PUBLIC_REPORT_2010-2011 - Delaware County Intermediate Unit by pengxiang

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									                                       RATIONALE


   Sec.644. ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS [42
                          U.S.C. 9839]


    (a)(2) Each Head Start agency shall make available to the public a report
     published at least once in each fiscal year that discloses the following
information from the most recently concluded fiscal year, except that reporting
 such information shall not reveal personally identifiable information about an
                            individual child or parent:



(A) The total amount of public and private funds received and the amount from each source.

(B) An explanation of budgetary expenditures and proposed budget for the fiscal year.

(C) The total number of children and families served, the average monthly enrollment (as a
percentage of funded enrollment), and the percentage of eligible children served.

(D) The results of the most recent review by the Secretary and the financial audit.

(E) The percentage of enrolled children that received medical and dental exams.

(F) Information about parent involvement activities.

(G) The agency’s efforts to prepare children for kindergarten.

(H) Any other information required by the Secretary.




                                   HEAD START ACT (AS AMENDED DECEMBER 12, 2007) p. 79


                                                                                             2
                               The History of Head Start
The Past

In 1965, The greater Chester Movement Head Start opened its doors under the direction
of Mr. Frank Tyler. Enrollment increased from 20 to 146 children and families and centers
were added in Sharon Hill and Darby, Pennsylvania.

In 1973, after a series of interim directors and the closing of the Greater Chester
Movement, the community organization, Citizens for Acting Now (CAN), became Head
Start’s grantee agency. In 1974, Mrs. Mary Hines was selected as Executive Director and
under her leadership and that of Mrs. Annie Gray, Executive Director of CAN, Head Start
rapidly grew to serve 592 children and their families.

The Present

In 1999, the Delaware County Intermediate Unit became the grantee for the local Head
Start Program under the direction of Mrs. Renée A. Bell. DCIU Head Start serves 950
children from the Federal Grant, 100 children from the PA Head Start Supplemental
Assistance Grant and 50 children from Pre-K Counts in 10 locations from Marcus Hook to
Yeadon, Pennsylvania. We published our first Outcome Measures on Child Readiness for
Kindergarten in 2001.

The DCIU Head Start Program was awarded grants from The Heads Up! Reading Network,
Boeing, The Gallagher Family Foundation and Fatherhood Initiative, the SPARC Literacy
and I Am Moving I Am Learning. In 2007, the program received The Speaker’s Education
Innovation Award: The Golden Apple Award at the Sharon Hill Early Childhood Learning
Center.

DCIU Head Start opened its first Early Childhood Learning Center in Sharon Hill with
partnerships with Early Intervention, Upper Darby, William Penn, Southeast Delco and
Interboro School Districts. Over the last 3-5 years the Program has formed early
childhood partnerships with Chichester and Chester Upland School Districts, as well as
the Chester Community Charter School.

The Future

In August 2010 Head Start will celebrate 45 years of serving children and families in
Delaware County.




                                                                                            3
             PROGRAM BUDGET

                                                                                   % of
PROGRAM                                                    2009-10                TOTAL

Operating Budget                                                $6,713,071            73.46%
Training & Technical Assistance                                    $76,798             0.84%
Credentialing                                                      $30,515             0.33%
One-Time Program Improvement Funds                               $472,010              5.17%
Child and Adult Food Program                                     $629,851              6.89%
Head Start Supplemental Assistance                               $823,857              9.02%
Pre-K Counts                                                     $392,500              4.29%

TOTALS                                                          $9,138,602




     All funds were spent during the Fiscal year that they were allocated and for the activities under each
     grant. For the Operating budget, Training & Technical Assistance and Credentialing funds, the fiscal year
     was 8/1/08 to 7/31/09. For the Child & Adult Care Food Program, the fiscal year was 10/1/08 to
                                                                                                             4
9/30/09. The Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program and Pre-K Counts Program operate under a
7/1/08 to 6/30/09 Fiscal Year.

Funding Sources and Budget

The mission of the Delaware County Intermediate Unit Head Start Program is to provide
families with tools to become self-sufficient; to prepare children who are ready, willing and able
to learn; to empower and develop capable and highly qualified staff and to produce leaders
committed to excellence for the promise and vision of a brighter future.

DCIU Head Start receives both Federal and State funding. There are seven sources of funding, 4
from Federal and 3 from State. The Federal Sources are the Head Start Operating grant,
Training and Technical Assistance, Credentialing for Staff and One-Time Program Improvement
funds. The State funds support the CACFP Food Program, Head Start Supplemental Assistance
Program and Pre-K Counts.

Head Start Operating Grant

   Services Provided: The Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU) Head Start program is a
   comprehensive child development program serving children from 3 to 5 years of age and
   their families. The child-focused program has the overall goal of increasing the social
   competence of young children in low-income families. “Social competence” implies the
   child’s effectiveness in dealing with both his/her present environment and later
   responsibilities in school and in life. Social competence addresses the inter-relatedness of
   social, emotional, cognitive and physical development. DCIU Head Start partners with DCIU
   Early Intervention providing the foundation for the early childhood learning system for Early
   intervention students serviced in Head Start classrooms.

   To support this overall goal, the DCIU Head Start program embraces and is committed to a
   set of core values, such as:

              Supporting learning environments for children, parents and staff
              Recognizing that the DCIU-HS community has roots in many cultures
              Understanding empowerment of families occurs when program governance is
               shared
              Embracing a comprehensive health system for children, families and staff
              Respecting all aspects of an individual’s development, including social,
               emotional, cognitive and physical growth.


TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE



                                                                                                   5
To provide training for personnel needed in connection with Head Start. To provide technical
assistance to communities in developing, conducting, and administering programs.

       Services Provided: Training and Technical Assistance provides: Full day/full year
       services, ensuring the school readiness of children and meeting educational
       performance measures, collaborative initiatives that foster effective early childhood
       professional development systems, experience in developing and operating successful
       family literacy services and training of Policy Council on Program Governance.


CREDENTIALING FOR HEAD START STAFF

To provide staff with consistent and ongoing training in early childhood education, nutrition,
family services, management and other related services.

   Services Provided:

              Associates or CDA in Early Childhood Program for all Teacher Assistants to be
               completed by 2011.
              Tuition allowance for all other staff.
              ServSafe certification and recertification classes for Nutrition Service Workers
              CDL certification and recertification for bus drivers

CHILD AND CARE FOOD PROGRAM (CACFP)

To promote child wellness by providing nutrition services which supplement and complement
those of the home and community.


   Services Provided: The USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is the primary
   source of reimbursement for meals for Head Start children. Reimbursement is claimed from
   CACFP for a daily maximum of two meals (breakfast, lunch) and one snack for each enrolled
   child in attendance.

HEAD START SUPPLEMENTAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

The purpose of the Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program (HSSAP) is to increase the
availability of high quality pre-kindergarten Head Start services for eligible children throughout
Pennsylvania.

       Services Provided: The primary emphasis for the program to provide comprehensive
       child development services to additional eligible children ages 3 to 5 years and their
       families who would not otherwise receive Head Start services.

                                                                                                     6
       The HSSAP also supports the establishment of an Early Learning System with
       collaborative program designs that enhance opportunities for children to have access to
       quality early care and learning programs. Those partnerships include childcare
       providers, school districts and Early Intervention.


PRE-K COUNTS PROGRAM

Pre-K Counts is designed to offer a high quality pre-kindergarten experience to eligible 3 and 4
year-olds in Pennsylvania.

       Services Provided: DCIU is providing full-day programming under the leadership of Head
       Start for at least 180 days of instructional activities in a provider/partnership with one
       child care center and two school districts.




                                                                                                   7
                                        COMPARISON OF PROGRAM BUDGETS




PROGRAM                                       2009-10        2010-11                             Notes


Operating Budget                              $6,713,071     $6,833,469   received a 1.8% increase over the 2008-09 funding.
Training & Technical Assistance                  $76,798        $88,323   received a 15% increase.
Credentialing                                    $30,515        $30,515
One-Time Program Improvement Funds              $472,010             $0   funding was only for the 2009-2010 Program Year
Child and Adult Food Program                    $629,851      $641,061    Approximate funding based on October's claim.
Head Start Supplemental Assistance              $823,857      $802,536    received a 2.6% decrease due to State budget
Pre-K Counts                                    $392,500      $384,650    received 2% decrease (1 slot) due to State budget


TOTALS                                       $9,138,602     $8,780,554




All funds were spent during the Fiscal year they were allocated and for the activities under each grant. For the Operating
budget, Training & Technical Assistance, Credentialing funds and One -time Program Improvement funds, the fiscal year
was 8/1/2009 to 7/31/2010. For the Child & Adult Care Food Program, the fiscal year was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2010. The
Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program and Pre-K Counts Program operate under a 7/1/2009 to 6/30/2010
Fsical Year.




                                                                                                                   8
                                             DCIU Head Start

                                    2009-2010 Enrollment Statistics

Enrollment by Funding
Total Funded Enrollment             # of children enrolled             % of children
1050                                1074                               102%


Enrollment by Age
2 years old                         44                                 4%
3 years old                         454                                42%
4 years old                         576                                54%


Enrollment by years
The first year                      763                                71%
The second year                     288                                27%
Three or more years                 23                                 2%


Enrollment by Ethnicity
Hispanic or Latino origin           67                                 6%
Non-Hispanic or Non-Latino origin   1007                               94%
American Indian or Alaska Native    3                                  0%
Asian                               39                                 4%
Black or African American           776                                72%
White                               125                                12%
Biracial/Multi-racial               83                                 8%
Other                               44                                 4%
Unspecified                         4                                  0%


Enrollment by Primary Language
English                                        980                             91%
Spanish                                        34                              3%
Caribbean Languages                            1                               0%
Mi1ddle Eastern & South Asian Languages        23                              2%
East Asian Languages                           5                               0%
European & Slavic Languages                    3                               0%
African Languages                              20                              2%
Other                                          4                               0%
Unspecified                                    4                               0%


Average Monthly Attendance

The average monthly attendance ranged from 82% to 88% for 2009-2010 program year.


                                                                                       9
                   Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU) Head Start Program

                                   ON-SITE MONITORING REVIEW



Conducted by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF)

Conducted from 03/21/2010 to 03/26/2010

Overview Report issued in July 2010 to Mr. Edward Cardow, Board President as legal notice to the
DCIU of the results of the on-site review.




      The DCIU Head Start program had no reported deficiencies
      Departments within Head Start either met or exceeded the Program Performance Standards
      Systems were in place and managed well
      The report cited the transition of our children as a strength



                                    AREAS OF NONCOMPLIANCE

Areas of noncompliance resulted in the following:

      Improved monitoring of the Staff Traffic Pattern Policy at two sites
      Safety & Pedestrian Training added to New Employee Orientation
      A reduction in class size by two slots in one classroom to adhere to the standard of 35 square
       feet of usable indoor space per child
      Improved monitoring of the Heating/Cooling System at one site as well as the installation of a
       new heating system




                                                                                                   10
AUDIT


The Delaware County Intermediate Unit is audited by an independent auditor. They have
audited the financial statements of the governmental activities, the business-type activities,
each major fund and the aggregate remaining fund information of the Delaware County
Intermediate Unit as of and for the year ended June 30, 2009, which collectively comprise the
Intermediate Unit's basic financial statements. These financial statements are the responsibility of
the Delaware County Intermediate Unit's management. The auditor’s responsibility is to express
opinions on these financial statements based on our audit.

The auditor conducted the audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in
Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those
standards require the auditor to plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance
about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial
statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant
estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement
presentation. The auditing firm believes that their audit provides a reasonable basis for their
opinions.

In their opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects,
the respective financial position of the governmental activities, the business-type activities, each
major fund and the aggregate remaining fund information of the Delaware County
Intermediate Unit as of June 30, 2009, and the respective changes in financial position and
cash flows, where applicable, thereof and the budgetary comparisons for the general fund
and its major special revenue funds for the year then ended in conformity with accounting
principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, the auditors also issued their report
dated February 16, 2010, on their consideration of the Intermediate Unit's internal control over
financial reporting and on their tests of Its compliance with certain provisions of laws,
regulations, contracts, grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to
describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and
the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial
reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance
with Government Auditing Standards and important for assessing the results of their audit.

                                                                                                         11
The management's discussion and analysis is not a required part of the basic financial statements but
is supplementary information required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United
States of America. The auditor applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally of
inquiries of management regarding the methods of measurement and presentation of the required
supplementary information. However, the auditing firm did not audit the information and express
no opinion on it.

Their audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that
collectively comprise the Delaware County Intermediate Unit's basic financial statements. The
accompanying schedule of expenditures of federal awards and certain state grants is presented
for purposes of additional analysis as required by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Circular A-133, "Audits of States, Local Governments and Nonprofit Organizations," and is not a
required part of the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing
procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, in their opinion, is fairly stated
in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole.




    Governmental Accounting Standards Board ("GASB") Statement No. 34, "Basic Financial
    Statements -and Management's Discussion and Analysis ('MD&A") - for State and Local
    Governments," requires an MD&A to precede the basic financial statements. The discussion
    and analysis of the Delaware County Intermediate Unit's financial performance will provide an
    overall review of the Intermediate Unit's financial performance for the year ended June 30,
    2009.

    FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

    The Delaware County Intermediate Unit ("DCIU") had combined annual revenue of
    $93,006.692. DCIU maintained quality services without significant Increases to the districts
    served.

    DCIU's annual revenue increased six percent, from $87,533,346 in 2007-2008. The
    Organization maintained consistent program offerings in special education, services to
    nonpublic schools, staff development, technology and administrative services.

    DCIU is scheduled to receive America Recovery and Reinvestment Act (“ARRA”) funding
    under President Obama’s stimulus program to support education for the period April 1,
    2009 through September 30, 2011. As of June 30, 2009, DCIU has not received ARRA funds.

    DCIU finances its programs and services through federal, state and local funding sources. The
    DCIU programs and services are identified in its Consolidated Budgets/Programs booklet.
    The total budgeted revenue reported in the 2009-2010 Consolidated Budget booklet is
    $103,589,207, an 3.7 percent increase over the 2008-2009 year. Components of the
                                                                                               12
increase are due to a rise in the cost for the Intermediate Unit's contribution toward health
care and prescription costs and contracted salary increases. Member districts of DCIU receive
IDEA funds as pass-through funds. Federal and state grant/entitlement programs provide funding
for many of the Intermediate Unit's programs. Local revenue is generated through individual
contracts with member districts or as a fee for service. Each member district has a contract
with DCIU to provide school-age special education services. The contracts are based on
estimated student participation and are reconciled yearly.



Member districts also contributed $834,475 toward the DCIU general operating budget for
2008-2009. District contributions are based on individual size and wealth. The amount of
district contributions has remained the same for 11 years. For the first time, in 2008-2009,
member districts received a 20 percent rebate on their contributions to the DCIU for a net
contribution of $667,580. The operating budget is used to provide services required of
Intermediate Units by the state under Act 102 of 1970.

In addition to the above, grants and awards are used to fund special services within the
Delaware County intermediate Unit.

Because Pennsylvania Intermediate Units are unable to levy taxes, it is important for the
Intermediate Unit to provide high quality services to meet districts' requests in a cost-
efficient manner.




                                                                                            13
          Child Health: Medical and Dental Overview
              2009-2010 Program Year Summary




                                Medical Home

                  84% of children were reported to have an
             ongoing source of continuous, accessible health care.


                               Medical Services

 85% of children were reported to have up-to-date schedule of age-appropriate
preventative and primary health care according to Pennsylvania’s EPSDT schedule
                              for well child care.

                            Immunization Services

    81% of children were reported to have been determined by a health care
               professional to be up-to-date on all immunizations

                           appropriate for their age.




                                 Dental Home

  49% were reported to have continuous, accessible dental care provided by a
                                  dentist.

                               Dental Services

                  53% of children received preventative care.

                                                                               14
                                                    Content Area Highlights

                                                                       Our Year-at-a Glance

                                 September 2009– Family Welcome, Initial Parent Committee Meeting

                                 October 2009– Parent Orientation, Parent Wellness Conference

                                 November 2009– Daddy and Me Activity Day, Career Exploration Series began

                                 December 2009– Policy Council Elections, December Dads Reading, Parent NHSA Conference
PARENT INVOLVEMENT 2009 - 2010




                                 January 2010- Policy Council Induction, Parent Leadership Training

                                 February 2010- Parent Committee Workshops and Trainings

                                 March 2010– Parent Nutrition Workshops partnership with Penn State University

                                 April 2009– Pennsylvania Head Start Association Conference

                                 May 2010-Family Days at Centers, College & Technical Schools Fair

                                 June 2010– Volunteer Training and Luncheon


                                                                SPOT LIGHT ON FATHERHOOD
                                 On November 28th, 2009, fathers of the DCIIU Head Start- Sharon Hill Early Childhood Learning
                                 Center hosted a “Daddy & Me

                                 Activity Day”. The event was well attended, with fathers representing all ten DCIU-Head Start
                                 locations. Fathers and their children participated in non-competitive “obstacle course-style” events–
                                 which supports our National Initiative to combat childhood obesity. Participants were treated to
                                 lunch and receive information about the Bridge Builders Male Involvement Advisory Board.
                                                       Volunteering

                                 Total volunteer hours calculated for 2009-2010 was 27,198
                                 hours. This time was generously donated primarily by
                                 parents, community representatives, and through our
                                 partnership with the Delaware County Services to the
                                 Aging “COSA”– Foster Grandparent Program. We also are
                                 pleased to report that of the 27,000 plus hours there was a
                                 28.34% increase in literacy based family activities. These
                                 volunteer hours help to support our Non-Federal In-Kind
                                 Donation contribution in the amount of $300,265.92. Our
                                 new goal will be to increase the hours to 30,000 .


                                                                                                                         15
TRANSITION

   Delaware County Intermediate Unit Head Start’s Developmental Transition Content Area is
continually striving to use new ideas and methods to enhance our students’ and their families’
experience in the Delaware County community. During the 2009-2010 program year, we have continued
to strengthen partnerships with a number of our districts. New joint events are being planned with both
Interboro and Upper Darby School Districts. Bridge Crossing ceremonies are held for all of our
transitioning children at the end of our program year. Transition activity backpacks are given to each of
the children participating in the ceremony.

   Strong partnerships, student success, and families connected to community resources continue to be
the objective of our developmental transition content area. In connecting families with school districts,
DCIU continues to prepare families for their child’s long educational journey in Delaware County. Giving
children a backpack full of activities for the summer keeps them engaged in learning and eager for
kindergarten. In the same respect, families who are connected to their community enhance civic
responsibility which is the fabric of Delaware County.

     In the 2009-2010 program year, DCIU Head Start had partnership agreements with nine of the
fifteen school districts in Delaware County. DCIU Head Start held joint kindergarten registration events
with Chester Community Charter, Chichester, and Southeast Delco School Districts. Our transitioning
students entered thirteen of the fifteen school districts in the county.




                                                                                                      16
                                                                    DCIU Head Start

                                                         2009-2010 Program Goals/Outcomes

The Self- Assessment process began on March 1, 2009 and ended on April 24, 2009. The Safe Environments Protocol from the Head Start Prism Evaluation
was the instrument used to conduct the self-assessment. Approximately 25 stakeholders participated in the self-assessment process which included: staff,
parents, policy council members, grantee, community partners, etc. The information was compiled and presented at the Program Planning Retreat where
the goals were established and a team was formed to implement a plan of action. The following are the goals and outcomes of the 2008-2009 Program
Self-Assessment.
                    Topic                                           Goal                                            Outcome
DCIU Head Start Mission Statement                   The Mission Statement will be             Achieved-The new Mission Statement was
                                                       customer friendly                       revised on January 26, 2010 and adopted on
                                                    The new Mission Statement will be         March 2, 2010.
                                                                    th
                                                       worded in 20 century language           The Mission statement is customer friendly
                                                                                                                  st
                                                    The Vision and Mission Statement will and worded in 21 century language
                                                       match
                                                    The new DCIU Head Start Mission
                                                       Statement will be completed by April
                                                       1, 2010

                   Topic                                            Goal                                            Outcome
Food Safety and Sanitation                            DCIU Head Start will ensure that all        Partially Achieved- The trainings are
                                                       Nutrition Service Workers obtain their     scheduled for September 1 & 2. The test will
                                                       Serv Safe Handlers Certificate             be administered at the conclusion of the
                                                                                                  trainings. We expect that all Nutrition Service
                                                                                                  will be certified

                                                      The Nutrition Consultant will develop      Achieved-An inventory sheet was developed
                                                       an inventory sheet for each kitchen.       and it was determined that all the necessary
                                                       She will also inspect the safeguards       large equipment was available. Small items
                                                       and conditions of the kitchens. A plan     that were missing was ordered
                                                       will be developed to replace necessary
                                                       items
                                                      The Nutrition 6 letter to the parents of   Achieved- The Nutrition Consultant developed

                                                                                                                                                     17
                  Topic                     Goal                                             Outcome
                              children that are at risk for obesity will   a letter and submitted it to the parents
                              be revamped to explain why the child         explaining how we determine if a child is
                              is believed to be over weight                overweight. These parents were invited to an
                                                                           “I Am Moving I Am Learning” Training where
                                                                           they learned how to eat properly and exercise
                                                                           daily.

                             Conduct a regional Nutrition training/       Partially Achieved- A dinner training was
                              Workshop for Parents regarding               conducted during the month of May
                              childhood obesity

                             Parent Nutrition Menu meetings will          Achieved- All menu planning meetings took
                              be held the first Monday of each             place at the center level. Parents were invited
                              month beginning in October                   to attend

Child Incidents              Reduce the amount of child incidents         Achieved- All classrooms were re-organized to
                              via blind spots in the classrooms by         ensure teachers had optimal spatial
                              25%                                          awareness. In some instances furniture was
                                                                           completely removed. Teachers were
                                                                           instructed to remove clutter piled on top of
                                                                           bookshelves and other areas which presented
                                                                           safety hazards.

                             Improve awareness of the DCIU Head           Achieved- During the month of February all
                              Start rules to lessen the probability of     sites received an intensive training regarding
                              child incidents by 25% (falling from         safety procedures including role and
                              running, injury from hitting/biting,         responsibility of emergency team leaders.
                              ect.)                                        Each site has a playground safety person
                                                                           responsible for ensuring the playground is
                                                                           safe prior to children entering. All sites are
                                                                           equipped with rugs which reinforce safety
                                                                           themes at each center.



                                                                                                                             18
                  Topic                     Goal                                           Outcome


                             Work with the Emergency Team              Achieved-All sites were trained in Positive
                              Leaders to ensure overall building        Behavior Support techniques, banners were
                              safety to reduce injuries to all staff    posted, and staff placards were created to
                              and consumers                             reinforce Head Start-wide rules. Classroom
                                                                        materials were purchased with an emphasis
                                                                        on appropriate social behavior for the children

Staff Incidents              To purchase slippery floor signs          Not Achieved-We will research this item,
                                                                        obtain 3 prices and present to the
                                                                        Administrative Budget Team for next program
                                                                        year.

                             Focus on getting ALL STAFF to go          Not Achieved- We will continue to brainstorm
                              through the IU New Employee               ways to make this happen with the IU
                              Training regarding safety and
                              protecting yourself from children
                              (child restraint training)
                             Offer first aid and CPR to ALL STAFF      Achieved-CPR/First Aid was offered to 20 staff
                              Look for flyers or picture-cards about    members during the February Ins-Service. The
                              how to lift properly                      CPR/First Aid trainings are part of our T/TA
                                                                        Plan and will take place on-going

                             Rolling laptop bas to lessen the stress   Achieved-Rolling laptops were distributed to
                              on the back                               all FSW’s and Lead Teachers

                             Update seatbelts on the buses             Achieved- New seatbelts were installed. All
                                                                        buses have up-to-date seatbelts

                             Make sure Worknet posters are             Achieved-They were sent from the
                              posted at each center                     Administrative Office to be placed in a visible
                                                                        spot. They are posted at all centers

                                                                                                                          19
                   Topic                                 Goal                                             Outcome

                                            Have gloves and masks available at        Partially Achieved-Gloves are available in all
                                             each center to avoid chemical burns       DCIU Head Start buildings.
                                             or odor exposure. Cleaning agents
                                             used only when children are not
                                             present
                                     Put non-slip rubber mats under all water          Partially Achieved-Rubber mats are placed at
                                     fountains and in every bathroom                   the entrance and exits doors at each center.
                                                                                       Water fountains are not used in our buildings.
                                                                                       We have water coolers and bottled water at
                                                                                       each center
Facilities Materials and Equipment         To create and document a sweep             Achieved- The morning sweep checklist was
                                            checklist for the program.                 developed and implemented on September
                                                                                       2009.

                                           To complete a 20 minute safety             Achieved-Safety training was completed at
                                            training at each of the ten centers by     the beginning of the 2009 school year during
                                            June 1, 2010                               staff orientation. Thereafter, monthly safety
                                                                                       trainings take place during new employee
                                                                                       orientation for new staff.

                                           To install carbon monoxide detectors       Achieved-5 carbon monoxide detectors was
                                            at (5) centers by February 26, 2010        installed by February 2010 at the following
                                                                                       locations:
                                                                                            Yeadon Regional
                                                                                            Sharon Hill Regional
                                                                                            Chester Township Regional
                                                                                            Marcus Hook Regional
                                                                                            Woodlyn

Hygiene                                    Install hand sanitizer’s at the entrance   Achieved
                                            of every building
                                           Ensure that changing tables are in         Partially achieved- Changing tables are

                                                                                                                                        20
                   Topic                                       Goal                                            Outcome
                                                  every building                           installed in 8 out of 10 centers

                                                 Health Techs will check the bus and      Achieved- during the month of January
                                                  classroom first aid bags quarterly.
                                                  Necessary items will be replaced

Health and Safety at the Marcus Hook Center      Scrape and paint the entire building     Achieved-The entire building at Marcus Hook
(DVAEYC Report)                                                                            was scraped and painted during the month of

                                                 Install paper towel and soap             Not Achieved-We are researching a more
                                                  dispensers                               affordable cost
                                                 Install intercom system throughout       Achieved
                                                  the building

Health and Safety at the Yeadon Center           Replace doors throughout the building    Achieved- during the month of April
(DVAEYC Report)
                                                 Scrape and paint the entire building     Achieved-during the month of February

                                                 Install intercom system throughout       Achieved
                                                  the building

                                                 Replace all windows                      Achieved-during the month of April

                                                 Install paper towel and soap             Not Achieved-Researching a more affordable
                                                  dispensers                               cost

                                                 Paint lines in the parking lot           Achieved


On-going Monitoring                              Work with the Facilities Specialist on   Achieved- The Facilities Specialist, the
                                                  identifying possible safety issues per   Education Coordinator and our T/TA Specialist
                                                  center                                   visited a number of centers looking for
                                                                                           possible safety issues. A number of things

                                                                                                                                           21
Topic                    Goal                                       Outcome
                                                  were identified and addressed.

           Identify trainings that could help    Achieved-Safety trainings were provided at
            ensure safety in the work place       the full Staff Orientation and the monthly New
                                                  Employee Orientation

           Document the process of how           Achieved- Emergency Team Leaders are asked
            Emergency Team Leaders are selected   to volunteer to be their center’s team leader.
                                                  If a no one volunteers, the site supervisor is
                                                  asked to come up with a plan. An effort is
                                                  made to appoint non instructional staff.




                                                                                                   22
      Delaware County Intermediate Unit
          Head Start Family Services
                Annual Outcome Results Audit Report
                  For 492 Parents and 522 Children

                         FOR THE PERIOD: JULY 2009 – June 2010


                           Renee Bell, Head Start Director
                   Antoinette Gordy, Head Start Assistant Director
              Elenore Armstead, Head Start Supervisor of Family Services

 Outcome Goal       Total # of                 Goal Achievement                HSPS Audit
   Domains           Parents                   % Major/Moderate                  Grade
                    with Goals       July 2009    June 2010       Pct.
                                                              Improvement
 Involvement In        146             35%           10%         +45%           Excellent
Child’s Learning
Parenting Skills       62              58%              81%             +23%      Very
                                                                               Satisfactory
Employment and         147             12%              61%             +49%      Very
 Self-Sufficiency                                                              Satisfactory
  Employment           93              26%              57%             +31%   Satisfactory
      Skills
 Literacy Skills       54              16%              52%             +36%   Satisfactory
 Post-Secondary        86              24%              71%             +47%      Very
    Education                                                                  Satisfactory
     Housing           39              13%              41%             +28%   Satisfactory
 Other Outcome         66              38%              83%             +45%    Excellent
      Goals
Overall Outcome        492             38%              68%             +30%      Very
  Results Grade                                                                Satisfactory


                    VERY SATISFACTORY
                                 Outcome Results Audit Grade

                           Prepared by: J. Dean Burkholder,
           President of HSPS, Inc. and Independent Outcome Results Auditor
                             Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU)

                                                                                       23
                                            HEAD START PROGRAM

                                     Renee Bell, Head Start Director
                          Lisa Carloni, Assistant Director for Child Development

                         Outcome Results for 1,181 Children
                               Head Start Program

                    Improvement in the Percentage of Children
                   With Major/Moderate Goal Achievement From
                        November 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010
                       and Proficiency in Skills May 31, 2010

                                            Major/ Moderate

                                           Goal Achievement *                                  HSPS
                                                                        Pct Proficient
           Head Start
                                                              %                              Outcome
      Eight Developmental                                                  in Skills
                                                       Improvement                         Results Audit
      Domains for Children
                                   Nov 1      May 31                       May 31
                                                          Nov 1-                             Grade**

                                                          May 31

     Language                      81%        95%         +14%             73%              Excellent
     Literacy                      79%        94%         +15%             58%            Satisfactory

     Mathematics                   73%        94%         +21%             65%          Very Satisfactory

     Science                       89%        96%          +7%             68%          Very Satisfactory

     Creative Arts                 92%        97%          +5%             71%              Excellent

     Social and Emotional          89%        97%          +8%             76%              Excellent

     Approaches to Learning        90%        97%          +7%             67%          Very Satisfactory

     Physical                      95%        99%          +4%             83%              Excellent


  Overall Outcome Results           86%        96%         +10%             70%              Excellent


* Major achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “Proficient” in demonstrating relevant skills.
   Moderate achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “In Process” of learning/demonstrating
   relevant skills. No achievement of outcome goals is for children who have “Not Yet” demonstrated any of
   the relevant skills.

** HSPS is an Independent Outcome Results Auditing Organization. The Audit Grades are determined by HSPS,
    based on the percentage of improvement from Nov. 1 to May 31 and percentage of “proficiency” in skills as
    of May 31.

                   Prepared by: J. Dean Burkholder, Independent Outcome Results Auditor
                               Human Services Planning Systems (HSPS), Inc.
                                               August 2010
                                                                                                               24
                                  Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU)
                                           HEAD START PROGRAM

                                       Renee Bell, Head Start Director
                            Lisa Carloni, Assistant Director for Child Development

                               Outcome Results for 33 Children

                                       PRE-K COUNTS

                         Improvement in the Percentage of Children
                        With Major/Moderate Goal Achievement From
                             November 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010
                            and Proficiency in Skills May 31, 2010

                                              Major/ Moderate

                                             Goal Achievement *                                 HSPS
                                                                         Pct Proficient
             Head Start
                                                                 %                            Outcome
        Eight Developmental                                                 in Skills
                                                         Improvement                        Results Audit
        Domains for Children
                                     Nov 1      May 31                      May 31
                                                            Nov 1-                            Grade**

                                                            May 31

       Language                     87%         93%         +6%             76%              Excellent
       Literacy                     55%         89%         +34%            58%             Satisfactory

       Mathematics                  81%         90%         +9%             68%          Very Satisfactory

       Science                      88%         98%         +10%            82%              Excellent

       Creative Arts                87%         98%         +11%            81%              Excellent

       Social and Emotional         85%         97%         +12%            85%              Excellent

       Approaches to Learning       79%         98%         +19%            66%          Very Satisfactory

       Physical                     95%        100%         +5%             95%              Excellent
  Overall Outcome Results            82%         96%         +14%            76%              Excellent

* Major achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “Proficient” in demonstrating relevant skills.
      Moderate achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “In Process” of learning/demonstrating
      relevant skills. No achievement of outcome goals is for children who have “Not Yet” demonstrated any of
      the relevant skills.

** HSPS is an Independent Outcome Results Auditing Organization. The Audit Grades are determined by HSPS,
    based on the percentage of improvement from Nov. 1 to May 31 and percentage of “proficiency” in skills as
    of May 31.

                     Prepared by: J. Dean Burkholder, Independent Outcome Results Auditor
                          Human Services Planning Systems (HSPS), Inc. August 2010
                                 Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU)
                                           HEAD START PROGRAM
                                                                                                                25
                                               Renee Bell, Head Start Director
                                    Lisa Carloni, Assistant Director for Child Development


                                            Outcome Results for 91 Children

                               HEAD START BLUE PRINTS CURRICULUM PILOT CLASSROOMS

                                      Improvement in the Percentage of Children
                                     With Major/Moderate Goal Achievement From
                                          November 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010
                                         and Proficiency in Skills May 31, 2010

                                                     Major/ Moderate

                                                    Goal Achievement *                                        HSPS
                 Head Start                                                        Pct Proficient
                                                                         %                                 Outcome
    Eight Developmental Domains for                                                   in Skills
                                                                  Improvement                            Results Audit
                Children                                                              May 31
                                            Nov 1      May 31
                                                                       Nov 1-                               Grade**

                                                                       May 31

     Language                               78%         95%           +17%             77%                 Excellent
     Literacy                               78%         91%           +13%             67%             Very Satisfactory

     Mathematics                            77%         94%           +17%             75%                 Excellent

     Science                                90%         97%             +7%            72%                 Excellent

     Creative Arts                          93%         97%             +4%            78%                 Excellent

     Social and Emotional                   90%         98%             +*%            82%                 Excellent

     Approaches to Learning                 89%         98%             +9%            68%             Very Satisfactory

     Physical                               97%         99%             +2%            92%                 Excellent
Overall Outcome Results                      86%         97%           +11%             77%                 Excellent

        * Major achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “Proficient” in demonstrating relevant skills.
           Moderate achievement of outcome goals is for children who were “In Process” of learning/demonstrating
           relevant skills. No achievement of outcome goals is for children who have “Not Yet” demonstrated any of
           the relevant skills.

        ** HSPS is an Independent Outcome Results Auditing Organization. The Audit Grades are determined by HSPS,
            based on the percentage of improvement from Nov. 1 to May 31 and percentage of “proficiency” in skills as
            of May 31.

                              Prepared by: J. Dean Burkholder, Independent Outcome Results Auditor
                                   Human Services Planning Systems (HSPS), Inc. August 2010


                                                                                                                       26
     Dual Language Learners (DLL)
    2009-2010 Program Year Summary




        English as a Second Language (ESL)
9% of families reported to have a primary
language other than Standard English spoken in
the home.




         Primary Languages of family or home
Of the 94 families reported to have spoken a language
other than English, the top three languages include:
  1. 36% indicated Spanish
  2. 24% indicated Middle Eastern and/or South Asian
     Languages
  3. 21% indicated African Languages

                                                        27
 DISABILITIES CONTENT AREA
    2009 – 2010 PROGRAM YEAR SUMMARY
Total of 118 children with special needs
Additional 34 in inclusive EI slots
     Represents 13% of the total enrollment


Report by disability:
     1 Health Impairment
     34 Speech/Language Impairment
     2 Orthopedic Impairment
     2 Autism
     78 Non-categorical developmental delay


113 children referred for evaluations to Early
Intervention providers.

                 Community Assessment Summary
                           2009-2010


                                                 28
                                          COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT SUMMARY 2009-2010

          A Community Assessment is conducted every three years and updated every year. During the 2009-2010 Program
Year, the Community Assessment was updated. The writing and research process for the Community Assessment is
inclusive of stakeholders in Head Start which is comprised of parents, staff, grantee representatives, policy council
representatives and community representatives. The Community Assessments gives us a comprehensive understanding of
the community and its changes, trends and needs.

          Delaware County can be found in the southeastern corner of Pennsylvania. There are 15 school districts, and 11
colleges and universities located throughout Delaware County. Delaware County has a population of 554,399. As a whole
it encompasses 184.21 square miles. Overall the county has grown by 0.4 percent since 2000.

          As for languages, the county residents speak fifty-nine different dialects. 9.3% of the Delaware County population
speak a language other than English. The median household income in Delaware County is $55,005. The families below
poverty level are listed at 6.3% and the individuals below poverty level are at 8.5%. The median household income in
Delaware County is $60,232. The families below poverty level are listed at 6.7% . The individuals below poverty level are at
9.8% . The percentage of families whose income is below the poverty line is 6.7%.

        The total civilian labor force in Delaware County for January 2009 was 287,800 of which 269,300 people were
employed and 18,500 were unemployed. The unemployment rate was at 6.4 percent. The average weekly wage for
Delaware County is $892.

         The top five districts with the highest numbers for receiving TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) is
Chester Upland, Upper Darby, William Penn, Southeast Delco and ChiChester. Chester Upland, Southeast Delco and Upper
Darby have the highest school dropout rates. Chester Upland has the highest obesity rate in the County.

           There are approximately 33,818 children under the age of five residing in Delaware County. As of May, 2008 there
were 4,442 children 0-5 years of age enrolled in subsidized care. With a 2007 child poverty rate of 10.1% in the county, it is
estimated that over 3400 children were living in poverty. Head Start provided 1,150 slots, Child Care Works provided 3,204
and Pre-K Counts provided 320. There is no Early Head Start program in the county. As of November 2009, the waiting list
for child care subsidy climbed to 1,392, up from 1,149 in September of that same year.

          The Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, September, 2007, “The Health Insurance Status of
Pennsylvania’s,” Statewide Survey, Pennsylvania Department of Insurance, states nationally, there are 8.3 million children,
11 % of which do not have health insurance. Nearly, 80% are working families.

         As of March 2009, 8,376 children in Delaware County are enrolled in CHIP.i Unfortunately some families either
don’t know about the program or they are intimidated by the application process. 9,362 or 6% of the children in Delaware
County were uninsured in 2008. 11% of adults in Delaware County were uninsured. ii 35,857 children are enrolled in Medical
Assistance (MA), and 35,384 adults are enrolled in Medical Assistance according to the Pennsylvania Department of Public
Welfare, September 2007; Pennsylvania Department of Insurance, May 9, 2005 statistics.

The community Assessment summarizes the changes and trends that will impact our families over the next few years.

    o    Increase in unemployment rate
    o    Increase in population of English Language Learners
    o    Increase of children living in poverty from 0-5 years old
    o    Increase demand for childcare subsidy
    o    Need for healthcare
    o    Lack of access to supermarkets




                                                                                                                           29
                                    2009-2010

                        SPARC LITERACY LEADERS

                              DCIU HEAD START

   (Strengthening Partnerships and Resources in the Communities)

DCIU Head Start was chosen to be literacy leaders among few other Head Start
Programs in our Region approximately 5 years ago. The SPARC Team
consists of an Administrator, a Family and Community Partnerships Supervisor,
a Community Representative, a Parent and an Education Coordinator. Our
mission is to ensure that we are intentional about encouraging family literacy by
providing interactive literacy activities, supporting parents as their child’s
primary teacher, promote parent literacy training that leads to economic self
sufficiency and offering appropriate early education that prepares children for
success in school and life.

We have developed take home literacy activities that have yielded over 3,695
parent volunteer hours in which families have spent with their children
engaging in meaningful activities (also available in Spanish). In addition,
families now have available math activities that can be done in the home as
well.

As part of our partnership with DCIU Family Centers, we have established a five
week Extended Program for families interested in obtaining their General
Education Degree’s (GED). Inclusive in this program is on-site care for all
children in the family, healthy family style meals, family field trips, Parent and
Child Time together and individual class instruction.

Additional resources include the following:

        Lending Libraries located at all ten centers which allows families to
         borrow books for their enjoyment
        Quarterly Newsletters from various content areas
        Career Exploration Workshops
        December Dads which encourages the males in the child’s life to
         volunteer time in the classroom reading a book or telling stories
        College/Technical Schools Fair to assist families who are interested in
         furthering their education.

As we continue in our efforts to ensure this occurs, we are planning to use our
community partners to develop a series of workshops that will benefit families
on a variety of topics. Additionally, our career training will culminate with a
Parent Career Day where we have businesses on site and are available to
interview.

Our overall objective is to increase literacy competency in all areas of life
including health, nutrition, finance, career training, child development and self-
help with the intention of increasing the quality of life for our children and
families.

. Moreover, we will continue to share our vision with the program and
community partners at large who share similar goals of enhancing literacy and
competency skills of our communities’ families.

                                                                           30
UNITED FOR A COMMON PURPOSE: WE’RE STANDING UP FOR CHILDREN



   As the 2009-2010 Program Year draws to a close, the Delaware County Intermediate Unit
(DCIU) Head Start Program reflects on the progress made in the areas of responsibility,
authority and accountability. What we discover is that the program took responsibility for
knowing what excellence looked like in order to pursue and achieve it; the program used the
authority they were given to promote the program, not themselves; and the program agreed to
be held accountable for the things they took responsibility for. As a result, our centers are
physically safer for everyone, we have a new Mission Statement; we reduced the number of on-
the job accidents and incidents and implemented tighter monitoring protocols.

   These accomplishments will go with us into the 2010-2011 Program Year, as we prepare to
plan strategically in the areas of finance, leadership, staff development and family involvement.

   The power of attitude and the essence of leadership has always been the hallmark of the
DCIU and the Head Start Program. As we unite with our school districts and other community
partners we want the nature of our success to be about a vision of a brighter future for our
children and their families through educational innovation, educational insight and moral
purpose.


Dr. Lawrence O’Shea, DCIU Executive Director
Dr. John Curtin, DCIU Assistant Executive Director
Mr. Thomas Brown, Business Manager
Mrs. Maria Edelberg, DCIU Special Programs Director
Mrs. Melanie Sharps, DCIU Special Programs Assistant Director for Early Childhood Connections
Mrs. Renee A. Bell, DCIU Head Start Program Director

DCIU Head Start Administrative Team
Mrs. Antoinette Gordy, Assistant Director
Mrs. Lisa Barlow, Assistant Director
Mr. Barry Colgan, Fiscal Officer
Mrs. Joyce Humphrey, Human Resources Specialist




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