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					                            MISSION AND OBJECTIVES

A-M.1: The accounting academic unit must have a clear and published mission
statement that is reviewed periodically and revised as needed.

The mission of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy is:

        To maintain high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that attract top
        students and prepare them for careers in business and to foster the understanding
        and practice of accounting through research, professional service, and outreach
        activities.

The educational portion of this mission is published in the undergraduate and graduate catalogs,
and the mission is included on the School’s web site (www.cba.ua.edu/accounting).

Following several years of informal discussion, the School began creating a formal strategic plan
in the fall of 1996. The academic year 1996-1997 was dedicated to gathering information,
primarily from School and College documents and surveys of alumni, students, and recruiters.
Beginning in 1997, faculty committees were formed to draft mission statements, including goals,
for the School and for each of its programs. Committee reports were circulated among the faculty
as a whole for comment, and then a one-day retreat was held at the North River Yacht Club to
discuss each report.

Committees were then charged with revising the mission statements to reflect the consensus of
the faculty as a whole and to draft strategies for achieving the goals. These reports were, in turn,
subjected to the process as described in the previous paragraph. The strategies developed for
each program included actions to be taken and measurements to be applied. When the faculty
had reached a consensus, the resultant strategic plan was circulated to constituents, as represented
by the School’s Professional Advisory Board.

Simultaneously with the process described, the College also conducted a strategic planning
process, facilitated by consultants sponsored by the Ernst & Young Foundation. Faculty
members from the School participated in the College initiative, and the School process benefited
from knowledge gained from this participation.

The strategic plan of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy, including the mission statements
for the school and each of its programs, was formally adopted in the fall of 1999 and was
modified in 2002. Exhibit M-1 provides an overview of the School’s strategic plan. The goals,
strategies, actions, and measurements are discussed by program in section A-M.2 of this
document.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                  M-1
                                    Exhibit M-1
                   Culverhouse School of Accountancy Strategic Plan

Mission: To maintain high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that attract top students
and prepare them for professional careers in business and to foster the understanding and practice
of accounting through research, professional service, and outreach activities.

                   Goals                                             Strategies
  Excellence in Undergraduate Program            ·   Maintain a highly qualified faculty
To maintain and enhance our status as the            possessing appropriate academic
program of choice in Alabama and as an elite         credentials, professional experience, and
program in the U.S. for students interested in       significant scholarly accomplishments.
professional accounting careers and for the      ·   Design and deliver a curriculum that
employers of these students.                         encourages students to develop the
                                                     knowledge and skills important for success.
                                                     This curriculum focuses on development of
                                                     a strong understanding of accounting,
                                                     business processes, and information
                                                     technology and the ability to apply this
                                                     knowledge to solving business problems and
                                                     communicating these solutions.
  Excellence in Masters of Accountancy           ·   Seek and accept only quality applicants
                    Program                          from our own and other outstanding
To provide students with greater breadth and         undergraduate accounting programs.
depth of understanding in accounting and         ·   Design and deliver a curriculum that builds
business than it is possible to attain in an         upon and enhances the student’s
undergraduate program alone.                         undergraduate education and includes
                                                     coverage of the most recent developments in
                                                     accounting theory and practice, and with the
                                                     extant technology in the field.
 Excellence in Master of Tax Accounting          ·   Seek and accept only quality applicants
                   Program                           from our own and other outstanding
To provide students who have decided on a            undergraduate accounting programs.
career in taxation a challenging graduate        ·   Design and deliver a curriculum that
education in their chosen specialty area.            provides preparation in the technical areas
                                                     of tax law and develops the research,
                                                     communication and analytical skills
                                                     necessary for a successful career in taxation.
    Excellence in Doctoral Program in            ·   Seek and accept only quality applicants who
                Accountancy                          are ambitious and focused on becoming
To prepare students who will excel in both           productive scholars.
research and teaching while pursuing             ·   Increase program visibility by promoting
academic careers in peer institutions.               our website and by communicating with
                                                     directors of masters of accountancy
                                                     programs and GMAT takers.
                                                 ·   To create a market niche for our students by
                                                     developing an accounting information
                                                     systems emphasis in our program.




M-2                                                                 AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
A-M.2: The accounting academic unit must articulate educational objectives for
each accounting degree program offered and identify the characteristics of the
students and other constituent groups served by each program. The program
objectives should include identification of the input and output market(s) served by
each program.


THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

The undergraduate program was the primary focus of the School from its inception until January
1995, when the 150-hour law became effective in Alabama. It has been the strongest of the
degree programs, and the one around which the School's reputation has been built. Although the
programs have remained distinct, a primary role of the undergraduate program is to prepare
students for continuing their education through entry into one of the master’s degree programs.
As such, the undergraduate program has become a strong lead program for the master’s programs
in accounting, taxation, and business administration.

In the face of resource limitations, the undergraduate offerings have been streamlined so that the
program is highly structured and without many electives. This structure permits resource
efficiency and insures that each student receives a solid foundation. Because of the 150-hour
requirement, steps were taken to control admission into the upper division courses to bring the
demand for these courses into line with available resources. Specifically, admission to the School
requires a student to have completed 54 credit hours and to have achieved a grade point average
of at least 2.5.

The competition for quality students across universities is high. The overall quality of students at
The University of Alabama is average for a state university, and therefore we are presented with a
challenge in attracting students to the program who have the ability to succeed in the accounting
profession and other business disciplines. We put considerable effort and resources into
recruiting quality students through the use of publications, letters, direct contact, and
scholarships. It has become increasingly important to recruit quality students as the pool of
college students in general, and those desiring to major in accounting in particular, has declined.

Input for the undergraduate program is primarily from high school graduates in Alabama and
surrounding states. Students desiring to major in accounting are identified as pre-business
students until they complete their sophomore year. Students must apply for admission to the
School in order to register for junior-level courses.

Approximately half of the undergraduate accounting majors enter graduate programs. Most enter
the MAcc or MTA programs at Alabama. Others go to other accounting graduate programs, to
MBA programs, and to law school. Students who do not continue their educations enter the labor
market as entry-level accountants in business, government, and non-profit organizations.
Professional certification is not a requirement for these positions.

The goal of the program and strategies for achieving the goal are stated in the School’s planning
document as:




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                 M-3
Goal: Excellence in our Undergraduate Program
To maintain and enhance our status as the program of choice in Alabama and as an
elite program in the United States for students interested in professional accounting
careers and for the employers of these students.

Strategies:

    1. Maintain a highly qualified faculty possessing appropriate academic credentials,
       professional experience, and significant scholarly accomplishments.
    2. Design and deliver a curriculum that encourages students to develop the knowledge and
       skills important for success. This curriculum focuses on development of a strong
       understanding of accounting, business processes, and information technology and the
       ability to apply this knowledge to solving business problems and communicating these
       solutions.

MASTER OF ACCOUNTANCY PROGRAM

The objective of the MAcc program is to build upon the foundation established by an
undergraduate accounting degree by providing students with additional exposure to accounting
issues and by developing the skills required of professional accountants.

Students who enter the MAcc program are primarily recent graduates of our own accounting
program. Other students enter from other universities in the State and region. Most students who
graduate from the program enter public accounting. About half start with one of the Big Five
firms, and the others begin with regional and local firms.

The goal of the program and strategies for achieving the goal are stated in the School’s planning
document as:

Goal: Excellence in our Master of Accountancy Program
To provide students with greater breadth and depth of understanding in accounting
and business than can be attained in an undergraduate program alone.

Strategies:

        1. Seek and accept only quality applicants from our own and other outstanding
           undergraduate accounting programs.
        2. Design and deliver a curriculum that builds upon and enhances the student’s
           undergraduate education and includes coverage of the most recent
           developments in accounting theory and practice, and with the extant
           technology in the field.

MASTER OF TAX ACCOUNTING

The objective of the MTA program is to provide an in-depth coverage of tax accounting that
emphasizes the legal as well as accounting requirements of this highly specialized area.




M-4                                                                AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
The program attracts students from our undergraduate accounting program and from other
programs in the region. Most of the graduates of the program enter the public accounting
profession with one of the Big Five firms.

The goal of the program and strategies for achieving the goal are stated in the School’s planning
document as:

Goal: Excellence in our Master of Tax Accounting Program
To provide students who have decided on a career in taxation a challenging
graduate education in their chosen specialty area.

Strategies:

        1. Seek and accept only quality applicants from our own and other outstanding
           undergraduate accounting programs.
        2. Design and deliver a curriculum that provides preparation in the technical areas of tax
           law and develops the research, communication, and analytical skills necessary for a
           successful career in taxation.

DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN ACCOUNTANCY

The objective of the doctoral program in accountancy is to prepare students to assume positions
in academic institutions as teachers and researchers. Most of the students who enter the program
have undergraduate or graduate degrees in accountancy from universities in the Southeast. All
graduates of the program have obtained faculty positions with universities.

Recent efforts have been undertaken to recruit for the program nationally. In 1998, the School
received enhancement funds from the University to strengthen the PhD program. Those funds
resulted in hiring two additional faculty in accounting information systems. We have worked
with the faculty in management information systems and computer science to develop a PhD
concentration in accounting information systems. We expect the first student with this
concentration to graduate in 2003.

The goal of the program and strategies for achieving the goal are stated in the School’s planning
document as:

Goal: Excellence in our Doctoral Program in Accountancy
To prepare students who will excel in both teaching and research while pursuing
academic careers in peer institutions and to maintain or improve our standing
among comparable programs.

Strategies:

    1. Seek and accept only quality applicants who are ambitious and focused on becoming
       productive scholars.
    2. Increase program visibility by promoting our website and by communicating with
       directors of masters of accountancy programs and GMAT takers.
    3. To create a market niche for our students by developing an accounting information
       systems emphasis in our program.



Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                M-5
RESOURCES TO ACCOMPLISH OBJECTIVES

The School’s physical, human, and fiscal resources are consistent with its mission and objectives.
Physical resources include state-of-the art classrooms and offices. Many classrooms are equipped
with computers and projection systems and are networked with computer labs and faculty offices.
Students have access to computers through labs and classrooms. All faculty are provided with
computers and instructional support. Faculty have access to College and University technical
support for the development of educational materials and courses.

Human resources include 17 full-time faculty, supplemented by several adjunct faculty, and
graduate students. Most faculty teach in the undergraduate program periodically. All programs
are sufficiently staffed to cover the curriculum in each program. The School’s support staff of 4.5
full-time equivalent people also is adequate for the clerical and student advising requirements of
the School.

Financial support is adequate, though hampered by a lack of state support for education in
general. Private support through gifts and endowments permits supplement of state dollars for
salaries, graduate students, scholarships, research, and travel. A financial summary for each of
the last four fiscal years is provided in Exhibit M-2. Amounts for 2001-2002 are not expected to
differ materially from those of the previous year.

                                        Exhibit M-2
                                     Financial Resources

                              2000-2001     1999-2000     1998-1999     1997-1998
Revenues
University appropriations     $2,615,970 $2,554,832 $2,323,833 $2,043,132
Expendable gifts                 145,105       94,769   91,444     86,873
Gifts to endowment               102,206       42,795   60,472     96,060
Endowment income                 314,502      307,539  309,542    314,066
Total revenues                 3,177,783 2,999,935 2,785,291 2,540,131
Expenditures
Faculty salaries and support 2,024,801 1,933,965 1,790,543 1,553,492
Staff salaries                    98,160      101,314  107,544     91,751
Student assistance               297,903      308,436  261,114    301,832
Benefits                         423,538      377,190  339,676    337,267
Operations                       172,422      176,185  181,568    182,438
Equipment and other               26,111       59,751   44,259     12,154
Transfer to endowment            102,206       42,795   60,472     96,060
Total expenditures             3,145,141 2,999,636 2,785,176 2,574,994
Endowment                      5,129,758 5,022,883 4,969,817 4,902,741
Full-time faculty                     18           18       16         16
Note: The University’s fiscal year ends September 30.

An additional $125,000 of permanent university appropriations was added in 1998-1999, and
another $125,000 was added in 1999-2000. These funds were obtained from an enhancement
grant to strengthen the School’s PhD program and offerings in accounting information systems.
The funds were used to hire two additional faculty in systems and to enhance PhD assistantship
lines.



M-6                                                                AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
A-M.3: The accounting academic unit’s mission and each program’s objectives
must be consonant with the mission of the school and the institution of which it is a
part.

The mission of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy is consistent with and complements the
mission of the University and College. The mission statement of The University of Alabama
defines the organization's purpose and establishes the foundation for the intellectual climate and
educational environment on the campus that encourages and supports the offering of high quality
programs.

        The University of Alabama, the State's oldest public university, is the senior
        comprehensive doctoral level institution in Alabama. Established by constitutional
        provision, with successive statutory mandates and authorizations, the University's
        purpose is to advance the intellectual and social condition of all the people of the state
        through quality programs of research, instruction, and service.

        The University of Alabama bases its activities on a broad range of research programs,
        many of which are recognized for their contributions to the economic, technological, and
        cultural growth of the State and region. This research, supported by a library which is a
        member of the national Association of Research Libraries, yields continuing stimulation
        for the instructional programs offered by the University’s thirteen colleges and schools.
        At the undergraduate level the University offers a comprehensive range of baccalaureate
        programs in the arts and humanities and in scientific, technological, pre-professional, and
        professional fields. A university-wide core curriculum provides a strong general
        education component as the keystone of every undergraduate program. Graduate
        programs, built on these strong undergraduate foundations, concentrate on the
        development of original scholarship and research. In selected areas, including the state's
        only public law school, professional programs develop the highest levels of competence
        and leadership. As one of the two major residential campuses in the state, the University
        enhances the academic and personal growth of all its students through its on-campus
        student life environment. Recognizing that education is a lifelong endeavor, the
        University offers a wide array of educational opportunities to adult and non-traditional
        students.

        The University recognizes the importance of educating students to live and work in a
        global community of increasingly interdependent countries. To this end, the University
        supports a variety of international programs for faculty and students.

        The University's research and instructional programs form a base for extensive service
        activities, providing continuous linkages with business, industry, and government through
        applications of new knowledge. These relationships cause the University's influence to
        extend beyond the bounds of the state as it assists developmental efforts at regional,
        national, and international levels. (The University of Alabama Faculty Handbook, p. 1.)

The mission statement of the College is included in the Self-Evaluation Report of the College and
is not repeated here.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                   M-7
A-M.4: The accounting academic unit must specify its relative emphasis on
teaching, intellectual contributions, professional interaction, and service.

The degree programs are not separate with respect to faculty involvement or relative weights of
teaching, research, and service. Most faculty teach in more than one program. Four faculty teach
in the MTA program, and all but one of these also teach in other programs. Faculty who teach
graduate courses must be appointed to the University’s Graduate Faculty. Permanent
appointment depends on the faculty member having made continuing and recent intellectual
contributions. Faculty who teach in the Ph.D. program are those with continuing and recent
contributions to basic research.

For purposes of merit evaluations, College policy specifies that up to 20% of the merit pool may
be assigned to service with the remainder assigned equally to teaching and intellectual
contributions. As a practical matter, the service weight is usually no more than 10%, and the
overwhelming weight is assigned to teaching and intellectual contributions.

Teaching excellence is expected of all faculty. All faculty are also expected to interact with the
professional community and to be involved in College and University service activities. The
emphasis on research varies by faculty member. Most faculty are expected to provide intellectual
contributions consistent with their rank and other responsibilities. A strong record of intellectual
contributions is required for tenure and promotion. Basic and applied scholarship are supported
and rewarded, as is instructional development. However, greater support and rewards are
provided for those who are engaged in and who publish basic research in premier journals.
The School views its contributions in each of these areas-instruction, research, and service-as
well as basic versus applied research as a portfolio. All faculty are expected to contribute to that
portfolio according to their interests and abilities.


A-M.5: The accounting academic unit’s activities must be consistent with its
mission and the objectives of its programs.

Underlying the mission, goals, and strategies of the School are requirements for quality faculty,
students, and curriculum. Actions, measures, and outcomes associated with these requirements
are discussed below.
                                               Faculty

A critical factor for the success of the program is our ability to recruit and retain distinguished
faculty members. Measures necessary to obtain this objective include:
    · Recruiting and retaining faculty who are critical to the program.
    · Maintaining salaries consistent with the market for accounting faculty.
    · Providing research and teaching support necessary for scholarship and teaching
         excellence.

Primary measures of faculty success and qualifications include:
    · Academic and professional qualifications of faculty
    · Scholarly productivity
    · Professional involvement
    · Teaching excellence


M-8                                                                   AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
These measures are monitored and evaluated on an ongoing basis. Outcomes associated with
these activities include:

Recruiting and retaining faculty who are critical to the program: Few faculty have left the
program voluntarily during the last decade. In the last five years, we have hired highly qualified
faculty from strong doctoral programs. We have succeeded in retaining our most productive
faculty and have been able to pay sufficiently well to hire a very productive faculty member in a
highly competitive market.

Maintaining salaries consistent with the market for accounting faculty: State appropriation
have been insufficient to keep salaries at competitive levels. We have been successful in using
private funds to supplement state support. Salaries, including private support, for most faculty
will be above averages for other universities in the Southeast for faculty at the same rank. Eleven
of 17 faculty will have some form of supplemental support through a fellowship, professorship, or
chair for the 2002-2003 year. Maintaining salaries of highly productive faculty at competitive
levels will continue to be a challenge.

Providing research and teaching support necessary for scholarship and teaching excellence:
Considerable support is available in the form of graduate assistants, technology and data support,
reimbursement for travel and fees, and research and curriculum development grants. Private
support has been used for these purposes. Faculty requests for support or reimbursement are
seldomly denied. Research and curriculum development grants are provided for all eligible
faculty from College and/or School resources.

Academic and professional qualifications of faculty: All faculty are academically and
professionally qualified, see Exhibits FD-1, 3, and 6.

Scholarly productivity: Faculty productivity in the form of articles, books, and presentations
has been consistently strong. While there are no specific criteria for measuring success, all
faculty are active in some form of scholarship. Nearly all faculty have ongoing research
programs that have led to publication in major journals in their areas of specialization.
Approximately one-third of the faculty have published in one or more of the top academic
journals in accounting, such as The Accounting Review, The Journal of Accounting Research,
Accounting Organizations and Society, and Contemporary Accounting Research, during the last
five years. Detailed data about scholarly activities are provided in Exhibits IC-1, 2, and 3.

Professional involvement: All faculty are involved in professional activities and organizations.
Several faculty members have held offices in these organizations. Interaction with the accounting
profession remains an ongoing interest of faculty. Details are provided in Exhibits FD-3, 9, 10,
and 11.

Teaching excellence: The faculty are dedicated to teaching excellence. Most faculty are
involved in ongoing curriculum development activities. Teaching evaluation scores have
averaged above 4.0 on a 5-point scale for almost all accounting faculty over the last five years.
See Exhibits FD-2 and IN-1.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                  M-9
                                              Students

Quality students are essential to a quality accounting program. Accordingly, it is important that
we:
    · Identify and recruit quality students
    · Maintain enrollment levels consistent with program resources
    · Provide good placement opportunities for students
    · Provide a quality educational experience for students

Primary measures associated with these activities include:
    · Entry level statistics: GPA, ACT/SAT, GMAT
    · Enrollment levels in each program
    · Scholarships and other support provided students
    · Internship and job placement
    · Success with professional examinations
    · Career development and progress
    · Student and alumni satisfaction with the program and career preparation

Outcomes associated with these activities include:

Entry level statistics: Students entering the undergraduate program have GPAs and ACT/SAT
scores well above average for the University and College (see Exhibit S-5). Our program is
intended to meet the needs of students who plan on entry-level business and government positions
as well as professional careers. We have elected not to set entry standards at a level that would
prevent students with these career aspirations from entering the program Average GPA’s of
students entering the masters programs are above 3.5, and average GMAT scores have been
above 550. Average GPA’s of students entering the PhD program have been above 3.5, and
GMAT scores have been well above 600. We are comfortable with these levels. Because a
masters degree is necessary to obtain 150 hours and 150 hours are necessary to sit for the CPA
exam throughout the Southeast, we attempt to maintain standards that will permit serious students
to pursue a professional career. More emphasis is placed on GPA, especially in accounting
courses, for students at UA. The best predictor of success we have found for the masters
programs is a student’s success in other accounting courses.

Enrollment levels in each program: Enrollment in the undergraduate level declined in the mid
1990’s below numbers we would like to see. We would like to graduate approximately 160
undergraduate students and approximately 80 graduate students each year. We began a
recruitment effort for undergraduate students in 2001-2002 involving meetings to discuss the
accounting profession and career opportunities with sophomores. Enrollment in the junior
courses has increased to over 130 students for the fall of 2002. We will continue and expand our
recruitment efforts in 2002-2003 for the undergraduate and masters programs. PhD program
enrollment decreased to four students in 2001-2002. A strong recruiting effort this year resulted
in four additional students joining the program in the fall and a fifth likely to begin in the spring.
These students have excellent credentials. Our goal is to maintain an enrollment of 10 students in
the PhD program. We plan to continue recruitment efforts in the coming year. See Exhibits P-2
and 3.

Scholarships and other support provided students: In addition to scholarships provided by the
University and College, the School provides over $100,000 of scholarships to students each year.
We continue to solicit scholarship support from employers and alumni. See Exhibits S-3 and 4.


M-10                                                                 AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
Approximately 25 masters students are offered graduate assistantships each year. These provide
about $5,000 plus half-tuition for 10 hours of work per week. PhD students receive graduate
assistantships that provide stipends of approximately $20,000 plus full tuition. These amounts
appear to be competitive with other universities.

Provide good placement opportunities for students: Over half of our undergraduate students
continue on to graduate programs, most at UA. Other undergraduate students find employment
with business and government. Nearly all students obtain employment soon after graduation.
See Exhibit S-8. Students completing the masters programs have had excellent success in
obtaining employment with CPA firms. Placement has been close to 100 percent for these
students. See Exhibits S-9 and 10. PhD students have all found faculty positions. Many of our
students have started their careers with peer institutions or major MBA programs. See Exhibit S-
11. Internships have become a major part of the recruiting/placement process. Approximately 50
students participate in our spring internship program each year. Many of these students have job
offers once they complete the internships. Other students secure summer or fall internships. See
Exhibit S-7.

Success with professional examinations: Pass rates on the CPA exam have increased
dramatically since students the 150-hour program has become effective. Nearly all students
completing the masters’ programs are successful with the CPA exam in a reasonable period. A
large portion of program graduates have become CPAs, and many have completed other
certifications. See Exhibit S-15 and 16.

Career development and progress: A recent survey of alumni indicates that alumni are
successful in professional careers. A large portion of graduates become partners with CPA firms.
Others become CEO’s and CFO’s in business. See Exhibits S-12, 13, and 14.

Student and alumni satisfaction with the program and career preparation: Recent surveys
of students and alumni indicate a high degree of satisfaction with the program. Student ratings
rank the program high relative to other universities. Alumni are pleased with the preparation they
received and their career development. See Exhibits C-3, 8, and 9.

                                          Curriculum

We maintain an ongoing curriculum development and evaluation process. Each program is
reviewed periodically and changes are made as needed. Primary concerns of this process are that:
    · The curriculum in each program is balanced among business and accounting courses,
       technical knowledge and skills development, and practical and conceptual subject matter.
    · The curriculum covers the spectrum of topics required for career success in accounting.
    · Course content be rigorous and up-to-date

Outcomes associated with these activities include:

Balanced curriculum: In addition to meeting AACSB requirements, curricula provide for a
wide range of knowledge and skills, including problem-solving, communications, technology,
and interpersonal skills. See C-1 and 2.

The curriculum covers the spectrum of topics required for career success in accounting:
Faculty examine the curriculum in each program on an ongoing basis and monitor current
developments in the profession and recommendations of professional organizations concerning
curricula content. See C-2, 3, and 4.


Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                              M-11
Course content be rigorous and up-to-date: Faculty are conscientious about keeping their
courses current. Each course is evaluated on a periodic basis to make sure the content is
consistent with program needs, current, and rigorous. We reviewed the undergraduate program
during the fall of 2001 and made minor program changes, including updating course titles and
descriptions. During the fall of 2002, we will examine the MAcc program. We also are looking at
the possibility of an MBA specialization in accounting with an emphasis on internal auditing and
a specialized MBA accounting program for students with undergraduate degrees in accounting.
We will be examining both of these options during the coming year.




M-12                                                             AACSB Self-Evaluation Report

				
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