assign a submissive role
  to women (Bartkowski, 1997)
• Gender roles within religious communities have
  been found to support and prolong abuse and stay
  of the abused (Adelman, 2000).
               Research Questions

• Are individuals that belong to more conservative
  religious groups more likely to endorse myth-
  based statements about domestic violence?

• Are individuals with a greater level of religiosity
  more likely to endorse myth-based statements
  about domestic violence?
                          Method

 Perceptions of Homelessness and Domestic Violence
  Survey

    Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing software

    Random phone numbers called in Orange, Osceloa, and
     Seminole Counties

    Participants were asked their perceptions of domestic
     violence and demographic questions
                           Measures

 Domestic Violence Measure:
   The measure for belief in myths about domestic violence was
    created using a scale.

   Example: Agreement with “Some women who are abused want to
    be treated that way” would result in one point in the overall score.
                     Measures Cont‟d

• Religious Measures:
  – Religious Affiliation (Catholic, Protestant, etc.)

  – Membership

  – Importance of Religion

  – Frequency of Attendance
            Religious Characteristics

 The modal religious affiliation was „Other
  Christian‟ (31.6%)

 3/4 of respondents said that religion was
  „Somewhat Important‟ to „Very Important‟ in their
  life

 1/3 of respondents attend church every week
                     Results


• There were many individual statements that were
  significant with the religious variables however
  the overall scale measure was not significant.

• The most consistently supported myth-based
  statement was “Domestic Violence is caused by
  the breakdown of the traditional family”
       Examples of Agreed Upon Myths

• Domestic Violence continues because most
  women will not leave the men who abuse them.
  (81.3%)

• The court system does very little to protect abused
  women (53.4%)

• Some women who are abused secretly want to be
  treated that way (24.1%)
Table 2: Significant cross tabs with religious
affiliation
                                                                Other
                                                    Other       Religion,        No          P-
                            Protestant   Catholic   Christian   Non- Christian   religio n   Value
Domestic violence is
caused by the breakdown       55.0%       63.2%      60.4%          43.9%        43.1%        .037
of the traditional family

Some women who are
abused secretly want to        19.2        33.7       29.9          32.5          14.1        .023
be treated that way

People who are violent
toward their family            65.0        74.3       56.3          81.0          75.8        .003
members are not likely to
change

Husbands who shou t,
yell, and curse at their       72.8        60.6       70.0          43.9          64.5        .013
wives are likely to
become phys ically
viole nt eventually

Most men who act
abusiv ely toward family       86.7        78.1       75.0          86.8          89.4        .047
members have
psychologi cal or
personality proble ms
        Using Demographics as Predictors

• Two variables were solid predictors of a score on
  the DV Scale

   – Age – The lower the age of the participant the higher the score on
     the scale

   – Political Outlook- The more liberal a respondent was the higher
     there score tended to be.
                          Discussion

 The effects of religious affiliation and religiosity were less than
  originally assumed in this research.

 When considered individually some domestic violence
  statements were significantly associated with the religious
  variables.

 The above relationship was supported when religious variables
  were compared to ideas about the “traditional family”, and in
  some instances victim-blaming statements.
             Practical Applications

• This research can be applied to various counseling
  models and practices. There is in fact some
  influence of religion on perceptions of domestic
  violence.
• These variations are important when counseling a
  victim with a religious background that may
  require a more tailored intervention program.
                 Future Research

• It may be beneficial to look more qualitatively into
  the respondent‟s definitions of the “traditional
  family” in accordance with their religious views
• It may also be beneficial to try and measure the
  extent to which religious values effect one‟s
  definition of the “traditional family” versus other
  socialization institutions

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:11/8/2011
language:English
pages:58