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    CITY OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
     ECONOMIC RECOVERY—“FIRED UP & READY TO GO”


       MAKING ST. LOUIS A GREAT CITY AGAIN:
ECONOMIC RECOVERY FUNDING ESSENTIAL TO CONTINUING PROGRESS


                    PRESENTED BY:
               FRANCIS G. SLAY
            MAYOR, CITY OF ST. LOUIS

                   JANUARY, 2009
                  REVISED JANUARY 15, 2009
TO TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS:
          CITY OF ST. LOUIS ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS
               MAKING ST. LOUIS A GREAT CITY AGAIN…FOR EVERYONE!
                                           CLICK ON ITEM TO GO TO SECTION

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................. 3

COMPLETE ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECT LIST ....................................... 7

SELECTED INDIVIDUAL PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS

     COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT—INFRASTRUCTURE
       Dick Gregory Place Infrastructure ....................................................................... 11
       Downtown Streetscape Reconstruction .............................................................. 15
       Gateway Mall: Parc Pacific Event Park .............................................................. 19
       Public Media Education Center ........................................................................... 23
       South Grand “Great Streets” ............................................................................... 27
       Laclede’s Landing Cobblestone Restoration ....................................................... 31
       CORTEX Infrastructure ....................................................................................... 33
       Branch Street Trestle Greenway ......................................................................... 37
       Grand Center: Performance Green .................................................................... 41
       Ellendale Park at Animal House .......................................................................... 43
       Euclid Avenue Streetscape ................................................................................. 47
       Gateway Mall: Kiener Plaza Reconstruction ....................................................... 51
       Crown Village Infrastructure ................................................................................ 57
       Arlington Grove Infrastructure ............................................................................. 61
       Veterans Hospital Parking Structures ................................................................. 65
       Zoo Improvements .............................................................................................. 67
       Federal Mogul Acquisition ................................................................................... 73
       Botanical Garden Improvements ......................................................................... 77
       Streetscape Improvements, Various ................................................................... 81
       Grand Center: Spring Church Art Park............................................................... 85
       Grand Center: Grandel Theater Modernization .................................................. 87
       Grand Center: Grand Center Streetscape.......................................................... 89

     ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION/CDBG
       Center for Emerging Technologies Expansion .................................................... 91

     ENERGY BLOCK GRANT—INFRASTRUCTURE AND GREEN JOBS
       Convention Center LEED Improvements ............................................................ 95
       “Green” Alleys ..................................................................................................... 99

     HIGHWAY/METRO ROADS & STREETS INFRASTRUCTURE
       Tucker Bridge Reconstruction ........................................................................... 103
       Exit Ramps—New Mississippi River Bridge ...................................................... 107
       South Kingshighway Bridge Reconstruction ..................................................... 109

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   HIGHWAY/METRO ROADS & STREETS INFRASTRUCTURE (continued…)
        Tucker & I-55 Ramp Relocation ........................................................................ 111
        Loughborough & I-55 Bridge Expansion ........................................................... 115
        Compton Bridge Rehabilitation.......................................................................... 117
        Regional Wayfinding System ............................................................................ 121

   TRANSIT EQUIPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE
     Grand Bridge Transit Plaza ............................................................................... 125
     Loop Trolley....................................................................................................... 129
     MetroLink Expansion North & South ................................................................. 133

   AIRPORT TECHNOLOGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE
      Various Airport Improvements ........................................................................... 137

   WATER AND WASTEWATER INFRASTRUCTURE
     Harlem-Baden Detention Basin ......................................................................... 141
     Floodwall Enhancements .................................................................................. 145
     Water System Improvements ............................................................................ 151
     Macklind Combined Sewer Separation ............................................................. 155
     Water Tower Renovation................................................................................... 159

   SCHOOL MODERNIZATION
     St. Louis Public Schools Lead Remediation/Modernization Projects ................ 163

   PUBLIC HOUSING
     Early Childhood Center at Murphy Park ............................................................ 167

CITY OF ST. LOUIS HISTORY & BACKGROUND .......................................... 171




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                CITY OF ST. LOUIS & ECONOMIC RECOVERY:
                             INTRODUCTION
In the past eight years, the City has made significant progress: population and jobs in
the City are now growing following five decades where residents and businesses left the
City en masse. We are rebuilding the market for our residential and commercial real es-
tate and improving quality of life—for existing residents and businesses, and for the new
residents and businesses the City is beginning to attract. We are using our strengths—
the City’s inherent “greenness”, our wealth of great science minds, our advantageous
location in the region and the country, and our wealth of historic buildings— to recon-
struct our economy.

Facts and figures detailing the City’s progress are provided in the “History and Back-
ground” section of this document. Much additional investment—public and private—is
needed, however, before the devastation of fifty years of population and job losses can
be considered truly overcome.

The national economic downturn, the likes of which our country has not faced since the
Great Depression, threatens everyone’s confidence in our collective future. As is the
case in every city, progress is now threatened by the national recession over which we
have no control. Progress must continue for those families and businesses who have
invested in our cities to remain positive.

WE ARE “READY TO GO” WITH ECONOMIC RECOVERY FUNDING. Thanks to the
application of a “can-do” attitude, teamwork with a wide variety of people and organiza-
tions, and the City’s resulting progress over the past eight years, a broad-based and
competent organizational infrastructure—public and private—is in place. As the project
descriptions in the remainder of this document demonstrate, these teams are ready,
willing and able to proceed—as soon as resources become available.

The economic recovery projects described in this book will have a number of significant
impacts: they will create many jobs, they will greatly enhance our quality of life, they will
set the stage for future business and population growth, and—most important—they will
demonstrate that our City and our nation can continue to make progress as President
Obama takes the steps necessary to rebuild the foundation of our national economy.
They will give our citizens reasons for hope.

We hope President Obama and Congress will see fit to make funds available to the City
so that our progress can continue. Thank you for your consideration.

                                  Francis G. Slay
                               Mayor, City of St. Louis

MAKING ST. LOUIS A GREAT CITY AGAIN…FOR EVERYONE!
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                           CITY OF ST. LOUIS & ECONOMIC RECOVERY:
                                EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Like the citizens of the City of St. Louis, the types of infrastructure projects on the City’s
“list” are a wide variety. They address a wide range of needs expressed by a diverse
group of elected officials, organizations, individuals and businesses.

Some of the projects have been waiting for a funding source for many years—others
have only recently been added to the City’s list of capital needs as we adapt to external
change and continually reinvent our future. Each of the projects has been on some-
one’s “drawing board” for some time.

Each project will improve the City’s ability to keep making progress in a time when con-
fidence is threatened by the state of the national economy. Each project will improve
quality of life for our residential and business citizens. Many of the projects will set the
stage for future private investment when our economy recovers. And many of them will
advance the City’s goal of becoming and being recognized as “green” and sustainable.

The following is a brief summary of the City’s specific capital needs that could be partial-
ly met with federal economic funding. A narrative with additional photographs and in-
formation for each project—why it is needed, what will it accomplish, how will it improve
our quality of life, what it will cost, how many jobs it will produce—is included in the body
of this document.




 New event park in Mall.          New public media education center.                South Grand “Great Street”.          Typical City sidewalk.




Euclid streetscape design.                   Crown Village streetscape rendering.                          New solar element in Gateway Mall.




Park design.   VA Hospital parking design.   Sidewalk construction.    New homes that need sidewalks.       Historic city hall in need of cleaning.




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    COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT INFRASTRUCTURE projects
    include neighborhood-level street infrastructure improvements that are necessary to en-
    courage new development in areas that have been distressed for many years as well as
    far-reaching initiatives that, if made reality, can move our economy forward in ways that
    we have not yet been able to achieve. These projects also include parking for the Vet-
    erans Administration Hospital, a variety of park and recreation center repairs and im-
    provements, expansion of the greenway system, and repairs to the Municipal Dock.




          Convention center façade.            Outdated obsolete energy-wasting systems behind Center façade.     Alleys drain to combined sewers.


    ENERGY BLOCK GRANT—INFRASTRUCTURE AND GREEN JOBS projects
    include energy improvements to City operations infrastructure that will save energy, re-
    duce costs, move our City towards sustainability, and make limited City revenues avail-
    able to improve services for our citizens. These projects also include LEED-related im-
    provements to the region’s convention center that will make the center competitive in a
    market that is increasingly concerned with environmental standards. In addition, these
    projects also include a City “green alley” initiative that will also help reduce the likelihood
    of combined storm/sanitary sewer overflows into basements and the Mississippi River.




    Temp.supports under Tucker.     Compton Bridge deterioration.       Shopping center interchange reconfiguration; HOPE VI center will serve.




    Inaccurate/deteriorated existing wayfinding system.   Kingshighway Bridge damage.         I-64/Chestnut Street interchange to be reconfigured.


    HIGHWAY/METRO ROADS & STREETS INFRASTRUCTURE projects include
    reconstruction of the decaying and dangerous Tucker Bridge and repair/reconstruction
    of other unstable and dangerous bridge structures, extending the Missouri exit from the
    new Mississippi River bridge into downtown St. Louis, relocating the I-55/Gravois
    southbound exit ramp so that a new retail center can be completed, and installing a re-
    gional wayfinding system so that travelers are less likely to waste energy getting lost.
    The reconfiguration of the Chestnut/20th Street/I-64 interchange is also included: this


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will replace an obsolete interchange constructed when the interstate terminated at 20th
Street before entering downtown with a modern interchange that recognizes the high-
way’s continuity and makes prime land available for new office and other development.




    Proposed new light rail expansion to run on street surfaces; potential transit-oriented development.            New Grand Avenue bridge.




     Proposed “Loop Trolley” rendering in City/University City mixed use district.              Proposed transit plaza at Grand Avenue Bridge.


TRANSIT EQUIPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE projects include construction
of a new transit plaza under the new Grand Avenue bridge and enhancements to the
bridge to make MetroLink and MetroBus access to Saint Louis University and Grand
Center safe and attractive for people with disabilities and others, as well as a new trolley
system that will link MetroLink to the multijurisdictional “Loop” retail and entertainment
district. The most ambitious of these projects is an expansion of the existing MetroLink
system to the north and south of the system’s current alignment to serve residents of
distressed areas of north and south St. Louis—this expansion can be constructed quick-
ly because it will operate on the surface of existing extra-wide streets and requires no
right-of-way acquisition, tunnels or extraordinary excavation.




                               Lambert St. Louis International Airport—gates, runway system, historic terminal.


AIRPORT TECHNOLOGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE includes various repairs to
existing infrastructure that supports the continuing viability of Lambert International Air-
port for the more than 15 million passengers who use it each year.



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    Water system.   Proposed MSD Harlem-Baden detention facility & Macklind outfall.       Floodwall blowout in 1993; damaged gates.           Water towers.


    WATER AND WASTEWATER INFRASTRUCTURE projects include the devel-
    opment of a Metropolitan Sewer District detention facility in the northern part of the City
    and other MSD improvements to help alleviate the combined storm/sanitary sewer over-
    flows that have caused basement backups and pollution of the Mississippi River cited
    by the Environmental Protection Agency. Various repairs to existing City water treat-
    ment and distribution infrastructure that serves not only the City but also many sur-
    rounding Missouri and Illinois municipalities, and full funding of floodwall and levee re-
    pairs necessary to protect the City from another “great flood” are also included.




                    Typical St. Louis Public School exterior; typical window, floor/wall, plumbing, electrical issues inside public schools.


    PUBLIC SCHOOL MODERNIZATION projects include lead remediation and other
    health and safety-related improvements to the City’s public school buildings, many of
    which were constructed in the early 1900s and have received little attention since.

    PUBLIC HOUSING projects include a new early childhood center at the Murphy Park
    HOPE III development and infrastructure necessary to support the Cochran HOPE VI.

    PUBLIC SAFETY JOBS AND TECHNOLOGY projects include a new police evi-
    dence storage warehouse, a consolidated public safety answering facility for police, fire,
    and EMS, and upgrades to the Building Division’s information systems.


    These projects, like our citizens, are very diverse. Variety is appropriate, because dif-
    ferent constituencies in our multidimensional society have different views on what is im-
    portant. These projects will help us continue to make progress in the face of the threats
    that the national recession presents. Constructing and rebuilding, whether a sidewalk
    system to give children safe routes to schools, a new education center, a bridge, or
    recreation centers, will lift the spirits of people dealing with the psychological challenges
    of this recession. These projects will foster a collective confidence in our future, change
    our City and our country for the better, and give a wide cross-section of people hope.




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                      PROPOSED ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS                                                                             7
                                           CITY OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
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                      CONG.                                                                                                   JOBS
   SUBCATEGORY        DIST.   WARD                               PROJECT NAME                              ESTIMATED COST    (RIMS)

  COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT--INFRASTRUCTURE
  Building              1       28      African-American Cultural Center                                     $5,800,000
  Building              1       19      Carver School Modernization                                          $1,000,000        30
  Building              1       19      Grandel Theater Modernization                                        $1,950,000        59
  Building              1        4      Habitat for Neighborhood Business Enhancements                       $1,000,000        30
  Building              1        6      Public Library Modernization                                         $15,000,000       453
  Building              1       19      Public Media Education Center                                        $11,000,000       332
  Building              1        7      Soldiers Memorial Improvements                                       $7,000,000        211
  Building              1        7      St. Louis Center Retail/Parking Conversion                           $20,000,000       604
  Building              1       19      VA Hospital Parking/Retail Structures                                $19,750,000       596
  Development           1       17      Federal Mogul Acquisition                                            $7,700,000        233
  Drainage              1        2      Hall Street Drainage Improvements                                    $7,000,000        211
  Greenway              3      11/12    River des Peres Greenway Extensions                                  $4,000,000        121
  Greenway              1       5/7     Trestle Bicycle/Pedestrian Greenway "Trail"                          $15,000,000       453
  Lighting              1        4      Dr. Martin Luther King Pedestrian Lighting—Grand to Kingshighway     $4,000,000        121
  Lighting              1        6      Lafayette Square Pedestrian Lighting                                 $2,500,000        76
  Lighting              1       17      Manchester Pedestrian Lighting—Kingshighway to Vandeventer           $2,000,000        60
  Park                  3       24      Ellendale Park/Streetscape Improvements at Animal House              $1,000,000        30
  Park                  1       28      Forest Park "Heels & Wheels" Trail                                   $1,800,000        54
  Park                  1       28      Forest Park Golf Course Renovation                                   $2,100,000        63
  Park                  1       28      Forest Park Liberal Arts Bridge/Muny Tributary Replacement           $3,300,000        100
  Park                  1        7      Gateway Mall: Kiener Plaza                                           $50,000,000      1,510
  Park                  1        7      Gateway Mall: Parc Pacific Parks                                     $9,000,000        272
  Park                  1        1      Handy Park Improvements                                              $1,000,000        30
  Park                  1        3      Hyde Park Renovation Plan Implementation                             $3,700,000        112
  Park                  3        8      Missouri Botanical Garden Improvements, Various                      $7,700,000        233
  Park                  1      17/28    Park Development--New                                                $2,000,000        60
  Park                  1       19      Performance Green                                                    $3,000,000        91
  Park                  1       19      Spring Church Park/Exhibition Space                                  $2,250,000        68
  Park                  1       19      Terry Park Improvements                                              $1,500,000        45
  Park                  1       28      Zoo Improvements, Various                                            $15,420,000       466
  Public facilities     1        7      City Hall Renovations--Interior and Exterior                         $12,000,000       362
  Public facilities     1        7      Kiel Retail/Parking Structure                                        $30,000,000       906
  Public facilities     1        5      Municipal Dock Repair/Replacement                                    $20,000,000       604
  Recreation            1       21      North Side Recreation Center                                         $10,000,000       302
  Recreation            1       22      Norville Brown Teen Center                                           $6,500,000        196
  Recreation            3     Various   Recreation Center Enhancements                                       $9,500,000        287
  Streetscape           1        2      Adelaide Business Campus Stormwater/Drainage                         $2,000,000        60
  Streetscape           1       22      Arlington Grove Infrastructure & Pedestrian Lighting                 $5,500,000        166
  Streetscape           1       17      Botanical Heights Streetscape                                        $1,120,000        34
  Streetscape           1        2      Carrie Avenue Improvements                                           $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           3       20      Chippewa Streetscape—Grand to S. Broadway                            $5,000,000        151
  Streetscape           1       17      CORTEX Infrastructure/Site Preparation                               $2,000,000        60
  Streetscape           1      26/28    Delmar Streetscape—Hodiamont to Goodfellow                           $2,000,000        60
  Streetscape           1       5/6     Delmar Streetscape—Tucker to Jefferson                               $5,000,000        151
  Streetscape           1        4      Dick Gregory Place Infrastructure                                    $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           1        7      Downtown Streetscape                                                 $33,000,000       997
  Streetscape           1       17      Euclid Avenue Streetscape--Forest Park to Lindell                    $4,500,000        136
  Streetscape           1       22      Goodfellow/I-70 Streetscape Improvements                             $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           1       19      Grand Center Public Improvements                                     $1,500,000        45
  Streetscape           1       19      Grand Center Streetscape Improvements--Various                       $5,675,000        171
  Streetscape           1       17      Gravois Avenue Streetscape--Loughborough to Taft                     $6,500,000        196
  Streetscape           1       19      Habitat for Humanity Streetscape Improvements                        $1,000,000        30
  Streetscape           3       23      Jamieson Streetscape Improvements--Arsenal to Chippewa               $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           1        7      Laclede’s Landing Cobblestone Resetting                              $6,000,000        181
  Streetscape           1       5/6     Locust Streetscape—Tucker to Jefferson                               $5,000,000        151
  Streetscape           3      14/16    Macklind Streetscape—Chippewa to Eichelberger                        $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           1        3      Mallinckrodt Streetscape Improvements--Phases 1 & 2                  $4,000,000        121
  Streetscape           3       25      Meramec Avenue Streetscape—Grand to S. Broadway                      $3,000,000        91
  Streetscape           3       11      Michigan Avenue Streetscape--E. Davis to Schirmer                    $2,300,000        69
  Streetscape           3      10/14    Morganford Streetscape—Arsenal to Chippewa                           $4,000,000        121
  Streetscape           3      13/14    Morganford Streetscape—Chippewa to Holly Hills                       $6,000,000        181
  Streetscape           1       18      N. Kingshighway Streetscape—Delmar to Dr. Martin Luther King         $3,000,000        91


JANUARY 12, 2009                                                                                                           Page 1 of 3
8                       PROPOSED ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS
                                              CITY OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
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                        CONG.                                                                                                         JOBS
     SUBCATEGORY        DIST.   WARD                                 PROJECT NAME                                  ESTIMATED COST    (RIMS)

    COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT--INFRASTRUCTURE (continued…)
    Streetscape           1     1/18/22    N. Kingshighway Streetscape—Dr. Martin Luther King/W. Florissant          $8,000,000       242
    Streetscape           1     5/3/21/1   Natural Bridge—N. Florissant to N. Kingshighway                           $15,000,000      453
    Streetscape           1        2       North Broadway Streetscape                                                $5,000,000       151
    Streetscape           1      18/19     North Central Infrastructure                                              $7,500,000       227
    Streetscape           1        19      North Grand Avenue Streetscape—Delmar to Dr. Martin Luther King           $3,000,000       91
    Streetscape           1        3       North Grand/Water Tower Streetscape                                       $3,000,000       91
    Streetscape           1        5       North Market Place Infrastructure                                         $1,300,000       39
    Streetscape           3      12/16     River des Peres Streetscape/Drainage—Lansdowne to Gravois                 $5,000,000       151
    Streetscape           1      18/19     Sarah Streetscape—Vandeventer to Lindell                                  $4,000,000       121
    Streetscape           1      22/26     Skinker Boulevard Streetscape—Delmar to Dr. Martin Luther King            $5,000,000       151
    Streetscape           3       9/20     South Broadway Streetscape—Arsenal to Delor                               $10,000,000      302
    Streetscape           3        11      South Broadway Streetscape--Courtois to Upton                             $3,000,000       91
    Streetscape           3       8/15     South Grand Streetscape—Arsenal to Gravois                                $4,000,000       121
    Streetscape           3     6/7/9/20   South Jefferson Streetscape—Chouteau to Broadway                          $10,000,000      302
    Streetscape           1        17      South Kingshighway Boulevard Streetscape--Christy to Southwest            $8,000,000       242
    Streetscape           3       8/10     Vandeventer/Southwest/Kingshighway Streetscape                            $1,000,000       30
    Streetscape          1&3    Various    Various Enhancements--Non-Arterial Streets Throughout City                $7,000,000       211
    Streetscape           1        21      West Florissant Streetscape—I-70 to Adelaide                              $2,500,000       76
    Streetscape           1        27      West Florissant Streetscape—I-70 to Riverview                             $4,000,000       121
    ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
    Building              1       17       Center for Emerging Technologies Expansion                                $10,000,000      559
    ENERGY BLOCK GRANT--INFRASTRUCTURE & GREEN JOBS
    Green Buildings       1       7        Convention Center LEED Certification Repairs/Enhancements                 $51,245,000      1,548
    Alleys               1&3      All      "Green" Alleys                                                            $30,000,000       906
    Green Buildings       1       7        City Hall HVAC Replacement/Upgrade                                        $25,000,000       755
    Green Buildings       1       7        Police Headquarters--Energy Enhancement/Retrofit                          $25,000,000       755
    Fleet Vehicles       N/A     N/A       Fleet Vehicles, City: Conversion to Energy Efficient Fuel Systems         $41,700,000       N/A
    Green Buildings      1&3    Various    HVAC Replacements/Upgrade: City-Owned Buildings                           $20,000,000       604
    Green Buildings      1&3    Various    Solar Augmentation--Green Power/Peak Load Shed: City Buildings            $21,250,000       642
    Lighting              1       27       "Green" Street Lighting--27th Ward                                        $3,000,000        91
    Lighting             1&3    Various    Energy-Efficient Lighting Upgrades--City Buildings                        $10,000,000       302
    Recycling            N/A     N/A       Recycling Program Expansion: City Government                              $4,500,000        136
    Recycling            1&3    Various    Residential Recyclilng--Expansion to City-Wide                            $18,000,000       544
    Reforestation        1&3    Various    Reforestation of City Parks                                               $6,500,000        196
    Public facilities     1       10       Street Department/Equipment Services Facility--New Energy-Efficient B     $17,000,000       513
    HIGHWAY/METRO ROADS & STREETS INFRASTRUCTURE
    Bridge                1       6/19     Compton Bridge                                                            $7,000,000        211
    Bridge                3        11      Loughborough/I-55 Bridge                                                  $1,500,000        45
    Bridge                1        5       Mississippi River/I-70 Bridge--Connection Downtown/N. Florissant          $23,000,000       695
    Bridge                3       8/10     South Kingshighway Bridge at Union Pacific Tracks                         $17,000,000       513
    Bridge                1        5       Tucker Bridge                                                             $35,000,000      1,057
    Bridge                         28      Wellington Bridge                                                         $3,000,000        91
    Ramp                  1        6       Chestnut/I-64 Interchange Reconfiguration                                 $29,000,000       876
    Ramp                  1        7       Lafayette-Tucker Ramp Relocation                                           $4,000,000      121
    Safety               1&3    Various    Arterial Resurfacing/ Enhancements—Various                                $15,000,000       453
    Safety                3      23/24     McCausland/Ellendale/Wabash Improvements                                  $8,000,000        242
    Safety               1&3    Various    Off-System Preventive Maintenance                                         $6,000,000        181
    Safety               1&3    Various    On-System Preventive Maintenance                                          $6,000,000        181
    Safety               1&3    Various    On-System Preventive Bridge Maintenance                                   $6,000,000
    Safety                1        24      Skinker/McCausland/Clayton Road/I-64 Intersection Improvements            $4,000,000       121
    Traffic               3        24      Manchester/McCausland Traffic Improvements                                $1,000,000       30
    Traffic              1&3    Various    Traffic Signal Interconnects--Various                                     $12,000,000      362
    Wayfinding           1&3    Various    Regional Wayfinding Program                                               $1,000,000       30
    TRANSIT EQUIPMENT & INFRASTRUCTURE
    Bridge                1        7       Eads Bridge Rehabilitation                                                $25,000,000       755
    Equipment            1&3      N/A      Regional Transit Data Infrastructure Upgrade                              $5,000,000        151
    Equipment            1&3      N/A      Transit Rolling Stock Replacement                                         $5,000,000        N/A
    Light Rail            1      17/19     Grand Avenue MetroLink Station                                            $16,550,000       500
    Light Rail            1     Various    Light Rail Rehabilitation/Preventive Maintenance                          $45,000,000      1,359
    Light Rail           1&3    Various    MetroLink System: New North/South Extensions to Existing System          $900,000,000     27,180


JANUARY 12, 2009                                                                                                                   Page 2 of 3
                    PROPOSED ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS                                                                                  9
                                         CITY OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
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                    CONG.                                                                                                        JOBS
   SUBCATEGORY      DIST.   WARD                               PROJECT NAME                                ESTIMATED COST       (RIMS)

  TRANSIT EQUIPMENT & INFRASTRUCTURE (continued…)
  Operations         1&3     N/A      Transit System Operating Deficit                                        $50,000,000        1,510
  Trolley             1     26/28     Fixed Lane Trolley—Lindell/Delmar/Skinker                               $35,000,000        1,057
  AIRPORT TECHNOLOGY & INFRASTRUCTURE
  Airport Various     1      N/A      Lambert International Airport Maintenance & Improvements                $80,675,000        2,436
  WATER & WASTEWATER INFRASTRUCTURE
  Drainage            1        2      Bissell Point Treatment Plant Repairs/Improvements                      $1,300,000          39
  Drainage            1       22      Harlem-Baden Relief Detention System                                    $35,500,000        1,072
  Drainage            3       10      Macklind Outfall Separation                                             $1,000,000          30
  Drainage            1        7      Wharf Street Pump Station Replacement                                   $1,000,000          30
  Floodwall          1&3    Various   Floodwall & Levee Repairs                                               $20,000,000         604
  Miscellaneous      1&3      3/6     Historic Water Tower Renovations                                        $1,400,000          42
  Water              1&3    Various   Water Distribution & Treatment System Improvements                      $9,700,000          293
  SCHOOL MODERNIZATION
  Building           1&3    Various St. Louis Public School Modernization                                     $181,740,000       5,489
  PUBLIC HOUSING
  Building            1       5       Murphy Park Early Childhood Center                                       $9,600,000        290
  Streetscape         1       5       Cochran Gardens infrastructure                                           $1,400,000        42
  PUBLIC SAFETY JOBS & TECHNOLOGY
  Building           1&3     TBD      New Police Evidence Storage Warehouse                                    $2,500,000        76
  Communications     N/A     N/A      Consolidated Public Safety Answering System                             $20,000,000        604
  IT                 N/A     N/A      Building Division Information Systems Streamlining/Upgrades              $1,500,000        45
  TOTALS:                                                                                                    $2,456,425,000     72,674




JANUARY 12, 2009                                                                                                              Page 3 of 3
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         DICK GREGORY PLACE INFRASTRUCTURE

Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                   Dick Gregory Place, named
for noted comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory
who was born in the City’s Ville neighborhood, is part of
the historic Ville neighborhood, the seat of African-
American culture in the City of St. Louis. The Ville neigh-
borhood has suffered from devastating disinvestment over
the past fifty years. The City was recently successful in
placing Dick Gregory Place on the National Register of
Historic Places. The Dick Gregory Place Infrastructure            Streetscape—Dick Gregory Place
project will support and enhance a mixed use affordable
residential and commercial development fronting on Dr.
Martin Luther King Drive. The $15 million first phase of
this development effort, undertaken by two Ville neighbor-
hood housing corporations and the Regional Housing and
Community Development Alliance, has recently been
awarded 9% low-income tax credits that ensure that this
work will be feasible and will commence in a timely man-
ner. This first phase will set the stage for additional histor-
ic rehabilitation in this culturally significant area and pro-    Sidewalk—Dick Gregory Place

vide new quality homes and new retail services in this area
of great community commitment but also great need.

Description:           As currently conceived, the mixed use
development will include only minimal infrastructure work
necessary to make rehabilitation possible—selective public
sidewalk and alley repair/replacement, minimal right-of-
way landscaping, and sewer improvements required by the
Metropolitan Sewer District. Additional economic recovery
funding will make broader improvements possible in the
historic district, as follows: complete replacement of public
sidewalks, additional landscaping in the public right-of-             Restored home—
                                                                     Dick Gregory Place
way, installation of entry markers, complete alley re-
pair/paving, additional sewer improvements, selective electrical service underground re-
location, and historic public lighting enhancements, within the area bounded by Marcus,
Cora, Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, and North Market.




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     Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
     This economic recovery project will have the following positive outcomes:

           Initiate development of quality public spac-
            es in this highly distressed area.
           Support first historic rehabilitation of cultu-
            rally and architecturally significant resi-
            dences in the historic Ville neighborhood.
           Enhance public safety and security.
           Enhance area’s accessibility for people with
            mobility impairments.
           Reduce surface storm water and combined
            sewer overflows.
           Advance implementation of EPA-required
            sewer system improvements;
           Advance efficiency/City cost savings with
            energy-efficient street lighting.
           Advance City’s goal of conformance with
            “Dark Sky” protocols.
           Extend useful life of neighborhood by im-
            proving the quality of neighborhood’s
            homes and public spaces.

     Project Cost:        $3 million

     Job Creation:
            Construction: 91 jobs
            Permanent:    16 permanent jobs created in
            new retail space available for lease

     Political Jurisdictions:
                                                                     ABOVE: Typical alley
            Congressional District: 1                              BELOW: Typical sidewalk

            City Ward(s):           4

     Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            Ville Neighborhood Housing Corporation
            Missouri Housing Development Commission
            Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
            Samuel Moore, Alderman, 4th Ward, City of
                 St. Louis




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Project Status/Schedule:
       Design: Preliminary design complete;
       Bid documents to be completed by March, 2009
       Construction Start Date: April, 2009
       Completion: August, 2010

Green Features: Improved infrastructure will cata-
lyze higher levels of reuse of existing built-out urban envi-      Typical alley—Dick Gregory Place
ronment. Recycled paving aggregates will be used. New
lighting will conform to International Dark-Sky Association
protocols and will meet with Energy Star standards with
LED luminaires (may be solar in some areas). Stormwater
management features, including permeable pavers in
some areas, will reduce runoff and help reduce likelihood
of combined sewer overflows.

Education Impacts:              The project will demonstrate
that historic buildings and materials can be recycled for
modern use; the project will demonstrate “green” outdoor
infrastructure features; the project will provide opportuni-
ties for unemployed and underemployed neighborhood
residents to receive training in the construction trades.

Contact Information:                                                “Dark Sky” Solar Light Fixture


       Name:            Stephen Acree
       Title:           Executive Director, RHCDA
       E-Mail:          stephen@rhcda.com
       Cell Phone:      314-458-6073
       Telephone:       314-333-7001




                                                                   Waggoner Place (Dick Gregory)
                                                                         Historic District

                         Homes to be restored—Dick Gregory Place




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            DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS STREETSCAPE
                REPAIRS/ENHANCEMENTS

Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 This project involves replacement of obsolete/dangerous
sidewalks, lighting, traffic signals, crosswalks, landscaping in sixty-six City blocks in the
core of downtown St. Louis. The majority of the streets and sidewalks in the City’s
downtown core are unattractive, dangerous, disjointed and inaccessible due to broken
sidewalk slabs, uneven streets and inappropriately designed intersections, traffic signals
and street lighting. This project will enhance public safety, improve accessibility for
people with disabilities, support previous historic rehabilitation stimulate continued
                                                         rehabilitation/reuse of the few
                                                         remaining undeveloped historic
                                                         buildings, and encourage
                                                         construction of new buildings to
                                                         replace surface parking lots.
CURRENT




PROPOSED

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/ Outcomes/Benefits:
For the past seven years, the City, working in collaboration with downtown
stakeholders, has been in the process of designing a streetscape plan for the entire
downtown core—the plan addresses all of the safety and other issues described above,
including ADA accessibility enhancements and new energy-efficient pedestrian lighting
that complies with “dark sky” protocols. The completed project will provide a cohesive
streetscape that encourages safe and attractive 24/7 pedestrian traffic and makes
vehicular traffic more efficient. This project will implement the streetscape plan, for
which construction details have all been prepared and full construction documents have
already been prepared for several of the blocks.



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     In addition to making the downtown environment safer and more attractive for existing
     workers and residents, the project will also enable the City and state to attract more
     tourism and business travel, and will encourage the development of new office and
     residential buildings to complement the historic rehabilitation that has already taken
     place. New development in this high-density urban environment is expected to continue
     to reduce passenger vehicle use and ownership—many downtown residents and
     workers currently use a “We Car” service that provides pool vehicle for those who need
     an automobile only infrequently.




     Project Cost:      $33 million


     Job Creation:

           Construction: 997 jobs
           Permanent: An undetermined
           number of jobs will be created as new
           development made possible/attractive
           by these improvements occurs

     Political Jurisdictions:
           Congressional District: 1
           City Ward(s):           7




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Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      Partnership for Downtown St. Louis
      Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
      Various downtown developers
      Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward, City of St. Louis

Project Status/Schedule:

      Design: Design Development Completed; Construction Drawings in Process
      Construction Start Date: August, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010




Green Features:            This project will encourage continuation of high-density urban
development in area well-served by mass transit, reducing passenger vehicle travel. In
addition, lighting will comply with “dark sky” protocols, stormwater management will
employ state-of-the-art green techniques including rain garden micro-detention
concepts that contribute to reducing the likelihood of combined sewer overflow,
sustainable/regionally extracted materials will be incorporated into the design.




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     Education Impacts:        Use of “green” features listed above will enhance
     community awareness of opportunities for/benefits of sustainability and “green” design.

     Contact Information:

           Name:            Otis Williams
           Title:           Deputy Director, St. Louis Development Corporation
           E-Mail:          williamsot@stlouiscity.com
           Cell Phone:      314-402-8475
           Telephone:       314-622-3400 Ext. 269




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    GATEWAY MALL: EVENT PARK @ PARC PACIFIC
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                The Gateway Mall
is a15-block green space extending from the
Gateway Arch to Union Station. The Gateway
Mall has the potential to be an exciting and im-
pressive “living room” for all of downtown; how-
ever, most of the Mall’s blocks are, at present,
underutilized and deteriorated. While the Gate-
way Foundation of St. Louis is in the process of
creating a $30 million two-block sculpture gar-
den in a portion of the mall, the remainder of the
space needs a great deal of improvement. In
early 2008, the City completed a plan for the
Mall, and has recently collaborated with other
organizations to retain staff to focus on imple-
menting the plan. Funding, however, is yet to be
raised for all but the Gateway Foundation’s
sculpture garden.

Steve Smith, president of the Lawrence Group, a
noted local architecture firm and developer, is




                                                             TOP: Gateway Mall location—City.
                                                             CENTER: Mall location—downtown.
                                                                BOTTOM: Event park model.
                                                           LEFT: “Taste of St. Louis” event in Mall.




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     preparing for the development of the historic former Union Pacific building, vacated
     when UP moved all of its employees to Omaha in 2005, for rehabilitation as retail
     space, offices and apartments. As a part of that development, Mr. Smith, working with
     the City, prepared a new design for the three Mall blocks abutting the Parc Pacific de-
     velopment. These blocks are designated in the City’s Gateway Mall plan as a venue for
     a variety of events, to reinforce downtown’s position as the gathering place for the re-
     gion and to enhance the quality of downtown’s public spaces. At present, downtown
     hosts at least fifteen events each year, but locating these events is haphazard.




          LEFT: Event Park aerial rendering. RIGHT: Sculpture garden under construction in east Mall.



                                                       Description:       This project will con-
                                                       struct the Event Park planned for the Gate-
                                                       way Mall, advancing implementation of the
                                                       entire plan.

                                                       Specific Quality of Life
                                                       Enhancements/Outcomes/
                                                       Benefits: This project will activate the
                                                     important “Civic Plaza” section of the Gate-
                                                     way Mall, the living room for downtown St.
                                                     Louis, as the gathering place for the St.
                                                     Louis region. The new event park will make
                                                     it possible to focus events in a well-planned,
                                                     functional and attractive space, minimizing
          Activity spaces planned for the event park
         and adjacent sections of the Gateway Mall.  set-up and other costs the City now incurs
                                                     for each event. More than 1.4 million
     people are expected to attend events currently held each year; the new venue will make
     it possible to host even more events, further activating the entire mall and the overall
     downtown environment.
     .


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                                                    Project Cost:          $9 million

                                                    Job Creation:
                                                         Construction: 270 jobs
                                                         Permanent:    Permanent jobs will
                                                         be created as additional rehabilitation
                                                         and new construction takes place, in
                                                         part due to the creation of attractive
                                                         public spaces

  Water features to be incorporated into streets
              abutting event park.



Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District: 1
       City Ward(s):           6, 7

Community Support:
       Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
       Kacie Starr Triplett, Alderwoman, 6th Ward
                                                                   Rendering of south event park block.
       Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward
       Partnership for Downtown St. Louis
       Downtown businesses
       Downtown residents
       Event sponsors and attendees

Project Status/Schedule:
       Design: Final design complete; construction documents in progress.
       Construction Start Date: April, 2009
       Completion: Summer, 2010

Green Features:          Lighting will comply with “dark sky” protocols, stormwater man-
agement will employ state-of-the-art green techniques including rain garden micro-
detention concepts that contribute to reducing the likelihood of combined sewer over-
flow, sustainable/regionally extracted materials will be incorporated into the design.

Education Impacts:         Events will include educational features—e.g., Susan G.
Komen Race for the Cure, Dr. Martin Luther King Day celebrations, Hispanic Festival,
Veterans Day remembrances.




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     Contact Information:
         Name:            Steve Smith
         Title:           President, The Lawrence Group
         E-Mail:          steve.smith@thelawrencegroup.com
         Cell Phone:
         Telephone:       314-231-5700




                           ABOVE: Existing conditions—event park blocks.
              BELOW: Additional renderings of proposed improvements to event park blocks




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                       GRAND CENTER:
               PUBLIC MEDIA EDUCATION CENTER
Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                Grand Center is the region’s and the City’s performing
arts district and is supported by many corporations and philanthropists in the region.
Grand Center is located in midtown St. Louis, just north of Saint Louis University, just
west of the Renaissance Place HOPE VI new rental development, and just east of the
Central West End.

                                                                 KETC, the region’s public
                                                                 television station, is already
                                                                 located in Grand Center. To
                                                                 maximize Grand Center’s
                                                                 potential as an educational
                                                                 center for broadcast media,
                                                                 public radio should be added
                                                                 to what KETC can offer. The
                                                                 University of Missouri—St.
   ABOVE: Rendering of new KWMU/University of Missouri building.
                                                                 Louis is host to KWMU, the
         BELOW: Rendering of rehabilitated KETC facility.        region’s public radio station.
                                                                 University of Missouri has
                                                                 agreed to locate a satellite
                                                                 facility in Grand Center, ad-
                                                                 jacent to KETC’s facility, if a
                                                                 building is made available as
                                                                 home to the satellite facility.
                                                                 Grand Center Inc. owns
                                                                 property in this location on
which a combined Public Media Education Center and KWMU facility is built.

Description:         Economic recovery project funding
will, when combined with $6 million in private contribu-
tions already available from private donors, allow the
construction of the Public Media Education Center in
the Grand Center Arts & Entertainment District to pro-
ceed. In addition to KWMU studio space, the new
building will include approximately 9,000 square feet of
common space on the first floor that will be shared by
KETC, KWMU and other community education
                                                                 Existing condition of site for new
                                                                building—KETC in right background.


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     organizations. The facility will offer educational opportunities in the area of broadcast
     media to the students of UMSL, SLU and the various high schools and middle schools
     nearby. The project also adds an important pedestrian walkway connecting this new fa-
     cility with Saint Louis University and includes rehabilitation of the adjacent KETC build-
     ing. This new center will provide enhanced broadcast media education possibilities for
     UMSL and SLU students as well as area high school students and will create a new at-
     traction for the Grand Center Arts and Entertainment District. The employee, student
     and visitor traffic that results will also support the expansion of restaurant, retail and
     other services in the District.

     Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
     This economic recovery project adds another dimension to the Grand Center Arts and
     Entertainment District. The facility will offer educational opportunities in the area of
     broadcast media to University of Missouri and Saint Louis University students as well as
     students attending various high schools and middle schools nearby—both universities
     now lack television media education curriculums, and Saint Louis University has no type
     of broadcast media education at present.




     Project Cost:       $17 million total, of which $6 million has already been raised

     Job Creation:
           Construction: 332 jobs
           Permanent:    50 new permanent jobs at the new facility in addition to jobs
           that will be created in support retail and other businesses as the customer base
           in Grand Center increases as a result of this project

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Political Jurisdictions:
     Congressional District:            1
     City Ward(s):                      19

Community Support:
     Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
     University of Missouri at St. Louis
     Saint Louis University
     Grand Center Inc.
     Various Grand Center/KWMU supporters

Project Status/Schedule:
     Design: Preliminary design complete.
     Construction Start Date: May, 2009                  Existing condition of site for new building—
     Completion: December, 2010                               Sheldon Memorial in background.


Green Features: The
building’s design includes solar
panels and other LEED fea-
tures; the project will contribute
to the high density pedestrian-
oriented development in
progress at Saint Louis Univer-
sity and Grand Center, further
reducing the need for passen-
ger vehicle travel.

Education Impacts:
The facility will offer educational
opportunities in the area of
                                                 KETC and Public Media Education Facility
broadcast media to the stu-                                site plan showing
dents of UMSL, SLU and the                        new walkway to Saint Louis Univeristy.

various high schools and middle
 schools nearby.

Contact Information:
       Name:             Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
       Title:            CEO, Grand Center Inc.
       E-Mail:           vince@grandcenter.org
       Cell Phone:       314-369-6630
       Telephone:        314-289-1502




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          “GREAT STREETS” ENHANCEMENTS:
       SOUTH GRAND ETHNIC BUSINESS DISTRICT
Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 The South
Grand Business District is growing as one
of the City’s most unique business dis-
tricts—businesses are a vibrant mix of
ethnic restaurants and other retail estab-
lishments, but also include professional
firms, banks, and basic services. The
streetscape was constructed in the 1970s
and has significantly decayed. Further,
the improvements were constructed pre-
ADA and do not meet modern accessibility requirements.
Traffic control in this increasingly pedestrian- and bicycle-
oriented area is also obsolete and ineffective.




Description: This project will
create a safer, more accommodating,
and more attractive environment for pe-
destrians, bicyclists, and transit users
along the heavily traveled section of
South Grand Boulevard in the City of
St. Louis from Tower Grove
Park/Arsenal Street to Utah Place. Im-
provements will include pedestrian
crosswalks, pedestrian lighting, and
other pedestrian amenities including
Americans with Disabilities Act up-
grades, traffic calming measures to re-
duce vehicle speeds, improved transit
stops, stormwater management techniques to reduce surface runoff and improve water
quality, and additional landscaping.




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                                         Specific Quality of Life Enhance-
                                         ments/Outcomes/Benefits: While the
                                          South Grand Commercial District is currently a
                                          “good” street, the enhancements proposed as part
                                          of the East-West Gateway Council of Governments
                                          program will make this street “great”. EWG devel-
                                          oped its “Great Streets” initiative over the past two
                                          years. This section of South Grand was one of four
                                          streets selected as an opportunity to demonstrate
                                          how great streets can be created. According to
                                          EWG, great streets are representative of their plac-
                                          es, reflect the neighborhoods through which they
                                          pass, have a scale and design appropriate to their
                                          characters, are inviting, and allow people to walk
                                          comfortably and safely. Great Streets contribute to
                                          the economic vitality of the City and serve as desti-
                                          nations, not just transportation channels. They are
                                          good commercial addresses and provide location
                                          value to businesses that power the local economy.
                                          Great Streets support balanced mobility with appro-
                                          priate provision for safe, convenient travel by all
                                          ground transportation modes: transit, walking, bi-
                                          cycling, private passenger and freight vehicles.
                                          Great Streets strike an appropriate balance among
                                          through travel, local circulation and access, with
                                          balance varying with the street’s function and cha-
                                          racter of abutting neighborhoods and properties.
                                          Great Streets incorporate memorable, interesting
                                          places—plazas, pocket parks, attractive intersec-
     tions/corners, or simply wide sidewalks that foster active street life. They are green,
     providing an attractive and refreshing environment by working with natural systems.

     As part of this initiative, a collaborative plan for South Grand was completed in mid-
     2008. Funding requested will implement this plan and provide roadway, pedestrian, and
     transit facility improvements to South Grand Boulevard from Arsenal Street to Utah
     Place in the City of St. Louis. These carefully designed improvements will make South
     Grand a “great street” and improve quality of life for neighborhood residents, workers
     and visitors in the following ways:

           Improve safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, and motorists
           Enhance transportation/land use connections
           Increase retail activity for local businesses along South Grand
           Create “greener,” more environmentally-friendly stormwater management.

     Project Cost:        $3 million




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Job Creation:
       Construction: 90 jobs
       Permanent: An undetermined
       number of jobs will be created as new de-
       velopment made possible/attractive by
       these improvements occurs

Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District: 3
       City Ward(s):           8, 15

Community Support:
       Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
       East West Gateway Council of Governments
       Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
       South Grand Business Association
       Stephen Conway, Alderman, 8th Ward
       Jennifer Florida, Alderwoman, 15th Ward

Project Status/Schedule:
       Design: Preliminary Design complete;
       Construction Drawings in process
       Construction Start Date: July, 2009
       Completion: July, 2010

Green Features: The project will include
stormwater management techniques that reduce surface water runoff and improve qual-
ity of water permeating into underlying soil. Better transit stop facilities will encourage
more people to use public transit, reducing passenger vehicles on the road and vehicle
emissions.

Education Impacts:              The project will educate pedestrians and transit users about the
“Great Streets” initiative and techniques used to turn problem streets into Great Streets.

Contact Information:
       Name:            Les Sterman
       Title:           Executive Director, East West Gateway Council of Governments
       E-Mail:          les.sterman@ewgateway.org
       Cell Phone:
       Telephone:       314-421-4220




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   LACLEDE’S LANDING COBBLESTONE RESETTING
Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 Historic
Laclede's Landing is located on the
northern edge of the downtown core,
just north of the Gateway Arch and
just east of the region’s convention
center, along the Mississippi River.
The Landing’s southern boundary is
historic Eads Bridge—a MetroLink
stop is located on the bridge and Me-
troLink uses the bridge to cross the
Mississippi River into Illinois. The
Landing was the City’s first business
district—its historic mercantile build-
ings have now been rehabilitated as
restaurants, clubs, retailers and offic-
es. The Landing is also the site of the
Big Muddy Blues Festival each fall.

The majority of the Landing’s streets
are constructed with historic granite
cobblestone pavers. While the pavers
themselves are virtually indestructible,
the base that supports them has set-
tled unevenly, resulting in a very un-
even surface with high spots and de-
pressions. There is no detectable
crown in the streets’ cross-sections, making drainage a significant problem. These is-
sues make the streets dangerous for both pedestrians and vehicles—the street surfaces
cause major difficulties for people in wheelchairs or with other mobility impairments.

Description: The City and the Laclede’s Landing Merchants Association have
completed an engineering study of the granite paver situation; the goal of the project is
to correct the above issues while preserving the historic character of the streets. The
study recommends that the pavers be removed and then reset on a level concrete base,
filling the spaces between with a sand/cement mixture that will allow the pavers to ex-
pand and contract with weather changed while preserving their positioning.



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                   Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/
                   Benefits: This is a labor-intensive construction project that will make
                   Laclede’s Landing more user-friendly for workers, visitors, tourists and
                   people with disabilities. Correcting these problems will stabilize the cob-
                   blestone streets, preserving this important historic feature.

                   Project Cost:        $6 million

     Job Creation:
           Construction: 180 jobs
           Permanent: Jobs will be created as additional rehab-
           ilitation/new construction occur due to these improvements

     Political Jurisdictions:
           Congressional District: 1
           City Ward(s):           7

     Community Support:
           Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
           Laclede’s Landing Business Association
           Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
           Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward

     Project Status/Schedule:
           Design: Preliminary design complete;
           Bid documents in process
           Construction Start Date: April, 2009
           Completion: June, 2010

     Green Features: The project will recycle historic paving materials that have been
     in use for more than a century.

     Education Impacts:           The project will demonstrate that historic materials can be re-
     cycled for modern use; the project will also preserve an important historic feature along one of
     America’s most historic waterways.

     Contact Information:
           Name:             Otis Williams
           Title:            Deputy Director, St. Louis Development Corporation
           E-Mail:           williamsot@stlouiscity.com
           Cell Phone:       314-402-8475
           Telephone:        314-622-3400, Ext. 269


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         CORTEX LIFE SCIENCES BUSINESS PARK:
         SITE PREPARATION & INFRASTRUCTURE
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:              The City of St. Louis, in conjunction with the Center of
Research, Technology and Entrepreneurial Exchange (“CORTEX”) and an array of civic
leaders, has begun to create a life sciences research district to capitalize on a unique
opportunity to develop and attract life sciences-related businesses and create quality
jobs in an area adjacent to
Washington University
Medical Center’s, Saint
Louis University’s and
the Missouri Botanical
Garden’s abundance of
great research minds.
The rapidly growing fields
of biomedical and plant
sciences are industries of the
21st century on which the
City can help build its econ-
omic future and replace the
declining industrial base that
was formerly the foundation
of the City’s economy. By
putting in place the necessary
physical, financial and intel-
lectual infrastructure, St.
Louis can turn a strong foun-
dation of locally developed
cutting-edge science and
research into successful
companies providing jobs
with good wages and benefits
                                  ABOVE: CORTEX-acquired property to
and drawing talent from             be demolished/developed. RIGHT:
                                  Completed CORTEX spec lab building.
across the nation and around
the world.

CORTEX’s goals are to foster revitalization of the CORTEX district, to serve as the
catalyst for promoting the region as a center for advanced life sciences research and
technology, and, in the process, revitalize a substantial portion of the midtown area.


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     Thanks to more than $60 million in investment in this
     effort by the member institutions of CORTEX, a non-
     profit organization, this initiative already has a strong
     foundation. CORTEX has constructed and leased its
     first speculative laboratory space building to a new
     life sciences company that “graduated” from the
     Center for Emerging Technologies incubator across
     the street, Washington University’s Center for Nano-
     medicine, and a variety of other entities. Solae, the
     nation’s premier researcher and provider in the field
     of soy-based nutritional products, has recently moved
     its world headquarters to a new building in Cortex.

     Using funds invested by its member institutions,
     CORTEX has assembled key tracts of land on which
     both public and private institutions can continue to
     develop new facilities to house life sciences organ-
     izations within an urban research park environ-
     ment—in addition to property already developed,
     CORTEX and its members have acquired 27 acres
     and are in active negotiations for 10 more acres.

     By spring of 2011, nearly $300 million in develop-
     ment will have occurred in CORTEX, based solely on
     projects completed and underway at this time. Local
     and national developers and life sciences companies
     have expressed increasing interest in the district, and
     other research-related development is poised to take
     place. We expect that CORTEX’s success will
                                                                   TOP: Completed CORTEX building.
     continue at a rapid pace, bringing investment, jobs          CENTER: Stereotaxis training facility.
     and bustling activity to the district.                      BOTTOM: Completed Solae headquarters.



     Since all of the properties in the CORTEX area were
     formerly developed for other uses over many years,
     demolition and environmental remediation are extra-
     ordinary expenses that must be incurred in order to
     redevelop the property and market it at a competitive
     price—“greenfields” development has neither these
     issues nor these extraordinary costs. In addition, the
     public infrastructure in the area is aging, deteriorated,
     and unattractive. Duncan Avenue will be the main
     pedestrian thoroughfare in the CORTEX West area
     and runs east/west through the entire length of the
     Redevelopment Area. Clayton Avenue is a second-
     dary but important east/west thoroughfare through
     the Area. Both Duncan and Clayton Avenues are in
                                                                  ABOVE: CORTEX-acquired property
     extremely poor repair due to historic use for heavy            to be demolished/developed.




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truck traffic, poor street, intersection and curb upkeep, and major underground utility
upgrades. Lighting in the public right-of-way is inadequate to provide security and
illumination for pedestrian/auto traffic growing in the district as development continues
to occur—lighting also lacks energy efficiency and does not meet “dark sky” protocols.

Description: This economic
recovery project has two compo-
nents in the CORTEX West redev-
elopment area: preparation of
sites already acquired by
CORTEX, and construction of
street improvements on Duncan
Avenue and Clayton Avenue.
Site preparation involves
demolition, clearing, grading and
asbestos abatement and
environmental remediation where
necessary of vacant and deter-
iorating properties owned by                     CORTEX West redevelopment area.
CORTEX and being held for future
development on Forest Park, Duncan, and Clayton Avenues. Street improvements
involve repaving of and lighting and other upgrades to Duncan Avenue from Newstead
to Vandeventer and Clayton Avenue between Taylor and I-64.

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
This economic recovery project will have the following positive outcomes:

  Support significant private investment completed in CORTEX and stimulate
   new/continuing investment—existing buildings waiting to be demolished and current
   condition of CORTEX’s streetscapes depress interest in CORTEX and discourage
   new private investment.
  Further commercialization of new research performed in CORTEX’s member
   institutions, creating quality jobs for lower-income City residents and others.
  Reduce cost of development, making sites in CORTEX more competitive with
   “greenfields” sites in other parts of region.
  Eliminate maintenance costs for acquired structures waiting to be demolished and
   allow CORTEX/its affiliates to dedicate their resources to additional land
   acquisition/other projects to further CORTEX mission of developing a life sciences
   district.
  Transform deteriorated, unattractive, inaccessible and inhospitable public rights-of-
   way into safe and accessible corridors that comfortably support pedestrian, bicycle
   and vehicular activity.
  Make public right-of-way lighting energy efficient, effective for pedestrian traffic, and
   in conformance with “dark sky” protocols.
  Promote reuse of property in a dense urban environment well-served by mass transit
   and pedestrian-accessible homes, retail support services, and recreational facilities.



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     Project Cost:        $2.0 million ($1 million site preparation, $1 million street enhancements)

     Job Creation:
            Construction:        30 jobs
            Permanent:           200+ permanent jobs will be created on sites prepared

     Political Jurisdictions:
            Congressional District:          1
            City Ward(s):                    17

     Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward, City of St. Louis
            Washington University School of Medicine
            BJC Medical Center
            Saint Louis University
            Missouri Botanical Garden
            Center for Emerging Technologies
            Regional Chamber & Growth Association

     Project Status/Schedule:
            Design: No design or drawings required for site preparation; street
            enhancement drawings can be completed in 60 days
            Construction Start Date: May, 2009
            Completion: July, 2010

     Green Features:          Eliminates asbestos and other environmental contaminants
     from structures demolished; replaces ineffective lighting with energy-efficient lighting
     that meets dark sky protocols; promotes reuse of property in a dense urban
     environment well-served by mass transit, and pedestrian-accessible homes, retail
     support services, and recreational facilities.

     Education Impacts:            Advances commercialization of life sciences research; will
     enhance attraction of cutting-edge scientists/researchers/educators to Washington
     University and Saint Louis University

     Contact Information:
            Name:            Barb Featherston
            Title:           Executive Director, CORTEX
            E-Mail:          bfeatherston@cortexstl.com
            Cell Phone:      314-971-2272
            Telephone:       314-531-4500


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GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY: BRANCH STREET TRESTLE
 Project Type:           Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

 “Change We Need”:                The health of our citi-
 zens is a very important City concern. One way the
 City addresses this concern is by promoting healthy
 activities. Walking and bicycling are becoming very
 popular forms of both exercise and transportation,
 thanks in large part to the efforts of the Great Riv-
 ers Greenway District (“GRG”), a regional organiza-
 tion making unique and attractive “greenway” im-
                                                                    Completed trestle rendering.




                                                                     Existing trestle conditions.




             Trestle in overall greenway system.


 provements in Missouri and Illinois. GRG works
 for a clean, green, connected St. Louis region. To
                                                                    Aerial photo—trestle/features.
 deliver on its mission, the District is spearheading
 development of The River Ring, an interconnected
 system of greenways, parks and trails that will en-
 circle the St. Louis region, enhancing the quality of
 life for residents and visitors. The concept of The
 River Ring was the outcome of a 10-month citizen
 planning process completed in September 2003.
                                                                  Bicycling and walking on the trail.
 Eventually, The River Ring will encompass a 600-

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                                           mile web of more than 45 greenways that will criss-
                                           cross the region and provide access to trail and
                                           greenway projects developed by the Metro East
                                           Park and Recreation District in Madison and St.
                                           Clair counties, Illinois.

                                              The portions of the bicycle and pedestrian trails
                                              along the Mississippi River are some of the most
                                              important in the greenway system, and the Branch
                                              Street Trestle is a very important component of the
                                              Mississippi River greenway. The Branch Street
                                              Trestle project is transforming two miles of aban-
                                              doned railroad alignment from Branch Street to
                                              Cass Avenue into a recreation attraction, a model of
                                              sustainability, and a link to downtown and northside
                                              neighborhoods that substantially enhances neigh-
                                              borhood attractiveness. Further, the Branch Street
            Existing Trestle conditions.
                                              segment of the riverfront trail connects the Missouri
     section of the trail to Illinois via the McKinley Bridge. With this transformation, St. Louis
     will become the third city in the world to convert a historic elevated railroad viaduct into
     an urban recreational asset: St. Louis will join Paris and New York City in the distinctive
     honor of having a converted rail trestle as a public open space. Among the three cities,
     St. Louis is the only city to include its trestle in a regionwide system of interconnected
     greenways, parks and trails.

     Description: The Trestle will be a story of
     economic, social and environmental transformation
     that focuses on historical education, sustainability,
     active living and urban redevelopment. Beginning at
     Cass Avenue and Hadley Street, a park with con-                  Views from Trestle.

     veniences, including a pavilion, playground and rest
     area for cyclists, will become the neighborhood ga-
     thering area for residents and visitors. Traveling
     over the I-70 overpass, cyclists and pedestrians will
     experience a green screen of landscaping while
     taking advantage of expansive views of St.
     Louis and the Mississippi River. Along North Market,
     crossing over Broadway and past Produce Row,
     visitors can stop to observe the operations of the
     commercial district and industrial riverfront. Finally,        Land uses along Trestle.
     connecting to the Riverfront Trail, visitors will expe-
     rience native landscape along the Mississippi River. Throughout the 2-mile stretch, visi-
     tors can expect a unique mix of elements – native landscaping, a variety of lighting op-
     tions, demonstrations of sustainability and “green” features, public art and historical
     markers.




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Specific Quality of Life Enhance-
ments/Outcomes/Benefits: This unique
and attractive addition to the regional greenways sys-
tem will enhance the attractiveness of bicycling as a
transportation, exercise and recreation option for Mis-
Missouri and Illinois residents and will advance the
region’s system of greenways as unique throughout
the world. Further, the Branch Street Trestle will en-
hance the residential and retail development potential
and attractiveness of north side neighborhoods, in
particular Old North St. Louis, in addition to advanc-
ing the industrial and commercial development
tential of the North Riverfront industrial area—while
industrial business located along the riverfront trail
were once skeptical of the trail’s value, they now view
the trail as an important amenity for employees.

Project Cost:       $15 million (see above chart)

Job Creation:
   Construction: 450 jobs
   Permanent: Permanent jobs will be created as
   business development occurs along the trestle
   greenway.

Political Jurisdictions:
   Congressional District: 1
   City Ward(s):           5&7

Community Support:
   Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
   April Ford Griffin, Alderwoman, 5th Ward                Renderings—various trestle sections.
   Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward
   Various businesses along Trestle
   Various businesses along Trestle
   Bicycle enthusiasts

Project Status/Schedule:
   Design: Engineering drawings complete; con-
   struction documents in progress.
   Construction Start: March, 2009
   Completion: December, 2010                                Completed connection to Illinois.




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                                           Green Features:           The Branch Street Trestle
                                           will include native landscaping, environmentally
                                           sensitive stormwater management features, and
                                           “dark sky” compliant lighting powered by wind and
                                           solar energy. The availability of this unique and
                                           tractive greenway will also encourage the use of
                                           bicycles as an everyday transportation option by
                                           making bicycling more attractive in general.

                                           Education Impacts: The Branch Street
                                           Trestle will include a variety of educational features:
                                            explanations of how the Trestle’s solar and wind
                                           energy generators work and information about the
                                           Trestle structure and the historical development of
                                           the adjacent area.

                                           Contact Information:
                                           Name: David Fisher
                                           Title:  Executive Director, GRG
                                           E-Mail: dfisher@greatrivers.info
                                           Telephone: 314-436-7009, Extension 101




     Sustainable & educational features.




                                                    Pedestrians/bicyclists on completed GRG projects.




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                            GRAND CENTER:
                         PERFORMANCE GREEN
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 Grand
Center is the region’s performing arts
district and is supported by many
regional corporations and philanthrop-
ists. The district is located in midtown
St. Louis, just north of Saint Louis
University, west of the Renaissance
Place HOPE VI new rental develop-
ment, and east of the Central West
End. The area at present has no
permanent outdoor performance
venue—outdoor performances now take                        ABOVE: Performance Green location.
                                                              BELOW: Existing conditions—
place on surface parking lots, and outdoor                      performance green site.
performances will cease to be possible at
these locations as the lots are developed.

Description: The Grand Center Per-
formance Green project will convert approx-
imately 2 ½ acres vacant land immediately
east of Cardinal Ritter College Preparatory
High School into public performance space
suitable for and equipped to host outdoor
festivals, concerts, performances, art instal-
lations and other uses. The venue will be
available to the cultural and entertainment
institutions in the Grand Center Arts & Enter-
tainment District and others.

Specific Quality of Life
Enhancements/Outcomes/
Benefits: Events and activities at the per-
formance green will attract thousands of
visitors each year, generating demand for restaurant and retail services and contributing
to the continued development of the Grand Center Arts & Entertainment District into a
diverse, vibrant community. The addition of an outdoor performance venue will provide
a designated location for outdoor performances like Circus Flora in the arts district.


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     Project Cost:        $3 million

     Job Creation:
        Construction:         91 jobs
        Permanent:            10 full time
        equivalent jobs from events at
        Green; additional customers
        created by event traffic will create
        jobs in other parts of District.

     Political Jurisdictions:
        Congressional District: 1
        City Ward(s):           19

     Community Support:                             Project Status/Schedule:
        Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis          Design: Preliminary complete; de-
        Grand Center Inc. and supporters                sign-build.
                                                        Construction Start: March, 2009
                                                        Completion: March, 2010

     Green Features:          N/A.

     Education Impacts:                 The performance green is located within walking distance
     of one university, two high schools and one middle school, providing excellent opportun-
     ities for use of the facility for educational purposes.

     Contact Information:
            Name:            Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
            Title:           CEO, Grand Center Inc.
            E-Mail:          vince@grandcenter.org
            Cell Phone:      314-369-6630
            Telephone:       314-289-1502




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        PARK AND STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS:
          ANIMAL HOUSE AT ELLENDALE PARK

Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                Animal House is a new                           CITY HOSPITAL

animal control center for the City of St. Louis. The
existing facility was constructed during World War II as
a temporary retrieve and kill facility. The new state-of-
the-art animal center will provide the facilities needed
to provide medical care for injured and neglected
animals and encourage their adoption. The new center
is being developed through a design/build arrangement
between Animal House Fund, a 501(c)(3) non-profit
created especially for this project and the City. Animal
House Fund is now in the process of raising money to
complete the design and construction of the project—
this process, like many fundraising efforts, has been
slowed by the state of the economy.

Animal House will be located on the north side of
Ellendale Park. As part of Animal House Fund’s
agreement with the City, a master plan and schematic
design documents have been prepared for Ellendale
Park improvements.

Parks have always been an integral part of great cities:
open space with trees and other landscaping provides
outdoor play area for children and outdoor recreation
opportunities for adults, often with pets. Parks are
often the center of community activity and allow for
neighbor-to-neighbor interaction. In addition to space
for activities involving animals, Animal House will also
include new meeting space for public activities like
                                                               TOP: Ellendale Park Location
neighborhood meetings and gatherings.                       ABOVE: Existing aerial photo of park.
                                                              BELOW: Existing conditions at
                                                               ballfield and shelter structure.




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     Ellendale Park has been in existence since 1929.
     For many years, the park has lacked acceptable
     levels of maintenance and improvement. The
     park, located next to a freight railroad corridor, is
     viewed by many as an eyesore and by some as
     dangerous. Animal House and the associated
     improvements to the park and the surrounding
     streetscape will re-establish the park as the focal
     point for adjacent neighborhoods.

     As a part of the Animal House planning process,
     a series of neighborhood meetings were held.
     Residents stressed the need for safe pedestrian
     access and improvements to the park. These
     changes are necessary for the park’s continued
     viability whether or not Animal House is con-
     structed. As a result of this neighborhood collab-
     oration, needs expressed by these residents
     were incorporated into the Animal House plan.

     Description:          This project will provide
     improvements to Ellendale Park and Arsenal and
     McCausland Streets that complement the
                                                                   ABOVE: Illustrative site plan.
     development of Animal House. Improvements                    BELOW: Park improvement plan.
     will include the following:

       New pedestrian signals and crosswalks on
        Arsenal Street and McCausland Avenue at
        center entrances to the park.
       Addition of pedestrian crossing signals to
        existing traffic lights at Arsenal and
        McCausland.
       Addition of left turn lane for Animal House site
        entrance and lane restriping along
        McCausland Avenue.
       Replacement of fencing and addition of a
        gate to prevent public from accessing
        dangerous areas: railroad service road and
        River des Peres drainage channel.
       Relocation and regarding of the soccer field.
       Regrading/improvements to existing ballfield.
       Addition of new pathways to allow users to
        enter the park from the west.
       Addition of new internal pathways for jogging,
        walking dogs and other activities.
       Renovation of existing shelter structure.
       Construction of a new picnic pavilion.


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Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
This economic recovery project will improve and enhance an underutilized park and
make the park and access to the park safe. The improvements will provide enhanced
outdoor recreational amenities for residents of surrounding neighborhoods and will also
provide an appropriate and attractive setting for a new, modern, LEED-certified animal
facility that will provide appropriate and humane care for stray city animals.




                      Additional views of existing Ellendale Park conditions.


Project Cost:       $1 million (park improvements only, not Animal House construction)

Job Creation:
      Construction: 30
      Permanent:    Animal House will create 2 additional full-time equivalent jobs




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     Political Jurisdictions:
           Congressional District:          3
           City Ward(s):                    24

     Community Support:
           Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
           William Waterhouse, Alderman, 24th Ward
           Animal House Fund Inc.
           City Department of Health and Hospitals
           Neighborhood residents
           Numerous supporters of animal rights

     Project Status/Schedule:
                                                                Ellendale Park topographical survey
           Design: Construction documents in progress.
           Construction Start Date: March, 2009
           Completion: November, 2010

     Green Features:          Animal House is designed as a LEED-registered facility with
     the goal of LEED-platinum certification. Stormwater collected from the roof and
     impervious surfaces will be piped to cisterns for use in cleaning animal cages. Other
     permeable pavement and pavers will allow for stormwater to infiltrate the site. Rain
     gardens and other landscape features in the park and at Animal House will allow for
     overflow stormwater retention without ponds and artificial infiltration systems. Native
     plantings at Animal House and elsewhere in the park will minimize the need for irrigation
     in the park.

     Education Impacts:            Animal House will offer meeting spaces for neighborhood
     use. In addition, sustainable park landscape features will educate the public about
     appropriate plantings for park settings and demonstrate the benefits of permeable
     paving, rain gardens and other stormwater strategies. Animal House will also provide
     opportunities for educating the public about respect for animal life and proper care for
     pets and other animals.

     Contact Information:
           Name:             Dan Skillman
           Title:            Parks Commissioner, City of St. Louis
           E-Mail:           skillmand@stlousicity.com
           Cell Phone:
           Telephone:        314-289-5340




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 EUCLID AVENUE STREETSCAPE RECONSTRUCTION

Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                Euclid Avenue is
the primary commercial street in the Central West
End, St. Louis’ most vibrant urban neighbor-
hood—much of the City’s recent population
growth is due to development in the CWE. The
commercial district also serves the BJC Medical
Center complex to the south, and many people
with mobility limitations have chosen to live in the
area. Streetscape improvements were last made
in the 1970s—nearly three decades ago, and pre-
ADA. Euclid’s aging infrastructure has a negative
impact on public safety and pedestrian accessibili-
ty. The streetscape needs to be reconfigured to
be safe and accessible and to continue to attract
residential and commercial development.
                    RIGHT: Poor 1970S design combined with
                     age of streetscape elements have made
                           parts of Euclid inaccessible.
                    BELOW: Proposed design w/rain gardens.




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     Description:       This project will reconstruct the Euclid Streetscape from Forest Park
     Avenue to Lindell Boulevard.




                                                                ABOVE: Rain garden schematic
                                                                      design elements.
                                                                  LEFT: Sheet from design
                                                                   development drawings—
                                                                     other sheets below.
                                                                 BELOW: Existing conditions.




     Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
     This economic recovery project will have the following positive outcomes:

           Supports significant private investment completed in the Euclid vicinity and stimu-
            lates new/continuing investment.
           Supports/stimulates investment made by the largest employment center in St.
            Louis, the adjacent Washington University Medical Center.
           Transforms a deteriorated, unattractive, inaccessible and inhospitable public
            right-of-way into a safe and accessible multimodal corridor that comfortably sup-
            ports pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular activity, as well as restaurants and other
            retail facilities.
           Implements sustainable stormwater, energy use reduction, alternative transporta-
            tion, and water saving design features.
           Induces continued private sector reinvestment along the Euclid corridor.



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Project Cost:             $4.5 million

Job Creation:
       Construction:         136 jobs
       Permanent:            Permanent jobs may be
       created in new retail or offices space availa-
       ble for lease in part as a result of these im-
       provements

Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District: 1
       City Ward(s):           17

Community Support:
       Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
                                                                         ABOVE AND BELOW:
       Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward                        Typical sidewalk accessibilty deficien-
                                                                cies due to narrow walks and overhead
       Central West End Improvement Association                       electrical wires and poles.
       Washington University Medical Center
       Disabilities Commissioner—City of St. Louis




     ABOVE RIGHT:
  Existing inefficient/
 broken light-polluting
        fixtures.
   ABOVE CENTER:
Deteriorated overhead
  electric poles/wires
     and sidewalk.
 RIGHT: Mature trees
 have outgrown grates
and buckled walkways.




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50




     Project Status/Schedule:
            Design: Design development drawings complete;
            construction documents to be completed by March, 2009
            Construction Start Date: May, 2009
            Completion: December, 2009

     Green Features: Seven rain gardens and an expanded rain garden area collect
     rainwater from street in order to clean/slow water before release into storm system—
     rain gardens include sand filters and native vegetation and provide storage capacity to
     meet sewer district water quality standards for 2-year/24 hour storms. Porous paving in
     parking aisles directs street water to rain gardens. Porous paving over large tree plant-
     ing areas absorbs sidewalk water to irrigate trees/reduce water entering storm sewer.
     Missouri native vegetation in rain gardens will clean water, reduce maintenance, and
     eliminate need for artificial irrigation. Aging electrical and lighting infrastructure will be
     replaced with new efficient lighting, other systems. New street lights are indirect, with
     full cut-off of light trespass to eliminate light pollution. Native vegetation will reduce use
     of energy for trimming. Separate pathways for bicycle/pedestrian travel promote non-
     motorized movement between Washington University Medical Center, the MetroLink
     light rail stop and adjacent Central West End business districts, in addition to creating
     accessible routes for people with disabilities. Reconfiguration of sidewalks eliminates
     need for accessibility ramps. Bikeways connect to City-wide Bike St. Louis system.

     Education Impacts:             Interpretive signage regarding the project’s “Green Fea-
     tures” will increase public awareness and appreciation for sustainable urban intrastate.

     Contact Information:
            Name:                 Dan Krasnoff
            Title:                Executive Director, Central West End Midtown District
            E-Mail:               d.krasnoff@cwemd.org
            Cell Phone:           314-276-5915
            Telephone:            314-535-5311




        Construction details for rain gardens, permeable            Additional design development drawings.
                    pavers, other features.



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            GATEWAY MALL: NEW KIENER PLAZA
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                The Gateway Mall
is a15-block green space extending from the
Gateway Arch to Union Station. The Gateway
Mall has the potential to be an exciting and im-
pressive “living room” for all of downtown; how-
ever, most of the Mall’s blocks are, at present,
underutilized and deteriorated. While the Gate-
way Foundation of St. Louis is in the process of
creating a $30 million two-block sculpture gar-
den in a portion of the mall, the remainder of the
space needs a great deal of improvement. In
early 2008, the City completed a plan for the
Mall, and has recently collaborated with other
organizations to retain staff to focus on imple-
menting the plan. Funding, however, is yet to be
raised for all but the Gateway Foundation’s
sculpture garden.

The Kiener Plaza section of the Mall is widely
recognized as an obsolete public space in poor
condition. Kiener Plaza is located two blocks
north of what will become Ballpark Village and
immediately west of the historic Old Court-
house—visitors to St. Louis experiencing the
Gateway Arch or enjoying a Cardinals baseball
game inevitably experience this obsolete space,
as do workers and residents on a daily basis.




                                                             TOP: Gateway Mall location—City.
                                                            CENTER: Mall location—downtown.
                                                           BOTTOM: New Kiener Plaza site plan.
                                                           LEFT: Rendering of New Kiener Plaza.




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     HOK, an internationally noted architectural firm headquartered in downtown St. Louis,
     has been working with the City on the design of a new Kiener Plaza. This public space
     has the potential to showcase innovation and quality design in St. Louis and to act as a
     major gathering point for Busch Stadium events. The new Kiener Plaza has the poten-
     tial to reassert the City’s optimistic view of its urban core and to become a more attrac-
     tive and thought-provoking destination for businesses, visitors, and residents.




        LEFT: Sculpture garden under construction in east Mall. RIGHT: New Kiener Plaza aerial rendering.


     Description:         This project will construct the New Kiener Plaza in the Gateway Mall
     in the City of St. Louis. The design incorporates the following major elements:

      ● Dynamic Solar Element/Vehicle Charging
        Station: This unique element moves during
        the day to reflect the passage of the sun
        over the City and capture the sun’s energy;
        it can also be moved manually to provide a
        backdrop for ceremonies and outdoor per-
        formances, both live and on film. The indi-
        vidual solar fabric surfaces move indepen-
        dently, show-casing the counter-balanced
        structure. The structure employs stainless
        steel, prismatic glass, and solar fabric to es-
        tablish a relationship to the iconic arch that
        emblematic of the city. The energy col-
        lected in its photovoltaic surfaces will light
        the plaza and power charging stations for
        electric cars that line the plaza’s edge.                    Solar element from northeast (TOP) and
                                                                              southeast (BOTTOM).

      ● Seating: Soft seating walls include LED
        lighting—these walls act not only as functional and flexible seating, but also as
        steps to accommodate changes in the plaza’s elevation. These walls define dy-


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    namic landscape forms, line the topographical edges of the amphitheater, and de-
    form and flex according to their uses and position in the landscape.

 ● Stage: The stage is the performance cen-
   ter for the plaza and sits under the dynamic
   solar sculpture, facing the amphitheater and
   operating as a band shell and projection
   screen. The modular surface of the stage
   serves as an armature that includes all ne-
   cessary electrical, lighting, and sound sys-
   tem infrastructure necessary for perfor-
                                                           ABOVE: Solar element as stage.
   mances and ceremonies. The back of the
   stage aligns with street level to encourage
   spontaneous events directed toward the
   street.

 ● Water Plaza: Providing a large flat area for
   gathering, this striated surface is animated
   with interactive water features including jets
   and lights embedded in the hardscaped sur-
                                                       ABOVE: Soft seating walls/water plaza.
   face. In its everyday configuration, this fea-        BELOW: Visitors center pavilion.
   ture is a play fountain with a patterned sur-
   face that changes when wet to create an
   ephemeral landscape. When the plaza is
   needed for large gatherings, the jets recede
   and the plaza becomes an unprogrammed
   space. This space is also intended to be
   transformed into an ice skating rink through
   the application of plastic ice.

 ● Pavilion: The pavilion includes a city information booth and a control point for a
   sustainable and independent bicycle borrowing program located next door. The
   pavilion also includes space for table service from the cafés nearby.

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
The synthesis of the planned elements will create a dynamic, contemporary space for
downtown and the entire City that reflects the City’s uniqueness. The new design for
the plaza incorporates an innovative shade and performance structure that is repre-
sentative of the commitment to sustainability that St Louis has adopted. The new plaza
will attract many user groups, including the strolling individual, the small lunch group,
and a variety of smaller ceremonies or impromptu gatherings. The plaza and the solar
structure will be dynamic, exciting forms—more important, they will affirmatively demon-
strate the progressive nature of the City today while reflecting the progressive nature of
Saarinen’s Gateway Arch. The new plaza will provide a high quality visual experience
for everyone who lives, works or visits downtown; in addition, the plaza will enhance this
portion of the Gateway Mall for special activities in addition to everyday use.



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     Project Cost:        $50 million

     Job Creation:
            Construction: 1,500 jobs
            Permanent:    25 jobs related to plaza activities;
            additional jobs will be created as additional rehabilita-
            tion and new construction takes place downtown, in
            part due to the creation of attractive public spaces

     Political Jurisdictions:
            Congressional District: 1
            City Ward(s):           7

     Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward

     Project Status/Schedule:
            Design: Preliminary design complete; construction
            documents in progress.
            Construction Start Date: April, 2009
            Completion: September, 2010

     Green Features: New Kiener Plaza is a prominent
     public space that will act as a symbol of St. Louis’ compre-
     hensive approach to sustainability. The dynamic solar ele-
     ment celebrates solar energy collection and the use of this
     energy to power the plaza’s lighting and electric vehicles.
     Plaza construction will also feature sustainable materials and
     water features fed by water collected on site as part of an
     overall stormwater management strategy that includes use of
     rain gardens to slowly release water into the sewer system.
     These elements will contribute to reducing the likelihood of
     combined sewer overflow. In addition to electric vehicles, the
     plaza also highlights use of bicycles as an alternative trans-
     portation option by including a center for a bicycle borrowing
     program that allows visitors and workers to leave their cars
     and use bikes to move about downtown—the recycled alumi-
     num bicycles are fun, environmentally friendly and efficient.

     Education Impacts:              The sustainable design features        TOP & CENTER: Crowds
                                                                            gathering in Kiener Plaza.
     of the new Kiener Plaza are the first layer of information that is   BOTTOM: Volunteers planting.

     available to visitors in the heart of the city. The innovative


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sustainable systems are readily visible in an interactive format that will stimulate interest
and future investment in green infrastructure. The visitor center focuses on an accessi-
ble history of the City’s important sites and citizens as a base for revealing the future
potential of St. Louis. The center includes a living physical model of planned improve-
ments to the city’s urban fabric, a real-time showcase of cultural and entertainment
events, and a meeting space for citizens to converse and exchange ideas. The stage
and its surroundings act as a gathering space and venue for cultural events. Smaller-
scale dance, music, and stage performances here will complement the popular events
in the City that will take place in the Event Park. Here, culture will literally be on display
in the heart of downtown.




     ABOVE & RIGHT: Existing conditions at Kiener Plaza.
       BELOW: Element Diagrams—New Kiener Plaza.




Contact Information:
       Name:              Jim Fetterman
       Title:             Senior Project Manager, HOK
       E-Mail:            jim.fetterman@hok.com
       Cell Phone:        314-518-5307
       Telephone:         314-754-4067


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                                                                                                              57




            CROWN SQUARE/NORTH MARKET PLACE
                    INFRASTRUCTURE
Project Type:              Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

                                    “Change We Need”:                 Located just north of
                                     downtown St. Louis, Old North St. Louis experienced
                                     significant decline from 1950 to 2000. Vacant and
                                     vandalized buildings are still common in the area today.
                                     For the past five years, the Regional Housing and
                                     Community Development Alliance has worked in concert
    Historic building awaiting
                                     with the Old North St. Louis Restoration Group to revitalize
          rehabilitation.            this neighborhood as a mix of historically rehabilitated and
                                     newly constructed homes—the neighborhood is listed on
                                  the National Register of Historic Places. This partnership is
                                 responsible for more than $60 million in economically diverse
                                 residential and retail development. New homes are a mix of
                                 owner-occupied and rental, with many apartments reserved
                                 for low and moderate income occupancy. Financing for
                                 development has been complex but possible; financing for
                                 infrastructure to complement development has been difficult to
                                 secure. Aging streets, sidewalks and lighting are character-




People of Old North St. Louis.       Renderings: Crown Square, w/new public right-of-way improvements.




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     istic of most neighborhood blocks. Although a
     number of the new and rehabilitated homes are
     designed to be accessible for people with
     disabilities, access is difficult due to the poor
     condition of streets and sidewalks.

     Description:          The North Market Place Infra-
     structure project will support and enhance resid-
     ential/mixed-use redevelopment efforts ongoing for
     the past five years in this emerging area. Proposed
     infrastructure will allow for completion of public
     improvements in the area of the partnership’s first
     $20 million single family and multifamily housing
     development, and will physically connect this first
     development the most recent $35 million residential/
     mixed-use component now under construction—two
     city blocks separate these two development
     phases, and the proposed infrastructure project will
     unify the redevelopment area as a whole.                    Site Plans: North Market Place and
                                                                    Crown Square developments.


     Work performed on the north-south streets of Blair,
     13th, and Hadley, between Monroe on the south
     and the alley running parallel to north side of North
     Market on the north and on 14th Street from Monroe
     on the south to Warren on the north will include the
     following: replacement of public sidewalks,
     landscaping in public rights-of-way, and selected
     alley repair/paving. In addition, historic public
     lighting enhancements will be installed along North
     Market Place from North Florissant to Hadley and            Locations—proposed infrastructure
     along 14th Street from Monroe to Warren.                             improvements.




                                                                   Sidewalk replacement under
                                                                       construction—part of
                                                                        Old North St. Louis.

             Historically
            rehabilitated
       homes and retail space
                  in
         Old North St. Louis.




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Specific Quality of Life
Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
The Old North St. Louis neighborhood has suffered
from decades of disinvestment. This infrastructure
project will bring about the following positive
outcomes:

   Replacement of aging, deteriorated,
    inaccessible and unsafe streets and sidewalks
    with new attractive and accessible streetscape
    features.
   Improving the neighborhood’s image and
    marketability.
   Enhancement of property values for both
    existing residents and new residents.
   Enhanced public safety and security.
   Physical and aesthetic unification of two distinct
    but proximate redevelopment initiatives.
   Energy efficiency/cost saving to City with new
    “Dark Sky Friendly” public lighting;
   “Reboot” the useful life of the public
    infrastructure in the immediate area, thereby
    facilitating new development, new residents,
    new business, and new employment
    opportunities.
   Advance efficiency/City cost savings with
    energy-efficient street lighting.
   Advance City’s goal of conformance with “Dark
    Sky” protocols.
   Extend useful life of neighborhood by improving
    the quality of neighborhood’s homes and public
    spaces.

Project Cost:        $1.5 million total ($200,000
available from other sources)

Job Creation:                                                New homes under construction and
                                                              completed in Old North St. Louis.


       Construction: 42 jobs
       Permanent:    N/A

Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District: 1
       City Ward(s):           5




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     Community Support:
           Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
           Old North St. Louis Restoration Group
           Regional Housing & Community Development Alliance
           Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
           April Ford Griffin, Alderwoman, 5th Ward

     Project Status/Schedule:
           Design: Design development complete;
                       bid documents to be completed by February, 2009
           Construction Start Date: March, 2009
           Completion: March, 2010

     Green Features: Improved infrastructure will catalyze higher levels of reuse of
     existing built-out urban environment. Recycled paving aggregates will be used. New
     lighting will conform to International Dark-Sky Association protocols and will meet
     Energy Star standards with LED luminaires (may be solar in some areas).

     Education Impacts:             The project will demonstrate that historic buildings and
     materials can be recycled for modern use; the project will demonstrate “green” outdoor
     infrastructure features; the project will provide opportunities for unemployed and
     underemployed neighborhood residents to receive training in the construction trades.

     Contact Information:
           Name:            Otis Williams
           Title:           Deputy Director, St. Louis Development Corporation
           E-Mail:          williamsot@stlouiscity.com
           Cell Phone:      314-402-8475
           Telephone:       314-622-3400




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           ARLINGTON GROVE INFRASTRUCTURE
Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

                              “Change We Need”:                The northwestern portion of
                              the City along Dr. Martin Luther King Drive has been particu-
                              larly devastated by fifty years of disinvestment from 1950 to
                              2000. This area was once a thriving commercial district that
                              served adjacent neighborhoods; today, all but a few of the
                              retail structures are vacant or have been demolished, and
                              the adjacent neighborhoods also have a large percentage of
                              vacant buildings, vacant lots, and property where ownership
                              fell to the City by default as owners abandoned property and
                              failed to pay property taxes.




   Bioswale storm water
       management.




  Prototypical green space layout.

                                                    Land use plan for Arlington Grove.




 Example streetscape improvements.



                                                    Land use plan for Arlington Grove.




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                          The area’s alderman, in co-
                          operation with Friendly
                          Temple Church, McCor-
                          mack Baron Associates,
                          Christner Partnership, and
                          the City’s Planning and Ur-
                          ban Design Agency, has
                          been working on a revitali-
                          zation plan for a portion of
     this area for the past several years. Until
     2008, a significant portion of the City’s housing de-
     ment resources—Community Development
     Block Grant funds, HOME funds, and low-
     income tax credits—were devoted to
     pleting the City’s HOPE VI developments.
     Now that two of the three HOPE VI
     ments are complete and the last phases of
     the third HOPE VI are underway, the City is                 Vacant buildings and lots:
                                                                 map and aerial photograph
     initiating similar transformative developments
     in several parts of the City. Arlington Grove
     is an area that needs transformation, and the City is
     working to assemble the necessary resources so
     that transformation can occur.

     Although Friendly Temple Church, a neighborhood
     anchor, has invested more than $37 million in the
     area over the past decade, commercial develop-
     ment and additional residential development is ne-
     cessary to provide this area with a sustainable
     complement of public, non-profit and private uses.
     The Arlington Grove Plan looks forward to a pre-
     miere mixed-use, mixed-income neighborhood
     where the rich history and tradition of the past are
     interwoven with modern innovation and “green” val-
     ues. Through a mix of market rate and affordable
     homes and both ownership and rental options, the
     plan is designed to create a diverse neighborhood
     where a variety of people affirmatively choose to
     live, work and play.
                                                                    Typical vacant buildings in
     While much of the necessary private development               Wells Goodfellow.
     can be supported with existing resources like low-
     income tax credits and HOME funding, the area needs a significant investment in infra-
     structure in order for the goals of the plan to be realized.




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Description:         This economic recovery project
will rebuild the streetscape and “alleyscape” for this
severely distressed area and set the stage for pri-
vate development to occur. The project may also
involve acquisition of vacant buildings and vacant
lots.




                                                               Potential new townhome design.




                                                              Potential new single-family design.




                    Examples of rehabilitation & new
                    construction in Wells Goodfellow.          Potential new mixed use design.


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     Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
     The comprehensive reconstruction of this portion of the area fronting Dr. Martin Luther
     King Drive and the Wells Goodfellow neighborhood to the north will provide a critical
     mass of development that can be expanded to other areas. Establishing a standard for
     attractive and sustainable infrastructure at the initiation of the redevelopment of the area
     will demonstrate to existing residents that their neighborhood has not been forgotten
     and that their neighborhood has great potential, and will also attract new residents to
     the neighborhood.

     Project Cost: $5.5 million (total infrastructure cost $16.5 million—this project in-
     volves Phase I infrastructure)

     Job Creation:                                   Community Support:
          Construction: 156 jobs (plus                   Francis Slay, City of St. Louis Mayor
          additional jobs from residen-                  Jeffrey Boyd, Alderman, 22nd Ward
          tial/commercial construction)                  Friendly Temple Church
          Permanent: Permanent jobs
          will be created by the construction        Project Status/Schedule:
          of new mixed use residen-
          tial/commercial buildings on Dr.               Design: Preliminary complete.
          Martin Luther King Drive.                      Construction Start: May, 2009
                                                         Completion: December, 2010
     Political Jurisdictions:
          Congressional District: 1
          City Ward(s):           22

     Green Features: Infrastructure will include the following green features:
      •   Stormwater management to include rain gardens, bio-swales, retention areas
      •   Site furnishing and elements with high percentage of recycled content
      •   Use of native plants to reduce irrigation requirements
      •   Diversified tree palette to prevent susceptibility and mass die-off
      •   New pedestrian lighting that meets “dark sky” protocols

     Education Impacts:           Arlington Grove plan implementation will demonstrate that
     severely distressed areas can be sustainably revitalized w/sufficient public/private in-
     vestment if plan addresses tradition/modern values and provides attractive environment.

     Contact Information:
             Name:            Jeffrey Boyd
             Title:           Alderman, 22nd Ward
             E-Mail:          jlboyd64@sbcglobal.net
             Cell Phone:      314-713-9201
             Telephone:       314-622-3287

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                    GRAND CENTER:
           VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL
             RETAIL & PARKING STRUCTURES
Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:
Grand Center is the region’s
performing arts district and is
supported by many regional
corporations and philanthrop-
ists. The district is located in
midtown St. Louis, just north of
Saint Louis University, west of
the Renaissance Place HOPE
VI new rental development, and
east of the Central West End.
The region’s primary Veteran’s
Administration hospital is lo-
cated at the northern end of
Grand Center. The facility
lacks sufficient, safe, and con-
venient parking for workers, pa-
tients and visitors. In addition,
few stores are located suffi-            Elevation and site plan prepared by Desman Associates.
ciently close to the hospital to
serve these same workers, visitors and patients. Further, the hospital has little room for
expansion—available land is now used for surface parking. For years, hospital adminis-
trators have planned for structured parking, but funds have not been available for this
purpose. The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, located immediately south of the hos-
pital complex, suffers from similar parking issues, as do other area facilities.

Description: This project involves the development of two parking structures with
approximately 550 parking spaces in each. Each structure will also include retail on the
first level. One structure will be located immediately adjacent to the Veterans Hospital,
with the other approximately 1½ blocks away in the heart of the Grand Center Arts and
Entertainment District. During daytime hours, the new parking will satisfy the parking
needs of staff, patients and visitors at the Veterans Hospital. In the evening hours, new
parking will serve visitors to the Grand Center arts and entertainment venues, including
Powell Symphony Hall, the Fox Theatre, the Grandel Theatre, the Black Repertory
Theater, and educational outreach programs.


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      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/ Outcomes/Benefits:
      These parking and retail structures
      will make additional safe, convenient
      parking available for workers, pa-
      tients and visitors at the Veterans
      Administration Hospital and will also
      make 8+ acres currently used as
      surface parking lots available for
      other VA Hospital facilities and other
      Grand Center development. Parking
      will also serve Symphony Orchestra
      patrons and patrons of other institu-
      tions and facilities in the area.

      Project Cost: $26 million, of
      which $7 million will be provided
      from other sources

      Job Creation:                                 Community Support:
         Construction:          596 jobs                Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
         Permanent:             14 full time            Grand Center Inc. and supporters
         equivalent jobs from parking opera-            Veterans Administration
         tions; other jobs to be created in             VA Hospital workers, patients, visitors
         street level retail. Additional park-
         ing/land for development will create       Project Status/Schedule:
         jobs in other parts of District.
                                                        Design: Preliminary complete.
      Political Jurisdictions:                          Construction Start: March, 2009
                                                        Completion: December, 2010
     Congressional    District: 1
     City    Ward(s):           19

      Green Features:           Solar and other energy efficient lighting elements and green
      roofs are included in design of both garages. The two garages will replace approximate-
      ly 8 acres of asphalt that currently contributes to both poor water and poor air quality.

      Education Impacts:          Will provide evening parking for Grand Center cultural and
      educational events sponsored by District’s 41 arts organizations and four schools.

      Contact Information:
             Name:            Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
             Title:           CEO, Grand Center Inc.
             E-Mail:          vince@grandcenter.org
             Cell Phone:      314-369-6630
             Telephone:       314-289-1502


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        ST. LOUIS ZOO: VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS

Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

                                                    “Change We Need”:            The St.
                                                Louis Zoo has been located in Forest
                                                Park in the City of St. Louis since 1910,
                                                soon after the 1904 World’s Fair. The
                                                St. Louis Zoo has been consistently
                                                recognized as one of the top three
                                                zoos in the country. The mission of the
                                                St. Louis Zoo is to conserve animals
                                                and their habitats through animal man-
                                                agement, research, recreation, and
                                                educational programs that encourage
the support and enrich the experience of the public.

State legislation provides that "the zoo shall be forever free," which has kept the Zoo
accessible to millions of visitors since its inception. The Zoo is part of the regional Zoo-
Museum Taxing District, established in 1971. The Zoo is governed by a ten-member
commission, with five members appointed by the Mayor of the City of St. Louis and five
appointed by the St. Louis County Executive. The Zoo also benefits from three non-
profit organizations established to raise additional funds for capital and operating costs.

In 2008, through collaboration among staff and leadership, community residents, zoo
experts and planning professionals, the Zoo developed a comprehensive strategic plan
for the next twenty-five years. The plan addresses the infrastructure needs of the cen-
tury-old campus, as well as improvements needed to preserve the Zoo’s status as one
of the nation’s outstanding zoos. The total cost of plan implementation is $120 million.

Even with the funding sources
listed, the Zoo does not have
sufficient funding to make all of
the improvements outlined in
its strategic plan for its 90-acre
campus. The plan includes
nine necessary improvements
that are “ready to go” now.
Some address public safety
concerns; others address
modernizing and expanding ex-


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     isting habitats and attractions. Still others are intended to modernize the Zoo’s image
     and improve its functionality as the Zoo nears its 100th anniversary in 2010.


     Description:                      The Zoo’s economic recovery projects are listed in the table below.

                                           ST. LOUIS ZOO:
                               ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS



            PROJECT NAME               ESTIMATED COST              PURPOSE/OUTCOMES
     Central Restroom Renovation          $397,000      Includes accessibility modifications,
                                                        improved ventilation and new water-
                                                        efficient fixtures in one of oldest restroom
                                                        facilities
     "Historic Hill" Fire Detection/      $569,000      Adds additional fire detection and
     Annunciation System                                annunciation equipment to protect some of
                                                        Zoo's most historic buildings--Herpetarium,
                                                        Primate House and Bird House. Special
                                                        equipment needed to function in
                                                        challenging environments without unduly
                                                        frightening animals.
     New Restrooms--Carousel             $1,080,000     This attraction has no restrooms located
     Corner                                             nearby. Project includes new restroom and
                                                        vending area construction.
     Path Lighting                        $510,000      Lack of illumination along pathways is a
                                                        safety and security concern during evening
                                                        activities that produce much of Zoo's
                                                        operating revenue. Includes additional
                                                        electrical service in addition to pathway
                                                        lighting.
     Maintenance Center                  $3,200,000     Replaces 50-year-old maintenance facility
                                                        with new facility sized to handle current
                                                        scope of Zoo buildings and outdoor
                                                        attractions; will also include space for Zoo
                                                        IT equipment. To be LEED certified.
     Elephant Habitat Expansion           $770,000      Expands Zoo's elephant habitat to
                                                        accommodate growing herd of Asian
                                                        Elephants.
     Lakeside Café Renovation             $400,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        centrally located dining facility.

     East Refreshment Area                $890,000      Addresses accessibility upgrades, deferred
     Improvements                                       maintenance and modernization of obsolete
                                                        food service structure.
     North Arrival Experience            $7,600,000     Expands, renovates, and makes ADA
                                                        accessibiilty, pedestrian/vehicular access
                                                        and energy conservation upgrades to 20-
                                                        year-old "Living World" facility.

     TOTAL:                            $15,416,000




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Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/
Outcomes/ Benefits: These improvements to
the St. Louis Zoo will have the following impacts:

   As a whole, these improvements will address pub-
    lic safety concerns, modernize and expand exist-
    ing attractions, and improve the Zoo’s image as
    the Zoo nears its hundredth anniversary in 2010.
   Central Restroom Renovations will bring this fa-
    cility into ADA compliance, improve ventilation,
    and will include new water-saving replacement fix-
    tures. New finishes will also be included.
   "Historic Hill" Fire Detection/ Annunciation
    System will add additional fire detection and an-
    nunciation equipment to protect some of Zoo's
    most historic buildings—the Herpetarium, the Pri-
    mate House and the Bird House—and the animals
    that these buildings protect. Special equipment is
    needed to function in challenging environments
    without unduly frightening animals.
   New Restrooms at Carousel Corner will con-
    struct new restroom facilities and a vending area
    for a popular attraction that now has no restrooms
    located nearby.
   Pathway Lighting will address safety and security
    concerns due to a lack of illumination along the
    Zoo’s many pathways. This improvement will
    make it possible to use the Zoo for additional
    evening events—these events generate a signifi-
    cant portion of the Zoo’s operating revenue.
   The New Maintenance Center will replace the ex-
    isting 50-year-old maintenance facility with a new
    facility sized to handle the scope of the Zoo’s
    buildings and outdoor attractions—the Zoo exist-
    ing building was developed when the Zoo’s devel-
    oped area was 50% of its current size. The new
    building will also include space to house the Zoo’s                                  Children and adults enjoying the
                                                                                           wildlife at the St. Louis Zoo.
    IT equipment—the equipment is now located in a




 Central Restroom Facility to be modernized.   East Refreshment Area to be modernized.   Safety elements will protect historic buildings.



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          makeshift area with neither the space nor the
          ronmental controls to properly accommodate the
          equipment. The new building will be LEED certi-
          fied.
         The Elephant Habitat Expansion will assist the
          Zoo in enhancing its Asian Elephant habitat as the
          Zoo’s herd of Asian elephants grows. An addi-
          tional 1.7 acres of land will be enclosed with a           North arrival point at Living World.
          steel and cable fence designed for bulls, cows and
          calves and connected to the existing habitat and
          management facility with a series of hydraulic and
          manual gates for safe transfer.
         The Lakeside Café Renovation project will add
          new features and address deferred maintenance
          needs in this centrally located 15-year-old dining
          facility—this facility generates more Zoo revenue
          than any other building on the Zoo grounds. Inte-            Growing Asian elephant herd.

          rior and exterior deteriorated finishes will be ad-
          dressed, and acoustical improvements will be
          made.
         East Refreshment Area Improvements will ad-
          dresses accessibility upgrades, deferred mainten-
          ance and modernization of this obsolete food ser-
          vice structure.
                                                                      Lakeside Café to be renovated.
         The North Arrival Experience will expand the
          “Living World” building in conjunction with a major renovation of the 20-year-old fa-
          cility that addresses mechanical systems replacement, accessibility improvements,
          and restroom expansion. The project will also add a bus drop-off area and exterior
          vehicular and pedestrian circulation improvements. The project will include a com-
          puterized energy management system and energy-efficient light fixture replace-
          ment.

     Project Cost:         $15.4 million for nine (9) projects—see chart above.

     Job Creation:
       Construction:           466 jobs
       Permanent:              Will create undetermined # of permanent jobs; will preserve
                               existing permanent and summer jobs.

     Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District: 1
       City Ward(s):           28




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Community Support:
   Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
   St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission
   St. Louis Zoo Commission
   Friends of the Zoo
   Zoo Friends Association
   Zoo Board of Trustees
                                                                       Penguin nutritionist.
   Zoo Endowment Trust

Project Status/Schedule:
   Design: Design in progress.
   Construction Start: April, 2009
   Completion: December, 2010
Green Features:            Many of the projects include
“green” features—e.g., new energy-efficient lighting,
water-saving plumbing fixtures, automated HVAC
controls. The new maintenance facility will be LEED
certified. Overall, the projects will assist the Zoo in
continuing to carry out its mission of animal conserva-
tion and animal research—animal conservation pro-            Veterinary procedure in progress.

tects the environment by minimizing elimination of species that play important roles in
world ecology.

Education Impacts:            Overall, the projects will assist the Zoo in continuing to
carry out its mission of animal conservation and animal research, together with educa-
tional programs that encourage public support of this mission and teach adults and
children about the importance of animals and roles they play in our ecological balance.

Contact Information:
       Name:              Dr. Jeffrey Bonner
       Title:             President & CEO, St. Louis Zoo
       E-Mail:            bonner@stlzoo.org
       Cell Phone:        314-807-5431
       Telephone:         314-646-4619




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                                                                                     73




        FEDERAL MOGUL PROPERTY ACQUISITION

Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                  Formerly Moog
Automotive, Federal Mogul produced auto-
mobile brake parts on Forest Park Avenue in
the City of St. Louis until 2007. At that time,
the company shut down the plant and moved
the jobs out of the country. The 9.1 acre site
is currently occupied by three vacant industrial
buildings—the property is thought to suffer
from significant environmental hazards due to
the nature of the manufacturing that took
place at the site, and the condition of the
buildings is poor. Given the types of institu-
tional and life sciences development that are
taking place to the west and north of the site,
the City does not believe this property is cur-
rently suitable for industrial development and
wishes to ensure that the property achieves
its highest and best use and makes the most
positive possible contribution to the City’s
economy. The property is located on a major east-west
roughfare, close to Washington University Medical Center
and Saint Louis University major employment centers—more
than 30,000 people work or attend college within eight
blocks. The City’s Planning Commission has designated
this property as an “Opportunity Area”—a key underutilized
location where the use of the land is in transition and where
the site offers particularly special opportunities. In order to
ensure that the site is developed as appropriately as pos-
sible and makes the maximum possible positive contribution
to the City’s economy, the City wishes to acquire the proper-
ty. Assembled sites of this size are very scarce in the City,
particularly in this attractive location—without City inter-
tion, a private party acquiring the site could use it for a
pose that would threaten the viability of continuing
ty, Medical Center, and life sciences business development
in the areas surrounding the site. The City does not have
funds available to pursue this acquisition.


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     The City has acquired similarly threatened
     properties for development in the past and
     successfully marketed them for appropriate
     development. While in some cases the City is
     able to recover the entire cost of the acquisi-
     tion when it sells the property for appropriate
     development, in many cases the City must
     subsidize the development with a reduction in
     the sales price (and often with other incen-
     tives) in order to ensure that appropriate de-
     velopment occurs.

     Description:         This project will fund the
     acquisition of the 9.1 acre Federal Mogul site.

     Specific Quality of Life En-
     hancements/Outcomes/ Bene-
     fits: While a number of small retailers are lo-
     cated in the Central West End business dis-
     tricts north of the Medical Center and west of
     Saint Louis University, there is no site in this
     area other than the Federal Mogul site large
     enough to permit the development of new
     mainstream retail. Mainstream retail is neces-                 Photographs of vacant
                                                                      Federal Mogul site.
     sary to serve not only these institutions but
     surrounding neighborhoods—at the present
     time, many City residents must travel outside
     the City to purchase items that are now consi-
     dered necessities because many mainstream
     retailers are not represented within the City’s
     62-square-mile boundaries. The Federal Mo-                             FEDERAL
     gul site is the City’s best opportunity to attract                       MOGUL
                                                                               SITE
     the mainstream retailers the City now lacks.
     Retailers attracted to this site will serve all
     central corridor and many north and south
     side neighborhoods—residents of these areas
     must now travel significant distances to find
     quality stores. If the site attracts this kind of
     retail development, travel costs for these resi-
     dents will be reduced. If the site also attracts office development in a “lifestyle center”
     environment, the City will also be able to offer an attractive location for new jobs.

     Project Cost:        $7.7 million (acquisition only)




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Job Creation:
   Construction: 400 jobs (assuming
   development of 135,000 sq. ft. building—
   actual development is expected to be
   much more dense).

   Permanent: Permanent jobs will be
   created when the acquired site is devel-
   oped.

Political Jurisdictions:
   Congressional District: 1
   City Ward(s):           28

Community Support:
   Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
   Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward
   CORTEX
   Saint Louis University
   Washington University Medical Center              Photographs of vacant Federal Mogul site.


Project Status/Schedule:
   Design: N/A
   Construction Start: March, 2009
   Completion: December, 2010

Green Features:          It is expected that the new development on the site will be
LEED certified. Acquisition and remediation of the site will eliminate environmental ha-
zards.

Education Impacts:          This project will demonstrate that retail in dense
urban environments can be successful and will encourage retail development
in other parts of the City.

Contact Information:
      Name:             Rodney Crim
      Title:            Executive Director, St. Louis Development Corporation
      E-Mail:           crimr@stlouiscity.com
      Cell Phone:       314-402-8474
      Telephone:        314-259-3441




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   MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN IMPROVEMENTS
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                The Missouri Botanical Garden
opened to the public in 1859 and is the oldest continuously
operating botanical garden in the United States. The Garden
was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. Widely
considered one of the top three botanical gardens in the world,
it is renowned for its global botanical research and conserva-
tion efforts, world class herbarium and botanical library, award
winning horticultural displays, highly regarded education pro-
grams and public outreach. The Garden is a treasured asset
of the St. Louis community. It attracts and educates more than
850,000 visitors and members each year. The Botanical Gar-
den is a major tourist attraction and contributes greatly to the
cultural and economic vitality of the St. Louis region.

As envisioned by its founder, Henry Shaw, the Garden has
been a neighborhood anchor for 150 years as many areas
around the Garden deteriorated. The Garden’s presence and
commitment to the area has been a stabilizing force. The
Garden is a significant participant in the revitalization of the
neighborhoods surrounding the Garden, in particular the
McRee Town neighborhood, now Botanical Heights. Since the
late 1990s, the Garden has sponsored a neighborhood-based
planning initiative that has accelerated the pace of McRee
Town’s revitalization. Until the Garden began to with residents
towards revitalization, this neighborhood was one of the most
crime-ridden and distressed areas in St. Louis. Today, vanda-
lized, vacant, and substandard buildings have been replaced
with new single-family homes; a second phase is poised to
address the western portion of this neighborhood.

The Garden, like many non-profit organizations, has a long list
of capital needs that the organization lacks funding to address.
In the Garden’s case, this situation is exacerbated by the age
of many of its facilities. In order for the Garden to maintain its
status as one of the best botanical gardens in the world and its
value as an attraction for residents of the St. Louis region,        Research/education at Garden.
these issues need to be addressed.


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     Description:                 The Garden has six critical infrastructure projects, listed below.
                            MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN:
                           ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS



            PROJECT NAME          ESTIMATED COST              PURPOSE/OUTCOMES
     Streetscape Improvements--      $765,000      Various repairs/enhancements to public
     Garden Perimeter                              sidewalks/fencing at the public streets
                                                   surrounding the Garden
     Historic Stone Wall            $4,000,000     Repairs to 1856-era native limestone wall
     Restoration--Garden                           surrounding Garden--portions of wall
     Perimeter                                     temporarily stabilized to prevent collapse

     Japanese Garden                $1,590,000     Repairs/improvements to 32-year-old
     Renovations                                   Japanese Garden section of property
     ADA Accessibility               $645,000      Accessibility enhancements at Children's
     Enhancements                                  Garden, Rose Garden, and other portions of
                                                   the property
     Fire Alarm Control Systems      $400,000      Replacement/expansion of obsolete fire
                                                   alarm control systems to adequately protect
                                                   Garden structures
     Greenhouse Retaining Wall       $300,000      Replacement of rotting railroad retaining
     Replacement                                   wall w/structurally sound concrete retaining
                                                   wall to prevent unplanned collapse
                                                                                                  “Drum” bridge in the
     TOTAL:                        $7,700,000                                                      Japanese Garden.


     Public Improvements around Garden Perimeter:
     The Garden lends a distinctive visual presence to the
     entire neighborhood. As a property owner, the garden
     is responsible for preserving and maintaining its outside
     perimeter as well as the historically important Victorian-
     era buildings and other structures within the Garden—
     and in the Garden’s case the perimeter of the property
     is very large. Repairs and upgrades to cracked, un-
     even and deteriorated sidewalks are needed—these
                                                                     Historic limestone wall
     sidewalks are heavily used during festivals, other                 damaged in 1946.
     events that draw large crowds, and by residents of sur-
     rounding neighborhoods. This project will install a new porous concrete sidewalk on Al-
     fred Avenue, replace unsafe sidewalks around remaining perimeter of the Garden, re-
     pair and repaint the cast iron and steel fencing on Magnolia and Tower Grove Avenues.

     Restoration of Missouri Botanical Garden’s Historic Perimeter Stone Wall: Signifi-
     cant portions of the indigenous limestone wall that surrounds much of the Garden pre-
     date the Civil War. This wall, ranging in height from nine to twelve feet, is part of Henry
     Shaw’s original plan for the Garden and is a prominent historic structure that defines the
     Garden’s location and lends a distinctive visual presence to the entire neighborhood.
     The portion of the wall along Tower Grove Avenue on the eastern side of the Garden
     was completed in 1856. Over the years, additional portions of the wall were built along
     the south side of the Garden on Shaw Avenue. Without immediate restoration and sta-
     bilization, portions of the original materials may be lost as sections collapse or are tem-
     porarily braced to avoid collapse.

     Japanese Garden Renovation: One Botanical Garden’s main features is the 14-acre
     Japanese Garden, the largest of its type in the western hemisphere. Designed in 1977

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by the late Professor Koichi Kawana to ensure authenticity, the Japanese Garden is a
dramatic example of the complexity of the oriental garden. Called “Seiwa-En” (meaning
garden of pure, clear harmony and peace), this garden features many symbolic land-
scape and architectural features. The Japanese Garden is now more than three dec-
ades old. Normal aging processes have taken a toll, and the following repairs are now
required so that the Garden can continue to serve the hundreds of thousands of people
that visit the Japanese Garden each year: electrical system replacement, fiber optic line
installation to Japanese Garden maintenance building, restroom renovation, footbridge
replacement, and replacement of asphalt pavement.

ADA Accessibility Improvements:
The Garden is committed to enriching
the lives of special needs populations,
senior citizens and others who find it dif-
ficult to walk the Garden’s seventy-nine
acres and rely on wheelchairs to enjoy
the beauty of the Garden. Addition of
ADA-compliant ramps in the Lehmann
Rose Garden and replacement of gravel
paths in the Children’s Garden with brick
pavers to make these areas accessible.
In 2008, 39,000 children under the age
of twelve visited the Children’s Garden.
It is extremely important that this special
garden be accessible to everyone.

Fire Alarm Control Systems: The
Garden’s fire alarm control systems are
outdated and need to be replaced with
more modern, reliable equipment in or-
der to adequately protect the Garden’s
buildings and the people who use them.
Since the Garden is a National Historic
Landmark, these modern systems must
sensitively designed and installed.

Replace Retaining Wall Adjacent to
Greenhouse Complex: Effects of time,
weather and wear on this railroad tie retaining wall have created a potentially dangerous
situation: many of the wooden ties are now rotten and the wall is now in danger of col-
lapse. Underground cables under a road supported by the wall would be seriously
damaged if a collapse occurred. A reinforced concrete wall will replace the railroad ties.

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
The completion of these key infrastructure projects will enable the Garden to better
serve the public and maintain its high level of commitment to research and conserva-
tion. The Garden’s research efforts are an important component of local, national and
international initiatives to develop new ways for people to live and work in a more sus-

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     tainable manner. The Garden’s plant science work is recognized around the world as
     cutting edge research and is the basis for many new species preservation and commer-
     cialization initiatives in the region and around the world that also have potential for new
     jobs and new revenues. In addition, these cutting-edge efforts are leading the way to-
     wards sustainability on a number of fronts.

     Project Cost:        $7.7 million (see above chart)

     Job Creation:
        Construction: 233 jobs
        Permanent:    N/A

     Political Jurisdictions:
        Congressional District: 3
        City Ward(s):           8

     Community Support:
        Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
        Stephen Conway, Alderman, 8th Ward
        Missouri Botanical Garden
        CORTEX

     Project Status/Schedule:
        Design: Design/specifications completed.
        Construction Start: May, 2009
        Completion: November, 2010
                                                                        Species being conserved.

     Green Features:              The Garden adopted a new strateg-
     ic plan in 2008, setting a major goal of advancing sustainability. The Garden is commit-
     ted to incorporating sustainable features in all its construction projects and to LEED cer-
     tification for all its new buildings. The Garden has been an advocate for green building
     and sustainable design, and the Garden administers St. Louis chapter of the GBC.

     Education Impacts:           The Garden advances education in many ways—through
     educational features and events throughout the Garden’s facilities and on the Garden’s
     website, through specialized plant science research that benefits scientists around the
     world, and through maintenance of one of the world’s finest collections of plant speci-
     mens. In addition, the Garden is one of the major sustainability advocates in the region.

     Contact Information:
            Name:            Bob Herleth
            Title:           Executive Vice President, Missouri Botanical Garden
            E-Mail:          bob.herleth@mobot.org
            Telephone:       314-577-5142

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ARTERIAL STREETSCAPES THROUGHOUT THE CITY
Project Type:          Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 Ar-
terial and “feeder” streetscapes
are the front doors to our neigh-
borhood residential and commer-
cial areas. If these streetscapes
are well-designed, well-lit, well-
maintained and welcoming, they
attract people to buy homes,
goods and services in these
neighborhoods. If streetscapes
are deteriorated, inaccessible, and
poorly lit, far fewer people will
choose to live in the neighborhood
and patronize neighborhood busi-
nesses. “Curb appeal” is an im-
portant concept in the sale of real
estate; curb appeal is equally im-
portant in marketing our neighbor-
hoods.

During the fifty years when the
City lost population and business-
es, the City’s streetscapes also
suffered from disinvestment. Im-
provements to our arterial streets-
capes are needed so that these
streetscapes can be safe, attrac-
tive, and serve the needs of the re-    Typical existing conditions—
tail and other businesses that line      City arterial streetscapes.

our arterial streets. Today’s
streetscapes must also accommodate bicycle and pedestrian
traffic as well as those who use automobiles. The City’s ar-
terial streets were designed at a time when the need for this
balance and the need to safeguard our environment was not
recognized. Our arterial streets need new lighting that is
energy-efficient, complies with “dark sky” protocols, and illu-
minates pedestrian walkways, bikeways and roadways, with-              Well-designed streetscapes
out polluting skies with excessive and energy-wasting light.              generate pedestrian
                                                                           activity/business.


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                    CITY OF ST. LOUIS STREETSCAPE PROJECTS
                                                                                                                      Description:
                   PROJECT NAME                  ESTIMATED COST
                                                                   JOBS
                                                                  (RIMS)              PURPOSE/OUTCOMES
                                                                                                                      These projects
     Adelaide Business Campus                      $2,000,000      60      Supports business development in this      address above-
     Stormwater/Drainage                                                   new business campus.
                                                                                                                      described needs
     Botanical Heights Streetscape                 $1,120,000      34      Suppports neighborhood revitalization.
     Carrie Avenue Improvements                    $3,000,000      91      Supports business development in this
                                                                                                                      and other needs
                                                                           new campus.                                described at left.
     Chippewa Streetscape—Grand to S.
     Broadway
                                                   $5,000,000      151     Suppports neighborhood revitalization.     Other streetscape
     Delmar Streetscape—Hodiamont to               $2,000,000      60      Supports "Loop" commercial district
                                                                                                                      projects are
     Goodfellow                                                            revitalization.                            described elsewhere
     Delmar Streetscape—Tucker to Jefferson        $5,000,000      151     Supports expansion of downtown
                                                                           development.
                                                                                                                      in this document.
     Goodfellow/I-70 Streetscape Improvements      $3,000,000      91      Supports SLAAP site, former ordinance      Improvements will
                                                                           plant business development.
                                                                                                                      include sidewalk,
     Gravois Avenue                                $6,500,000      196     Supports commercial development.
     Streetscape—Loughborough to Taft                                                                                 drainage, lighting,
     Habitat for Humanity Streetscape              $1,000,000      30      Supports low-income home construction.     bikeway, and park-
     Improvements
                                                                                                                      ing improvements.
     Jamieson Streetscape                          $3,000,000      91      Replaces deteriorated/inaccessible
     Improvements—Arsenal to Chippewa                                      sidewalks/medians/lighting with
                                                                           accessible "green" features.
     Locust Streetscape—Tucker to Jefferson        $5,000,000      151     Suppports expansion of downtown
                                                                           development.

     Macklind Streetscape—Chippewa to              $3,000,000      91      Supports new business development.
     Eichelberger
     Mallinckrodt Streetscape Improvements--       $4,000,000      121     Supports new residential development in
     Phases 1 & 2                                                          historic distressed neighborhood.
     Meramec Avenue Streetscape—Grand to S.        $3,000,000      91      Supports new residential development in
     Broadway                                                              historic distressed neighborhood.
     Michigan Avenue Streetscape--E. Davis to      $2,300,000      69      Supports new residential development in
     Schirmer                                                              historic distressed neighborhood.
     Morganford Streetscape—Arsenal to             $4,000,000      121     Supports new business development.
     Chippewa
     Morganford Streetscape—Chippewa to            $6,000,000      181     Supports new business development.
     Holly Hills
     N. Kingshighway Streetscape—Delmar to         $3,000,000      91      Supports new business development.
     Dr. Martin Luther King
     N. Kingshighway Streetscape—Dr. Martin        $8,000,000      242     Supports new residential development.
     Luther King/W. Florissant
     Natural Bridge—N. Florissant to N.           $15,000,000      453     Supports new business development.
     Kingshighway
     North Broadway Streetscape                    $5,000,000      151     Supports new business development.
     North Central Infrastructure                  $7,500,000      227     Supports comprehensive redevel-
                                                                           opment of distressed neighborhood.
     North Grand Avenue Streetscape—Delmar         $3,000,000       91     Supports new business development.
     North Grand/Water Tower Streetscape           $3,000,000       91     Supports new business development.
     River des Peres Streetscape/                  $5,000,000      151     Improves drainage/lighting/accessibility
     Drainage—Lansdowne to Gravois                                         on aging greenway that connects to
                                                                           MetroLink.
     Sarah Streetscape—Vandeventer to Lindell      $4,000,000      121     Supports comprehensive redevel-
                                                                           opment of distressed neighborhood.
     Skinker Boulevard Streetscape—Delmar to       $5,000,000      151     Supports new business development/
     Dr. Martin Luther King                                                Washington University expansion into
                                                                           City.
     South Broadway Streetscape—Arsenal to        $10,000,000      302     Supports new business development.
     South Broadway Streetscape—Courtois to        $3,000,000       91     Supports new residential development in
     Upton                                                                 historic distressed neighborhood.
     South Grand Streetscape—Arsenal to            $4,000,000      121     Supports new residential development in
     Gravois                                                               historic distressed neighborhood.
     South Jefferson Streetscape—Chouteau to      $10,000,000      302     Supports new business/residential
     Broadway                                                              development.
     South Kingshighway Boulevard Streetscape-     $8,000,000      242     Supports new business development.
     Vandeventer/Southwest/Kingshighway            $1,000,000       30     Improves very pedestrian-unfriendly
     Streetscape                                                           intersection.
     West Florissant Streetscape—I-70 to           $2,500,000       76     Supports new recplex development.
     West Florissant Streetscape—I-70 to           $4,000,000      121     Supports new business development.
     TOTAL:                                      $159,920,000     4,830


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Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
lmprovements to these streescapes will support ongoing revitalization efforts and stimu-
late new development in the neighborhoods served by these arterials and “feeder”
streets, improving property values, improving ADA accessibility, generating new resi-
dential and business activity, growing the City’s tax base and improving the energy effi-
ciency and sustainability of street features.

Project Cost:        $159.9 million (see above chart)

Job Creation:
   Construction: 4,830 jobs
   Permanent: Permanent jobs will be
   created as business development occurs
   along the improved streets.

Political Jurisdictions:
   Congressional District: 1 & 3
   City Ward(s):           Various

Community Support:
   Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
   Aldermen Representing Wards Listed in
   Above Chart
   Various businesses served by streets
                                                        Streetscape design in
   Various neighborhood residents served by                various stages.
       streets
   Bicycle enthusiasts

Project Status/Schedule:
    Design: Streetscape projects are in various stages of design,
    waiting for funding to become available. Many construction de-
    tails will apply to all streetscapes, making it possible to complete
    bid documents quickly and efficiently.
    Construction Start: March, 2009
    Completion: December, 2010

Green Features:            Improved infrastructure will catalyze higher
levels of reuse of existing built-out urban environment. Improve-
ments will encourage pedestrian and bicycle travel modes. Recycled
paving aggregates will be used. New lighting will conform to Interna-
tional Dark-Sky Association protocols and will meet Energy Star
standards with LED luminaires (may be solar in some areas).
Stormwater management will reduce likelihood of combined sewer
overflows.


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     Education Impacts:           Streetscape enhancements will demonstrate that existing
     built-out urban environments can be successfully revitalized.

     Contact Information:
           Name:               Marjorie Melton
           Title:              President, City of St. Louis
                                 Board of Public Service
           E-Mail:             meltonm@stlouiscity.com
           Cell Phone:         314-622-4143
           Telephone:          314-471-5570

           Name:               Rodney Crim
           Title:              Executive Director, St. Louis
                                  Development Corporation
           E-Mail:             crimr@stlouiscity.com
           Cell Phone:         314-402-8474
           Telephone:          314-259-3441




                                                                     Examples of streetscape
               Goodfellow Avenue at SLAAP/federal ordnance plant.    improvements proposed.




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                   GRAND CENTER:
         SPRING CHURCH PARK ADAPTIVE REUSE
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:               Grand Center is the re-                         CITY HOSPITAL

gion’s and the City’s performing arts district and is sup-
ported by many corporations and philanthropists in the
region. Grand Center is located in midtown St. Louis,
just north of Saint Louis University, just west of the Re-
naissance Place HOPE VI new rental development,
and just east of the Central West End.

In the late 1990s, a prominent church built in 1884 and
located at the corner of Spring Avenue and Delmar
Boulevard in Grand Center suffered significant fire
damage. The congregation moved to other quarters af-
ter the fire and Grand Center Inc. acquired control of
the property. The structure is not sound at present, but
Grand Center Inc. would like to preserve this important
piece of the area’s history and adaptively reuse it as
both a unique sculptural attraction and as a quiet park
where reflection and a series of temporary public art in-    ABOVE: Fire damage in late 1990s.
                                                             BELOW: Temporary art installation
stallations can take place.                                              in 2008.




Description:      This project consists of stabilizing the structure of the above-
described church and landscaping and lighting improvements to the entire property.
With these improvements, the property will be used as a public art park.


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     Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
     As a unique and public park, the Spring Church will provide an important and valuable
     contribution to the continued development of the Grand Center Arts & Entertainment
     District. With this new attraction, more people from around the St. Louis region will visit
     the Grand Center district, expanding demand for retail and restaurant services and help-
     ing to create the diverse and vibrant community intended for the area.

     Project Cost:        $2.25 million

     Job Creation:
        Construction: 69 jobs
        Permanent:    It is antic-
        ipated that temporary public art
        installations in the new park will
        create approximately 6 full time
        equivalent new permanent jobs

     Political Jurisdictions:
        Congressional
        District:              1
        City Ward(s):          19

     Community Support:                                   Project Status/Schedule:
        Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis            Design: Design development complete.
        Grand Center Inc.                                 Construction Start Date: March, 2009
        Various Grand Center supporters                   Completion: December, 2009
     Green Features:           N/A

     Education Impacts:             The Spring Church property has already been used for
     one high impact public art project involving four schools in the District. However, be-
     cause of the physical deterioration of the church structure, the cost of temporary scaf-
     folding made the project excessively expensive and future projects will not be possible
     without permanent restoration. The structure is located within walking distance of one
     university, three high schools and one middle school, and the completed project will
     provide significant art education opportunities for the students at these institutions.

     Contact Information:
            Name:            Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
            Title:           CEO, Grand Center Inc.
            E-Mail:          vince@grandcenter.org
            Cell Phone:      314-369-6630
            Telephone:       314-289-1502


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                    GRAND CENTER:
            GRANDEL THEATER MODERNIZATION

Project Type:       Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:
Grand Center is the region’s perform-
ing arts district and is supported by
many regional corporations and phi-
lanthropists. The district is located in
midtown St. Louis, just north of Saint
Louis University, west of the Renais-
sance Place HOPE VI new rental de-
velopment, and east of the Central West
End. The area at present has no permanent
outdoor performance venue—outdoor per-
formances now take place on surface park-
ing lots, and outdoor performances will
cease to be possible at these locations as
the lots are developed.

The Grandel Theatre is an historic 1887
church that was converted in the mid-1990s
into a live performance theater. It now
serves as home for three non-profit theater               ABOVE: Grandel Theater.
                                                     BELOW: Grandel Theater performances.
companies: the St. Louis Black Repertory
Theatre, the St. Louis Shakespeare and the
St. Louis Repertory Theatre Company. The
theatre needs repairs and improvements to
address deferred maintenance and bring its
performance features into conformance with
current standards—this work has been de-
ferred in order to keep operating costs as
low as possible for the non- profit tenants.
Sound, lighting and other interior equipment
has aged and does not perform optimally.

Description:        This economic recovery
project will modernize the Grandel Theater,
correcting the issues described above and
creating an additional performance space.

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      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
      These improvements would significantly increase the utilization of the building, drawing
      more people from around the St. Louis region to the Grand Center Arts & Entertainment
      District expanding the demand for retail and restaurant services and helping to create
      the diverse and vibrant community planned for the District. In addition each of the not-
      for-profit tenants operate outreach educational programs which could be operated more
      efficiently in more modern and efficient space.

      Project Cost:        $2 million

      Job Creation:
         Construction:        59 jobs
         Permanent:           6 full time
         equivalent jobs from events in new
         performance space; additional cus-
         tomers created by event traffic will
         create jobs in other parts of District.

      Political Jurisdictions:
     Congressional    District: 1
     City    Ward(s):           19

      Community Support:                              Project Status/Schedule:
         Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis           Design: Design complete.
         Grand Center Inc. and supporters                 Construction Start: March, 2009
         Black Repertory Theater                          Completion: March, 2010
         St. Louis Shakespeare Theater
         St. Louis Repertory Theater Company

      Green Features:           N/A.

      Education Impacts:            The Grandel Theater is located within walking distance
      from one university, two high schools and one middle school providing significant art
      education opportunities to the students at these institutions.

      Contact Information:
            Name:              Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
            Title:             CEO, Grand Center Inc.
            E-Mail:            vince@grandcenter.org
            Cell Phone:        314-369-6630
            Telephone:         314-289-1502




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               GRAND CENTER:
 STREETSCAPE/INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS

Project Type:         Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure

“Change We Need”: Grand Center is the region’s
performing arts district and is supported by many regional
corporations and philanthropists. The district is located in
midtown St. Louis, just north of Saint Louis University, west of
the Renaissance Place HOPE VI new rental development,
and east of the Central West End. The area at present has
no permanent outdoor performance venue—outdoor perfor-
mances now take place on surface parking lots, and outdoor
performances will cease to be possible at these locations as
the lots are developed.

Current streetscapes in the District are without distinction.
Visitors to the many cultural, entertainment and educational
venues in the District are left without a memorable impression
of the District’s identity. The
planned streetscape improve-           ABOVE RIGHT: Existing street.
                                      RIGHT: Streetscape improvement
ments will create distinctive vis-               locations.
ual appeal for the District to              BELOW: Streetscape
                                           improvement designs.
provide visitors with a sense of
excitement and a sense of
place each time they visit the
District. The visual impact will
support the District’s on-going
development and help create
the diverse community sought
by Grand Center’s supporters.
In addition, a variety of public
improvements are needed to
enhance public safety, improve
pedestrian and vehicular way-
finding, and provide additional
arts education resources.




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      Description:          This project will construct new streetscapes in a portion of the Grand
      Center Arts & Entertainment District, and will provide security cameras in the District to
      reduce the incidence of crime. The project will also improve selected alleys and parking
      lots for ease of use, provide public information signage, and help complete an arts edu-
      cation facility. The results of these changes will be a safer and more vibrant arts and en-
      tertainment district with a distinctive identity.

      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
      The new identity created by the new streetscapes will enhance the District’s appeal to
      patrons of the performing and visual arts. In addition, the streetscape enhancements
      will highlight the appeal of St. Alphonsus “Rock” Church and visually incorporate this di-
      verse and vibrant landmark into the fabric of the District. The District’s appeal will be
      supported by an enhanced sense of security, and wayfinding in the District will be signif-
      icantly improved.

      Project Cost:        $7.2 million ($5.7 million streetscape; $1.5 million other)

      Job Creation:                                    Community Support:
         Construction:        216 jobs                    Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
         Permanent:           8 full time                 Grand Center Inc. and supporters
         equivalent jobs from events in new               Saint Louis University
         performance space; additional cus-
         tomers created by event traffic will          Project Status/Schedule:
         create jobs in other parts of District.
                                                          Design: Design in progress.
      Political Jurisdictions:                            Construction Start: March, 2009
                                                          Completion: December, 2010
     Congressional    District: 1
     City    Ward(s):           19

      Green Features: Lighting elements will include LED and other low energy con-
      sumption lighting and changes to alleyways will be designed to minimize wastewater
      runoff.

      Education Impacts:          The project will enable the completion of additional arts
      education space for the schools in the District.

      Contact Information:
             Name:             Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr.
             Title:            CEO, Grand Center Inc.
             E-Mail:           vince@grandcenter.org
             Cell Phone:       314-369-6630
             Telephone:        314-289-1502




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         CENTER FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES:
             BUILDING III CONSTRUCTION
Project Type:        Community Development Block Grant for Infrastructure
                     Economic Development Administration

“Change We Need”:                 As manufacturing jobs in the United
States continue to be exported to other parts of the world, local
economies must be reinvented. The City of St. Louis is already well
along the road to economic reinvention, thanks in large part to the
great minds and entrepreneurial spirit that have characterized the
City for the greater part of its history. Much of this brainpower today
is concentrated in the City’s universities and research institutions, in
particular the Washington University Medical Center, Saint Louis
University, and the Missouri Botanical Garden. The Medical Center
is the City’s largest employer and has continued to grow even as
other industries have receded; other life-sciences related indus-
tries—notably Mallinckrodt/Covidien, Solae, and Sigma Aldrich—
have also grown and are continuing to grow in the City. It is clear
that growth in these innovation-based industries is a major part of
our City’s economic future. These institutions and companies are
producing new ideas for new life sciences-based products and ser-
vices every day.

Nationally recognized as a Top Ten incubator and recipient of the
U.S. Economic Development Administration award for Excellence in
Tech-Led economic development, the Center for Emerging Tech-
nologies (“CET”) was created in 1995 by a number of civic leaders
with a vision for the future of the region’s economy. These leaders
believed that the great ideas generated at the region’s research in-
stitutions could be commercialized to build a new economy for the
region and create jobs for the region’s people. Since its inception,
the CET life sciences incubator facility has demonstrated that this
belief could become reality. Since 1998 when the first building
opened, 33 companies originally nurtured at CET have created 457
direct jobs, obtained $875 million in funding, including $597 million
while at CET, collaborated with 85 faculty at local universities and
more than 100 research institutions outside St. Louis, had a busi-
ness and/or research relationship with 92 companies in the United
States, Europe and Asia, and received financing from 38 venture
capital funds located in St. Louis and other parts of the country.
                                                                           Stereotaxis, CET graduate.



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     CET is the only incubator in the region serving bio-
     tech/medical instrument /device companies and non-
     medical engineering and advanced information tech-
     nology companies. The Center is noted for innovative
     leveraging of funding to create one of the best
     equipped and flexible incubator facilities in the country.
     CET provides specialized facilities, knowledgeable
     support services, entrepreneur training programs, and
     access to capital needed to establish and develop next
     generation medical and advanced technology compa-
     nies. Tenants have access to shared office and re-
     search equipment, conference rooms, high-speed tele-
     communications and individual spaces that are custo-
     mized for their specific research and business needs.         Orion Genomics, current CET tenant.


     CET currently occupies two rehabilitated buildings
     in the City’s Central West End, along a research
     corridor between the region’s premier universities,
     with ready access to a variety of sources of re-
     search excellence. 92,000 square feet of incuba-
     tor/accelerator space is located in the current facility—
     the current facility will not support the development of
     any additional laboratory space.

     Industry data indicates that the amount of potential
     commercialization from three local research universities
                                                                      Singulex, current CET tenant.
     could be significantly increased with the availability of
     additional incubator/accelerator space, in particular wet
     laboratory space.

     Description: CET is poised to construct a new
     60,000 square foot building, with wet laboratory space
     occupying sixty percent of the new structure. Pilot
     plant facilities will also be located in the new structure.
     Building III plans also include a specialized area desig-
                                                                         Existing CET facility.
     nated exclusively for startups that just move off univer-
     sity campuses because they have received a Phase I SBIR grant, a proof‐of‐concept
     grant from a commercialization fund, and/or have been accepted as a BioGenerator
     company. With space for ten startup companies, this specialized area will fill a current
     void in the region’s continuum of incubator/accelerator facilities.

     Working with CORTEX, the governing board for the City’s life sciences business park
     across the street, CET has acquired the land necessary for the development of this
     Building III. Phase I of the Building III project includes construction of the shell and core
     of the structure and provide tenant finish for 50% of the interior—the remainder of the
     interior will receive tenant finish as particular tenants are selected to occupy the space.


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Specific Quality of Life
Enhancements/Outcomes/
Benefits: Expansion of the Center for
Emerging Technologies will allow additional
researchers at local universities and other
research institutions to turn research into
businesses and permanent jobs. Expansion
will also make possible the development of
products that will improve the quality of med-              EXISTING CET CAMPUS
ical care with cost-effective and efficient solu-
tions to today’s issues.

Project Cost: $10 million (total cost
$18.5 million; $8.5 million from other
sources)

Job Creation:
   Construction: 600 jobs
   Permanent: An estimated 150 perma-
   nent jobs will be created when the build-
   ing is complete.

Political Jurisdictions:
   Congressional District: 1
   City Ward(s):           17
                                                            ABOVE: Site plan and floor plans.
Community Support:                                         BELOW: Renderings--CET Expansion.


    Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
    Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward
    State Senator Robin Wright Jones
    State Representative Rachel Storch
    Saint Louis University
    Washington University Medical Center
    University of Missouri—St. Louis
    CORTEX

Project Status/Schedule:
   Design: Design development drawings
               complete.
   Construction Start: May, 2009
   Completion: December, 2010




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                                 Rendering—proposed new CET expansion.


     Green Features:          The Building III Project has been designed to incorporate a
     number of green features, including energy saving features and the use of renewable
     and Missouri originated construction materials. LEED Silver certification will be
     sought—silver is generally the highest designation level available for wet lab buildings.


     Education Impacts:           Overall, the project will strengthen the connections be-
     tween education and research and business development—this facility will help to at-
     tract new educators and researchers to the region’s universities. Extensive individual
     services and training program for technology entrepreneurs will be expanded within the
     full CET environment.

     Contact Information:
           Name:             Marcia Mellitz
           Title:            Executive Director, Center for Emerging Technologies
           E-Mail:           mmellitz@emergingtech.org
           Cell Phone:       314-640-5830
           Telephone:        314-615-6903




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                     CONVENTION CENTER
                ENERGY & IMAGE IMPROVEMENTS

Project Type:          Energy Block Grant




             America’s Center entry and exhibition space.



“Change We Need”:                  America’s Center, owned by
the City of St. Louis and governed by a Convention and
Visitors Commission with representatives from St. Louis
City and County, is the region’s major convention facility.
The Center has more than two million square feet of exhibit
and meeting space. It is a significant economic engine for
the region: its conventions, business meetings and other
events create a wide variety and large number of hospitali-
ty-related private jobs in hotels, restaurants, and transpor-
tation facilities as well as in the Center itself. Union work-
ers specializing in tradeshows (carpenters, teamsters, de-
corators, electricians, stagehands, projectionists, house-
keeping and food service), companies that provide servic-
es for events such as audio-visual firms, florists, tradeshow
decorators, event organizers and others are all employed
at the Center, either directly or via contract. It is very im-
portant to the region’s economy that America’s Center re-
main competitive. Many of the items in the Center’s physi-
cal plant are original to the building’s 1977 construction,
when energy conservation and sustainability were not yet
concerns. HVAC equipment, electrical systems, kitchen
equipment, and other building elements are not energy ef-
                                                                  ABOVE: Energy wasting obsolete
ficient. Further, normal “wear and tear” over the building’s      mechanical equipment includes
30 years of life has created many gaps in heating and cool-        chiller, air handler, emergency
                                                                          generator, boilers.
ing coverage, and many of the Center’s finishes are worn

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     out. Further, the Center does not meet the LEED certification standards that many or-
     ganizations now seek as they choose meeting/convention locations.

              AMERICA’S CENTER                                                                       The leadership in energy and environmental design
             LEED IMPROVEMENTS:                                                                      (“LEED”) Green Building Rating System is the nation-
              WORK ITEMS/COSTS                                                                       ally accepted benchmark for the design, construction
                                 WORK ITEM
                                                                     ESTIMATED
                                                                       COST            SUBTOTAL      and operation of high-performance green buildings.
                                                                                                     LEED certification provides independent third party
     I. Interior Renovations
     A. Lobbies/ Prefunction
     1. Replace Carpets                                                  360,000


                                                                                                     verification that a building is environmentally respon-
     2. Repaint Walls and Ceilings                                       300,000
     3. Acoustical Ceiling Panels/ Treatment Ballroom Prefu nction       275,000
     4. Replace Water Fou ntains                                          35,000

                                                                                                     sible and a healthy place to live and work. LEED for
     5. Replace Sound System Sp eakers (20 years old )                    85,000
     6. Replace Sound System in Second Floor Atriu m                      60,000
     7. Replace Sprinkler H ead s (Covers)                               150,000
     8. Replace Lennox Stairs
     9. Replace Atriu m Skylight
     10. Rep lace Washington Lobby & Gallery Flooring
                                                                          50,000
                                                                       1,300,000
                                                                       3,000,000
                                                                                                     existing buildings provides a benchmark for building
     Subtotal:
     B. Meeting Rooms
     1. Replace Carpets                                                  360,000
                                                                                   $     5,615,000
                                                                                                     owners and operators to measure operations im-
     2. Repair/ Rep lace Operable Walls
     3. Replace Ceiling Tiles
     4. Replace/ Up grad e Floor Boxes
                                                                       1,650,000
                                                                         425,000
                                                                          50,000
                                                                                                     provements and maintenance on a consistent scale
     5. Replace 100-106 Airw alls
     6. Repaint Walls
                                                                         525,000
                                                                         360,000                     with the goal of maximizing operational efficiency
                                                                                                     while minimizing environmental impacts. Areas of im-
     7. Replace Dimm able Lighting                                       300,000
     8. Replace Ball Room Curtains and Lighting                          250,000
     9. Replace Sprinkler H ead s                                        165,000


                                                                                                     provement focus on energy efficiency, water efficien-
     10. Rep lace Sou nd System Speakers                                 150,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $     4,235,000
     C. Halls


                                                                                                     cy, green cleaning systems, and operations, mainten-
     1. Replace Tectu m Panels                                           250,000
     2. Paint Walls and Up p er Steel                                    550,000
     3. Up grad e Floor Boxes and Covers                                 700,000

                                                                                                     ance and upgrade costs once the project is complete.
     4. Renovate Restrooms and Mop Rooms                               1,100,000
     5. Repair/ Rep lace Operable Walls                                  500,000
     6. Repair Concrete Slabs                                          2,000,000
     7. Replace Smoke Fans
     8. Renovate Concession Stand s/ Equ ip ment
     9. Weatherp roof Overhead Doors
                                                                         175,000
                                                                       1,100,000
                                                                          30,000
                                                                                                     Green buildings can significantly reduce greenhouse
     10. Rep lace Sp eakers
     11. Rep air Rep lace Overhead Doors
     12. Upgrad e / Ad d Cameras to CCTV System
                                                                         250,000
                                                                         550,000
                                                                          50,000
                                                                                                     emissions and energy dependence.
     13. Soffit Lighting at H all Entry's                                 30,000
     14. Water Fou ntains                                                 50,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $     7,335,000
     D. Back of House
     1. Up grad e Kitchen/ Comm issaries and Pantries                  2,650,000
     2. Rep lace Show Comp ressors                                       100,000
     3. Service Corrid or                                              2,000,000
     4. Repaint Walls and Replace Ceiling Tiles                          120,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $     4,870,000

     II. Exterior Renovations
     1. Replace Bad Sid ew alks and Cu rbs                               150,000
     2. Reglaze/ Rep aint Canop ies                                      135,000
     3. Up grad e Signage                                                 30,000
     4. Refinish Washington Drivew ay                                     90,000
     5. Clean/ Seal Lim estone and brick                                 300,000
     6. Clean Granite and Bricks on Washington                            35,000
     7. Replace 7th Street Canop ies                                      25,000
     8. Ad d Lighting to Cou rtyard                                       25,000
     9. Cau lk / Tuckp oint Joints                                       450,000
     10. Upgrad e Exterior Bu ild ing Lighting                            60,000
     11. Upgrad e CCTV Cap abilities                                     100,000
     12. Rep lace Trash Com pactors and Op erators                       150,000
     13. Rep lace Roofs/ Sou thern Exp ansion                          1,950,000
     14. Rep lace Dock Seals                                              30,000
     15. Upgrad e Marquees to LED                                        350,000
     16. Weatherp roof Doors                                              40,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $     3,920,000
     III. FF&E
     1. Replace Tables, Chairs, Stages and Carts                       1,200,000
     2. Replace Trash Cans                                                80,000
     3. Replace Dance floor                                              100,000
     4. Replace Convention Center Portable Bleachers                     250,000
     5. Small Stages, Step s and Rails                                   100,000
     6. Purchase N ew Snow Rem oval Equ ip m ent                         100,000
     7. Purchase N ew Portable Box Offices                                25,000
     8. Purchase N ew Bike Racks, Tensabarriers, Sign H old ers           30,000
     9. Food / Beverage Kitchen Concession Stand s/ Portables          1,600,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $     3,485,000
     IV. MEP Systems
     1. Replace Steam Chillers                                         5,000,000
     2. Replace Emergency Generators and Transfer Sw itch                500,000
     3. Infrared Scan all Electrical Equ ip ment                          50,000
     4. Reinsu late All Internal/ External Pip ing                       175,000
     5. Replace N ortel w ith Cisco Data System                          500,000
     6. Phone System Upgrad es - N ew / Rep lace                         350,000
     7. Fire Protection System Pip ing/ Plu mbing Major                2,750,000
     8. Expand ed Electrical Metering                                    375,000
     9. H VAC monitoring, controls and filters                           750,000
     10. Rep lace Roof Exhau st Fans                                     600,000
     Subtotal:                                                                     $    11,050,000
     Total Estimated Cost:                                                         $ 40,510,000
     Miscellaneous
     1. Contingency (10%)                                              4,051,000
     2. Design (7%)                                                    3,119,270
     3. Constru ction Managem ent (3%)                                 1,336,830
     4. Insu rance, License & Perm its (5%)                            2,228,050
     Total Miscellaneous:                                                          $    10,735,150
     Total Project Cost:                                                           $ 51,245,150




                                                                                                                                   ABOVE AND LEFT: Obsolete,
                                                                                                                                     deteriorated and energy-
                                                                                                                                    inefficient “back of house”
                                                                                                                                   facilities, including kitchen
                                                                                                                                    equipment, walk-in cooler,
                                                                                                                                   catering equipment, service
                                                                                                                                             plumbing.




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Description:            This project will make improvements to the region’s primary conven-
tion facility that will bring the facility up to LEED existing building standards. The work
will also result in improved aesthetics that will improve the Center’s image and attrac-
tiveness, making it more marketable. Above is a list that details work needed to make
this facility viable for LEED certification. These improvements will have an extremely
positive impact on energy use and efficiency in this two million square foot facility. The
upgrades will also provide a healthier environment for the 700 full and part-time people
who work in the facility as well as the more than one million citizens who attend events,
meetings and conventions in the building each year.

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
This project will have the following specific benefits and outcomes:

   This facility supports 700 full and part-time direct jobs
    and thousands of other private hospitality jobs in the
    St. Louis region that are directly dependent on out-of-
    town visitors. With these improvements, the Center
    can remain competitive, the Center’s bookings will be
    stable, and the thousands of jobs supported by the
    Center will be preserved.
   There is strong demand, both nationally and interna-
    tionally, for facilities that are LEED certified. If LEED
    status can be achieved for America’s Center, national
    and international bookings for meetings and conven-
    tions should grow.
   LEED-related improvements will result in a more
    energy-efficient Center, with lower annual operating
    costs. Funds saved in operations can be used for
    other programs that help the Center fulfill its potential.
   These improvements will also result in a healthier,
    more comfortable facility for workers in the facility and
    for those who visit the Center for meetings, conven-
    tions, and events.


                                                                  ABOVE: 30+ year old obsolete
                                                                 restrooms with no water-saving
                                                                 or energy efficient plumbing and
                                                                          light fixtures.




                                                                 LEFT: Proposed restroom
                                                                 improvements will include
                                                                   LEED standard toilets,
                                                                   urinals, sinks and light
                                                                           fixtures.




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     Project Cost:       $51.2 million

     Job Creation:
                                              BELOW AND RIGHT: Damaged,
        Construction: 1,537 jobs              deteriorated, energy-inefficient
        Permanent: Improvements                acoustical elements, movable
                                              walls, skylights, concrete floor,
        will preserve 700 jobs at Ameri-        electrical boxes, fire safety
                                                   elements and lighting.
        ca’s Center and thousands of
        private jobs in the region’s hos-
        pitality industry.

     Political Jurisdictions:
        Congressional District: 1
        City Ward(s): 7

     Community Support:
        Francis Slay, Mayor,
           City of St. Louis
        St. Louis Convention & Visitors
           Commission
        Partnership for Downtown
           St. Louis
        Phyllis Young, Alderwoman,
           7th Ward, City of St. Louis

     Project Status/Schedule:
        Design: Design completed.
        Construction Start: March, 2009
        Completion: December, 2010

     Green Features:           Primary purpose of the project is to earn LEED Existing Build-
     ing Certification for America’s Center. Green design, purchasing, operations and main-
     tenance considerations will be considered at every step in order to attain that status.

     Education Impacts:            N/A

     Contact Information:
           Name:             Kathleen Ratcliffe
           Title:            CEO, St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission
           E-Mail:           kratcliffe@explorestlouis.com
           Cell Phone:       504-554-1569
           Telephone:        314-992-0600



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                               GREEN ALLEYS
Project Type:     Energy Block Grant

                                       “Change We Need”:                Combined
                                       sewer overflows are a big problem for the St.
                                       Louis region--in many older cities, stormwater
                                       and sanitary (household) waste both run into
                                       the same sewer system. During times of
                                       heavy rain, large volumes of stormwater run
                                       down the City’s 600 linear miles of alley and
                                       into the combined sewer system. During pe-
                                       riods of heavy rain, the antiquated sewer sys-
                                       tem in the City and in some parts of St. Louis
                                       County is unable to handle the heavy volume
                                       of water. As a result, sewage backups occur
                                       in residential and other basements, and un-
                                       treated sewage overflows into the Mississippi
                                       River. Further, the water running down the
                                       City’s alleys carries a variety of pollutants that
                                       must be treated before flowing back into the
                                       Mississippi River. The Environmental Protec-
                                       tion Agency has cited the Metropolitan Sewer
                                       District for this problem, and environmental
                                       advocates are also very concerned about
                                       these issues.




        Typical City alleys.
                                                    ABOVE: Alley drainage system.




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      The City has designed three “green alley”
      systems that will help address this problem,
      modeled after systems the City of Chicago is
      now using. The "green alleys” not only filter
      the water before it hits the sewer system but
      detain the water in porous substrates under
      permeable pavement so that it takes more
      time for the water to get into the sewers --the
      longer it takes, the less likely it is that the
      sewers will overflow.

      Description:        This project will make it
      possible to expand the City’s green alley
      demonstration from the original three blocks
      to approximately 150 city blocks. The work
      will replace “standard” alley pavements (now
      a combination of deteriorated concrete, brick
      and asphalt) with permeable substrates and
      one of three types of permeable pave-
      ments—permeable asphalt, permeable con-
      crete, or pavers.

      Specific Quality of Life
      Enhancements/Outcomes/
      Benefits: This project will have the fol-
      lowing specific benefits and outcomes:

         The new “green” alleys will reduce
          stormwater runoff by capturing peak
          flows and allowing runoff to gradually                   ABOVE: How permeable alley paving
                                                                            systems work.
          percolate into the sewer system. Sub-
          stantially increasing the number of al-
          leys that are designed to capture rain-
          water will reduce the likelihood that the
          combined storm/sanitary sewer system
          will overflow.
         New alley systems will reduce alley
          maintenance and re-paving costs—
          standing water will be minimized,
          reducing the impacts of freeze-thaw
          cycles on alley pavement. Further, per-
          vious alleys can be “restored” with bi-
          annual vacuuming, pressure washing
          and infrequent replacement of porous
          grout.
         Reducing standing water in alleys will            ABOVE: Standard asphalt ponding vs. porous
                                                                  asphalt permeabililty effects.
          also reduce dangers of icing in winter.


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   Water flowing back into rivers will be
    cleaner—the soil chemistry and biology
    “treat” water naturally and reduce the le-
    vels of “first flush” pollutants—oil, fertiliz-
    er, anti-freeze—that enter the sewer sys-
    tem and rivers.
   The new pavement surfaces will minim-
    ize heat pollution.
   These types of “green” alleys are EPA-
    recognized Best Management Practices.
   Implementation of this additional sustai-               ABOVE: Heat sink reduction impacts—
    nability measure will attract new busi-                  permeable pavements vs. .standard.

    nesses and residents seeking environ-
    ment-friendly locations.

Project Cost:         $30 million

Job Creation:
  Construction:          900 jobs
  Permanent:             N/A

Political Jurisdictions:
  Congressional District: 1 & 3
  City Ward(s): All wards
                                                        Pervious Concrete        Conventional Asphalt
Community Support:
  Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
  Various Aldermen
  St. Louis Green Building Council
  Metropolitan Sewer District
  Various neighborhood residents                         TOP: Installatiion of pervious asphalt.
                                                      BOTTOM: Typical concrete parking lot (right)
                                                        vs. pervious concrete parking lot (left).
Project Status/Schedule:
  Design: Design completed.
  Construction Start: March, 2009
  Completion: December, 2010

Green Features: Primary purpose of the project is to reduce combined
storm/sanitary sewer overflows.

Education Impacts:              N/A




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      Contact Information:
              Name:                 Marjorie Melton
              Title:                President, City of St. Louis Board of Public Service
              E-Mail:               meltonm@stlouiscity.com
              Cell Phone:           314-471-5570
              Telephone:            314-622-4143

                       BELOW: Recent St. Louis Post-Dispatch article on City’s green alley initiative.



      St. Louis Post-Dispatch Along for the Ride Column: An Alley-Oop:
      Soon, They May Help Keep Our Water Clean
      Sunday, August 17, 2008 11:53 AM


      By Elisa Crouch and Ken Leiser, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

      Aug. 17--They rarely, if ever, trigger an image of eco-friendliness.

      We're talking about alleys -- sometimes the place to find an antique dresser
      but more often a place to dump bacon grease. And now, they're being used
      in an experiment to improve the environment.

      The city of St. Louis is about to put down pervious pavement in three alleys
      to see how well it keeps storm water from ending up in rivers. Pervious
      pavement is material that allows water to seep through the alley and into
      the soil, where pollutants like oil and fertilizer are filtered out.

      St. Louis has about 600 miles of alleys, all of which contribute to the gigantic
      problem created by anything paved -- parking lots, roads and driveways.

      During rain storms and snow melts, water is directed to storm drains in the
      center of the alley, carrying all kinds of nasty stuff with it. In a downpour,
      the runoff overpowers storm sewers, bypasses treatment facilities and pol-
      lutes waterways. (Often, the mucky water ends up in basements.) This ru -
      off is such a problem that the Environmental Protection Agency successfully
      sued the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District over the issue.

      Alleys have always served a purpose. Now, they hold the potential for reduc-
      ing the area's storm water problem.

      "If we can help out, we improve the water quality for everybody who has to
      use the river," said Marjorie Melton, president of the Board of Public Service.

      Before next spring, three different kinds of porous pavement will go down in
      alleys in the Compton Heights area, off Henrietta Street, Geyer Avenue and
      Cardinal Avenue. The cost is about $560,000, paid for through donations
      and grants from organizations, Melton said. No city money is involved. City
      workers are collecting data now to determine next year if the new surfaces
      work.

      So far, they're working in Chicago. The city is retrofitting many of its alleys
      with porous pavement to reduce the runoff that pollutes Lake Michigan.


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  TUCKER BOULEVARD BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION
Project Type:           Metro Streets and Roads/Public Safety

“Change We Need”:               Tucker Bou-
                   th
levard, formerly 12 Street, is one of the
major entrances to downtown St. Louis.
Tucker is also a major north-south thorough-
fare that connects to major arterials serving
both north and south St. Louis. With the
construction of the New Mississippi River
Bridge, scheduled to begin in 2010, Tucker
will become an important entranceway from
Illinois into downtown.

The current bridge, built in 1931, lies above
an underground railway system that pre-             Deteriorated bridge structure shoring above;
viously served buildings adjacent to the                deteriorated expansion joint below.
bridge—the railway tracks have now been
abandoned. Although a series of temporary
repairs have been made over the past two
decades, the bridge structure has deteri-
orated to point where it no longer can safely
carry vehicular loads of any sort. A signifi-
cant portion of the bridge has been closed
completely; lane closures have been insti-
tuted on the remainder of the bridge.
These closures have made travel difficult for
people living north of the bridge and have
caused business located adjacent to the
bridge inconvenience, increased travel
times, and loss of commerce.

Description: This project will remove
this seriously deficient bridge and replace it
with new fill and structure, eliminating the need for further costly temporary repairs and
restoring the full use of the roadway. A companion project will link the new Tucker
Bridge to the new Interstate 70 Bridge across the Mississippi River, allowing traffic to di-
rectly enter the heart of the downtown St. Louis commercial district.




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                         Approach to Tucker Bridge looking south from Cass Avenue.


      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      This project will incorporate features that make the bridge safe for pedestrians and bi-
      cyclists—bicycles are an increasingly popular transportation mode in the City of St.
      Louis. The project will also address a major safety hazard in a planned, controlled
      manner—if the bridge suffers further deterioration, businesses along this major arterial
      will experience further disruption resulting in loss of jobs and revenue.

      Project Cost:       $38 million

      Job Creation:
            Construction: 1,100 jobs
            Permanent:    Preserves permanent
                                 jobs accessed by bridge;
                                 makes further business
                                 development possible
                                 adjacent to bridge

      Political Jurisdictions:                                       Failing expansion joing above;
                                                                   Biddle Street bridge closure below.
            Congressional District: 1
            City Ward(s):           5

      Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            April Ford Griffin, Alderwoman, 5th Ward
            East West Gateway Council of Governments
            Residents of areas north of the bridge
            Businesses located north of and adjacent to bridge

      Project Status/Schedule:
            Design: Preliminary design complete; construction documents in progress
            Construction Start Date: May, 2009
            Completion: December, 2010


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Green Features:             New lighting will
conform to International Dark-Sky Associa-
tion protocols and will meet with Energy Star
standards with LED luminaires (may be solar
in some areas). Stormwater management
features will reduce runoff and help reduce
likelihood of combined sewer overflows, and
reconstruction on fill will allow the Metropoli-
tan Sewer District to improve pumping sys-
tems at lower cost. Existing steel will be re-
cycled. Existing concrete will be crushed and
reincorporated into project as base and ag-
gregate.

Education Impacts: N/A
Contact Information:
       Name:              William Early                   Deteriorated sidewalks above bridge at
       Title:             Engineer, City                           Washington Avenue.

                          Board of Public Service
       E-Mail:            earlyw@stlouiscity.com
       Cell Phone:
       Telephone: 314-589-6066




        Deteriorated sidewalk, deteriorated           Deteriorated sidewalks at expansion joint
         expansion joing and lane closure.                      w/vertical separation.




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       I-70 MISSISSIPPI RIVER BRIDGE EXTENSION
Project Type:        Highway/Metro Streets

“Change We Need”:               The Mis-
souri and Illinois Departments of Trans-
portation have embarked on the construc-
tion of a new bridge spanning the Missis-
sippi River immediately north of down-
town St. Louis. The new bridge design
does not, however, provide appropriate
connections to either downtown or the
neighborhoods north of the bridge—the
new DOT bridge design terminates in a
“T” intersection at Cass Avenue. This
project will construct extensions into the
heart of downtown from Cass to Tucker
Boulevard and from the ramp at Cass to
North Florissant, ensuring that the new
bridge enhances transportation options in-
to downtown St. Louis and development
potential in surrounding neighborhoods.

Specific Quality of                ADDS NEW ENHANCEMENTS
Life Enhancements/                 TO DOT BASIC STREET
                                   MODIFICATIONS
Outcomes/Benefits:
An exit ramp design that care-
fully and effectively delivers
bridge traffic into both the
downtown area and the devel-
opment area to the north of the
bridge will enhance the bridge’s
effectiveness as a critical part
of Missouri’s surface transpor-
                                                                         N
tation system and enhance de-                                    O
                                                                     W
                                                             T
velopment opportunities in the                       W
                                                         N
                                                DO
vicinity of the bridge.                     O                                ADDS NEW
                                        T
                                                                             CONNECTIONS NOT IN-
Project Cost:       $23 million                                              CLUDED IN DOT PLANS




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      Job Creation:
             Construction: 730 jobs
             Permanent: An undetermined number of jobs will be created as the neigh-
             borhoods north of and adjacent to the new bridge are developed as a result of
             the new connections

      Political Jurisdictions:
             Congressional District: 1
             City Ward(s):           5 (also benefits 6th and 7th wards encompassing
                                             significant parts of downtown)

      Community Support:
             Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
             April Ford Griffin, Alderwoman, 5th Ward, City of St. Louis
             Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward, City of St. Louis

      Project Status/Schedule:
             Design: Conceptual design completed and agreed upon by all parties; final
             design/construction to be undertaken w/design-build process
             Construction Start Date: October, 2008
             Completion: December, 2010

      Green Features:           Project will encourage high-density urban development, mini-
      mizing transportation/travel costs; project will encourage rehabilitation of existing build-
      ings—rehabilitation is inherently “green”. Lighting will comply with “dark sky” protocols;
      may be solar.

      Contact Information:
             Name:             Otis Williams
             Title:            Deputy Director, St. Louis Development Corporation
             E-Mail:           williamsot@stlouiscity.com
             Cell Phone:       314-402-8475
             Telephone:        314-622-3400 Ext. 269




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SOUTH KINGSHIGHWAY BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION

Project Type:        Metro Streets and Roads/Public Safety

“Change We Need”:
Kingshighway Boulevard is one of the
City’s major north-south arterials, and
one of the few arterials that spans the
entire City from north to south. This
arterial is also a major bus route and
allows residents throughout the City to
access the retail and other businesses
along Kingshighway. The South King-
shighway bridge over the Union Pacif-
ic rail tracks is a critical link in this ma-
jor City transportation system compo-
nent. The bridge experienced one
partial failure in the late 1980s—
repairs were made but underlying conditions that precipitated failure remain; the bridge
also appears to have suffered additional damage in the July, 2008, minor earthquake.
All components of the existing bridge has been rated as seriously deficient—to tempora-
rily address these deficiencies while allowing the bridge to remain in use, the City has
reduced the bridge’s load rating to 20 tons, much less than the load limits for the re-
mainder of the arterial. In addition, the bridge has no pedestrian walkways and narrow
lanes that make bicycling dangerous, and provides motorists with very poor visibility due
to the structure’s slope.




Description:       This project will remove this seriously deficient bridge and replace it
with a new structure.




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      Specific Quality of Life Enhance-
      ments/Outcomes/Benefits: This project will
      incorporate features that make the bridge safe for pede-
      strians and bicyclists—bicycles are an increasingly pop-
      ular transportation mode in the City. Project will also
      address major safety hazard in planned, controlled
      manner—if bridge suffers further deterioration or unanti-
      cipated collapse, businesses along this major arterial
      will experience disruption and loss of jobs and revenue.

      Project Cost:       $17 million

      Job Creation:
         Construction:     510 jobs
         Permanent: Preserves jobs accessed by bridge

      Political Jurisdictions:
         Congressional District: 3
         City Ward(s):           8, 10

      Community Support:
         Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
         Stephen Conway, Alderman, 8th Ward
         Joseph Vollmer, Alderman, 10th Ward

      Project Status/Schedule:
         Design: Feasibility study complete;
         bid documents complete November, 2009
         Construction Start Date: November, 2009
         Completion: December, 2010

      Green Features: New lighting will conform to International Dark-Sky Association
      protocols and will meet with Energy Star standards with LED luminaires (may be solar in
      some areas). Stormwater management features will reduce runoff and help reduce like-
      lihood of combined sewer overflows. Existing steel will be recycled. Existing concrete
      will be crushed and reincorporated into project as base and aggregate.

      Contact Information:
            Name:             William Early
            Title:            Engineer, City Board of Public Service
            E-Mail:           earlyw@stlouiscity.com
            Telephone:        314-589-6066


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                 I-55 AT TUCKER/GRAVOIS
         INTERSTATE HIGHWAY RAMP RELOCATION
            FOR RETAIL CENTER DEVELOPMENT

Project Type:              Highway Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                   The
                                                    Additional anchor store       Relocated ramp location
former Darst Webbe high-rise public                   dependent on ramp
                                                           relocation
housing development has now been
transformed into a mixed-income                  HOPE VI
HOPE VI low-rise development; City
Hospital, more than 30 years vacant
and vandalized, has now been trans-               CITY HOSPITAL
formed into residential condominiums,
most of which are now sold and occu-             Walgreens ready to start
pied. Over the past 30 years, the adja-
cent neighborhoods of Lafayette                  New Retail Center Development at I-55/Tucker/Lafayette
Square, Soulard and LaSalle Park
have been almost completely revita-
                                                                          CITY HOSPITAL      HOPE VI
lized. The most significant missing                 Relocated ramp
piece linking all of these successful re-               location
vitalization initiatives is quality main-
stream retail development.
                                                                                                   LASALLE
                                                                                                    PARK
Gilded Age Renovation, developer of
both City Hospital and a number of
rehabilitations and new constructions in                                                     Existing ramp
                                                                                             to be removed
Lafayette Square, also controls the re-
tail site to the south of City Hospital. A
retail complex is planned for this site,            Aerial photograph of I-55/Tucker/Lafayette interchange
and the construction of a Walgreens is



   LEFT: City Hospital
  before rehabilitation.
  RIGHT: City Hospital
     rehabilitated as
       residential
     condominiums.




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      ready to commence on the northwest corner.
      Development of the remainder of the com-
      plex, however, requires relocation of the “clo-
      verleaf” exit ramp from southbound I-55 that
      now directs exiting traffic west along Gravois.
      This ramp relocation will coordinate this exit
      with the recently completed ramp and exit
      modifications for northbound I-55 that were
      completed as a part of the Truman Parkway
      construction. Equally important, the relo-
      cated ramp’s more efficient design will make           ABOVE: Completed King Lewis Square/
                                                           Darst-Webbe HOPE VI development that will
      excess property available to complete the re-                be served by retail center.
                                                        BELOW: Aerial view of retail site w/existing ramps.
      tail center—plans for its completion include a
      grocery store and smaller shops with office
      space above.

      Description:         This economic recovery
      project will relocate the I-55/Tucker/Gravois
      southbound exit ramp to provide a direct
      connection from the interstate into the La-
      fayette Square neighborhood and to the new
      retail center. The new ramp configuration will
      also match this exit to the northbound exit
      from I-55 developed in 2003 as part of the
      Truman Parkway construction.

      Specific Quality of Life
      Enhancements/Outcomes/
      Benefits: This economic recovery
      project will make completion of the new retail center to serve residents of the HOPE VI
      and City Hospital developments and the Lafayette Square, Soulard and LaSalle Park
      neighborhoods possible.

      Project Cost:        $4.5 million

      Job Creation:
             Construction:        135
             Permanent:           Retail center completion will create minimum of 30 new jobs

      Political Jurisdictions:
             Congressional District:          1
             City Ward(s):                    6, 7




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Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      Kacie Starr Triplett, Alderwoman, 6th Ward
      Phyllis Young, Alderwoman, 7th Ward
      Residents of surrounding neighborhoods

Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Construction documents in progress.
      Construction Start Date: May, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010

Green Features: Completion of the retail center will allow residents of five
neighborhoods to purchase basic retail products close to home, thereby reducing travel
and energy consumption. In addition, more residents will be able to walk or bicycle to
shopping opportunities.

Education Impacts:          This project supports preservation of the City’s history by
adding modern amenities to historically significant neighborhoods.

Contact Information:
      Name:            Chris Goodson
      Title:           Partner, Gilded Age Renovation
      E-Mail:          chris@gildedage.com
      Cell Phone:      314-630-6817
      Telephone:       314-241-0811




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   LOUGHBOROUGH BRIDGE EXPANSION OVER I-55
Project Type:       Metro Streets and Roads/Public Safety

“Change We Need”:                 The Loughborough Avenue bridge connects Interstate 55
to one of the City’s few full-service shopping centers—Loughborough Commons,
opened in 2007. Soon, the bridge will also provide primary access from I-55 to a new
City-owned “recplex” currently under construction in Carondelet Park. At present, the
bridge is only four lanes wide. One of the four lanes must be used as a left turn queuing
lane for entrance into Loughborough Commons, southwest of the bridge. Due to the
large number of left turns into the shopping center, traffic backs up across the bridge
onto the interstate, creating a dangerous condition.




                     Loughborough Bridge, looking west from I-55 overpass.


Description:       This project widens the bridge to provide sufficient queuing space to
eliminate congestion, thereby supporting the retail development and removing a dan-
gerous safety condition.




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      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
      This project will add a lane to this bridge to reduce queuing backup onto I-55 at times of
      significant shopping center and recplex activity. This traffic enhancement will reduce
      emissions by making it possible for customers to enter the shopping center and recplex
      more efficiently, reducing time spent idling in slow-moving queues. This expansion will
      also enhance quality of life for users of both the shopping center and the recplex by re-
      ducing travel times to shop and engage in recreational/fitness activities.

      Project Cost:        $1.5 million

      Job Creation:
            Construction: 45 jobs
            Permanent:    N/A

      Political Jurisdictions:
            Congressional District: 3
            City Ward(s):           11                       Bridge elevation from railroad tracks
                                                                       paralleling I-55.

      Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            Matt Villa, Alderman, 11th Ward
            The DESCO Group
            Schnuck’s Markets and other businesses in Loughborough Commons
            Neighborhood residents
            Recplex users

      Project Status/Schedule:
            Design: Final design and construction documents complete.
            Construction Start Date: April, 2009
            Completion: December, 2009

      Green Features:          N/A

      Education Impacts:             N/A

      Contact Information:
            Name:             William Early
            Title:            Engineer, City Board of Public Service
            E-Mail:           earlyw@stlouiscity.com
            Cell Phone:
            Telephone:        314-589-6066



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      COMPTON AVENUE BRIDGE REHABILITATION
Project Type:        Metro Streets and Roads/Public Safety

“Change We Need”:                The Compton
Avenue Bridge spans the Union Pacific rail-
road tracks immediately south of I-64. The
bridge is approximately 1,400 feet long—1/3
of a mile—and is deficient in many respects.
MoDOT has recently reconstructed the
bridge to the north over I-64; the City’s bridge
over the Union Pacific tracks has a much
lower load rating due to its deficiencies. To
establish a continuous roadway with consis-
tent load ratings, the deficiencies in the
Compton Avenue Bridge need to be ad-
dressed. Compton Avenue and its bridges
are major entranceways from both north and
south St. Louis to Saint Louis University, Har-
ris Stowe State University, and the Grand
Center Arts District.

Description: Unlike many bridges in
the City, the Compton Bridge’s existing su-
perstructure and much of the substructure
are in relatively good condition, although the
pavement needs major repair and replace-
ment. These conditions make rehabilitation
of the existing bridge both possible and cost-
effective. This project implements the reno-
vation of the Compton Avenue Bridge over
the Union Pacific railroad tracks.




                                                       TOP: View looking south from Market St.
                                                    CENTER: Spalled/rusted concrete/reinforcement.
                                                         BOTTOM: Deteriorated substructure.
                                                      LEFT: East elevation looking west at tracks.




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      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/ Benefits:
      This project will renovate this deficient bridge and re-establish a continuous consistently
      load rated roadway serving Harris Stowe State University, Saint Louis University, and
      the Grand Center Arts District. Compton Avenue parallels Grand Avenue, the City’s
      most heavily traveled bus route, and is often
      used as an alternative to Grand Avenue
      when traffic on Grand is particularly heavy.
      Rehabilitation of this bridge at this point in its
      life cycle will cost significantly less than re-
      placing the entire bridge—replacement will
      be necessary in the future if renovation is de-
      ferred for a considerable length of time. Fur-
      ther, renovation can be completed within a
      much shorter time frame than complete re-
      placement, minimizing inconvenience to resi-              ABOVE: View of spalled/rusted
      dents, visitors and businesspeople.                 concrete/reinforcing from underneath bridge.
                                                            BELOW: Spalled beam w/rusted reinforcing.

      Project Cost:         $7 million

      Job Creation:
             Construction: 210 jobs
             Permanent:    N/A

      Political Jurisdictions:
             Congressional District: 1
             City Ward(s):           6, 19

      Community Support:
             Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
             Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward
             Marlene Davis, Alderwoman, 19th Ward
             Grand Center Inc.
             Saint Louis University
             Harris Stowe State University
             Residents of areas north and south of the bridge
             Businesses located north and south of and adjacent to bridge

      Project Status/Schedule:
             Design: Preliminary design complete; construction documents in progress
             Construction Start Date: July, 2009
             Completion: May, 2010




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Green Features:         Rehabilitation of the existing bridge saves energy and mate-
rials when compared to total reconstruction.

Education Impacts:             N/A

Contact Information:
      Name:              William Early
      Title:             Engineer, City Board of Public Service
      E-Mail:            earlyw@stlouiscity.com
      Cell Phone:
      Telephone:         314-589-6066




              Severely deteriorated concrete beam/column; rusted steel substructure.




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                                                                                                     121




                 REGIONAL WAYFINDING SYSTEM

Project Type:        Highway/Metro Street & Roads Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                Wayfinding allows us to put the right information in the
right place in order to provide travelers with an easy journey through a possibly difficult
environment. A comprehensive wayfinding program decreases accidents, removes
clutter from interchanges
and makes travel more effi-                ISSUES:
                                          EXISTING
cient in time and in energy        WAYFINDING SYSTEM
consumption—those who
get lost take far more time        BELOW AND RIGHT: Damaged &
                                      deteriorated downtown
and energy getting to their            wayfinding elements.
destinations via circuitous
routes than those who know
where they’re going and
how to get there. At pres-
ent, the region’s existing
wayfinding elements are
fragmented and in disrepair,
many wayfinding elements
contain erroneous informa-
tion that has not been                    BELOW: Inaccurate downtown wayfinding elements.
dated, and some major des-
tinations lack wayfinding
elements altogether.                                   SHOULD BE
                                                      “SCOTTRADE”


Description:         A colla-
boration of regional organi-
zations interested in better
                                                       SHOULD BE
wayfinding—St. Louis Con-                               DELETED

vention & Visitors Commis-                                                           SHOULD BE
                                                                                      CHANGED
sion, Missouri Department of
Transportation, Forest Park
Forever, Grand Center and
Laclede’s Landing—are in-
vesting $325,000 in design
of a regional wayfinding sys-
tem for St. Louis City and
                                    ABOVE: St. Louis Centre no      ABOVE: Busch Stadium recon-
County. It is intended that a      longer exists; Savvis Center       structed in new location—
significant portion of the           is now Scottrade Center.       directional arrow now wrong.




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      project be in place when the last piece of Interstate 64 reopens in December, 2009,
      ter two years of reconstruction work. The entire project, including design, manufac-
      ture and installation of system elements, will take 13 months. The project is ready to
      begin today.

      Elements of the program will include many levels of signage, all designed to make it
      easier for travelers to locate their destinations: “trailblazers” leading to the region,
      gateway signage, vehicular directional signs, and identification signs for public parking
      facilities, and street signs. Americans with Disabilities Act compliance issues will also
      be addressed. Signage elements will be designed, manufactured and installed.
      Selection criteria for signage materials—metals, coatings and other components—will
      include environmental and sustainability standards. .




                                                            Corbin Design, in association with
                                                               Vector Communications and
                                                                Crawford Bunte Braimeier,
                                                                   has been selected to
                                                                design the improvements.
                                                                   These are examples
                                                            of Corbin’s work in other regions.




      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      The new wayfinding system will correct many errors and inaccuracies in the existing
      fragmented system. The new system will be continuous and comprehensive and unify
      the design of wayfinding elements. A clear, correct wayfinding system will reduce travel
      time and aggravation for travelers, thereby reducing emissions and making it more likely
      that travelers will have a positive experience in the St. Louis region. The new system
      will also enhance the region’s image by eliminating broken and inaccurate signage and
      replacing it with accurate, well-designed, attractive elements that can be easily modified
      when destinations change.




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  Project Cost:         The total project cost is $2 million, but it is expected that up to $1
  million will be funded from non-federal sources—specific institutions and attractions
  wishing to be part of the wayfinding program will make contributions to the program’s
  budget. Examples of institutions and attractions that are expected to make such contri-
  butions are the following: Edward Jones Dome, America’s Center, Scottrade Center,
  Busch Stadium, and the St. Louis Zoo.

  Job Creation:                                  Community Support:
     Construction:         60 jobs                  Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
     Permanent:            N/A                      St. Louis Convention and Visitors
                                                        Commission
  Political Jurisdictions:                          Grand Center Inc.
                                                    Partnership for Downtown St. Louis
Congressional    District: 1, 2, 3                  Laclede’s Landing
City    Ward(s):           Various                  Forest Park Forever
                                                    Missouri Department of Transportation

  Project Status/Schedule:
     Design: Design in progress.
     Construction Start: April, 2009
     Completion: March, 2010

  Green Features:          Program will reduce gasoline consumption and auto emissions
  by making travel to destinations more efficient. Selection criteria for signage mate-
  rials—metals, coatings and other components—will include environmental and sustai-
  nability standards.

  Education Impacts: The new wayfinding system will demonstrate quality de-
  sign and material selection. In addition, the new system will include educational and
  cultural institutions that are not part of the existing fragmented system, enhancing
  access to these educational attractions.

  Contact Information:
         Name:             Kathleen Ratcliffe
         Title:            CEO, St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission
         E-Mail:           kratcliffe@explorestlouis.com
         Cell Phone:       504-554-1569
         Telephone:        314-992-0600




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      GRAND AVENUE METROLINK TRANSIT PLAZA
Project Type:          Transit Equipment and Infrastructure

                                                                “Change We Need”:
                                                                The Grand Avenue light rail stop
                                                                serves both Saint Louis
                                                                University and the Grand Center
                                                                Arts District, primary destinations
                                                                for people likely to use mass
                                                                transit. This light rail stop,
                                                                located a significant vertical
    Existing Conditions at Grand Avenue MetroLink Station       distance from Grand Avenue, is
                                                                plagued with elevators that are
                                                                often inoperable and discharge
                                                                onto a narrow, uneven broken
                                                                sidewalk, a lack of turnout room
                                                                that forces buses to pick up and
                                                                drop off passengers in active
                                                                traffic lanes, passenger routes
                                                                that force pedestrians to cross
                                                                light rail tracks, extremely poor
                                                                lighting, and a lack of off-street
                                                                parking that inhibits the station’s
                                                                utility. Many prospective light rail
                                                                passengers do not use the
                                                                station because they do not
                                                                perceive it as safe.

                                                             Grand Avenue is the City’s most
                                                             heavily traveled bus route; this
                                                             bus route intersects with light rail
                                                             under the Grand Avenue
                                                             Viaduct. The City of St. Louis is
     Aerial View—New Grand Avenue Viaduct at MetroLink       prepared to commence
                                                             reconstruction of the Grand
Avenue Viaduct and has the funding necessary for this reconstruction. However, in
order for the reconstructed viaduct to fulfill its potential as a major vehicular, mass
transit, pedestrian, and bicycle transportation asset and for the light rail station to most
effectively meet the needs of people with disabilities, the light rail station below the
bridge needs major improvements, and the elevators must be relocated and replaced.


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      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      This project will address the issues described above in the following ways:

          Replacement of elevators and relocation to appropriately safe position with
           respect to transit plaza/bridge.
          Improved accessibility for people with disabilities.
          Improved safety for all light rail passengers via enhanced station lighting/access.
          Improved bus access to the elevators.
          Development of a “Park and Ride” lot at the transit plaza.
          Improved passenger vehicle access to light rail station.
          Redesign of plaza to create opportunities for transit-oriented retail/other
           development.
          Encourage use of mass transit by patrons of Grand Center arts venues and
           students/faculty/workers/visitors at Saint Louis University.

      Project Cost:       $16.5 million

                          Proposed New Transit Plaza Under Grand Avenue Viaduct




      Job Creation:

             Construction: 510 jobs
             Permanent: An undetermined number of jobs will be created as transit
             oriented development made possible by these improvements occurs

      Political Jurisdictions:
             Congressional District: 1
             City Ward(s):           17 and 19



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Community Support:
       Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
       Bi-State/Metro Transit Agency
       East West Gateway Council of Governments
       Saint Louis University
       Grand Center Inc.
       Citizens for Modern Transit
       Disabilities Commissioner, City of St. Louis
       Marlene Davis, Alderwoman, 19th Ward, City of St. Louis
       Joseph Roddy, Alderman, 17th Ward, City of St. Louis

Project Status/Schedule:
       Design: Design Development Completed; Construction Drawings in Process
       Construction Start Date: February, 2009
       Completion: November, 2010

Green Features: Project will reduce passenger vehicle use by creating a safe,
attractive mass transit alternative, incorporate energy-efficient lighting that meets “dark
sky” protocols and incorporate bioswales for water infiltration that reduce threat of
combined sewer overflows.

Education Impacts:           The project will expand opportunities for access to Saint
Louis University and educational opportunities in the Grand Center Arts District.

Contact Information:
       Name:       Jeff Braun, Metro St. Louis
       E-Mail:     JBraun@metrostlouis.org
       Cell Phone:
       Telephone: 314-923-3064




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                  “LOOP” FIXED LANE TROLLEY:
                 DELMAR/DEBALIVIERE CORRIDOR

Project Type:         Transit Equipment and Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                  Delmar
Boulevard has historically been the dividing
line between the City’s African-American
north side and the Caucasian south side.
Thanks to a variety of public/private
partnership initiatives completed over the
past ten years, erasure of this “line” has
begun. This fixed-lane trolley transit
initiative will continue to knit the north and
south sides of the City together by
enhancing the success of this new,
emerging, unique and culturally diverse
retail district that spans University City and
                                                         ABOVE: Heavy Activity in Delmar Loop
the City of St. Louis: the trolley concept is            BELOW: Rendering of Heritage Trolley
the result of an engagement process
involving businesses in the area as well as
residents of the neighborhoods to the north
and south. The new multijurisdictional
trolley will also merge the University City
and City of St. Louis sections of the Loop—
an energetic, exciting retail district rooted in
the area’s historic commercial structures.

Further, this transit development will allow
the new businesses that line this stretch of
Delmar to survive the economic recession
by making these businesses easily
accessible to Washington University
students and faculty and visitors to the nation’s largest urban park as well as residents
of St. Louis City and County by connecting the region’s existing light rail system to the
Loop. The “Loop” is a shining example of urban economic recovery—the American
Planning Association recently named the Delmar Loop one of the “Ten Great Streets in
America." This project will ensure the Loop’s success and will also allow the success of
this “Loop” commercial district to progress further east. In addition, this project can be a
prototype for connecting the City’s neighborhoods with clean electric transit.



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      Description:         This project will construct a 2.2 mile single-track electric trolley line
      with double-tracked passing/turnaround zones as needed running within the existing
      street right of way along Delmar Boulevard from Trinity Avenue to Debaliviere Avenue,
      then southward along Debaliviere to the Missouri History Museum south of Lindell
      Boulevard. Trolleys using the track will be refurbished historic equipment. It is
      projected that 446,000 people will ride the trolley each year. The “Loop Trolley
      Company” has been formed as a non-profit corporation to design and operate the
      trolley.

             Loop Trolley Project Area Spanning City of St. Louis and University City in St. Louis County




      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      The “Loop Trolley” will make Delmar Boulevard a more attractive location for retail and
      other commercial facilities and generate new investment in the Trolley corridor,
      particularly along the eastern section of Delmar Boulevard and along DeBaliviere
      Avenue in the City of St. Louis. This new investment will increase property values in
      the corridor as well as in adjacent neighborhoods. The project will also generate
      increased sales and payroll tax revenues for the City and State of Missouri.

      The project also will provide a transit connection from the popular Loop area in
      University City to the light rail stations at Delmar Boulevard and Forest Park. This will
      help some commuters reach light rail stations more easily and increase tourism activity
      throughout the corridor.


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Project Cost:     $35 million


Job Creation:

     Construction: 1,057 jobs resulting from design/construction of trolley line
     Permanent: 30 new jobs per year through hiring of staff by commercial/retail
     establishments in the corridor; 70 new jobs per year through new trolley-induced
     construction

Political Jurisdictions:
     Congressional District: 1
     City Ward(s):           26/28

Community Support:
     Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
     Charlie Dooley, St. Louis County Executive
     Joe Adams, Mayor, University City
     University City City Council
     Frank Williamson, Alderman, 26th Ward, City of St. Louis
     Lyda Krewson, Alderwoman, 28" Ward, City of St. Louis
     University City Loop Special Business District Board
     Parkview Gardens Association Board
     Parkview Gardens Special Business District Board
     East Loop Parkview Gardens Special Business District Board
     Property Owners in The Loop in University City
     Parkview Place Board of Agents

      More than 97% of eligible registered voters/property owners in the district
         voted "Yes"' in 2008 to implement the Loop Trolley Transportation
     Development District and impose a 1% sales tax to support trolley operation.




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      Project Status/Schedule:

            Design: Project design initiated in October, 2008; engineering to be completed
                       December 2009
            Construction Start Date: January 1, 2010
            Completion: September, 2010—construction period estimated at 6 months
                             once design is complete

      Green Features:         The project involves implementation of clean electric mass
      transit and removes gasoline powered passenger vehicles cars from the corridor, thus
      reducing vehicle emissions.

      Educational Impacts:           The project will provide a link to the region’s past when
                                              trolleys were a common form of transportation
                                              and will educate residents and visitors alike
                                              about legacy transit systems. The trolley’s
                                              southern terminus is at the Missouri History
                                              Museum—this facet of the project will
                                              facilitate presentation of educational programs
                                              and distribution of educational materials. In
                                              addition, the project will be a prototype for
                                              educating residents and visitors on the
                                              benefits and advantages of clean, electric
                                              mass transit. The trolley will be fun!



      Contact Information:

            Name:            Les Sterman
            Title:           Executive Director, East West Gateway Council of Governments
            E-Mail:          les.sterman@ewgateway.org
            Cell Phone:
            Telephone:       314-421-4220

            Name:            Joe Edwards
            Title:           President, Loop Trolley Company
            Telephone:       314-727-4444, Extension 10




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              NORTH-SOUTH EXPANSIONS:
        EXISTING METROLINK LIGHT RAIL SYSTEM
Project Type:          Transit Equipment and Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 While the region’s
MetroLink system is highly successful, the system
currently serves only downtown St. Louis, the City’s
central corridor, and a small portion of southwest City.
Expansion of the system is necessary to make mass
transit convenient for all City residents and to make
mass transit competitive with passenger vehicle use.
Expansion of the light rail system will also provide
greater mobility for transit-dependent populations,
particularly on the City’s north side, and spur new
transit-oriented development on both the City’s
distressed north side and in distressed parts of south
St. Louis.

In 2007, the East West
Gateway Council of                                               ABOVE: Existing light rail alignment.
Governments                                                       BELOW: Proposed north and south
                                                                      expansion alignments.
completed a study of
north and south
extensions to the
MetroLink system
within the City of St.
Louis. The study
identified “locally          Proposed surface street running
                            configurations for north and south
preferred alternatives”                expansions.
that extend the light rail
system through the hearts of north and south St. Louis.

Description: This project will construct north and
south MetroLink extensions in the City of St. Louis.
The entire length of the proposed extensions is
located on the surfaces of existing extra-wide City
streets—the expansions can therefore be constructed
quickly and cost-effectively when compared to
configurations that include tunnels and underground
sections of track.


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                 LEFT: Transit-oriented development possibility along north expansion at Natural Bridge.
                  RIGHT: Transit-oriented development possibility along south expansion at Jefferson.


      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      This project will deliver high-quality mass transit services to a broad population—those
      who are currently transit-dependent as well as those who would otherwise not use
      public transit. The success of the existing light rail system has demonstrated that light
      rail attracts a far wider ridership than busses. The City’s population is predominantly
      low-income—this project will improve services for that population. In addition, the
      extension of the light rail system into disinvested and deteriorated portions of north St.
      Louis will stimulate new real estate development in those areas.

      Project Cost:           $900 million

      Job Creation:
             Construction: 11,250 jobs
             Permanent:    4,000 jobs anticipated in transit-oriented developments along
                                     the expanded MetroLink route

      Political Jurisdictions:
             Congressional District: 1 & 3
             City Ward(s):           Various




              ABOVE: MetroLink station at Busch Stadium downtown.
        RIGHT: MetroLink station at BJC Medical Centeer in Central West End.




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Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      Various Aldermen
      East West Gateway Council of Governments
      Citizens for Modern Transit
      Partnership for Downtown St. Louis
      Residents of areas along the expansion routes
      Businesses located along the expansion routes

Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Preliminary design complete; design-build approach for construction
      Design/Build Start Date: May, 2009
      Construction Completion: December, 2010—partial; full completion will
      require a multi-year construction period.

Green Features: The light rail expansion will reduce automobile travel, thereby
reducing both energy consumption and ozone precursor emissions. The expansion will
also replace petroleum-fueled busses with electric light rail vehicles, thereby further
reducing emissions. Because the project would operate within existing street rights-of-
way, current pavements disturbed during the MetroLink installation can be replaced with
permeable surfaces to reduce stormwater impacts.

Education Impacts:               The expansions will demonstrate the value of mass transit
and the ability of fixed rail systems to generate high-density urban real estate
development.

Contact Information:
      Name:             Jerry Blair
      Title:            Project Manager, EWGCOG
      E-Mail:           jerry.blair@ewgateway.org
      Cell Phone:
      Telephone:        314-421-4220 Ext. 254




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            VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS:
    LAMBERT ST. LOUIS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Project Type:        Airport Technology and Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:               Lambert St. Louis International Airport serves the entire
St. Louis region. Although “owned” by the City of St. Louis, the airport is located in St.
Louis County and is governed by a board that includes representatives from both St.
Louis County and St. Charles County. Lambert’s continuing viability is critical to the
economic health of the entire St. Louis region. In 2007, nearly 15.4 million passengers
traveled through the airport. Clearly, Lambert’s 1,850 acres serve an important and es-
sential function in the
St. Louis region’s eco-
nomic life, and it is im-
portant that Lambert be
maintained and pre-
served.

Lambert is an historic
airfield for many reasons: President Theodore
Roosevelt took his first airplane ride at the Lam-
bert location, and Charles Lindbergh departed
from Lambert on his historic non-stop solo flight
to Paris in 1927. The City of St. Louis purchased
the airport from its original developer, Major
Lambert, in 1928. During World War II, the
McDonnell Aircraft Corporation was founded and
manufactured more than 3,000 military airplanes in a
factory adjacent to Lambert. In 1956, Minoru Yama-
saki’s domed design became the model for then-
modern airport terminal designs.

Due in part to its age, in part to the decline in non-
federal airport revenues, and in part to a decline in
federal funding for airport facilities, Lambert is in
need of a number of improvements. It is not possi-
ble to fund these improvements with currently avail-
able funds. Like airports all over the country, Lambert was hard hit by changes in the
airline industry following the tragedy of September 11, 2001—total passengers em-
planed and deplaned in 2007 were only 50% of such passengers in 2000. Fees gener-
ated by airport users are the airport’s major source of non-federal income—as air travel

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      has significantly declined, fees generated by air travel have also declined significantly.
      The extinction of the “hub” model of airline operation and the precarious financial state
      of many major airlines has also contributed to this revenue decline, although Southwest
      continues to be a robust and healthy airline both at Lambert and nationally.

      Description: This economic recovery project has ten (10) components, listed in
      the following chart. Nine of the ten components involve reconstruction of runway com-
      ponents, taxiways and aprons; the tenth component is an environmental management
      system that will bring the airport into the 21st century in terms of managing safety and
      other critical factors involved in airport operations.


                     LAMBERT ST. LOUIS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT:
                              ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS




              PROJECT NAME           ESTIMATED COST                PURPOSE/ OUTCOMES
        Taxiway L                        $375,000       Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        facility necessary for Boeing operations
        Noise Monitoring System          $500,000       Updates system for monitoring noise in
        Upgrade                                         areas adjacent to ariport
        Environmental Management        $1,500,000      Updates system for monitoring/managing
        System                                          environmental aspects of airport
        North Apron Reconstruction      $5,200,000                   (
                                                        Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway E—Phase II              $6,700,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway V—Phase II              $8,500,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway D                       $8,800,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway E—Phase III             $9,000,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway E—Phase I               $9,200,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Taxiway V—Phase I               $9,700,000      Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        Centerline Panels               $10,000,000     Replaces center sections of runways most
                                                        impacted by aircraft landings
        Taxiway S                       $11,200,000     Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                        important air traffic support facilities
        TOTAL:                        $80,675,000




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Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
This economic recovery project will have the following positive outcomes:

      Runway, taxiway, and apron improvements will ensure that airport continues to
       function effectively as region’s only full-service airport for many years to come.
      New environmental management system will make it possible for airport to oper-
       ate more efficiently, thereby saving both money and energy.

Project Cost:        $80.7 million (see chart above)

Job Creation:
       Construction:        2,410 jobs
       Permanent:           Taxiway L project is expected to add 40 new jobs; perma-
       nent jobs that rely on convenient passenger/freight air travel will be preserved;
       new jobs may be created as airport’s excess capacity attracts new businesses.

Political Jurisdictions:
       Congressional District:          1
       City Ward(s):                    17

Community Support:
       Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
       Regional Chamber & Growth Association
       All airline passengers and businesses in the region

Project Status/Schedule:
       Design: Construction documents in progress.
       Construction Start Date: May, 2009
       Completion: December, 2010
Green Features:            The new environmental management system will make it poss-
ible for airport to operate more efficiently, saving energy. Companion “Airport Expe-
rience” project, designed to make airport more passenger-friendly/improve airport’s im-
age, is designed to receive LEED certification.

Education Impacts:            Maintenance of Lambert will preserve airport’s history.

Contact Information:
       Name:            Richard E. Hrabko
       Title:           Director of Airports/CEO
       E-Mail:          rehrabko@flystl.com
       Cell Phone:      314-807-8020
       Telephone:       314-426-8020

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HARLEM BADEN STORMWATER DETENTION SYSTEM

Project Type:         Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                The
Metropolitan Sewer District (“MSD”)
has provided storm and sanitary sewer
and wastewater treatment services for
a significant portion of the Missouri
side of the St. Louis region since the
mid-1950s, when St. Louis City and St.
Louis County conveyed title to their
wastewater-related infrastructure to the
new regional entity. MSD operates the
4th largest sanitary sewer system in the
country with 6,600 miles of sewer.
Most of the City and the eastern por-
tion of St. Louis County are served by
a combined sewer system where
stormwater and sanitary sewage dis-
charge into the same piping and treat-       Combined sewer area MSD district shaded in green.
ment systems. In times of heavy rain,
the combined system is unable to han-
dle the volume of combined wastewa-
ter. This causes several problems:
basement and street surface flooding
in areas where piping is particularly
undersized, and discharge of untreated
wastewater into the Mississippi River.
This situation has caused the Envi-        LEFT: Dysfunctional sewer. RIGHT: Flooded basement.
ronmental Protection Agency to cite
MSD on a number of occasions for violations of the Clean Water Act. While MSD and
the region recognize that these issues need to be addressed, the combined sewer sys-
tem included many miles of piping and many treatment facilities. Thus, solutions to the
problem are both complex and expensive. MSD, working with local governments, has
instituted a system of stormwater charges based on area of impervious surface. MSD
and the City are also encouraging property owners and governments to implement
measures that reduce the rapid discharge of rainwater into the sewer system, thereby
reducing the likelihood of combined sewer overflows. These individual property and
right-of-way measures include “rain gardens”, downspout disconnection/rain barrel
grams, “green” roofs, “green” alleys, and pervious pavements. Incremental


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      implementation of these individual improvements will
      help address this problem, but more extensive meas-
      ures are also necessary to address this problem in
      areas where overflow problems are most severe.

      Description:         This economic recovery
      project will construct a large-scale detention              Incremental sewer overflow measures.

      basin in a portion of the Harlem-Baden area
      where most of the property is now vacant
      due to severe basement and surface flooding
      in the past. In addition to addressing a major
      problem for the area, the new basin will also
      serve as an amenity for other properties in
      the neighborhood. The new basin will re-
      duce basement sewer backups and surface
      flooding in the Harlem-Baden portion of the
      Mississippi River watershed, reduce com-
      bined sewer overflows downstream from the             Proposed detention basin—Harlem-Baden.
      Harlem-Baden area, and improve water
      quality via construction of an aesthetically
      pleasing detention basin, thereby improving
      quality of life, enhancing property values,
      and making new development possible with-
      out extraordinary cost in this distressed area
      of the City’s north side.




      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      This economic recovery project will have the following specific benefits for the dis-
      tressed Wells Goodfellow neighborhood, for the City and County areas affected by the
      improvement, and for the region:

            Surface and basement flooding in areas of the City and County where stormwa-
             ter is directed into the new basin will be reduced.
            Deteriorated and vacant properties in the Wells Goodfellow neighborhood will be
             replaced with an attractive amenity.
            Combined sewer overflows downstream from the new basin will be reduced.
            Values of remaining affected properties will improve due to removal of problem
             and nuisance properties and elimination of flooding hazards.
            New development in the area will be possible without extraordinary costs asso-
             ciated measures to hazards on an individual property basis or danger of flooding
             in the new development.


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Project Cost:       $35.5 million

Job Creation:
      Construction:     1,072
      Permanent:        Permanent jobs
      w/new commercial development in Wells
      Goodfellow neighborhood

Political Jurisdictions:
      Congressional District:         1
      City Ward(s):                   22

Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      Jeffrey Boyd, Alderman, 22nd Ward, City of St. Louis
      Metropolitan Sewer District
      Property owners, including churches, in area adjacent to improvement
      Residents of surrounding neighborhoods

Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Preliminary design complete; construction documents in progress.
      Construction Start Date: March, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010

Green Features: The project as a whole will improve water quality throughout
the region and reduce the release of pollutants into the environment. Storm and sanita-
ry sewers will be separated in the area served by the project; new landscaping and
open space will be introduced into the neighborhood, together with the water feature;
the project will incorporate green features, including pervious pavers. This improve-
ment, together with new development that the improvement will make possible, will en-
hance the potential for reuse of existing residences and commercial structures in this
densely developed but depressed urban area.

Education Impacts: Improvement will incorporate interpretive/educational kiosk.
Contact Information:
      Name:            Brian Hoelscher
      Title:           Chief Engineer, Metropolitan Sewer District
      E-Mail:          blhoel@stlmsd.com
      Cell Phone:      314-267-5246
      Telephone:       314-768-6204



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         MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOODWALL REPAIRS

Project Type:         Water/Wastewater

“Change We Need”:                The floodwall,
completed in 1974, protects the City’s entire
Mississippi River frontage. This floodwall
system is an eleven-mile combination of seven
miles of floodwall and four miles of levee,
together with twenty-eight pumping stations
and a number of gates that penetrate the wall
but can be closed during flooding events. The
system was designed to provide protection for
3,160 acres of heavily developed urban land
area against a 52-foot Mississippi River stage
in the City of St. Louis section of the river.
These standards were established based on
the previous “great flood” of 1844.


                                             The “Great Flood of 1993” highlighted a number
                                             of deficiencies inherent in the original design of
                                             the floodwall and generated a significant amount
                                             of concern as to whether the floodwall could
                                             withstand future floods of that magnitude. As
                                             the Mississippi River approached 49.58 feet on
                                             the St. Louis Gage on August 1, 1993, sandboils
                                             appeared at many locations along the interior of
  Blowout above; rotated section below.      the levee, and a severe underseepage founda-
                                             tion blowout occurred immediately east of River-
                                             view Boulevard. On July 22, 1993, with the river
                                             level at 46.9 feet on the St. Louis gage, on the
                                             northern end of the flood control system a four
                                             foot high by eighteen inch diameter geyser was
                                             observed, with seepage water and foundation
                                             material gushing from underneath the floodwall
                                             monolith on the protected of the floodwall—this
                                             event caused the top of the floodwall monolith to
                                             rotate riverward approximately three inches due
                                             to the blowout and resulting loss of supporting
       Rotated floodwall section.
                                             foundation material below the floodwall.


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      Extraordinary emergency flood fighting measures were required to prevent disastrous
      flooding of the protected area: hundreds of tons of crushed stone were rushed to the
      failing floodwall monoliths and dumped over the geyser, which slowed down the flow,
      and a crushed stone ring levee was constructed behind the failed floodwall. A reported
      111 cubic yards of grout was pumped into the voids below the floodwall to stabilize it.
      The quick thinking of flood control teams saved the City of St. Louis from a catastrophic
      breach—had it not been for the immediate action taken by these teams, the area
      protected by this section of the floodwall would have been immediately inundated with
      floodwaters.

                                   The flood of 1993 demonstrated that the City’s flood
                                   control system has serious design deficiencies and in all
                                   likelihood will not function safely if serious flooding occurs.
                                   Since that time, Hurricane Katrina showed the country
                                   what a catastrophic breach can cost, most importantly in
                                   lives but also in property damage and lost employment and
                                   wages.

                                   In light of the 1993 events, the U. S. Army Corps of
                                   Engineers, the agency responsible for design and
                                   construction of the floodwall in 1974, conducted a detailed
                                   study of the floodwall and identified a number of
                                   deficiencies due to the original design of the structure
                                   rather than to its age. The study was completed in 2005.
                                   Design deficiency issues include a lack of “relief wells” that
                                   relieve pressure on the structure and control entry of
          Damaged flood gates.
                                   floodwater under the flood wall and serious levels of rust
                                   and other damage to the floodgates—few if any other
                                   major flood control system was designed with metal gates,
                                   according to the Corps’ research.

                                   As part of that study, the FM Global insurance company
                                   has estimated that complete failure of this flood protection
                                   system would cost them more than $3 billion dollars in
                                   damage claims, in addition to the significant cost of post
                                   failure levee system repair and environmental cleanup.

                                    The floodwall is obviously in need of major repairs in order
                                    to provide the originally designed levels of protection.
      While the Corps has begun the work necessary to strengthen the floodwall in
      partnership with the City, appropriations for the project have been slow, and completion
      of the work is expected to take at least an additional three years based on the schedule
      of appropriations to date. Just this past summer, another serious flood threatened to
      approach the magnitude of the Great Flood of 1993. Repairs to the floodwall are “ready
      to go” and the pace of the necessary repairs can be accelerated with economic
      recovery funding, protecting the City much sooner than would otherwise be the case.



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In addition, as a result of last summer’s flood, deficiencies have recently been identified
in the levee portion of the flood control system. Correction of these deficiencies can be
added to the repair and enhancement project currently underway, completing the
entirety of the work needed to ensure that the system can protect the City in the event
of another catastrophic flood.

Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
Acceleration of floodwall repairs will have the following positive impacts on the City’s
quality of life:

   First, the area protected by the floodwall was once completely developed—now it
    is in dire need of redevelopment. The City has acquired many parcels in this area
    and is promoting them for commercial and industrial redevelopment—both
    developers and end users are now very interested in this area. Concerns about
    the safety of the floodwall inhibit this redevelopment. Acceleration of floodwall
    repairs and the addition of levee repairs will give developers and users enhanced
    confidence that the protected area is safe and a good investment. Existing
    businesses in the protected area will have greater reason to remain, and workers
    in both existing and new businesses will be protected.

   Many existing businesses in the area
    protected by the floodwall involve
    chemicals that can be hazardous if not
    appropriately contained—a catastrophic
    flood could release these chemicals and
    result in dangerous environmental
    spillage, both in the St. Louis area and
    down river. Acceleration of floodwall
    repairs and the addition of levee repairs
    will prevent such environmental
    catastrophes and the cost of extensive
    cleanup.

   The floodwall is also very important to national security. The National Geospatial-
    Intelligence Agency has one of its two main facilities protected by the St. Louis
    Flood Protection System. This agency provides geospatial intelligence to the U. S.
    Armed Forces and others. Flooding of the NGA facility in St. Louis would have an
    effect on national security. The flood of 1993 inundated an inadequately protected
    satellite facility in south St. Louis that had to be closed. The damage was
    substantial enough that a new facility was constructed out of the floodplain. The
    Coast Guard also has facilities protected by the St. Louis flood protection system.




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        The City and the region have passed
         a sales tax to develop “greenways”
         that provide recreational oppor-
         tunities (cycling, walking) that high-
         light the natural wonders of the
         Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. A
         greenway is a natural corridor set
         aside for the benefit of the environ-
         ment. The Corps of Engineers is
         required by law to evaluate a federal
         interest in recreation as part of a
         greenway on or adjacent to the flood
         protection system. While making
         necessary design changes and
         repairs to the City’s flood protection
         system will not directly involve
         expansion or enhancement of
         greenway systems currently in
         place/under development, floodwall
         work will protect the greenways and
         preserve this important educational
         and recreational opportunity for the
         region and the country.

        Accelerating the pace of the neces-
         sary floodwall work will save money.
         The Corps’ 2005 study estimated
         that for every $5 spent to make the
         floodwall safe, $5 in benefit are
         achieved. The potential savings is
         even greater if the cost of the neces-
         sary floodwall work (currently estim-
         ated in total at approximately $20
         million) is weighed against the $3
         billion potential for loss of life and       Greenways along City flood protection system.
         property if the floodwall fails. A
         relatively small expenditure now will protect the City and federal disaster
         authorities against a far, far greater exposure if the repairs are not quickly made.
         Further, if work is done quickly, inflation impacts can be minimized.

      Project Cost:       $14.5 million (remaining cost—previous appropriations subtracted)

      Job Creation:
        Construction: 604 jobs
        Permanent:    An undetermined number of jobs will be created as new develop-
                             ment made possible/attractive by these improvements occurs.


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Political Jurisdictions:
   Congressional District: 1 & 3
   City Ward(s): Various riverfront wards

Community Support:
   Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
   Army Corps of Engineers
   Businesses protected by floodwall
   Various downtown developers
   Aldermen representing riverfront               Affected business during Great Flood of 1993.


Project Status/Schedule:
   Design: Repair/modification plan has been completed and agreed upon.
   Construction document production is in progress. Initial relief well contract has been
   awarded and construction is underway. Additional relief well construction will be
   awarded as design is complete. Contract to replace some closure structures and
   permanently close others is expected to be awarded in 2009.
   Construction Start Date: February, 2009
   Completion: December, 2010

Green Features: This project will protect one of the nation’s major natural
resources by solidifying the separation between urban industrial uses that could harm
the environment if man-made products were released into the river in the event of a
major flood. Further, the project will protect a major water supply source for many
communities located along the Mississippi River.

Education Impacts:             As noted above, a greenway system has been partially
developed by Great Rivers Greenway along the floodwall. This system of bikeways and
trails is an educational resource for the region and the nation as it allows cyclists,
pedestrians and workers in businesses close to the riverfront to experience the river up
close.

Contact Information:
      Name:            Tamara Atchley
      Title:           Project Manager, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers
      E-Mail:          tamara.l.atchley@usace.army.mil
      Cell Phone:
      Telephone:       314-331-8044




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            WATER TREATMENT & DISTRIBUTION
                SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS

Project Type:         Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                 In contrast to many municipali-
ties across the country, St. Louis City owns and operates the
water treatment and distribution system that serves City resi-
dents and businesses—this system has been in operation
since 1835. While the entire system is owned by the City, por-
tions of the system’s facilities are located in other portions of
the region, and water for the system is drawn from the Missis-
sippi and Missouri Rivers. As a result of five decades of disin-
vestment in the City, the water system’s capacity exceeds the
City’s demand for water—the City sells excess capacity to
neighboring jurisdictions in both Missouri and Illinois.

While the system overall is in generally good condition—the
City’s water was named “best tasting in the country” in a blind
test conducted by the U. S. Conference of Mayors in early
2008—a number of system components are in need of repairs
and upgrades to meet earthquake safety and homeland secu-
rity requirements and to preserve the system’s ability to pro-
duce and distribute quality water to residents, businesses, and
other municipalities in the region.

Description: This economic recovery project will repair,
renovate and upgrade parts of several important components
of the City’s water treatment/distribution system as follows:

  Install new bypass connections to conduit at Stacy Park
   Reservoir, using 48-inch ductile iron restrained joint pipe,
   to provide a bypass that enhances the safety of a primary
   water source for the City and county should earthquake or
   manmade disaster disable the reservoir and necessitate
   its repair.

  Various tasks to preserve and improve efficiency of exist-
                                                                     ABOVE: Deteriorated
   ing water distribution system infrastructure, including          components at Howard
   installation of automatic meter reading devices, replace-        Bend Treatment Plant.




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          ment of aging water meters, replacement of small water mains, and improvements
          to downtown distribution piping.

        Various tasks to replace approximately 10,000 feet of existing water mains with a
         history of leaks and main breaks, including replacement of portions of small service
         lines.

        Repair of various water treatment plant structures including the boiler house roof,
         concrete basins, access manholes and discharge conduits at the Howard Bend
         Treatment Plant and the filter plant roof, concrete basins, and the HTPE main by-
         pass loop at the Chain of Rocks treatment plant to extend the useful life of critical
         treatment plant structures.

                                CITY OF ST. LOUIS WATER DIVISION:
                                  ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS


                                            ESTIMATED
                    PROJECT NAME              COST                 PURPOSE/ OUTCOMES
              Seismic Bypass of Stacey      $1,500,000   Enhances safety of primary water source
              Park Reservoir                             for City/County
              Water Distribution System     $3,500,000   Addresses deferred maintenance of
              Improvements                               important water distribution facilities
              Water Main Renovations        $1,500,000   Addresses deferred maintenance of
                                                         important water distribution facilities
              Water Treatment Plant         $2,850,000   Addresses deferred maintenance of
              Improvements                               important water treatment facilities
              TOTAL:                       $9,350,000


      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      These projects will extend the useful life of the City’s water treatment and distribution
      system, preserve City water quality, and protect the water system in the event of natural
      or man-made disasters.

      Project Cost:        $9.35 million
      (see chart above)

      Job Creation:
            Construction:          285
            Permanent:             N/A

      Political Jurisdictions:                                                  ABOVE AND LEFT:
                                                                            Deteriorated components at
            Congressional                                                    Chain of Rocks Treatment
                                                                                       Plant.
            Districts:    1, 3
            City Ward(s): Various

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Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      City residents of surrounding neighborhoods
      City businesses, particularly those that depend on water supply
      Other jurisdictions that purchase water from the City

Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Construction documents complete.
      Construction Start Date: May, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010

Green Features: This project protects the City’s ability to deliver quality water to
residents, businesses and other jurisdictions in the region.

Education Impacts:          N/A.

Contact Information:
      Name:           Curtis B. Skouby
      Title:          Water Commissioner/Public Utilities Director, City of St. Louis
      E-Mail:         cskouby@stlwater.com
      Cell Phone:     314-807-8319
      Telephone:      314-633-9012




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            MACKLIND AVENUE COMBINED SEWER
                  OUTFALL SEPARATION

Project Type:         Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                The
Metropolitan Sewer District (“MSD”)
has provided storm and sanitary sewer
and wastewater treatment services for
a significant portion of the Missouri
side of the St. Louis region since the
mid-1950s, when St. Louis City and St.
Louis County conveyed title to their
wastewater-related infrastructure to the
new regional entity. MSD operates the
4th largest sanitary sewer system in the
country with 6,600 miles of sewer.
Most of the City and the eastern por-
tion of St. Louis County are served by
a combined sewer system where
stormwater and sanitary sewage dis-
charge into the same piping and treat-        Combined sewer area MSD district shaded in green.
ment systems. In times of heavy rain,
the combined system is unable to handle the
volume of combined wastewater. This caus-
es several problems: basement and street
surface flooding in areas where piping is par-
ticularly undersized, and discharge of un-
treated wastewater into the Mississippi River.
This situation has caused the Environmental
Protection Agency to cite MSD on a number
of occasions for violations of the Clean Water
Act. While MSD and the region recognize
that these issues need to be addressed, the           Macklind outfall where overflows occur.
combined sewer system included many miles
of piping and many treatment facilities. Thus, solutions to the problem are both complex
and expensive. MSD, working with local governments, has instituted a system of
stormwater charges based on area of impervious surface. MSD and the City are also
encouraging property owners and governments to implement measures that reduce the
rapid discharge of rainwater into the sewer system, thereby reducing the likelihood of
combined sewer overflows. These individual property and right-of-way measures in-

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      clude “rain gardens”, downspout disconnection/rain
      barrel programs, “green” roofs, “green” alleys, and
      pervious pavements. Incremental implementation of
      these individual improvements will help address this
      problem, but more extensive measures are also ne-
      cessary to address this problem in areas where over-
      flow problems are most severe.                              Incremental sewer overflow measures.


      Description: This economic recovery
      project will reconstruct the Macklind Avenue
      outfall to eliminate combined sewer overflows
      in this area of south St. Louis, thereby im-
      proving quality of life, enhancing property
      values, and making new development possi-
      ble and attractive in this area of the City’s
      south side.

      Specific Quality of Life
      Enhancements/Outcomes/                                  ABOVE: Area subject to flooding.
      Benefits: This economic recovery                    BELOW: Location of Macklind Avenue outfall.

      project will reduce the likelihood of combined
      sewer overflows in this area of the south
      side.

      Project Cost:       $1.0 million

      Job Creation:
            Construction:        30 jobs
            Permanent:           N/A

      Political Jurisdictions:
            Congressional District:          3
            City Ward(s):                    10

      Community Support:
            Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
            Joseph Vollmer, Alderman, 10th Ward, City of St. Louis
            Metropolitan Sewer District
            Businesses in area adjacent to project
            Residents of surrounding neighborhoods




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Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Preliminary design complete; construction documents in progress.
      Construction Start Date: March, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010

Green Features:
The project as a whole will
improve water quality
throughout the region and
reduce the release of pollu-
tants into the environment—
storm and sanitary sewers
will be separated in the area
served by the project, reduc-
ing the likelihood of com-
bined sewer overflows.




Education Impacts: N/A
Contact Information:
      Name:             Brian Hoelscher
      Title:            Chief Engineer, Metropolitan Sewer District
      E-Mail:           blhoel@stlmsd.com
      Cell Phone:       314-267-5246
      Telephone:        314-768-6204




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          HISTORIC WATER TOWER RENOVATIONS

Project Type:         Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

“Change We Need”:                In contrast to
many municipalities across the country, St. Louis
City owns and operates the water treatment and
distribution system that serves City residents and
businesses—this system has been in operation
since 1835. While the entire system is owned by
the City, portions of the system’s facilities are lo-
cated in other portions of the region, and water
for the system is drawn from the Mississippi and
Missouri Rivers. As a result of five decades of
disinvestment in the City, the water system’s ca-
pacity exceeds the City’s demand for water—the
City sells excess capacity to neighboring jurisdic-
tions in both Missouri and Illinois.

Before modern pumping methods, the steam-
driven pumps used to send water throughout the
city created large surges in pressure, often caus-
ing water pipes to rattle and shake, and also
                                                        Three historic “standpipe” water towers
caused multiple-story houses to have difficulty                    in City of St. Louis
getting water to upper floors. Standpipes (large
vertical pipes in which a column of water rose and fell to prevent surges) were built to
equalize water pressure. For aesthetic purposes, decorative towers hid the standpipes.

In times past, nearly 500 of these “standpipe” towers dotted cities and towns of the
United States. As technology advanced, however, standpipes became obsolete, and
most of the standpipes and the towers surrounding them were torn down. Today, only
seven remain; three of the seven, constructed in1870, 1885 and 1898, are located in
the City of St. Louis. All three have been listed on the National Register of Historic
Places since the early 1970s. They are the Grand ("Old White") Water Tower and the
Bissell ("New Red") Water Tower in north St. Louis near Grand and Bissell, and the
Compton Hill Water Tower near Grand and Russell in south St. Louis. Each of these
towers is more than 150 feet tall, and each serves as a neighborhood and City land-
mark—at one point, lights atop the Bissel Tower guided airplanes to Lambert Field.




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      Since the towers no longer functioned as part of the City’s
      water distribution system after modern pumping equipment
      was placed in service, maintaining the towers has not been
      a priority in difficult City budgetary times. While one of the
      water towers received attention in the past several years as
      a result of special federal and private foundation grants, the
      other two towers have serious deferred maintenance is-
      sues. Structural stabilization work and other repairs are
      necessary to preserve two of the seven remaining free-
      standing historic “standpipe” water towers in the country.

      Description: This economic recovery project will re-
      pair and renovate two of the City’s three historic water tow-
      ers—the Grand “Old White” Tower and the Compton Hill
      Tower. Repairs will include renovation of architectural cast
      iron details, masonry repair and tuckpointing on the Grand
      Tower and stonework, masonry repair and tuckpointing on
      the Compton Hill Tower, as well as replacement of roof                       LEFT: Grand “Old White” Tower
      decks and roof vents on both towers.                                          RIGHT: Compton Hill Tower




                                BELOW AND LEFT:
                               Details of deteriorated
                                      areas on
                                   Compton Hill
                                   Water Tower.




                                                          ABOVE AND RIGHT:
                                                         Details of deteriorated
                                                          areas on Grand “Old
                                                          White” Water Tower.




      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/Outcomes/Benefits:
      This economic recovery project will preserve two of the seven remaining historic “stand-
      pipe” water towers in the United States.

      Project Cost:        $4.5 million

      Job Creation:
             Construction:        135
             Permanent:           N/A




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Political Jurisdictions:
      Congressional District:           1, 3
      City Ward(s):                     3, 6

Community Support:
      Francis G. Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
      Freeman Bosley Sr., Alderman, 3rd Ward
      Kacie Starr Tripplett, Alderwoman, 6th Ward
      Residents of surrounding neighborhoods
      Various historic preservation associations & advocates

Project Status/Schedule:
      Design: Construction documents complete.
      Construction Start Date: May, 2009
      Completion: December, 2010

Green Features:          N/A

Education Impacts:            This project supports preservation of the country’s history
of water treatment and distribution.

Contact Information:
      Name:             Curtis B. Skouby
      Title:            Water Commissioner/Public Utilities Director, City of St. Louis
      E-Mail:           cskouby@stlwater.com
      Cell Phone:       314-807-8319
      Telephone:        314-633-9012




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              ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS:
        LEAD REMEDIATION AND MODERNIZATION
Project Type:         School Modernization

“Change We Need”:               As
the City’s population declined dras-
tically from 1950 to 2000, enroll-
ment in the City’s public schools
also dropped significantly. Al-
though the City’s population has
now begun to grow, public school
enrollment continues to drop. One
important factor contributing to this
drop in enrollment is the condition
of the public school buildings: the
majority of these buildings were                 Typical historic school building still in use.

constructed more than fifty years
ago—some in the early 1900s—and the majority of
the buildings have received little improvement since
their original construction. Lead paint remains and
presents hazards in many of the buildings, HVAC
system controls are outdated, inefficient and obso-
lete, electrical systems do not support the demands
of modern computer-based learning, lighting sys-
tems are neither energy-efficient nor conducive to
learning, fire safety systems are outmoded or lack-
ing altogether, and plumbing systems often mal-
function, creating health hazards. These serious                        Typical classroom.

issues need to be addressed so that children who
attend public schools because they have no other options can receive the necessary
foundation for productive and fulfilled lives as adults, and so that parents who have
choices will choose to send their children to the St. Louis Public Schools. Quality public
schools are an essential part of the great city that St. Louis is striving to become. While
some of the City’s schools are excellent—Metro High School has been ranked #1 of all
of the public and private high schools in the state, and several other schools are also
highly ranked—lack of quality throughout the City’s public school facilities continues to
negatively impact the lives of the City’s low-income children and inhibit the City’s revita-
lization. Improving the physical quality of school facilities will improve morale among
students and teachers and enable the district to attract new teaching professionals, in
addition to addressing the physical issues that make learning difficult.


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      Description:         This series of economic recovery
      projects, described in the chart below, will address lead
      hazards in a significant number of the City’s eighty pub-
      lic school buildings, modernize mechanical, electrical
      and plumbing systems, improve the energy-efficiency
      of the buildings, and make the buildings more attractive
      learning environments.
                                     ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM:
                                      ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROJECTS


                                              ESTIMATED
                  PROJECT NAME                   COST                   PURPOSE/ OUTCOMES
      St. Louis Public School Lead             $5,000,000   Addresses individual lead hazard issues not
      Remediation                                           remediated in conjunction w/work below
      St. Louis Public School Window          $15,740,000   Replaces lead-painted and energy-inefficient
      Replacement                                           windows in 27 elementary schools and
                                                            additional middle schools and high schools
      St. Louis Public School Electrical      $52,300,000   Electrical system replacement/enhancement
      Upgrades                                              to support modern technology/energy
                                                            conservation (up to 80 schools)
      St. Louis Public School Plumbing        $50,000,000   Plumbing/water conservation upgrades in up
      Upgrades                                              to 80 historic school buildings
      St. Louis Public School Exterior        $21,000,000   Energy conservation/deferred maintenance
      Enclosure Repairs/Replacements                        (tuckpointing, roofing, insulation, window
                                                            repair/replacement) in historic school
                                                            buildings (up to 80 schools)

      St. Louis Public School Interior        $14,700,000   Lead paint removal/other interior upgrades--
      Finishes                                              up to 80 schools
      St. Louis Public School Site            $15,000,000   Field, playground, other site improvements
      Improvements                                          (including lead paint removal from fencing)
      St. Louis Public School Furnishings      $8,000,000   Furnishings/equipment replacement--up to 80
                                                            schools
      TOTAL:                                $181,740,000



      Specific Quality of Life Enhancements/
      Outcomes/Benefits: This series of economic
      recovery projects will have the following positive im-
      pacts for the St. Louis Public School system and for the
      children who attend these schools:

           Improvements as a whole will improve learning
            environments for children and teachers, improve
            the image of the school district, and attract more
            children and teachers to the district.
           Lead hazard remediation will remove what is
            thought to be a significant source of lead poison-
            ing for City children.
           Energy-efficiency improvements will lower op-
            erating costs to the District and make savings
            available to improve other non-physical aspects of          Typical tuckpointing and
            the school system.                                              masonry issues.

           Window replacement will remove lead hazards
            for elementary school children, improve energy efficiency, reduce operating costs,
            and improve exterior appearance and image of schools.
           Electrical upgrades will replace existing lighting with energy-efficient lighting, re-
            ducing loads on HVAC systems and eliminating hazards and light quality issues


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    associated with mercury vapor luminaires. Up-
    grades will also increase capacity of electrical sys-
    tems, install new distribution elements to support
    additional personal computer use to improve
    learning capacity, replace HVAC and lighting con-
    trol systems with automated control capacity to
    reduce energy use, replace fire alarm panels and
    public address systems and upgrade exit and
    emergency lighting systems to enhance building
    safety. Improved lighting quality and intensity will
    enhance the learning environment.
   Plumbing improvements will replace fixtures,
    upgrade deteriorating water supply and drainage
    lines, make restrooms accessible for children and
    teachers with disabilities, enhance fire sprinkler
    systems, and cafeteria plumbing fixtures, conserv-
    ing water and improving school health.
   Exterior enclosure repairs and improvements
                                                             Typical lighting and electrical issues.
    will include tuckpointing of historic deteriorated
    masonry, below-grade waterproofing, gut-
    ter/downspout repairs/replacements, improving
    indoor air quality and energy efficiency and lon-
    gevity of buildings. ADA upgrades will ensure that
    accessible routes to schools are present.
   Interior finish improvements will include a wide
    variety: adding window shades that conserve
    energy and improve the learning environment, re-
    pairing/replacing doors and locks, repairing plas-
    ter, painting walls and ceilings, various accessibili-
    ty upgrades, various restroom enhancements, and
    replacing/renovating floor and ceiling finishes. In
    addition, interior environmental and other hazards
    will be remediated—asbestos, falling plaster, etc.
    These improvements will enhance the learning
    environment and image of the schools, make the
    buildings healthier, and improve security and ac-
    cessibility.
   Site improvements will remove lead from fences
    and playground and other fixtures, improve play-
                                                                    Plumbing deficiencies.
    grounds and exterior athletic facilities, make acces-
    sibility upgrades, improve landscaping, install irrigation systems, repair storm
    drains and sewer laterals and remove obsolete and abandoned underground fuel
    storage tanks.
   Furnishings enhancements will replace obsolete/broken classroom furniture, ca-
    feteria tables/chairs, and add computers/video equipment and other modern learn-
    ing tools in addition to a variety of miscellaneous replacements/enhancements.



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       Project Cost:       $181.7 million (see chart above)

       Job Creation:
          Construction:        5,500 jobs
          Permanent:           If enrollment in-
          creases as result of modernization, ad-
          ditional permanent jobs can be created.

       Political Jurisdictions:
      Congressional    District: 1, 3
      City    Ward(s):      Various

       Community Support:
          Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
          St. Louis Board of Education
          Children enrolled in public schools
          Parents
          Property owners in the City

       Project Status/Schedule:                                                 Typical window issues.

          Design: Design complete.
          Construction Start: March, 2009
          Completion: March, 2010

       Green Features:           Modernization will improve
       energy efficiency in St. Louis Public Schools.

       Education Impacts:           All of the improvements
       will enhance learning environments in the St. Louis
       public schools. Operating cost savings achieved by                   Typical guttering and resulting
                                                                                    masonry issue.
       energy efficiency improvements will al-
       low more funds to be spent on enhanc-
       ing education. School buildings will be
       healthier.

       Contact Information:
          Name: Deanna Anderson
          Title: Building Superintendent            Typical wall, floor and ceiling
                                                               issues.
                    St. Louis Public Schools
          E-Mail: deanna.anderson@slps.org
          Cell Phone: 314-267-6388
          Telephone: 314-345-4469


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                                                                                                           167




        MURPHY PARK EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

Project Type:           Public Housing

“Change We Need”:                    The Murphy Park HOPE III development, located on the
                                     City’s near north side, was the prototype for the HOPE
                                     VI developments that have successfully transformed a
                                     wide variety of failed high-rise public housing projects
                                     across the country into quality mixed-income low rise
                                     developments.




 Mixed income homesat Murphy Park.




                                                     Early Childhood Center site at Murphy Park.


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168




                                              The residential portion of the development was
                                              completed in 2007 with the completion of the final
                                              senior building. Developed by McCormack Baron
                                              Salazar (“MBS”) working in concert with the St.
                                              Louis Housing Authority, Murphy Park is a model for
                                              quality affordable neighborhoods. As part of the
                                              development, McCormack Baron “adopted” Jeffer-
                                              son Elementary School, a St. Louis Public School
                                              located within the Murphy Park development area.
                                              With infusions of private capital and recruitment of a
                                              quality principal and excellent teaching staff, Jeffer-
                                              son School has played a significant role in Murphy
                                              Park’s success. To complement this elementary
                                              school and ensure that the neighborhood’s
                                              school children are well-prepared to succeed in
                                              elementary school, a plan for a quality early child-
                                              hood center has been developed with funding pro-
                                              vided by the Missouri Foundation for Health.

                                              Description:         This project will develop the Ear-
                                              ly Childhood Center at Murphy Park. Designed by
                                              Trivers and Associates, the facility will include
                                              29,000 sq. ft. of building area and a 12,500 sq. ft.
                                              enclosed outdoor courtyard. The facility will also
                                              include a mini-clinic. The Center is designed to
                                              enroll 170 children. In addition to activities geared
                                              towards a “total literacy” environment, the Center
                                              will provide music, art, and gross motor skills activi-
                                              ties for children and adult education opportunities
                                              for home-based child care providers. The Center
                                              will be governed by a board of stakeholders, includ-
                                              ing residents and MBS representatives.

                                              Specific Quality of Life Enhance-
                                              ments/Outcomes/ Benefits: This new
                                                 facility for pre-school children will enhance the abili-
                                                 ty of these children to enter elementary school well-
                                                 prepared for learning. The Center is modeled after
        Jefferson Elementary School—Murphy Park.
                                                 the local University City Children’s Center, an excel-
      lent example of an early childhood facility that has generated the positive outcomes de-
      sired for Murphy Park’s children in an economically and culturally diverse environment.

      Project Cost:         $9.6 million




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                                                                                                     169




                                         Renderings—Early Childhood Center at Murphy Park.


Job Creation:
  Construction: 288 jobs
  Permanent: Permanent jobs will be created in administrative, health care and
  teaching positions at the facility.




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170




      Political Jurisdictions:
         Congressional District: 1
         City Ward(s):           5

      Community Support:
         Francis Slay, Mayor, City of St. Louis
         McCormack Baron Salazar
         Urban Strategies
         Missouri Foundation for Health
         Parents in Murphy Park and surrounding
         neighborhoods




                                                                         Early Childhood Center workshop; children
                                                                               enjoying new ballfield w/Mayor.




                                                                         Status/Schedule:
                                                                         Design:       Preliminary complete.
                                                                         Construction: March, 2009
                                                                         Completion: December, 2010

                                                                         Green Features:          It is
                                                                         expected that the new devel-
                                                                         opment on the site will be
                                                                         LEED certified.

          Floor Plan/Site Plan—Early Childhood Center at Murphy Park.    Education Impacts:
                                                              The entire project will help en-
      sure that pre-school children in Murphy Park and surrounding neighborhoods receive
      quality preparation for elementary school to enhance these children’s futures as adults

      Contact Information:
             Name:                Richard Baron
             Title:               President, McCormack Baron Salazar
             E-Mail:              richard.baron@mccormackbaron.com
             Cell Phone:          314-922-3056
             Telephone:           314-621-3400



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                                                                                               171




MAKING ST. LOUIS A GREAT CITY AGAIN…FOR EVERYONE!

                                 CITY OF ST. LOUIS:

              HISTORY & BACKGROUND
                                    Functioning as both a city and a county required to
                                    provide services for both governmental units, the City
                                    of St. Louis is a major Midwestern city that has suf-
                                    fered from serious economic deterioration for the five
                                    decades from 1950 to 2000. The City has been
                                    choked by its 62-square-mile boundaries since 1876,
                                    and the City’s economy deteriorated significantly as
                                    businesses, jobs and people fled to surrounding
                                    suburbs.

For five decades, City officials watched helplessly as this suburban migration left thou-
sands of abandoned and undervalued residential and business properties in its wake—
annexation across county borders is not permitted per Missouri law.

In the past eight years, the City has made significant progress towards rebuilding the
market for its residential and commercial real estate and improving quality of life for ex-
isting residents and businesses and for new residents and businesses the City is begin-
ning to attract. Much additional investment is needed, however, before the devastation
of the past fifty years can be considered truly overcome.

The common goal of City officials, residents and businesses is to make St. Louis a great
city again. Over the past eight years, the City has made a great deal of progress to-
wards that goal. The current state of the national economy, however, threatens continu-
ing progress.

Population: The City’s population peaked at 857,000 in 1950. At the time of the 2000
census, the City’s population stood at 348,189—the loss of half a million people since
between 1950 and 2000 represented a 60% decrease in the number of people living in
the city. Over the past seven years, the City has begun to rebuild its population base.
The net number of people returning to the City is not large—the Census Bureau’s popu-
lation estimate for July, 2007, is 355,663, a gain of approximately 7,500 people since
the 2000 Census—but it is a significant sign of hope in a long term landscape of nega-
tivity. The City has worked hard, in partnership with a variety of residential developers,
to attract new residents by focusing on the rehabilitation of its wealth of unique historic
properties, by using a variety of tax incentives to give prospective residents a reason to
take a chance on the City, and by capitalizing on the new interest in urban lifestyles
among both empty nesters and young adults.


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172




            Source: U. S.
              Census                                                                  1830-2000:                                                                                                           POPULATION CHANGE
              Bureau
                                                                       POPULATION PER CENSUS                                                                                                               CALENDAR YEARS 1990-2007
                                                                                    CITY OF ST. LOUIS                                                                                               (PER CENSUS BUREAU AND CITY ESTIMATES)
                9 0 0000                                                                                                                                                           400,000
                                                                                                                                 857,000


                7 5 0000                                                                                                                                                           390,000                                                                     OUR
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             ESTIMATE



                6 0 0000                                                                                                                                                           380,000
       PEOPLE




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 CENSUS




                                                                                                                                                                          PEOPLE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                ESTIMATES


                4 5 0000                                                                                                                                                           370,000
                                                                                                                                                                348,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   CENSUS

                3 0 0000                                                                                                                                                           360,000


                1 5 0000                                                                                                                                                           350,000
                            5,000

                      0                                                                                                                                                            340,000
                             1830


                                      1840


                                             1850


                                                    1860


                                                              1870


                                                                      1880


                                                                             1890


                                                                                      1900


                                                                                             1910


                                                                                                     1920


                                                                                                            1930


                                                                                                                   1940


                                                                                                                          1950


                                                                                                                                  1960


                                                                                                                                           1970


                                                                                                                                                  1980


                                                                                                                                                         1990


                                                                                                                                                                   2000




                                                                                                                                                                                             1990


                                                                                                                                                                                                    1991


                                                                                                                                                                                                            1993


                                                                                                                                                                                                                   1995


                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1997


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 1999


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2001


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2003


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      2005


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2007
                          UNEMPLOYMENT "GAP": CITY VS. COUNTY/STATE

           6.0%
                                             Although the growth in population is a sign of hope,
                                 SEPTEMBER--2000 THROUGH 2008

           5.5%
           5.0%
                                             a preponderance of City’s residents still have in-
           4.5%                              comes far below those of residents of the surround-
           4.0%
           3.5%
                                             ing area. As the graph at left demonstrates, the
           3.0%
           2.5%
                                             “unemployment gap” between the City and neigh-
           2.0%                              boring counties has diminished. In addition, the
                                             number of City households with incomes of $75,000
           1.5%
           1.0%
                      2000          2001
                                             or more has also grown. But median income in the
                                             2002

                      CITY VS. ST. LOUIS COUNTY
                                                      2003           2004    2005

                                                             CITY VS. ST. CHARLES COUNTY
                                                                                         2006       2007    2008

                                                                                                     CITY VS. MISSOURI


                                             City is still relatively flat and both median income
      and rates of increase in median income lag far behind the MSA and St. Louis County,
      according to the U. S. Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Further, the num-
      ber of people in the City living in poverty is not declining, particularly among the City’s
      African-American population—overall, more than 25% of City residents live in poverty,
      and approximately 40% of the City’s black residents live in poverty.

      The St. Louis Agency for Training and Employment placed more than 5,000 City resi-
      dents in jobs from 2006 through 2008, but the state of the economy threatens SLATE’s
      ability to continue this important work.

                                                    While the City added more than 27,000 new
                                             CUMULATIVE NEW HOMES
        Source: St.
        Louis Metro
       Homebuilders
                        CITY OF ST. LOUIS
                                                    and substantially rehabilitated homes to its
       27,000                                       inventory from 2001 through 2008—more
       24,000
       21,000
                                                    than 15% of the 176,000 housing units in the
       18,000                                       City at the time of the 2000 census, with
       15,000
       12,000                                       many of the homes affordable—the current
        9,000
        6,000
                                                    single-family home sales and mortgage crisis
        3,000                                       threatens continuation of this progress as
            0
              2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007    well. Although more people of all incomes
                           Multifamily rehab        than ever before are interested in purchasing
                                                           Multifamily new            Single family rehab          Single family new

                                                    a home in the City, most of these people al-
      ready own homes and must sell them before they can move. According to data from
      the City Assessor’s office, sales prices based on free-market sales have remained sta-
      ble and even risen in a number of neighborhoods. But the rate of sales has declined by
      approximately 50%. Because the City is a mixed use geography and most of its neigh-
      borhoods support rental development as well as single-family homes, residential devel-
      opment is still proceeding, although at a much slower rate. Economic recovery funding
      will make possible continuing demonstrations of progress until the economy recovers
      sufficiently that the rate of ongoing private development can accelerate.



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                                                                                                                   173




Economy: The City’s economy, too, shows signs of hope. According to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, although the number of jobs in the City declined significantly from 1978
to 2006, in 2007 and 2008 the number of jobs in the City grew. As of the end of March,
2006, approximately 219,000 jobs were located in the City, down from a high of approx-
imately 360,000 in 1979. As of March, 2008—the latest data available from the BLS—
the number of jobs in the City stood at 232,000—an increase of 6% over 2006. The
number of businesses located in the City has also grown from 2006 to 2008. Notwith-
standing this progress, the City has been impacted by events beyond the City’s control,
including the recent Anheuser Busch-InBev merger and the less-recent acquisition of
Macy’s by Federated Department Stores. And BLS data for the months following March
of 2008 will certainly show that the City is negatively impacted by the national recession,
although much of the City’s economy has transitioned over the past five decades to in-
dustries like health care that are less sensitive to changes in consumer behavior.

   Source: U. S.
     Bureau of
                       JOBS & BUSINESSES IN THE CITY:
                                                           Notwithstanding the significant loss of
                                                                   JOBS   BUSINESSES

                                                           jobs over the past twenty years, the City
   Labor Statistics
                        ANNUAL TOTALS--1978 THROUGH 2006

                                                           is still home to more than 8% of all of the
       400,000                                                               16,000

       350,000                                                               14,000

       300,000
                                                           jobs in the State of Missouri and more
                                                                             12,000
                                                           than 12% of the State’s wage base within
                                                                                              BUSINESSES



       250,000                                                               10,000

                                                           its tiny 62-square-mile boundaries—state
JOBS




       200,000                                                               8,000

       150,000
                                                           officials recognize the City’s importance
                                                                             6,000

       100,000                                             to Missouri’s economy and have partici-
                                                                             4,000

         50,000                                            pated heavily in the City’s revitalization.
                                                                             2,000

                0                                          But the historic loss of jobs has negatively
                                                                             0


                                                           impacted the City’s economy and its abili-
                      1978
                      1979
                      1980
                      1981
                      1982
                      1983
                      1984
                      1985
                      1986
                      1987
                      1988
                      1989
                      1990
                      1991
                      1992
                      1993
                      1994
                      1995
                      1996
                      1997
                      1998
                      1999
                                                           2000
                                                                  2001
                                                                  2002
                                                                  2003
                                                                  2004
                                                                  2005
                                                                  2006




                                                           ty to provide services for its low-income
             JOBS & BUSINESSES IN THE CITY
        Source:
       U. S. Bureau
         of Labor
                                                           residents, since a significant portion of the
                       MARCH, 2001 - 2008
                                                           City’s tax revenues are derived from
        Statistics


    250,000                                         16,000
    225,000                                         14,000
                                                           businesses and workers employed in the
    200,000
                                                    12,000
                                                           City but living elsewhere. Similarly, as
    175,000
                                                    10,000
                                                           neighborhood retail models have been
                                                                                 BUSINESSES




    150,000
                                                           displaced by suburban shopping malls,
   JOBS




    125,000                                         8,000
    100,000                                         6,000
                                                           forcing City residents to go outside the
     75,000
                                                    4,000
                                                           City for necessary and desirable pur-
     50,000
                                                    2,000
                                                           chases, the City’s sales tax base has also
     25,000
          0                                         0
                                                           deteriorated. The City has worked with
            2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008        developers to locate new retail establish-
                                 JOBS       BUSINESSES
                                                           ments, including Lowes, Target, and De-
                                                           sign Within Reach, in a variety of City
neighborhoods and in downtown, and a new St. Louis Cardinals ballpark was recently
completed that preserved a major source of City revenue and improved business confi-
dence in the resurgence of downtown. As a result, the City’s retail, earnings tax and
property tax revenues were growing before the national recession fully blossomed.
Over the last six months, however, growth has all but ceased.

City’s Approach to Progress: The City has adopted several primary philosophies that
have made the progress to date possible:

             First, we must make the City a place where more affirmatively people
             choose to live, work and play, to reverse the catastrophic job and population
             losses that the City experienced from 1950 to 2000.


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174




         Second, to achieve that goal the City must address all aspects of the City’s
         economy and quality of residential and “business” life at once, since lack of
         progress in any one area adversely affects progress in all the others. Crime,
         quality of the public school system, and the quality of our infrastructure affect our
         ability to attract both residents and businesses. Businesses will not choose to lo-
         cate or remain in a City where residents and businesses continue to leave; resi-
         dents will not choose to locate or remain in a City where businesses and other
         residents continue to leave and where retail services now considered basic to
         modern life do not exist. The City must offer the kinds of public and private
         amenities that people want and need.
         Third, incentives like tax abatement, tax increment financing, and direct City fi-
         nancing are necessary to rebuild the market for City residential and busi-
         ness real estate—e.g., to encourage homebuyers and businesses to take
         chances on locations where a healthy market has not existed for many, many
         years. The lack of such markets is evident in vacant and abandoned business
         and residential properties in many parts of the City.

         Fourth, to overcome negative attitudes towards the City that have built up over
         the last five decades, the City must create a business and residential envi-
         ronment that welcomes new businesses and residents.

         Fifth, the City must be able to get things done. A City that cannot act on its
         goals is a City doomed to failure.

         Sixth, and most importantly, City revitalization is a “team sport”—no one indi-
         vidual, organization, business or developer can singlehandedly rebuild a city that
         has suffered St. Louis’ catastrophic economic losses. The City has reached out
         to everyone who is key to making St. Louis a great city again. Developers, con-
         tractors, architects, bankers, equity investors, retailers, employers, attorneys, ac-
         countants, hospitals, educators, entrepreneurs, scientists, state officials, federal
         officials, philanthropists, and everyone who lives or works in the City are all our
         very important partners in getting things done—on a wide variety of fronts.

      Thanks to the application of these philosophies and the City’s resulting progress over
      the last eight years, a broad-based and competent organizational infrastructure—public
      and private—has been developed. As the project descriptions in the remainder of this
      document demonstrate, these teams are ready, willing and able to proceed with more
      development—as soon as resources become available.

      One of the few bright spots in the current economy is that construction pricing has
      dropped significantly. With economic recovery funding, we have an opportunity today to
      make progress on a variety of public infrastructure fronts. This public progress will set
      the stage for private enterprise-driven progress as the economy recovers.

      MAKING ST. LOUIS A GREAT CITY AGAIN…FOR EVERYONE!




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