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ELLIS UNIVERSITY 2009 CATALOG 0

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									ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG   0
Table of Contents

Introduction.........................................................................................................4
Message from the President .............................................................................................4
Mission Statement ...........................................................................................................5
Statement of Values.........................................................................................................5
Accreditation/Affiliations ................................................................................................5
Governance .....................................................................................................................6
     Board of Trustees ....................................................................................................6
     University Administration ........................................................................................8
Institutional Policy ..............................................................................................8
Academic and Professional Standards .............................................................................8
Assessment......................................................................................................................9
Pedagogy.........................................................................................................................9
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ..............................................9
ADA Compliance..........................................................................................................13
Admission Requirements.................................................................................13
Acceptance Statuses ......................................................................................................13
Application Documents .................................................................................................14
Readmission..................................................................................................................14
Funding Options for Ellis University...............................................................14
Academic Policy ...............................................................................................15
Academic Calendar .......................................................................................................15
Continuous Enrollment Policy.......................................................................................15
Multiple Course Enrollments.........................................................................................15
Enrollment Verification.................................................................................................16
Registration...................................................................................................................16
Course Cancellation ......................................................................................................16
Course Waiver and Substitutions ...................................................................................16
Transfer Credit Policy ...................................................................................................17
     Non-Traditional Credit ..........................................................................................17
Residency Requirement .................................................................................................17
Attendance Policy .........................................................................................................18
     Leave of Absence ...................................................................................................18
     Military Leave .......................................................................................................18
Add/Drop Policy ...........................................................................................................18
Withdrawal Policy.........................................................................................................18
Tuition Refund Policy ...................................................................................................19
Grade Level Classification ............................................................................................19
Semester Credit System.................................................................................................19
Grade Point Systems .....................................................................................................19
     Other Grades.........................................................................................................20
     Auditing Courses ...................................................................................................21
     Repeating a Course ...............................................................................................21
     Grade Appeals.......................................................................................................21
     Cumulative Grade Point Average ..........................................................................21


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                                                 1
Academic Probation Policy ...........................................................................................22

Academic Dismissal Policy ...........................................................................................22
Academic Dismissal Appeal Process .............................................................................22
Academic Honors..........................................................................................................23
Graduation Requirements ..............................................................................................23
      Petition to Graduate ..............................................................................................23
Commencement ............................................................................................................23
Academic and Student Support Services........................................................................24
      Academic Advising ................................................................................................24
      Academic Resource Center ....................................................................................24
      Alumni Services .....................................................................................................24
      Bookstore ..............................................................................................................24
      Campus Community...............................................................................................24
      Career Development Office ...................................................................................25
      Library ..................................................................................................................25
Student Rights & Responsibilities ..................................................................25
Statement of Rights and Responsibilities .......................................................................25
Student Code of Conduct...............................................................................................26
Student Conduct Policies...............................................................................................27
      Types of misconduct: .............................................................................................27
Student Disciplinary Procedures....................................................................................28
Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism ..................................................................................29
Institutional Review Board ............................................................................................31
Student Conduct Committee..........................................................................................31
Appeal Process..............................................................................................................32
Grievance Process .........................................................................................................33
Computer and Technical Requirements .........................................................34

Ellis University Programs ................................................................................35
Ellis University Undergraduate Core Curriculum...........................................................35
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ...................................................................37
Bachelor of Arts in English ...........................................................................................37
Interdisciplinary Studies Degree ....................................................................................38
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science......................................................................42
Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Concentration in Information and
Network Security, Interactive Multimedia, or Telecommunications ...............................43
Master of Science in Computer Science.........................................................................45
Master of Arts in Communication Arts—Advertising and Public Relations Specialization
......................................................................................................................................46
COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES.........................................................48
Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science ....................................................................48
Bachelor of Science in Political Science ........................................................................49
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice.........................................................................50
Bachelor of Arts in Paralegal Studies.............................................................................52
Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies.........................................................53


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                                                       2
Master of Science in Human Resources Management and Labor Relations....................54

Certificate in Fraud Examination ...................................................................................56
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS .................................................................................57
Bachelor of Science in Accounting (B.S.A.) ..................................................................57
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (B.S.B.A.) ..........................................58
Bachelor of Professional Studies in Hospitality Management ........................................61
Associates in Applied Science in Accounting ................................................................62
Associates in Applied Science in Business Administration ............................................63
Master of Business Administration (MBA)....................................................................64
Master of Science in Management .................................................................................68
Accounting Cornerstone Certificate...............................................................................69
Accounting Supplement Certificate ...............................................................................69
Advanced Certificate in Accounting ..............................................................................70
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ..............................................................................70
Master of Arts in Teaching ............................................................................................71
Master of Science in Instructional Technology ..............................................................73
Fundamentals of Child Development.............................................................................76
Basic Certificate in Child Development .........................................................................76
Intermediate Certificate in Child Development ..............................................................77
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.................................................................................78




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                                        3
Introduction

This academic catalog defines Ellis University policies and procedures, admission requirements,
program requirements and graduation requirements. As an Ellis student, you should be familiar
with your rights and responsibilities at Ellis and the expectations that the institution has for you as
you progress toward the completion of your degree. This catalog (and any amendments to it) is
available on the Ellis University website at http://www.ellis.edu. Students are encouraged to
check this site for new or updated information.

This academic catalog does not constitute a contract or an offer of a contract to students,
prospective students or any third parties. The information and program requirements contained in
this catalog are regularly updated and are subject to change without notice.

Ellis University does not discriminate in admission or access to its programs on the basis of race,
color, national origin, ancestry, religious affiliation, creed, disability, age, marital status, gender,
sexual orientation, military status or any other protected category.

Message from the President

On behalf of the administration, faculty, and staff at Ellis University let me welcome you to our
educational and professional community. I applaud your commitment to advancing your
education and your career. This commitment sets you on a path to creating a better life for you
and your family.

As you know, education is a prized commodity in today’s competitive global economy. At Ellis
University, we are dedicated to providing a solid educational experience that prepares
professionals to excel within this dynamic, fast-paced environment.

During your time at Ellis University, you will learn from outstanding faculty who practice what they
teach. Our faculty members possess the professional experience and academic credentials
necessary to ensure that your curriculum will be relevant and meaningful. Our courses are
challenging and engaging. The content is designed to provide you with the skills and knowledge
you need to be successful in your chosen profession. Our learning platform, based on social
constructivist pedagogy, is among the best in higher education. This combination of real world
instruction and a world-class learning platform underscores our dedication to a quality educational
experience that leads to your professional advancement.

At Ellis University, we don’t think you have to sacrifice quality to learn in a convenient manner that
fits your current life circumstances. We believe that your time here should be spent focusing on
the curriculum, not standing in line to register for classes or to buy books. Our support staff will
work to provide you with a seamless, convenient process that gets you into class as efficiently as
possible.

Once again, welcome to Ellis University where a world of learning opportunities awaits you. The
administration, faculty, and staff of Ellis University wish you much success in your academic
endeavors.

David Harpool, J.D., PhD
President




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                        4
Mission Statement

The mission of Ellis University is to educate a diverse population of students so that they can
contribute to their professions and communities through education. Ellis is a learner-centered
University dedicated to connecting learner needs to institutional resources to create and
communicate knowledge through a variety of program delivery methods and technologies.

Statement of Values

The mission of Ellis University aligns with the five core institutional values accepted throughout
the Ellis University community:

    •   Excellence in Education and Learning: We distinguish ourselves through quality. Our
        commitment to excellence is based on a social constructivist paradigm and encompasses
        content, pedagogy, instruction, advising, community, and technology.
    •   Our Students: Our students are the lifeblood of our institution. We help guide and foster
        their development and we provide them with an engaging and rewarding educational
        experience. Our first commitment is to serve them with excellence in their coursework.
    •   Our People: We believe that our efforts to make education widely available will make a
        difference in the lives of people everywhere. We are a confident, talented, and motivated
        team that is passionate about and committed to working together to realize a shared
        vision for Ellis University.
    •   Our Work Environment: We provide a workplace that rewards teamwork, open
        communication, and collaboration across all functions and levels. We think imaginatively
        and voice any opinion or belief knowing it will be heard. Our environment promotes
        professional growth, is a meritocracy, and creates a challenging and enjoyable place to
        work and learn.
    •   Integrity: We adhere to the highest standards of conduct in every aspect of our
        operations. We have created an institution in which character – institutional and individual
        – counts.

Accreditation/Affiliations

Ellis University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North
Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA).


        The Higher Learning Commission
        30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
        Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504
        Web site: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org


Ellis University is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and
Training Council (DETC).

        The Distance Education and Training Council
        1601 18th Street, N.W.,
        Washington, D.C. 20009
        Web site: www.detc.org




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      5
Ellis University is authorized to operate and grant degrees by the Illinois Board of Higher
Education

        Illinois Board of Higher Education
        431 E. Adams, Second Floor
        Springfield, IL 62701
        Web site: www.ibhe.org

Governance

Board of Trustees

Responsibility for the governance of the University resides with the Board of Trustees. The Board
is primarily focused on structuring the policies that guide the University. The Board is charged
with ensuring that the University meets the needs of its constituencies, its students and extended
community. The Board maintains the integrity of the University.

The members of the Board of Trustees include:

Dr. John Theodore (Ted) Sanders (Chair) is widely experienced as an educator; he has been a
classroom teacher, chief state school officer in three states (Nevada, Illinois, and Ohio), United
States Deputy Secretary of Education, Acting U.S. Secretary of Education, a university president
(Southern Illinois University), and, most recently, he served as the president of the Education
Commission of the States.

Dr. Sanders is the President Emeritus of the Education Commission of the States. He spends his
time serving on corporate and non-profit boards including ACT Inc, Plato Learning, and the
Teachers Support Network (TSN). He is the co-chair of the National Commission on Teaching
and America’s Future.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, in his
native Texas; a master’s degree in teaching mathematics from Washington State University,
Pullman; and a doctor of education degree in educational administration and higher education
from the University of Nevada at Reno. He holds honorary doctorates from National-Louis
University, the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Eastern Illinois University, and Wayland
Baptist University.

Ted is married to the former Beverly McSwain of Plainview, Texas. They have four children and
eight grandchildren. They presently make their home in Plainview, Texas, Angel Fire, New
Mexico, and Chicago, Illinois.

Dr. Richard C. Kunkel is currently a Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and
Policy Studies at Florida State University, where he previously served as Dean of the College of
Education. Dr. Kunkel has held a number of prestigious academic appointments. He has served
as Dean of the Colleges of Education at Auburn University and University of Nevada-Las Vegas.
Additionally, he has served as Chair (Dean Level) of the Department of Education at Saint Louis
University and as an Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Ball State University.
In addition to his college and university appointments, he has served as Chair of the Assembly of
Specialized Accrediting Agencies, and on the Board of Directors of the Council of Post Secondary
Accreditation (COPA). Dr. Kunkel has also served as the Executive Director of the National
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Dr. Kunkel has received and




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  6
administered numerous grants and has presented and published his scholarship widely. He
earned his Ph.D. in Administration and Curriculum from St. Louis University, his M.Ed. in
Administration and Counseling from the University of Missouri; and his B.S.Ed. from Northeast
Missouri State University (now Truman University).

Dr. Barry Munitz is currently Trustee Professor at the California State University, Los Angeles
campus, and chairs the state-wide P-16 Council. He also heads the Woodrow Wilson Foundation
President’s Advisory Committee, and the Sierra Nevada College Board of Trustees. He formerly
served as Chancellor of the CSU system, President and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, and
Chancellor of the University of Houston.

Dr. Munitz is a member of the three Eli and Edye Broad Family Foundation Boards (education ,
health and art), is a corporate director at Sallie Mae, chairs the Finance and Investment
Committee for the Cotsen Foundation, and is on the U.S. DOE State Scholars Advisory
Commission. He was Chairman of the American Council of Education, Vice Chair of the
Congressional Cost Commission, and led the California Education Roundtable. In 1982, Dr.
Munitz moved from the University of Houston to become a senior executive at MAXXAM, Inc., in
a leadership position and as a director at this natural resources and finance company, until he
joined the California State University in 1991 – the largest senior system of higher education in
the United States. He has recently completed terms as a Trustee of Princeton University, the
Seattle Art Museum, and the Courtauld Institute in London.

Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Munitz received a Bachelor’s degree in Classics and
Comparative Literature from Brooklyn College, graduating Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta
Kappa, before earning a Master’s degree and a Ph.D. from Princeton University. His first teaching
position was at the University of California, Berkeley campus, which he left forty years ago to
work for Clark Kerr at the Carnegie Commission – Kerr remained a mentor over the balance of
his life. Dr. Munitz is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and holds honorary
degrees from Whittier College, Claremont University, the California State University, the
University of Southern California, Notre Dame, and the University of Edinburgh.

Dr. Ted Mitchell is the President and CEO of NewSchools Venture Fund, a venture philanthropy
firm working to transform public education through powerful ideas and passionate entrepreneurs
so that all children, especially those underserved, have the opportunity to succeed. Dr. Mitchell
served as president of Occidental College for six years and is a former deputy to the president at
Stanford University and vice chancellor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a
national leader in the effort to provide quality education for all students and has long been active
in California and Los Angeles educational reform initiatives. Prior to his presidency at Occidental,
he served as vice president for education and strategic initiatives of the J. Paul Getty Trust. Dr.
Mitchell is also an education advisor to California Sen. Dianne Feinstein and served as a senior
education advisor to then-Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan. He serves on the boards of a
variety of nonprofit education organizations. Dr. Mitchell earned bachelor’s degrees in economics
and history, as well as a master's degree in history and a Ph.D. in education at Stanford
University.

Dr. Elanna Yalow is President and COO of Knowledge Learning Corporation. She joined KLC in
1989 to initiate the development of its employer-sponsored services division. In her current role,
Dr. Yalow supervises corporate operations and oversees several support functions including
human resources, marketing, corporate services, and education training. With a background in
educational research and development, Dr. Yalow has contributed to numerous statewide and
national curriculum development and assessment projects. She has also written extensively on
matters related to the education of young children. Dr. Yalow earned her Ph.D. in educational
psychology, with an emphasis on the design and evaluation of educational programs for children,
at Stanford University School of Education and her MBA at the Stanford University Graduate
School of Business.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   7
David Harpool, J.D, Ph.D. has served as President of Kendall College of Evanston, Illinois and
Argosy University of Chicago. He was the Provost of Kaplan University until joining the NYIT as
Provost of Ellis College, and most recently was elected by the Board of Trustees as the President
of Ellis University. He has experience as an associate professor of law, department chair, Dean
of Business, provost, regional vice-president, senior vice-president, and president of traditional
and non-traditional colleges. His insight on higher education has been cited in over 100
newspapers and other media sources. He is the author of Survival College: The Best Practices of
Traditional and For-Profit Colleges. His articles have appeared in Chicago Tribune, Saint Louis
Post-Dispatch, University Business, Chronicle of Higher Education, Journal of College and
University Law and Trusteeship Magazine. He has appeared on CNN, ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox.

He has presented at the prestigious WISCAPE forum on higher education at the University of
Wisconsin, the Annual Meeting of the Association of Governing Boards for Universities and
Colleges and at the Annual Meeting of the Career College Association. He served as a Peer-
Consultant for the Higher Learning Commission. Dr. Harpool earned a B.S in Education from
Missouri State University, a Juris Doctorate from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a Ph.D.
in Higher Education from Saint Louis University. He is a former State Debate Champion and
Semi-finalist in the National Collegiate Cross-Examination Debate Tournament.

University Administration

The Board of Trustees has delegated to the university administration the management of day-to-
day affairs of the institution. The President of the University is charged with overseeing the overall
operation of the institution and ensuring compliance with all state, federal and accrediting body
regulatory requirements. The members of the University administration are:

    •   David Harpool, Ph.D., J.D., President
    •   John LaNear, Ph.D., J.D., Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs
    •   Ralph Freye M.A., CFO and VP of Compliance
    •   Virginia Carlin, Ed.D., Dean of Students
    •   James Dorris, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Business
    •   Chris Dunham, MBA, Associate Provost for Academic Operations and Vice-President for
        Strategic Alliances
    •   Elizabeth M Hawthorne, Ph.D., Dean of College of Education
    •   Ray Rodriguez, M.A., Dean of Assessment and Programmatic Outcomes
    •   Gene Scaramella, Ed.D., Dean of the College of Behavioral Sciences
    •   Edward Shannon, Ed.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
    •   Sharon Sweeney, MBA, Vice President of Student Financial Services
    •   Roger Widmer, Ed.D., Vice President of Student Services

Institutional Policy

Academic and Professional Standards

Ellis University is committed to developing and providing academic programs that demonstrate
high levels of academic integrity. Each degree program is designed to be academically
challenging and demanding.

Ellis University monitors each student’s progress toward a degree. Both faculty and academic
advisors monitor progress and address the academic achievement of each student. Aspects of
student comportment and behavior within the classroom are relevant to student progress.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     8
Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with professional ethics at
all times. Professional conduct assumes respectful interpersonal relationships with all members
of the University community.

Assessment

Ellis University employs an institutional assessment system embedded within the curriculum,
which is intended to satisfy contemporary trends toward comprehensive assessment and
provides a functional feedback loop for academic decision makers.

The systematic assessment program is incorporated within the philosophy of continuous quality
improvement for student learning and the improvement of contexts in which that learning occurs.
Key values underpinning the Ellis University assessment processes are:

    •    Assessment is an action-oriented process focused on continuous improvement;
    •    Assessment always comes back to individual student learning;
    •    Instructors are the most direct link to understanding what works in the classroom; and
    •    Assessment is not a department – it is a culture.

The primary focus of the comprehensive assessment system is direct assessment of student
learning. Additionally, the system collects indirect measures of institutional effectiveness such as
end of term student surveys, faculty surveys, alumni and employer surveys, and archival data
such as persistence and graduation rates.

Pedagogy

At Ellis University, the student is placed at the center of the learning experience. Research
suggests that adults learn best by actively applying what they learn. To the greatest extent
possible, courses are designed using a problem-based learning or learn-by-doing approach.

The Ellis University faculty is committed to research and best practices of non-traditional learning
styles of working adults. Our courses embed five pedagogical values designed for those learners:

    1.   active learning and reflection (constructivism)
    2.   problem-based inquiry
    3.   higher-order reflection
    4.   situated learning
    5.   collaborative learning

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended, sets out
requirements designed to afford students certain rights with respect to their education records. In
addition, it puts limits on what information Ellis University may disclose to third parties without
receiving prior written consent from the student.

I. Procedure to Inspect Education Records
Students have the right under FERPA to inspect and review their own education records. A
student who wishes to inspect and review his/her records should submit a written request to the
University Registrar. The request should identify as precisely as possible the records the student
wishes to inspect. If the requested records are subject to inspection and review by the student,
arrangements for access will be made within a reasonable period of time but in no case more




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      9
than 45 days after the request was made, and the student will be notified of the time and place
where the records may be inspected.

The University may require the presence of a school official during the inspection and review of a
student’s records. Certain limitations exist on a student’s right to inspect and review their own
education records.
Those limitations include, for example, the following: (i) financial information submitted by
parents; (ii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to January 1, 1975;
(iii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files after January 1, 1975 to which
the student has waived his or her right to inspect and review and that are related to the student’s
admission, application for employment or job placement, or receipt of honors. In addition, the
term “education record” does not include certain types of records such as, by way of example,
records of instructional, supervisory, administrative, and certain educational personnel that are in
the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are not accessible or revealed to any other
individual.
When a record contains personally identifiable information about more than one student, the
student may inspect and review only the information that relates to him/her personally.

II. Disclosure of Educational Records
Ellis University generally will not permit disclosure of personally identifiable information from the
records of a student without prior written consent of the student. Personally identifiable
information is disclosed (some items are mandatory, some discretionary) from the records of a
student without that student’s prior written consent to the following individuals or institutions or in
the following circumstances:

1. To Ellis University officials who have been determined by the school to have legitimate
educational interests in the records. A school official is:
         A. a person employed by the school in an administrative, supervisory, academic or
         research, or support staff position; or
         B. a person employed by or under contract to the school to perform specific tasks, such
         as an auditor, consultant, or attorney, a person on the Board of Trustees, or a student
         serving on an official committee or assisting another school official. Any school official
         who needs information about a student in the course of performing instructional,
         supervisory, advisory, or administrative duties for Ellis University has a legitimate
         educational interest.

2. To certain officials of the United States Department of Education, the Comptroller General of
the United States, the Attorney General of the United States, and state and local educational
authorities in connection with state or federally supported educational programs.

3. In connection with the student’s request for, or receipt of, financial aid necessary to determine
the eligibility, amounts or conditions of financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the
aid.

4. To organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school.

5. To accrediting commissions or state licensing or regulatory bodies to carry out their functions.

6. To parents of a dependent student, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code.

7. To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena.

8. To appropriate parties in health or safety emergencies.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      10
9. To officials of another school, upon request, in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

10. To an alleged victim of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sexual offense, the final results of
the disciplinary proceedings conducted by the school against the alleged perpetrator of that crime
or offense with respect to that crime or offense.

11. To persons in addition to the victim of a crime of violence or non-forcible sexual offense, the
final results of the disciplinary proceedings described in item 10 above but only if the school has
determined that a student is the perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sexual offense,
and with respect to the allegation made against him or her, the student has committed a violation
of the institution’s rules or policies. (The school, in such instances, may only disclose the name of
the perpetrator - not the name of any other student, including a victim or witness - without the
prior written consent of the other student(s)).

12. To a parent regarding the student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law or of any rules
or policy of the school governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the
school determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to that use
or possession, and the student is under 21 at the time of the disclosure to the parent.

13. Directory information (see Section IV below).

III. Record of Requests for Disclosure
Except with respect to those requests made by the student themselves, those disclosures made
with the written consent of the student, or to requests by or disclosures to Ellis University officials
with legitimate educational interests and disclosures of directory information (or other exceptions
described in the applicable regulations), Ellis University will maintain a record indicating the
parties who have requested or obtained personally identifiable information from a student’s
education records and the legitimate interests those parties had in requesting or obtaining the
information. This record may be inspected by the student.

IV. Directory Information
Ellis University designates the following information as directory information. (Directory
information is personally identifiable information which may be disclosed without the student’s
consent):

1. Student’s name
2. Address: Local, email and website
3. Telephone number (local)
4. Date and place of birth
5. Program of study
6. Participation in officially recognized activities
7. Dates of attendance
8. Degrees and certificates awarded
9. Most recent previously attended school
10. Photograph of the student, if available
11. Enrollment status (i.e., enrolled, continuing, future enrolled student, reentry, etc.)

Notice of these categories and of the right of an individual in attendance at Ellis University to
request that his/her directory information be kept confidential will be given to the student annually.
Students may request nondisclosure of student directory information by specifying nondisclosure,
in writing, to the Office of the Registrar, Ellis University 111 N. Canal, Suite 380, Chicago, IL
60606-7296. Failure to request nondisclosure of directory information will result in routine
disclosure of one or more of the above-designated categories of personally identifiable directory
information.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      11
V. Correction of Educational Records
Students have the right under FERPA to ask to have records corrected which they believe are
inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of their privacy rights. The following are the procedures for
the correction of records:

1. A student must ask the Registrar to amend a record. As part of the request, the student should
identify the part of the record he/she want to have changed and specify why he/she believe it to
be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy rights.

2. Ellis University will either amend or maintain the current record. If it decides to maintain the
current record, it will notify the student of its decision and advise the student of the right to a
hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the
student’s privacy rights.

3. Upon request, Ellis University will arrange for a hearing and notify the student reasonably in
advance of the date, place, and time of the hearing. The hearing will be conducted by an
individual who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. That individual may
be an official of Ellis University. The student shall be afforded a forum for the opportunity to
present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student’s
education records. The student may be assisted by other people, including an attorney.

4. Ellis University will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the
hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence, and the reasons for the decision.

5. If, as a result of the hearing, Ellis University decides that the information is inaccurate,
misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it will
          (a) amend the record accordingly; and
          (b) inform the student of the amendment in writing.

6. If, as a result of the hearing, Ellis University decides that the information in the education
record is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it
shall inform the student of the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the
contested information in the record or stating why he or she disagrees with the decision of the
school.

7. If a statement is placed in the education records of a student under item 6 above,
Ellis University will:
          (a) maintain the statement with the contested part of the record for as long as the record
          is maintained; and
          (b) disclose the statement whenever it discloses the portion of the record to which the
          statement relates.

VI. Student Right to File Complaint
A student has the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education
concerning alleged failures by Ellis University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The
name and address of the governmental office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
United States Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-5920




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       12
ADA Compliance

Ellis University provides qualified students with disabilities an equal opportunity to access the
rights and privileges of university services, programs and activities as outlined by The Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Ellis University provides reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. The
ADA Compliance Officer assists qualified students with disabilities in acquiring appropriate
accommodations at the University.

Students in need of accommodations should contact the Vie President of Student Services. If you
have a concern or complaint regarding this process, please contact the Dean of Students.
Complaints will be handled in accordance with the University’s Student Complaint Procedures.

Admission Requirements

Ellis University evaluates each candidate according to the following admission standards:

    Undergraduate:
    • Completion of a high school diploma or its equivalent
    • Completion of at least 12 semester credits at an accredited institution of higher education
    • Good academic standing: students who have been academically dismissed from other
       colleges or universities are ineligible to pursue courses at Ellis University unless they
       meet one of the following conditions:
           o Earned 24 semester hours from an accredited college or university with a
               minimum GPA of 2.0.
           o Have not attended any college or university for 2 years since being academically
               dismissed.
           o May appeal to the Dean of the academic program to which they are applying and
               at the Dean’s discretion the previous requirements may be waived.
               Undergraduate students who have their appeal approved will be placed on
               academic probation and must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher upon the completion
               of their fourth course at Ellis University. Students who fail to earn a GPA of 2.0
               after their fourth course will be academically dismissed from the University.
               Students will be restricted to one course per term and must meet weekly with
               their academic advisor.

    Graduate:
    • Completion of a Bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university.

    •   At the discretion of the Dean of a specific Ellis University College, graduate admission
        requirements may be waived. Documentation of any exception will become a part of the
        student’s permanent file.

    International Students
    • A score of 79 on the IBT TOEFL for international applicants who graduated from a
        secondary school in which English was not the primary language of instruction.

Acceptance Statuses

Upon review of the application for admission and other required documents, students may be
accepted into one of four categories as defined below:




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    13
    1. Regular Acceptance: This signifies that the student has satisfied all admission
       requirements including the receipt of all official transcripts from all Colleges and
       Universities previously attended.
    2. Conditional Acceptance: This signifies that the student has satisfied all admission
       requirements, has provided the institution with unofficial transcripts from all Colleges and
       Universities and will become accepted as a regular student once the institution receives
       all official transcripts.
    3. Provisional Acceptance: The University may, at its discretion, provisionally accept
       students who, otherwise, do not meet the standard admission requirements. Students
       may be provisionally accepted until they meet all of the standard admission requirements.
    4. Student-at-Large: A student who is not seeking enrollment into a degree program is
       considered a student-at-large. A student may only take four courses as a student at
       large.

Application Documents

Along with a completed application, Ellis requires the following documents prior to admission to
the University. Failure to supply necessary documentation will result in a denial of admission.

        1.     Transcript Request Form
        2.     Tuition Payment Form
        3.     Enrollment Agreement
        4.     Undergraduate students must provide an official transcript from all colleges and
               universities previously attended.
        5.     Graduate students must provide an official transcript from the institution awarding
               the bachelor’s or master’s degree.
        6.     International students must provide an evaluation of their official transcript. Ellis
               University will accept evaluations from any foreign transcript evaluator approved
               by NACES. A list of those agencies may be found at www.naces.org.
        7.     A score of 79 on the IBT TOEFL for international applicants who graduated from a
               secondary school in which English was not the primary language of instruction.

All students are required to provide Ellis University with official documents from postsecondary
institutions previously attended within 45 days of enrollment.

Readmission

Former students of Ellis University who wish to apply for readmission may do so by contacting
Enrollment Services. Students who were dismissed for disciplinary reasons must petition to the
Dean of Students for their application to be considered.

Students who were academically dismissed are ineligible to reapply for one calendar year. All
outstanding tuition and fees must be paid prior to readmission. Once readmitted, the student’s
program requirements will be governed by the academic catalog in place at the time of
readmission.

Funding Options for Ellis University

Ellis University realizes that paying for a college education is a concern to most students. Ellis is
in the process of applying for Title IV approval with the U.S. Department of Education. Ellis staff
will work with you individually to discuss the various funding options currently available. Listed
below are funding options available to Ellis students.

Credit Card – Ellis University accepts most major credit cards.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    14
Tuition Discounts – Ellis University offers liberal tuition discounts for students employed with
specific companies, military students and employees of the Department of Defense.

Ellis University Grants – Ellis University allocates a limited amount of funds to students each
term. Ask your Student Finance advisor if you qualify for an Ellis University grant.

Employer Reimbursement – Students may already receive a benefit from their employer to pay
for a portion of their tuition.

Military Benefits, including GI Bill – Students may use their military or veteran’s benefits
toward their tuition costs. In addition, Ellis University discounts tuition for military students and
their family members.

Tuition Deferral – Ellis University recognizes that students who receive employer or military
benefits may need to wait for reimbursement. To assist these students, Ellis offers a tuition
deferral plan which allows the student to pay their tuition 60 days after the term start date.
Students who select this option will need to provide credit card information.

Alternative Loan – Students may be interested in applying for an alternative loan. These funds
can be applied toward tuition or other educational expenses.
Qualified students (subject to credit approval) have the option to borrow from this loan program
with the interest rate subsidized by Ellis University to match the federal loan programs. Excess
funds from the alternative loan will be issued to students as a stipend to use for educational
expenses.

Payment Plan – Students may be interested in the payment plan offered by Ellis University.
                             th
Payments are due by the 15 of each month. Students will be asked to sign a promissory note.
There are no interest or finance charges associated with this plan.

Academic Policy

Academic Calendar

Ellis University follows a traditional 18 week semester. The academic year consists of a Fall,
Spring and Summer semester. The Fall and Spring semesters each have 3 six-week terms and
the Summer semester has 2 six-week terms.

Continuous Enrollment Policy

Students must be continuously enrolled in a program from the time of matriculation through
graduation. Undergraduate students are expected to be enrolled in at least one course per term
or three courses per semester. Graduate students are expected to be enrolled in at least one
course during two of the three terms per semester. Students who must take time off due to a
medical or other significant reason may apply for a temporary leave through the Registrar’s
Office. (Please see the Leave of Absence policy).

Multiple Course Enrollments

Ellis University offers courses in an accelerated format. It is recommended that students do not
enroll in more than two courses per term. Students who wish to enroll for more than two courses
in one term must seek approval from their College Dean. As a general rule first-time
undergraduate students are encouraged to take one course in their first term. If a new student




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                         15
can demonstrate that they have already succeeded in an online environment, they may request
permission from their College Dean to take a second course in their first term.

Enrollment Verification

Following the Add/Drop period of a student’s first term, he or she may request documentation
verifying enrollment status by contacting the Office of the Registrar at registrar@ellis.edu. Prior to
this date, a student has not officially attended. Enrollment Verifications are limited to directory
information and thus do not require a waiver to be submitted to a third party (please see FERPA
Policy). For more information please contact the Office of the Registrar.

Registration

Students will register for classes through their academic advisor. During the initial Curriculum
Planning Session, the student and academic advisor will determine which courses must be taken
in order to complete the student’s program. As the student progresses in the program, he or she
will continue to register for additional courses through the academic advisor.

Students focused on completing degree requirements should expect to be registered for one
course every six weeks until degree completion. Students needing a break between courses
should consult with their academic advisor to ensure adherence with school attendance policies
and continued degree completion progress.

Students are prompted prior to each term start date to confirm tuition payment method and to
order their books and materials. A student may change his or her curriculum plan at any time by
contacting his/her Academic Advisor, and may cancel a planned enrollment in a course through
the add/drop period without incurring tuition charges, less the $100 administration fee.

Course Cancellation

Ellis University reserves the right to make changes to course offerings. The University may cancel
any course because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. Any course
with fewer than four students may be considered for cancellation. The decision to cancel a class
will be made by the Dean of the applicable college. If a course is cancelled, the student will be
notified by his or her Academic Advisor two weeks prior to the course start date. The Academic
Advisor will work closely with the student to choose a new course for the upcoming term start.
The student will not be charged for the canceled class but any other related cost or expense, like
course materials, will not be refunded to the student.

Course Waiver and Substitutions

Ellis University does allow for course waivers and course substitutions to be granted within
certain degree programs. The course waiver policies are as follows:

    •   Course substitutions are defined as a substitution of a required course with a comparable
        course taken at another accredited institution, subject to the programmatic requirements.

    •   The term “waiver” is used when the University is accepting a course from other institution
        that satisfies course requirements, but is not counted toward the total credits required for
        the degree.

    •   Substitution and waiver requests should be submitted to the Dean of the applicable
        College during the admission process.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    16
    •   Substitution and waiver requests are not reviewed until a student is officially accepted
        into the University, and an official transcript is received.

Transfer Credit Policy

Ellis University offers undergraduate degree completion programs and students must have
earned prior college credit to be admitted to an Ellis undergraduate degree program. Applicants
can transfer credit earned at accredited institutions, through proficiency exams and through
coursework evaluated by the American Council on Education (www.acenet.edu). In addition, Ellis
University students are eligible to submit a portfolio for evaluation to earn additional academic
credit for life experience. There is a 60 semester credit hour limit to credits obtained through
means other than transfer from accredited institutions (i.e., proficiency exams, DANTES, ACE
and portfolio). Check with the Registrar’s Office for detailed policy regarding Proficiency Exams,
Military transcripts and Portfolio Evaluation.

The following general rules guide the awarding of transfer credits:

    1. Ellis University will award transfer credit for courses completed at accredited institutions.
    2. Transfer credit will be awarded for courses that are aligned with the Ellis University
       curricula.
    3. Ellis University will consider substituting core courses when prior courses from the same
       discipline are determined to be comparable in content and learning outcomes. Final
       determination will be made by the Dean of the college where the program resides.
    4. Ellis University grants credit for Advanced Placement exams and courses taken in high
       school. Check with the Registrar’s Office for details.
    5. Transfer credit is not computed in the cumulative grade point average. (Please see
       important considerations under Academic Honors, p 22)
    6. Students must earn a C or better in courses considered for transfer. Grades of D are
       accepted only if the student earned an associate’s degree.
    7. Credit from courses listed on official transcripts submitted after admission may be
       transferred into a degree program at the discretion of the University, but will not result in
       a refund for coursework already completed or in process at Ellis.
    8. Some courses are time-sensitive and may not be accepted due to dated course content
       (more than five years old).

Non-Traditional Credit

Non-traditional credit includes credit earned through proficiency exams, portfolio credit, and
coursework evaluated by the American Council on Education (including military coursework). A
letter grade is not calculated for non-traditional credit, nor will it be considered when determining
honor status. Check with the Registrar’s Office for detailed policy regarding non-traditional credit.

Residency Requirement

Undergraduate Students:
Ellis University requires a minimum of 30 semester credit hours be earned through the institution.
The maximum number of semester credit hours that students may transfer into an undergraduate
degree is 30 less than the total required credits for their program. Undergraduate students must
complete their final 30 hours with Ellis University.

Graduate Students:
A maximum of 9 credits taken at other accredited institutions and completed with a grade of B or
higher may be applied toward an Ellis University graduate degree, provided those credits have


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    17
not been applied toward another degree. Transfer credit is only awarded to degree-seeking
students with matriculated status. Courses taken more than five years prior to the date of
enrollment cannot be transferred. However, the Dean of the academic college may make
exceptions following a review of the transfer request.

Attendance Policy

Launching a course is equivalent to participation in the classroom, and establishes and
attendance record. Students are encouraged to both launch and post to their course on the first
day of the term.

Leave of Absence

Ellis University students may apply for a temporary leave from their program if they encounter
extenuating circumstances. Students may apply for a leave through the Academic Advising
Office. Approval for a leave must be granted by the Registrar. Except for a leave request for jury
duty, military service, or circumstances covered under the Family Medical Leave Act of 1993,
students are eligible for leave that may not exceed 180 calendar days.

Military Leave

Ellis University supports students who are called to or are on active duty. Students called to duty
after the beginning of a course may submit a copy of their duty assignment to the Academic
Advising Office and may withdraw from courses without penalty. Students are encouraged to
contact their academic advisor for more details.

Add/Drop Policy

Students dropping a class must provide official notification to the Academic Advising Office by
completing an Add/Drop Form or via email. A credit of tuition (less a $100 administrative fee) will
be provided if a student drops prior to Noon Central time of the fourth day of the term. After the
fourth day of the term, a student can only withdraw from a course and is subject to the refund
policy guidelines. Students who have not logged into their course by Noon Central time on the
fourth day of the term will be dropped from the course. If a student finds that s/he is unable to
begin the course as planned, notification must be made to the appropriate Ellis University
representative as specified below:

New students who do not log in to a course by the fourth day of the term will be administratively
dropped from the course, and will receive a tuition refund (less a $100 administrative fee). The
course will not appear on transcripts.

Continuing students who do not log in to a course by the fourth day of the term will be
administratively dropped from the course, and will receive a tuition refund (less a $100
administrative fee). The course will not appear on transcripts.
New and continuing students who participate in and drop courses during the add/drop period (first
four [4] calendar days of the term) will be charged a $100 administration fee.

Withdrawal Policy

After the add/drop period is over, a student may withdraw from a course. Any student wishing to
withdraw from a course should contact his or her Academic Advisor. The student should notify
the instructor and, if applicable, the Office of Student Finance.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  18
*Please note that students who withdraw from a course after the add/drop period will receive a
grade of a W if the student is passing at the time of the withdrawal. Students who are failing at
the time of the withdrawal will receive a WF. This is a failing grade and is included in the
computation of the cumulative grade point average.

Tuition Refund Policy

A student who withdraws from Ellis University through the fourth day of the term will be entitled to
a full refund of tuition less a $100 administration fee.

From Day 1 through Day 4, 100% refund less non-refundable application fee and $100
administration fee
From Day 5 through Day 14, 70% refund
From Day 15 through Day 21, 50% refund
After Day 21, no refund

Grade Level Classification

Freshman        0-30 credits earned
Sophomore       31-60 credits earned
Junior          61-90 credits earned
Senior          More than 90 credits earned

Semester Credit System

Academic credit at Ellis University is granted using the semester credit hour system.

Grade Point Systems

Undergraduate students receive one of the following grades for each course taken:

GRADE                            QUALITY POINTS
A     Excellent                  4.0
A-                               3.7
B+                               3.3
B     Good                       3.0
B-                               2.7
C+                               2.3
C    Satisfactory                2.0
C-                               1.7
D+                               1.3
D    Marginal                    1.0
F     Failure                    0.0
P     Pass                       0.0
I     Incomplete                 0.0
W     Withdrawn                  0.0
WF    Withdrawn/fail             0.0
NC   No Credit                   0.0




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     19
Graduate students receive one of the following grades for each course taken:

GRADE                             QUALITY POINTS
A      Excellent                  4.0
B+                                3.3
B     Good                        3.0
C+                                2.3
C    Satisfactory                 2.0
F     Failure                     0.0
P     Pass                        0.0
I     Incomplete                  0.0
W     Withdrawn                   0.0
WF    Withdrawn/fail              0.0
NC   No Credit                    0.0

Interim and final grades are posted by the instructor to students’ grade pages within the course.
Students’ grade pages are not viewable by other students in the course.

The grade point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the points earned for each course by
the number of credits that the course carries, taking a sum of these values, and then dividing by
the total number of credits attempted. Students have a cumulative GPA calculated for them in the
student’s personal area of the Ellis online campus as their grades are posted in the courses they
complete.

Other Grades

        Incomplete (I):
        A grade of “I” signifies a course that has not been completed during the normal time of
        instruction. An incomplete is given at the faculty member’s discretion to a student who
        has not completed all course requirements, but has attended and been active in the
        course beyond the last day to withdraw. Students must request an incomplete grade prior
        to the term end date. Any course for which a student receives an “I” must be completed
        before the end of the next term. A grade of “I” is changed to the permanent grade once it
        is submitted by the faculty member. When a student completes and Incomplete course,
        a grade of “I” that is not completed by the required date will automatically be changed to
        an “F.”

        Withdraw (W):
        Students who officially withdraw from a course after the end of the add/drop period and
        before the last day to withdraw within an academic term will receive a “W” on their
        transcripts.

        Withdrawal Fail (WF):
        A grade of Withdrawn Fail (WF) will be assigned if the student is failing the course at the
        time of withdrawal, or stopped attending without officially notifying the University. WF is a
        failing grade and is included in the computation of the grade point average

        Life Experience (LE):
        Ellis University students are eligible to submit a portfolio for evaluation to earn additional
        academic credit for life experience. Life Experience is not included in the computation of
        the grade point average. Please refer to Transfer Credit Policy for further information.

        Audit (AU):
        A student who is not completing a degree-level course for credit will receive an “AU” for



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      20
        auditing a course. An audit is not used in computing the grade point average. Admission
        into a course for audit is at the College Dean’s discretion.

Auditing Courses

With the approval of the academic College Dean, a student may audit a course. Requests should
be submitted at the time of registration through the Academic Advising Office. The normal rate of
tuition applies.

Repeating a Course

A student who fails a required course must repeat and pass the course. If a student wishes to
retake a completed course, he or she may do so by making a request through the Academic
Advising Office. The grade earned by retaking a course will be included in the calculation of the
GPA. Both grades are considered when calculating satisfactory academic progress. Courses are
only counted once toward graduation requirements. Both classes are grades earned and are
shown on the transcript.

Grade Appeals

A student has the right to dispute a final course grade in the case of disagreement with an
instructor’s assessment of performance. A grade appeal will be considered only if there is
evidence of any of the following:
     • The grade was incorrectly calculated.
     • There was a clerical error in recording the grade whereby the instructor communicated a
         grade different than the one earned by the student.
     • There has been unfair or capricious conduct on the part of the instructor.

A student wishing to appeal a final course grade must first address the issue directly with the
instructor who issued the grade. If the student is unable to resolve the appealed grade with the
instructor, the student may file a formal grade appeal to the appropriate College Dean using a
Grade Appeal Form which can be obtained from student’s Academic Advisor. Students should
clearly articulate the nature of the issue and include supporting documentation to support their
claim. This document should be submitted to the student’s Academic Advisor no later than five
days following the end date of the course. Upon review, the College Dean will issue a decision
within one week.

A grade appeal does not guarantee a higher grade. The disputed grade may be maintained,
raised, or lowered as a result of an independent review. If, after the Dean’s review, the issue is
still not resolved to the satisfaction of the student, he/she may contact the Vice President for
Academic Affairs (VPAA) for a final appeal. The VPAA will review the appeal and reply directly to
the student in writing within one week.

Cumulative Grade Point Average

To meet satisfactory academic progress standards, each student must maintain a cumulative
grade point average of 2.00 or above at the undergraduate level and 3.00 or above at the
graduate level. This component of satisfactory academic progress is reviewed at the end of each
semester.

All other courses taken for credit will be counted in the credit hours attempted and in the
calculation of the cumulative grade point average.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    21
Academic Probation Policy

Undergraduate Students:
An undergraduate student, after completing 12 semester hours, must achieve a minimum
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 to maintain satisfactory academic status at the
University and in order to graduate.

When an undergraduate student’s cumulative GPA falls below the 2.0 minimum, the student shall
be placed on Academic Probation. The student will be allowed to take 12 additional semester
hours while on academic probation. The student will be notified of probation status and will be
required to meet weekly with his or her Academic Advisor while on probation to discuss academic
success strategies. A student on Academic Probation will be restricted to one class per six week
term during the Academic Probation period. A student who has raised his or her cumulative GPA
to 2.0 or above after taking the 12 additional semester hours will be taken off academic probation.

Graduate Students:
A graduate student, after completing nine semester hours, must achieve a minimum cumulative
grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 to maintain satisfactory academic status at the University and in
order to graduate.

When a graduate student’s cumulative GPA falls below the 3.0 minimum, the student shall be
placed on Academic Probation. The student will be allowed to take nine additional semester
hours while on Academic Probation. The student will be notified of probation status and will be
required to meet weekly with his or her Academic Advisor while on probation to discuss academic
success strategies. A student on Academic Probation will be restricted to one class per session
during the Academic Probation period. A student who has raised his or her cumulative GPA to 3.0
or above after taking the nine additional semester hours will be taken off Academic Probation.

Academic Dismissal Policy

A student who is on probation and does not raise his/her cumulative grade point average above
the program’s minimum standard will be academically dismissed.

Academic Dismissal Appeal Process

Undergraduate Students:
Students who were academically dismissed from Ellis University are ineligible to pursue credit-
bearing courses at Ellis University for a period of one calendar year following such a dismissal; or
until a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 is earned from the most recent 12 semester credit hours
taken at another accredited institution; or upon approval of the appropriate college dean. All
outstanding tuition and fees must be paid prior to readmission. Once readmitted to Ellis
University, the student must fulfill the curriculum and other requirements in effect at the time of
readmission and maintain a GPA of 2.0 or higher over the next 12 semester credit hours.

Graduate Students:
Students who are academically dismissed from Ellis University are ineligible to pursue credit-
bearing courses at Ellis University for a period of one calendar year following such a dismissal.

Formal readmission approval must be granted from the appropriate college dean, who may waive
the time limit when special circumstances warrant. All outstanding tuition and fees must be paid
prior to readmission. Once readmitted to Ellis University, the student must fulfill the curriculum
and other requirements in effect at the time of readmission and maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher
over the next nine semester credit hours.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     22
Academic Honors

Undergraduate students who have completed at least 55 percent of degree credits at Ellis
University and have achieved a minimum 3.5 grade point average within their designated
program of study will graduate with the following honors:

3.5 to 3.74 cum laude
3.75 to 3.89 magna cum laude
3.9 to 4.0 summa cum laude

Undergraduate students who have not completed at least 55 percent of degree credits at Ellis
University, but who have a GPA of 3.5 or above at Ellis, will have grades from courses taken at
other accredited U.S. institutions of higher education which were accepted for transfer by Ellis
University computed into their averages for the purpose of granting honors.

Graduation Requirements

All degree candidates must fulfill the following requirements to be eligible for graduation:

1. Undergraduate students must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 in undergraduate courses;
graduate students must achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0.

2. Satisfactory completion of a designated degree program.

3. Undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 30 credits toward the degree at Ellis
University.
        a. At least nine credits of these 30 must be upper-division courses (300 or higher)
        completed at Ellis University in the major field of study.
        b. At least 15 credits or 50 percent of the credits required in the major field, whichever is
        greater, must be completed at Ellis University.
        c. Depending on the major field of study, additional requirements may apply for
        graduation.

4. Graduate students must complete at least 27 credits toward the degree at Ellis University.

5. All financial commitments to Ellis University must be cleared.

Petition to Graduate

Students must submit an “Intent to Graduate” (ITG) form as part of the graduation process. The
form should be submitted during the student’s final course. If the ITG form is not received by the
last day of the student’s final course, the student’s diploma will not be ordered during that
conferral period. Students can upload the form through the student portal, email the form to
studentrecords@ellis.edu, or fax the form to 312.669.6550.

Commencement

Ellis University confers degrees three times per year in May, August, and December. To be
considered eligible, a student must have completed all coursework with final grades prior to the
final day of the month in which degrees are conferred. Please consult with your Academic Advisor
for additional guidance. Students who complete degree requirements early in a conferral period
may request a Letter of Degree Verification from the Office of the Registrar if they are required to



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    23
prove that they have earned a degree prior to the availability of the official transcript (with degree
information posted) and diploma.

Academic and Student Support Services

Ellis University has a core value of helping students fulfill their educational objectives by offering
degree programs with a high degree of quality and in a manner that allows them to achieve the
learning outcomes of their courses and programs of study.

The institution provides six vital support areas: Academic Advising (registration services, early
identification of at-risk students, and remedial services); Library Services; Office of the Dean of
Students, Office of the Registrar; Student Help Desk (technical and general support); and
Student Life (orientation, career services and alumni services).

Academic Advising

Upon entering Ellis University, each student is assigned an academic advisor who will provide
information regarding courses of study, program requirements, services and policies. The
University provides the student with the Academic Advisor’s telephone number and email
address. The Academic Advisor is available for any questions or concerns regarding Ellis
University, its courses, or services.

Academic Resource Center

The Academic Resource Center provides writing assistance, web links, videos of writers
discussing the writing process, animations providing guidance about beginning essays;
completing essays; drafting arguments; and active reading (among others). Additionally, there are
resources devoted to web research, using and documenting references; avoiding plagiarism;
style, mechanics, and grammar (including tips on drafting concise sentences and coherent
paragraphs); and a math module.

Alumni Services

Ellis University operates its own alumni resources website that provides alumni with resources to
assist in job searching, information on professional associations, and details of the Ellis University
group available on Linkedin.com. Regional alumni chapters will eventually form and all Ellis
alumni will be invited to participate. Ellis Alumni may also participate in webcasts, receive student
newsletters and remain active in the Ellis University virtual community. Student groups are open
to Ellis students, alumni and faculty, allowing the Ellis online community to grow and share ideas
with one another.

Bookstore

Ellis University partners with Ambassador to provide bookstore services. Students should order
books well in advance of each term to ensure that they are adequately prepared to succeed in
each course.

Campus Community

Blogs: Each student and faculty member can create a personal profile, including the ability to
maintain a personal blog. These blogs allow students to connect outside the classroom in the
larger Ellis community.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      24
Coffeehouse: Each Ellis University class has a live chat area, the class Coffeehouse. Students
and faculty use this feature for live classroom discussion or to discuss team assignments.

Student Groups: Ellis University students and faculty may create and maintain groups in the Ellis
University Virtual Campus. Groups can be academic, professional or based on shared hobbies
and interests.

Webinars: Through webinars, Ellis University offers Webcasts to all students, faculty and staff.
These webcasts bring speakers to the Ellis community to discuss personal and professional
development. All webcasts are archived and available through the webcast schedule.

Career Development Office

Ellis University provides students with career development resources to help them strengthen and
broaden their professional skill set. The Career Development Office provides access to a
nationwide job search database, career coaching and assessment, interviewing skills workshop,
resume building workshop, networking, company profiles, and salary information.

Library

The Ellis University Library includes an extensive collection of online journals, full-text databases,
resources and tools, and practical guides – all available through the Ellis University website.
Reference assistance from the librarian is also available. These resources provide immediate
access to up-to-date information that supports instruction, class participation, and online
discussion.

Student Rights & Responsibilities

Statement of Rights and Responsibilities

Student Rights: The University will uphold and protect your rights as a student.

      •   Students have the right to an impartial, objective evaluation of their academic
          performance. Students shall receive within the syllabus for each course at the
          beginning of each term clear expectations regarding the method of evaluating student
          work and the method for how final grades are determined.
      •   Students have the right to be free from acts or threats of intimidation, harassment,
          mockery, insult, or aggression from others in the University community.
      •   Students have the right to due process. Formal procedures are followed to ensure
          notice and hearing for all students accused of academic or disciplinary misconduct.
      •   Students have the right to a grievance process. The process is articulated in the
          Academic Catalog and is available to students who seek redress for perceived non-
          compliance with University policy or procedure.
      •   Students have the right to full disclosure and explanation of all fees and financial
          obligations to the University.
      •   Students have the right to participate in course and instructor evaluations and provide
          constructive criticism of the services provided by the University in appropriate time,
          place, and manner.

Student Responsibilities: The University will expect the student to assume certain
responsibilities associated with becoming a member of the academic community.

      •   Demonstrate respect for the personal and professional opinions of others.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     25
        •     Demonstrate respect for the personal and professional values of others.
              Demonstrate respect for faculty, fellow students, and staff regardless of gender,
              ethnicity, or religious, moral, political, or sexual orientation.
        •     Accept responsibility for one’s own actions, inaction, verbal or written communication,
              and interactions with faculty, fellow students, and staff.
        •     Acknowledge that the resolution of conflicts is integral to the learning process and
              demonstrate good citizenship within a broader community.
        •     Maintain confidentiality and personal privacy within all methods of communication with
              other students.
        •     Maintain the highest ethical standards when interacting with faculty, fellow students,
              and staff.
        •     Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner within all
              institutional settings (including online or virtual settings) and to understand and abide
              by all University policies.
        •     Students are expected to conduct all relationships with the faculty, fellow students and
              staff with integrity, honesty and respect.
        •     Students are to comply with the direction given by faculty, staff, and administrators who
              are acting within the purview of their role within the institution.
        •     Students have the responsibility to strive for academic excellence and share their
              knowledge and learning experiences with fellow students in the spirit of building a
              community of learners.
        •     Each student has the responsibility for respecting, protecting, and building a learning
              environment. The effectiveness of the educational process depends upon developing
              and maintaining an environment that supports diversity, unique ideas, and unique
              cultures.

Student Code of Conduct

Ellis University comprises a community of learners, faculty, staff, and administration who are
committed to certain values. These values include academic excellence, respect for all members
both in and outside the college community, and integrity. Ethical decision-making is at the core of
our community especially when faced with adversity.

This Code of Conduct is designed to ensure that the work of teaching and learning are
unencumbered within the University community. The Code defines what it means to actively
succeed within the community by outlining student rights and responsibilities. This Code also
defines the policies that community members agree to comply with in order to remain a member
of the community.

Each student is encouraged to read and understand the Code of Conduct. Students assume the
rights and responsibilities upon admission into the institution and may not use ignorance as a
justification for violations of the Code. Questions or concerns should be referred to the Office of
the Dean of Students.

                                                Definitions

    •       A student is defined as one who is enrolled or registered within a program of study at Ellis
            University. Further, a student is defined as one who has completed the most recent
            academic term and is eligible for re-enrollment, or who is on an approved qualified leave
            of absence, or a pending graduate.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      26
   •   A Review Committee is comprised of members of the University community who are
       designated to review alleged violations of the Code on behalf of the Provost.


   •   A Student Conduct Committee is comprised of members designated to conduct formal
       hearings as referred by the Review Committee.

   •   Notice is satisfied under the Code by sending an email to the most recent email address
       provided by the student to the institution.

Student Conduct Policies

Types of misconduct:

       1. Academic Dishonesty (See the Academic Catalog for Institutional Policy)
       Students may be disciplined for any form of academic dishonesty including, but not
       limited to, plagiarism, cheating, multiple submissions, coercion, and inappropriate
       collaboration.

               a. “Plagiarism” defined as the appropriation of all or part of someone else’s work
               (such as, but not limited to, writing, coding, programs, and images) and
               submitting it as one’s own without proper citation. Common sources of
               plagiarized work include published books and articles, another student’s work,
               Internet websites, and websites offering academic papers for sale. Plagiarism
               may include the use of another’s words or ideas as if they were one’s own. This
               may include the use of part of or an entire work produced by someone other than
               the student and representing the work as the student’s original work.

               b. “Cheating” is defined for the purpose of any courses taken at this institution as
               using false pretenses, tricks, devices, artifices, or deception to obtain credit on an
               examination or assessed work in a college course. Cheating may include the use
               of unauthorized materials; or the failure to observe the instructions of an
               academic experience.

               c. “Multiple Submissions” is defined as the resubmission by a student of any work
               which has been previously submitted for credit in identical or similar form in one
               course to fulfill the requirements of another course (concurrent or otherwise),
               without the permission of the instructor of the current courses.

               d. “Coercion” is defined as threatening personal/professional repercussions
               against an instructor in an effort to coerce the instructor to change a grade.

               e. “Inappropriate Collaboration” is defined as the sharing of actual completed or
               graded assignments or documents, with other students within Ellis University. If
               a student has questions about whether something would be considered an
               inappropriate collaboration, he/she should consult with his/her instructor.

       2. Harassment
       Harassment is the use or display of words or imagery, on any basis that creates a hostile
       and intimidating environment so severe or pervasive to impair a student’s or faculty
       member’s participation in teaching and learning activities.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   27
         3. Obstruction or Disruption
         Any interference or disruption of the teaching, learning, or administration within the
         University community.

         4. Failure to Comply
         Resisting or obstructing University officials in the performance of or the attempt to
         perform their duties. Failure to comply with directions of a University official acting in the
         performance of their duties.

         5. Violation of Disciplinary Conditions
         Not complying with the sanctions set forth by the Dean of Students, The Student Conduct
         Committee, or the Provost.

Student Disciplinary Procedures

Referral of Complaints
Complaints and grievances will be mediated by the Dean of Students. All complaints involving
alleged misconduct by students will be referred to the Office of the Dean of Students, except
when the student is subject to a disciplinary procedure of another unit within the institution. All
complaints should be filed within thirty (30) days of discovery of the alleged misconduct.

Notice to Student
Upon receipt of a complaint or grievance that includes an allegation of misconduct, the Dean will
conduct an investigation in order to determine if a violation has occurred. If the Dean determines
that enough evidence points toward a violation, the Office of the Dean of Students will provide the
following notice:

    1. the nature of the alleged misconduct
    2. the corresponding student conduct policy and/or procedure
    3. the student will have five business days to provide a statement of response to the
       allegations
    4. if the student fails to file a statement of response a hold may be placed on the student’s
       account
    5. no degree will be conferred on a student until any pending disciplinary charges are
       resolved
    6. the Dean may direct the student to refrain from acting in a specific manner until such a
       time as the investigation is complete

Investigation
The investigation will include the initial complaint or grievance, the statement of response and any
additional documentation relevant to the case. The investigation may include any of the following:

    1. an initial meeting with the Dean of Students or a designee
    2. an inspection of documentation
    3. interviewing the accused student and/or other parties familiar with the case

Disposition
After concluding the investigation, the Dean of Students will take one of the following actions:

    1.   Dismiss the complaint based upon lack of evidence
    2.   Impose sanctions
    3.   Refer the student to the Student Conduct Committee
    4.   Determine an Agreement of Resolution




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       28
Sanctions
When a student is found in violation of a policy or regulation, the Dean of Students may impose
one or more of the following sanctions:

    1. Exclusion – the student may be removed from a course, a student group or no longer
       allowed to participate in other student community events.
    2. Warning – Notice to the student that a violation has occurred and that any repeated
       violation may result in suspension or dismissal
    3. Censure – the student may not be allowed to comment on a specific topic or in specific
       forums.
    4. Disciplinary Probation – a sanction imposed for a specific period of time during which a
       student must demonstrate conduct that conforms to the Student Code of Conduct.
    5. Records Hold – all academic records will be unavailable to the student until such a time
       as the conditions imposed as part of another sanction are satisfied.
    6. Suspension
    7. Dismissal

Suspension
Suspension is the termination of student status for a specific period of time. Reinstatement may
occur only if the student satisfies the following:

    1.   the student has complied with the terms and conditions of an imposed sanction
    2.   the student is academically eligible
    3.   the student does not have a Records Hold on their file
    4.   the student meets the required deadline for reinstatement

Dismissal
A student may be dismissed from the institution. Reinstatement requires the specific approval of
the Provost.

Revocation of a Degree
Subject to the consensus of the Faculty Senate, a degree may be revoked if it is determined that
it was fraudulently obtained.

Appeal of Sanction
A sanction imposed by the Dean that includes Suspension or Dismissal may be appealed to the
Provost. The appeal must be in writing and must be filed within five (5) business days from the
time the notice of the sanction is provided.
During the appeal, the student may continue to attend class. The review of the appeal will be in
accordance with the terms and conditions outlined within this document, and the decision of the
Provost is final.

If the Provost determines that the student was improperly disciplined, any reference to the
disciplinary process will be removed from the student’s record. In such case, the disciplinary
process records may only be used in connection with legal proceedings.

Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism

Academic dishonesty (i.e., plagiarism, cheating, multiple submissions, coercion, and
inappropriate collaboration) is not acceptable within the Ellis community. Cases of academic
dishonesty are to be reported by both faculty members and students. If a case of academic
dishonesty is substantive, transgressors are subject to discipline.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   29
        a. “Plagiarism” defined as the appropriation of all or part of someone else’s work (such
        as, but not limited to, writing, coding, programs, and images) and submitting it as one’s
        own without proper citation. Common sources of plagiarized work include published
        books and articles, another student’s work, Internet websites, and websites offering
        academic papers for sale. Plagiarism may include the use of another’s words or ideas as
        if they were one’s own.

        b. “Cheating” is defined for the purpose of any courses taken at this institution as using
        false pretenses, tricks, devices, artifices, or deception to obtain credit on an examination
        or assessed work in a college course.

        c. “Multiple Submissions” is defined as the resubmission by a student of any work which
        has been previously submitted for credit in identical or similar form in one course to fulfill
        the requirements of another course (concurrent or otherwise), without the permission of
        the instructor of the current courses.

        d. “Coercion” is defined as threatening personal/professional repercussions against an
        instructor in an effort to coerce the instructor to change a grade.

        e. “Inappropriate Collaboration” is defined as the sharing of actual completed or graded
        assignments or documents, with other students within Ellis University. If a student has
        questions about whether something would be considered an inappropriate collaboration,
        he/she should consult with his/her instructor.

Faculty members expect students to adhere to the following guidelines with respect to
preparation of graded assignments:

• Unless the assignment description explicitly states otherwise, all work he/she submit will be
his/her own. Students are encouraged to share ideas and questions about work as it is worked
on, but the work itself should not be shared. If he/she would like to work with others, it is best to
check first with the faculty member.
• In assignments and discussions, the student will state your own ideas in his/her own words,
clearly citing any borrowed words or ideas. Exceptions would be course content or assignment
instructions that ask he/she to apply templates, data, or information contained in the course
materials or to use ideas generated in course discussions.
• For a quiz or exam, the student will work independently, without sharing answers with others.
• For a group project, the student will share work with other members of your team, but not
outside of your team.
• All information from course materials, whether online or textbook, can be used as sources for
course assignments without formal citation. However, guidelines for source documentation and
plagiarism apply.

For example, if a student is to borrow verbatim from course content, he/she will provide proper
acknowledgement via quotation marks or citations. If he/she uses information, words, or ideas
from sources outside the course, the student will cite your sources. He/she will not share finished
or draft work (individual or group project) with others unless explicitly directed to do so by course
materials or faculty member. Providing such work may create a situation where another individual
would violate the Code of Conduct.

To prevent and detect cases of plagiarism and cheating, all assignments for every undergraduate
and graduate course at this institution are scanned with Turnitin™ plagiarism detection software.
“Turnitin’s Originality Checking ensures originality, as well as use of proper citation” (Retrieved
from http://www.turnitin.com). Sanctions for plagiarism or cheating can range from failure on an
individual assignment or the entire course to expulsion from the institution. Each student enrolled


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     30
in a course agrees that, by taking such course, he or she consents to the submission of all
required work for textual similarity review by Turnitin™ to detect plagiarism. Each student also
agrees that all work submitted to this service may be included as source documents to that
service’s database, solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such work.

Whenever the student has any doubts or questions about appropriate work processes or
academic integrity standards, check with the faculty member teaching the course to clarify his or
her expectations.

Plagiarism is a very serious offense that will result in the following sanctions:

1st Offense: Failure of the assignment in which the action occurred.
2nd Offense: Failure of the course in which the action occurred.
3rd Offense: Dismissal from the institution.

In all documented cases of plagiarism, the instructor of record shall notify the affected student in
writing of the instructor’s decision to file charges. All charges of plagiarism will be made in writing
and forwarded to the Office of the Provost along with supporting documentation or evidence. The

Provost’s office shall maintain a record of all complaints of plagiarism. The Provost’s office shall
send a letter to the affected student stating the sanctions to be taken and informing the instructor,
the Dean of the College in which the student’s program resides, and the Dean of Students. All
appeals of sanctions must be made by the student within 10 days of the mailing of the official
letter notifying the student of the action. Appeals of sanctions are made with the assistance of the
student’s Academic Advisor. The appeal of sanctions shall be first directed to the appropriate
Dean of the student’s program. It is the responsibility of the student to submit to the Dean a
written basis for the appeal that details either an unknown inequity or clerical error of process. No
other appeals shall be heard. The Dean shall review all pertinent documentation and decide on
the appropriateness of the sanction. The Dean shall notify appellants of the decision within two
weeks of receipt of appeal. If, after the Dean’s review, the issue is still not resolved to the
satisfaction of a student, the Provost of Ellis University may be contacted for a final appeal. The
Provost will review the appeal and issue a decision within two weeks of the appeal. The decision
of the Provost shall be final.

Institutional Review Board

The Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Ellis University is an administrative body established to
protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects recruited to participate in research
activities conducted under the auspices of this institution. The IRB is comprised of faculty and
administrators who have specific expertise in various forms of research and protection of human
subjects. The primary function of the IRB is to insure that investigators adhere to federal
regulations regarding the treatment of human subjects.
If you have specific questions about human subjects research or the IRB, please contact the
Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

Student Conduct Committee

When a case is referred to the Student Conduct Committee, the following will be provided to
ensure a fair hearing:

    1. written notice including the factual basis for the charges, policy allegedly violated, and
       time of the hearing.
    2. a prompt and fair hearing where the institution will have the responsibility to prove that a
       violation has occurred.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      31
    3. the opportunity to present documents and other evidence.
    4. a written report summarizing the findings.
    5. an appeal process.


The Student Conduct Committee will be comprised of a least two (2) members of the faculty with
at least one (the Chair) having some training in law, arbitration or adjudication of disputes. The
Vice President for Academic Affairs will assign the faculty to serve a 2-year term.
At least 2 students, one graduate and one undergraduate and who were nominated by their
respective Deans, will serve 1-year terms. The students must be in good standing academically.
At least two (2) members-at-large from the institutional staff as assigned by the VPAA and will
serve 2-year terms.

Presentation of the Case
The Student Conduct hearing is not a legal proceeding and legal representation is not allowed.
Students are responsible for representing themselves and presenting their case. The University
will be represented by the Chair of the Student Conduct Committee.

Resolution with the Office of the Dean of Students
Prior to the submission of the Student Conduct Committee’s report to the Provost, the student
may make an admission of responsibility to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students may
choose to impose one or more of the sanctions previously mentioned in this document or may
defer to the decision of the Student Conduct Committee.

Report to the Provost
The Student Conduct Committee will file a report with the Provost within fifteen (15) business
days after the hearing. The report will include the following:

    1. a summary of the allegations and a summary of the evidence presented
    2. the opinion of the majority of the Student Conduct Committee
    3. the recommended sanction to be imposed upon the student

Filing of the Report
The Student Conduct Committee report will be distributed to the student, the Chair of the Student
Conduct Committee, the Dean of Students, and the Provost.

Appeal Process

The student may enter a written appeal to the Provost within five business days from receipt of
the Student Conduct Committee report. The appeal must be signed by the student and must
include an argument against the Student Conduct Committee report. If deemed appropriate, the
Provost may request a discussion with the student following the receipt of an appeal.

Bases for Decision
The Provost decision will be based upon the following:

    1. the report filed by the Student Conduct Committee
    2. any argument presented by the student at the time of appeal
    3. the counsel of the Office of the Dean of Students regarding this matter and similar or
       previous cases of misconduct

Notice of Decision
The Provost will provide a decision within twenty (20) business days from the receipt of the
student appeal. The decision rendered by the Provost is final and cannot be appealed. The



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  32
decision will be provided to the student in writing and copies will be distributed to the Chair of the
Student Conduct Committee and the Office of the Dean of Students.

Grievance Process

Students wishing to file a formal grievance should complete the Ellis University Grievance Form,
available through their academic advisor. The completed form should be emailed to the academic
advisor along with any additional supporting documentation. The academic advisor will forward
the grievance form to the Dean of Students for review and resolution.

When possible, grievance resolutions should occur within two weeks. Grievance issues that
require additional time will be resolved as quickly as possible. The student will be made aware of
the status of the grievance if it is not resolved within the two week timeframe.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     33
Computer and Technical Requirements



Ellis University courses rely on the Internet, as well as books and printed materials, for source
information. Students must walk through our technical setup to ensure that their computers can
access the latest features of Ellis University courses before they begin their first course.
BASIC TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS ARE:



            BASIC TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS

Internet Access                        Required
E-mail Account                         Required
Internet Connection Speed              56K bps (DSL or cable recommended)
Installed RAM                          256 MB (512 MB or more strongly recommended)
Operating System                       Microsoft Windows™ 2000/XP/Vista
                                       [Mac OS X 10.4 or higher]*

Display                                1024x768 pixels or higher, thousands of colors
Sound                                  Sound card and speakers or headphones
Printer                                Recommended
CD-ROM                                 Required
Web Browser                            Microsoft Internet Explorer™ 6 or later
                                       [Safari version 2 or later for Mac]*

Plug-ins                               Macromedia Flash™ 9, Shockwave™ 8.51, and Apple QuickTime
                                       7, Adobe Reader 6.0

Software                               Microsoft Office Pro™ 2000 or higher for your Windows computer, or an
                                       office suite compatible with Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft
                                       Access and Microsoft PowerPoint file formats. Certain courses may
                                       require additional software.


*Not all elements of all courses are accessible with Apple hardware and software.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                         34
Ellis University Programs

Ellis University Undergraduate Core Curriculum

The purpose of the core curriculum is to provide Ellis University students with the communication,
analytical, and problem-solving skills they need for job success. The core curriculum also
provides students with the broad perspective of history, science and philosophy and insights into
human behavior derived from the study of behavioral science and literature.

Individual core courses may be structured around real-world problems, group and individual
projects, and meaningful inquiries to reflect upon, discuss, and debate. In short, learning is active
and it is applied and made meaningful by drawing on the unique experience and perspective of
individual learners through the structure of the courses.

Another special feature of all core courses is the concept of writing to learn. Because writing
about a subject is one of the best ways to learn the subject, each core course requires students
to write often, both formally and informally in assignments, collaborative activities, and discussion.
Such work helps students gain confidence and fluency in all forms of written expression.

In addition, many core courses contain elements of quantitative reasoning to help students use
numbers and quantitative display techniques to understand and communicate complex subjects
more effectively.

The required core course areas are listed below. This set of courses is central to all Ellis
undergraduate programs. Students should work with their Academic Advisor early and often to
make sure that they meet the requirements of the core sequence. The courses listed below
satisfy the requirements of the core curriculum.

College Success Seminar - 3 credits

English Composition - 6 credits
WRT 101 College Composition I
WRT 151 College Composition II

English - 6 credits
COM 240 Writing for Mass Media
LIT 210 The Art of Poetry
LIT 220 The Art of Drama
LIT 230 The Art of Fiction
LIT 240 The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Literature
LIT 310 Modern Poetry
LIT 330 Survey of World Literature
LIT 331 Art of the Novel
LIT 340 The African-American Writer in American Literature
LIT 341 Twentieth-Century American Literature
WRT 310 Business Writing
WRT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions
WRT 330 Writing for Communication Arts
WRT 335 Writing for Publication

Speech - 3 credits
SPH 105 Basic Speech Communication
COM 101 Communication: Principles and Process




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    35
Humanities - 6 credits
PHL 110 Problems of Philosophy
PHL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy
PHL 230 Technology, Society, and Values
HIS 110 American History I
HIS 150 American History II
HIS 210 The Contemporary World
PLS 110 American Government and Politics

Behavioral Sciences - 3 credits
CRM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CRM 303 Police Psychology
PSY 110 Introductory Psychology
SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology

Economics - 3 credits
ECO 105 Principles of Economics I
ECO 110 Principles of Economics II

Science - 6 credits
BIO 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe
BIO 103 Nutrition
BIO 105 Food Microbiology
PHY 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe
PHY 120 Journey Through the Universe
PHY 170 General Physics I

Mathematics - 3 credits
MAT 115 Introductory Concepts of Mathematics
MAT 125 Finite Mathematics
MAT 141 Pre-calculus
MAT 140 College Algebra and Trigonometry
MAT 161 Basic Applied Calculus

Liberal Arts Elective - 3 credits
From Behavioral Science, Social Science, or other general education area




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                            36
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Arts and Sciences is an academic community engaged in the discovery,
dissemination, and application of knowledge in the traditional areas of liberal arts and sciences
and in emerging areas of study. The College offers six degree programs and 22 academic
specializations spanning the liberal arts and sciences. These programs, specializations, and
individual courses encompass literature, mathematics, history, writing, life sciences,
communications, computer science and philosophy.

Undergraduate Programs

Bachelor of Arts in English

The English major prepares students to be both creative and critical thinkers as well as articulate
workers in today’s fast-changing professional settings. Students take core and advanced classes
in literature and culture, or in professional writing. This diverse and structured curriculum also
offers students the opportunity to shape their own education through work in an area of study and
a generous allotment of electives.

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts in English program students will be able to:
       1. Produce organized and grammatically correct written communication. Clearly,
          effectively, and convincingly engage in scholarly discussion and professional
          communication.
       2. Critically evaluate human experience and artistic achievement through analysis and
          research.
       3. Apply in professional and personal contexts a nuanced understanding of ethical and
          social responsibility

Literature and Culture Concentration:
         1. Produce informed, original, and persuasive analyses of literature
         2. Analyze and interpret diverse literary styles and genres
         3. Evaluate the influence of social, historical, and cultural context on the production of
             works of literature
         4. Employ textual evidence to support original interpretations of literature
         5. Recognize the influence of literary movements on the production of an author’s work
         6. Synthesize relevant literary criticism into original analyses
         7. Engage in critical discussion about literary works, periods, and movements and make
             connections between texts within a course

Professional Writing Concentration:
        1. Write effectively according to the purposes and conventions of diverse professional
            areas
        2. Employ appropriate stylistic and genre conventions related to professional, technical,
            and web-writing
        3. Apply pertinent writing strategies for different audiences
        4. synthesize material and resources to produce convincing reports and presentations
        5. Write and edit collaboratively
        6. Develop writing fluency in all fundamental areas (e.g. focus, organization,
            development, voice/tone, prose style, revising and editing).




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     37
Degree requirements

Core                                                                                     15
LIT 420             Literature Survey                                                    3
LIT 430             Major Author                                                         3
LIT 440             Multicultural Literature                                             3
LIT 450             Special Topics in Literature                                         3
LIT 460             Capstone Seminar                                                     3

General Education Core                                                                   42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Electives                                                                                49

Concentrations:

Literature and Culture (five of the following)                                           15
LIT 310            Modern Poetry                                                         3
LIT 315            Modern Drama                                                          3
LIT 320            Shakespeare                                                           3
LIT 330            Survey of World Literature                                            3
LIT 331            Art of the Novel                                                      3
LIT 340            The African-American Writer in American Literature                    3
LIT 341            Twentieth-Century American Literature                                 3

Or

Professional Writing (five of the following)                                             15
WRT 335            Writing for Publication                                               3
WRT 351            Advanced Technical Writing                                            3
WRT 355            Advanced Writing and Editing                                          3
WRT 360            Seminar in Professional Writing                                       3
WRT 363            Writing for the Web                                                   3
WRT 366            Survey of Technical & Professional Document Production                3


                                  Total Semester Hours: 121



Interdisciplinary Studies Degree

The degree program in Interdisciplinary Studies prepares students for a wide variety of careers
and graduate study. The program stresses knowledge and understanding by promoting the
virtues of a broad-based general education. The Interdisciplinary Studies program offers students
a broadly focused degree that develops competencies in several disciplines, and prepares
graduates for the modern workplace. In addition, the wealth of elective credits available in
Interdisciplinary Studies affords excellent opportunities for students with prior learning
experience.

The program in Interdisciplinary Studies offers three degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science, and Bachelor of Professional Studies. Although all students complete the same core
courses, individual degree plans differ significantly. Students who complete at least 75% (90



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 38
credits or more) of liberal arts courses may be granted the Bachelor of Arts degree. Those who
complete at least 50% (60-89 credits) of liberal arts courses will be awarded the Bachelor of
Science degree. The Bachelor of Professional Studies degree is granted to those students who
acquire at least 25% (30-59 credits) of liberal arts courses.

Enrollment in Interdisciplinary Studies offers students the opportunity to organize a degree
program to suit their individual career and academic goals. The degree program includes four key
elements:

1. Ellis University’s Core Curriculum, which includes a broad mix of liberal arts and science
courses.
2. Three concentrations in any combination.
3. An array of general electives from which students can tailor to their career interests.
4. A final synthesis course, the Capstone Seminar.

Ellis University’s required Core Curriculum (42 credits) is designed to provide students with
communication skills and knowledge essential to job success as well as the broad perspective of
history, science, philosophy and insights into human behavior derived from the study of
behavioral science and literature.

In addition to the core courses, each student selects three subject areas of concentration, taking
at least 12 credits in each area. An additional 18 elective credits may be taken in one of these
areas of concentration, and an additional 6 elective credits in each of the other two areas. The
remaining elective credits are chosen to complement the student’s individual degree plan.

The Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone Seminar rounds out the University experience by involving
students in research, analytic, and synthetic activities. The Capstone Seminar uses a general
topic or current issue to explore a variety of perspectives that multiple disciplines bring to bear on
any given substantive subject of interest. The capstone course requires students to demonstrate
mastery of the reading, writing, communication and research skills they have learned throughout
their coursework at Ellis and/or previous institutions.

The Ellis Interdisciplinary Studies Program prepares students for a variety of professional careers
that demand breadth of knowledge and excellent problem-solving skills. In the Capstone
Seminar, students apply and refine these skills as they exchange ideas with fellow students and
their instructors on engaging and timely topics.

Students may select their areas of concentration from the following 12 areas:

Concentrations:
                  Behavioral Sciences
                  Business
                  Communications Arts
                  Computer Science
                  English
                  Hospitality Management
                  Humanities
                  Labor Relations
                  Math/Physics
                  Social Sciences
                  Technical Writing
                  Technology




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    39
Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Professional
Studies in Interdisciplinary Studies program students will be able to:

         1.   articulate major concepts and issues related to their chosen fields of study
         2.   write a research brief and annotated bibliography on their chosen areas of study
         3.   discuss and defend their positions on important issues related to their fields
         4.   synthesize research and interview material into a draft of a research paper
         5.   evaluate and critique other writers' papers
         6.   write a coherent, well-researched paper that supports an effective argumentative
              thesis with credible evidence

Degree requirements

General Education Core                                                                    42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

General Electives                                                                         40

Concentrations:                                                                           39

Behavioral Science (among others)
ANT 101           Anthropology                                                            3
PSY 110           Introduction to Psychology                                              3
PSY 230           Child Psychology                                                        3
SOC 110           Introductions to Sociology                                              3
SOC 310           Marriage and the Family                                                 3

And/Or

Business
MGT 201               Business Organization and Administration                            3
MKT 101               Introduction to Marketing                                           3
FIN 201               Corporate Finance                                                   3
ACC 101               Accounting I                                                        3
MIS 101               Introduction to Computer Applications                               3

And/Or

Communication Arts (among others)
ADV 101         Introduction to Advertising                                               3
COM 101         Communication: Principles and Process                                     3
JOU 101         Introduction to Journalism                                                3
COM 301         Communication Law                                                         3

And/Or

Computer Science (among others)
CSC 110          Introduction to Computer Science                                         3
CSC 120          Computer Programming I                                                   3
CSC 130          Computer Organization                                                    3
CSC 170          Computer Architecture                                                    3




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  40
And/Or
English (among others)
LIT 210          Poetry                                                            3
LIT 220          The Art of Drama                                                  3
LIT 440          Multicultural Literature                                          3
WRT 310          Business Writing                                                  3
WRT 316          Writing for the Technical Professions                             3

And/Or

Hospitality Management (among others)
HOS 101           Hospitality Management                                           3
HOS 201           Convention and Meeting Planning                                  3
HOS 204           Food and Beverage                                                3

And/Or

Humanities (among others)
ART 101          Art History                                                       3
HIS 110          American History I                                                3
LIT 210          The Art of Poetry                                                 3
PHI 110          Problems of Philosophy                                            3

Labor Relations (among others)
MGT 210           Business Organization and Administrations                        3
MGT 315           Human Resource Management                                        3
MGT 320           Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations                        3
MGT 415           Compensation Management                                          3

And/Or

Math/Physics (among others)

PHY 115            Humanity and the Physical Universe                              3
PHY 120            Journey Through the Universe                                    3
MAT 151            Business Calculus                                               3
MAT 135            Technical Mathematics I                                         3

And/Or

Social Sciences (among others)
HIS 110           American History I                                               3
PHI 110           Problems of Philosophy                                           3
PHI 230           Technology, Society and Values                                   3
PLS 110           American Government and Politics                                 3

And/Or

Technical Writing (among others)
LIT 240            The Art of Prose                                                3
WRT 316            Advanced Writing for Technical Professions                      3
WRT 351            Advanced Technical Writing                                      3
WRT 366            Survey of Technical and Professional Documentation Production   3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                        41
And/Or

Technology (among others)
CTE 205         Computer Programming for Technology                                      3
CTE 310         Introduction to UNIX                                                     3
ETE 110         Electrical Technology I                                                  3
ETE 120         Electrical Technology II                                                 3


                                   Total Semester Hours: 121



Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The electronic digital computer has contributed to revolutionary changes in the methodologies of
business and governmental data processing, the control of manufacturing operations, and the
scope and nature of research in scientific and technological areas. It is the objective of this
program to create computer scientists whose skills are consistent with today’s demand for
graduates with hardware and software expertise in areas such as computer graphics, distributed
information system, or internet engineering. Students choose between concentrations in Internet
Engineering or Distributed Database Systems.

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program, students will be able
to:

         1. Conduct relevant research on theories and computer-related technological solutions
            depending on their professional practices
         2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of theory and design of lower-level languages and
            applications in design development of systems software
         3. Produce work that reflects proficiency in fundamental concepts, terms, and
            procedures in computer science operations and problem solving
         4. Demonstrate functional understanding of challenges associated with contemporary
            theory and design of assemblers, compilers, and operating systems
         5. Demonstrate rudimentary technical knowledge, skills, and capabilities relevant to the
            architecture and operation of a variety of computer systems
         6. Demonstrate basic skills in conceptualization, organization, and development of
            algorithms, data organization and process optimization

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                     58
CSC 120              Computer Programming I                                              3
CSC 130              Computer Organization                                               3
CSC 170              Computer Architecture                                               3
CSC 180              Computer Programming II                                             3
CSC 230              Discrete Structures                                                 3
CSC 260              Data Structures                                                     3
CSC 300              Database Management                                                 3
CSC 325              Compiler Design                                                     3
CSC 330              Operating Systems                                                   3
CSC 450              Seminar Project                                                     3




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               42
ENG 245             Statistical Design I                                                 3
ENG 345             Statistical Design II                                                3
WRT 316             Writing for Technical Professions                                    3
MAT 170             Calculus I                                                           4
MAT 180             Calculus II                                                          4
MAT 310             Linear Algebra                                                       3
PHY 170             General Physics I                                                    4
PHY 180             General Physics II                                                   4

General Education Core                                                                   42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Computer Science Electives                                                               6

General Electives                                                                        3

Concentrations:

Internet Engineering                                                                     12
CSC 303            Internet Programming and Languages                                    3
CSC 360            Website Engineering                                                   3
CSC 370            Introduction to Computer Networks                                     3
CSC 405            Distributed Database Systems                                          3

Or

Distributed Database Systems                                                             12
CSC 370           Introduction to Computer Networks                                      3
CSC 401           Database Interfaces and Programming                                    3
CSC 405           Distributed Database Systems                                           3
CSC 460           Special Topics                                                         3


                                   Total Semester Hours: 121



Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Concentration in Information and
Network Security, Interactive Multimedia, or Telecommunications

Information and Network Security
Interactive Multimedia
Telecommunications

Today, computers are applied to every industry and every level of human interaction. Information
Technology (IT) professionals, often working with people in every walk of life, design systems,
create computer based solutions, introduce computer human interfaces, configure and manage
networks, and serve as technical consultants in technical as well as non-technical fields.

Ellis University’s career-oriented programs prepare students for some of today's fastest growing
professions. This program develops students' skills in analyzing and solving technology related
problems. The program prepares students to adapt to new innovations in technology.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                43
Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program, students will be
able to demonstrate:

       1. Mastery of the fundamental principles, concepts and techniques associated with
          software development, telecommunications, and developmental methodologies
       2. Teamwork and interpersonal skills needed to function effectively in the business
          context (applications and technologies)
       3. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business practices
       4. Focused critical thinking skills evidenced in the analysis, design, construction, and
          testing of simple and complex information systems
       5. Effective written business and technical communication skills;
       6. Effective application of modeling and problem-solving techniques
       7. Identify and solve unstructured real-world problems by identifying central issues,
          recognizing causational factors, and generating evidence-based viable solutions.


Degree requirements

Core                                                                                      43
CSC 120             Computer Programming I                                                3
CSC 130             Computer Organization                                                 3
CSC 170             Computer Architecture                                                 3
CSC 180             Computer Programming II                                               3
CSC 260             Data Structures                                                       3
CSC 330             Operating Systems                                                     3
CSC 370             Introduction to Computer                                              3
ITE 251             Discrete Structures I                                                 3
ITE 252             Discrete Structures II                                                3
ITE 290             Database Systems                                                      3
ITE 305             Internet Programming Language I                                       3
ITE 320             Web-based Multimedia Development I                                    3
ITE 410             Internetworking Lab                                                   1
ENG 251             Project Engineering                                                   3
MGT 421             Cyber Law, Policy and Ethics                                          4

General Education Core                                                                    42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

General Electives                                                                         27

Concentrations:

Information and Network Security (three of the following courses)                         9
ITE 365           Secure Programming                                                      3
ITE 385           Introduction to Computer and Network Security                           3
ITE 440           Network Security and Perimeter Protection                               3
ITE 445           Operating System Security                                               3
ITE 460           Topics in Information Technology                                        3

Or

Interactive Multimedia                                                                    9
ITE 420            Internet Programming Language II                                       3
ITE 460            Topics in Information Technology                                       3


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   44
ART 210             Computer Graphics I                                                    3

Or

Telecommunications (three of the following courses)                                        9
TEL 110         Internet Programming Language II                                           3
TEL 321         Topics in Information Technology                                           3
TEL 330         Computer Graphics I                                                        3
TEL 410         Advanced Cellular and Wireless Systems                                     3
TEL 420         Internetworking Technology I                                               3
TEL 430         Internetworking Technology II


                                  Total Semester Hours: 121



Graduate Programs

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science program is designed to serve a wide range of
professional interests and thus takes a broad-based approach to practical computer applications.
The curriculum emphasizes the relationship between computers and their areas of application.
The program is designed for individuals interested in systems analysis and systems engineering,
application software, software engineering, systems programming, data communications,
microprocessors or computer graphics. Its curriculum is consistent with the recommendations of
the Association for Computing Machinery.

Upon completion of the Master of Science in Computer Science program students will be able to
demonstrate:

        1. A functional knowledge of theory and design of high-level languages and applications
           in design and development of systems software
        2. Skill in conceptualization, organization, and development of algorithms, data
           organization and process optimization
        3. Mastery of fundamental concepts, terms, and procedures in computer science
           operations and problem-solving
        4. A thorough understanding of the major challenges associated with contemporary
           theory and design of assemblers, compilers, and operating systems
        5. Facility in the use of appropriate team skills to effectively accomplish goals in the
           design of high-level languages and development of systems software.
        6. Professional written communication skills through technology-mediated modalities.
        7. Requisite technical and in-depth knowledge, skills, and capabilities related to the
           architecture and operation of a variety of computer systems including
           microprocessors and large-scale computer systems.


Objectives
Specific objectives of this program provide students with a comprehensive background in:

        1. Theory and design of high-level languages and applications in design and
        development of systems software;



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                45
        2. Development of algorithms, data organization and process optimization;
        3. Theory and design of assemblers, compilers, and operating systems:
        4. Architecture and operation of a variety of computer systems including
        microprocessors and large-scale computer systems;
        5. Other topics specific to the student’s particular area of specialization such as software;
        engineering, computer graphics and artificial intelligence.

Admission Requirements
The Master of Science in Computer Science is principally designed for graduates of
baccalaureate programs in computer science, engineering, operations research, mathematics
and related areas. Students who are admitted to the program with insufficient background in
mathematics or computer science may be required to take one or more of the following
undergraduate deficiency courses:

CSC 130         Computer Organization
CSC 120         Computer Programming I
CSC 170         Introduction to Computer Architecture
CSC 210         Computer Programming II
CSC 260         Data Structures
CSC 330         Operating Systems
MAT 170         Calculus I
MAT 180         Calculus II
MAT 310         Linear Algebra

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                        27
CSC 541          Computer Architecture                                                      3
CSC 551          Algorithm Concepts                                                         3
CSC 600          Project                                                                    3
Computation (select one from the following)
CSC 510          Theoretical Concepts of Computer and Computation                           3
CSC 535          Probability and Stochastic Processes                                       3
CSC 545          Numerical Analysis                                                         3
System Programming (select two from the following)
CSC 511          Operating Systems I                                                        3
CSC 521          Programming Languages                                                      3
CSC 531          Compiler Theory I                                                          3

Computer Science Electives                                                                  9


                                    Total Semester Hours: 36



Master of Arts in Communication Arts—Advertising and Public Relations Specialization

The Master of Arts program in Communication Arts is an interdisciplinary program that
incorporates sound theoretical principles of research and aesthetic design and cultural studies to
achieve highly pragmatic and effective professional results. This program is designed for media
professionals seeking further career development, and for recipients of undergraduate degrees in
communication arts or other fields who are seeking to advance their knowledge and skills.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   46
For this degree, students must submit a portfolio that is completed during their regular course
work. This is not an independent project, but must be done in close consultation with a course
instructor, verifying that the work meets professional standards. Typically, master’s projects in this
area can include multiple media presentations, public relations or advertising campaigns,
complete media business plans, or scripts.

The minimum number of credits required for the MA degree specializing in Advertising and Public
Relations is 36. Academic credit for this program will not be awarded for previous professional
experience in this field.

Upon completion of the Master of Arts in Communication Arts program students will be able to
demonstrate:

        1. A functional knowledge of theory and research associated with media, culture, public
           relations, and news reporting.
        2. Skill in conceptualization, organization, and development of multimedia applications
           to public relations.
        3. Mastery of fundamental concepts, terms, and procedures in public communications
           related areas of specialization.
        4. A thorough understanding of the major challenges associated with contemporary
           public communications issues.
        5. Facility in the use of appropriate team skills to effectively accomplish goals related to
           public communications, news reporting, or multimedia integration.
        6. Professional written communication skills through technology-mediated modalities.
        7. Requisite technical and in-depth knowledge, skills, and capabilities related
           multimedia applications, public relations, and public communications.


Degree requirements

Core                                                                                         12
COM 510              Vocabulary of the Media Critic                                          3
COM 520              Media Research                                                          3
COM 530              Media and Culture                                                       3
DGI 501              Multimedia Production Tools                                             3

Required Specialization Courses                                                              24
Advertising and Public Relations
ADV 560           Advertising Copy Writing                                                   3
ADV 570           Media Planning and Buying                                                  3
ADV 590           Strategic Advertising Campaigns                                            3
COM 563           Seminar: Integrated Marketing                                              3
PRE 510           Principles and Practices of Advertising                                    3
PRE 520           Seminar: Public Relations I                                                3
PRE 530           Writing for Public Relations                                               3
PRE 560           Advanced Public Relations                                                  3
Or
ADV 580           Advanced Topics Seminar: Advertising/Public Policy                         3


                                    Total Semester Hours: 36




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    47
COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science

The Behavioral Science degree program is designed to prepare students for a wide variety
of careers in clinical, social, educational, industrial, and law enforcement environments. In
addition to a broad range of elective courses across diverse topics, students choose one of
three concentration areas of study: Criminal Justice, Psychology, or Sociology.

Undergraduate Programs
Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science program, students will be able
to:

        1. Connect theories of human behavior to problems of contemporary practice in the
           behavioral sciences
        2. Analyze social institutions, structures, environment, and the processes and
           complexities of behavior within a global culture and diverse society
        3. Recommend policies and practices to address issues involving the treatment,
           modification or control of abnormal behavior
        4. Apply scientific methods of inquiry and analysis to arrive at reasoned decisions
           regarding professional practice in the behavioral sciences
        5. Use legal, regulatory, and appropriate ethical standards and guidelines to assess
           policies and procedures and to select courses of action in behavioral science practice

Degree Requirements

Core                                                                                       36
PLS 110             American Government and Politics                                       3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                                  3
PSY 110             Introduction to Psychology                                             3
PSY 210             Theories of Personality                                                3
PSY 220             Statistical Analysis                                                   3
PSY 310             Abnormal Psychology                                                    3
PSY 340             Introductory Research Methods                                          3
PSY 410             Physiological Basis for Behavior                                       3
SOC 110             Introduction to Sociology                                              3
CRJ 384             Professional and Organizational Ethics                                 3
CRJ 460             Institutional Corrections                                              3
PHI 220             Ethics and Social Philosophy                                           3
OR
PHI 260             Philosophy and the History of Science                                  3

General Education Core                                                                     42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

General Electives                                                                          27

Concentrations:

Criminal Justice                                                                           18
CRJ 110             Introduction to Criminal Justice                                       3
CRJ 220             Ethics, Diversity, and Professionalism                                 3
CRJ 240             Corrections                                                            3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 48
CRJ 330              Criminal Law and Procedure                                             3
CRJ 360              Probation and Parole                                                   3
CRJ 370              Managing Criminal Justice Organizations                                3

Or

Psychology                                                                                  18
PSY 230              Child Psychology                                                       3
PSY 250              Learning Theory                                                        3
PSY 280              Social Psychology                                                      3
PSY 320              Communications and Interviewing Techniques                             3
PSY 330              Personnel Psychology                                                   3
PSY 420              Introduction to Counseling                                             3

Or

Sociology                                                                                   18
ANT 101              Anthropology                                                           3
SOC 210              Criminal Theory                                                        3
SOC 310              Social Problems                                                        3
SOC 320              Marriage and the Family                                                3
SOC 330              Juvenile Delinquency                                                   3
SOC 340              Juvenile Justice                                                       3


                                   Total Semester Hours: 123


Bachelor of Science in Political Science

This course of study includes the rich history and philosophy of political science. These foci are
designed to impart appreciation for intellectual, historical and political accomplishments of
humankind and aid students in assuming civic and social responsibility. Students who major in
political science are prepared for public service and policy formation, graduate programs in
political science, law, international service and political careers.

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Political Science program, students will be able to:

     1. Analyze political institutions
     2. Recommend policies and practices to address issues confronting political institutions and
        constituencies
     3. Assess the political behavior of individuals and groups
     4. Apply legal and ethical standards in political decision making and the formulation and
        execution of public policy

Degree Requirements

Core                                                                                        24
PLS 110              American Government and Politics                                       3
PLS 210              Comparative Government                                                 3
PLS 212              Basic Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice                     3
PLS 220              International Relations                                                3
PLS 310              Politics and Society                                                   3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      49
PLS 317             Public Policy Analysis                                                3
PLS 320             Public Administration                                                 3
PLS 490             Selected Topics in Political Science                                  3

General Education Core                                                                    42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Political Science Electives (select five course from below)                               15
PLS 211            History of Political Thought                                           3
PLS 311            Politics of Change                                                     3
PLS 312            American Society and Judicial Behavior                                 3
PLS 313            Foreign Policy of the U.S.                                             3
PLS 314            Government and Metropolitan Problems                                   3
PLS 315            Government and Business                                                3
PLS 316            International Law and Organization                                     3
PLS 390            Seminar in Political Science                                           3

General Electives                                                                         40


                                   Total Semester Hours: 121




Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree is a 121 hour program which offers a
comprehensive and practical study of the American criminal justice system and the professional
roles that accompany it. Students gain in-depth and relevant understanding of the tools,
processes, legal issues, and challenges inherent in careers in law enforcement, corrections and
private security. Specializations include Forensic Investigation, Corrections, and
Leadership/Management of Criminal Justice Organizations. A capstone course designed to be
the culminating learning experience tests critical thinking and analytic skills of every student.

Concentrations
   • Forensic Investigation
   • Corrections
   • Leadership/Management

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program, students will be able to:

        1. Recommend policies and practices to address issues confronting contemporary
           criminal justice systems
        2. Assess contemporary correctional policies and practices from differing criminal
           justice perspectives
        3. Connect biological, sociological, and psychological theories of criminality and
           evaluations of individual behaviors to problems of contemporary criminal justice
           practice
        4. Use legal and regulatory standards to assess polices and procedures and to select
           courses of action in the practice of criminal justice
        5. Analyze polices, procedures, and practices that affect law enforcement agencies and
           professional practice




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 50
        6. Apply scientific methods of inquiry and analysis to arrive at reasoned decisions
           regarding professional practice

Degree Requirements

Core                                                                                     46
CRJ 110             Introduction to Criminal Justice                                     3
SOC 110             Introduction to Sociology                                            3
PLS 110             American Government and Politics                                     3
CRJ 210             Organization and Administration of Criminal Justice                  3
CRJ 220             Ethics, Diversity and Professionalism                                3
CRJ 230             Rules of Evidence                                                    3
CRJ 240             Corrections                                                          3
CRJ 250             Criminal Investigation and Procedure                                 3
CRJ 310             Research Methods in Criminal Justice I                               3
CRJ 320             Research Methods in Criminal Justice II                              3
CRJ 330             Criminal Law and Procedure                                           3
PSY 310             Abnormal Psychology                                                  3
SOC 330             Juvenile Delinquency                                                 3
SOC 340             Criminological Theory                                                3
CRJ 490             Capstone                                                             4

General Education Core                                                                   42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Electives                                                                                33
From CRJ courses and inclusive of MGT 315, MGT 320, and/or MGT 410

Or

Concentrations

Forensic Investigation                                                                   18
CRJ 350             Crime Scene Investigation I                                          3
CRJ 351             Crime Scene Investigation II                                         3
CRJ 352             Law Enforcement Photography                                          3
CRJ 353             Advanced LE Photography                                              3
CRJ 354             Death Investigation                                                  3
CRJ 355             Criminal Psychological Profiling                                     3
AND
Criminal Justice Electives                                                               15

Or

Corrections                                                                              18
PSY 310             Abnormal Psychology                                                  3
CRJ 360             Probation and Parole                                                 3
CRJ 361             Correctional Treatment                                               3
CRJ 460             Institutional Corrections                                            3
CRJ 461             Juvenile Corrections                                                 3
CRJ 462             Specialized Offender Groups                                          3
And
Criminal Justice Electives                                                               15



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               51
Or

Leadership/Management of Criminal Justice Organizations                                     18
MGT 315             Human Resource Management                                               3
MGT 320             Collective Bargaining/Labor Relations                                   3
MGT 410             Employment Law                                                          3
CRJ 370             Managing Criminal Justice Organizations                                 3
CRJ 371             Criminal Justice Leadership                                             3
CRJ 384             Professional and Organizational Ethics                                  3
And
Criminal Justice Electives                                                                  15


                                   Total Semester Hours: 121



Bachelor of Arts in Paralegal Studies

Program Description: This degree program offers a substantive and practical exposure to the
law. The courses provide students with the analytical and critical thinking tools to understand and
apply the law. The program is designed for working professionals who seek a degree that will
enhance their current career paths while broadening and deepening their existing legal strengths.

Process: Students take the Introduction to Paralegal Studies Course, then all core and
specialization courses, then the Capstone Course

Program Outcomes
Students will be able to:
       1. Utilize Critical Thinking Skills: Analyze a problem; identify and evaluate alternative
       solutions.

        2. Develop Organization Skills: Sort information by category, prioritize assignments and
        client needs, manage information manually and through computerized databases; and
        utilize time efficiently.

        3. Enhance Communication skills: Interact effectively, in person, by telephone and in
        written correspondence with lawyers, clients, witnesses, court personnel, co-workers, and
        other business professionals

        4. Learn Legal Research Skills: Prepare and carry out a legal research plan; identify,
        analyze and categorize key facts in a situation.

        5. Develop Legal Writing Skills: Understand and apply principles of writing and rules of
        English grammar to all writing tasks. Communicate complex legal matters in
        understandable and concise terms.

        6. Understand Professional and Ethical Obligations: Understand the legal process and
        the nature of law practice, emphasizing the role of the paralegal in the delivery of legal
        services; understand the legal and ethical principles that guide paralegal conduct.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    52
Degree requirements

Core                                                                                       27
PLG 110              Introduction to Paralegal: Cornerstone Course                         3
PLG 120              Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility                          3
PLG 130              Introduction to Law                                                   3
PLG 140              Law Office Technology                                                 3
PLG 210              Legal Research and Writing I                                          3
PLG 220              Torts                                                                 3
PLG 230              Civil Litigation                                                      3
PLG 240              Contract Law                                                          3
PLG 250              Advanced Research and Writing                                         3

General Education Core                                                                     42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Paralegal Electives                                                                        36
From PLG courses

General Electives                                                                          15

Self-Developed Concentration                                                               30
With advisor assistance, choose credits from among courses available

                                   Total Semester Hours: 120



Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies

Program Description: The A.A.S. degree program offers a substantive and practical exposure to
the law. The courses provide students with the tools necessary to be effective to understand and
apply the law. The program is designed for entryway to a career as a working professional and a
stepping stone for those who may continue to seek a degree that will enhance their current career
paths.

Process: Students take the Introduction to Paralegal Studies Course, then all core and elective
courses, then the Capstone Course

Program Outcomes
Students will be able to:

        1. Utilize Analytical Thinking Skills: Analyze a problem and evaluate alternative solutions.

        2. Develop Organization Skills: Sort information by category, prioritize assignments and
        client needs, manage information manually and through computerized databases; and
        utilize time efficiently.

        3. Enhance Communication skills: Interact effectively, in person, by telephone and in
        written correspondence with lawyers, clients, witnesses, court personnel, co-workers, and
        other business professionals




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  53
        4. Learn Legal Research Skills: Prepare and carry out a legal research plan; identify,
        analyze and categorize key facts in a situation.

        5. Develop Legal Writing Skills: Understand and apply principles of writing and rules of
        English grammar to all writing tasks. Communicate complex legal matters in
        understandable and concise terms.

        6. Understand Professional and Ethical Obligations: Understand the legal process and
        the nature of law practice, emphasizing the role of the paralegal in the delivery of legal
        services; understand the legal and ethical principles that guide paralegal conduct.

Degree Requirements

Core                                                                                       27
PLG 110             Introduction to Paralegal: Cornerstone Course                          3
PLG 120             Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility                           3
PLG 130             Introduction to Law                                                    3
PLG 140             Law Office Technology                                                  3
PLG 210             Legal Research and Writing                                             3
PLG 220             Torts                                                                  3
PLG 230             Civil Litigation                                                       3
PLG 240             Contract Law                                                           3
PLG 250             Legal Research and Writing II                                          3

Paralegal Electives                                                                        9

General Education Core                                                                     24
CSS 101           College Success Seminar                                                  3
MATH 102          Finite Math                                                              3
WRIT 101          College Composition I                                                    3
PSYC 101          Introductory Psychology                                                  3
SOCI 101          Introductory Sociology                                                   3
ECON 105          Principles of Economics                                                  3
MIS 105           Computer Applications                                                    3
HIST 110          American History I                                                       3


                                   Total Semester Hours: 60



Graduate Programs


Master of Science in Human Resources Management and Labor Relations

39 Credits

Specializations:
   Human Resource Management
   Labor Relations

Human resources and labor relations are critical factors in the operation of any organization, and
how they are managed often makes the difference between success and failure of an enterprise.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  54
Over the past two decades, there has been a tremendous growth in the need for qualified
individuals to manage these functions.

Managing human resources in today’s complex organizational, legal, and economic environment
requires professionals with special skills and knowledge in such areas as employee selection,
training, appraisal and motivation; compensation and employee benefits programs; employment
law and policy—EEO, OSHA, Workers’ Compensation, ERISA; employee relations; and dispute
resolution.

For those in a unionized workplace or those who represent labor unions, the above is important
and study is also essential in collective bargaining, labor law and legislation, union organization
and arbitration.

The Master of Science in Human Resources Management and Labor Relations is designed to
provide advanced study to those who need professional competence in these and related areas.

Upon completion of the Master of Science in Human Resource Management and Labor
Relations, students will be able to demonstrate:

            1. A functional knowledge of organizational behavior and human resources
               management.
            2. Skill in conceptualization, organization, and development of human resource
               information systems.
            3. Mastery of fundamental concepts, terms, and applications of labor
               economics and industrial relations systems to human resource management
               and labor relations.
            4. A thorough understanding of the major challenges associated with
               contemporary employment law and collective bargaining processes.
            5. Facility in the use of appropriate team skills to effectively accomplish goals
               related to human resources management and labor relations.
            6. Professional written communication skills through technology-mediated
               modalities.
            7. Requisite knowledge, skills, and capabilities related to research methodology and
               cost, benefit, and impact analyses that are relevant to human resource
               management.

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                         24
HRM 510              Labor Economics                                                         3
HRM 520              The American Industrial Relations System                                3
HRM 530              Principles and Practices of Collective Bargaining                       3
HRM 540              Employment Laws and Policies                                            3
HRM 550              Human Resource Management                                               3
HRM 560              Organizational Behavior                                                 3
HRM 570              Human Resource Management and Labor Relations: Costs,                   3
                     Benefits and Impact
HRM 580              Methods of Research in Organizations                                    3

Specializations:

Human Resource Management                                                                    15
HRM 529             Human Resource Management Seminar (required)                             3
Select four of the following:
HRM 521             Fair Employment Practices and Policies                                   3


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       55
HRM 522              Staffing and Selection                                                 3
HRM 523              Training and Development of Human Resources                            3
HRM 524              Management of Compensation                                             3
HRM 525              Management of Employee Benefits                                        3
HRM 526              Alternative Dispute Resolution                                         3
HRM 527              Occupational Safety and Health                                         3
HRM 528              Human Resource Policies and Procedures                                 3

Or

Labor Relations                                                                             15
HRM 535              Labor Relations Seminar (required)                                     3
HRM 531              The Collective Bargaining Process                                      3
HRM 532              Arbitration and Dispute Resolution                                     3
HRM 533              The Labor Union as an Organization                                     3
HRM 534              Labor Law and Policy                                                   3

                                    Total Semester Hours: 39


Certificate

Certificate in Fraud Examination

Business and government professionals are involved in combating escalating incidences of
occupational fraud within their organizations. A multi-disciplinary understanding of how and why
occupational fraud occurs and how to resolve allegations of fraud has emerged.

In the response to this crisis of ethics, an elite vanguard has made the investigation, detection
and prevention of fraud a distinct, rewarding, and vital career path.

The certificate in Fraud Examination is designed to assist professionals from the diverse
disciplines of finance, law, and education in meeting the growing challenge of complying with new
fraud prevention laws and in establishing fraud prevention systems.

This program builds on a growing body of knowledge and experience and provides the most
relevant information and instruction on the complex Issues evolving from new technology and
global commerce in relation to fraud schemes.

Completion of this certificate provides:

     •   A thorough understanding of the challenges, concepts, terms and procedures of
         detection and prevention
     •   Functional knowledge of investigative techniques for uncovering fraudulent activity
     •   Skills to develop preventive measures to minimize risk of fraud
     •   Excellent preparation to sit for the CFE exam required to earn the designation of
         “Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE)”

Students will take the following courses:

CRJ 450 Introduction to Fraud Examination
CRJ 451 Fraud Prevention and Investigation
CRJ 452 Advanced Fraud Prevention and Investigation


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     56
CRJ 453 Criminology and the Legal Elements of Commercial Fraud
CRJ 454 Electronic Data Investigations
CRJ 455 Interviewing and Interrogation



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

The College of Business provides an individualized educational experience designed to develop
the business skills and appreciation for continuous learning necessary to succeed in a dynamic
global economy. Our high quality programs develop ethical, knowledgeable, and technologically
competent business professionals. We emphasize theory, foundational concepts, practical
applications, and the refining of critical thinking skills in our classes.

The College of Business at Ellis University comprises three educational levels: an Associate’s
Degree, a Bachelor’s Degree, Masters in Management, and a Master’s of Business
Administration (MBA).

The MBA is directed toward working professionals currently wanting to enhance their careers with
a degree that covers all functions of business growth and development.

The Bachelor’s Degree is directed to people who desire to finish a degree they may have started
a few years ago in order to start careers, change careers, or for their personal growth and
development.

The Associate’s Degree in Science (A.A.S.) is offered to people who want to begin an
undergraduate degree or enhance their employability within certain industries

Undergraduate Programs


Bachelor of Science in Accounting (B.S.A.)

Every for-profit and not-for-profit organization relies on accounting to generate information for
decision-making purposes. Accounting captures information about an organization’s operating,
investing and financing activities and reports this information to a wide variety of internal and
external stakeholders. The B.S. in Accounting degree program prepares students for rewarding
careers in this highly desirable field.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting program will demonstrate:

                1. Mastery of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices common to all
                   areas of accounting, including taxation, financial accounting, managerial
                   accounting, auditing and information systems
                2. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business
                   practices
                3. Effective written and oral business communication skills
                4. The ability to identify and solve unstructured real-world problems by
                   identifying central issues, recognizing causational factors, and generating
                   evidence-based viable solutions.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  57
Degree requirements

Core
Business                                                                                39
ACC 101             Accounting I                                                        3
ACC 110             Managerial Accounting                                               3
ECO 110             Principles of Economics II                                          3
ECO 201             Money and Banking                                                   3
FIN 201             Corporate Finance                                                   3
MAT 125             Finite Mathematics                                                  3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                               3
MIS 105             Introduction to Information Technology                              3
MGT 201             Legal Research and Writing II                                       3
MGT 209             Business Law I                                                      3
MGT 405             Business Policy Seminar                                             3
MKT 101             Introduction to Marketing                                           3
MGT 302             Statistical Sampling Theory                                         3
Accounting                                                                              30
ACC 210             Financial Accounting                                                3
ACC 302             Federal Taxation I                                                  3
ACC 306             Cost Accounting                                                     3
ACC 311             Non for Profit Accounting                                           3
ACC 320             Accounting Information Systems                                      3
ACC 402             Federal Taxation II                                                 3
ACC 411             Auditing                                                            3
ACC 416             Advanced Accounting                                                 3
FIN 210             Principles of Investment and Security Analysis                      3
MGT 309             Business Law II                                                     3

General Education Core                                                                  42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

General Electives                                                                       10



                                  Total Semester Hours: 121


Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (B.S.B.A.)

With a comprehensive examination of business functions, theories, and practices, the business
administration program offers students a choice of career objectives. Beyond the required general
education core courses and business courses, students can choose courses directed toward a
particular concentration.

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration must choose to
concentrate in the following:

Finance
General Management



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               58
Human Resources Management
International Business
Management of Information Systems
Managerial Accounting
Marketing
Small Business and Entrepreneurship

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program will demonstrate:

           1. Mastery of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices common to all
              areas of business administration
           2. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business practices
           3. Effective written and oral business communication skills
           4. The ability to identify and solve unstructured real-world problems by identifying
              central issues, recognizing causational factors, and generating evidence-based
              viable solutions.

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                   39
ACC 101             Accounting I                                                       3
ACC 110             Managerial Accounting                                              3
ECO 110             Principles of Economics II                                         3
ECO 201             Money and Banking                                                  3
FIN 201             Corporation Finance                                                3
MAT 125             Finite Mathematics                                                 3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                              3
MIS 105             Introduction to Information Technology                             3
MGT 201             Business Organization and Administration                           3
MGT 209             Business Law I                                                     3
MGT 302             Statistical Sampling Theory                                        3
MGT 405             Business Policy Seminar                                            3
MKT 101             Introduction to Marketing                                          3

General Education Core                                                                 42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

General Electives                                                                      22

Concentrations:                                                                        18

Finance
ACC 315             Financial Statement Analysis                                       3
ECO 320             International Economics and Finance                                3
FIN 205             Financial Management                                               3
FIN 210             Principles of Investment and Security Analysis                     3
FIN 401             Finance: Working Capital Management                                3
FIN 405             Modern Portfolio Theory                                            3

Or

General Management
MGT 301         Introduction to International Business                                 3


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                             59
MGT 305            New Product Management                              3
MGT 310            Small Business Management                           3
MGT 311            Knowledge Management                                3
MGT 315            Human Resource Management                           3
MGT 401            Production and Operation Management                 3

Or

Human Resource Management
MGT 301         Introduction to International Business                 3
MGT 310         Small Business Management                              3
MGT 315         Human Resource Management                              3
MGT 320         Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations              3
MGT 410         Employment Law                                         3
MGT 415         Compensation Management                                3

Or

International Business
ECO 320            International Economics and Finance                 3
MGT 301            Introduction to International Business              3
MIS 450            E-Commerce                                          3
MKT 310            Fundamentals of Exporting and Importing             3
MKT 320            Cross-Cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices   3
MKT 405            International Marketing                             3

Or

Management of Information Systems
MIS 215          Application Program Development I                     3
MIS 305          Database Program Analysis                             3
MIS 320          Managing Data Communications and Networks             3
MIS 325          Structured Systems Analysis and Design                3
MIS 430          Information Resource Management                       3
MIS 401          Seminar                                               3

Or

Managerial Accounting
ACC 210          Financial Accounting I                                3
ACC 306          Cost Accounting                                       3
ACC 311          Non for Profit Accounting                             3
ACC 320          Accounting Information Systems                        3
ACC 402          Federal Taxation II                                   3
ACC 406          Auditing II                                           3

Or

Marketing
MKT 201            Sales Management                                    3
MKT 205            Retailing Management                                3
MKT 301            Management of Promotion                             3
MKT 315            Internet Marketing                                  3
MKT 401            Marketing Research                                  3
MGT 305            New Product Management                              3


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                            60
Or

Small Business and Entrepreneurship
MGT 305          New Product Management                                                    3
MGT 310          Small Business Management                                                 3
MGT 315          Human Resource Management                                                 3
MGT 411          Business and Ethics                                                       3
MGT 420          Business Practicum                                                        3


                                   Total Semester Hours: 121



Bachelor of Professional Studies in Hospitality Management

The program in Hospitality Management is designed to enable graduates to accelerate their
careers, whether they are preparing to enter, or to significantly advance, in the hospitality,
tourism, and leisure industry.

Graduates of the program are prepared for customer-service oriented positions in hotels,
restaurants, casinos, health clubs, cruise ships, convention centers, event planning companies,
country clubs, sports clubs, tour companies, travel agencies, parks and recreation departments,
and adult living communities.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graduates of the Bachelor of Professional Studies in Hospitality Management will demonstrate:

            1. Mastery of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices common to all
               areas of hospitality management
            2. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business practices
            3. Effective written and oral business communication skills
            4. The ability to identify and solve unstructured real-world problems by identifying
               central issues, recognizing causational factors, and generating evidence-based
               viable solutions.

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                       54
HOS 101             Hospitality Management                                                 3
HOS 102             Front Office Management                                                3
HOS 201             Convention and Meeting Planning                                        3
HOS 202             Fundamentals of Purchasing                                             3
HOS 204             Food and Beverage Operations                                           3
HOS 206             Principles of Beverage Management                                      3
HOS 301             Facilities Management                                                  3
HOS 302             Hospitality Managerial Accounting                                      3
HOS 306             Hospitality Industry Marketing                                         3
HOS 308             Labor Management Relations                                             3
HOS 401             Seminar in Hotel/Restaurant Administration                             3
HOS 404             Facilities Layout and Design II                                        3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  61
HOS 406             Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry                    3
HOS 408             Law for the Hospitality Industry                                     3
HOS 410             Menu Design and Planning                                             3
ACC 101             Accounting I                                                         3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                                3
MGT 209             Business Law I                                                       3

General Education Core                                                                   42
Ellis University Core Curriculum requirements can be found on page 34.

Hospitality Electives                                                                    12
HOS 150             Personnel Management for the Hospitality Industry                    3
HOS 154             Casino Management                                                    3
HOS 221             Travel Management                                                    3
HOS 251             Quantity Food Production                                             3

General Electives                                                                        12


                                  Total Semester Hours: 120



Associates in Applied Science in Accounting

This degree program prepares students for careers in the managerial accounting, business
analysis, and related professions. The associate’s degree provides a strong basis for students to
continue their business studies to complete the bachelor’s degree in accounting. The program
combines required core courses in the liberal arts and sciences areas with courses from a variety
of functional business areas.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graduates of the Associate in Applied Science in Accounting will demonstrate:

            1.   An understanding of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices common
                 to accounting
            2.   An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business practices
            3.   Effective written and oral business communication skills


Degree requirements

Core                                                                                     33
ACC 101             Accounting I                                                         3
ACC 110             Managerial Accounting                                                3
ECO 110             Principles of Economics II                                           3
ECO 201             Money and Banking                                                    3
FIN 201             Corporate Finance                                                    3
MAT 151             Business Calculus                                                    3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                                3
MGT 201             Business Organization and Administration                             3
MGT 209             Business Law I                                                       3
MGT 302             Statistical Sampling Theory                                          3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                62
MKT 101             Introduction to Marketing                                            3

Concentration Courses                                                                    12
ACC 210          Financial Accounting                                                    3
ACC 306          Cost Accounting                                                         3
ACC 402          Federal Taxation II                                                     3
MGT 309          Business Law II                                                         3

General Education Core                                                                   24
CSS 101            College Success Seminar                                               3
ECO 105            Principles of Economics                                               3
MAT 125            Finite Mathematics                                                    3
SPH 105            Basic Speech Communications                                           3
WRT 101            College Composition I                                                 3
WRT 151            College Composition II                                                3
Behavioral Science Course (e.g. ANT 101, PSY 110, SOC 110)                               3
Science Course (e.g. BIO 101, PHY 115, PHY 120)                                          3


                                  Total Semester Hours: 69



Associates in Applied Science in Business Administration

The business administration program offers students relevant choices to achieve their personal
career objectives. The program combines required core courses in the liberal arts and sciences
areas with courses from a variety of functional business areas. This associates degree provides
an opportunity for students to complete the Bachelor degree in Business Administration.

Students pursuing the Associate in Applied Science degree in Business
Administration may choose concentrations in the following:

Finance
General Management
Marketing

Graduates of the Associate in Applied Science in Business Administration will demonstrate:

                1. An understanding of the fundamental concepts, principles and practices
                   common to business administration
                2. An awareness of and commitment to professional and ethical business
                   practices
                3. Effective written and oral business communication skills

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                     33
ACC 101             Accounting I                                                         3
ACC 110             Managerial Accounting                                                3
ECO 110             Principles of Economics II                                           3
ECO 201             Money and Banking                                                    3




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               63
FIN 201             Corporate Finance                                                    3
MAT 151             Business Calculus                                                    3
MIS 101             Introduction to Computer Applications                                3
MGT 201             Business Organization and Administration                             3
MGT 209             Business Law I                                                       3
MGT 302             Statistical Sampling Theory                                          3
MKT 101             Introduction to Marketing                                            3

General Education Core                                                                   24
CSS 101            College Success Seminar                                               3
ECO 105            Principles of Economics                                               3
MAT 125            Finite Mathematics                                                    3
SPH 105            Basic Speech Communications                                           3
WRT 101            College Composition I                                                 3
WRT 151            College Composition II                                                3
Behavioral Science Course (e.g. ANT 101, PSY 110, SOC 110)                               3
Science Course (e.g. BIO 101, PHY 115, PHY 120)                                          3

Concentrations:                                                                          12

Finance
ECO 320             International Economics and Finance                                  3
FIN 205             Financial Management                                                 3
FIN 210             Principles of Investment and Security Analysis                       3
FIN 302             Insurance and Risk Management                                        3

General Management
MGT 305               New Product Management                                             3
MGT 310               Small Business Management                                          3
MGT 315               Human Resource Management                                          3
History or Political Science Course                                                      3

Marketing
MKT 201             Sales Management                                                     3
MKT 205             Retail Management                                                    3
MKT 301             Management of Promotion                                              3
MKT 305             New Product Management                                               3


                                  Total Semester Hours: 68



Graduate Programs


Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Ellis University offers an online MBA program for working adults interested in assessing theories
and practices developed by academic business experts. Courses are grounded in scenario-based
learning, and graduates of the Master of Business Administration program are exposed to the
knowledge and skill that prepare them for career advancement in business.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               64
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of an Ellis University Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree students
will be able to:

        1. Apply appropriate theories to the assessment of business strategies, policies,
           processes, and procedures within a variety of organizational forms, functions, and
           industries
        2. Analyze and resolve complex business problems

PROGRAM OPTIONS

Students choose from three program options:

ELLIS MBA — GENERAL BUSINESS STUDIES
This option is offers students the opportunity to critique and apply knowledge related to classic
business disciplines. To earn an MBA in general business studies, students must complete 12
courses, including the nine-course MBA core curriculum and three elective courses (36 Credits
total).

ELLIS MBA — WITH SPECIALIZATION
This option enables students to tailor their studies to specific areas of interest as they develop
professionally. To earn an MBA with a specialization, students must complete the nine course
MBA core curriculum (27 credits) and three specified courses (9 credits) in an area of
specialization.

Students should declare their intention to pursue a specialization early in their MBA careers,
since this will make for easier planning and class scheduling.

ELLIS MBA — WITH TWO SPECIALIZATIONS
Students may pursue an additional 9-credit specialization once they have satisfied the
requirement for the MBA with one specialization.

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION INCLUDE:
Accounting and Information Systems
E-Commerce
Finance
Global Management
Health Care Administration
Human Resources Management
Leadership
Management of Information Systems
Management of Technology
Marketing
Professional Accounting
Project Management
Risk Management
Strategy and Economics

The Ellis MBA core curriculum offers students an opportunity to evaluate business theories while
honing their managerial skills related to processes, individuals and organizations. Students
sharpen their abilities to design, evaluate, and improve the processes and procedures that lead to
business success. Students also analyze theories and practices used to formulate business



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      65
strategies and tactics. The core provides a foundation from which students can explore more
advanced concepts:

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                    27
MBA 500             Managing Organizations                                              3
MBA 501             Managerial Marketing                                                3
MBA 502             Economics for Managers                                              3
MBA 503             Accounting for Managers                                             3
MBA 504             Managerial Corporate Finance                                        3
MBA 505             Operations Management                                               3
MBA 506             Managerial Decision Models                                          3
MBA 507             Global Environment of Business                                      3
MBA 508             Managerial Strategy                                                 3

Electives                                                                               9

Specializations:                                                                        9

Accounting and Information Systems
FIN 534           Advanced Assurance Topics                                             3
MIS 570           Data Mining                                                           3
MIS 571           Advanced Information Systems                                          3

Or

E-Commerce
MGT 563             Introduction to E-Commerce                                          3
MGT 563             Game Theory and Information Economics                               3
MKT 581             Principles of Internet Marketing                                    3

Or

Finance
FIN 530             Principles of Global Finance                                        3
FIN 531             Fundamentals of Derivative Contracts                                3
FIN 552             Topics in Financial Markets and Investments                         3

Or

Global Management
FIN 530         Principles of Global Finance                                            3
FIN 535         Export-Import Operations and Finance                                    3
MKT 583         International Marketing                                                 3

Or

Healthcare Administration
HLH 540          Health Administration and Management                                   3
HLH 541          Systems in Healthcare Delivery                                         3
HLH 542          Current Issues in Health Care Delivery                                 3




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               66
Or

Human Resource Management (choose nine credits)
HRM 530         Principles and Practices of Collective Bargaining   3
MGT 560         Managing the Workforce                              3
MGT 565         Strategic Negotiations                              3
HRM 550         Human Resource Management                           3

Or

Leadership (Choose nine credits)
LEA 550          Creating the Visionary Organizations               3
LEA 551          Leadership                                         3
LEA 512          Leading Change                                     3
ETH 513          Business Ethics                                    3

Or

Management of Information Systems
MIS 570          Data Mining                                        3
MIS 571          Advanced Information Systems Risks and Controls    3
MIS 572          Information Resource Management                    3

Or

Management of Technology
ECO 521         Game Theory and Information Economics               3
ECO 522         Topics in Strategy                                  3
MIS 572         Information Resource Management                     3

Or

Marketing (Choose Nine Credits)
MKT 580          Managing Innovation                                3
MKT 581          Principles of Internet Marketing                   3
MKT 582          Implementing Marketing Strategy                    3
MKT 583          International Marketing                            3

Or

Professional Accounting
ACC 510          Managerial Accounting                              3
ACC 511          Intermediate Financial Accounting                  3
ACC 512          Professional Auditing                              3

Or

Project Management
PMI 520         Principles of Project Management                    3
PMI 521         Advanced Topics in Project Management               3
PMI 592         Principles of Quality Control                       3

Or




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                         67
Risk Management
FIN 533         Risk Management                                                            3
MIS 571         Advanced Information Systems Risks and Controls                            3
MIS 573         Computer Information Systems Security                                      3

Or

Strategy and Economics
ECO 520          Macroeconomics                                                            3
ECO 521          Game Theory and Information Economics                                     3
ECO 522          Topics in Strategy                                                        3

                                   Total Semester Hours: 36



Master of Science in Management

The M.S.M. degree program offers an academic grounding in management theories and their
application to business practices, and provides decision-making tools with a process orientation.
The program is designed for working professionals who seek a degree that will enhance their
current career paths while broadening and deepening their existing managerial strengths.

Students take the Cornerstone Course, then all core and specialization courses, then the
Capstone Course

Program Outcomes
Students will be able to:
    1. Evaluate contemporary managerial theories for their applicability to current best practices
    2. Evaluate contemporary managerial theories for their applicability to one’s own approach
       to management
    3. Clearly communicate one’s assessments and evaluations to others
    4. Assess processes for continuously improving an organization’s performance

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                       27
MSM 500             Managerial Theory and Practice                                         3
MSM 501             Process Development, Management, and Improvement                       3
MSM 502             Managerial Communication Strategies                                    3
MSM 503             Managerial Financial Strategies                                        3
MSM 504             Organizational Analysis and Development                                3
MSM 505             Management and Corporate Governance                                    3
MSM 506             Strategic Decision Making                                              3
ETH 513             Business Ethics                                                        3
MSM 507             Capstone Seminar                                                       3

Specializations:                                                                           9

Leadership
LEA 550             Creating the Visionary Organization                                    3
LEA 551             Leadership                                                             3
LEA 552             Leading Change                                                         3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 68
Project Management
PMI 520         Principles of Project Management                                            3
PMI 521         Advanced Topics in Project Management                                       3
PMI 522         Contract Procurement                                                        3

Non-Profit Management
NPM 530          Legal Issues for Nonprofits                                                3
NPM 531          Financial Management in Nonprofits                                         3
NPM 532          Human Resource Management: Managing Volunteers and
                 Employees in Nonprofit Organizations                                       3

Health Care Administration
HLH 540          Health Care Administration and Management                                  3
HLH 541          Systems of Health Care Delivery                                            3
HLH 542          Current Issues in Health Care Administration                               3

Marketing
MKT 580             Managing Innovation                                                     3
MKT 582             Implementing Marketing Strategy                                         3
MKT 583             International Marketing                                                 3

                                         Total Credits: 36


Certificates

The Accounting Certificates allow students to earn college credits in accounting ranging from as
few as 12 undergraduate credit hours to 18 graduate credit hours in Accounting. Our programs
are designed to help students further their career in accounting by providing high quality
accounting courses, in an accelerated format, delivered on a best-in-class e-learning platform.

Accounting Cornerstone Certificate (21 undergraduate credit hours)
This certificate allows students to select seven (7) courses from the twelve Accounting Electives
in order to bolster their subject matter knowledge in preparation for a career in Public Accounting.
If the student’s bachelor’s degree did not include at least 12 credit hours of accounting
coursework, then this certificate is their recommend program of study.

Accounting Supplement Certificate (12 undergraduate credit hours)
This certificate allows students to select four (4) courses from the twelve Accounting Electives in
order to bolster their subject matter knowledge in preparation for a career in Public Accounting.
If their bachelor’s degree did not include at least 18 credit hours of accounting coursework, then
this certificate is their recommend program of study.

Accounting Electives (used for the Cornerstone and Supplement certificates):
ACC 210 Financial Accounting I
ACC 302 Federal Taxation
ACC 306 Cost Accounting
ACC 311 NFP Accounting
ACC 315 Financial Statement Analysis
ACC 320 Accounting Info Systems
ACC 402 Federal Taxation II (Corporate)
ACC 411 Auditing
ACC 416 Advanced Accounting


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   69
ECO 201 Money and Banking
FIN 201 Corporate Finance
MGT 209 Business Law II

Admissions Requirements

Student enrolling the Accounting Certificates must have completed a Bachelors degree in a
Business-related field from an accredited institution and have earned at least 30 credit hours of
Business courses including the following:

College Algebra
Intro to Statistics
Accounting Principals I
Accounting Principals II
Economics I (Micro)
Economics II (Macro)

Each course has prerequisites which must be met either by proof from prior college coursework
or by inclusion as part of the students selected Certificate program of study.


Advanced Certificate in Accounting (18 graduate credit hours)
The certificate provides students with more advanced knowledge in key accounting areas such as
financial accounting, analysis, taxation, and auditing. Such knowledge helps students meet their
specific career and professional goals in the accounting, finance, and controllership areas.

Admissions Requirements

The Advanced Accounting Certificate is designed for the student who has completed a bachelor’s
degree in business (which includes 12 or more credit hours in accounting) and wants to bolster
their educational experience with more advanced courses in accounting.

Required Courses:
ACC 511 Intermediate Financial Accounting
ACC 512 Professional Auditing
ACC 513 Financial Statement Analysis and Reporting
ACC 514 Federal Taxation
ACC 515 Advanced Accounting
MBA 503 Accounting for Managers


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

The mission of the Ellis University College of Education is to promote excellence in the practice
and analysis of education in diverse settings and to advance knowledge and understanding of
education in a free society and in a complex world. Programs and courses are designed for
teachers, trainers, educational leaders, journalists, policy analysts, policy makers, union leaders,
and parents interested in improving education practice.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     70
Master of Arts in Teaching

Thesis track: 33 credit hours
Specialization track: 39 credit hours

Program Overview

The program is designed to address core proficiencies that are consistent across most National
Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certificates. The goal of this program is to
increase teachers’ abilities to engage students in effective and efficient learning experiences that
produce measurable gains in student achievement.

Students may select a program with a thesis option that allows a student to explore an issue in
depth through empirical research and will advance students toward doctoral study or they can
select a specialization that will advance their practice.

Specialization areas include Teacher as Leader, designed for teachers who continue to teach but
also mentor or supervise other teachers, and Early Childhood Education, designed for teachers,
supervisors, and child care workers engaged with young children.

 Both degree tracks engage students in case-based and problem-based learning activities and
assignments that require them to implement and integrate strategies and techniques within their
own classroom and engage in inquiry that assesses the outcomes and effectiveness of their
efforts.

Coursework develops from beginning to advanced levels and focuses on core competencies and
engages teachers in a community of learners to share ideas and research. Depending on the
degree track chosen, degree completion will require either 33 (thesis) or 39 (specialization) credit
hours.

Program Outcomes

The MAT program outcomes are based upon and aligned with National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards (NBPTS) standards and also includes Environmental Literacy. Upon
completion of the degree, graduates will be able to:

    EDM-1       Student Assessment: Apply student performance levels to decision-making
                about curriculum, social support, and teaching strategies.
    EDM-2       Curriculum Development: Create and deliver integrated curriculum
                experiences that fit students’ learning and developmental needs.
    EDM-3       Instructional Strategies and Resources: Manage instructional strategies and
                technical resources to meet diverse learning needs
    EDM-4       Diverse Learning Communities: Develop strategies to involve family members
                and community resources as active partners in children’s total development in
                diverse settings.
    EDM-5       Improved Professional Practice: Advance knowledge and improve
                professional practice individually and through collaboration with other
                professionals.
    EDM-6       Research/Reflection: Engage in research and in critical inquiry and reflection




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   71
    EDM-7        Environmental Literacy: Design a variety of instructional strategies and tools
                 that enhance environmental learning based on the principles, practices, and
                 relationships between the living environment and human social systems.

Audience
This degree program is designed primarily for licensed, practicing P-12 classroom teachers and
early childhood educators, and home schoolers who want to advance their knowledge and skills
to improve their classroom practice and demonstrate their skill and qualifications as a master
teacher or are seeking to advance their research skills as they study an area in the field of
Education in depth.

Prerequisites The program is open to all students who have a bachelor’s degree from an
accredited institution and who hold a current state license or credential in Early Childhood
Education, Elementary and/or Middle Level Education, and/or Middle Level/Secondary Education
or in Special Education. All students must have access to children or youth in group settings

Degree Requirements

                                   Master of Arts in Teaching

Core                                                                                      24
FND 500              Teacher as a Learner and Reflective Practitioner                     3
EDP 500              Theories of Teaching and Learning                                    3
EDR 500              Applied Research Methods I                                           3
EDR 504              Classroom Assessment for Improving Learning                          3
FND 510              Teaching Diverse Learners                                            3
EDP 510              The Developing Learner                                               3
EDP 511              Classroom Management                                                 3
EDP 520              Strategies for Meaningful Learners and Motivation                    3

Specialization                                                                            15

Early Childhood Education
ECE 500           Issues in Early Childhood Education                                     3
RLT 500           Turn on the Brain for Reading                                           3
ECE 510           Play in the Early Childhood Curriculum                                  3
ECE 511           Mood and Learning in Early Childhood
EDM 596           Capstone: Teacher As Professional                                       3

Teacher as Leader
EDM 596               Capstone: Teacher As Professional                                   3
Select four of the five listed below:
ELD 500               Introduction to School Leadership and Administration                3
CUR 500               Curriculum Design and Development                                   3
FND 521               School Law and Ethics                                               3
ELD 530               Developing, Motivating, and Supervising Teachers                    3
FND 560               Issues Facing Elementary and Secondary Teachers                     3

Thesis Track                                                                              9
EDR 502              Applied Research Methods II                                          3
EDR 596              Thesis Research I                                                    2
EDR 597              Thesis Research II                                                   2
EDR 598              Thesis Research III                                                  2



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   72
                       Total Semester Hours for Specialization Track: 39
                          Total Semester Hours for Thesis Track: 33


Master of Science in Instructional Technology

Program Overview
The Master of Science in Instructional Technology degree is a 13 course, 37 credit hour degree
with two program specializations to meet student needs. One specialization is focused on
practicing P-16 educators in public or private school settings. The other specialization is focused
on learners whose goal is to work in areas of workforce training and performance improvement in
corporate, not-for-profit, and government settings.

Prerequisites
Students must have an earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and familiarity
with and interest in a variety of software and hardware.

Additional Admission Requirements
It is essential that students in this program have access to students/trainees in order to be able to
complete required assignments throughout the program. During the enrollment process,
applicants must provide a letter from their employer/principal/school director indicating that they
have such access.

Specializations
1. Instructional Technology for P-16 Educators
Purpose
The Master of Science in Instructional Technology for Educators is a 13 course, 37-hour master’s
degree program that provides a broad understanding of instructional design and technology and
its application in P-16 educational settings today and in the future. The program prepares
learners to integrate effective technological processes and tools into their curriculum and
classroom practices. The program focuses on the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to assess
classroom learning environments, technology access, and learners engaged in various content
area studies; and design, develop, implement, and evaluate instructional activities that integrate
multimedia, the Internet, and other technology available towards the goal of providing effective,
efficient, and appealing instruction.

Audience
This program is most appropriate for practicing classroom teachers who want to advance their
knowledge and skills related to integration of technology within classroom learning environments,
to prepare to lead change efforts and/or serve as a technology leader, and/or to become a
curriculum developer for pre-K, elementary, middle and secondary education and in community
and technical colleges.

P- 16 Educators Specialization Learning Outcomes
The learning outcomes are based on the NETS-TF standards
(http://www.ncrel.org/tech/nets/nets-t-rubric.pdf)
At the conclusion of the program, students will be able to:
ITE 1. Demonstrate knowledge, skills, and understanding of technology operations and concepts
ITE 2. Plan and design technology-advanced learning environments and experiences.
ITE 3. Enhance existing learning environments and experiences through the use of technology
ITE 4. Apply appropriate tools and methods for effective assessment and evaluation
ITE 5. Promote productivity and professional practice among teachers and administrators with
technology and targeted professional development.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   73
ITE 6. Model social, ethical, legal, and human practices issues regarding the use of technology in
educational settings
ITE 7. Develop and implement technology plans regarding infrastructure, procedures, policies,
plans, and budgets in educational settings.
ITE 8. Contribute to shared visions for campus integration of technology and foster an
environment and culture conducive to the realization of those visions.

2. Instructional Technology for Trainers
Purpose
The specialization designed for individuals interested in training in a corporate, non-profit,
government, or related settings. Students will be prepared to integrate instructional and
technological knowledge and skills within the context of workplace training and performance
improvement. The program is designed around industry needs and competencies identified by
the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) and other training organizations with
a primary focus on developing corporate training and development practitioners. This
specialization emphasizes intercultural communication.

Audience

Those entering this program are usually employed in the field of training and development or
human resources or are independent trainers and/or performance consultants. Others may
choose this degree option to transition to a training or performance improvement career. The
program focuses on the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to pursue careers as professional
trainers, instructional designers, and internal or external consultants working in corporate, not-for-
profit, and government settings. Graduates are able to assess learning and performance
problems and identify instructional and non-instructional solutions. They are equipped with the
skills to design, develop, implement, and evaluate training and professional development
activities that integrate multimedia, the Internet, and other technology available towards the goal
of providing effective, efficient, and appealing training for performance improvement.

Trainer Specialization Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to

ETR 1. Identify the diversity of learning needs among adult learners in a variety of
organizational contexts.

ETR 2. Create instructional experiences using technology that address individual and
shared learning needs

ETR 3. Diagnose organizational needs for change and the role of technology in facilitating
the change

ETR 4. Manage technological and human resources through skillful project management

ETR 5. Foster increased understanding in an organization of the use of technology for
developing human resources in an organization

ETR 6. Design and implement formative and summative learning assessments and
program evaluations




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    74
ETR 7. Communicate clearly in written, oral and multimedia forms including promotional
and instructional materials.

ETR 8. Communicate in multi-cultural environments

Degree requirements

Core                                                                                  12
CUR 500            Curriculum Design and Development                                  3
TIE 500            Survey of Instructional Technology                                 3
TIE 501            Foundations of Instructional Design and Technology                 3
TIE 503            Instructional Applications of the Internet                         3

Specializations:                                                                      25

Instructional Technology for P – 16 Educators                                         7
TIE 525            School Technology Planning and Change Management                   3
TIE 539            Emerging Technologies Seminar                                      1
EDP 550            Computers and Higher Order Thinking Skills                         3

Elective Courses (4 courses from the list below)                                      12
TIE 504            Distance Learning Applications I                                   3
TIE 505            Distance Learning Applications II                                  3
TIE 510/SED 550 Social Studies and Technology                                         3
TIE 511            Language Arts and Technology                                       3
TIE 512            Mathematics, Science and Technology I                              3
TIE 513            Mathematics, Science and Technology II                             3
TIE 530            Multimedia Authoring                                               3
EDP 551            Psychology of Multimedia Design: Human-Computer Interaction        3

Research and Field Project (2 courses must be taken in consecutive terms)             6
EDR 500           Research Methods and Assessment                                     3
TIE 596           Filed Project                                                       3

TOTAL CREDITS                                                                         37

Instructional Technology for Trainers                                                 13
HRM 523            Training and Development of Human Resource                         3
TIE 560            Training Practitioner Skills, Strategies and Techniques            3
TIE 561            Instructions Systems Design                                        3
TIE 564            Technology Planning and Change Management for Trainers             3
TIE 539            Emerging Technologies Seminar                                      1

Elective Course (2 course from below)                                                 6
TIE 504            Distance Learning Applications I                                   3
TIE 505            Distance Learning Applications II                                  3
TIE 530            Multimedia Authoring                                               3
TIE 531            Designing Multimedia Projects                                      3
TIE 535            Advanced Multimedia Technology                                     3
TIE 562            Training and Performance Consulting                                3
TIE 563            Computer Courseware Design for Training and Leaning Applications   3
HRM 550            Human Resource Management                                          3
ELD 520            Management Development                                             3
EDP 551            Psychology of Multimedia Design: Human-Computer Interaction        3



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                            75
Research and Field Project (these courses must be taken in consecutive terms)               6
EDR 502           Research Methods and Assessment                                           3
TIE 596           Filed Project                                                             3


Total Semester Hours:                                                                       37


Certificates


Fundamentals of Child Development
(fulfills educational requirements towards the CDA Credential from the Council
for Professional Recognition (http://www.cdacouncil.org)
12 credits

Four Designated Courses:
1. CSS 101     College Success Skills--3 credits
2. ECE 101     Introduction to Early Childhood Education--3 credits
3. EDP 101     Early Childhood Growth and Development—3 credits
4. ECE 102     Early Childhood Learning Communities—3 credits

At the completion of this certificate, students will be able to:
    • Meet CDA training goals
    • Plan for a safe and healthy learning environment
    • Apply appropriate practices for advancing children’s physical and intellectual
        development
    • Use positive strategies to support children’s social and emotional development
    • Implement techniques for establishing productive relationships with families
    • Use strategies to manage an effective program operation
    • Demonstrate a commitment to professionalism
    • Observe and record children’s behavior
    • Apply principles of child development and learning

Students earning this certificate will be able to apply it toward their CDA credential. At the same
time, students can apply the credits to other Ellis University certificates and associate degree and
baccalaureate programs.



Basic Certificate in Child Development
12 credits

Four Designated Courses:
1. CSS 101     College Success Skills—3 credits
2. CHD 111     Health, Safety and Nutrition—3 credits
3. EDP 202     Child Growth and Development—3 credits
4. CHD 241     Child, Family and Community Relations—3 credits


At the completion of this certificate, students will be able to:
    • Plan for a safe and healthy learning environment



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  76
    •   Apply appropriate practices for advancing children’s physical and intellectual
        development
    •   Use positive strategies to support children’s social and emotional development
    •   Implement techniques for establishing productive relationships with families
    •   Use strategies to manage an effective program operation
    •   Demonstrate a commitment to professionalism
    •   Observe and record children’s behavior
    •   Apply principles of child development and learning

Students who are seeking an associate degree and are not seeking a CDA credential, but also
wish to have a stopping point along the way, will begin their degree with the Basic Certificate in
Child Development (or, alternatively, the CDA Credential Certificate). This certificate will provide
students with a firm foundation in the study of young children upon which the Intermediate
Certificate will build.



Intermediate Certificate in Child Development
21 credits

Fundamentals of Child Development Certificate plus three designated courses:
1. CHD 201    Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood—3 credits
2. SPE 201    Survey of Exceptional Children—3 credits
3. CHD 260    Guiding Young Children and Managing the Classroom—3 credits

At the completion of this certificate, students will be able to:
    • explain the development and learning of young children in their care
    • identify best practices in working with families and their communities
    • Write observation records of young children
    • Identify different strategies appropriate to special needs children
    • Design safe indoors and outdoors spaces to promote child growth and development
    • Identify strategies for positive classroom management

This certificate is designed for students who are expecting to earn an associate degree or
bachelor’s degree, but want to have another stopping point on the way. These courses are
transferable to other institutions, although students should check institutional catalogs to ensure
that their program is aligned with these specific courses. In this certificate, student gain exposure
to leadership in the classroom through their study of assessment and observation and classroom
management approaches. Additionally, students are introduced to the education of special needs
students, which is essential since most child care facilities enroll special needs children.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   77
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


ACCOUNTING (ACC)

ACC 101
Accounting I
3 Credits
A study of accounting fundamentals. Topics include the accounting cycle, statement preparation
systems, asset valuations, accounting concepts, and principles for sole proprietorship.

ACC 110
Managerial Accounting
3 Credits
Special emphasis is placed on the collection and interpretation of data for managerial decision
making purposes. A study is made of cost concepts used in planning and control, cost-profit-
volume analysis, and budgeting.
Prerequisite: ACC 101

ACC 210
Financial Accounting I
3 Credits
Stresses the theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting. Attention is directed to
asset valuations with emphasis on current controversies and opinions of the AICPA and other
professional organizations.
Prerequisite: ACC 110

ACC 302
Federal Taxation
3 Credits
A study of federal tax structure as it applies to the taxation of individuals. The course will include
elements of tax research and the preparation of tax forms.
Prerequisite: ACC210

ACC 306
Cost Accounting
3 Credits
Examines the importance of cost accounting to the various levels of management and the dual
function of cost as an information system and as a tool for planning and control. Concepts in the
accumulation of manufacturing costs, job order, and process costs systems are stressed. A
study of budgets and standard cost systems as a function for planning and control; direct costing,
break-even and cost-volume-profit analysis, as an aid to decision making.
Prerequisite: ACC 110

ACC 311
Not for Profit Accounting
3 Credits
Fund accounting for nonprofit organizations such as governmental units, universities, hospitals,
foundations and charitable institutions.
Prerequisite: ACC 210




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     78
ACC 315
Financial Statement Analysis
3 Credits
A critical review of corporate review of corporate financial reports and associated footnotes from
the perspectives of different potential users including: creditors, management and investors. Use
of financial statements in the assessment of business performance. Exposure to methods for the
adaptation of financial statements for decision-making. Topics include: statements of income,
balance sheet, cash flow from operation and free cash flow; financial ratio analysis, cash budgets,
pro forma statements, forecasting growth potential and financial requirements; quality of earnings,
inventory valuation and depreciation methods.
Prerequisite: FIN 201

ACC 320
Accounting Information Systems
3 Credits
Introduces the fundamentals of accounting information systems knowledge base needed by
accounting professionals, business information generated by organizational and accounting
processes and operations, application areas in an organization, and risks and internal controls.
Prerequisite: ACC 110

ACC 402
Federal Taxation II
3 Credits
Federal Income taxation for partnerships, estates, trusts, and corporations: Preparation of
returns, Introduction to federal income tax procedure.
Prerequisite: ACC 210

ACC 406
Internal Auditing
3 Credits
Internal control, behavioral aspects, audit reporting, the management of internal auditing, its
status as a profession, internal auditing techniques such as: internal control questionnaires,
flowcharting, interviewing and statements and standards of major professional auditing and
accounting bodies.
Prerequisite: ACC 210

ACC 411
Auditing
3 Credits
Fundamentals of auditing principles and procedures, form and content of auditor’s reports,
professional ethics and legal responsibilities, EDP considerations, statistical sampling
applications in auditing, the role of internal control in relation to the auditor and substantive audit
procedures of assets, liabilities and equity capital.
Prerequisite: ACC 210

ACC 416
Advanced Accounting
3 Credits
Methods for arranging business combinations; merger, consolidation, acquisition of common
stock and acquisition of assets. Methods of accounting for business combinations, purchase and
pooling of interest. Specialized topics include partnership and branch accounting.
Prerequisite: ACC 210



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       79
ACC 510
Managerial Accounting
3 Credits
Effective managerial decision making and financial planning through accounting information and
costing systems, performance evaluation and control of operations, budgeting, and management
of assets.
Prerequisite: MBA 503

ACC 511
Intermediate Financial Accounting
3 Credits
Accounting concepts and principles are combined with accounting practices and methods in order
to provide a comprehensive presentation of the discipline of financial accounting. Interpretation
and use of financial statements is covered with a focus on the complementary relationships
between the accrual and historical cost-based traditional financial statements, on the one hand,
and the newer statement of cash flow on the other. Specific topics include: accounting for
revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity; financial statements, and accrual
income and framework for financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: MBA 503

ACC 512
Professional Auditing
3 Credits
Fundamentals of auditing principles and procedures under generally accepted auditing standards
will be covered. Auditor’s reports, professional ethics and legal responsibilities, EDP
considerations, statistical sampling, applications in auditing, the role of internal control in relation
to the auditor and substantive audit procedures of assets, liabilities and equity capital will be
reviewed. Communication of auditor findings to applicable parties will also be studied.
Prerequisite: ACC 511

ACC 513
Financial Statement Analysis and Reporting
3 Credits
An analysis and evaluation of corporate financial statements as an aid to accountants, security
analysis, lending officers and managers in making decisions based on financial data. Financial
statements will be reviewed for fairness and completeness in reporting and revision will be made
to financial statement data for analytical purposes. Communication of such analysis will be
discussed.
Prerequisite: ACC 511

ACC 514
Federal Taxation
3 Credits
A study of federal tax structure as it applies to the taxation of individuals and corporations.
Property transactions are also covered in this course. The course will include elements of tax
research, communication of tax strategies, ethics and the preparation of tax forms. A tax
research project is required.
Prerequisite: MBA 503




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       80
ACC 515
Advanced Accounting
3 Credits
Business combinations and consolidated financial statements under the purchase method and
the accounting for goodwill is the core of this course. Specialized topics include branch
accounting, partnership and foreign currency translation. A research project is required.
Prerequisite: ACC 511

ADVERTISING (ADV)

ADV 560
Advertising Copy Writing
3 Credits
This course examines the business, craft and creative process of writing advertising copy.
Students are assigned weekly creative and text assignments. Critiques and individual reviews of
draft copy help impart a thorough grounding in advertising creativity. Students work on the
integration of the verbal and graphic components in imaginative concepts, supported by coherent,
entertaining and persuasive text, all resting on a carefully devised foundation of sound strategy.
Prerequisite: None

ADV 570
Media Planning and Buying
3 Credits
This course provides an understanding of the central position of media planning and buying in
campaign development, as well as analysis of the organization and the purpose of the media
plan. Discussion focuses on the rates and sources of information, evaluation of the
representative media, problems of coverage costs, duplication and scheduling and the media
sales process.
Prerequisite: None

ADV 590
Strategic Advertising Campaigns
3 Credits
This advanced course studies advertising from the consumer perspective, using a case-study
approach. The focus is on the different ways that advertisers and consumers view advertising
and how advertising campaigns are planned and executed to account for these differences.
Prerequisite: PRE 520

ADV 580
Advanced Topics Seminar: Advertising/Public Policy
3 Credits
This seminar deals with current issues in advertising and public relations. Specific issues and
course context vary in response to developments in the field. Among the topics covered in the
course are: global advertising, direct response advertising, integrated marketing
communications, sales promotion, business to business advertising, or events marketing.
Prerequisite: None

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT)

ANT 101
Anthropology
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   81
An introduction to the study of ancient man and primitive cultures. Major topics include: the
origins and evolution of man; the evolution of different cultural forms in terms of craft and
technology, magic, religion, and government.

ART GRAPHICS (ARG)

ARG 201
Computer Graphics I
3 Credits
Introductory course in digital image-making which surveys the currently used application
packages in the computer graphics field. Hands-on experience with emphasis on developing and
understanding the workings of a digital design system.
Prerequisite: Departmental permission

ART (ART)

ART 101
Art History I
3 Credits
A survey of history and principles of the fine and utilitarian arts from the Paleolithic era through
the Renaissance.

ART 110
Introduction to Visual Literacy
3 Credits
The investigation, interpretation and practice of communicating information and emotions are
explored via visual imagery. Using the language of 2D and 3D composition, students are
introduced to design fundamentals that emphasize the relationships between line, mass and form
in organizing the elements that create statements within the frame. Topics include: the meaning
of images in a cultural context; misrepresentation and subliminal messaging in visualization;
application of color and theory; uses of photography and typography; internet site and page
design.

BIOLOGY (BIO)

BIO 101
Humanity and the Biological Universe
3 Credits
This course acquaints students with basic biological, health and environmental issues of the
modern world. To achieve intended awareness, students will study basic anatomy, physiology,
genetics and microbiology. Special attention will be given to contemporary problems such as
AIDS, genetic engineering, cancer, heart disease, and pollution. The student will use basic
mathematical, computer and quantitative reasoning skills to present cohesive written summations
of learning.

BIO 103
Nutrition
3 Credits
An introduction to the principles of nutrition in food management. Includes food customs,
patterns and habits, nutrients in foods, applied nutrition, and world nutrition problems and
programs.

BIO 105
Food Microbiology
3 Credits


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                        82
A course in basic food microbiology outlining important micro-organisms, food preservation and
spoilage, food contamination, enzymes produced by micro-organisms, foods in relation to
disease, food sanitation, control and inspection, and microbiological laboratory methods.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (CHD)

CHD 111
Health, Safety & Nutrition in Early Childhood
3 Credits
This course is an examination of the contributions of effective health, safety and nutrition
practices on the well-being of children. Course will include a review of basic hygiene practices,
health maintenance and illness prevention, as well as environmental safety practices, accident
prevention, and nutritious meal planning for promoting optimal growth, development and learning.
Community resources will be explored.
(Not required for students from CDA program with credits in ECE 101)

CHD 201
Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood
3 Credits
Provides students with skills needed for observation of children, documentation, and
interpretation to develop curriculum, long term projects and parent communication in early
childhood programs. Overview of common assessment and observation tools in early childhood.
Students observe children in structured and unstructured situations, record their observation, and
use records as a way of assessing strengths and needs of individual children.
Field observation is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 101

CHD 210
Art, Music, and Movement in Early Childhood
3 Credits
This course provides students with a conceptual and experiential base for the use of art,
movement, drama, and music in the education of young children. The content will focus on actual
skill development, along with the rationale and importance of using these areas in a curriculum for
young children. Through active participation with hands-on experiences, students work with the
concepts of age and developmental appropriateness when designing fun activities with all
subjects. Students will also investigate the development of self-taught art techniques in young
children. Students practice working with various media and materials as used with the young
child. This course presents developmentally appropriate musical activities with emphasis on
movement, songs, and simple dances. Students learn to plan and implement a comprehensive
and developmentally appropriate art, music, and movement program for young children. Field
work is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 201

CHD 211
Early Childhood Methods: Science and Math
3 Credits
Examines theories of cognitive development as a framework for conceptualizing the way young
children acquire scientific and mathematical skills, concepts, and abilities. The course enables
students to research and develop appropriate individual and group scientific/mathematical
activities for young children. It examines the fundamental concepts of comprehensive early
childhood science and mathematics curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on
learning environment that fosters creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students
learn to plan a comprehensive, interactive program that meets individual and group needs,
interests, abilities and development. Includes a field-based component in which students carry



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    83
out activities in an early childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current
performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, CUR 520 and ECE 201

CHD 212
Early Childhood Methods: Language and Social Studies
3 Credits
This course examines theories of social and language development as a framework for
conceptualizing the way young children acquire language, literacy, and social skills, concepts,
and abilities. It enables students to research and develop appropriate individual and group
language arts and social studies activities for young children. The course also examines the
fundamental concepts of comprehensive early childhood social studies and language arts
curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on learning environment that fosters
creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students learn to plan a comprehensive,
interactive program that meets individual and group needs, interests, abilities and development.
The course includes a field based component in which students carry out activities in an early
childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, RLT 202, and CHD 201

CHD 241
Child, Family & Community Relations
3 Credits
Study of diverse family structures, family systems theory, and the educator’s role in working with
families. Critical events in the lives of families and other stressors will be examined. Focus on
effective methods of facilitating communications, parent involvement, and the coordination of
family, school and community cooperation with culturally diverse populations.
 (Not required for students from CDA program with credits in ECE 102)

CHD 260
Guiding Young Children and Managing the Classroom
3 Credits
This course investigates developmentally appropriate guidance and discipline practices that are
supportive of heterogeneous populations, including children with challenging behaviors, in early
childhood learning environments. Examines a relationship-based approach to adult-child
interactions. Explores current brain research on the development of executive functions, and
strategies for supporting children in the development of self-regulation, pros-social behaviors,
communication and conflict resolution skills.
Prerequisite: EDP 101 for students with a CDA credential or EDP 202

COMMUNICATION (COM)

COM 101
Communication: Principles and Process
3 Credits
This survey course introduces the nature, principles, elements and mechanism of the
communication process. How, why, in what forms, and through what stages communication
occurs is explored along with the nature of human perception and the role of verbal and
nonverbal language in conveying meaning. Emphasis is placed on providing a working
knowledge of the fundamental principles of communication as they apply to the design and
delivery of the message via such media as print, radio, television, film and the internet.

COM 210
Broadcast History and Criticism
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  84
This survey of ratio and television development in the United States includes consideration of the
roles played by the broadcast media as cultural, social, and economic forces. Special emphasis
is placed on major trends in both entertainment and factual programming.

COM 240
Writing for the Mass Media
3 Credits
This is a practical introductory course that exposes students to the basics of effective writing and
the variety of writing challenges posed by the mass media. Simple forms of writing for various
media are explored as are elements of good writing such as internal conflict, word economy,
objectivity, subjectivity, and the use of nonverbal messages.
Prerequisites: WRT 101 and WRT 151

COM 301
Communications Law
3 Credits
This survey of the statutes and regulations governing the press, broadcasting, film, and the
Internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship,
and political expression.

COM 510
Vocabulary of the Media Critic
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide the student with the critical vocabulary used by media critics in
discussing and evaluating non-technological aspects of various media. Material will be drawn
from philosophy, psychology, semantics, aesthetics and literary criticism.
Prerequisite: None

COM 520
Media Research
3 Credits
This course is designed to familiarize the students with the basic research techniques
(quantitative, qualitative, background research for creative projects, content analysis, opinion and
audience research) used in the areas of public information, television, film and instructional
communications. It introduces the students to the professional literature of their fields of
specialization and to the skills necessary to read and interpret it.
Prerequisite: None

COM 530
Media and Culture
3 Credits
An exploration of the role of media in the popular culture and in society in terms of the interaction
of media and culture. The media’s role in reflecting society and, in turn, the shaping of media
practice by society will be explored. Reading will include an examination of major works on public
opinion and public policy.
Prerequisite: None

COM 563
Seminar: Integrated Marketing
3 Credits
These seminar courses are designed to cover areas of current professional interest or to fill
specific student needs. The topic of this seminar is Integrated Marketing.
Prerequisite: None




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   85
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CRJ)

CRJ 110
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits
An introduction to the contemporary American criminal justice system. Discussion of the role of
police, courts and prisons. Also examined is the juvenile justice system. General issues
considered include: police discretion, due process and change as an integral element of the
American criminal justice system.
Prerequisite: None

CRJ 210
Organization and Administration of Criminal Justice
3 Credits
An introduction to the organization and structure of a police department. Topics include an
overview of the police departments, and analysis of the police function, tables of organization,
chains of command and lines of authority, division of labor, and the informal police organization.
Attention centers on typical problems of police administration and the coordination of police
services.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 220
Ethics, Diversity and Professionalism
3 Credits
This course is designed to familiarize students with concepts relating to cultural diversity and the
ethics/morality of criminal justice practitioners in the U.S. It identifies specific issues that are
recurrent and problematic and suggests possible solutions for practitioners.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 230
Rules of Evidence
3 Credits
An explanation and analysis of the rules of evidence. The course treats recent U.S. Supreme
Court decisions concerning the rights of the citizen against unreasonable search and seizure, and
the rules of giving testimony and the protecting and safeguarding of evidence.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 240
Corrections
3 credits
This course provides an overview of corrections component of the criminal justice system. The
student will be introduced to institutional and community-based aspects of corrections. Underlying
theoretical and philosophical underpinnings will be discussed as well as ancient and early
historical periods of correctional development. An overview of modern day corrections will be
presented to demonstrate the full evolution of the correctional process throughout the United
States.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 250
Criminal Investigation and Procedures
3 Credits
Introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Analysis and explanation of conduct at the crime
scene, strategies for interviewing and interrogating witnesses and suspects, techniques of
surveillance and preservation of evidence for presentation in court.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   86
CRJ 310
Research Methods in Criminal Justice I
3 Credits
A course designed specifically for the Criminal Justice student, the emphasis is directed toward
an introduction to research, reading and writing research reports, research design and
methodology, sampling, and surveys.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 320
Research Methods in Criminal Justice II
3 Credits
This course completes the basic study of research methods by addressing observation,
interviews, data analysis, measurements, dispersions, and introducing inferential statistics.
Prerequisite: CRJ 310

CRJ 330
Criminal Law and Procedure
3 Credits
A study of the elements of the Penal Law particularly relevant to police officers, including a review
and analysis of major criminal offenses with consideration given to the available defenses and
judicial interpretations.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 350
Crime Scene Investigation I
3 Credits
Documentation, collection, and preservation of comprehensive physical evidence; latent
fingerprints, trace and biological evidence processing and collection techniques. Biohazard and
other safety concerns are stressed in this course.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

CRJ 351
Crime Scene Investigation II
3 Credits
This course provides an exploration of the potentiality of physical evidence through an
examination of the wide scope of the forensic sciences. Fundamental overview of crime
laboratory analytical techniques, historical development of the scientific investigation of crime,
exploration of the current state of instrumentation and technology, concentration on relevancy of
laboratory results to the overall investigative effort from the field investigator’s perspective. This
course also covers advanced latent fingerprint development techniques.
Prerequisite: CRJ 350

CRJ 352
Law Enforcement Photography
3 Credits
This course exposes students to the science of photography, in general, and special techniques
and legal requirements in the application of photography in criminal justice contexts. This course
will stress the proper use of camera, film, and light in diverse law enforcement applications such
as crime scene investigations and surveillance. This course also covers legal admissibility of
recorded images, including videography and digital photographs.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 353
Advanced Law Enforcement Photography


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      87
3 Credits
This course focuses on composition of light, specialized forensic applications; advanced low light
techniques, and techniques involving reflection, absorption, and fluorescence, as well as digital
image capture and processing techniques.
Prerequisite: CRJ 352

CRJ 354
Death Investigations
3 Credits
This course focuses on the investigation of violent, sudden, unexpected, and suspicious deaths
through an examination of pathologies, artifacts of decomposition, and trauma.
Prerequisite: CRJ250

CRJ 355
Criminal Psychological Profiling
3 Credits
An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of behavioral evidence present at the crime scene; a
synthesis of criminal psychology with scientific theory and methodology to combine discrete data
into a more meaningful whole. Special emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of
psychopathic behavior.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250, PSY 210, PSY 310

CRJ 360
Probation and Parole
3 Credits
An examination of organization and management in probation and parole systems. Topics
include: distinctions between probation and parole in terms of organizational function and types
of clients served; client relationships and interactions with other social control agencies, case
loads, case work methods, and case supervision; problems in pre-sentence investigation; and job
requirements and performance standards for probation and parole officers with particular
emphasis on recruitment, training and assignment.
Prerequisite: CRJ 240

CRJ 361
Correctional Treatment
3 Credits
This course provides an examination of the structure and function of the prison setting and prison
operations. Particular emphasis is placed on security procedures, legal aspects, and the role of
various custodial staff. In addition, the effects of the prison environment and the prison subculture
upon staff and inmates are presented.
Prerequisite: CRJ 240

CRJ 370
Managing Criminal Justice Organizations
3 Credits
This course will examine the structure of criminal justice organizations including formal
organizational theory, behavior and its application to the structure and methods of operation. The
course will also explore the bureaucratic, political and environmental characteristics that impact
criminal justice organizations.
Prerequisite: CRJ 210

CRJ 371
Criminal Justice Leadership
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   88
This course will examine the role of management and leadership within criminal justice agencies.
The course will also explore the complicated interrelationships between members of law
enforcement agencies, its leadership and the communities to which they serve.
Prerequisite: CRJ 210

CRJ 380
Police and Community Relations
3 Credits
This course analyzes the complex relationship between police and community, community
attitudes toward police, the efforts of the police organization to create a more favorable public
image, the emergence of a civil rights and civil liberties movement, and the contribution of the
individual police officer to police-community relations.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 381
Forensic Technology
3 Credits
An introduction to problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. Emphasis on
value and assistance of various scientific aids to the investigator. Included are such topics as
fingerprint identification, lie detector usage, hypnosis, blood typing, hair analysis, DNA typing and
crime scene analysis.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

CRJ 382
Patrol Function
3 Credits
A course devoted to an analysis of the objectives and functions of the uniformed police.
Emphasis is placed on detailed examination of many typical patrol problems and consideration of
both the sociological and psychological factors which facilitate or impede effective performance.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 383
Organized Crime
3 Credits
This course examines traditional and nontraditional organized crime groups. Topics to be
covered include the role of law enforcement in investigating organized crime groups, the external
relations (police, courts, prisons) within the law enforcement community as they relate to
organized criminal groups. Also, the history of organized crime as it relates to the domestic and
international law enforcement community will be covered.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 384
Professional & Organizational Ethics
3 Credits
This course is intended to identify and clarify ethical issues associated with criminal justice
organizations and professional practice. Specifically, these issues address conflicts between
duty and morality, personal and professional accountability, and the philosophies of law, justice
and civil rights. Practical ethics in professional life are examined.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 385
Special Problems in Criminal Justice
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     89
This course will provide students with the opportunity to investigate topics within the field of
criminal justice. Topics may be timely or political in nature and may cover areas as police
brutality, evidence mishandling, immigration laws, police corruption, forensic abuses or any other
topic relevant to an issue within the criminal justice field.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 386
Police Psychology
3 Credits
The focus of the course will be on the personality, character, behavioral changes and social
isolation that result from the inherent high levels of stress and trauma associated with police work
(from entry level to retirement). Factors such as managerial planning, supervision, specialized
assignments, high hazard work, tour changes, work environments, alcoholism, substance abuse,
other addictive behavior patterns, suicide, and codependent family issues will be identified and
addressed.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110, PSY 110

CRJ 450/550 *
Introduction to Fraud Examination
3 Credits
Financial statement fraud and occupational fraud will be studied including billing schemes, cash
larceny, conflicts of interest, bribery and corruption and financial statement schemes. Upon
leaving the course, students will have an understanding of how crimes are committed by an
organization's management, employees and by outside parties. Students will gain an
understanding of basic investigation techniques.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

CRJ 451/551 *
Fraud Prevention and Investigation
3 Credits
Students in this course will obtain an understanding of the legal requirements for fraud prevention
within an organization, and will gain an understanding of policies, procedures, and internal
controls intended to prevent fraudulent activity. An analysis of corporate governance will be
discussed, including ethics and fraud policies and procedures, Sarbanes-Oxley fraud prevention
requirements, and an analysis of accounting control systems.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

CRJ 452/552 *
Advanced Fraud Prevention and Investigation
3 Credits
Advanced study of types of fraud, documents, sources of evidence, and analysis of internal and
external fraud schemes with an emphasis on the skills needed to identify and investigate
fraudulent activity. Major fraud case investigation will be used with an emphasis on forensic and
litigation support.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250, CRJ 451

CRJ 453/553 *
Criminology and the Legal Elements of Commercial Fraud *
3 Credits
The legal elements pertinent to investigating crime will be explored, including crime causation
theories, associated punishment, and related federal laws and sentencing guidelines. The class
will also include information on attorney-client privilege and the rules of evidence and testifying.
Prerequisite: SOC 320, CRJ 450




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    90
CRJ 454/554 *
Electronic Data Investigations
3 Credits
During the course of fraud investigations, varied electronic data investigation techniques are
used, including computer forensics, data analysis, data mining of accounting information, and
public record searches utilizing the Internet and commercial service bureaus. Students will come
away from this class with knowledge of such computer-aided techniques which help to streamline
investigations.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250, CRJ 450

CRJ 455/555 *
Interviewing and Interrogation
3 Credits
In this course, students will study interview and interrogation techniques commonly utilized in
fraud examination to obtain evidence for an investigation. This course also includes an analysis of
the types of questions asked during an interview/interrogation - including introductory,
informational, assessment, closing, and admission-seeking questions - and a review of the
information needed from the interview/interrogation.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

*The courses identified above may be applied toward graduate credit at Ellis University
should any student elect to do so.

CRJ 460
Institutional Corrections
3 Credits
This course provides an in-depth examination of various treatment practices within both the
institutional and the community-based setting. Assessment, classification and risk prediction, the
correctional counseling process, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness are all presented. This
course places particular emphasis on counseling paradigms and techniques that are commonly
used in correctional programs.
Prerequisite: PSY 310

CRJ 461
Juvenile Corrections
3 Credits
This course focuses on the juvenile segment of the correctional system in the United States. The
history of juvenile corrections is provided with detailed emphasis on the rationale behind the
juvenile correctional process. Specific attention is given to the reformative nature of juvenile
corrections. Further emphasis on modern juvenile correctional systems, classification, and
treatment planning is provided. This course presents both institutional and community-based
programs commonly used throughout the United States.
Prerequisite: CRJ 240, SOC 330

CRJ 462
Specialized Offender Groups
3 Credits
This course provides a detailed investigation of the various criminal subgroups that are commonly
encountered in custodial institutions and on community supervision caseloads. Sex offenders,
geriatric offenders, juvenile offenders, female offenders, mentally ill offenders, and offenders with
communicable diseases are addressed. These various offender typologies present unique
challenges for correctional workers; students will gain an understanding of the complications that
often face correctional staff and supervisors that must contend with these specialized offender
groups.
Prerequisite: CRJ 240, PSY 310


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   91
CRJ 480
Crisis Intervention for Public Safety Personnel
3 Credits
Examines the concepts and techniques used by criminal justice practitioners in handling crisis
situations. The focus of the course will be the development of skills to intervene effectively with
specific types of crises, thereby diffusing the immediate conflict situation. Topics to be covered
include: landlord/tenant disputes, family fights, suicide attempts, civil disorder and
demonstrations, labor/management relations, and common crises occurring at institutional and
corporate sites.
Prerequisite: CRJ 110

CRJ 481
Computers and Crime
3 Credits
This course will examine the use of computers in the commission of crimes, the use of computers
in tracking criminal activity, and computer security.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250

CRJ 490
Capstone
4 Credits
The culminating academic experience of the baccalaureate program. This course
comprises an assignment that integrates the academic concepts of criminal justice and realities of
criminal justice practice. The assignment is designed to test analytic application of critical thinking
skills in working through fact-based scenarios through analysis of issues affecting contemporary
practice.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all core courses.

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC)

Computer Science
CSC 110
Introduction to Computer Science
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic hardware and software
organization of computer systems. Students get hands-on experience with the DOS and
Windows operating systems environments. Computer programming skills are taught using the
Visual Basic programming language.
Prerequisite: MAT 141 or equivalent

CSC 120
Programming I
3 Credits
This course provides basic skills in problem solving and programming. Topics covered include
simple data types, expressions and statements, program flow control structures, exception
handling and functions. Elements of object oriented programming techniques are also
introduced.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of Algebra

CSC 130
Computer Organization
3 Credits
Number systems, binary data representation, digital logic circuits, Boolean algebra, and
minimization of combinatorial circuits are presented. Flip flops, synthesis of synchronous and



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       92
asynchronous sequential machines, PLAs and PAL, RAMs and ROMs, basic computer
organization, an assembly language programming are also discussed.
Prerequisite: MAT 141 or equivalent

CSC 170
Computer Architecture
3 Credits
A detailed discussion of computer hardware organization and design. Topics included are:
processor bus organization, the arithmetic unit, micro-instructions, micro-programming, memory,
subsystem design, and memory organization. I/O interface, asynchronous data transfer, interrupt
and direct memory access.
Prerequisite CSC 130

CSC 180
Programming II
3 Credits
Object oriented design concepts and techniques are explored. Topics covered include classes,
objects, function overloading and inheritance, to name a few. Students are introduced to object
oriented design, code reusability and encapsulation. The techniques learned are applied in
solving practical problems using a modem software development environment.
Prerequisite: CSC 120

CSC 230
Discrete Structures
3 Credits
A review of sets, functions, relations, mathematical induction and algorithmic analysis as applied
to Computer Science. Graph theory, including minimal and maximal algorithms and the critical
path method, is studied as well as automata theory and formal languages.
Prerequisite: CSC180

CSC 260
Data Structures
3 Credits
The classic data structures, such as stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, etc. are studied.
Sorting and searching are stressed. Computational analysis is also studied.
Prerequisite: CSC 180

CSC 300
Database Management
3 Credits
Database concepts such as file system organization, database structures and design, security,
operation of database systems and DBMs are discussed. Data independence, schema, the
normalization theory, the design and the structure of data dictionary, logical and physical file
structures, database integrity and query languages are also presented. The storage and the
retrieval of information are implemented using SQL and object oriented programming languages.
Prerequisite: CSC 260

CSC 303
Internet Programming Languages
3 Credits
This course will use Web oriented programming languages such as Java, JavaScript, Perl, and
PHP. Students will learn how to write scripts and embed them in HTML pages. The use of these
languages in dynamic web page generation will be studied.
Prerequisite: CSC 260



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      93
CSC 325
Compiler Design
3 Credits
The design and implementation of a compiler is studied, including compiler organization, lexical
analysis, searching methods and symbol tables, formal languages and grammar, parser
construction, code syntax and code generation.
Prerequisites: CSC 260, CSC 170

CSC 330
Operating Systems
3 Credits
The design and implementation of an operating system is studied, including process states and
synchronization, memory management strategies, processor scheduling, multiprocessing, parallel
processing, hardware organization, disk scheduling and file management.
Prerequisite: CSC 170, CSC 260

CSC 360
Web Site Engineering
3 Credits
This course covers issues related to the design of a web site. Topics such as visual presentation,
effective interface, navigation architecture, appropriate content generation, scripting languages
and their role in web page generation, graphics creation and manipulation, multimedia
implementation and serving, and details of Web server configuration and administration are
discussed.
Prerequisite: CSC 260

CSC 370
Introduction to Computer Networks
3 Credits
An introduction to the fundamentals and the applications of data communications. Network
architectures, topology and the ISO model will be discussed. Novell’s LAN or equipment will be
used for practical hands-on experience.
Prerequisite: CSC 330

CSC 401
Database Interfaces and Programming
3 Credits
An advanced course in static and dynamic programming embedded SQL using C. Open
Database Connectivity (ODBC), interface to access data from various database management
systems with Structured Query Language (SQL).
Prerequisite: CSC 300

CSC 405
Distributed Database Systems
3 Credits
Concepts underlying distributed systems: synchronizations, communication, fault tolerance.
Concepts and architecture of distributed database systems. Distributed concurrency control and
recovery. Replicated databases. Distributed Query Processing. Examples of commercial
relational distributed DBMS.
Prerequisite: CSC 300

CSC 450
Seminar Project
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    94
The student will undertake a project under the guidance of an instructor. Each student will
present oral reports before the group in a seminar situation. The project will be concerned with
some aspect of computer science and results will be presented in a final written report.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean

CSC 460
Special Topics I
3 Credits
Critical study of theory and research related to advanced topics in computer science such as
computer graphics, artificial intelligence, performance evaluation, advanced systems
programming or topics in computability, automata theory, etc. The specific topics of the seminar
will be determined by the interest of both the students and the instructor>
Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean

CSC 510
Theoretical Concept of Computer and Computation
3 Credits
Selected topics in set theory, Boolean Algebra, graph theory, and combinatorics. Formal
languages, regular expressions and grammars. Automata and Turing machines. Algorithms and
computability.
Prerequisite: None

CSC 511
Operating Systems I
3 Credits
The basic structure as well as the framework for the analysis and design of operating systems is
developed. The operating system is viewed as a manager of resources (memory, processors,
devices and information). The techniques and issues involved in managing these resources are
discussed with examples.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of probability and statistics; CSC 551 and an undergraduate course in
operating systems

CSC 521
Programming Languages
3 Credits
The general principles of modern programming language design: imperative (as exemplified by
Pascal, C and Ada), functional (Lisp), and logical (Prolog) languages. Data management,
abstract data types, packages, and object-oriented languages (Ada, C + +). Control structures.
Syntax and formal semantics. While some implementation techniques are mentioned, the
primary thrust of the course is concerned with the abstract semantics of programming languages.

CSC 531
Compiler Theory I
3 Credits
Review of general structures of a compiler. Finite state automata, regular expressions and lexical
analysis. Review of BNF and context free syntax, recursive descent and operator precedence
parsing. General table drive, top-down and bottom-up parsing methods. Syntax directed
translation. Type checkings. Run-time environments. Introduction to intermediate code-
generation. A compiler project is required.
Prerequisite: CSC 551 and an undergraduate course in computers

CSC 535
Probability and Stochastic Processes
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    95
Elements of probability theory. Random variables, distributions, densities, moments,
characteristic functions, functions of random variables and limit theorems. Correlation, spectral
density, ergodicity and applications in linear systems. Normal, Poisson and Wiener processes,
mean square estimation and Markov processes. Applications to electrical engineering-noise
analysis.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of undergraduate probability theory

CSC 541
Computer Architecture
3 Credits
The study of the software/hardware boundary as defined in the Von Neumann Architecture.
Review of the technological framework. Effects on machine instructions and formats, addressing
techniques, microprogramming, fast arithmetic, and advanced memory and 110 practices.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate Computer Architecture

CSC 545
Numerical Analysis I
3 Credits
Real and complex zeros of a function and polynomials, interpolation, roundoff error, optimization
techniques, least square techniques, orthogonal functions. Legendre and Chebyshev
polynomials, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of differential equations
with initial and boundary values. The numerical methods developed will emphasize efficiency,
accuracy and suitability to high-speed computing. Selected algorithms may be flowcharted and
programmed for solution on a computer.

CSC 551
Algorithm Concept
3 Credits
Abstract Data Structures and their algorithms for implementation are reviewed. The study and
analysis of various topics such as storage and execution time requirements, graph algorithms,
minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, maximal matchings, internal sorting, asymptotic analysis
of recursive procedures, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, local search algorithms,
external sorting and large-scale storage organization, memory management, and complexity
class.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in data structures

CSC 555
Artificial Intelligence I
3 Credits
State-space representation in problem-solving, problem-reduction and searching methods.
Application of the predicate calculus in problem-solving, resolution, production systems, LISP (3
credits)
Prerequisite: CSC 551

CSC 560
Database Systems
3 Credits
Design and implementation of databases. Hierarchal and network concepts; relational databases
systems; entity-relationship model: query languages; relational design theory, security and
authorization; access methods; concurrency control back-up and recovery.
Prerequisite: CSC 551

CSC 565
Software Engineering
3 Credits


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     96
echniques for the development and implementation of high quality digital computer software are
presented. Major areas covered in the course include software quality factors and metrics,
software development outlines and specification languages, top-down vs. bottom-up design and
development, complexity, testing and software reliability.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of data structures

CSC 570
Computer Graphics
3 Credits
Introduction to display system parameters; comparison of information retrieval and document
retrieval; digitizing as an input process; picture models and data structures; display software;
applications, hands-on laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of data structures

CSC 590
Computer Networks
3 Credits
Connection of multiple systems in a networked environment. Topics include physical connection
alternatives, error management at the physical level, commercially available protocol support,
packet switching, LANs, WANs and Gateways.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of probability and statistics

CSC 600
Project
3 Credits
Independent research project.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean

COLLEGE SUCCESS SEMINAR (CSS)
CSS 101
College Success Seminar
3 Credits
The cornerstone of the general education program is a three-credit course designed to provide
students with the tools necessary for collegiate success. This course provides support to new
students as they develop confidence in their academic and social endeavors.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY (CTE)

CTE 205
Computer Programming for Technology
3 Credits
This course covered structured programming in a language, such as “C” or Pascal with emphasis
on “hands on” and problem solving. Problem-solving techniques are introduced to solve electrical
engineering technology problems.
Prerequisite: MAT 135 or equivalent, or MAT 141.

CTE 215
Digital Computer Fundamentals
4 Credits
A discussion of number systems and codes as applied in computers. Switching logic, design of
switching circuits using small and medium scale integrated devices, flip-flops, counters, decoders,
multiplexers, and shift registers are studied. Laboratory work is coordinated with the lectures.
Prerequisite: ETE 131




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    97
CTE 310
Introduction to UNIX
3 Credits
The principles of the UNIX operating system are introduced, including command language,
access and privacy, process management in a multiprocessing environment, memory
management and input and out put (I/O) devices. Basic UNIX commands, tools and utilities,
UNIX system operations and administration, Shell programming and UNIX system calls from C
language programs are presented.
Prerequisite: CTE 205

CTE 470
Internet Application Development I
3 Credits
Web technologies and recommended strategies for Web site development, including architecture,
Web life cycle, tools and technologies, and approaches to security planning. Topics included in
the course are: elements of a simple website, HTML, design of a user interface, scripting
languages on client side and server side, Elements of Java and applet development.
Prerequisites: CTE 205, or TEL 420

CTE 472
Internet Application Development II
3 Credits
In this course, we present further study of technologies that make a web application more
interactive. The student will learn to build an application that utilizes basic aspects of the
following topics: Dynamic HTML, Data source connection, Web server configuration and
maintenance, Database-Driven Web Sites, Interactive server-side programming and
Implementation of Security and Encryption.
Prerequisite: CTE 470

CURRICULUM (CUR)

CUR 500
Curriculum Design and Development
3 Credits
Candidates outline a course of study and develop a unit of study that meets academic learning
standards and promotes a learner-centered inquiry-based program. Candidates develop
instructional goals and objectives at various learning levels. Candidates determine needs,
interests, abilities, and learning styles of diverse learners, and apply learning principles to
facilitate the learning process. Literacy and study skills strategies to enable students to achieve
learning objectives are planned. Candidates select a range of teaching/learning methods, media,
and instructional technology that enhance and individualize activities for diverse learners.
Criteria, rubrics, reflective practice techniques and assessments are developed. Curriculum
alignment is achieved through application of curriculum design, learning theory, and use of the
learning technologies of the information age.

CUR 520
Children’s Literature and Early Literacy
3 Credits
Focuses on knowledge and practice of how young children in a culturally diverse society develop
language and literacy skills. Exploration of children’s literature is the foundation of activities and
curriculum that integrates language with beginning reading and writing concepts. Students
explore ways in which children develop the basis of literacy and come to understand the social
world. Students learn ways of creating an integrated curriculum that includes children’s literature



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     98
and provides children with developmentally appropriate activities that foster the development of
language and literacy.
Prerequisite: EDP 201

CUR 521
Art, Music, and Movement in Early Childhood
3 Credits
This course provides students with a conceptual and experiential base for the use of art,
movement, drama, and music in the education of young children. The content will focus on actual
skill development, along with the rationale and importance of using these areas in a curriculum for
young children. Through active participation with hands-on experiences, students work with the
concepts of age and developmental appropriateness when designing fun activities with all
subjects. Students will also investigate the development of self-taught art techniques in young
children. Students practice working with various media and materials as used with the young
child. This course presents developmentally appropriate musical activities with emphasis on
movement, songs, and simple dances. Students learn to plan and implement a comprehensive
and developmentally appropriate art, music, and movement program for young children. Field
work is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 201

CUR 522
Early Childhood Methods: Science and Math
3 Credits
Examines theories of cognitive development as a framework for conceptualizing the way young
children acquire scientific and mathematical skills, concepts, and abilities. The course enables
students to research and develop appropriate individual and group scientific/mathematical
activities for young children. It examines the fundamental concepts of comprehensive early
childhood science and mathematics curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on
learning environment that fosters creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students
learn to plan a comprehensive, interactive program that meets individual and group needs,
interests, abilities and development. Includes a field-based component in which students carry
out activities in an early childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current
performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, CUR 520 and ECE 201

DIGITAL IMAGING (DGI)

DGI 101
Introduction to Digital Imaging
3 Credits
This course focuses on the uses of the computer as a media development system. Students
create imagery using drawing and painting software, and explore the computer’s potential in new
forms of media content. Focus is on the development of the Internet as a resource for
communication. Each student creates a personal web page.

DGI 501
Multimedia Production Tools
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to image, text, animation, digital audio and video in multimedia
products like CD-ROMs and web sites. The focus is the use of the computer as a media
development system. Students focus on message design using text and graphics, and explore
the computer’s potential in telecommunications and new forms of media content. The
development of the Internet as a resource for education, communications, advertising, and public
relations is also explored. All students create a personal web page.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    99
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ECE)

ECE 101
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credits
Examines the world of early childhood education. This course assists those individuals that are
interested in a professional career as an early childhood educator. In addition, it covers current
issues and trends regarding the benefits of early childhood education, including the basic values,
structure, organization, and programming in early childhood. Focuses on creating and
maintaining a healthy and safe learning environment for young children. Students learn about the
basic nutritional needs of children. Good health practices and accident prevention in the home
and classroom.

ECE 102
Early Childhood Learning Communities (CDA course)
3 Credits
Focuses on the child in the context of family and community. This course looks at issues of
communication, diversity, professionalism, and social policy. It also promotes awareness and
effective use of community resources. Students gain knowledge of the importance of parent-
teacher partnerships in the education of young children. Skills will be developed to support
families and enhance parent involvement in early childhood programs. Students learn to involve
parents in understanding the child’s home and school environments.
Prerequisite: EDP 101

ECE 201
Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood
3 Credits
Provides students with skills needed for observation of children, documentation, and
interpretation to develop curriculum, long term projects and parent communication in early
childhood programs. Overview of common assessment and observation tools in early childhood.
Students observe children in structured and unstructured situations, record their observation, and
use records as a way of assessing strengths and needs of individual children.
Field observation is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 201

ECE 210
Art, Music, and Movement in Early Childhood
3 Credits
This course provides students with a conceptual and experiential base for the use of art,
movement, drama, and music in the education of young children. The content will focus on actual
skill development, along with the rationale and importance of using these areas in a curriculum for
young children. Through active participation with hands-on experiences, students work with the
concepts of age and developmental appropriateness when designing fun activities with all
subjects. Students will also investigate the development of self-taught art techniques in young
children. Students practice working with various media and materials as used with the young
child. This course presents developmentally appropriate musical activities with emphasis on
movement, songs, and simple dances. Students learn to plan and implement a comprehensive
and developmentally appropriate art, music, and movement program for young children. Field
work is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 201

ECE 211
Early Childhood Methods: Science and Math


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                100
3 Credits
Examines theories of cognitive development as a framework for conceptualizing the way young
children acquire scientific and mathematical skills, concepts, and abilities. The course enables
students to research and develop appropriate individual and group scientific/mathematical
activities for young children. It examines the fundamental concepts of comprehensive early
childhood science and mathematics curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on
learning environment that fosters creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students
learn to plan a comprehensive, interactive program that meets individual and group needs,
interests, abilities and development. Includes a field-based component in which students carry
out activities in an early childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current
performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, ECE 201

ECE 212
Early Childhood Methods: Language and Social Studies
3 Credits
This course examines theories of social and language development as a framework for
conceptualizing the way young children acquire language, literacy, and social skills, concepts,
and abilities. It enables students to research and develop appropriate individual and group
language arts and social studies activities for young children. The course also examines the
fundamental concepts of comprehensive early childhood social studies and language arts
curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on learning environment that fosters
creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students learn to plan a comprehensive,
interactive program that meets individual and group needs, interests, abilities and development.
The course includes a field based component in which students carry out activities in an early
childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, ECE 201

ECE 296
The Early Childhood Profession Capstone
3 Credits
This course is the capstone experience for the AA degree in Early Childhood Education. This
course focuses on providing students with the skills and tools to communicate and demonstrate
the competencies acquired throughout their AA degree. It examines competencies and requires
demonstration of skills necessary for professional performance in early childhood education.
Students examine standards of professional behavior and resources and professional
development opportunities for early childhood professionals. Students are engaged in self-
reflection of individual knowledge, skills, and dispositions leading to a final presentation of their
professional portfolio.
Students must work as a lead care-giver for 2 weeks in a student-teacher role.

ECE 500
Issues in Early Childhood Education
3 Credits
 This course provides a comprehensive overview of the many trends and issues affecting early
childhood education, to include, but not be limited to: political, social and historical issues
affecting young children; various factors affecting curricula foci and professional practice; and
contemporary influences affecting teacher preparation programs and continuing professional
education activities and requirements.
Prerequisite: completion of core courses

ECE 510
Play in the Early Childhood Curriculum
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   101
This course focuses on play in the early years of childhood and its contribution to the learning
process. Other topics of coverage include, but are not limited to: coverage of the various
theoretical perspectives regarding play and learning; issues affecting curricula on play; and
strategies for developing and recording play activities.
Prerequisite: completion of core courses

ECE 511
Mood and Learning in Early Childhood
3 Credits
Neuroscience advances have confirmed that children are primed for learning during their early
years of life. This course discusses how early childhood brain development is shaped by
biological and social/ environmental cues. It underscores the importance of early nurturing,
attachment and comfort, having decisive impacts on how children develop, regulate their
emotions and learn. Neuroscience research regarding the role of mood as a protective function
aiding in learning and developing intelligence is discussed. The role of stress upon brain
development influencing attention, cognition, motor, language, and memory functions is
emphasized. Participants discuss current early brain research showing that emotional
responses, early experiences, primary attachments and environmental support, act as predictors
for developing learning, intelligence, and school achievement.
Prerequisite: Completion of core courses

ECE 523
Early Childhood Methods: Language and Social Studies
3 Credits
This course examines theories of social and language development as a framework for
conceptualizing the way young children acquire language, literacy, and social skills, concepts,
and abilities. It enables students to research and develop appropriate individual and group
language arts and social studies activities for young children. The course also examines the
fundamental concepts of comprehensive early childhood social studies and language arts
curriculums. Students learn to create an active, hands-on learning environment that fosters
creativity, curiosity, confidence, and persistence. Students learn to plan a comprehensive,
interactive program that meets individual and group needs, interests, abilities and development.
The course includes a field based component in which students carry out activities in an early
childhood setting and use scheduled conferences to evaluate current performance.
Prerequisite: TIE 110, CUR 520 and ECE 201

ECONOMICS (ECO)

Economics
ECO 105
Principles of Economics I
3 Credits
A study of basic economic concepts emphasizing analysis of the aggregate economy. The
fundamental concepts of national income and its determination, economic fluctuations, monetary
and fiscal policies, and economic growth are covered.

ECO 110
Principles of Economics II
3 Credits
An examination of processes of price determination, output, and resource allocation in perfect
and in imperfect competition. Also covers labor economics, international trade and finance, and
alternative economic systems.
Prerequisite: ECO 105




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    102
ECO 201
Money and Banking
3 Credits
The structure and function of the banking system and financial markets in the United States. The
use of monetary policy in the regulation of the national economy. The role of the Federal
Reserve System.
Prerequisite: ECO 110

ECO 320
International Economics and Finance
3 Credits
A study of international trade, investment, finance and economic cooperation. Topics will include
theory and techniques of international trade, the U.S. in international trade, tariffs and quotas,
foreign aid programs, foreign exchange markets and hedging exposure to foreign exchange risk.
Operations of multinational corporations, economic integration and cooperation, balance of
payments and international adjustment mechanisms and international indebtedness.
Prerequisite: ECO 201

ECO 520
Macroeconomics
3 Credits
A detailed examination of the relationship involving consumption, investment spending, the
impact that government and international economic transactions have on the economy and the
special role that money and interest rates play in determining output and employment levels.
Also, analyzes the phenomena of productivity and economic growth, including a discussion of the
major theoretical approaches to these issues.

ECO 521
Game Theory and Information Economics
3 Credits
Major topics include analyzing simultaneous and sequential games (Nash equilibrium, backwards
induction, sensitivity analysis), valuing information, information as a commodity and information
markets, problems of information asymmetry (including moral hazard and adverse selection), and
auctions

ECO 522
Topics in Strategy
3 Credits
Major topics include vertical integration, strategic alliances, and strategies for technology
companies.
Prerequisite: MBA 508

ECO 523
Global Comparative Economic Performance
3 Credits
This course is designed to bridge the gap between the abstract-theoretical models and the
practical data-based needs of decision-makers. It is also intended to provide decision-makers
with a compact and consistent framework for a sophisticated reading of economic signals for the
gauging of the state of the global economy. A small subset of economic indicators will be used to
capture the essence of the bewildering stream of economic signals about performance and trends
in economic activity. This course examines sources of international economic information for the
monitoring of trends in international economic performance by regions and sectors. Global
competitive reports are used to gain a comprehensive world economic outlook.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 103
EDUCATIONAL MASTER’S (EDM)

EDM 590
Capstone: Teacher as Professional
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on using authentic assessment to document the scholarship of
teaching. It introduces educators to the concept of using artifacts/products/teacher work samples
as evidence of effective teaching and, then, expands this to include student work samples as
supportive evidence of that effectiveness. The course emphasis is focused on collection and
presentation of teacher developed instructional examples organized comprehensively to
demonstrate the educator’s abilities in six areas: planning and teaching, actual teaching,
assessment and evaluation, learning environment, professional growth, and communication.
Prerequisite: Taken as last course in the program.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EDP)

EDP 101
Early Childhood Growth and Development
3 Credits
Focuses on how a teacher or caregiver can foster physical, emotional, social, creative, and
cognitive development. This course provides instruction on the quality care techniques for
children, from infancy to five years of age. It highlights the development of teaching and
interaction skills that can be applied to a wide range of children from a variety of backgrounds and
at all developmental levels. Students learn to support children’s physical and cognitive
development, communication skills, and creative expression.
Prerequisite: ECE 101

EDP 102
Early Childhood Learning Communities
3 Credits
Focuses on the child in the context of family and community. This course looks at issues of
communication, diversity, professionalism, and social policy. It also promotes awareness and
effective use of community resources. Students gain knowledge of the importance of parent-
teacher partnerships in the education of young children. Skills will be developed to support
families and enhance parent involvement in early childhood programs. Students learn to involve
parents in understanding the child’s home and school environments.
Prerequisite: EDP 101

EDP 201
Educational Psychology for Early Childhood
3 Credits
This course focuses on an in-depth study of physical, social/emotional, cognitive, language, and
aesthetic development from birth to age 8. Examines the foundations of major child development
theories that are the basis of professionally defined “best practices” at the early childhood (birth-
8) level. An exploration of child development in the context of gender, family, culture, and
society. An emphasis on the implications for early childhood professional practice. Students
learn key theories from an application and educational perspective for teachers of young children.
Prerequisite: EDP 101

EDP 202
Child Growth and Development: Conception to Adolescence
3 Credits
Focus on children’s physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to
adolescence. Major theories of growth and development will be examined. Concepts will be
analyzed in regard to direct application to adult expectations of children at various ages and


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  104
stages, developmentally appropriate program planning and curriculum implementation in early
childhood settings.
(Not required for students from CDA program with credits in EDP 101)

EDP 500
Theories of Teaching and Learning
3 Credits
The focus of this course is to examine current theories of learning, cognition, development, and
instruction and their practical application in educational practice. This course is designed to
enable the reflective practitioner to examine the variety of theories of learning, cognition,
development, and instruction and discuss their appropriate application in the design of learning
environments, the design and development of instruction, and the assessment and evaluation of
learning. The overall goal for this course is for you to be able to select and apply theories of
learning, cognition, and instruction in your learning setting towards the goal of creating learning
environments and instruction as appropriate given a target audience, a learning task, and
resources available to you.
Prerequisite: FND 500

EDP 510
The Developing Learner
3 Credits
The focus of this course is to develop an understanding of the important methods, terms,
theories, and findings in the field of developmental psychology. The primary focus of the class is
the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical changes associated with child and adolescent
development. The goal of the course is for the teacher to understand how children with broad
ranges of ability learn and be able to confidently design and provide instruction that supports their
intellectual, social, and personal development.
Prerequisite: EDP 500

EDP 511
Classroom Management
3 Credits
This course introduces students to various methodologies for facilitating positive student behavior
and achievement. This course also attempts to provide teachers, counselors, and administrators
with comprehensive analyses of contemporary research pertaining to classroom management. In
addition, students are presented with detailed coverage of the following topics: management of
the classroom in the context of students' academic, psychological, and social needs; the effects
of interpersonal relationships at school and at home on student behavior and learning; detailed
analyses of research-based strategies for improving learning and classroom behavior; and
numerous adaptive methods for handling classroom and school-wide discipline problems.
Prerequisite: FND 500

EDP 520
Strategies for Meaningful Learning and Motivation
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on the conceptual and procedural application of specific instructional
strategies in the classroom. The course is a skill building experience for teachers who desire to
learn and apply a wide range of instructional strategies in an actual learning environment. The
course will articulate each strategy in detail and then develop each student’s skill and ability to
deliver these strategies in live situations. There will be an emphasis on planning, presenting,
reviewing, revising, and re-presenting each technique to increase audience attention, reception,
motivation, and retention. The goal of the course is that the teacher understands and uses a
variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology to encourage learner’s
development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
Prerequisite: MAT 505


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  105
EDP 550
Computers and Higher Order Thinking Skills
3 Credits
Computers and Higher Order Thinking Skills is a technology applications course focused on
designing micro-worlds for teaching problem solving in K-12 settings. Learners will apply
knowledge of human cognition, motivation, and multiple intelligences in creation of technology-
enhanced learning environments that promote the development and transfer of critical thinking
and problem solving skills in students. Learners will review existing micro-worlds and use
industry standard authoring tools to create their own. Learners will also look at designing lessons
in which students work with technology to solve problems and engage in critical and complex
thinking. Learners will explore the capabilities of tools that engage students in higher order
thinking. Learners will create assessment rubrics for meaningful learning activities.

EDP 551
Psychology of Multimedia Design: Human-Computer Interaction
3 credits
This course is the culminating experience in the multimedia sequence. Students will develop
knowledge and skill in the analysis and application of cognitive frameworks and conceptual
models that are the foundation of multimedia designs. Students will design a technologically
integrated Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) instructional unit appropriate for differentiated
learners.
Prerequisite: EDP 550

EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (EDR)

EDR 500
Research Methods and Assessment
3 Credits
Students explore selected forms of quantitative and qualitative research, considering the
strengths and weaknesses of each. Specific topics include: establishing the problem and the
hypothesis; locating and reviewing relevant research literature; selecting a subject, research
design, and appropriate statistical measures; and interpreting research results. Special attention
is devoted to methods of assessing learning and other outcomes. Students complete the course
by preparing a detailed research proposal in the form of a completed document using actual or
hypothetical data. Students must have completed a minimum of 24 credits prior to enrolling in this
course.

EDR 501
Applied Research Methods I
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the research process and
the ethical context within which research should be conducted. Further, it will provide the basic
skills needed to conduct and evaluate research on topics relevant to field of education. In order to
accomplish these objectives, the course will focus on the nature of scientific inquiry; the
connections between theory and research; designing research projects and exploring causation;
sampling procedures and logic; research techniques; and reliability, validity, and measurement of
data.
Prerequisite: FND 500

EDR 502
Applied Research Methods II
3 Credits
This course will focus on the various data analysis techniques used in scientific research. Heavy
emphasis will be placed on: descriptive statistics; cross-tabulations; regression and correlation


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 106
analysis; inferential statistics and parameter estimation; and hypothesis testing. Techniques used
for analyzing qualitative data are included as well.
Prerequisite: EDR 501

EDR 504
Classroom Assessment for Improving Learning
3 Credits
The focus of this course is to provide an overview of models for planning and implementing
classroom assessment projects. The course emphasizes the implementation, data collection,
analysis, and reporting of results on classroom assessment projects. The primary focus is on
learning-centered assessment and an overview of the tools, techniques, and issues that
educators should consider as they design and use assessments focused on learner needs. The
goal is for the teacher to understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to
evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.
Prerequisite: FND 500

EDR 596
Field Project
3 Credits
This is the culminating course in the masters’ courses of study. Candidates carry out an applied
research project in a chosen area of expertise that demonstrates and documents the candidates
comprehensively developed skills. The project synthesizes work of the degree candidates’
program. The field project is based on standards based learner-centered quantitative and
qualitative design begun in the research course ad refined in this course. The design
demonstrates the application of a range of teaching/learning methods, media, instructional
technology, and integrates appropriate criteria, rubrics, and assessments. The instructional
needs of diverse learners are integrated into the field design. The final report includes detailed
documentation of the rationale, design, and implementation of the project followed by an
evaluation and analysis of project results. Candidates are encouraged to publish their reports in
professional journals and in ERIC.
Prerequisite: EDR 500

EDR 597
Thesis Research I
2 Credits
This course is the first of three courses in which student enroll to prepare their thesis proposal,
thesis, and engage in their defense of their work. In this course, students develop and submit, in
writing, a formal proposal for research in education to their chosen thesis committee, made up of
a chairperson and two (2) additional members. The student, under the guidance of faculty, will
select an appropriate topic for research to be approved by the student’s committee; provide a
justification for the selection of the research topic; conduct a pertinent literature review; and
construct an appropriate methodology and design to be used for data collection. This research
proposal must conform to the standards and procedures of the University’s Institutional Review
Board (IRB). At the conclusion of this course, students will have an approved proposal for their
thesis.
Prerequisite: EDR 502

EDR 598
Thesis Research II
3 Credits
In this course students will engage in data collection and initial analysis using appropriate analytic
methods. This research project must conform to the standards and procedures of University’s
Institutional Review Board (IRB).
Prerequisite: EDR 597



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   107
EDR 599
Thesis Research III
2 Credits
During this phase of the research process, students will complete their analysis and their
conclusions and recommendations based on the research they have conducted. Students will
submit the final draft of their research project to their committee members for review in sufficient
time for the committee to review the thesis and prepare the student for the oral defense during
the same term as students are registered for this course. This research project must conform to
the standards and procedures of University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). The research
report shall be prepared according to University guidelines and the final, approved product of
same shall be submitted to appropriate library personnel for binding and acquisition.
Prerequisite: EDR 598

EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (ELD)

ELD 500
Introduction to School Leadership and Administration
3 Credits
This course focuses on study of school leadership and administrative responsibilities, with an
emphasis on understanding schools as complex organizations and facilitating leadership to
create a work climate supportive of excellence in teaching and learning.
Prerequisite: completion of core courses

ELD 520
Management Development
3 credits
In today’s business environment, management development is a key factor to organizational
survival. In this course, students will learn the concept of management development, how Human
Resources professionals should look at management development, the current strategies and
techniques utilized for developing the various levels of managers in the organization, and the
strategies/techniques that need to be developed to prepare management for future challenges.
This course will provide students with practical strategies/methodologies needed to effectively
develop and integrate management development programs/initiatives in their organizations and
get the support needed to implement them. In the course, each student will focus on the design of
a specific management development program, initiative, or curriculum that is of significant
importance to his/her organization or personal situation. At the completion of the course, each
student will have developed an outline/proposal for use as a “blueprint” for their management
development program/initiative.
Prerequisite: TIE 560

ELD 530
Developing, Motivating and Supervising Teachers
3 Credits
The course will survey best practices in developing new teachers, motivating returning teachers
and supervising the performance of all teachers through effective evaluation, professional
development and mentoring. Prerequisite: ELD 500

ENGINEERING (ENG)

ENG 240
Engineering Economics
3 Credits
Economic problems relevant to the management-engineering decision-making environment,
managerial costs, interest, depreciation, break-even analysis, capital budgeting, replacement
decisions.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  108
Prerequisite: MAT 170

ENG 245
Statistical Design I
3 Credits
Fundamentals of engineering probability and statistical analysis as applied to industrial problems:
sample spaces, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling techniques
and design of statistical investigations, Bayesian decision making. Emphasis is on the application
of these ideas to the decision making process, rather than pure theory.
Prerequisite: MAT 170

ENG 251
Project Engineering
3 Credits
In this course, we discuss development and management of engineering and technology projects.
Project proposal preparation, resources and cost estimating, project planning, organizing, and
controlling, network diagrams and the techniques covered.
Prerequisite: MAT 170 or MAT 161

ENG 345
Statistical Design II
3 Credits
Principles of modern statistical experimentation and practice in basic engineering design:
statistical inference and decision problems, estimation, tests of hypothesis, regression correlation,
one-way and two-way analysis of variance, application to engineering and management data,
time-series analysis.
Prerequisite: ENG 245

COMPUTER AND SOCIETY (ETC)

ETC 102
Computer and Society
3 Credits
Computers and Society is designed to provide basic understanding of what the computer can do.
This course covers the basic concepts of computer operation, applications, and how computers
affect society.

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (ETE)

ETE 110
Electrical Technology I
4 Credits
Fundamental units, electrical components, wire calculations, work power, efficiency, Ohm’s law
series and parallel resistive circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws. Introduction to electric and magnetic energy
storage, capacitance, inductance, RC and RL time constraints, meters, fundamentals of dc
motors and generators.
Co-requisite: MAT 135 or equivalent, or MAT 141

ETE 120
Electrical Technology II
4 Credits
Alternating current concepts. Reactance circuits, series and parallel, power factor, complex
algebra, and phasor notation. Resonance Phenomena, coupled circuits and transformers.
Lectures are followed by laboratory experiments.
Prerequisite: ETE 110


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   109
Corequisite: MAT 155

ETE 131
Electronics Technology I
4 Credits
This course covers semiconductor theory, diodes, Zener diodes, rectifier circuits, filters, voltage
regulators, special purpose diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) and Junction Field Effect
Transistor (FET) fundamentals. BJT and FET configurations, blasing, AC models and voltage
amplifiers, and small signal analysis. BJT power amplifier classification and analysis are also
discussed. Laboratory work is correlated with the lectures.
Prerequisite: ETE 110
Corequisite: ETE 120

ETE 231
Electronics Technology II
4 Credits
This course covers Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) fundamentals,
configurations, biasing and small signal analysis. Frequency response of BJT and FET circuits.
Bode plots, and Oscillators are discussed. Other topics covered include Differential Amplifiers,
Operational Amplifiers (opamps) fundamentals and applications including linear and non-linear
op-amp circuits. Regulated Power supplies and Thyristor devices are also considered.
Laboratory work is correlated with the lectures.
Prerequisite: ETE 131

ETHICS (ETH)

ETH 513
Business Ethics
3 Credits
This course is intended to help students make ethical choices in a business context. Students
analyze case studies dealing with such topics as employee rights and responsibilities, consumer
issues and product liability, community and environmental issues and ethical norms in different
cultures. In each area, an analytic framework is used to identify stakeholder rights and interests,
and relevant moral duties and virtues.

EDUCATION FOR TRAINERS (ETR)

ETR 504
Distance Learning Applications
3 Credits
This advanced course in distance learning is an applied laboratory experience in which
candidates develop distance learning plans and deliver distance learning instructional units for
diverse audiences. Each unit will include an interactive development process with field testing
and specified outcomes, supportive materials and evaluation designs.

FILM (FIL)

FIL 210
History of Motion Pictures
3 Credits
This survey course explores the development of the film as an art form and a technique. Fifteen
hours of selected representative films are screened during the laboratory portion of the course.
Post-screening analyses, research, and a term paper are required.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  110
FINANCE (FIN)

FIN 201
Corporation Finance
3 Credits
An overview of the financial management function in modern business, emphasizing the time
value of money and financial analysis. The financial and economic environment and capital
markets and securities are covered.
Prerequisite: ACC 101, ECO 201, MAT 125

FIN 205
Financial Management
3 Credits
Focus is on corporate financial decisions and policy. Topics include: capital budgeting and
financing decisions, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions and financial failures. Risk/return
considerations are examined in the context of value maximization.
Prerequisite: FIN 201

FIN 210
Principles of Investment and Security Analysis
3 Credits
An introduction to the investment process. An understanding of how individuals and institutions
make their investment decisions. A broad exposure to a range of topics including selection of
securities, security analysis, instruments, and investment trends. The risks and returns involved
in investing in different financial instruments are examined.
Prerequisite: FIN 201

FIN 302
Insurance and Risk Management
3 Credits
An introduction to current insurance principles and theory. Management of risk and the role of
insurance. Fundamentals of property and liability insurance and insurance contracts for
management. The scope of the insurance industry will be explored.

FIN 310
Fundamentals of Financial Planning
3 Credits
Fundamentals of Financial Planning deals with the basics of financial planning. Topics include
the financial planning process; measuring client-risk propensities; communication skills; using
time-value analysis in financial planning; basics of insurance, investment, and retirement
planning, the regulatory and ethical environment information technology, and a sample financial
planning case.

FIN 401
Finance: Working Capital Management
3 Credits
An introduction to the management of short-term or current accounts of the firm to optimize the
risk/return profile. Management of the liquid assets of the firm which comprise a substantial
portion of total assets has become more significant because of the increasing range of
management techniques and technologies.
Prerequisite: FIN 201

FIN 405
Modern Portfolio Theory
3 Credits


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 111
A detailed examination of portfolio management and capital market theory including a review of
material on efficient markets, the basic Markowitz portfolio model and the capital asset pricing
model. The above concepts in terms of international diversification and the evaluation of portfolio
performance are covered. Traditional equity and bond valuation techniques will also be
investigated.
Prerequisite: FIN 201

FIN 530
Principles of Global Finance
3 Credits
This course teaches how multi-national firms or firms facing international competition manage
financial risk unique to a multi-national setting such as fluctuations in currency exchange rates,
interest rates, and political stability.
Prerequisite: MBA 504

FIN 531
Fundamentals of Derivative Contracts
3 Credits
This course involves study and analysis of various forms of derivative securities. Explanation of
various risk-transfer devices such as options and futures contracts, valuation of and strategies
involved in trading these securities, hedging and speculating with options and futures.
Prerequisite: FIN 532

FIN 532
Topics in Financial Markets and Investment
3 Credits
Major topics include capital structure, determining discount rates, the risk return tradeoff, capital
markets, and derivatives and options.
Prerequisite: MBA 504

FIN 533
Risk Management
3 Credits
Risk Management covers the fundamental principles of financial risk management, evaluating
risks, and managing them using derivative securities. The objective of this course is to present a
realistic overview of risk management for multinational corporations. This course involves study
and analysis of various forms of risk-transfer financial instruments, such as options and futures
contracts, valuation of these securities, and hedging with options and futures.

FIN 534
Advanced Assurance Topics
3 Credits
This course explores different trends in the assurance area. Assurance services include
professional activities that improve information quality for decision makers. Major course topics
include assurance services and corporate governance, continuous auditing, international
assurance models, earnings management, and fraud detection.
Prerequisite: MBA 503

FIN 535
Export-Import Operations and Finance
3 Credits
This course will concentrate on development and execution of export/import operations. Sources
of data and methods for evaluating market potential within the context of international agreements
and regulations are explored. The methods of executing export/import transactions, including
instruments of trade financing, are examined extensively.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    112
FIN 536
Investment Principles and Policies
3 Credits
This course investigates a variety of financial instruments as vehicles for effective investment
decisions. These instruments include treasury securities, corporate bonds, preferred stock and
common stock. Fundamental and quantitative methods of valuation and selection are examined.
Efficient methods of portfolio construction, management and performance evaluation are studied.
Risk and return characteristic of individual instruments are evaluated and contributions to the
overall performance of the investment portfolio are analyzed.
Prerequisites: MBA 504

FIN 537
Financial Institutions and Portfolio Management
3 Credits
This course will focus on financial institutions and markets in the context of portfolio construction,
management, performance evaluation and performance presentation standards. Specific topics
include: capital markets and money markets, roles and functions of monetary institutions,
sources and uses of funds, institutional investors, economic indicators, sources of information on
global markets, the efficient market hypothesis, market inefficiencies and selection criteria,
portfolio diversification methods, asset pricing models, portfolio construction and asset
allocations, hedging and risk management, performance presentation standards, performance
evaluation and attribution.
Prerequisite: MBA 504

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (FND)

FND 500
Teacher as Learner and Reflective Practitioner
3 Credits
The focus of this course is to develop teachers’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions to seek to
improve their knowledge and practice through a continuing process of professional reading,
writing, dialogue, inquiry, and reflection. Course content focuses on developing the teacher as a
reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effect of his or her choices and action on
learners, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and who actively seeks out
opportunities to grow professionally. The course will also contribute to the professional
development of educators to use technology effectively to promote and develop reflective
learners and to enhance and expand their learning environment.
Prerequisite: None

FND 510
Teaching Diverse Learners
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on the wide range of diversity that exists across today's general school
population and examination of the increased professional demands that this diversity makes upon
teachers. Teachers will explore a range of issues that they confront in our pluralistic society and
how a global perspective affects educational practice. Topics include socioeconomic class,
nationality, ethnicity, race, geographic region, gender, sexual orientation, exceptionality, and
religion, language, learning style, age and developmental status. Teachers will also explore
inclusive strategies by examining effective and reflective classroom practices that address and
expand the realities of the classroom setting. Legislation and legal information will be explored
and will include their affects on assessment and evaluation of diverse learners. The goal of this
course is for teachers to understand how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the
barriers that impede learning and to be able to adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of
pupils, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities.
Prerequisite: FND 500


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    113
FND 511
Foundations II: Diversity, Learning, and Technology
3 Credits
Candidates apply an understanding of diversity of student populations in contemporary
elementary and secondary school. Consideration is given to addressing the needs and
aspirations of all learners across the spectrum of culture, gender, language, and ability levels.
Particular emphasis is placed on research and use of case studies toward the development of
open-mindedness, the awareness and implications of bias, and issues surrounding character
education and school violence. Literacy, reflective practice and assessment strategies are
developed. The role of technology, both as resource and tool, in the application of educational
theory to meet State and professional standards is an integral aspect of this course. Field
observation and experiences are required and integrated into this course.
Prerequisite: TIE 501, CUR 500

FND 521
School Law and Ethics
3 Credits
This course provides an overview of various legal and ethical issues as related to practical
problems of school administration. Constitutional provisions and court decisions are examined as
they impact education, especially classroom effectiveness.

FND 560
Issues facing Elementary and Secondary Teachers
3 Credits
This course leads in an in-depth analysis of 5-7 key issues impacting the effectiveness of
classroom teachers including, but not limited to: use of technology, quality of facilities, diversity of
student ability, school environment, classroom management techniques and a support network.

HISTORY (HIS)

HIS 110
American History I
3 Credits
This is a survey course of American History from the colonial period, the Revolution to the
establishment of the Republic, the first half of the nineteenth century, up through the period of the
Civil War, ending in 1865. The impact of geography on the growth of the Republic is considered.
The political, economic and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the
student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.

HIS 150
American History II
3 Credits
This is a survey course of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present: the
period of the Reconstruction, the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the
country as a Great Power, U.S. role in the twentieth century are considered. The political,
economic, cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with
historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.

HIS 210
The Contemporary World
3 Credits
This is a survey course of 20th century global history: it covers the period of imperialism leading
to World War I, the emergence of the USSR as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     114
result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the USA in the post-cold war world.
Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political,
economic and cultural development of the world.

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (HLH)

HLH 540
Health Administration and Management
3 Credits
Managerial policies in the management of health care facilities, budgeting and cost-effectiveness
analysis, and development of health information systems.

HLH 541
Systems of Health Care Delivery
3 Credits
Methods of health care delivery and conditions imposed externally and internally in compliance
with regulations and laws that relate to such institutions as health maintenance organizations,
health care corporation, group practice clinics, prepaid health care organizations.
Prerequisite: HLH 540

HLH 542
Current Issues in Health Care Delivery
3 Credits
Politics and economics of health care, national health insurance, and risk factors and their effect
on the economy. Providers of these services will be studied. Changing legislation relating to the
operation and management of health care facilities.
Prerequisite: HLH 540

HOSPITALITY (HOS)

HOS 101
Hospitality Management
3 Credits
The basic principles of management and their relationship to the hospitality industry. The future
of the restaurant industry, travel and tourism, hotel/motel operations, leadership and the directing
function in hospitality management. Many other current topics will also be discussed.

HOS 102
Front Office Management
3 Credits
Develops an understanding of front office procedures with emphasis on new methods of group
reception, registration and billings. Other areas that will be covered are the structure of the front
office management, credit and collection procedures.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 150
Personnel Management for the Hospitality Industry
3 Credits
Study of the realities in industry and the procedures which would be helpful in addressing
problems relating to the personnel function. Areas that will be covered include administration,
human resource development, labor relations and placement procedures.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 154
Casino Management


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   115
3 Credits
Operation of casinos from the hospitality management perspective. Topics include the theories of
operation, games management, legal restrictions and service functions. Student will also learn
loss control and rules of the most popular games in casinos.

HOS 201
Convention and Meeting Planning
3 Credits
Theory and operation of convention meeting planning for hotels and conference centers.
Principles of bookkeeping, account processing, sales, banquet/catering management as they
apply to these operations. Other related current topics will be covered.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 202
Fundamentals of Purchasing
3 Credits
Fundamental principles and purchasing techniques will be studied with a greater emphasis on
product information needed to purchase in a special field. Areas of concentration include
purchasing of vegetables, poultry, beef, fish, and alcoholic beverages.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 204
Food and Beverage Operations
3 Credits
Comprehensive study of the control process in food and beverage operations, with a look at
various alternatives and available solutions and methods. Areas of study include cash receipts,
receiving, menu pricing and labor cost controls.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 206
Principles of Beverage Management
3 Credits
Detailed comprehensive study of the origins, production and characteristics of all types of
alcoholic beverages. Other areas that will be explored include purchasing beverages,
merchandising, and beverage control.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 221
Travel Management
3 Credits
Acquaints students with two major components of Travel and Tourism: hospitality (hotels, motor
inns, resorts, alternative accommodations and related occupations: bus operations, land
arrangers and tour operators) and retail travel agency organization, operation, administration,
personnel and sales.

HOS 251
Quantity Food Production
3 Credits
Concepts and nature of food preparation in large quantities. A systematic presentation of all the
phases in food service operations. Areas of nutrition, sanitation and equipment analysis will also
be covered.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                116
HOS 301
Facilities Maintenance
3 Credits

Introduction to maintenance and engineering principles required to today’s lodging and food
service operations including technical information necessary to establish effective preventive
maintenance programs. Study includes engineering and maintenance department roles and
responsibilities, blueprint reading, electric, plumbing, sewer, swimming pool, HVAC, elevator,
acoustic and sound control and elimination of pollution problems.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 302
Hospitality Managerial Accounting
3 Credits
Application of practical accounting techniques relating to the hospitality industry with
concentration in financial statements, internal control, payroll and cost accounting.
Prerequisite: ACC 101

HOS 306
Hospitality Industry Marketing
3 Credits
Study of what marketing is, what it can accomplish for the organization, and how to establish and
operate a marketing plan. Includes product development, personal selling, market planning and
pricing.
Prerequisite: HOS 101

HOS 308
Labor-Management Relations
3 Credits
Analysis of labor-management relations in the hospitality industry through historical reference,
case studies and on-the-job incidents. Includes material on contract provisions, negotiations and
interpretation.
Prerequisite: Junior status.

HOS 401
Seminar in Hotel/Restaurant Administration
3 Credits
This is the senior “capstone” course calling for a broad range of skills and knowledge learned
both in the major and in the college. The class is divided into teams each of which prepares on or
more solution(s) to a given large problem in the Hotel Restaurant Institutional industry. The
presentations mandate appropriate written, visual and numerical aspects demonstrating
communication skills, integration of knowledge, application of computer skills, teamwork skills and
job readiness through the panel critique.
Prerequisite: Senior status.

HOS 404
Facilities Layout and Design II
3 Credits
Individual student effort in the development of a restaurant from concept to operation. A major
project will include blueprints for dining rooms, bars and kitchens developed after the concept and
menu have been established. Prior industry experience or 30 credits in culinary arts, food service
or restaurant courses are recommended as a prerequisite to this course.
Prerequisites: HOS 204 and HOS 410




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  117
HOS 406
Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry
3 Credits
Comprehensive study on the different objectives in financial management. Deciding on company
goals, ways of obtaining the funds to meet these goals and effective uses of the funds. Ratio
analysis working capital and long term financing will also be included.
Prerequisites: HOS 101, ACC 101

HOS 408
Law for the Hospitality Industry
3 Credits
The legal aspects of running a hotel. Designed to give a basic understanding of preventive
tactics and what must be done to avoid lawsuits. Also includes legal research, licensing and
hotel keepers’ obligations.
Prerequisite: MGT 201

HOS 410
Menu Design and Planning
3 Credits
Comprehensive study of all phases of menu preparation. The menu is broken down into several
different elements such as art and design layout, copy and others. Each is analyzed as it applies
to food service operations, nutritional requirements and balanced presentation. Final project:
preparation of a menu.
Prerequisites: HOS 202 or HOS 204

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (HRM)

Human Resource Management
HRM 510
Labor Economics
3 Credits
The focus of this course is the macro and micro economic aspects of the labor market. Included
are the examination of the economic, demographic, and technological factors affecting the
nation’s workplaces. Key issues of wages and employment are considered from the perspective
of labor market theory. Other topics include productivity, unemployment, education and training,
occupational choice and government-sponsored human resource programs.
Prerequisite: MBA 502

HRM 520
The American Industrial Relations System
3 Credits
A comprehensive study of industrial growth, the labor movement, governmental involvement, and
the emergence of the industrial relations system. Historical analysis of management and labor
philosophies and approaches. Review of landmark labor laws. Consideration of economic,
political and institutional forces affecting the American industrial relations system.
Prerequisite: None

HRM 521
Fair Employment Practices and Policies
3 Credits
An intensive and critical examination of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act., Executive Orders 11246
and 11375, the Equal Pay Act and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, their amendments,
Americans with Disabilities Act, and other legislation relating to fair employment and
nondiscrimination. Included will be a study of policies, procedures and requirements of federal
and state enforcement agencies, as well as a review of relevant court decisions and rulings.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                118
Implications for human resources management and labor relations policies and practices are
considered.
Prerequisites: HRM 540

HRM 522
Staffing and Selecting
3 Credits
This advanced course examines the role and techniques of human resources planning,
recruitment and selection in the contemporary organization. The use of planning and staffing
strategies and models is reviewed. Techniques of job analysis, recruiting, interviewing, and data
verification are also covered.
Prerequisite: HRM 550 and HRM 540

HRM 523
Training and Development of Human Resources
3 Credits
Examination of training and development in organizations, the purposes served and the role
played in increasing individual and organizational effectiveness. Included is a review of adult
learning behaviors; methodologies for conducting needs analysis and evaluation of training
activities; and the systematic design of instructional modules for skills training activities and
management development programs. The role of the training director and management of the
training functions are examined.
Prerequisite: HRM 550

HRM 524
Management of Compensation
3 Credits
The development, implementation and administration of compensation programs are covered.
Emphasis will be placed on the total compensation system, including basic wages, incentives,
special programs and the role of employee benefits. Consideration will be given to hourly,
salaried, sales, professional and executive compensation plans. Also included is practical
application in how to analyze jobs, write job descriptions, develop a hierarchy of jobs and
determine the relative worth of each job by using job evaluation techniques.
Prerequisite: HRM 550

HRM 525
Management of Employee Benefits
3 Credits
This course covers the establishment and administration of employee benefits programs.
Evaluation, design, selection, negotiation, operation and government reporting requirements of
various plans are covered. ERISA requirements are reviewed in detail. Benefit programs studied
will include health and welfare, retirement, capital accumulation and statutory benefits such as
disability, unemployment insurance and workers’ compensation.
Prerequisite: HRM 550

HRM 526
Alternative Dispute Resolution
3 Credits
Disputes occur in all workplace and business settings. Effective human resources management
and employee/labor relations managers need to understand how and why these disputes occur
and how they can be resolved. This course examines the causes, consequences and dynamics
of disputes in the workplace and business settings; the role of alternative dispute resolution
(ADR) methods in dealing with such disputes; the design of ADR policies and procedures; and
provides instruction in the successful use of mediation and negotiation techniques.
Prerequisite: HRM 550


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 119
HRM 527
Occupational Safety and Health
3 Credits
An advanced course which covers the development of federal and New York State occupational
safety and health laws and policies, with emphasis on the Occupational Safety and Health Act of
1970 and New York State Workers’ Compensation laws. The course provides a framework for
understanding occupational safety and health issues from the technical, legal, political and
economic problems perspective. The elements of safety and health management in an
organization and related human resource management and labor relations policies are examined.
Prerequisites: HRM 550

HRM 528
Human Resource Policies and Procedures
3 Credits
Policy and procedure development is an integral human resources management function.
Effective policies must comply with a complex set of employment laws and regulations, and they
must be consistent with an organization’s business goals and priorities and culture. Through this
course, students will actually develop a set of policies and procedures. Issues involved in multi-
state and multi-national operations, as well as electronic policy manuals, will be considered.
Prerequisites: HRM 540

HRM 529
Human Resource Management Seminar
3 Credits
An advanced seminar on contemporary human resources management practices. Topics will
vary from semester to semester. A project will be required of all students.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 33 Credits. May be repeated for credit with permission of
the director.

HRM 530
Principles and Practices of Collective Bargaining
3 Credits
An introduction to fundamental concepts, principles and practices of the collective bargaining
process from the organization of workers through negotiations. Topics include subjects of
bargaining, strikes, slowdowns, contract administration and enforcement. The course also
examines the roles of participants and of government agencies as related to the national Labor
Relations Act, as amended, in the process.
Prerequisite: None

HRM 531
The Collective Bargaining Process
3 Credits
A study of strategies and tactics of collective bargaining from preparation to the dynamics of
negotiation, to contract administration. Resolution of key issues of wages, benefits, working
conditions, job security, seniority and others are examined. Students apply course concepts
through participation in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite: HRM 530

HRM 532
Arbitration and Dispute Resolution
3 Credits
This course provides critical examination of arbitration and dispute resolution procedures. Topics
covered include a study of significant court and National Labor Relations Board decisions, the
arbitration process, rules of evidence, contemporary policy and the role of powers of an arbitrator.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  120
Also considered are mediation, fact-finding, the role of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation
Services and other agencies and organizations concerned with dispute resolution.
Prerequisite: HRM 530

HRM 533
The Labor Union As An Organization
3 Credits
This course examines similarities and differences among the labor organizations in the United
States. The functions and practices of the AFL-CIO, the international unions, the intermediate
union bodies and local unions are covered. The course also covers the Landrum-Griffin Act and
its impact on union member’s rights and the operation and administration of the union. The
function of unions and their economic social and political impact on American society is
considered.
Prerequisites: HRM 530 and HRM 520

HRM 534
Labor Law and Policy
3 Credits
The focus of this course is the National Labor Relations Act, the Labor-Management Relations
Act, the Landrum Griffin Act, National Labor Relations Board rulings and relevant Supreme Court
decisions. The law as it relates to key labor relations topics of union organization and
recognition, collective bargaining, strikes and pickets, and unfair labor practices will be covered.
Related NLRB procedures will also be reviewed.
Prerequisite: HRM 530

HRM 535
Labor Relations Seminar
3 Credits
An advanced seminar on contemporary labor relations practices. Topics will vary from semester
to semester. A project will be required of all students.
Prerequisite: Completion of 33 Credits. May be repeated for credit with permission.

HRM 540
Employment Laws and Policies
3 Credits
A study of the provisions, administration, enforcement and reporting requirements of federal and
state legislation relating to employment standards and worker protections from the hiring phase
through termination and post-termination phases. Implications for employment policies and
procedures are studied in detail.
Prerequisite: HRM 550

HRM 550
Human Resources Management
3 Credits
An introduction to human resource management in the modern organization. Major functional
areas including employment, compensation, benefits, HRIS, employee and labor relations,
training and development, human resource planning, personnel policy and procedures are
covered.
Prerequisite: MBA 500

HRM 560
Organizational Behavior
3 Credits
Review of organizational theory and the dynamics of participation of management and employees
in modem organization. Deals with the areas of authority and power, decision making,
communication, interpersonal relations, organizational change, and resolution of conflict. Special


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   121
consideration of group participation and its contribution to problem solving and decision making.
Human values, motivation, and morale are also among the areas reviewed in this course,
particularly as they relate to the influences of supervision and productivity expectations.
Prerequisite: MBA 500

HRM 570
Human Resources Management and Labor Relations: Costs, Benefits and Impact
3 Credits
Human resources management and labor relations programs and activities involve costs, but also
result in benefits and other positive outcomes to the organization. Both the costs and benefits
can be measured. The ability to quantify both the costs and benefits of such programs and to
translate them into the language of business is essential to HRM/LR specialists who need to
select the most cost-effective approaches, and who must compete for funds with other
organizational activities. Through this course, students will develop their ability to quantify
HRM/LR programs and activities, relate them to business strategies and outcomes, and make
decisions based upon quantitative, financial and other criteria. Basic concepts of accounting and
finance are reviewed.
Prerequisites: Accounting at the undergraduate level and HRM 550

HRM 580
Methods of Research in Organizations
3 Credits
Application of quantitative and qualitative methodologies to human resources and labor relations
problem-solving in organizations. Problem identification, methodology, analytical techniques,
research design and report preparation are covered.
Prerequisite: Statistics

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (IDS)

IDS 401 Special Topics
IDS 402 Special Topics
IDS 403 Special Topics
IDS 404 Special Topics
3 Credits each
This course involves directed independent study and research. It is open for individual or
seminar group work in advanced areas of interest to the student(s) and instructor.

IDS 410
Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone Seminar
3 Credits
Reading, writing and research activities requiring demonstration of mastery in analytic and
communication skills in addressing a problem related to students’ individualized programs of
study.

IDS 701 Special Topics
IDS 702 Special Topics
IDS 703 Special Topics
IDS 704 Special Topics
1-4 Credits
This course involves directed independent study and research. It is open for individual seminar
small group work in advanced areas of interest to the student and instructor.

INFORMATION SECURITY (ISE)

I


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                122
SE 150
Electronics Concepts in Security
3 Credits
In this course we present an introduction to the basic electronic components such as resistors,
capacitors and inductors and their behavior in dc and ac circuits. Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws,
filters and resonance will be discussed. The on junction is introduced and a brief description of
how diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field-effect transistors, and the operational amplifier work.
We conclude with a discussion of digital circuits, beginning with simple gates and Boolean
algebra, registers, counters, memory, and analog-to-digital converters.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of Algebra

ISE 251
Electronic Security Systems
3 Credits
In this course we present a hands-on approach to the design and implementation of electronic
security systems such as those used for perimeter and occupant protections, surveillance and
security deterrence. An analysis of hardware devices such as smoke and heat detectors,
acoustic wire, electric fences and their integration in the design of fire alarms and electronic
perimeter security systems. A study of the theory and design of CCTV surveillance systems
including hardware components, video transmission systems, design trends, system layout using
CAD, installation process, evaluation, testing, control room, auditing, management, health and
safety issues. An analysis of the latest technology in CCTV systems such as wired and wireless
cameras, isolation devices, amplifiers, lighting techniques, fiber optic transmission, lenses,
multiplexing, quads and video switchers, monitors and recording systems. A discussion on legal
and ethical issues related to surveillance systems.
Prerequisite: ISE 150

ISE 351
Introduction to Intrusion Detection
3 Credits
Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to deploy and manage intrusion
detection systems. Topics will include the role of an IDS and its limitations, TCP/IP for intrusion
detection, internet security threats, identifying and recognizing hacking attacks, nuisances and
security breaches, TCP dump and Snort Students will learn how to use hardware such as
switches, hubs, trunks, switch ports, spanning ports, taps, IDS machine and resource machine to
deploy network-based and host-based intrusion detection systems. IDS in a switched
environment, IDS signatures and analysis, and open source IDS. This course will cover
commercial intrusion detection tools such as NFR, ISS, CRACK, and TCP Wrapper. IDS
management will include planning for an attack, latest attack patterns and luring techniques.
Legal matters in intrusion detection will be discussed.
Prerequisite: TEL 345 or equivalent

ISE 360
Access Control and Biometrics
3 Credits
In the first part of this course we will focus on firewall technologies used in access control of
computer networks against the common internet threats such as eavesdropping, spoofing,
sniffing, viruses, worms, denial of service attacks, buffer overflow attacks and Trojan horses.
Topics will include packet filters, application proxies, network address translation, circuit-level
gateways, and socks. This course will detail firewall architectures such as screening router,
screened gateway, screened subnet, dual homed gateway, and internal firewalls. The second
part of this course will cover biometric access control hardware devices including fingerprint
identification, facial geometry, hand geometry, speaker recognition, retina scanning, iris scanning,
keyboard recognition, DNA analysis and data hiding. Effectiveness and limitations of various
techniques will be analyzed.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    123
Prerequisite: TEL 345 or equivalent

ISE 380
Computer Security Concepts
3 Credits
In this course, the students will learn how to write simple navigational scripts used in interactive
objet-oriented solutions to problems from domains such as simulations, gaming, instruction and
artificial life. Students will develop data structures and classes in order to navigate through
screens. They will learn to implement interfaces and control media.
Prerequisite: ITE 320

ISE 420
Computer Forensics
3 Credits
In this course we present a range of topics on aspects of forensic investigations on computer
hardware and software. Methods of recovering traces of information from computer storage
devices are analyzed. Tools and technologies utilized in information recovery from computers
are studied. Federal, state, and local statutes governing forensic investigations of computer
related crimes are also reviewed.
Prerequisite: ISE 380

ISE 495
Seminar Project on Security Topics
3 Credits
Independent work in electronic, information security and related areas selected by a student and
a faculty member who acts as an advisor. A written report and presentation are required.
Prerequisite: Senior status

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (ITE)

ITE 251
Discrete Structures I
3 Credits
A review of sets, functions, relations and mathematical induction as applied to information
technology will be given. Graph theory, recursion, and sorting algorithmic analysis will be
studied.
Prerequisite: CSC 120, MAT 161

ITE 252
Discrete Structures II
3 Credits
Principles and applications of probability and statistics. Recurrence and relations, generating
functions, combinatorial circuits, finite state machines, logic and proof will be discussed.
Prerequisite: CSC 120, ITE 251

ITE 290
Database Systems
3 Credits
This course introduced students to the database design, implementation administration. The
students will also learn how to develop database applications using SQL. Additionally other
topics such as XML and data mining will be discussed.
Prerequisite: CSC 260

ITE 305
Internet Programming Language I


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   124
3 Credits
This course provides students with an understanding of various Internet programming languages
including HTML, JavaScript, and Java server side languages, including Java Server Pages and
Java Servlets. Furthermore, fundamental web site design issues will be discussed including page
navigation, user interface and web page layout.
Prerequisite: CSC 260

ITE 320
Web-based Multimedia Development I
3 Credits
Introduction to web-based multimedia systems, digital video compression techniques, operating
system support for streaming audio and video, as well as network protocols for multimedia.
Emphasis will be placed on the efficient use of resources and proper design choices to achieve
the required quality of service for web-based multimedia intensive content.
Prerequisite: CIC260
Corequisite: ITE 305

ITE 365
Secure Programming
3 Credits
Secure programming involves the use of new methodologies in software engineering. This
course provides an introduction to secure software design, development, testing and deployment.
Practical approaches to secure software development are introduced. Topics related to the
development of enterprise and web-based software are investigated. Secure programming for
operating systems, databases, web servers, web services and their frameworks are addressed.
Prerequisite: ITE 305 or equivalent

ITE 385
Introduction to Computer and Network Security
3 Credits
In this course we introduce various aspects of computer and network security. Security concepts
including but not limited to public and private cryptography, authentication, digital signatures,
email system security, IP security, web security technologies, firewalls and viruses are
introduced. The fundamentals of computer and networks security concepts are provided in the
context of modern computer systems and services.
Prerequisite: CSC 370

ITE 410
Internetworking Lab
1 Credit
This lab provides students with practical experience in the design, construction and maintenance
of computer communication networks. Students utilize the laboratory to gain hands-on
experience by applying concepts in Information Technology.
Prerequisite: CSC 370

ITE 420
Internet Programming Language II
3 Credits
This course provides students with an understanding of advanced techniques in World Wide Web
programming. Students are introduced to the C + + programming language for use in
programming sophisticated web sites and services. Topics covered include SML, Web Services,
database interactions, and web site design patterns. Students will implement a significant project
using Microsoft .Net framework.
Prerequisite: CSC 303




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               125
ITE 440
Network Security and Perimeter Protection
3 Credits
This course will cover infrastructure security issues. Network operating systems and network
architectures will be discussed together with the respective security related issues. The students
will learn about the threats to computer networks through exploitation of weaknesses in the
design of network infrastructure protocols. Issues related to the security of content and
applications such as email, DNS, web servers will be discussed. Security techniques including
intrusion detection, forensics, cryptography, authentication and access control are analyzed.
Developments in IPSEC, transport protocols, secure mail, directory services, and multimedia
services are discussed.
Prerequisites: CSC 370

ITE 445
Operating System Security
3 Credits
In this course students are introduced to advanced concepts in operating systems with emphasis
on security. Students will study contemporary operating systems including UNIX and Windows.
Topics include the application of policies for security administration, directory services, file system
security, audit and logging, cryptographic enabled applications, cryptographic programming
interfaces, and operating system integrity verification techniques. Equivalent to CSC 521.
Prerequisite: CSC 370, ITE 385 or equivalents

ITE 460
Topics in Information Technology
3 Credits
Critical study of recent developments in information, network and computer security.
Prerequisite: ITE 385

LEADERSHIP (LEA)

LEA 550
Creating the Visionary Organization
3 Credits
This course explores the importance of corporate visionary as a source of long-term business
success, as well as the practical guidelines for how to move one’s organization toward that
status. This course elaborates on the visionary frameworks identified in the book “Built to Last”.
The material emphasizes the organization change principles necessary to implement the Built to
Last vision framework.

LEA 551
Leadership
3 Credits
This course explores the definitions and philosophies of leadership in the corporate environment.
Topics include how leadership is instilled through education and training, the role of values and
ethics in leadership, the role of power and influence and an exploration of successful leadership
traits.

LEA 552
Leading Change
3 Credits
Major topics include barriers to implementing organizational change; chaos, anxiety and political
sources of employee resistance to change; using Dissatisfaction, Vision and Process tools to
implement change; applying different leadership styles to supporting change; and balancing



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    126
change for dynamic stability using different implementation approaches and pacing of different
kinds of changes.
Prerequisite: MBA 500

LITERATURE (LIT)

LIT 210
The Art of Poetry
3 Credits
An intermediate-level course in which the student learns the technique of reading, interpreting,
and evaluating poetry of increasing difficulty and brilliance.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 220
The Art of Drama
3 Credits
An intermediate-level course in which the student explores dramatic literature in an effort to
discover its ritual origins, historical role, and current significance.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 230
The Art of Fiction
3 Credits
An intermediate-level course in which selected works of fiction are examined in an effort to
understand the approaches, strategies, and techniques of artists in this compelling medium.
Students will also produce an original, creative piece
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 240
The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Literature
3 Credits
An intermediate-level course in which the art of prose writing is explored in depth. This course
focuses on stylistics and rhetoric and covers the development of scientific and technical literature.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 310
Modern Poetry
3 Credits
This course is more a study in depth than an introduction to representative British and American
poets of the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which modern poetry
derives from traditional patterns yet manages to create new forms and messages for our time.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 320
Shakespeare
3 Credits
An advanced course in which selected texts and critiques from Shakespearean literature are
examined intensively.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 330
Survey of World Literature
3 Credits
Study of outstanding writers from all over the world except England and America, from ancient
times to the twentieth century.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  127
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 331
Art of the Novel
3 Credits
An advanced study of selected masterpieces in the novel form.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 340
The African-American Writer in American Literature
3 Credits
Reading and discussion of representative works of African-American writers. Historical and
social backgrounds are explored to interpret African-American literature as meaningful as part of
the American literary tradition.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 341
Twentieth-Century American Literature
3 Credits
An advanced study of major American literature of the 20th century.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 420
Literature Survey
3 Credits
In this advanced course, students will survey British or American literature of s specific period.
The period covered will vary from semester to semester. Students may repeat the course to
cover additional time periods.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 430
Major Author
3 Credits
In this advanced course, students will study a single major author. This course will provide
intensive study of selected texts, an examination of the milieu in which the author wrote, and will
include study of other texts that were influential upon or influenced by the major author. The
author studies will vary from semester to semester; the choices will include those authors who are
generally considered part of the canon as well as third world and minority authors. Students may
repeat the course to study a different major author.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 440
Multicultural Literature
3 Credits
In this advanced course, the focus will be on the literature of another culture, subculture, or
combination of cultures. The approach and subject matter will vary from offering to offering. A
student may repeat the course to take advantage of the different offerings.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 450
Special Topics in Literature
3 Credits
In this advanced course, students will examine literature from a particular perspective. The
course will focus on a specific theme, genre or approach, may focus on literature in relation to
another discipline, or may look at literature in any other way that does not fall within the Survey,


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   128
Major Author or Multicultural categories. The content of the course will vary from semester to
semester. Many of the offerings will focus on non-Western literature. Students may repeat the
course to take advantage of the varying offerings.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

LIT 460
Capstone Seminar
3 Credits
This senior seminar provides special studies in the students’ area of specialization: Literature
and Culture or Professional Writing. Individual, supervised research is a major component of the
course.
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours in upper division LIT courses

MATHEMATICS (MAT)

MAT 096
Developmental Mathematics I
NOTE: Equivalent credits only (not applicable for the baccalaureate degree, but valid for
maintaining full-time student status)
This course is for students who have not acquired the techniques of algebra. It can serve as a
refresher course and must be followed by MAT 100 as a prerequisite for MAT 125, or MAT 135.

MAT 100
Developmental Mathematics II
NOTE: Equivalent credits only (not applicable for the baccalaureate degree, but valid for
maintaining full-time student status)
A continuation of the sequence of topics in algebra begun in MAT 096. This course may not be
challenged and may not be substituted for required mathematics courses. This course, or its
equivalent, is a pre-requisite for MAT 125, or MAT 135.
Prerequisite: MAT 096

MAT 115
Introductory Concepts of Mathematics
3 Credits
A course on selected topics in mathematics for students of the humanities, especially in
communication art. Topics include: graphs, matrices, elements of linear programming, finite
probabilities, introduction to statistics. Applications to real-life situations are emphasized. The
place of these topics in the history of mathematics is outlined.

MAT 125
Finite Mathematics
3 Credits
Review of elementary algebra and selected topics in statistics and probability. Sets, real
numbers, graphing, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, relations and functions,
solving systems of linear equations, descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, graphical
displays of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, introduction to probability.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam, MAT 100 or equivalent

MAT 135
Technical Mathematics I
4 Credits
A mathematics course for students who wish to concentrate in Telecommunications Management
or take selected courses within the other technical concentrations. Review of algebra:
exponents, factoring, fractions. Linear equations, ratio, proportions, Word problem application.
Coordinate systems and graphs of functions: straight line, slope. Systems of linear equations


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   129
and their applications. Complex numbers. Quadratic equations. Introduction to trigonometry.
Applications to problems in engineering and technology are emphasized throughout.
Prerequisite: Placement exam, MAT 100 or equivalent

MAT 141
Precalculus
4 Credits
College Algebra and Trigonometry gives students a strong preparation for taking calculus. Topics
include functions, their graphs, domain, range, inverse functions, standard algebraic
transformations of functions and their corresponding geometric transformations of their graphs,
exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their applications, addition
formulas and double angle formulas.

MAT 151
Business Calculus
3 Credits
Applications of calculus to business and social science intuitive use of limits and continuity.
Derivatives, extrema, concavity, and applications such as marginal analysis, business models,
optimization of tax revenue, and minimization of storage cost. The exponential and logarithmic
functions. Antiderivatives and the definite integral. Areas and consumer’s surplus. Some
concepts of probability extended to discrete and continuous sample spaces.
Prerequisite: MAT 125, MAT 140 or MAT 135

MAT 155
Technical Mathematics II
4 Credits
Part of the integrated course sequence in mathematics for students who wish to concentrate in
Telecommunications Management or wish to take selected courses within the other technical
concentrations. Topics include trigonometric functions, identities and equations, the sine and
cosine laws; graphs of the trigonometric functions; functions of a composite angle; DeMoivre’s
theorem; logarithms, binomial theorem; and Cramer’s rule. Applications are drawn from
technology.
Prerequisite: MAT 135 or equivalent

MAT 161
Basic Applied Calculus
3 Credits
An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics covered in this course include functions,
limits, the derivative, tangent line, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching,
applications, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution,
and finding areas.

MAT 170
Calculus I
4 Credits
A study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to
derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related
rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite
integrals. The conic sections.
Prerequisite: MAT 141 or equivalent

MAT 180
Calculus II
4 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    130
Riemann sums, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Area, volumes of
solids of revolution, arc, length, work. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Inverse
trigonometric functions. Formal integration techniques. L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals. Polar
coordinates.
Prerequisite: MAT 170

MAT 310
Linear Algebra
3 Credits
Matrices and systems of linear equations, vector spaces, change of base matrices, linear
transformations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical forms.
Prerequisite: MAT 180

MASTER’S IN BUSINESS CORE (MBA)

MBA 500
Managing Organizations
3 Credits
This course focuses on problem solving techniques that take into consideration all aspects of the
organization: the people, informal organization, work, formal organization, and external culture.
Students are introduced to a process to identify management problems through root-cause
analysis, diagnose the causes of the problems, recommend solutions, and plan implementation.

MBA 501
Managerial Marketing
3 Credits
This course focuses on analyzing the marketing environment, including customers and
competition, as well as how the marketing efforts align with the strategic goals of the company.
Students learn to determine which customers should be targeted in the marketing effort, choose
which products the company should offer, establish how and when customers will be informed
about the product, determine the best pricing strategy for a product and decide the best way to
get the product to market.
Prerequisite: None

MBA 502
Economics for Managers
3 Credits
Major topics include profit-maximization for a competitive firm, economic allocation of costs, price
discrimination and other pricing strategies, pricing with market power, and an introduction to
game theory.

MBA 503
Accounting for Managers
3 Credits
This course focuses on how managers use corporate accounting information for making business
decisions. Major topics include the use of financial statements and accounting information to
determine profitability and financial performance, risk, differences in structure and business
models, and the relationship of cash flow statements to the balance sheet and income
statements, and the use of ratios to assess the quality of a company’s accounting information,
and the use of internal operating metrics.

MBA 504
Managerial Corporate Finance
3 Credits



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 131
This course introduces the fundamental financial concepts managers use to make crucial
corporate investment decisions. Students will also encounter important concepts such as free
cash flow and the cost of capital. Students will learn to use techniques such as net present value
(NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), capital budgeting, and
regression output to distinguish between systematic and unsystematic risk.

MBA 505
Global Operations Management
3 Credits
Major topics include engineering business processes, choosing the right architecture for
production systems, capacity sizing and timing, lead time management, and supply chain
management.

MBA 506
Managerial Decision Models
3 Credits
Many decision situations such as optimization and risk lend themselves to quantitative modeling.
The first major topic is optimization using linear programming, non-linear programming and
integer programming with the Excel ad-in Solver. The other major topic is Monte Carlo simulation
using the Excel ad-in Crystal Ball to analyze decisions involving uncertainty and risk.

MBA 507
Global Environment of Business
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to an integrated framework for global management. This
framework focuses on the relationships between organizational structure, environment (market
and non-market), and strategy – the Organization-Environment-Strategy (“OES”) triangle. This
approach offers managers a systematic way of thinking about basic global strategy decisions and
key tradeoffs.

MBA 508
Managerial Strategy
3 Credits
Major topics include industry analysis, six forces analysis, identifying competitive advantages,
and strategy evaluation.

MANAGEMENT (MGT)

MGT 201
Business Organization and Administration
3 Credits
A study of organizations and of the activities of the manager in an organization. The course
follows a functional approach, analyzing such management concepts as organizing
decentralization, use of staff, human relations, conflict, decision making, planning, supervision,
communication, and financial and production control systems such as budgeting and PERT.
Prerequisite: None

MGMT 205
Organizational Behavior
3 Credits
Provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of human behavior within organizations.
Topics covered include motivation, group dynamics, informal organization, formal organizational
design, leadership, performance measurement, organizational changes, conflict management,
and organizational development.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    132
MGT 209
Business Law I
3 Credits
An introductory course with emphasis on the law of contracts and agency. Designed to give a
basic understanding of the legal aspect s of contractual obligations and agency relationships.

MGT 301
Introduction to International Business
3 Credits
Techniques for analyzing and understanding the world of international business. Students will
examine the challenges posed by the multinational firm and the dynamic nature of international
business.
Prerequisite: MGT 201, MKT 101, ACC 101

MGT 302
Statistical Sampling Theory
3 Credits
Introduces the use of statistics in business. Topics covered include descriptive statistics,
probability theory, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, statistical
sampling and regression analysis.
Prerequisite: MIS 101 and MAT 125

MGT 305
New Product Management
3 Credits
Techniques and practices applied to conceiving, developing, launching, and managing new
products. An in-depth evaluation of the life cycle concept will analyze various stages and how
careful planning and managing can extend it. The product management concept and its
effectiveness as a management tool will also be studied.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MGT 306
Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions
3 Credits
Quantitative techniques for managerial decision-making are covered. These techniques include
decision theory, forecasting, inventory models, linear programming, and simulation. Realistic
business problems are solved using computer software.
Prerequisites: MGT 302 and MAT 151

MGT 309
Business Law II
3 Credits
Law of property, application of Uniform Commercial Code to sales transactions and secured
transactions, bankruptcy and related subjects. A study of government regulations as applied to
business activities,. Designed to give a basic understanding of legal problems in the marketing
and transportation of goods.
Prerequisite: MGT 209

MGT 310
Small Business Management
3 Credits
An examination of required skills, resources, and techniques which transform an idea into a viable
business. Entrepreneurial decision making will be stressed and the role it plays in idea
generation, conception, opportunity analysis, marshalling of resources, implementation of plans,
management of ongoing operations, and providing for growth will be stresses.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                       133
Prerequisites: MGT 201, MKT 101, ACC 101

MGT 311
Knowledge Management
3 Credits
This survey of Knowledge Management examines the prevailing trends in Knowledge
Management. Areas covered include Knowledgeware Technologies, The Learning Organization,
Knowledge Management and Leadership and Organizational Design, introduction to systems
approach and systems thinking, Knowledge Management Payoffs, the four underlying pillars of
Knowledge Management.

MGT 315
Human Resources Management
3 Credits
An introduction to the management of human resources for the effective support and
achievement of an organization’s strategies and goals. The major functions of planning and
staffing, employee development and involvement, compensation and reward and employee
relations are examined. Decision-making skills in these areas are developed through class
assignments.
Prerequisite: MGT 201

MGT 320
Collective Bargaining/Labor Relations
3 Credits
The course is designed to meet two objectives: to introduce the student to the background and
relationships between economics, public policy, unionism, and business management and their
impact upon management -labor relations; to provide a basic orientation to the framework,
processes, and strategies involved in collective bargaining and the resolution of labor grievances
and arbitration in management-labor relations.
Prerequisite: MGT 315

MGT 401
Production and Operations Management
3 Credits
Introduces the activities required in the process of production of products and delivery of services.
Background of concepts, processes and institutions in the production of goods and services will
be covered.
Prerequisite: MGT 201 and MGT 302

MGT 405
Business Policy Seminar
3 Credits
This is a capstone business core course in which the disciplines of business and economics will
be focused on the solution of specific business problems.
Prerequisite: Completion of all other business core courses

MGT 410
Employment Law
3 Credits
The management of human resources takes place in a complex legal environment which places
obligations and responsibilities on the employer and extends protections and rights to the
employee. Federal and state requirements in EEO, employment standards, wages, job security,
safety and health, workers compensation and other benefits will be covered. Integration of such
requirements in day-to-day management practices is emphasized.
Prerequisite: MGT 209


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  134
MGT 411
Business and Ethics
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide new entrepreneurs and business leaders with a solid
background of ethical behavior as it relates to the issues they will face in many aspects of their
professional and personal lives. Building on the fundamentals of ethics as evolved from great
thinkers who explored issues of evil, duty and right from a moralistic viewpoint, this course will
bring those eternal questions to current topics in business through debate and analysis.

MGT 415
Compensation Management
3 Credits
Elements of a rational and objective compensation system are examined. Review of economic
and behavioral science theories underlying modern compensation systems. Wage and salary
administration, techniques of job evaluation, performance appraisal and wage surveys, role of
employee benefits are studied.
Prerequisite: MGT 315

MGT 420
Business Practicum
3 Credits
This course is designed as a capstone course to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship
concentration. Specific cases in finance, management, marketing and leadership will be explored
as an integral part of the course through hands on approach to problem solving. Additional
related business cases will also be explored in class.
Prerequisites: FIN 201, MGT 310, MKT 101, ACC 101, and ACC 110

MGT 421
Cyber Law, Policy and Ethics
3 Credits
The internet raises a multitude of legal issues in many areas. Among the issues covered in this
course are privacy, electronic contracts, trademarks and domain names, content protection,
jurisdiction, regulation, civil and criminal liability, and cyber crime.
Prerequisite: Senior status

MGT 560
Managing the Workforce
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to analytic methods for managing employees that are based
on economic principles. It also covers important concepts such as job design. This course is
useful to managers who want concise ways to think about building the right workforce and
motivating it efficiently.

MGT 562
Business Communications
3 Credits
This course is designed to help students convey messages and ideas clearly and persuasively in
order to put ideas into action and generate desired results. The course teaches practical writing
techniques and provides guidance on specific forms of business documents, including memos, e-
mails, and PowerPoint presentations.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  135
MGT 563
Introduction to E-Commerce
3 Credits
Electronic Commerce (EC) examines transactions that take place over networks, primarily the
Internet. EC is the gateway for international business that transcends the barriers of time and
distance. It is the process of electronically buying and selling goods, services, and information.
This course will study what EC is, how it is being conducted and managed, its major
opportunities, limitations, issues and risks and how businesses can leverage Internet
technologies to gain a competitive advantage.

MGT 564
Decision Making in the Uncertain World of Business
3 Credits
What are the common pitfalls that most managers fall into when making decisions? This course
discusses descriptive decision models and the heuristics and biases that lead people to poor
decisions. Prescriptive models such as multi-criteria decision analysis, probability models, and
decision trees are presented that show how to structure values and risk to make better decisions.
Decision support software is used in the course as an integral part of management decision
making.

MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)

MIS 101
Introduction to Computer Applications
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to computers and management information systems. Topics
include operating systems, networks and the internet, productivity tools used in business
including word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation programs, management
information systems. office automation.

MIS 105
Introduction to Information Technology
3 Credits
The concept of information technology is introduced and examined. Topics include computer
hardware and software, networks and the internet, programming languages, data communication,
management information systems, and office automation.

MIS 215
Application Program Development I
3 Credits
Introductory problem solving and programming, using various generation languages to develop
deterministic business systems. Development activities may include business applications such
as accounts payable, order entry or the use of professional support applications such as
electronic spreadsheet, database file management, and graphic functions.
Prerequisites: MIS 105 and MAT 125

MIS 305
Data Base Program Analysis
3 Credits
Survey of the techniques and methodology used in database management. Analysis of the
software design and programming in the data base environment.
Prerequisites: MIS 101



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 136
MIS 320
Managing Data Communications and Networks
3 Credits
Advanced topics in teleprocessing systems. Analysis of the data transmission channels,
computer equipment configurations, procedures, and security of teleprocessing systems.
Teleconferencing, electronic mail, electronic fund transfer, electronic commerce, integration of
teleprocessing and automation into the management information system of a business enterprise.
Prerequisites: MIS 101

MIS 325
Structured Systems Analysis and Design
3 Credits
This course involves use of the systems approach to analysis and design of various information
systems, including, but not limited to database systems, networking systems, programming
systems, accounting information systems, and decision support systems. Structured, as well as
object-oriented methods of system design are treated.
Prerequisite: MIS 101

MIS 401
Seminar
3 Credits
Crucial study of information systems related to advanced topics such as IS in the manufacturing
environment, IS in the legal environment, IS in the finance environment, IS in the health service
environment, EDP facility and management. Specific topics will be determined by interest of both
the students and the instructor.
Prerequisites: MIS 215, MIS 305, and MIS 325

MIS 430
Information Resource Management
3 Credits
Examines management of information systems including how to acquire, organize, monitor and
control computer resources with emphasis on management problems unique to computer based
information systems environments.
Prerequisite: MIS 105

MIS 450
E-Commerce
3 Credits
This course involves study of Internet technology and its global use in commerce and industry.
Communications, business processing and service concepts are introduced along with other web
based techniques. Application of e-commerce to various areas within management is discussed.
Prerequisite: MIS 101

MIS 570
Data Mining
3 Credits
Major topics include determining business problems or questions that might be effectively
answered via data mining, comparing and contrasting different data mining techniques,
evaluating data mining reports, developing organizational policies on data mining, understanding
the typical data-mining project cycle, and developing a plan for implementing and evaluating data
mining.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                              137
MIS 571
Advanced Information Systems Risks and Controls
3 Credits
This course explores different methodologies and perspectives in the risk and control area. Major
course topics include risk assessment models, operational and organizational control structures,
and strategic use of risk and control feedback.
Prerequisite: MBA 503

MIS 572
Information Resource Management
3 Credits
Introduces the use of the information resources through which a business can achieve
competitive advantage. Topics covered include systems development, end-user computing
approaches, computer-based information systems, and enterprise computing, both domestic and
global.
Prerequisite: None

MIS 573
Computer Information Systems Security
3 Credits
Reviews the current security issues in terms of technical, managerial, and legal aspects in a
gamut of information systems. with emphasis on electronic commerce. Prevention and
administration techniques for securing computers and networks will be discussed in terms of
theory and practice.
Prerequisite: None

MIS 574
Systems Hardware and Software
3 Credits
Analyze the general characteristics of computer systems and programming languages. Develop
criteria to evaluate hardware and software selection for “end users” and information systems
development.
Prerequisite: MIS 572

MIS 575
Systems Analysis and Design
3 Credits
Application of systems approach to the analysis and design of information systems. Topics
covered include techniques for information requirement analysis, systems analysis issues, design
theory, design techniques, system development life cycle and project management issues.
Prerequisite: MIS 572

MIS 576
Data Base Management Systems
3 Credits
This course focuses on the general concepts and methodologies in file and data-base
management systems-data representation, data modeling and file organization. Additional focus
will be on the movement of data to related data-base systems within and outside the user
organization. Students are required to understand the architecture of and start implementing
simple database applications using commercially available packages.
Prerequisite: MIS 572




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 138
MIS 577
Data Communication and Networks
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to networking, generating and receiving data, encoding and
decoding, local area and wide area networks, client server networks, decentralized and
centralized networks. Topics include data transmission channels, procedures, security, electronic
mail, electronic fund transfer, network administration, and integration of networks and databases.
Prerequisite: MIS 572

MIS 717
Human Resource Information Systems
3 Credits
Designed for the nontechnical end-user, this course defines HRIS, its basic concepts and
important components. Included will be development of a database, data entry and retrieval and
the concept of a human resource information center. Recordkeeping applications, payroll,
employee development and training, human resources utilization and HRIS applicability to legal
reporting requirements are covered. PC-based projects will be assigned.
Prerequisite: HRM 550

MARKETING (MKT)

MKT 101
Introduction to Marketing
3 Credits
Study of the process by which consumers needs and wants are analyzed and satisfied within the
context of a modern marketing system. Investigation of current developments in the external
environment affecting the marketing process. The role of marketing institutions in facilitating the
flow of goods and services from producers to consumers is analyzed.

MKT 201
Sales Management
3 Credits
Planning, supervising and evaluation of sales force efforts within the guidelines set by strategic
marketing planning are the principal responsibilities of sales managers. This course examines
both the theory and practices that are encompassed within the role of sales manager.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 205
Retailing Management
3 Credits
An investigation of the organization of the retail function. Consideration of managerial problems
in the operation of large and small retailing organizations, control of retail operations, design of
retailing facilities, retailing strategies and current developments in the field.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 301
Management of Promotion
3 Credits
A firm’s promotional efforts focus on developing and managing integrated marketing
communications. This course studies the planning and implementation of demand stimulating
promotion, i.e., advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity/public relations.
Promotion is seen as a key element of the marketing mix that contributes to an organization’s
cohesive marketing strategy.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   139
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 310
Fundamentals of Exporting and Importing
3 Credits
An introduction to the export/import practices of small and medium sized firms. The course will
provide a guide through the stages of the export/import process; from an assessment of its
feasibility to successful completion. Students will develop a familiarity with international trade
regulations and requirements, procedures and documentation, intermediaries facilitating the
acquisition of information, the flow of goods and services, and financing.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 315
Internet Marketing
3 Credits
Shows how the Internet can be leveraged to acquire, retain, and delight consumers. Students
gain a strategic and tactical marketing perspective, with an emphasis on integrating online and
offline marketing activities.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 401
Marketing Research
3 Credits
Research activity in the field of marketing, methods of data collection and analysis thereof,
quantitative techniques in marketing, the role of the computer in marketing research, control and
evaluation of the marketing function.
Prerequisite: MKT 301

MKT 405
International Marketing
3 Credits
Designed to develop a systematic approach for analyzing trends shaping the global marketplace.
Among others, physical , cultural, socio-demographic, legal/political and technological factors are
explored. Emphasis is placed on development and implementation of optimal marketing
programs to capitalize on emerging market opportunities as well as the avoidance of the pitfalls
inherent in cross-national marketing activities.
Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 320
Cross-cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices
3 Credits
The course is designed to sensitize the student to the cultural antecedents of managing
promotional activities in international settings. Of special concern are the areas of advertising,
public relations, publicity, personal selling and negotiations. Management of these functions will
be investigated within the context of methodologies applicable to “measurement and
understanding of cultures, customs and business practices.”
Prerequisite MKT 101

MKT 580
Managing Innovation
3 Credits
This course teaches the organizational and marketing skills to develop new products. Specific
approaches to organizing product development processes and teams, choosing markets,
generating and evaluating product ideas, choosing product attributes, predicting the success of
new products and launching products are covered.


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  140
MKT 581
Principles of Internet Marketing
3 Credits
Major topics include the collection and use of online customer data, attracting customers to a web
site, using a web site to create customer value, transitioning customers to online purchasing, and
competition strategies in industries with both online and traditional channels.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MKT 582
Implementing Marketing Strategy
3 Credits
In this course, students will engage in some of the activities required when developing a
marketing plan for a new product, including marketing research and post research to measure the
success of the product’s introduction. Students will develop a branding strategy for a new
product and the marketing communication strategies to communicate the benefits of the new
product to the marketplace.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MKT 583
International Marketing
3 Credits
Problems of cross-national marketing; identification of market potential; development of strategies
to suit cultural differences; management of multinational marketing efforts. The development of
product promotion policies, pricing strategies and distribution methods. Legal aspects of
international marketing. Government trade regulations and impediments to technological
innovation in developing countries. The political dimensions of multinational marketing.

MKT 584
Sales Force Management
3 Credits
Application of fundamental management principles to the sales function of a marketing oriented
firm. The course focuses on the external and internal responsibilities of the sales manager who
has to generate and maintain an adequate sales volume while profitably managing human,
physical and geographic resources.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MKT 585
Marketing Research
3 Credits
The course addresses the issues arising in the process of generating data and information for
decision making in the area of marketing. Emphases are on the validity and reliability of the
techniques associated with exploratory, descriptive and causal research designs; methodologies
in measurement and scaling, sampling and fieldwork. Basic parametric and nonparametric
techniques of data analysis are explored. Students gain experience in analyzing “real-life”
marketing research data, which provides some exposure to the multivariate data analysis.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MKT 586
Marketing Communication and Promotion
3 Credits
This course will deal with fundamental concepts of marketing communication, including
assessment of demand and legal environment of marketing communication; government impact



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                141
on advertising and promotion through the Federal Trade Commission and other regulatory
agencies. It also covers the development of promotion budgets; management of the advertising
function; relationships with outside agencies; personal selling and supportive communication; the
conditions of and integrations with the entire promotional program: and economic an social
dimensions of promotional strategy.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MKT 587
Cross-Cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices
3 Credits
Cross-Cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices is designed to sensitize the student to the
cultural antecedents of managing promotional activities in international settings. Of special
concern are the areas of advertising, public relations, publicity, personal selling, and negotiations.
Students will investigate management of these functions within the context of methodologies
applicable to measurement and understanding of cultures, customs, and business practices.
Prerequisite: MBA 501

MANAGEMENT (MSM)

MSM 500
Managerial Theory and Practice: Cornerstone Course
3 Credits
This course focuses on analyzing, critiquing, and applying current managerial theory and
practice, and serves as the cornerstone experience for MSM students. Students assess their own
approaches to managing organizations in relation to theories and best practices.

MSM 501
Process Development, Management, and Improvement
3 Credits
This course focuses on theories, concepts, tools, and techniques used in the management and
measurement of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in an international environment. Topics
include continuous quality improvement; employee involvement in quality; team building for
quality; the relationship between quality, productivity, and competitiveness; and statistical process
control.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

MSM 502
Managerial Communication Strategies
3 Credits
This course focuses on theories, concepts, tools, and techniques used in the management of
communication processes within an organization. Topics include interpersonal/organizational
communication policies and practices, team development and management, and crisis
communication policies and practices.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

MSM 503
Managing Financial Strategies
3 Credits
This course focuses on the financial theories, concepts, tools, and techniques with which to
manage financial resources, respond to competitive challenges, begin new projects, and recover
from financial setbacks. Topics covered include: What managers need to know about accounting
and finance; and managing your CFO.
Prerequisite: MSM 500




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   142
MSM 504
Organizational Analysis and Development
3 Credits
This course focuses on theories, concepts, tools, and techniques with which to strategically and
systemically design and implement organizational structures. Topics covered include: Matching
organization mission, strategies, culture and structure; and ensuring the long-term growth and
development of an organization and its resources.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

MSM 505
Management and Corporate Governance
3 Credits
This course focuses on theories and practices related to managers’ roles and corporate
governance issues. Topics covered include: Defining corporate governance and ownership,
managing boards, executive compensation, and regulatory issues such as the Sarbanes-Oxley
Act. Ethics issues underpin the discussion of all topics.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

MSM 506
Strategic Decision Making
3 Credits
This course focuses on the concepts and tools managers use to develop and analyze industry
and corporate strategies. Porter’s six forces (power of suppliers, buyers, competitiveness,
substitutes, complements, and barriers to entry) provide the theoretical base for the course.
Topics covered include: industry analysis, potential industry earnings (PIE) and individual
corporate strategy development.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

MSM 507
Capstone Seminar
3 Credits
This seminar/scenario based experience focuses on the integration of concepts, theories, and
practices covered in the M.S.M. program. Students become part of a business team in which
they, as senior managers, run companies for several virtual years.
Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses
Must be the last course (core and specializations) students take

Non-Profit Management (NPM)

NPM 530
Legal Issues for Nonprofits
3 Credits
This course focuses on the legal issues related to the initiation, maintenance, and growth of
nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include nonprofit formation and statutory requirements;
liability; tax issues; and laws affecting contracts, employment issues, lobbying and public
advocacy, and fund raising.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

NPM 531
Financial Management in Nonprofits
3 Credits




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 143
This course focuses on the building of systems and practices needed to sustain a financially
healthy nonprofit organization. Topics covered include building and managing treasurers and
board-level finance committees, viewing financial data strategically, capital formation, generating
earned income, and creating processes for managing strategic endowment, gifts, and tax
planning issues.
Prerequisite: MSM 500, MSM 503

NPM 532
Human Resources Management: Managing Volunteers and Employees in Nonprofit
Organizations
3 credits
Course Description: This course focuses on general human resource policies and procedures
and on those aspects of human resources management unique to nonprofit organizations.
Topics covered include staffing, compensation, performance appraisal and development, and
supervision of employees and volunteers
Prerequisite: MSM 500

PHILOSOPHY (PHI)

PHI 110
Problems of Philosophy
3 Credits
An introduction to philosophy by way of selected problems from various areas of philosophy.
Topics include: the nature of a priori knowledge and of scientific explanation, the existence of
God, whether or not there can be moral knowledge, and the problem of free will. The course
objective is to acquaint students with these philosophical issues, and through detailed discussion,
to teach them how to analyze ideas critically.

PHI 220
Ethics and Social Philosophy
3 Credits
An examination of some of the most critical issues of moral and social philosophy. These include
subjects such as the linguistic analysis of terms such as “good”, “evil”, “duty”, “right”, and others.
The basis of different moral systems will be studied, and the selections from ethical and social
philosophers will be read.

PHI 230
Technology, Society, and Values
3 Credits
An examination of models and case studies concerned with the impact of machines on man, of
technological systems on social structure, and modes of production on value systems. Special
attention is paid to the ethical problems connected with newly emerging technologies.

PHYSICS (PHY)

PHY 115
Humanity and the Physical Universe
3 Credits
A survey course utilizing inquiry based strategies in the physical sciences for non-science
students. This course examines a broad range of topics including: Newtonian mechanics,
electricity, magnetism, sound, optics, heat, energy and power, earth science including weather
and climate, modern physics and the solar system. The interactions between physical science
and technology and their impact on society and the quality of life will be considered.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   144
PHY 120
Journey Through the Universe
3 Credits
Introductory and descriptive course in astronomy. Topics include: study of the Universe,
planetary motion, the solar system; stars and galaxies; quasars, pulsars, and black holes;
possibility of extra-terrestrial life.

PHY 165
Physics for Telecommunications
4 Credits
A basic course in the physics of communication systems. Topics include electricity and
magnetism, optics, frequency band width relationships. This course will include an introduction to
signal propagation in different media as well as amplification and signal correction as applied to
electrical and optical systems.
Prerequisite: MAT 125 or equivalent
Corequisite: MAT 151

PHY 170
General Physics I
4 Credits
A basic course covering vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, particle kinematics and dynamics,
work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion.
Corequisite: MAT 170

PHY 180
General Physics II
4 Credits
A continuation of PHY 170. Topics include fluids, wave motion, electric fields and electric
potential, dc circuits, magnetic fields, capacitance and inductance, ac circuits, and
electromagnetic waves.
Prerequisite: PHY 170
Corequisite: MAT 180

PARALEGAL (PLG)

PLG 110
Introduction to Paralegal
3 Credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to the paralegal profession, its ethics, tasks and
role in the legal system. Include will be discussions and reviews of the skills and concepts
necessary to be competent in the paralegal profession. Those skills and concepts include, but
are not limited to legal terminology, relationships between the paralegal, the attorney, law office
staff, the client, and the legal system, ethics, regulation, etc.
Prerequisite: None

PLG 120
Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility
3 Credits
This course will introduce students to the types of ethical dilemmas that they will face in the work
force; generally to the ethical rules developed by the American Bar Association, and specifically,
to the rules adopted by this jurisdiction for the regulation of attorney and paralegal conduct and


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  145
the model codes of paralegal associations; and to methods for researching the answers to ethical
dilemmas.
Prerequisite: PLG 110

PLG 130
Introduction to Law
3 Credits
Overview of the Constitution and the American legal system. This course covers such topics as
torts, contracts, criminal law and procedure, business organizations and administrative law. In
addition, students are introduced to case law interpretation and legal analysis.
Prerequisite: PLG 110

PLG 140
Law Office Technology
3 Credits
This course is designed to allow the student to apply knowledge of computer hardware and
software applications commonly used in the law office to the development and maintenance of
hypothetical case files. Areas examined include time and billing software, document storage
device, network security, research programs and accounting software.
Prerequisite: PLG 110

PLG 210
Legal Research and Writing
3 Credits
The course will provide a comprehensive working knowledge of and an understanding of the
research materials and research tools. Students will familiarize themselves with the researching
cases, statutes, articles and constitutional issues. Students learn to develop research strategies
and research software. In addition, students will apply the research they learn to write internal
memoranda, legal memoranda and briefs.
Prerequisite: PLG 110

PLG 230
Civil Litigation
3 Credits
This course will provide the principles of civil litigation in federal and state courts. Causes of
action and defenses will be introduced as will the rules of procedure and discovery, along with
ethical responsibilities. Pretrial practice, including discovery, pretrial motions, and trial
preparations will be covered, together with the basics of a civil trial, post-trial motions, and
appeals.
Prerequisite: PLG 110

PLG 220
Torts
3 Credits
This course will provide an introduction to the broad area of civil wrongs and their appropriate
remedies as well as Tort Law principles in the traditional areas of intentional torts, negligence,
absolute liability, product liability, nuisance and commonly employed defenses.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 230
Civil Litigation
3 Credits
This course will provide the principles of civil litigation in federal and state courts. Causes of
action and defenses will be introduced as will the rules of procedure and discovery, along with
ethical responsibilities. Pretrial practice, including discovery, pretrial motions, and trial


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      146
preparations will be covered, together with the basics of a civil trial, post-trial motions, and
appeals.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 240
Contract Law
3 Credits
This course examines the formation, modification and termination of contracts, the various
remedies for breach and enforcement mechanisms. Students explore the elements of contract
including offer, acceptance, consideration, capacity and legality. In addition, the students will
learn how courts employ contractual analysis to matters which do not meet the definition of a
contract.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 250
Advanced Legal Research and Writing
3 Credits
This course is designed to teach students to use a law library, perform legal research, analyze
legal problems, and write a legal memorandum. Students are taught to locate and use both
primary, secondary and CARL legal research sources to solve legal problems, including federal
and state cases, digests, statutes, regulations, treatises, encyclopedias, law reviews, citators and
practice works.
Prerequisite: PLG 210

PLG 260
Criminal Law
3 Credits
Course Description: Examine each element of crime including assault, battery, rape, murder,
manslaughter, arson, kidnapping, tampering, fraud, possession and RICO. Explore the
procedural and constitutional safeguards in which law enforcement operates including stop and
frisk, searches, arrests warrants, Miranda warnings, Habeas Corpus, preliminary hearings, jury
selection and more.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 270
Real Estate law
3 credits
This course is an introduction to Real Estate Law. Topics of study include property rights,
principles of land ownership, sale, financing and conveyance, contracts, liens, mortgage
financing, mortgages or deeds of trust, deeds, recording, settlement concepts, condominiums and
cooperatives, leasing and other property concepts.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 310
Estate planning
3 Credits
This course will introduce students to an overview of post-mortem estate administration. Including
beginning a decedent's estate, filing of claims, will contests, settlement of claims and final
accounting. Also, explore the law of when someone dies without a will. In addition this course
examines alternatives to probate and estate planning including jointly owned assets, beneficiary
designations, contractual designations and trusts.
Prerequisite: PLG 130




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    147
PLG 320
Family Law
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide greater understanding of domestic relations laws and to
show students how those laws governing family situations are applied. The content of the course
covers such areas as formation of the marital relationship, dissolution, child custody and support,
adoption, abortion, paternity, domestic violence, child neglect, and surrogacy. In addition
modification and enforcement of judgments and orders is explored.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 330
Employment Law
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the legal relationship between
employer and employee and a basic understanding of employment related law and its impact on
the employer/employee relationship. The student will study both federal and state laws applicable
to the employer/employee relationship. The following federal acts are highlighted; FLSA, Equal
Pay Act, Title VII, ADEA, OSHA, ERISA, PDA, FMLA, ADA, HIPAA and COBRA. Other areas
covered include the basis for the employer/employee relationship, pre-employment-concerns,
legal aspects of the employment relationship, discrimination issues, discrimination actions,
termination of the employer-employee relationship, and ethical issues in employment law.
Prerequisites: PLG 130

PLG 340
Insurance Law
3 Credits
Students will learn about the various types of insurance, nature of insurance, insurable interests
and creation of insurance contracts. In addition, the course will examine defenses to insurance
contracts, filing of claims, third party beneficiary rights, tortuous bad faith claims, fidelity bonds
and who regulates the insurance industry.
Prerequisites: PLG 130

PLG 350
Medical Malpractice Law
3 Credits
This course examines the methods and procedures for pursuing medical malpractice claims.
Areas of medical care from diagnosis, examination, surgery, rehabilitation, failure to warn and
negligent prescription of drugs and therapy. In addition, topics such as the standard of care for
medical professionals, the remedies available, limits on damages and possible defenses
available to the medical care provider are covered.
Prerequisite: PLG 130 and PLG 220

PLG 360
Administrative Laws
3 credits
This course explores the convergence of the three branches of government in a single agency of
the government. Students will learn about the Constitutional limits and safeguards that
legislatures consider when establishing an administrative agency. Specific areas include
rulemaking and adjudication within the agency and how to appeals inside and outside of the
agency.
Prerequisite: PLG 130




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     148
PLG 410
Constitutional Law
3 Credits
The course examines the supreme document of our legal system. Explores the individual
protections provided by the Bill of Rights such as Freedom of Speech, Right to Bear Arms, Right
to Speedy Trial, Right to Counsel and others. Understand the method of election of Congress,
the separation of powers and the checks and balances of our legal system.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 420
Law Office Management
3 Credits
Prerequisite: PLG 110 and PLG 140
Students analyze the administration and management of a law office including time and billing
practices, calendaring, docketing systems, case file maintenance and office design and
ergonomics. The course examines procedures and processes used in law offices to enable the
law firm to practice efficiently and optimally.
Prerequisite: PLG 110, PLG 140

PLG 430
Business Organizations
3 credits
This course examines the choices available for which entity to operate a business, liabilities, sale,
and the method and manner for operating each entity and related topics. Define and understand
sole proprietorships, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability company, professional
corporation, S corp., and general corporate law.
Prerequisite: PLG 130

PLG 440
Products Liability
3 Credits
Examine the elements of product liability law including theories of recovery, including contract,
negligence and strict liability. This will include examining design, defect and failure to warn and
other labeling issues. Students will learn about actions on warranties, remedies available and
class action suits.
Prerequisite: PLG 130 and PLG 220

PLG 450
Alternative Dispute Resolution
3 Credits
Examines the various methods for resolving dispute without resorting to litigation. Students will
learn will ADR is required and how it is begun. The differences in choosing arbitration and
mediation and mechanically how each is conducted. Also, students will learn the rules of
evidence and how they are established and applied in the ADR setting.
Prerequisite: PLG 230

PLG 460
Intellectual Property
3 Credits
Students examine the various forms of intellectual property including copyrights, patents, trade
secrets, trademarks and trade names. Including in this course is the law of infringement on these
intellectual property rights. Students will learn the remedies available for infringing including
injunctions, compensatory and punitive damages.
Prerequisite: PLG 130



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  149
PLG 470
Environmental Law
3 Credits
Students will examine the statutory and common law regulation of the environment and the role of
the EPA. In addition, CERCLA and other federal acts are reviewed. Included is this course is the
administrative power of federal and state agencies to intervene and private causes of actions.
Prerequisite: PLG 130 and PLG 220

PLG 490
Internship
3 Credits
Students will examine the statutory and common law regulation of the environment and the role of
the EPA. In addition, CERCLA and other federal acts are reviewed. Included is this course is the
administrative power of federal and state agencies to intervene and private causes of actions.
Prerequisite: PLG 110 and PLG 130

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PLS)

PLS 110
American Government and Politics
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government;
the nature and structure of US government; its chief characteristics and functions. Special
attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each
other, expanding the students’ awareness of the effects of governmental decision on the
American People.
Prerequisite: None

PLS 210
Comparative Government
3 Credits
An introduction to comparative political structures and institutions covering the major European
governments as well as non-Western political systems.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 211
History of Political Thought
3 Credits
A study of the historical and theoretical underpinnings to current political ideologies, starting with
he Greek city state and the political theories of Plato and Aristotle, continuing with the Roman,
Medieval and Renaissance contributions to political thought and culminating in the radical political
theories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 212
Legal Concepts/ Admin of Justice
3 Credits
This course covers the judicial process and its evolution, the rights of accused persons, and the
administration of justice in the light of the elementary foundations and functions of substantive
and adjective law. The theoretical aspects of basic concepts will be examined, but the stress will
be on the practical aspects.
Prerequisite: PLS 110




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   150
PLS 220
International Relations
3 Credits
A systematic analysis of national goals and determinants, the basis of national power, sources of
international conflict. The uses of power: balance of power and the balance of terror.
Diplomacy, collective security, and international organizations will also be explored.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 310
Politics and Society
3 Credits
The fundamental concepts of the state, government, and their interrelationships. Topics include:
the state as an instrument of social control; power, its legitimacy and authority; political doctrines
such as democracy, oligarchy, and totalitarianism; the modern state and its political structures,
elites, and decision makers; the electoral process and sociopolitical means of attitudinal
influence. The impact of class, status, and influence will also be analyzed.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 311
Politics of Change
3 Credits
This course is concerned with the impact of modernization on the political system; the relationship
between modernization and decolonization, revolution and nation-building; theories of political
change; and the consequences of modernization as experienced by several countries from the
First, Second, and Third Worlds.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 312
American Society and Judicial Behavior
3 Credits
This course covers changing values and patterns of judicial behavior, federal courts and the
power of judicial review, fundamental constitutional principles, nationalization and enforcement of
the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court’s policy-making role and its effect on economic policy, and
the controversy over the arbiter role of the court. Included will be an analysis of constitutional
development of rights and duties of the people, and the role of the government as an institution.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 313
Foreign Policy of the United States
3 Credits
The historical development of American policy, the mechanics of its formulation, and its current
objectives will be studied, discussed, and analyzed.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 314
Government and Metropolitan Problems
3 Credits
The first part comprises the political framework: state governmental structure, its functions,
services, and financing; local, rural, and urban governments, their structures, services, and
functions. The second half focuses on metropolitan problems and their interaction with
metropolitan government; housing, schooling, transportation, sanitation, pollution, and taxation.
Social parameters stemming from ethnic, religious, class, and employment factors, among others,
will be interwoven in the analysis.
Prerequisite: PLS 110



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    151
PLS 315
Government and Business
3 Credits
A consideration of relationships between business enterprise and the societal and political milieu
in which these enterprises operate. New concepts in business ethics and corporate
responsibility. Government regulation of business activity.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 316
International Law and Organization
3 Credits
The nature of international law; the organization of the community of nations; the United Nations
system; the regional organizations of the bloc type; the substantive rules of international law;
procedures for the pacific settlement of international disputes; international and social
cooperation; and prospects for a development system of world order through international
organization.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 317
Public Policy Analysis
3 Credits
This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need
articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs,
and resource development.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 320
Public Administration
3 Credits
This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need
articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs,
and resource development.
Prerequisite: PLS 110

PLS 390
Seminar in Political Science
3 Credits
The seminar topic changes by semester. Students wishing to enroll should contact their
academic advisor for detailed information.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 15 semester hours or more of course work in Political
Science.

PLS 490
Selected Topics in American Government and Politics
3 Credits
This course provides a detailed analysis of topics related to American government and politics.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core courses.

PLS 491
Selected Topics in Comparative Government
3 Credits
This course provides a detailed comparative analysis of various governmental issues.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core courses.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                152
PLS 492
Selected Topics in International Relations and Foreign Policy
3 Credits
This course provides an in-depth examination of foreign policy ideologies.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core courses.

PLS 493
Selected Topics in Public Administration and Policy
3 Credits
This course examines various perspectives pertaining to public administration and related
policies.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core courses.

PLS 494
Selected Topics in Political Theory and Methodology
3 Credits
This course provides a detailed analysis of theoretical and methodological applications found in
contemporary Political Science.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of core courses.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT (PMI)

PMI 520
Principles of Project Management
3 credits
This course focuses on an analysis and evaluation of the theories and practices for managing
projects in effective organizations management. Topics include project life cycle, budgeting and
timeline management for a variety of project management settings. The course also uses project
management software package to design project schedules.
Prerequisite: MSM 500

PMI 521
Advanced Topics in Project Management
3 Credits
This course focuses on current organizational and behavioral tools and techniques needed for
successful project management. Topics covered include professional project management
development, cost and schedule control, and setting effective project schedules and financial
plans for risk management.
Prerequisites: MSM 500, PMI 520

PMI 522
Contract Procurement
This course focuses on the acquiring of goods and services in the project management
environment. Topics covered include procurement and solicitation planning, source selection,
contract administration, and decision making that minimizes ethical and legal risk.
Prerequisites: MSM 500, PMI 520, PMI 521

PMI 592
Principles of Quality Control
3 Credits
This course explores quality assurance topics that are suitable in applications for various
business disciplines. Course discussions include the latest in quality and productivity
improvement tools, leadership requirements in quality organizations to manage change, and




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                153
innovation. Advanced topics related to the principles and application of quality management
methodologies are presented.

PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRE)

PRE 101
Public Relations and Publicity I
3 Credits
This introductory course confronts the ethics of public relations and techniques of identifying
public relations problems by using public relations techniques, and measuring results. Case
histories are analyzed.

PRE 510
Principles and Practices of Advertising
3 Credits
The functions, organization and economics of advertising agencies will be studied. Then, using
market research data, students will develop advertising plans and budgets, as well as plans for
monitoring results.

PRE 520
Seminar: Public Relations I
3 Credits
This course uses a case study format to evaluate and discuss public relations as a management
function; its role in employee, community, investor, customer and government relations as well as
laws and regulations affecting the profession are covered.

PRE 530
Writing for Public Relations
3 Credits
This class is aimed at helping the student recognize the difference between effective and
ineffective writing. Students are helped to improve the writing skills they need for careers in
public relations. Focus is on persuasive writing and its components, which are needed to sell
writing to clients, management and other gate keepers. Students are given the guidelines and
practical experience for writing for both external and internal publics, everything from letters and
news releases to newsletters and presentations.
Prerequisite: PRE 520

PRE 560
Advanced Public Relations
3 Credits
This course uses a real-life situation derived from a business, non-profit organization or
government agency. Students develop a complete public relations program, demonstrating their
ability to formulate workable strategies and tactics for reaching appropriate publics.
Prerequisite: PRE 530

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

PSY 110
Intro to Psychology
3 Credits
An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will
be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered
include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   154
and assessment, maladjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social
influence and society.
Prerequisite: None

PSY 210
Theories of Personality
3 Credits
A survey of the major theoretical approaches to understanding the development, structure and
dynamics of personality.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 220
Statistical Analysis
3 Credits
This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, percentile rank,
measure of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression and tests of significance.
Using computer software students will directly apply these statistics to specific problems common
to the behavioral sciences.
Prerequisite: MAT 115

PSY 230
Child Psychology
3 Credits
The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an
understanding of children and how they change while passing through the major phases of
growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and personality development with an aim
toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded. Special topics
include: identification of conditions in childhood leading to normal psychological development.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 240
Educational Psychology
3 Credits
Emphasis on human learning. Consideration of concepts of readiness, individual differences,
motivation, retention, transfer, concept development, reasoning, mental health, and measurement
as related to learning. Psychological principles of teaching-learning technology are examined.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 250
Learning Theory
3 Credits
Learning theory is a fundamental science course. The student is asked to trace the emergence
of modern cognitive learning theory (neo-behaviorism) from the original works of Pavlov,
Thorndike, and Watson through the “blackbox” Skinnerian school of thought. The school
emphasizes theoretical rather than methodological issues and, as such, is designed to give the
student a firm grasp of the conditions under which permanent behavior change occurs.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 260
Environmental Psychology
3 Credits
A study of man’s relationship to the physical environment. Topics include the effects of
architecture on behavior, design in selective environments, social uses of space, urban and
environmental stressors, and encouraging ecological behaviors.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 155
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 270
Measurement Concepts
3 Credits
The construction, validation, and interpretation of test results. Group and individual tests of
aptitude, intelligence, and personality are analyzed. Each student will develop and administer a
measure for a specific diagnostic or research purpose.
Prerequisite PSY 110, PSY 220

PSY 280
Social Psychology
3 Credits
An analysis of the structures and properties of human groups. Topics include: group formation,
development of role relationships, intra-group and inter-group conflict, factors influencing group
effectiveness, the role of motivation, and attitudes in group processes.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 290
Organizational Psychology
3 Credits
A study of the impact of organizational structure, leadership and group dynamics on role-related
behaviors, on personal feelings of motivation and commitment and communication within the
organization. The course stresses theories of work motivation and job satisfaction and linkage of
these factors with worker performance. A major focus of organizational psychology concerns the
means by which organizations, supervisory and work-group factors can facilitate or interfere with
the individual worker’s feelings and behaviors on the job.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 310
Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits
A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of
mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and
prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of
the course material.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 320
Communications and Interviewing Techniques
3 Credits
The examination of communication from various standpoints, as illustrated by different types of
interviews. Interviewing techniques employed for personnel selection are compared with those
used in interrogation and those used for the therapeutic purposes. Practice in interviewing.
Prerequisite: PSY 110, SOC 110

PSY 330
Personnel Psychology
3 Credits
Examines the important role of individual differences in selecting and placing employees, in
appraising the level of employee’s work performance and in training recently hired and veteran
employees to improve various aspects of job-related behavior. Emphasis is placed on job
analysis, measurement of performance and methods used in selection, i.e., tests and interviews.
Special attention to the legal issues involving fairness in selection of employees.



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 156
Prerequisite: PSY 110; previous coursework in elementary statistics recommended

PSY 340
Introductory Research Methods for Behavioral Sciences
4 Credits
This course stresses the classical approach to experimental research on human behavior.
Students conduct and report on experiments in the fields of psychophysics, psychomotor
learning, memory, and perception. These laboratory experiments permit the student to apply
knowledge gained in former courses about measurements, statistical inference, and design of
experiments.
Prerequisites: PSY 110, PSY 220

PSY 410
Physiological Basis of Behavior
3 Credits
A basic course to familiarize students with the bodily processes involved in various aspects of
human behavior. Physiological psychology studies the biological basis of psychological functions
such as sleeping, emotions, motivations, perceptions, learning, memory, and problem solving.
The two major biological systems most relevant to psychology are the nervous system and the
glandular system.
Prerequisite: PSY 110

PSY 420
Introduction to Counseling
3 Credits
Theories and practical techniques of counseling, including advisement, guidance, and supportive
psychotherapy, by both directive and non-directive methods. Counseling is considered both as a
career in itself and as a component of one’s job in such fields as teaching, business and
personnel management, health occupations, social work, and the law.
Prerequisite: PSY 110, PSY 210

PSY 430 SEMINAR
3 Credits
Topics studied will vary from semester to semester, but include: alienation, generation gap,
drugs, sexual revolution, interpersonal dynamics, self-actualization, social commitment, individual
freedom, religion, human encounter.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 15 semester hours or more in psychology, or permission
of dean.

READING, LANGUAGE, AND LITERACY (RLT)

RLT 202
Children’s Literature and Early Literacy
3 Credits
Focuses on knowledge and practice of how young children in a culturally diverse society develop
language and literacy skills. Exploration of children’s literature is the foundation of activities and
curriculum that integrates language with beginning reading and writing concepts. Students
explore ways in which children develop the basis of literacy and come to understand the social
world. Students learn ways of creating an integrated curriculum that includes children’s literature
and provides children with developmentally appropriate activities that foster the development of
language and literacy.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                    157
RLT 500
Turn on the Brain for Reading
3 Credits
Advances in neuroscience and technology have afforded us insights regarding early childhood
neural plasticity- how the brain learns and changes with environmental experience. This course
provides a tour of early childhood brain development highlighting brain areas and associated
functions necessary for reading acquisition. Learning the alphabet code for reading requires the
working relationship of multiple brain areas involving the necessary functions of eye movement,
speech-sound perception, tactile awareness, relaxed alert states, and memory and multi-sensory
synthesis. Participants will discuss reading methodology based upon state of the art
neuroscience research.
Prerequisite: completion of core courses

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

SOC 110
Intro to Sociology
3 Credits
An analysis of the social and cultural forces that govern human behavior. The principal topics
include: social interaction and organization, socialization processes, primary groups and the
family (associations, bureaucracy and other social institutions), collective behavior, population
and ecology.
Prerequisite: None

SOC 120
American Urban Minorities
3 Credits
An in-depth analysis of the diverse ethnic structure of the urban community. Major attention is
given to black, Puerto Rican, and Mexican groups. Topics include: a survey of each group’s
social and economic structure, an examination of ghetto conditions and their effects, the impact of
urban conditions on the new arrival, a comparison with the adaptation and treatment accorded
earlier migrants, the validity of the melting pot concept, and a comparison of the life styles of
various minority groups.
Prerequisite SOC 110

SOC 210
Social Problems
3 Credits
A sociological analysis of social problems in American society. All social problems will be viewed
from a structural perspective, i.e., the root cause of a social problem lies in the institutional
arrangements of a given society. Various institutional arrangements of American society that give
rise to social problems will be evaluated in terms of value-conflicts, power structures, and
economic institutions. Major topics include: inequality, poverty, environmental destruction,
ageism, educational institutions, social deviance, unemployment, problems of the city.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 310
Marriage and the Family
3 Credits
The course covers historical changes in family patterns, contemporary family life in different
cultures and subcultures, evolution of the American family pattern, functions of the family, the
family as primary group, kinship patterns, and nuclear and extended families. Other topics
include: dating, mate selection, family disorganization, and marital success.
Prerequisite: SOC 110



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                     158
SOC 320
Introduction to Sociological Theory
3 Credits
The development of sociological theory in Europe and the Unites States during the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries from Comte to the present day. Emphasis is given to comparing and
contrasting various schools of theoretical thought.
Prerequisite: SOC 110

SOC 330
Juvenile Delinquency
3 Credits
An inquiry into the causes of juvenile delinquency and the social and psychological factors
involved in the predictive studies and theories concerning the development of delinquency.
Topics also include formation of youth gangs, methods of coping with gang activity, the types of
crime committed by children and youths, narcotics problems, neglected and retarded children, the
youthful offender and wayward minor, the operation of the Children’s Court, crime prevention
programs.
Prerequisite: SOC 110

SOC 340
Criminological Theory
3 Credits
An examination of crime and theories of crime causation. Topics include: the white-collar
criminal, the professional criminal, and the structure of organized crime. The criminal-justice
process is analyzed, including the role of the police, the criminal courts, the probation officer,
correctional services, and the re-entry of the offender into society.
Prerequisite: PSY 110, SOC 110

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPE)

SPE 201
Survey of Exceptional Children
3 Credits
This class focuses on an overview of children with exceptional cognitive, physical, social and
emotional characteristics. Analysis of developmental and educational needs imposed by
exceptionality is included. Identification, intervention strategies, methods, and programs
designed to meet exceptional needs; including both high and low incidence disabilities are
discussed. The course also talks about study of applicable federal and state laws and
requirements. Content focuses on functional methods for use by educators to assist in the
provision of an inclusionary environment which enriches the education of children with and
without special needs.
Field observation is required.
Prerequisite: EDP 201 and TIE 110

SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPH)

SPH 105
Basic Speech Communication
3 Credits
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal
communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing
materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      159
TELECOMMUNICATIONS (TEL)

TEL 110
Telecommunications Fundamentals
3 Credits
A broad examination of fundamental concepts in telecommunications. Topics include a
discussion on signal and channel bandwidth, digitization of voice (with emphasis on PCM), data
transmission, analog and digital modulation techniques (AM, FM, PSK, FSK, etc.) and
multiplexing (FDM, TDM, T1 multiplexing, SONET and SDH) and switching (circuit, packet, and
cell). The role of the Public Switched Telephone Network is also examined. An introduction to
data networking is presented.
Prerequisite: MAT 135 or MAT 141

TEL 210
Data Networking Fundamentals
3 Credits
Topics discussed include the DTE to DCE physical connection (with emphasis on EIA-232),
datalink protocols (BISYNC, DDCMP, HDLC) the OSI reference model, LANs, MANs, LAN
interconnection and the role of bridges and routers, X 25, TCP/IP, Frame Relay, SMDS, SNA,
ISDN, SS7, BISDN, and enterprise networks. An introduction to traffic engineering is also
provided.
Prerequisite: TEL 110, MAT 155 (or MAT 141), MGT 302 or equivalent

TEL 220
Applied Telecommunications
3 Credits
An overview of the fundamentals of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) and
broadband ISDN architecture and protocols is presented. The Signaling System 7 (SS7) network
structure and architecture is described. Packet switching, Frame Relay and the Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM) are introduced and compared. Network Management, an introduction to
the internet and traffic engineering are also covered.
Corequisite: TEL 210

TEL 310
Telecommunications Law and Policy
3 Credits
The domestic and international regulatory framework of telecommunications including telephone,
broadcasting, cable and private radio is discussed. Historical, economic and legal aspects of
telecommunications regulation will be included. First Amendment rights, privacy, copyright,
antitrust, contact and product liability, and developing areas such as satellite communications
networks and integrated services digital networks (ISDN) are presented.
Prerequisites: TEL 110 or equivalent

TEL 321
Cellular and Wireless Technologies
3 Credits
The fundamental concepts of wireless networks, physical layer (air interface) issues and cell
planning are introduced. Access technologies, including FDMA, TDMA, and CDMA, in Cellular
Systems, first Generation Digital Systems are also discussed. The course concludes with
coverage of paging systems and satellite communications.
Prerequisite: TEL 220




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                              160
TEL 330
High Speed Information Networks
3 Credits
The application, architecture, and protocols of high speed information networks are examined
along with their unique challenges and opportunities. Included in this examination are frame relay
networks, BISDN/ATM, high speed LANs and MANs, and the merging user applications in this
environment.
Prerequisite: TEL 220

TEL 340
Advanced Topics in Telecommunications
3 Credits
This seminar-based course will examine emerging trends in telecommunications and networking.
Prerequisite: TEL 220

TEL 345
LAN and Internetworking
3 Credits
The Interconnection of dissimilar data networks to provide users with access to network
resources from anywhere at anytime is discussed. The role of the Internet and intranets is
examined along with the internetworking devices: routers; bridges, and gateways. Important
internetworking protocols are discussed and their application is examined. Selected user
applications made possible by this environment will be presented.
Prerequisite: TEL 220

TEL 410
Advanced Cellular and Wireless Systems
3 Credits
Cellular and wireless systems are reviewed. Fixed Wireless Systems such as wireless local loop
(WLL), wireless LANs (802.11) and packet data over wireless are discussed. Evolution of second
Generation Cellular Systems to packet based technologies (TPRS and EDGE) is presented.
Third Generation Systems (3G) are introduced.
Prerequisite: TEL 321

TEL 420
Internetworking Technology I
3 Credits
Commonly used networking terminology and topologies, fundamental network devices, and
internetworking fundamentals are covered. The OSI model and local area network (LAN)
protocols are discussed. Network components such as repeaters, hubs, bridges, routers and
switches will be used in basic network design.
Prerequisite: CTE 205, TEL 210, TEL 220

TEL 430
Internetworking Technology II
3 Credits
The design, configuration and maintenance of switches, local area networks (LANs), virtual local
area networks (VLANs) and wide area networks (WANs) are covered. Advanced router
configurations, network management and security are also discussed. Working on a class project
provides critical hands-on experience.
Prerequisite: TEL 420




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                               161
TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (TIE)

TIE 110
Instructional Technology in Early Childhood
3 Credits
Designed to introduce students to computers and to teach appropriate uses for young children.
Students survey hardware and software and examine and evaluate them in the context of the
early childhood classroom. Students also learn about productivity tools for professional use.

TIE 500
Survey of Instructional Technology
3 Credits
Students are provided with an overview of the field of instructional technology. The course
includes an exploration past trends and issues that led to the emergence of the field, areas of
research in instructional design, contextual applications of theory and practice, and technology
integration. Current trends and issues in training and staff development are investigated

TIE 501
Foundations of Instructional Design and Technology
3 Credits
Students explore historical trends in instructional media and instructional design to understand
the emergence of the field of Instructional Design and Technology in the 20th century. Basic
design principles, methods, and techniques of instructional design are also addressed.

TIE 503
Instructional Applications of the Internet
3 Credits
In this course candidates will able to use websites to integrate digital media content on the
Internet with instructional activities, and define assessment methods appropriate for each class of
digital media content. Candidates will develop a taxonomy of instructional uses of the Internet,
including but not limited to assessment practices, student mentoring and in-service training.
Candidates will also practice synchronous and asynchronous online collaboration techniques for
interacting with colleagues and students.
Prerequisites: TIE 501 or CUR 500

TIE 504
Distance Learning Applications
3 Credits
This course provides candidates with the foundation in the conceptual rationale for delivery of
distance instruction. The technologies of data telecommunications, audio conferencing, audio
graphics systems, satellite programming and full motion audio and video will be developed.
Candidates will become conversant with differentiated needs of various audiences as well as cost
factors associated with delivery.
Prerequisite: None

TIE 505
Distance Learning Applications II
3 credits
This advances course in distance learning is an applied laboratory experience in which students
develop distance learning plans and deliver distance learning instructional units for diverse
audiences. Each unit will include an interactive development process with field testing and
specified outcomes, supportive materials and evaluation designs.
Prerequisite: TIE 504




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                162
TIE 510/SED 550
Social Studies and Technology
3 Credits
Social Studies and Technology is a technology applications course focused on integrating
technology into the social studies curriculum. Learners review national, state, and local district
standards for history and social studies and identify specific technology tools and procedures that
assist in implementing best practices in social studies instruction. Learners build technology
integration strategies and apply them to projects and lessons that can be used directly in the
classroom. Additional emphasis is placed on using project-based teaching and assessment as
well as inquiry learning for the integration of all content areas.

TIE 511
Language Arts and Technology
3 credits
Students examine the nature and components of language arts including listening, speaking,
reading, writing, viewing and visually representing material. Students develop knowledge about
the development of language from birth through grade 12. In this course, students focus on the
effects of cultural, ethnic, gender, and learning disabilities on the acquisition and use of language
and all its functions. Students explore the theoretical basis of instruction in language arts and
teaching strategies for early childhood through grade 12, as appropriate to the student’s level of
instruction. The students also research underlying effective practices for instruction and
assessment of learner progress. The role of technology in supporting language arts is a primary
strand throughout the course. Field observations and experiences are required and integrated
into the course.
Prerequisites: TIE 500, TIE 501, TIE 503, CUR 500

TIE 512
Mathematics, Science, and Technology in Education I
(math focus)
3 Credits
Candidates examine an integrated approach to the teaching of mathematics, science, and
technology. Mathematical reasoning, numbers and numeration, operations, modeling, and
multiple representation, measurement, uncertainty, patterns and functions will be studied in the
context of problem solving. The candidate will learn strategies to integrate mathematical content
with science content in life, physical sciences, technology tools, and design. Constructivist and
project based teaching and assessment techniques will be guiding principles throughout the
course. The candidate will learn research-based strategies to address the needs of diverse
learners in the context of reflective practice. Field observations and experiences are required and
integrated into the course.
Prerequisite: CUR 500

TIE 513
Mathematics, Science and Technology in Education II
3 credits
Integrating mathematics, science, and technology in the elementary school experience is critical
in providing students with relevant, inquiry-based learning that is aligned with NYS standards and
that helps young people develop problem-solving skills. These MST experiences reflect the life
experiences that await students and help to create life long learners. In this course, students
explore the issues and methods in creating integrated MST experiences. These issues and
methods include planning effective lessons, developing MST experiences that address the
diversity of students, collegiality, and planning. Crucial to this will be an investigation of
appropriate assessment strategies and the application of various technologies. To successfully
study the integration of MST, students research and analyze curriculum integration as proposed
by scholarly education journals. In addition, students will fully plan a unit of study and actually do



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   163
the activity or project indicated in that unit. Field observations and experiences are required and
integrated into the course.
Prerequisite: TIE 512

TIE 520
Technology Planning and Change Management
3 Credits
Technology Planning and Change Management is a leadership development course focused on
planning for technology and leading change efforts in K-12. Learners will develop a broad
knowledge base of techniques and procedures for developing and implementing short and long-
range technology plans within schools and across districts including elements of needs
assessment, writing goals and objectives, facilities planning, staffing, staff development, budgets,
purchasing, and evaluation. Learners will develop and apply knowledge of networking, ethics,
and security within their planning. Learners will complement their technology planning skills by
developing knowledge and skills of change management models and strategies to insure plans
for implementation of technology are successful.

TIE 521
Leadership in Technology
3 Credits
Leadership in Technology is a leadership development course focused on implementation and
evaluation of technology programs in K-12 educational settings. Learners research technology
tools and processes available to schools and districts engaged in developing strategic plans for
technology integration and develop procedures and processes for communicating with vendors of
instructional technology. Learners evaluate the comprehensiveness of professional development
provided for faculty and staff at both school and district levels and develop plans to manage the
change process and evaluate the effectiveness of technology use in schools.

TIE 522
Management Development
3 Credits
In today’s business environment, management development is a key factor to organizational
survival. In this course, students will learn the concept of management development, how human
Resources professionals should look at management development, the current strategies and
techniques utilized for developing the various levels of managers in the organization, and the
strategies/techniques that need to be developed to prepare management for future challenges.
This course will provide students with practical strategies/methodologies needed to effectively
develop and integrate management development programs/initiatives in their organizations and
get the support needed to implement them. In the course, each student will focus on the design
of a specific management development program, initiative, or curriculum that is of significant
importance to his/her organization or personal situation. At the completion of the course, each
student will have developed an outline/proposal for use as a “blueprint” for their management
development program/initiative.

TIE 525
School Technology Planning and Change Management
3 credits
The focus in this course is on the position of a building or district coordinator. Topics to be
discussed include: planning, implementing change in organizations, selection and acquisition of
hardware and software, preparation of bid sheets; availability and handling of software; repair and
maintenance of hardware; lab assistants and their role; laboratory use by teachers and classes;
training of staff, students, and administration; salary; release time and teaching duties; and
computer ethics. Hardware of all types will be demonstrated; field trips will be made to schools.
Prerequisite: None



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                  164
TIE 530
Multimedia/Authoring
3 Credits
Each candidate selects an instructional module for design and development in computer-based
format for a particular hardware-configuration as the final course output. Projects include
individual and design-team approaches for planning and implementation of a complete module of
instruction. In addition to multimedia lesson materials, candidates also produce user
documentation required for professional-level development of a product. Candidates use an
authoring software package to develop computer-based and web-based instruction. Candidates
construct strategies for integrating the use of multimedia applications into their own classrooms
with an awareness of the diverse needs of their students. Class sessions feature lecture, hands-
on practice, small group meetings, group discussions and individual project-related effort. The
instructor uses individualized coaching to assist students.
Prerequisites: TIE 501, CUR 500

TIE 531
Managing Multimedia Projects
3 Credits
Managing Multimedia Projects is a leadership development course focused on project
management for multimedia projects. Students will apply knowledge and skills required to assess
client needs and develop a multimedia project proposal to meet those needs. Proposals will
include consideration of project team members and required skills, budgeting, and equipment
needs. Students will develop multimedia management responsibilities and guidelines for specific
project requirements and be able to communicate with all project team members in relation to
technical issues of various media. Students will learn to communicate with clients using written
and presentation skills for conceptual design, production solutions, a development team, budget,
and timeline.
Prerequisite: TIE 530

TIE 535
Advanced Multimedia Technology
3 credits
Students in the course will become conversant with a variety of technologies used in the
integration of multimedia components into instructional programs. These components include
sound and video tools for image/text scanning and text recognition. Participants will work with
tools for creating animations and digital movies along with tools for image and text formatting. As
a culminating exercise, Students will prepare units of instruction suitable for all learners that
incorporate the tools and techniques noted above.
Prerequisites: TIE 531

TIE 539
Emerging Technologies Seminar
1 credit
Students will each identify an emerging technology and develop a proposal to their employers to
adopt the technology including such topics as a description of the technology, the appropriate
audience for the technology, how that technology will enhance learning for a particular group of
learners, e.g., students with disabilities, young children, factory workers, and how the technology
will be used. Students will critique all proposals submitted.
Prerequisite: successful completion of 24 credits




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                 165
TIE 560
Training Practitioner Skills, Strategies and Techniques
3 Credits
Virtually every practitioner instructional specialist at some time faces the requirement to conduct
training presentations in a platform or stand-up mode. This course develops trainer skills through
study and practice of a broad range of training session activities including: formal presentations,
interactive discussion, role-playing, case study, simulation, facilitation and distance learning.
Students will also use video and other media and modifications of package activities. Participants
will also explore the use of computers and related technologies in training.

TIE 561
Instructional Systems Design
3 Credits
Participants are introduced to systems approach, or ISD. Class work applies scientific method to
training development to be sure programs are comprehensive in scope, yet lean in execution.
Each student will select a specific training need and then develop a systematic training design
through careful front-end analysis of training needs, tasks performed and learner population.
Media and techniques appropriate to a given setting are chosen. Participants complete all
aspects of program design, including analysis described, construction of training objectives,
evaluation measures and budgets. At course completion, each student will have a blueprint fro
training for implementation in TIE 659.

TIE 562
Training Consulting
3 Credits
Students will explore the world of training consulting. The multiple roles of several types of
consultants will be examined as well as the phases of the consulting process. Strategies fro
success, ethical dilemmas, marketing of the consulting process and financial concerns will also
be discussed. Participants will examine their own behavior in developing a consulting practice,
identify their own modes for dealing with outside consultants and practice the consulting process,
both external and internal.
Prerequisite: None

TIE 563
Computer Courseware Design for Training and Learning Applications
3 Credits
Each student selects an instructional training system for design and development in computer-
based format for a particular equipment configuration as the final course output. Projects include
individual-and-design-team approaches for planning and producing documentation required for
commercial development of the lesson. Participants will use an authoring system to develop
Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) courseware. Class sessions feature lecture, small group
meetings, group discussion and individual project-related effort. The instructor will use
individualized coaching to assist students.

TIE 564
Technology Planning and Change Management for Trainers
3 credits
Students will study theories of organization change and planning strategies in order to be able to
learn skills that will allow them to manage and lead change regarding the adoption and change of
technology. Students will learn about planning tools, how to analyze organizational needs for
technology and how to prepare the organization and its members for the changes. Finally,
students will learn to assess changes and develop embedded approaches to assessment for
continual improvement in the selection and use of technology for all its stakeholders.
Prerequisite: TIE 521



ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                166
WRITING (WRT)

WRT 100
Basic Writing and Reading
3 Credits
Basic Writing and Reading is designed for students whose English placement test reveals the
need for improved basic writing and reading skills. Students will read various kinds of writing and
create a portfolio of their own writing. This course will help students improve their use of standard
grammar and mechanics and develop comprehension strategies, vocabulary, and study skills.
Students will focus on paragraph-level writing in various rhetorical patterns.

WRT 101
College Composition I
3 Credits
Instruction in the application of the principles and skills involved in effective expository writing,
with most readings from nonfiction prose. Introduces students to the writing process with special
attention to constructing arguments, working with sources, and crafting effective sentences and
paragraphs.

WRT 151
College Composition II
3 Credits
Further development of the expository and writing and reading skills taught in English. An
introduction to literature and the development of library skills leading to a documented research
paper.
Prerequisite: WRT 101

WRT 310
Business Writing
3 Credits
An intermediate-level writing course for students in business. Instruction and practice in all
phases of business communications. Required of all business and management majors.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

WRT 316
Writing for the Technical Professions
3 Credits
An intermediate-level writing course for students of the physical and life sciences an technology.
Emphasis on style in technical writing, modes of technical discourse (definition, description,
analysis, interpretation) and strategies for effective business communication, including resume
writing, technical reports and oral presentations. Methods and procedures of research are
explored in depth.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

WRT 330
Writing for Communication Arts
3 Credits
An intermediate-level writing course for students in the communication field with emphasis on
developing writing fluency. Focus on expository, persuasive writing; in-depth study of research
methods; and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing and oral
presentations.
Prerequisite: WRT 151




ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                   167
WRT 335
Writing for Publication
3 Credits
An advanced writing course, with special emphasis on published work. Students interested in
writing and those seriously committed to their own writing improvement and to the writing of prose
articles, fiction or poetry are especially encouraged to take this course.
Prerequisite: WRT 151

WRT 351
Advanced Technical Writing
3 Credits
Advanced training and practice in the techniques and forms of technical writing. Focused around
planning and producing electronic and print-based manuals. Topics will include: information
gathering, usability testing, group collaboration, project management, using text and graphics,
relevant technologies, and writing techniques.
Prerequisite: WRT 310, WRT 316, WRT 320 or WRT 330

WRT 355
Advanced Writing and Editing Techniques
3 Credits
An advanced workshop in business and technical writing techniques including technical aspects
of editing and interpersonal skills employed by successful editors. Participants practice revising
writing for specific audiences; strengthen their techniques in revising for style, clarity, and
conciseness; increase their command of grammar and mechanics; practice production editing
and using style manuals; utilize word processors and computerized text editors; and develop
important interpersonal editing skills through the use of role playing and peer evaluation.
Participants also continue to be exposed to a variety of common forms of career-oriented
business and technical writing.
Prerequisite: WRT 310, WRT 316, WRT 320 or WRT 330

WRT 360
Seminar in Professional Writing
3 Credits
An advanced seminar in a specialized topic, utilizing the expertise of an instructor from the
profession at large. The topic will vary from offering to offering.
Prerequisite: WRT 310, WRT 316, WRT 320 or WRT 330

WRT 363
Writing for the Web
3 Credits
Focus is on learning and practicing advanced aspects of creating multimedia, hypertext, and
online help documents. Topics: linear and nonlinear planning structures (“information
architecture”), writing stylistics, the rhetoric and use of graphics, linking, reading and editing
online, project management.
Prerequisite: WRT 310, WRT 316, WRT 320 or WRT 330

WRT 366
Survey of Technical & Professional Document Production
3 Credits
A survey of principles, techniques and procedures of electronic and print-based document
production. Topics: the relationship between written and visual material, traditional copy
preparation and design, desktop publishing, traditional printing techniques for books, brochures,
pamphlets, and newsletters. Students will produce their own brochures, pamphlets, and
newsletters.
Prerequisite: WRT 310, WRT 316, WRT 320 or WRT 330


ELLIS UNIVERSITY | 2009 CATALOG                                                                      168
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