Los Angeles County San Mateo County by alicejenny

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									Advancing a Strategic Plan for the implementation of AB 109 – Community
                   Supervision Program Countywide


                 Los Angles County Probation Department’s
                               AB 109 Plan


 This plan addresses the needs of those we serve emphasizing community safety
and profound change in the clients we serve. The Probation Department’s plan is
aimed at keeping our communities safe while providing evidence based treatment
                         services to the clients we serve.

 (For use by all stakeholders that will be impacted by the implementation of AB 109)




                Produced by Los Angeles County Probation Department
                                  June 10, 2011



                          Donald H. Blevins
                        Chief Probation Officer
                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

1   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                           3

      Background                                                                3
      Evidenced- Based Supervision Models                                       3
      Systemic Interventions                                                    3
      Implementation Plan                                                       4
      Quality Assurance                                                         4
      Staffing and Cost of AB 109                                               4

2   PROBATION HISTORY                                                           5

      Who We Are                                                                5

3   NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MODEL FOR EVIDENCE-BASED                              6
    SUPERVISION

      Introduction and Background                                                6
      Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Interventions                7
      Assessment Tools                                                          11
      Motivational Interviewing                                                 12
      Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Social Learning                    15
      Evidence-Based Supervision Conclusion                                     17

4   LA COUNTY’S ADOPTED EVIDENCE BASED SUPERVISION MODELS                       18

      Background                                                                18
      Los Angeles County Probation Department Efforts                           19
      SB 81                                                                     19
      SB 678                                                                    19
      ATC At a Glance                                                           20

5   SYSTEMIC INTERVENTIONS                                                      22

      Objectives of Systemic Interventions                                      22
      Guiding Principles                                                        22
      An Example of Systemic Intervention: Program to Reduce the No. of State   23
      Prison Recommendations

6   IMPLEMENTATION PLAN                                                         23

     The Plan                                                                   23
     Offender Classification System                                             24
     Target Population                                                          24
     Post Release Community Supervision Requirements                            24
     Post Release Community Supervision (Flow Chart)                            27
       Case Supervision Process and Procedures                   28
       Program Completion and Transition to Aftercare Planning   29
       Case Management Reference Guide (Flow Chart)              31
       Probation Violation Flow Process                          34
       Role, Function and Responsibility of Probation Staff      35

7    CONTRACTING FOR SERVICE PROVIDERS                           35

       Community Based Treatment Services Contracting Process    35

8    QUALITY ASSURANCE                                           36

       Data Analysis                                             36
       Observation Procedures                                    36
       SDPO/DPO Responsibilities                                 36
       Analysts Responsibilities                                 37
       Observation Forms                                         37

9    BUDGET NARRATIVE                                            38

       Personnel Descriptions                                    38
       Supplies and Equipment                                    43
       Vehicles                                                  43

10   REFERENCES                                                  44

11   ATTACHMENT                                                  46

       A. Budget Line Item Detail

       B. Los Angeles County Probation Organization Charts




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1. Executive Summary

Background

AB 109, which was signed into law by the Governor on April 5, 2011, will reduce the number
of offenders incarcerated in our state prison system. It will accomplish this by releasing low
risk offenders or Post-Release Community Supervision (non-serious, non-violent, and non-
sex) or “PRCS” back to the local counties where they were sentenced and secondly, by
changing the penal code and sentencing laws to keep such low-risk offenders from going to
state prison. This community corrections approach will provide drug treatment and mental
health services in the communities where these returning offenders will live. It is estimated
that Los Angeles County will receive approximately 9,791 PRCS. These PRCS will be
supervised for approximately 18 months, only serve time in custody as a result of any
probation (supervision) violation.

The magnitude of responsibility, scale of supervision requirements and management scope
of offender population required at the county level by AB 109 necessitates an agency with
vast experience in evidence based practice and effective community supervision. The Los
Angeles County Probation Department with its long history of community supervision and
court case processing interaction servicing a wide range of offenders, from low-risk offenders
to high and serious risk offenders, is the only agency equipped to effectively handle such a
change in the criminal justice community.

Evidence-Based Supervision Models

The Los Angeles County Probation Department’s success with the Adult Day Reporting
Center and the Byrne/JAG Alternative Treatment Caseload (ATC) program was linked
directly to the implementation of the nationally recognized evidenced-based supervision
model and its core principles. The Principles of Effective Interventions, the use validated
assessment tools, the application of Motivational Interviewing techniques, and the facilitation
Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) interventions has shown positive effects on our targeted
populations. The Department plans to continue following this model of success with the Post
Release Community Supervision (PRCS) population.

The Los Angeles County Probation Department will also utilize the experiences learned in the
methods of effective EBP supervision from the recent successes of SB 678 "California
Community Corrections Performance Incentive Act of 2009”, where the Department earned
performance based funding of $28 million related to the supervision of adult felony offenders,
towards the implementation of AB 109.

Systemic Interventions

Empirical research has firmly supported improved outcomes of criminal populations when
EBP concepts are employed and appropriately monitored with the establishment of systemic
interventions. The Los Angeles County Probation Department will establish AB 109



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objectives of systemic interventions, follow guiding principles, and develop a program to
reduce the number of state prison recommendations.

Implementation Plan

The Los Angeles County Probation Department will implement AB 109 in an Evidence Based
Supervision Model with dual supervision programs serving; 1) Low Level State Prison Post
Release offenders and 2) Low-Level Non-violent, Non-Serious, and Non-Sex offenders (N3’s)
that would otherwise be sentenced to State Prison. The Los Angeles County Probation
Department will develop an offender classification system to target the AB 109 population by
implementing post release community supervision requirements, creating phases of
rehabilitation, establishing a case supervision management process with procedures
designed to incorporate EBP principles for effective intensive interventions, and promoting
the objective of producing sustained reductions in recidivism. To effectively case manage the
proposed 18,000 offenders from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitations
(CDCR), the Los Angeles County Probation Department supervision programs are designed
in a three (3) tiered system focusing on the appropriate level of supervision based on levels
of risk and intervention strategies, including the best in evidence-based practices (EBP) as
determined by the risk assessment (LS/CMI).

A critical area in the successful implementation of AB 109 is the processing mechanism of
the Superior Court process. Cases under AB 109 will no longer be handled as parole
hearings (violations) but will be required to be processed through the local court system. Los
Angeles County Probation Department has the vast experience dealing with the court by the
handling of numerous reports required in the supervision management of an offender (such
as the following reports: progress, supplemental, desertion, deportation, modification, inter-
county transfer, and violation) and the application of post sentence sanctions.

Quality Assurance

The Los Angeles County Probation Department will incorporate a quality assurance
component to the implementation plan of AB 109, which will include EBP methods in the
training of staff, application of performance functions, creation of data analysis, completion of
observation procedures, delivery of services and execution of case management practices.

Staffing and Costs of AB 109

Full implementation of AB 109, as specified previously, assumes the three-year budget
proposal for fiscal years 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14, and is adopted as presented in the
Probation Department’s AB 109 Plan.

Year one (2011-12) staffing at the beginning of the first quarter will be 103 positions and will
increase to a total of 289 positions. The estimated budget for this level of staffing is
$20,356,021. Of the 289 total positions, 184 represent line Deputy Probation Officer II (DPO)
items. Services and Supplies costs are estimated to be $1,500, 839 for year one.




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Year two (2012-2013) staffing will increase from 289 to a total of 557 positions. Of that total,
366 are DPO items. The staffing budget for year two is estimated to be $47,734,806. The
Services and Supplies budget for year two is estimated to be $1,449,661.

Finally, year three (2013-2014) staffing will stay at the 557 total achieved by the end of the
year two. Total budget for the staffing component is estimated to be $55,236,559. The
Services and Supply budget is estimated to be only $243,960. It is anticipated that by the end
of year two, all of the required services and supplies needed for the staff build-up will have
already occurred. Thus, the Services and Supplies budget for year three reflects ongoing
costs for Air Cards and for the purchase of ammunition ($100 per DPO).

2. Probation History

Who We Are

The Los Angeles County Probation Department which is the largest of its kind in the world
was established in 1903. The jurisdiction of the department includes all cities within the
borders of the County of Los Angeles. The Chief Probation Officer has jurisdiction over the
entire county, including all of the cities within its borders. The legal provisions setting forth his
office, duties, and responsibilities are found in the California Welfare and Institutions Code
and Penal Code.
The department is staffed by 5,800 employees who are deployed in more than 50 locations
throughout the county. The current budget of the department is approximately $685 million.
With these resources, services include but are not limited to, recommending sanctions to the
court, enforcing court orders, operating correctional institutions, incarcerating juvenile
delinquents, assisting victims, supervising and monitoring adult and juvenile offenders, and
affective positive behavioral change, etc.

Probation Officers serve under the court system as the enforcing arm of the court. They
provide to the court two important services: investigation and supervision. Probation Officers
are charged with the task of investigating and supervising offenders whom the courts have
conditionally released to the community on probation. By serving as the court's fact-finder,
monitoring the risk offenders may pose to public safety, and providing offenders with
correctional treatment, officers help ensure that persons previously convicted of crime obey
the law rather than commit further crime.
In supervising offenders, Probation Officers hold weighty public safety responsibilities. They
use risk control techniques designed to detect and deter criminal behavior. Probation officers
are required to have a broad range of knowledge of the criminal justice system and the roles,
relationships, and responsibilities distributed among the courts, local jails, law enforcement,
substance abuse counseling and social services agencies, applicable case law, sentencing
guidelines (if applicable), and the prosecutor. Additionally, they must have an ability to work
with an extremely diverse population and wide variety of government agencies and
community organizations and accept the potential hazards of working closely with a criminal
population.



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3. Nationally Recognized Models for Evidence-Based Supervision

Introduction and Background

Until recently, community corrections had suffered from a lack of research that identified
proven methods of reducing offender recidivism. Recent research efforts based on meta-
analysis have broken through this barrier and are now providing the field with indications of
how to better reduce recidivism. 1 This research indicates that certain programs and
intervention strategies, when applied to a variety of offender populations, reliably produce
sustained reductions in recidivism. This same research literature suggests that few
community supervision agencies (probation, parole, residential community corrections) in the
U.S. are using these effective interventions and their related concepts/principles. 2

The conventional approach to supervision in this country emphasizes individual accountability
from offenders and their supervising officers without consistently providing either with the
skills, tools, and resources that science indicates are necessary to accomplish risk and
recidivism reduction. Despite the evidence that indicates otherwise, officers continue to be
trained and expected to meet minimal contact standards which stress rates of contacts and
largely ignore the opportunities these contacts have for effectively reinforcing behavioral
change. Officers and offenders are not so much clearly directed what to do, as what not to
do. 2

An integrated and strategic model for evidence-based practice is necessary to adequately
bridge the gap between current practice and evidence supported practice in community
corrections. This model must incorporate both existing research findings and operational
methods of implementation. The biggest challenge in adopting better interventions isn’t
identifying the interventions with the best evidence; so much as it is changing our existing
systems to appropriately support the new innovations. Identifying interventions with good
research support and realign the necessary organizational infrastructure are both
fundamental to evidence-based practice. 2

Evidence-based practice is a significant trend throughout all human service fields that
emphasize outcomes. Interventions within corrections are considered effective when they
reduce offender risk and subsequent recidivism and therefore make a positive long-term
contribution to public safety. This document presents a model or framework based on a set of
principles for effective offender interventions within the County of Los Angeles. Models
provide us with tangible reference points as we face unfamiliar tasks and experiences. Some
models are very abstract, for example entailing only a set of testable propositions or
principles. Other models, conversely, may be quite concrete and detail oriented. The field of
community corrections is beginning to recognize its need, not only for more effective
interventions, but for models that integrate seemingly disparate 1 Best Practices. 2
Approximately 80 percent of state felony defendants are placed on probation, fined or jailed
in their local communities. 3 Although the United States has the highest incarceration rate in
the world, there are nearly three times more offenders on probation than in state prisons. 4
For many years, conventional wisdom has been that “nothing works” to change offender
behavior—that once an offender has turned to crime little can be done to help turn his or her


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life around. 8 Today, however, there is a voluminous body of solid research showing that
certain “evidence-based” sentencing and corrections practices do work and can reduce crime
rates as effectively as prisons at much lower cost. A comprehensive study by the Washington
legislature, for example, showed that greater use of these evidence-based practices would
reduce Washington’s crime rate by 8 percent while saving taxpayers over $2 billion in
additional prison construction. 7 As the United States faces the prospect of its deepest and
longest recession since the Great Depression, we cannot afford to ignore the opportunity to
reduce offender recidivism and resulting high crime rates through use of these cost-effective
evidence-based practices. 9

Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Interventions

The following framework of principles is listed in developmental order and they are all highly
interdependent. For example, offender assessments must consider both risk to reoffend
and criminogenic needs, in that order. Research indicates that resources are used more
effectively when they are focused on higher-risk rather than lower-risk offenders, therefore
considering offenders’ risk to reoffend prior to addressing criminogenic needs allows
agencies to target resources on higher-risk offenders. The following chart illustrates the
Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Interventions:

                  Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Interventions
 1. Assess Actuarial Risk/Needs.
 2. Enhance Intrinsic Motivation.
 3. Target Interventions.
              a. Risk Principle: Prioritize supervision and treatment resources for higher risk
              offenders.
              b. Need Principle: Target interventions to criminogenic needs.
              c. Responsivity Principle: Be responsive to temperament, learning style, motivation,
              culture, and gender when assigning programs.
              d. Dosage: Structure 40-70% of high-risk offenders’ time for 3-9 months.
              e. Treatment: Integrate treatment into the full sentence/sanction requirements.
 4. Skill Train with Directed Practice (use Cognitive Behavioral treatment methods).
 5. Increase Positive Reinforcement.
 6. Engage Ongoing Support in Natural Communities.
 7. Measure Relevant Processes/Practices.
 8. Provide Measurement Feedback.



1) Assess Actuarial Risk/Needs

Develop and maintain a complete system of ongoing offender risk screening / triage and
needs assessments. Assessing offenders in a reliable and valid manner is a prerequisite for
the effective management (i.e.: supervision and treatment) of offenders. Timely, relevant
measures of offender risk and need at the individual and aggregate levels are essential for
the implementation of numerous principles of best practice in corrections, (e.g., risk, need,
and responsivity). Offender assessments are most reliable and valid when staff are formally
trained to administer tools. Screening and assessment tools that focus on dynamic and static


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risk factors, profile criminogenic needs, and have been validated on similar populations are
preferred. They should also be supported by sufficiently detailed and accurately written
procedures. Offender assessment is as much an ongoing function as it is a formal event. In
LA County we use the Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI). Case
information that is gathered informally through routine interactions and observations with
offenders is just as important as formal assessment guided by instruments. Formal and
informal offender assessments should reinforce one another. They should combine to
enhance formal reassessments, case decisions, and working relations between practitioners
and offenders throughout the jurisdiction of supervision.

2) Enhance Intrinsic Motivation.

Staff should relate to offenders in interpersonally sensitive and constructive ways to enhance
intrinsic motivation in offenders. Behavioral change is an inside job; for lasting change to
occur, a level of intrinsic motivation is needed. Motivation to change is dynamic and the
probability that change may occur is strongly influenced by interpersonal interactions, such as
those with probation officers, treatment providers, and institution staff. Feelings of
ambivalence that usually accompany change can be explored through motivational
interviewing, a style and method of communication used to help people overcome their
ambivalence regarding behavior changes.

Research strongly suggests that motivational interviewing techniques, rather than persuasion
tactics, effectively enhance motivation for initiating and maintaining behavior changes.

3) Target Interventions.

                 A. RISK PRINCIPLE: Prioritize supervision and treatment resources for
                    higher risk offenders.

                 B. NEED PRINCIPLE: Develop Case Plans that Target interventions to
                    criminogenic needs.

                 C. RESPONSIVITY PRINCIPLE: Be responsive to temperament, learning
                    style, motivation, gender, and culture when assigning to programs.

                 D. DOSAGE: Structure 40-70% of high-risk offenders’ time for 3-9 months.

                 E. TREATMENT PRINCIPLE: Integrate                treatment   into   the    full
                    sentence/sanction requirements.

      a) Risk Principle

      Prioritize primary supervision and treatment resources for offenders who are at higher
      risk to re-offend. Research indicates that supervision and treatment resources that are
      focused on lower-risk offenders tend to produce little if any net positive effect on
      recidivism rates. Shifting these resources to higher risk offenders promotes harm-



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reduction and public safety because these offenders have greater need for pro-social
skills and thinking, and are more likely to be frequent offenders. Reducing the
recidivism rates of these higher risk offenders reaps a much larger bang-for-the buck.

Successfully addressing this population requires smaller caseloads, the application of
well developed case plans, and placement of offenders into sufficiently intense
cognitive-behavioral interventions that target their specific criminogenic needs.
(Gendreau, 1997; Andrews & Bonta, 1998; Harland, 1996; Sherman, et al, 1998;
McGuire, 2001, 2002)

b) Criminogenic Need Principle

Address offenders’ greatest criminogenic needs. Offenders have a variety of needs,
some of which are directly linked to criminal behavior. These criminogenic needs are
dynamic risk factors that, when addressed or changed, affect the offender’s risk for
recidivism. Examples of criminogenic needs are: criminal personality; antisocial
attitudes, values, and beliefs; low self control; criminal peers; substance abuse; and
dysfunctional family. Based on an assessment of the offender, these criminogenic
needs can be prioritized so that services are focused on the greatest criminogenic
needs.

c) Responsivity Principle

Responsivity requires that we consider individual characteristics when matching
offenders to services. These characteristics include, but are not limited to: culture,
gender, motivational stages, developmental stages, and learning styles. These factors
influence an offender’s responsiveness to different types of treatment. The principle of
responsivity also requires that offenders be provided with treatment that is proven
effective with the offender population. Certain treatment strategies, such as cognitive-
behavioral methodologies, have consistently produced reductions in recidivism with
offenders under rigorous research conditions. Providing appropriate responsivity to
offenders involves selecting services in accordance with these factors, including: a)
Matching treatment type to offender; and b) Matching style and methods of
communication with offender’s stage of change readiness.

d) Dosage

Providing appropriate doses of services, pro-social structure, and supervision is a
strategic application of resources. Higher risk offenders require significantly more initial
structure and services than lower risk offenders. During the initial three to nine months
post-release, 40%-70% of their free time should be clearly occupied with delineated
routine and appropriate services, (e.g., outpatient treatment, employment assistance,
education, etc.) Certain offender subpopulations (e.g., severely mentally ill, chronic
dual diagnosed, etc.) commonly require strategic, extensive, and extended services.
However, too often individuals within these subpopulations are neither explicitly
identified nor provided a coordinated package of supervision/services. The evidence



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      indicates that incomplete or uncoordinated approaches can have negative effects,
      often wasting resources.

      e) Treatment Principle

      Treatment, particularly cognitive-behavioral types, should be applied as an integral
      part of the sentence/sanction process. Integrate treatment into sentence/sanction
      requirements through assertive case management (taking a proactive and strategic
      approach to supervision and case planning). Delivering targeted and timely treatment
      interventions will provide the greatest long-term benefit to the community, the victim,
      and the offender. This does not necessarily apply to lower risk offenders, who should
      be diverted from the criminal justice and corrections systems whenever possible.

4) Skill Train with Directed Practice (using cognitive-behavioral treatment methods).

Provide evidence-based programming that emphasizes cognitive behavioral strategies and is
delivered by well trained staff. To successfully deliver this treatment to offenders, staff must
understand antisocial thinking, social learning, and appropriate communication techniques.
Skills are not just taught to the offender, but are practiced or role-played and the resulting
pro-social attitudes and behaviors are positively reinforced by staff. Correctional agencies
should prioritize, plan, and budget to predominantly implement programs that have been
scientifically proven to reduce recidivism.

5) Increase Positive Reinforcement.

When learning new skills and making behavioral changes, human beings appear to respond
better and maintain learned behaviors for longer periods of time, when approached with
carrots rather than sticks. Behaviorists recommend applying a much higher ratio of positive
reinforcements to negative reinforcements in order to better achieve sustained behavioral
change. Research indicates that a ratio of four positive to every one negative reinforcement is
optimal for promoting behavior changes. These rewards do not have to be applied
consistently to be effective (as negative reinforcement does) but can be applied randomly.
Increasing positive reinforcement should not be done at the expense of or undermine
administering swift, certain, and real responses for negative and unacceptable behavior.
Offenders having problems with responsible self-regulation generally respond positively to
reasonable and reliable additional structure and boundaries. Offenders may initially overreact
to new demands for accountability, seek to evade detection or consequences, and fail to
recognize any personal responsibility.

However, with exposure to clear rules that are consistently (and swiftly) enforced with
appropriate graduated consequences, offenders and people in general, will tend to comply in
the direction of the most rewards and least punishments. This type of extrinsic motivation can
often be useful for beginning the process of behavior change.




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6) Engage On-going Support in Natural Communities.

Realign and actively engage pro-social supports for offenders in their communities. Research
indicates that many successful interventions with extreme populations (e.g., inner city
substance abusers, homeless, dual diagnosed) actively recruit and use family members,
spouses, and supportive others in the offender’s immediate environment to positively
reinforce desired new behaviors. This Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) has been
found effective for a variety of behaviors (e.g., unemployment, alcoholism, substance abuse,
and marital conflicts). In addition, relatively recent research now indicates the efficacy of
twelve step programs, religious activities, and restorative justice initiatives that are geared
towards improving bonds and ties to pro-social community members.

7) Measure Relevant Processes/Practices.

Accurate and detailed documentation of case information, along with a formal and valid
mechanism for measuring outcomes, is the foundation of evidence-based practice. Agencies
must routinely assess offender change in cognitive and skill development, and evaluate
offender recidivism, if services are to remain effective. In addition to routinely measuring and
documenting offender change, staff performance should also be regularly assessed. Staff
that are periodically evaluated for performance achieve greater fidelity to program design,
service delivery principles, and outcomes. Staff whose performance is not consistently
monitored, measured, and subsequently reinforced work less cohesively, more frequently at
cross-purposes and provides less support to the agency mission.

8) Provide Measurement Feedback.

Once a method for measuring relevant processes/practices is in place (principle seven), the
information must be used to monitor process and change. Providing feedback to offenders
regarding their progress builds accountability and is associated with enhanced motivation for
change, lower treatment attrition, and improved outcomes (e.g., reduced drink/drug days;
treatment engagement; goal achievement). The same is true within an organization.
Monitoring delivery of services and fidelity to procedures helps build accountability and
maintain integrity to the agency’s mission. Regular performance audits and case reviews with
an eye toward improved outcomes, keep staff focused on the ultimate goal of reduced
recidivism through the use of evidence-based principles. 10

Assessment Tools

Actuarial risk/needs assessment tools use hard data about past cases to identify the offender
characteristics most closely associated with the likelihood of future criminality. When
“validated” through testing on a known correctional populations, they are much more accurate
than human judgment in predicting the risk of an offender’s recidivism. 11

Use of accurate risk assessment information is critical in making a number of important case
management decisions, including consideration of the:




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          •   Offender’s suitability for diversion from prosecution;
          •   Most appropriate conditions of probation to be imposed;
          •   Offender’s amenability to treatment;
          •   Most appropriate treatment or level of supervision to be imposed;
          •   Most appropriate sanction or behavioral control mechanism to be imposed;
          •   Decision whether to revoke probation; and the
          •   Kind of sanction or additional treatment to be ordered upon a violation. 12

The Level of Service / Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI) assessment tool provides
scores in eight subcomponents: Criminal History, Education/Employment, Family/Marital,
Leisure/Recreation, Companions, Alcohol/Drug Problems, Procriminal Attitude/Orientation,
and Antisocial Pattern. These subcomponents have been termed the “big eight” by
researchers because of their well evaluated predictivity of risk and needs.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a directive, client-centered approach for eliciting behavior
change by helping offenders explore and resolve ambivalence. It is a more focused and goal-
directed approach to working with individuals. It is an evidence based practice that has been
shown to effectively change behaviors. MI recognizes and accepts the fact that clients who
need to make changes in their lives approach counseling at different levels of readiness to
change their behavior. MI is non-judgmental, non-confrontational and non-adversarial. The
approach attempts to increase the offenders awareness of the potential problems caused,
consequences experienced, and risks faced as a result of the behavior in question. Deputies
in the Department have received over 30 hours of Motivational Interviewing training as a
standard. Additionally, Deputies assigned to Evidence-based supervision programs receive
quarterly MI booster trainings and one-on-one coaching sessions from a Motivational
Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Master trainer.

Motivational interviewing is based upon four general principles:

   1. Express empathy, guides interventionist to share with clients their understanding of the
      clients' perspective.
   2. Develop discrepancy, guides interventionist to help clients appreciate the value of
      change by exploring the discrepancy between how clients want their lives to be vs.
      how they currently are (or between their deeply-held values and their day-to-day
      behavior).
   3. Roll with resistance, guides interventionist to accept client reluctance to change as
      natural rather than pathological.
   4. Support self-efficacy, guides interventionist to explicitly embrace client autonomy
      (even when clients choose to not change) and help clients move toward change
      successfully and with confidence.




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Express Empathy

Empathy involves seeing the world through the client's eyes, thinking about things as the
client thinks about them, feeling things as the client feels them, sharing in the client's
experiences. Expression of empathy is critical to the MI approach. When clients feel that
they are understood, they are more able to open up to their own experiences and share those
experiences with others. Having clients share their experiences with you in depth allows you
to assess when and where they need support, and what potential pitfalls may need to be
focused on in the change planning process. Importantly, when clients perceive empathy on a
counselor's part, they become more open to gentle challenges by the counselor about
lifestyle issues and beliefs about substance use. Clients become more comfortable fully
examining their ambivalence about change and less likely to defend ideas like their denial of
problems, reducing use vs. abstaining, etc. In short, the counselor's accurate understanding
of the client's experience facilitates change.

Develop Discrepancy

"Motivation for change occurs when people perceive a discrepancy between where they are
and where they want to be" (Miller, Zweben, DiClemente, & Rychtarik, 1992, p. 8). MI
counselors work to develop this situation through helping clients examine the discrepancies
between their current behavior and future goals. When clients perceive that their current
behaviors are not leading toward some important future goal, they become more motivated to
make important life changes. Of course, MI counselors do not develop discrepancy at the
expense of the other MI principles, but gently and gradually help clients to see how some of
their current ways of being may lead them away from, rather than toward, their eventual
goals.

Roll with Resistance

In MI, the counselor does not fight client resistance, but "rolls with it." Statements
demonstrating resistance are not challenged. Instead the counselor uses the client's
"momentum" to further explore the client's views. Using this approach, resistance tends to be
decreased rather than increased, as clients are not reinforced for becoming argumentative
and playing "devil's advocate" to the counselor's suggestions. MI encourages clients to
develop their own solutions to the problems that they themselves have defined. Thus, there
is no real hierarchy in the client-counselor relationship for the client to fight against. In
exploring client concerns, counselors may invite clients to examine new perspectives, but
counselors do not impose new ways of thinking on clients.

Support Self-Efficacy

As noted above, a client's belief that change is possible is an important motivator to
succeeding in making a change. As clients are held responsible for choosing and carrying
out actions to change in the MI approach, counselors focus their efforts on helping the clients
stay motivated, and supporting clients' sense of self-efficacy is a great way to do that. One
source of hope for clients using the MI approach is that there is no "right way" to change, and



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if a given plan for change does not work, clients are only limited by their own creativity as to
the number of other plans that might be tried.

The client can be helped to develop a belief that he or she can make a change. For example,
the clinician might inquire about other healthy changes the client has made in their life,
highlighting skills the client already has. Sharing brief clinical examples of other, similar
clients' successes at changing the same habit or problem is sometimes helpful. In a group
setting, the power of having other people who have changed a variety of behaviors during
their lifetime gives the clinician enormous assistance in showing that people can change.

The Spirit of Motivational Interviewing

It is vital to distinguish between the spirit of motivational interviewing and techniques that we
have recommended to manifest that spirit. Clinicians and trainers who become too focused
on matters of technique can lose sight of the spirit and style that are central to the approach.
There are as many variations in technique as there are clinical encounters. The spirit of the
method, however, is more enduring and can be characterized in a few key points.
   1. Motivation to change is elicited from the client, and not imposed from without. Other
      motivational approaches have emphasized coercion, persuasion, constructive
      confrontation, and the use of external contingencies (e.g., the threatened loss of job or
      family). Such strategies may have their place in evoking change, but they are quite
      different in spirit from motivational interviewing which relies upon identifying and
      mobilizing the client's intrinsic values and goals to stimulate behavior change.
   2. It is the client's task, not the counselor’s, to articulate and resolve his or her
      ambivalence. Ambivalence takes the form of a conflict between two courses of action
      (e.g., indulgence versus restraint), each of which has perceived benefits and costs
      associated with it. Many clients have never had the opportunity of expressing the
      often confusing, contradictory and uniquely personal elements of this conflict, for
      example, "If I stop smoking I will feel better about myself, but I may also put on weight,
      which will make me feel unhappy and unattractive." The counselor’s task is to
      facilitate expression of both sides of the ambivalence impasse, and guide the client
      toward an acceptable resolution that triggers change.
   3. Direct persuasion is not an effective method for resolving ambivalence. It is tempting
      to try to be "helpful" by persuading the client of the urgency of the problem about the
      benefits of change. It is fairly clear, however, that these tactics generally increase
      client resistance and diminish the probability of change (Miller, Benefield and Tonigan,
      1993, Miller and Rollnick, 1991).
   4. The counseling style is generally a quiet and eliciting one. Direct persuasion,
      aggressive confrontation, and argumentation are the conceptual opposite of
      motivational interviewing and are explicitly prescribed in this approach. To a counselor
      accustomed to confronting and giving advice, motivational interviewing can appear to
      be a hopelessly slow and passive process. The proof is in the outcome. More
      aggressive strategies, sometimes guided by a desire to "confront client denial," easily
      slip into pushing clients to make changes for which they are not ready.


                                                                                              14
   5. The counselor is directive in helping the client to examine and resolve ambivalence.
      Motivational interviewing involves no training of clients in behavioral coping skills,
      although the two approaches not incompatible. The operational assumption in
      motivational interviewing is that ambivalence or lack of resolve is the principal obstacle
      to be overcome in triggering change. Once that has been accomplished, there may or
      may not be a need for further intervention such as skill training. The specific strategies
      of motivational interviewing are designed to elicit, clarify, and resolve ambivalence in a
      client-centered and respectful counseling atmosphere.
   6. Readiness to change is not a client trait, but a fluctuating product of interpersonal
      interaction. The therapist is therefore highly attentive and responsive to the client's
      motivational signs. Resistance and "denial" are seen not as client traits, but as
      feedback regarding therapist behavior. Client resistance is often a signal that the
      counselor is assuming greater readiness to change than is the case, and it is a cue
      that the therapist needs to modify motivational strategies.
   7. The therapeutic relationship is more like a partnership or companionship than
      expert/recipient roles. The therapist respects the client's autonomy and freedom of
      choice (and consequences) regarding his or her own behavior.
Viewed in this way, it is inappropriate to think of MI as a technique or set of techniques that
are applied to or (worse) "used on" people. Rather, it is an interpersonal style, not at all
restricted to formal counseling settings. It is a subtle balance of directive and client-centered
components shaped by a guiding philosophy and understanding of what triggers change. If it
becomes a trick or a manipulative technique, its essence has been lost (Miller, 1994).

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Social Learning

Offender change and re-socialization require direct instructional methods, modeling and
observation of the individuals in the environment. Behavioral psychologists such as Albert
Bandura have shown us the benefit that social learning plays in teaching and modeling
socially acceptable behavior.

Many, if not most, offenders have significant deficits in what to do and how to act in a
socially responsible manner. In fact, most offenders see little value in socially responsible
behavior, either because it is not supported within their peer culture or it doesn’t provide the
immediate gratification and excitement of crime. Often, offender thinking patterns are so
entrenched that they cannot break free without a considerable period of de-conditioning
followed by re-conditioning. Old patterns of behavior are extinguished and new behaviors
reinforced by the process of appropriate application of punishment and rewards. Ultimately,
offenders learn to practice self-regulation and self-management skills.

The elements that support the environment in which social learning can take place are
structure and accountability. Structure organizes the behavior of members toward a common
goal of “right living.” Staff, operating as a rational authority, provides an organized structure of
values, rules, roles, and responsibilities. The necessary information is provided to increase
awareness and knowledge of behavioral, attitudinal and/or emotional consequences.
Accountability teaches respect for structure and moves the offender from an observer stance


                                                                                                 15
(strong denial and resistance), to a participant stance (willing to comply, but attitudinally still
in criminal thinking mode), to a member stance (a willing participant who shares the new
values of right living). The environment provides the opportunity for practice and success.
This process continually reinforces gains and builds self-efficacy.

Cognitive programs operate with the following assumptions:

   •   Cognitive behavior is the key to social behavior. Problem behavior is almost always
       rooted in modes of thinking that promote and support that behavior. Permanent
       change in problem behavior demands change at a cognitive level, i.e., change in the
       underlying beliefs, attitudes, and ways of thinking;
   •   Authority and control that increases resentment and antisocial attitudes is
       counterproductive. Punitive methods of controlling behavior all too often reinforce
       modes of thinking that were responsible for the initial anti-social behavior. The
       alternative to punitive measures is not permissiveness. The alternative is a rational
       strategy of authority and control combined with programs of cognitive change;
   •   Authority and control can achieve both compliance and cooperation. Authority can
       define rules and enforce consequences while reminding and encouraging offenders to
       make their own decisions. As offenders learn to make conscious and deliberate
       decisions they accept responsibility for their behavior;
   •   Programs of cognitive change can teach pro-social ways of thinking, even to severely
       criminogenic and violent offenders. The effectiveness of cognitive programs in
       changing antisocial behavior has been demonstrated in numerous scientific studies;
   •   The values of cognitive strategies extend well beyond the correctional environment.
       Cognitive principles can be applied to victim restitution, educational settings, personal
       development, and as an overall approach to public safety and offender change.

Types of Cognitive Approaches

There are two main types of cognitive programs: cognitive skills, and cognitive restructuring.
Cognitive skill training is based on the premise that offenders have never learned the
“thinking skills” required to function productively and responsibly in society. This skill deficit
is remedied by systematic training in skills, such as problem solving, negotiation,
assertiveness, anger control, and social skills focused on specific social situations, like
making a complaint or asking for help.

Cognitive restructuring is based on the premise that offenders have learned destructive
attitudes and thinking habits that point them to criminal behavior. Cognitive restructuring
consists of identifying the specific attitudes and ways of thinking that point to criminality and
systematically replacing them with new attitudes and ways of thinking.

Cognitive restructuring and cognitive skills approaches are complementary and can be
combined in a single program. When practiced in a community model, re-socialization can
be enhanced and accelerated. Both cognitive strategies take an objective and systematic
approach to change. Change is not coerced; offenders are taught how to think for
themselves and to make their own decisions.


                                                                                                 16
Cognitive corrections programs regard offenders as fully responsible for their behavior.
Thinking is viewed as a type of learned behavior. Dishonesty and irresponsibility are the
primary targets for change. Limit setting and accountability for behavior do not conflict with
the cognitive approach to offender change - they support it.

“The Cognitive Community”

Treatment models that maximize outcomes as part of correctional strategy incorporate an in-
depth understanding of antisocial logic, social learning, cognitive/behavioral programs, and
appropriate communication. Such a program could be referred to as a “cognitive community”.
Programs producing maximum results have developed competence in the concept skills and
attitudes of these program elements. Competence includes appropriate situational and
interchangeable application of these methods. One example of application is knowing when
and how to confront crime producing attitudes and beliefs thinking (cognitive restructuring
and cognitive skill building) and when to use the behavioral confrontation tools of the
therapeutic community. In a cognitive community, cognitive behavioral programs are far more
than simply a type of group to be placed into a therapeutic environment as a learning
experience or a group activity. In effective application, social learning must never become
rote compliance or peer coercion. The treatment model employed must be flexible enough to
encompass self-actualization, but structured enough to create a climate for peer
accountability and consequences. (Gornik, M., Bush, D. and Labarbera, M. 1999)

In the cognitive community, thinking and behavior are both exposed to the larger community.
The community then becomes the baseline and milieu in which new learning and change can
take place. Once implemented, the cognitive community is as much like real life as possible.
All staff, including custody, participates in the cognitive community practices. Thoughts and
behaviors that typically lead to relapse are discovered more quickly. Staff’s ability to
recognize the internalization of offender change is more efficient. The cognitive community
operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Social learning and cognitive
change operates as the oxygen and lifeblood of the community and fosters a “no place to
hide” philosophy. Cognitive/behavioral practices form the lifestyle in which all other
operations and activities exist including: work, both on-and-off the living unit, educational
programming, drug treatment and counseling, specialized programs and groups, visitation,
family re-unification, and transition planning.

Evidence-Based Supervision Conclusion

In conclusion, the Probation Department’s success with the Adult Day Reporting Center and
the Byrne/JAG Alternative Treatment Caseload (ATC) program was linked directly to the
implementation of the nationally recognized evidenced-based supervision model and its core
principles. Empirical research has firmly supported improved outcomes of criminal
populations when these concepts are employed and appropriately monitored. The Principles
of Effective Interventions, the use validated assessment tools, and the facilitation Cognitive
Behavior Therapy (CBT) interventions, while applying Motivational Interviewing techniques,
has shown positive effects on our populations and positions the Department in alignment with
industry standards.



                                                                                           17
Moving forward, the Department plans to continue following this model of success with the
Post Release Community Supervision (PRCS) population. The Implementation Plan, section
of this document highlights the details of our mission. We believe, as demonstrated in past
efforts, these strategies will net the greatest outcomes for offenders, the community and
pubic safety as a whole.

4. LA County’s Adopted Evidence-Based Supervision Models

Background

Probation Departments throughout the state have suffered from increasing caseloads and
static funding sources. The lack of a stable funding source for adult probation services and
the lack of fiscal incentives to promote the best outcomes for public safety have constituted
major barriers to the promotion of successful probation practices. As a result, California has
experienced significant levels of probation failure that have seriously impacted state prison
costs and have ultimately not been in the best interest of public safety.

For many years, California has struggled to solve escalating and serious crime problems.
The response has been to enact harsher laws, mandatory and often lengthy periods of
incarceration, and to correspondingly build more prison and jail beds. The building and
staffing of state prisons, along with the costs of properly housing inmates has resulted in
considerable fiscal obligation. The result has been little more than the warehousing of
inmates without adequate services to prepare them for return to society.

“Prison Reform” only addresses part of the corrections issue, and only part of what it takes to
keep our communities safe. By 2007, the total adult probation population supervised in
California had increased by 15% over the past decade, from about 300,000 offenders in 1997
to roughly 350,000 offenders in 2007. This reflects a 15% decrease in misdemeanor
offenders and a 28% increase in felony offenders. 13

Statewide, approximately 52% of all adult offenders are placed on “Bank” caseloads. These
caseloads are administratively supervised and range from several hundred to well over one
thousand cases, resulting in little opportunity to intervene in the offender’s course of current
criminal behavior. Consequently, a percentage of offenders continue on a path which leads
to local jail time, or directly to state prison.

These issues negatively impact public safety through continued recidivism, the lack of
accountability, and no measurable improvements in the competency of offenders. A high
ratio of offenders to officers also reduces the offenders’ respect and expectations of the
criminal justice system. 15

With over ten million residents, Los Angeles County is the most populous county in the
United States. The Los Angeles County Probation Department has long experienced issues
with caseload size and the lack of adequate resources to service its 60,000 adult felon
offenders.



                                                                                             18
Los Angeles County Probation Department Efforts

SB 81

In late November 2007, the Los Angeles County Probation Department was notified by the
California Standards Authority (CSA), that as a result of SB 81, Los Angeles County would be
the second county (Alameda was the first) to receive a $5 million grant to develop innovative
programs for Emerging Adult (age18-25) offenders living in known gang “hot spots,” who
were either gang members or at risk of being involved with gangs. This Department chose to
establish a Day Reporting Center (DRC) where Evidence Based and Cognitive Behavioral
Therapy (CBT) interventions would be delivered on-site at the center. Mental Health and
Drug Abuse screening and therapeutic services were also delivered at the DRC. The study
results indicated participants who successfully completed the program out-performed the
Control Group, at the six-month review period, in all recidivism categories (i.e., re-arrest,
county jail, and sent to state prison).

SB 678

SB 678 was designed to reduce the felony probation failure rate by investing in probation and
achieving three key goals:

        1. Reduce crime in California's communities through a community corrections
           strategy focused on increasing the supervision and management of felony
           offenders on probation.

        2. Reduce prison overcrowding, not by early release but by decreasing the criminal
           activity of those already on felony probation. The bill actually makes offenders
           MORE accountable for their actions by providing better supervision, monitoring and
           intermediate sanctions that will change their behavior. By improving the public
           safety outcomes for adult felons who now are failing felony probation, this bill will
           stem the tide of those going to prison by de-escalating their criminal behavior.

        3. Establish sustainable funding for enhanced adult felony probation through
           performance incentive funding.

The purpose of SB 678 was to enact the "California Community Corrections Performance
Incentive Act of 2009," which would establish a system of performance-based funding to
support evidence-based practices relating to the supervision of adult felony offenders.

SB 678 was designed to reduce the felony probation failure rate which is estimated to be
approximately 40%. Forty percent of new admissions to state prison are composed of
offenders who were on formal probation. With a state-wide estimate of 200,000 offenders on
active formal probation at any given time, it is obvious what the impact is that failed probation
has on California’s prison overcrowding situation.




                                                                                              19
SB 678 has key goals to reduce the failure rate among felons on formal probation. Generally,
these goals would implement community corrections strategies and other programs aimed at
intensifying the supervision, monitoring, and correction of offenders locally. These strategies
would also include lowering caseload sizes and increase use of intermediate sanctions. Only
those formal probation offenders, who by their actions, demonstrated that they are a danger
to the community, victims, or are habitual or career criminals who are not amenable to
probation supervision.

Finally, the purpose of SB 678 was to create a sustainable funding source to maintain and
enhance local felony probation programs. The funding from SB 678 Byrne/JAG was utilized
to implement and establish the Alternative Treatment Caseload (ATC) program. The
Department’s ATC Program enabled the Probation Department to create 76 new positions,
across a variety of classifications. The ATC program was an unprecedented opportunity that
allowed the Probation Department to substantially enhance adult supervision services for a
targeted population of higher risk offenders in order to improve offender outcomes, enhance
public safety, and reduce system-wide criminal justice costs.

Since implementation, the ATC program has afforded DPOs manageable size caseloads and
greater opportunities to establish and maintain a therapeutic alliance that combine empathy
and accountability between themselves and the offenders.

ATC at a Glance

Background:

The ATC originated from Senate Bill 678. The purpose of this bill is to enact the “California
Community Corrections Performance Incentive Act of 2009,” which would establish a system
of performance-based funding to support evidence-based practices relating to the supervision
of adult felony offenders. The bill would provide a formula-based system for sharing state
savings with probation for purposes of improved supervision of felony offenders when those
savings are achieved as a result of reduced prison admissions.

Program Goal:

The goal of the ATC program is to reduce our client’s criminogenic risk factors. It is
anticipated that by reducing criminogenic risk factors, there will be a direct impact on the
reduction of prison imposed sentences.

Caseload Size:

In order to achieve program goals, Deputies are responsible for managing a small, dual-
tiered caseload that consists of approximately 40 offenders (20 in Tier 1 and 20 in Tier 2).
Tier 1 lasts approximately 6 months and Deputies meet with offenders 2-3 times a month.
Upon completion of Tier 1, offenders move onto Tier 2 where supervision is modified.




                                                                                            20
Target Population:

The target population is moderate to high risk offenders as measured by the Modified
Wisconsin Risk Assessment tool.

Program Enrollment:

       Inclusion Criteria:
   •   Currently offenders are being accepted based on a Modified Wisconsin risk score of
       approximately 15 or higher (can go lower on a case by case basis).

       Exclusion Criteria:
   •   Sex Registrant (SRG) cases;
   •   Family Violence (FAM) cases;
   •   Prop 36 cases (will take if there is an open formal grant of Probation) and
   •   In-Patient Residential Treatment conditions.

CBT Intervention (Courage to Change):

Offenders participate in the evidence-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) curriculum
that was developed by The Change Company, “Courage to Change.” This curriculum
addresses the criminogenic risk factors of the LS/CMI through a developed process known as
Interactive Journaling. Interactive Journaling is a structured and experiential writing process
that motivates and guides offenders in their decisions to make positive life changes. It
incorporates the Stages of Change model, Motivational Interviewing principles and cognitive-
behavioral strategies.

During the Interactive Journaling treatment process, offenders identify, confront and alter the
attitudes, values and thinking patterns that led to inappropriate behavior. As a result,
offenders gain the realization that they are both capable and responsible for changing their
lives.

Training & Quality Assurance:

Deputies have taken part in extensive training in order to properly prepare for the Alternative
Caseload Treatment Program. Some of the trainings include: LS/CMI, Motivational
Interviewing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Courage to Change.

In order to ensure the quality of the program is maintained, under the supervision of
Supervising Program Analysts, Program Analysts are tasked with monthly fidelity monitoring
activities including observation of service delivery, review of files and other performance data,
and data collection. As part of the quality assurance process, Program Analysts also review
and analyze statistical data that evaluates specific outcomes




                                                                                              21
Outcomes:

Since implementation, the ATC Program has continued to show its effects on the declining
number of state prison commitments stemming from the Probation Department. Current
program performance measures suggest future outcomes are just as promising. The
following chart illustrates the decline in state prison commitments as the ATC program began
implementation in July 2010:


                                                     LA County Probation Offender Prison Commitments FY2010/2011

                                              700
         # o f P ris o n C o m m itm e n ts




                                              600
                                              500
                                              400
                                              300
                                              200
                                              100
                                                0
                                                    Jul-10 Aug-10 Sep-10 Oct-10 Nov-10 Dec-10 Jan-11 Feb-11 Mar-11 Apr-11

                                                               Prison Commitments    ATC Implementation




5. Systemic Interventions

Objectives of Systemic Interventions

   •   Data-driven solutions for justice improvement;
   •   Increase probation success and reduce reliance on local and prison incarceration
       through safe and effective interventions;
   •   Compliment and build upon offender focused interventions.

Guiding Principles

   •   Leadership, Collaboration and Self Critique;
   •   A System Perspective;
   •   Commitment to thoughtful planning and data-driven practices;
   •   Examination of key decision points;
   •   Commitment to research based practices;
   •   Build capacity through options to enhance Probation success and safely reduce
       reliance on incarceration;
   •   Innovation and replication;


                                                                                                                            22
   •   Policy and practice.

An Example of a Systemic Intervention: Program to Reduce the Number of State
Prison Recommendations

Systemic Intervention Effort to Address 2010 SB 678 Departmental Benchmarks resulted in:

   •   2,100 less State prison commitments below the “weighted” SB 678 baseline.

   •   Assessment: After reviewing Adult Probation Systems (APS), the Byrne/JAG
       Committee determined that approximately 30% of State prison recommendations were
       not appropriate.

   •   Planning & Implementation: A training program (for line staff) was implemented to
       ensure that State prison recommendations were appropriate. A Quality Assurance
       (QA) system was implemented at the Supervisor level, which was also tied to the
       MAPP goals of the Area Office Directors.

   •   Evaluation: The success was evident as demonstrated by the reduction in State
       prison recommendations and the subsequent reduction in State prison commitments
       (2,100 in performance year 2010).

6. Implementation Plan

The Plan

The Los Angeles County Probation Department will implement an Evidence Based
Supervision Model that serves two (2) populations; 1) the Post-Release Community
Supervision offenders; and 2) the Non-Sex, Non-Violent, Non-Serious (3Ns) population. The
plan will be used to address the needs of the clients while ensuring public safety. The plan is
designed to ensure that community supervision and outreach services are effective in
promoting positive offender behavioral change in an effort to reduce recidivism and State
Prison commitments.

The plan can be described as involving several progressive steps from case intake to case
termination. Critical plan components include:

   •   Post Release Community Supervision Flow Process
   •   Post Release Community Supervision Requirements
   •   Case Assessment and Planning
   •   Matching criminogenic needs with specific outreach services (CBT, Mental Health,
       substance abuse, family counseling, education and employment service)
   •   Program Completion and Transition to Aftercare Planning




                                                                                            23
Offender Classification System

The Los Angeles County Probation Department’s AB109 Evidence Based Supervision
Program is a dual supervision model serving; 1) Low Level State Prison Post Release
offenders and 2) Low-Level Non-violent, Non-Serious, and Non-Sex offenders (N3’s) that
would otherwise be sentenced to State Prison. To implement a response to this shift in
community corrections the Los Angeles County Probation Department developed a three (3)
tiered system that is designed to provide an appropriate level of supervision based on levels
of risk. Probation will categorize offenders according to their risk level based on the LS/CMI.
Tiers are as follows:

        Tier 1 – Reduced (1 point)
        Tier 2 – Moderate (2 points)
        Tier 3 – High (3 points)

Target Population

Based on State assumptions, the Probation Department will have the added responsibility of
supervising approximately 9,791 Post Release offenders and 8,342 Low Level (N3’s)
offenders beginning no earlier than July 1, 2011. Based on CDCR statistics it is anticipated
that the breakdown of offenders by crime type will be as follows:

   •    44% Drug Offense
   •    41% Property Offense
   •    14% Other
   •    .72% Sex offense (failure to register)

Currently, the breakdown of active felony adult probationers supervised by LA County
Probation, by crime type is:

   •    38%   Drug Offense
   •    29%   Serious and Violent Offenses
   •    16%   Sex Offenses
   •    14%   Property Offenses
   •     3%   Other

Post Release Community Supervision Requirements

This population will receive services based on the Probation AB 109 Evidence-based
Supervision Model which will include the following services and case management practices:

       Ratio of 50:1;
       Supervision Intake (file review);
       Risk and Needs Assessment administered (LS/CMI);
       Review of Assessments (Compass and LS/CMI);
       Caseload Placement and assignment (Tier 1,2 or 3);


                                                                                            24
       Financial Evaluator Activities;
       Initial Home/Family visit (No later than 14 days);
       Development of a probation supervision case plan
       Two (2) Home/Family visits monthly;
       MI practices;
       CBT using MI (2-3 times per month);
       Courage to Change (C2C)Journaling (minimally 1 time per month);
       Pre and Post tests (outlined in section x);
       Periodic Anti-Narcotic Testing ;
       Referrals to services (to include monitoring of participation) according to criminogenic
       needs (Mental Health, Social Services, Substance Abuse, Education, and Employment
       Services); and
       Graduated sanctions as needed to promote rehabilitation (GPS/electronic monitoring,
       flash incarceration and PAAWs).

Additionally, specialized Deputy Probation Officers (DPO) will operate in two person teams
with mobile capability in county vehicles throughout Los Angeles County. The main duty
function of these DPOs is to conduct mobile “field checks” on Post Release Community
Supervision Offenders. These “field checks” may occur at various locations such as an
offender’s home, work, school, treatment or other applicable location.

All Post Release Community Supervision offenders will be required to report to the Probation
Department twice and will have two (2) field visits conducted during the first thirty (30) days of
case supervision. After the initial 30 days, the offender will be required to report as mandated
based on what supervision tier they have been assigned. Reporting requirements for the
three (3) tier system is as follows:

Tier             Office Visit                               Field Visit
1                1 time, per month (minimum standards)      Not Required
2                1 time, per month (minimum standards)      Every 90 days
3                1 time, per month (minimum standards)      1 time, per month

At these office visits the offenders will receive Cognitive Behavioral Therapy administered by
the DPOs through the use of the Courage to Change interactive journaling program.
Interactive Journaling is a structured and experiential writing process that motivates and
guides offenders in their decisions to make positive life changes. It incorporates the Stages
of Change model, Motivational Interviewing principles and cognitive-behavioral strategies.

During the Interactive Journaling treatment process, offenders identify, confront and alter the
attitudes, values and thinking patterns that led to inappropriate behavior. As a result,
offenders gain the realization that they are both capable and responsible for changing their
lives.

The DPO’s will be responsible for providing reports, tracking of collected data, and verifying
proof of the offender’s compliance. It is critical that the Post Release Community Supervision
offenders participate in structured behavioral, social learning and cognitive behavioral


                                                                                               25
evidence-based interventions to target their prioritized criminogenic needs as determined by
the risk and need assessment and outlined in the case plan. Offenders will be supervised by
DPOs trained in principles of effective correctional interventions and cognitive behavioral
curriculum.




                                                                                         26
Post Release Community Supervision Flow Process
                                                                         Wednesday, June 08, 2011
                            CDCR Pre-Release
                      Assessment/Screening and Case
                          Records/Parole Packet



             LA County Probation Post Release Center (PRC)
       “Pre-Planning Stage- to be initiated 30 to 60 prior to release”

      •    Central point of contact for CDCR
      •    Liaison with “Parole Desk” at each State Prison facility

   PRC receives case record packet and is responsible for the following:

      a. File Review: Conduct Modified Wisconsin Assessment (to assess
         offender risk), review the COMPAS score, LEADS and other case
         information.

      (All offenders will be classified as “High Risk” for the initial 30 days of
      Post Release Supervision and will be required to adhere to all
      supervision requirements.)

      b. Video Conferencing: Staff will provide the offender with general
         Probation Orientation information and community supervision
         expectations. Staff will provide answers to questions offenders
         have regarding next steps;

      c.   Processes necessary offender Inter-State Compact;

      d. Processes necessary County to County transfers;

      e. Conducts address verification and home assessments;

      f.   Request additional Condition of Probation (submit to CDCR); and

      g. Assigns program cases to supervision area offices.




                       CDCR Case Records Notification
                                   And
                            Release to County



                      Probation Community Supervision
                          (See Case Supervision Process &
                                    Procedures)




                                                                                          27
Case Supervision Process and Procedures

All offenders accepted into the program will be assigned to Tier 3 supervision level and
assessed for treatment needs within the first thirty (30) days during which time the
assessment is verified. Due to the high risk of offenders re-offending during the first months
of community supervision, services will generally be frontloaded. The offender will receive
intense supervision by reporting no less than twice per month to their assigned DPO during
this period of time.

Once the adult offender arrives at the assigned area office to meet with the DPO, the intake
process begins. The offender will first receive an orientation reviewing community
supervision conditions and other requirements. Once the information has been covered, the
offender will receive an LS/CMI assessment that identifies the offender’s criminogenic needs.
A case plan driven by criminogenic needs, as identified by the LS/CMI, will be developed to
address and reduce those needs by targeting specific interventions.

In keeping with current evidence based trends for offender management, the Probation
Department assesses high risk offenders to determine what level of risk they pose to the
community and what treatment modalities and dosage would best achieve measurable
outcomes. Criminogenic needs are those attributes that if treated and reduced are the most
likely to decrease the likelihood of future criminality. To further illustrate how the LS/CMI is
used in identifying need, an offender with a high score in the “Alcohol/Drug Problem” domain
indicates the need for substance abuse treatment.

In order to effectively address criminogenic needs and the risk factors that lead to recidivism,
treatment should promote stable and lasting pro-social life changes the LS/CMI assessment
keys on eight central criminogenic needs in order to determine risk and how these needs can
be addressed, as well as identifying strengths. The central targeted needs are listed below:

      1.   Criminal History
      2.   Education/Employment
      3.   Family/Marital
      4.   Leisure/Recreation
      5.   Companions
      6.   Alcohol/Drug Problem
      7.   Pro-criminal Attitude/Orientation
      8.   Antisocial Pattern

Once an offender’s criminogenic needs are identified and rated as to which should receive
immediate treatment, appropriate referrals to qualified treatment programs will be matched to
the client's needs in order to capitalize on research-backed treatment interventions.
Evidence based practice clearly demonstrates that effective treatment and reduction of
criminogenic needs correlates to reduces recidivism. The LS/CMI assessment enables the
Department to identify and address the needs of the offender.




                                                                                             28
Case Planning

After completion of the LS/CMI the results will be used to identify the appropriate level of
service and treatments to include an array of services such as:

          •   Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (to be conducted by the DPO);
          •   Mental Health services as needed (Service provider);
          •   Substance Abuse Treatment (Service provider);
          •   Education Services (Service provider);
          •   Employment Services (Service provider);
          •   Family Counseling (Service provider);

Before the DPO and the offender begin the on-going CBT interventions or treatment referrals,
the Working Alliance Inventory Survey (WAI-SR) pre-test will be completed by the offender.
The Working Alliance Inventory Survey is a self-rating form composed of a series of Likert-
scale questions. It is a standardized, reliable instrument for evaluating the extent to which a
client and therapist work collaboratively and purposefully and connect emotionally.

A Working Alliance Inventory Survey (WAI-SR) will be completed in order to measure the
working relationship between the Probation Officer and the offender. Offenders will complete
a Participant Evaluation at the completion of each Courage to Change (C2C) journal session.

The DPO will be responsible for completing the post assessment of Participant after the
completion of each C2C journal. The DPO will complete the Participant Evaluation form prior
to each CBT session. The Evaluation and Assessment Instruments are validated tools
composed of Likert-scale questions designed to measure pre and post participation results
for both participants (offenders) and facilitators (DPO’s). The instruments measure participant
progress through self-assessment and provider assessment. The WAI-SR and Participant
Evaluation forms will be administered by Supervising Deputy Probation Officer.

The DPO will develop a supervision case plan based on the individual needs of the offender.
The overall goal is to develop a plan to reduce the “criminogenic needs” and risk score of
adults at risk of re-offending, which will assist offenders in finding stable employment/income
and housing. Part of the program fidelity process includes the task of reassessing at various
stages of treatment to ensure program effectiveness and offender compliance.

Program Completion and Transition to Aftercare Planning

Post Release Community Supervision (PRCS)

The LS/CMI is initially conducted during the first office visit. The scores will be captured as
baseline data. The scores will identify the criminogenic risk/needs and responsivity factors
which will aid in tailoring the appropriate case plan that showcases needed services.
Subsequently, when the offender has successfully adhered to the supervision the LS/CMI will
be re-administered. The scores will be used to review and compare analysis in conjunction
with the earlier administered pre-test. The results will be reviewed to assess the overall


                                                                                            29
changes in criminogenic needs and risk of offender. Additionally, the offender will complete
the Working Alliance Inventory Survey (WAI-SR) self-assessments to be utilized for program
evaluation purposes. Upon completion these cases may be returned to court for early
termination of probation supervision. Offenders with verified stable employment/income and
housing or stable means of support that reassess at or below an overall risk score of 20, will
be transitioned out of the Post Release Community Supervision program.

Non-sex, Non-violent, Non-serious (N3’s)

Case management for the N3 population will generally be similar to the Post Release
Community Supervision (PRCS) population. It is anticipated that Low Level (N3’s) offender
population will fall into Tiers 1, 2 & 3. Tiers 2 & 3 will mandate the practice of evidence-based
supervision model as outlined above.

The Tier 1 population will receive the following program supervision services:

       Maximum Caseload Ratio ranging from 50:1
       Risk Assessment Targeting Criminogenic Needs
       Monthly Field (Home) and Office Contacts
       Treatment Referrals
       Community Based Services (CBO)
       Anti-Narcotic Testing
       Provide Employment Resources

The critical factors identified in Case Management and aftercare processes will be evaluated
for quality and adherence to the requirements. The Quality Assurance unit will evaluate and
capture the data/information to assess the functioning of the case management process.
(Section x outlines the Quality Assurance Unit’s roles, responsibilities and processes and
procedures)




                                                                                              30
                 Case Management Reference Guide

Initiate          1. SDPO review and assign new case to DPO within 24 hours. (Case
                     assignment will occur prior to CDCR release.)
                  2. DPO schedule first office visit.
  Orientation    First office visit to occur within five (5) days of case assignment
                 1. Offender will be given a general overview of the Post Release
  Plan              Community Supervision Program expectations.
                 2. Offender will be given an overview of the Evidence-Based
                    Interventions being offered.
                 3. LS/CMI will be conducted by the DPO. Baseline data will be captured
                    and recorded in a database and in APS.

                 Second office visit to occur within the first twenty-one (21) days of
   Create Plan
                 case assignment

                 1. DPO and offender will begin the case planning process. The DPO
                    will use Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques to increase the
                    engagement of the offender from the onset.

                 2. Identify the dosage of rehabilitative services (CBT and C2C Journals)
                    that are required to promote intrinsic change that will support meeting
                    case plan stated goals

                 3. Based on the LS/CMI, identify the C2C Journals to be completed by
                    the offender.

                 4. DPO will develop preliminary case plan within 7 business days based
                    upon prioritized needs of the client.

                 5. DPO will schedule a case plan conference with the offender within 7
                    days of the LS/CMI case plan completion and assign appropriate
                    services.
    Assign
   Resources     6. DPO will provide offender with an individualized treatment plan and
                    schedule.




                                                                                        31
                                       Level of Supervision   Level of Supervision   Level of Supervision
     Baseline          Task Type               High                 Medium                   Low
    outlined in
                       Office Visits            2                      1                      1
    Case Plan
                       Field Visits             2                      1                      1

                       CBT                  1-2 hours            45 min - 1 hour            None

                       Narcotic            2 per month            1 per month            2 per quarter
                       Testing              (minimum)              (minimum)              (minimum)

                       Assessments        Orientation &          Orientation &            Orientation
                       and Pre/Post
                       Tests            Completion of CTB      Completion of CTB


                   DPO to initiate supervision practices as mandated by the Tier of
Execute            Supervision the offender is assigned. Additionally, the DPO will
                   conduct the CBT services as outlined in the case plan. Supervision
                   practices will be maintained until the offender has been reassigned to a
                   new Tier of Supervision has been terminated.

                  1. Each offender will meet at least twice per month with their DPO as
                     scheduled.
                  2. The DPO will review the following prior to meeting with the offender:
                        a. Behavior file.
                        b. Narcotic testing file.
                  3. DPO will complete a case conference sheet bi-monthly for participant
                     that documents compliance with conditions of supervision, Post
                     Release Community Supervision Program attendance, drug testing,
                     participation and short term goal requirements.
                  4. DPO will discuss progress and assist offender in the development of
                     personal short term (monthly) goals that will be documented in the
                     offenders Record of Supervision.
                  5. DPO will reinforce skills taught in CTC curriculum that occurs twice a
                     month and provide additional skill building scenarios if an offender
                     behavior indicates a lack of active participation.
                  6. DPO and offender will assess monthly whether the offender is
                     reaching their monthly targeted goals.
                  7. DPO will exercise graduate sanctions as needed to help the offender
                     gain compliance to his/her court orders and program requirements.




                                                                                                         32
  Update       1. DPO will monitor the offender’s progress throughout the program and
  & Track         update the offender’s case plan as needed.

               2. DPO will review the individual case plans to assess (a) provision of
                  prescribed EBP interventions and other activities, (b) accomplishment
                  of case plan objectives, and (c) timely update of the case plan for
                  provision of aftercare services and transition to a reduced supervision
                  level.

                    (Monitoring will be executed through an assortment of techniques that
                    track and evaluate the offender’s compliance. This reinforces vigilance
                    on recognizing possible warning signs of non-compliance and need to
    Convey &
     Report         modify treatment and services, thus reducing the risk for relapse
                    before it occurs)

               1.   DPO will develop and submit reports to the court as ordered
               2.   DPO will notify the court of any violations per Departmental mandates
               3.   DPO record all case activities and services rendered in APS
               4.   DPO will maintain Quality Assurance data bases
               5.   DPO will maintain monthly statistics

Close       The DPO will take the following steps:
               1. DPO will administer the LS/CMI and WAI-SR assessment upon
                  offender’s successful completion of the individual case plan
                  requirements.
               2. DPO will assist offender in developing a comprehensive relapse
                  prevention plan.
               3. DPO will make a recommendation to the court for a request of
                  termination of supervision or transfer to regular supervision, “High Risk”
                  caseload.
               4. Based upon court approval, the DPO will schedule an exit conference
                  with the offender and family for support.
                       a. DPO will instruct offender to report to assigned Area Office for
                          further supervision.
               5. DPO will complete the Program Completion form and submit to the
                  Quality Assurance Unit.

               6. Offenders with verified stable employment/income and housing or


                                                                                         33
                     stable means of support that reassess at or below an overall risk score
     Close Out       of 20, will be transitioned out of the Post Release Community
     the Case        Supervision program and reassigned to a regular supervision “High
                     Risk” caseload at a Regional Area Office for the remainder of their
                     supervision.

                 7. DPO may return the case to court for early termination of supervision.


Probation Violation Flow Process

Supervision Deputies will be responsible for ensuring all offender violations are reported in
accordance with the policies and procedures of the LA County Probation Department. The
flow chart below illustrates the Probation violation flow process for Post Release Community
Supervision offenders:

            P o s t R e le a s e C o m m u n ity S u p e r v is io n R e v o c a tio n
                                       F lo w P r o c e s s
                                                                              W ednesday, June 08, 2011

                                 Violation



            Detained                                  Non-Detained



        Due Process                                   Court Hearing
      Morrissey Hearing

                       County Jail (Increments of two                 Revocation of Probation
                         (2), seven (7) day periods)                    1 Year County Jail




                             Alternative Sentencing                       Alternative Sentencing
                         •      Flash Incarceration                   •      Incarceration
                         •      Home Detention                        •      Home Detention


                          Released to Community                       Released to Community
                               Supervision                                 Supervision




                                                                                                     34
Role, Function, and Responsibility of the Probation Staff

The Probation Director will be responsible for all aspects of program management. The
Secretary III will provide administrative support for and report to the Probation Director.
Supervising Deputy Probation Officers (SDPO) will report to the Probation Director. SDPOs
will supervise Deputy Probation Officer II (DPO II) personnel and will be intensively involved in
the training of staff, and the monitoring and assessment of this program. The SDPO will
review and sign all court reports. The SDPO will have the responsibility of maintaining and/or
coordinating the collection, disbursement, entry, and update of all data with emphasis on
quality assurance.

The DPO will report to the SDPO assigned to their region. The DPO will be responsible for
providing casework services for the targeted population of offenders. They may drug test
clients and appear in court as directed. Additionally, the DPO will be responsible for
conducting field visits, performing data entry; ensuring files contain all pertinent information,
monitor compliance and update the Adult Probation System (APS).

7. Contracting for Service Providers

Community Based Treatment Services Contracting Process

Through the Request for Proposal (RFP) process, Probation will seek the participation of
community based treatment providers for needed services. This includes mental health and
substance abuse treatment, and referrals for vocational, educational, and job preparation
services. This will require collaboration with the Departments Contract Monitoring Division.

Contract Treatment Providers will be required to employ evidence-based treatment models
and practices through-out the continuum of services offered to offenders, and will increase
the likelihood for reducing recidivism. The evidence-based programs must contain certain
characteristics that can serve as indicators of measurements.

Mental Health providers will be required to provide mental health assessments for services
and develop a treatment plan. Providers will be required to refer offenders to local mental
health agencies for treatment and services in the community and provide follow-up
assessments services to gauge the offender’s progress.

Substance Abuse services will include a requirement for the use of an addiction severity
assessment tool that will identify the offender’s level of abuse and need for services. The
Departments RFP will include requirements that will facilitate the referral and enrollment of
the offender for contracted department paid treatment providers.

Education, vocational and job readiness services will be provided by a contracted provider.
The provider will be required to complete an educational assessment and vocational
assessment to determine the offender’s skill level and readiness for employment. Offenders
will be referred for adult education classes, vocational training or employment as part of their
overall case plan.


                                                                                             35
Internal Program Checks including will include monitoring and assessment of treatment
implementation, review of client files, and risk/needs-oriented records that monitor treatment
progress and correspond directly to the results of the LS/CMI. This will require routine
documented observation of providers with regard to delivery of treatment services and
programming, with written feedback to staff. Periodic documented surveys of clients, while
participating in the programs, will be conducted regarding satisfaction with services being
provided will be used to aid in program modifications/improvements when needed.

8. Quality Assurance

The Quality Assurance Unit will implement a systemic observation and evaluation process
which examines the various components of the program, in an effort to maximize the
probability that minimum stands of quality will be maintained. Observations, data analysis,
and other relevant actions will be taken to ensure that desired levels of quality are in
accordance with the standards of the program.

Data Analysis
A database will be maintained to track two (2) outcomes; successful completion and rate of
recidivism in regards to state prison imposed sentences. The database includes specific
demographic variables that are directly related to successful outcomes. These variables
include age, ethnicity, sex, currently employed and completion of high school. The database
also includes all pre/post measurements. The results from the database will be analyzed
through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). SPSS is a computer
program used for survey authoring and deployment (IBM SPSS Data Collection), data mining
(IBM SPSS Modeler), text analytics, statistical analysis, and collaboration & deployment
(batch & automated scoring services).
Observation Procedures

In order to assure that the Courage to Change (CTC) and Motivational Interviewing (MI)
interventions are being utilized and implemented with fidelity to the model, a team of analysts
will conduct direct observations of live, one-on-one sessions between the Deputy Probation
Officer and the offender. All observations will be conducted by a pair of analysts that will work
together in order to maintain Inter-Rater Reliability. Observations will be conducted by region.
Once all DPOs in the region have completed their one hour MI Skill Application Training, the
team of analysts will schedule observations for that region.

SDPO & DPO Responsibilities

Supervising Deputy Probation Officers (SDPO) will be responsible for scheduling the
observation date and time for each DPO II in their region. It will be the responsibility of the
DPO to gain consent from the adult offender participating in the observation. Offenders will
be informed that the session will be audio recorded. The DPO will explain to the offender the
purpose of the recording – solely for the review of the DPO’s performance – and that each
recording will be deleted immediately following its review.



                                                                                              36
Analysts Responsibilities

Analysts will arrive at least 30 minutes prior to each scheduled observation. Analysts will
meet with the DPO prior to the observation to discuss the CTC journal being reviewed and
the target behavior being addressed. The Analysts will position themselves in plain sight of
the DPO and offender in order to observe all interactions. The thirty to forty-five minute
session will be audio recorded. CTC and Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI)
observation forms will be completed by the Analysts during and after the session.

Once the session is completed, the offender will be escorted out of the probation office by the
DPO. At this time, 20 random minutes of the audio recording will be reviewed by the
Analysts. This will allow the Analysts to complete the MITI scoring portion of the observation.

   Note: If time permits, the audio recording should be reviewed in the presence of the DPO.
         This will present an opportunity for the DPO to self-assess and for the Analysts to
         provide feedback to the DPO.

The Analysts will take the following steps during assessment process:

   1.   Analysts will make contact with DPO and arrange observation setting.
   2.   Analysts will observe live one-on-one session between DPO and offender.
   3.   Analysts will closely monitor the use of the CTC curriculum and the application of MI.
   4.   Analysts will review 20 random minutes of audio recorded session.
   5.   Analysts will complete the following forms upon review of the audio tape:

           a.   Sentence Stemming
           b.   Behavior Counts
           c.   Global Scores
           d.   CTC scoring

In the case that a offender does not attend the scheduled session, the DPO will be given the
opportunity to re-schedule or select an alternate offender who is willing to participate in the
observation.

Upon completion of all observations for the region, an exit meeting will be scheduled between
the SDPOs and the Supervising Analyst. The SDPOs will be provided with the individual DPO
scores, their strengths, and areas in need of improvement.

Observation Forms

Courage to Change: An observation assessment fidelity form evaluating the delivery of the
Courage to Change curriculum with the offender. The fidelity tool concentrates on three
areas; Facilitation, Responsivity and Group Work if applicable. Scoring is based on a 5 point
scale with the definitions listed below:




                                                                                             37
      1                 2               3               4                5
      Skill     level   Skill         Skill             Skill         Skill
      undermines        evidenced at evidenced at       evidenced at evidenced at
      program           below         average level     above         superior level
      integrity         average level                   average level

Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) 3.1.1: The MITI has two components the
global scores and behavior counts. A global score requires the coder to assign a single
number from a five-point scale to characterize the entire interaction. These scores capture
the rater’s global impression. Five global dimensions are rated: Evocation, Collaboration,
Autonomy/ Support, Direction, and Empathy. A behavior count requires the coder to tally
instances of particular interviewer behaviors.

T.B. Moyers, T.Martin, J.K. Manuel, W.R. Miller & D. Ernst University of Mexico Center on
Alcoholism, and Substance Abuse and Addictions (CASAA)

9. Budget Narrative - (please see the attached line-item budget detail)

The proposed plan requires the Los Angeles County Probation Department to enhance
personnel to include the addition of 557 full time positions. The hiring process would be
staggered in quarterly intervals over a three year period, as outlined in the line-item budget
detail. This plan includes small caseloads that afford staff the opportunity to truly work with
offenders to improve outcomes. Funded staff will be assigned to this program on a full time
basis. Their duties fully support program goals and objectives. As a result, more offenders
will be able to successfully complete probation and remain in their respective communities.

Personnel Descriptions

Two (2) Senior Probation Director will be responsible for program oversight, including
responsibility for administrative operations, ongoing assessment of outcomes, and approval
of subsequent program modifications. This individual shall have a minimum of three years of
experience at the level of Probation Director or shall possess a college degree from an
accredited college and have five years of responsible experience supervising professional
staff in the delivery of services to clients in social or human services, mental health, or
correctional programs. This position will be funded 100% by the program.

Seven (7) Probation Director reports to the Senior Probation Director and is responsible for
assisting in the administration of this program providing overall direction, management, and
evaluation of this program. This individual shall have a minimum of two years of increasingly
responsible managerial or administrative experience and shall possess a bachelor’s degree
from an accredited college or university. This position will be funded 100% by the program.

Two (2) Senior Secretary III will be responsible for the provision of full time secretarial
support for the Senior Probation Director assigned to manage this program. This individual
shall possess a minimum of one year of highly responsible secretarial experience at the level


                                                                                            38
of Los Angeles County Secretary III, Secretary IV, Senior Secretary II, Intermediate
Stenographic Secretary or two years of responsible secretarial experience at the level of Los
Angeles County’s class of Secretary I, Secretary II, or Stenographic Secretary. Specific
duties will include: handling of phone calls, appointments, and correspondence; gathering of
data for special reports; responsibility, for routine personnel, budget, scheduling, supply, and
time keeping responsibilities and acting as a liaison with staff for the Senior Probation
Director. This position will be funded 100% by this project.

Seven (7) Secretary III will be responsible for the provision of full-time secretarial assistance
to administrative support positions. This individual will possess a minimum of one year of
responsible secretarial experience at the level of Los Angeles County’s class of Secretary I or
Secretary II –or- one year of medical stenographic experience at the level of Los Angeles
County’s class of Medical Stenographer or two years of highly specialized office clerical
experience keyboarding using a computer. Examples of duties include: replies to
correspondence with or without dictation, screens office callers and telephone calls, furnishes
requested information, and act as a liaison officer between the supervisor’s office and other
departments. This position will be funded 100% by this program.

Thirty-seven (37) Supervising Deputy Probation Officers will be responsible for the direct
supervision of 364 Deputy Probation Officer II staff assigned to oversee program participants
and assist with the assignment of probation (Note: Two (2) Deputy Probation Officer II staff
will be assigned to administrative functions and will report to the Administrative Services
Bureau. This bring the total number of DPO IIs to 366). The Supervisor will obtain release
information of inmates and establish protocol for Probation Officers to adhere to. In addition,
the Supervisor will oversee the operations of electronic monitoring. It will be required to
complete and submit personnel management related documents consistent with issued
deadlines coordinate and monitor subordinate compliance with staff training requirements.
The individual shall have graduated from an accredited college and have completed three
years of experience in probation or parole work at the level of Deputy Probation II or higher.
This position will be funded 100% by this project.

Three hundred sixty-six (364) Deputy Probation Officer II staff will be responsible for utilizing
evidence-based supervision practices to manage all supervision and case management
activities. (Note: Two (2) Deputy Probation Officer II staff will be assigned to administrative
functions and will report to the Administrative Services Bureau. This brings the total number
of DPO IIs to 366). Staff shall be assigned to offices throughout the County. These individuals
shall have graduated from an accredited college or have three years of experience as a
peace officer in probation, parole, corrections, or other law enforcement fields at the level of
Los Angeles County’s classes of Deputy Probation Officer I, or other applicable class as
listed in the official class specification. These positions will be funded 100% by this project.

Seven (7) Head Clerks will be responsible of supervising a large number of employees
performing general and specialized office clerical work. Specific duties include planning ways
and means of accomplishing work objectives, plans flow of work from inception to completion,
and reviews work of subordinates. These employees shall have a minimum of four years




                                                                                              39
office clerical experience, two years of which must have been in a highly specialized or
supervisory capacity. These positions shall be funded 100% by this program.

Seven (7) Supervising Typist-Clerk will supervise, for a substantial portion of their time,
general and specialized office clerical work and does skilled typewriting work. Examples of
duties include: has full supervisory responsibility for a small number, instructs employees in
the work to be performed and the order in which it is to be done and explains changes in
departmental rules and procedures, and keeps records of and makes reports on work
performed by their subordinates. These employees shall possess a minimum of two years
office clerical experience involving typewriting, one year of which mush have been in a
specialized capacity, and typewriting skill must be at the rate of 40 net words per minute. This
position will be funded 100% by this program.

Eighty (80) Intermediate Typist Clerks will be responsible for providing additional on site
clerical support necessary as a result of adding additional deputized staff to the work location.
Specific duties include handling telephone and in-person public inquiries, the processing of
case files according to established clerical protocols, data entry, and the operation of a
variety of office equipment such as personal computers, to input data, perform computations,
or produce documents. These employees shall have six months office clerical involving
typing in the County service or in districts under the jurisdiction of the County, or, one year’s
office clerical experience involving typing outside the County service, or, a certificate of
Associate of Arts degree in clerical procedures or office administration from an accredited
college. These positions shall be funded 100% by this project.

Three (3) Administrative Services Manager I will be responsible for ensuring that complex
and time sensitive studies are conducted to meet program requirements, along with the
assessment and preparation of required budgets. These employees will perform critical
budgetary, analytical, and oversight functions, which include the performance of highly
specialized, complex and sensitive studies that will provide consultative services to
management. These positions shall be funded 100% by this project.

Two (2) Supervising Program Analyst will be responsible for providing immediate technical
assistance and administrative supervision to the Program Analysts assigned to this program.
This individual will be responsible for working with Federal, State, and local agencies to gain
agreement on program concepts and goals, evaluating program effectiveness,
recommending corrective actions and reporting program results to management. This
employee shall have oversight responsibility for data monitoring and analysis and for making
recommendations regarding program modifications. This employee will also ensure that
appropriate data is available and properly utilized in the completion of all required Federal,
State, and County reports, and that all established report deadlines are met. This individual
shall have graduated from an accredited college and have two years experience in a
responsible staff, administrative or supervisory capacity, analyzing and making
recommendations for the solution of problems of organization, procedure, program, budget or
personnel. One additional year of the required experience will be accepted for each post
graduate year of college. This position will be funded 100% by this project.




                                                                                              40
Twenty-six (26) Program Analysts, Probation will be responsible for developing and
implementing program data collection and evaluation systems in order to assess the efficacy
of the program model. These employees will also review and monitor this project for
compliance with program requirements, analyze trends and forecasts and make
recommendations to management for long range planning. Program Analysts shall also
prepare management reports which reflect program performance activities and statistical
data, and formulate revisions to improve program efficiency and outcomes. These individuals
shall have graduated from an accredited college and have two year’s experience in a highly
responsible staff capacity at the level of Administrative Assistant III, analyzing and making
recommendations for the solution of problems of organization, procedure, program, budget,
or personnel, or, one year of experience at the level of Program Assistant and graduation
from the County of Los Angeles Administrative Intern Program. These positions will be
funded 100% by this project.

One (1) Procurement Assistant III will be responsible to direct the activities of a number of
procurement and procurement-clerical positions engaged in the procuring of supplies,
equipment, and services for this program. Examples of duties include: ensures compliance
with established County and departmental purchasing policies and procedures, supervises
the preparation of reports of findings, and plans work of the procurement section so that
operating units will be met. These people shall possess a minimum of one year of
procurement experience at the level of Procurement Assistant II supervising staff performing
a full range of purchasing functions including the preparation of purchase orders, and
specification writing. This position will be funded 100% by this project.

One (1) Accountant III will be responsible for professional accounting and auditing work,
under technical direction. Specific duties include: analyzing and interpreting accounting and
other financial provisions of this program, cost accounting assignments in connection with the
operations, compiling and evaluating fiscal accounts. This person shall possess a minimum
two years professional accounting or auditing experience at the level of Los Angeles County’s
class of Accountant II, Accountant-Auditor, or higher –and- completion of accounting courses
in an accredited college equivalent to 21 semester units or 32 quarter units including a course
in cost accounting, governmental accounting, or auditing. This position will be funded 100%
by this project.

One (1) Senior Departmental Personnel Technician will be responsible to perform the more
difficult technical personnel work for this program and supervise the work of technical
personnel and clerical staff of the personnel office. Specific duties include counseling
employees, and management in matters involving procedure, regulations, problems,
grievances, and discipline; prepares case and represents the department in hearings. This
person shall possess a minimum graduation from an accredited college or university and
three years of experience in a staff capacity analyzing and making recommendations for the
solution of problems of organization, procedure, program, budget, or personnel –or- one year
of experience as a Departmental Personnel Technician. This position shall be funded 100%
by this program.




                                                                                            41
Two (2) Departmental Personnel Technician will be responsible for the performance of a
variety of specialized clerical duties in the personnel office of this program. Specific duties
include maintaining personnel files and records of individual employees, including work
history, vacations, leaves of absence, probation reports, performance evaluations, appraisals
of promotability, status changes, and disciplinary actions. These people shall possess a
minimum of one year of experience in a highly specialized capacity assisting in technical
personnel work in a central personnel office –or- one year of payroll experience at the level of
Payroll clerk I. This position will be funded 100% by this program.

Two (2) Payroll Clerk II will be responsible for processing the payroll for this program.
Specific duties include recording time reports and maintaining time records for the employees
in this program, enters and monitors payroll data necessary to produce total pay, and
explains payroll policies and procedures to employees. These people shall possess a
minimum of one year’s payroll clerical experience in a central payroll office of a County
department at the level of a Payroll Clerk I- or- two years specialized office clerical
experience. This position will be funded 100% by this program.

One (1) Departmental Employee Relations Representative will be responsible in assisting in
the administration of the employee relations program, including representing departmental
management in contacts and negotiations with organizations. Specific duties include
assisting in recommending policies, procedures, rules, and regulations governing the
department’s employee relations program. This person shall posses a minimum three year’s
experience in a staff capacity analyzing and making recommendations for the solution of
programs –or- graduation from an accredited college with a Bachelor’s Degree in labor
studies or a closely related field and one years’ experience representing either management
or a labor in negotiating. This position will be funded 100% by this program.

One (1) Custodian will be responsible to maintain the buildings in a clean and orderly
condition. Specific duties include: clean, sweep and mop floors, replenishes toilet room
supplies, and removes trash. No training or experience is required for this position. This
position will be funded 100% by this program.

One (1) IT Technical Support Analyst II will be responsible for providing technical, procedural,
and conceptual support to this program. Specific duties include: servicing problematic
computers, reviewing systems registration, and trouble shooting.

One (1) Principal Application Developer will be responsible for performing specialized and
complex information analysis and programming tasks and acts as technical expert for
maintaining program systems. Specific duties include: establishes quality assurance
procedures, provides technical consulting, and analyzes performance data and conducts
capacity planning. This person shall possess the minimum bachelor’s degree in Computer
Science, Information Systems, or a closely related field, and four years of field experience.
This position will be funded 100% by this program.




                                                                                             42
Mid-year salary range adjustments
Although there have been no adjustments for mid-year salary changes, the budgeted item
being at top step will prevent that problem.

Supplies and Equipment

Office supplies will be needed for the day to day operations. Moreover, safety equipment is
budgeted under this program to maintain the safety of the Deputy Probation Officers who will
be conducting field visits.

Vehicles

One-hundred and thirty six (136) vehicles will be required to allow Deputy Probation Officers
to conduct mandatory field compliance checks. These vehicles are vital to the safety of the
Deputies occupying these functions.




                                                                                          43
10. References

Dr. Edward J. Latessa’s article, “What Works in Reducing Recidivism” State of Crime and
Justice in Ohio (2003-2004)
Miller, W. R., Zweben, A., DiClemente, C. C., & Rychtarik, R. G. (1992). Motivational
Enhancement Therapy manual: A clinical research guide for therapists treating individuals
with alcohol abuse and dependence. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and
Alcoholism
1 (Bogue2002; Carey 2002; Corbett et al. 1999; Gornik 2001; Lipton et al. 2000; Taxman and
Byrne 2001).

2 National Institute of Corrections, Community Corrections Division, U.S. Department of
Justice. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: The Principles of
Effective Intervention (2004).

3 Matthew R. Durose & Patrick A. Langan, Bureau of Justice Statistics, State Court
Sentencing of Convicted Felons, 2002, Tbl.1.1 (2005)

4Compare Criminal Justice Statistics Center, California Department of Justice, Crime in
California 2006, 70, table 37, with Durose & Langan, supra note 1, at Tbl.1.2.

5 Lauren E. Glaze & Thomas P. Bonczar, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Probation and Parole
in the United States,
2007, 2 (2008); Pew Center on the States, One in 100: Behind Bars in America, 29
(Washington, D.C.: The Pew
Charitable Trusts, February 2008).

6See, e.g., Thomas H. Cohen and Brian A. Reaves, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Felony
Defendants in Large Urban Counties, 2002, iii, 13 (2006) (comparison of prior arrest records
of felony defendants in 1992 and 2002); Patrick A. Langan & David J. Levin, Bureau of
Justice Statistics, Recidivism of Prisoners Released in 1994, 1 (2002) (comparison of re-
arrest records of inmates released in 1983 and 1994); Robyn L. Cohen, Bureau of Justice
Statistics, Probation and Parole Violators in State Prison, 1991 (1995) (comparison of
percentages of state prison inmates who were on probation or parole at the time of current
arrests in 1974 and 1991); Thomas P. Bonczar & Lauren E. Glaze, Bureau of Justice
Statistics, Probation and Parole in the United States, 1998, 4, 7 (1999) and Lauren E. Glaze
& Thomas P. Bonczar, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Probation and Parole in the United States
2005, 6, 9 (2006) (comparison of successful probation and parole completion rates in 1990
and 2005).

7 Cohen & Reaves, supra note 4, at 12; Glaze & Bonczar, supra n. 3, at 7. 6 Figures from the
National Association of State Budget Officers, cited in Pew Center on the States, One in 31:
the Long Reach of American Corrections (Washington, D.C.: The Pew Charitable Trusts,
March 2009).




                                                                                          44
8Bonta, J., & Andrews, D. A. (2007). Risk-Need-Responsivity Model for Off ender
Assessment and Rehabilitation: Public Safety Canada, Carleton University.

9See, e.g., Steve Aos, Marna Miller & Elizabeth Drake, Washington State Institute for Public
Policy, Evidence-
Based Public Policy Options to Reduce Future Prison Construction, Criminal Justice Costs,
and Crime Rates (2006)

10 National Institute of Corrections, Community Corrections Division, U.S. Department of
Justice. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: The Principles of
Effective Intervention (2004).

11D.A. Andrews, James Bonta, J. Stephen Wormith, “The Recent Past and Near Future of
Risk and/or Need Assessment,” 52 Crime and Delinquency 7, 12-13 (January 2006).

12Arming The Court with Research. 10 Evidence-Based Sentencing Initiatives to Control
Crime and Reduce Cost. Public Safety Policy Brief No. 8, May 2009.

13   Legislative Analyst’s Office, Achieving Better Outcomes For Adult Probation, May 29, 2009

14 California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Fourth Quarter 2008 Facts and
Figures

15Chief Probation Officers of California, “Adult Probation Services and The Need to Increase
Public Safety, Accountability, Competency Development and Cost Effectiveness”

16 Legislative   Analyst’s Office, Achieving Better Outcomes For Adult Probation




                                                                                            45
11. Attachment




                 46
Attachment A
                                                                                                                                                                           6/9/2011




AFSB: Plan for Supervising Offenders outlined in AB 109
FY 2011-2012 - FY 2013-2014 And Thereafter

PERSONNEL SUMMARY                       County                                                          Annual
                                                      Q1       Q2       Q3       Q4    Annual total                   Q1 cost       Q2 cost       Q3 cost       Q4 cost    Annual cost
Supervised Parole                                                                                       salary
FY 2011-2012
 Sr. Director                                        1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00   $183,000      $45,750      $45,750       $45,750       $45,750            $183,000
 Sr. Secretary III                                   1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    $72,000      $18,000      $18,000       $18,000       $18,000             $72,000
 Director                                            1.00     2.00     3.00     4.00              4.00   $158,333      $39,583      $79,167      $118,750      $158,333            $395,833
 Secretary III                                       1.00     2.00     3.00     4.00              4.00     66,666      $16,667      $33,333       $50,000       $66,666            $166,665
 SDPO (includes bonus)                               6.00    12.00    15.00    19.00             19.00    115,722     $173,583     $347,166      $433,958      $549,680          $1,504,386
 DPO                                                62.00   120.00   150.00   184.00            184.00    107,622   $1,668,141   $3,228,660    $4,035,825    $4,950,612         $13,883,238
 Head Clerk                                          1.00     2.00     3.00     4.00              4.00     71,000      $17,750      $35,500       $53,250       $71,000            $177,500
 STC                                                 1.00     2.00     3.00     4.00              4.00     59,500      $14,875      $29,750       $44,625       $59,500            $148,750
 Administrative Services Manager I                   1.00     3.00     3.00     3.00              3.00    108,090      $27,023      $81,068       $81,068       $81,068            $270,225
 Program Analyst, Probation                         12.00    12.00    14.00    14.00             14.00    101,649     $304,947     $304,947      $355,772      $355,772          $1,321,437
 Supervising Program Analyst                         1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    128,444      $32,111      $32,111       $32,111       $32,111            $128,444
 Procurement Assistant III                           1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     77,842      $19,461      $19,461       $19,461       $19,461             $77,842
 Accountant III                                      1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     85,372      $21,343      $21,343       $21,343       $21,343             $85,372
 Sr. Departmental Personnel Technician               1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     96,294      $24,074      $24,074       $24,074       $24,074             $96,294
 Departmental Personnel Technician                   1.00     1.00     2.00     2.00              2.00     88,450      $22,113      $22,113       $44,225       $44,225            $132,675
 Payroll Clerk II                                    1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     76,626      $19,157      $19,157       $19,157       $19,157             $76,626
 Departmental Employee Relations Representative      0.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     96,105           $0      $24,026       $24,026       $24,026             $72,079
 Custodian                                           0.00     0.00     0.00     1.00              1.00     50,044           $0           $0            $0       $12,511             $12,511
 IT Technical Support Analyst II                     0.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    108,379           $0      $27,095       $27,095       $27,095             $81,284
 Principal Application Developer                     0.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    146,480           $0      $36,620       $36,620       $36,620            $109,860
 ITC                                                10.00    20.00    30.00    40.00             40.00     54,400     $136,000     $272,000      $408,000      $544,000          $1,360,000
 Total                                             103.00   186.00   236.00   289.00            289.00 $2,052,018   $2,600,575   $4,701,338    $5,893,106    $7,161,001         $20,356,021

FY 2012-2013
 Sr. Director                                        2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00              2.00   $183,000      $91,500       $91,500       $91,500       $91,500           $366,000
 Sr. Secretary III                                   2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00              2.00    $72,000      $36,000       $36,000       $36,000       $36,000           $144,000
 Director                                            5.00     6.00     7.00     7.00              7.00   $158,333     $197,916      $237,500      $277,083      $277,083           $989,581
 Secretary III                                       5.00     6.00     7.00     7.00              7.00     66,666      $83,333       $99,999      $116,666      $116,666           $416,663
 SDPO (includes bonus)                              25.00    31.00    34.00    37.00             37.00    115,722     $723,263      $896,846      $983,637    $1,070,429         $3,674,174
 DPO                                               244.00   304.00   334.00   366.00            366.00    107,622   $6,564,942    $8,179,272    $8,986,437    $9,847,413        $33,578,064
 Head Clerk                                          5.00     6.00     7.00     7.00              7.00     71,000      $88,750      $106,500      $124,250      $124,250           $443,750
 STC                                                 5.00     6.00     7.00     7.00              7.00     59,500      $74,375       $89,250      $104,125      $104,125           $371,875
 Administrative Services Manager I                   3.00     3.00     3.00     3.00              3.00    108,090      $81,068       $81,068       $81,068       $81,068           $324,270
 Program Analyst, Probation                         26.00    26.00    26.00    26.00             26.00    101,649     $660,719      $660,719      $660,719      $660,719         $2,642,874
 Supervising Program Analyst                         2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00              2.00    128,444      $64,222       $64,222       $64,222       $64,222           $256,888
 Procurement Assistant III                           1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     77,842      $19,461       $19,461       $19,461       $19,461            $77,842
 Accountant III                                      1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     85,372      $21,343       $21,343       $21,343       $21,343            $85,372
 Sr. Departmental Personnel Technician               1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     96,294      $24,074       $24,074       $24,074       $24,074            $96,294
 Departmental Personnel Technician                   2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00              2.00     88,450      $44,225       $44,225       $44,225       $44,225           $176,900
 Payroll Clerk II                                    2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00              2.00     76,626      $38,313       $38,313       $38,313       $38,313           $153,252
 Departmental Employee Relations Representative      1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     96,105      $24,026       $24,026       $24,026       $24,026            $96,105
 Custodian                                           1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00     50,044      $12,511       $12,511       $12,511       $12,511            $50,044
 IT Technical Support Analyst II                     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    108,379      $27,095       $27,095       $27,095       $27,095           $108,379
 Principal Application Developer                     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00              1.00    146,480      $36,620       $36,620       $36,620       $36,620           $146,480
 ITC                                                50.00    60.00    70.00    80.00             80.00     54,400     $680,000      $816,000      $952,000    $1,088,000         $3,536,000
 Total                                             385.00   465.00   512.00   557.00            557.00 $2,052,018   $9,593,753   $11,606,541   $12,725,372   $13,809,140        $47,734,806




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                                                                                                                                                                      6/9/2011




FY 2013-2014
 Sr. Director                                       2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00   $183,000       $91,500       $91,500       $91,500         $91,500             $366,000
 Sr. Secretary III                                  2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00    $72,000       $36,000       $36,000       $36,000         $36,000             $144,000
 Director                                           7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00   $158,333      $277,083      $277,083      $277,083        $277,083           $1,108,331
 Secretary III                                      7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     66,666      $116,666      $116,666      $116,666        $116,666             $466,662
 SDPO (includes bonus)                             37.00    37.00    37.00    37.00    37.00    115,722    $1,070,429    $1,070,429    $1,070,429      $1,070,429           $4,281,714
 DPO                                              366.00   366.00   366.00   366.00   366.00    107,622    $9,847,413    $9,847,413    $9,847,413      $9,847,413          $39,389,652
 Head Clerk                                         7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     71,000      $124,250      $124,250      $124,250        $124,250             $497,000
 STC                                                7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     7.00     59,500      $104,125      $104,125      $104,125        $104,125             $416,500
 Administrative Services Manager I                  3.00     3.00     3.00     3.00     3.00    108,090       $81,068       $81,068       $81,068         $81,068             $324,270
 Program Analyst, Probation                        26.00    26.00    26.00    26.00    26.00    101,649      $660,719      $660,719      $660,719        $660,719           $2,642,874
 Supervising Program Analyst                        2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00    128,444       $64,222       $64,222       $64,222         $64,222             $256,888
 Procurement Assistant III                          1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     77,842       $19,461       $19,461       $19,461         $19,461              $77,842
 Accountant III                                     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     85,372       $21,343       $21,343       $21,343         $21,343              $85,372
 Sr. Departmental Personnel Technician              1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     96,294       $24,074       $24,074       $24,074         $24,074              $96,294
 Departmental Personnel Technician                  2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     88,450       $44,225       $44,225       $44,225         $44,225             $176,900
 Payroll Clerk II                                   2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     2.00     76,626       $38,313       $38,313       $38,313         $38,313             $153,252
 Departmental Employee Relations Representative     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     96,105       $24,026       $24,026       $24,026         $24,026              $96,105
 Custodian                                          1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     50,044       $12,511       $12,511       $12,511         $12,511              $50,044
 IT Technical Support Analyst II                    1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00    108,379       $27,095       $27,095       $27,095         $27,095             $108,379
 Principal Application Developer                    1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00    146,480       $36,620       $36,620       $36,620         $36,620             $146,480
 ITC                                               80.00    80.00    80.00    80.00    80.00     54,400    $1,088,000    $1,088,000    $1,088,000      $1,088,000           $4,352,000
 Total                                            557.00   557.00   557.00   557.00   557.00 $2,052,018   $13,809,140   $13,809,140   $13,809,140     $13,809,140          $55,236,559



Vehicles
1 Car per 2 Mobile Deputy and 1 Car Per SDPO
Cars needed +15% FY 2011/2012 ($30,000 per car)      17       17       17       17       68     $30,000     $510,000      $510,000      $510,000         $510,000           $2,040,000
Cars needed +15% FY 2012/2013 ($30,000 per car)      17       17       17       17       68     $30,000     $510,000      $510,000      $510,000         $510,000           $2,040,000
Fuel Needed for FY 2011/2012 ($3,200 per car)                                                    $3,200                                                                       $217,600
Fuel Needed for FY 2012/2013 ($3,200 per car)                                                    $3,200                                                                       $217,600
  Fuel Needed for FY 1213/2014                                                          136    $3,200                                             Total Fuel Costs            $435,200
  Total Fleet needed over 2 years                                                       136                                                     Total Vehicle Costs         $4,080,000




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Building Space
Centralized office FY 2011/2012 ($2 per Sq. Ft.)   10,300   18,600   23,600   28,900              28,900         $2        $61,800      $111,600      $141,600      $173,400            $488,400
Centralized office FY 2012/2013($2 per Sq. Ft.)    38,500   46,500   51,200   55,700              55,700         $2       $231,000      $279,000      $307,200      $334,200          $1,151,400
Centralized Office FY 2013/2014($2 per Sq. Ft.)    55,700   55,700   55,700   55,700              55,700         $2       $334,200      $334,200      $334,200      $334,200          $1,336,800
 Total Sq Feet Needed                              55,700

                                                                                       Annual Total (Per   Cost Per
SERVICES AND SUPPLIES                                 Q1       Q2       Q3       Q4                                       Q1 Cost       Q2 Cost       Q3 Cost       Q4 Cost     Annual Cost
                                                                                            Item)            Item
FY 2011-2012
 Computers ($672/computer);                        103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00      $672.00    $69,216.00    $55,776.00    $33,600.00    $35,616.00       $194,208.00
 LCD Screens ($145/screen);                        103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00      $145.00    $14,935.00    $12,035.00     $7,250.00     $7,685.00         $41,905.00
 Recycling Fee ($8/recycling);                     103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00        $8.00       $824.00       $664.00       $400.00       $424.00          $2,312.00
 Surge Protector ($18/surge protector);            103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00       $18.00     $1,854.00     $1,494.00       $900.00       $954.00          $5,202.00
 Printer ($236.60);                                103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00      $236.60    $24,369.80    $19,637.80    $11,830.00    $12,539.80         $68,377.40
 Network Printer ($572.15)                           1.00     1.00     1.00     1.00                4.00      $572.15       $572.15       $572.15       $572.15       $572.15          $2,288.60
 Laptop & Docking Station ($1,500)                  27.00    28.00    27.00    28.00              110.00   $1,500.00     $40,500.00    $42,000.00    $40,500.00    $42,000.00       $165,000.00
 Air Cards ($85 per month)                          27.00    28.00    27.00    28.00              110.00      $85.00      $6,885.00     $7,140.00     $6,885.00     $7,140.00         $28,050.00
 Wiring Costs (approx. $350/data jack)             103.00    83.00    50.00    53.00              289.00     $350.00     $36,050.00    $29,050.00    $17,500.00    $18,550.00       $101,150.00
 Firearms ($650)                                    27.00    28.00    27.00    28.00              110.00     $650.00     $17,550.00    $18,200.00    $17,550.00    $18,200.00         $71,500.00
 Bullet Proof Vest ($285)                           68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00     $285.00     $19,380.00    $18,240.00     $9,405.00    $10,830.00         $57,855.00
 Pepper Spray ($16.99)                              68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00      $16.99      $1,155.32     $1,087.36       $560.67       $645.62          $3,448.97
 Handcuffs ($25)                                    68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00      $25.00      $1,700.00     $1,600.00       $825.00       $950.00          $5,075.00
 Belt & Holders ($64.43)                            68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00      $64.43      $4,381.24     $4,123.52     $2,126.19     $2,448.34         $13,079.29
 Flashlight ($129.99)                               68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00     $129.99      $8,839.32     $8,319.36     $4,289.67     $4,939.62         $26,387.97
 Radios & Chargers                                  68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00   $3,000.00    $204,000.00   $192,000.00    $99,000.00   $114,000.00       $609,000.00
 Training & Materials                               68.00    64.00    33.00    38.00              203.00                 $23,750.00   $23,750.00    $23,750.00    $23,750.00          $95,000.00
 Ammunition ($100 per DPO)                          27.00    28.00    27.00    28.00              110.00    $100.00       $2,700.00     $2,800.00     $2,700.00     $2,800.00         $11,000.00
 Total                                                                                                                  $475,961.83   $435,689.19   $276,943.68   $301,244.53      $1,500,839.23
FY 2012-2013
 Computers ($672/computer);                         96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00      $672.00    $64,512.00    $53,760.00    $31,584.00    $30,240.00       $180,096.00
 LCD Screens ($145/screen);                         96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00      $145.00    $13,920.00    $11,600.00     $6,815.00     $6,525.00         $38,860.00
 Recycling Fee ($8/recycling);                      96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00        $8.00       $768.00       $640.00       $376.00       $360.00          $2,144.00
 Surge Protector ($18/surge protector);             96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00       $18.00     $1,728.00     $1,440.00       $846.00       $810.00          $4,824.00
 Printer ($236.60);                                 96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00      $236.60    $22,713.60    $18,928.00    $11,120.20    $10,647.00         $63,408.80
 Network Printer ($572.15)                           1.00     1.00     1.00     0.00                3.00      $572.15       $572.15       $572.15       $572.15         $0.00          $1,716.45
 Laptop & Docking Station ($1,500)                  26.00    27.00    26.00    27.00              106.00   $1,500.00     $39,000.00    $40,500.00    $39,000.00    $40,500.00       $159,000.00
 Air Cards ($85 per month)                          26.00    27.00    26.00    27.00              106.00      $85.00      $6,630.00     $6,885.00     $6,630.00     $6,885.00         $27,030.00
 Wiring Costs (approx. $350/data jack)              96.00    80.00    47.00    45.00              268.00     $350.00     $33,600.00    $28,000.00    $16,450.00    $15,750.00         $93,800.00
 Firearms ($650)                                    26.00    27.00    26.00    27.00              106.00     $650.00     $16,900.00    $17,550.00    $16,900.00    $17,550.00         $68,900.00
 Bullet Proof Vest ($288)                           66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00     $285.00     $18,810.00    $18,810.00     $9,405.00     $9,975.00         $57,000.00
 Pepper Spray ($16.99)                              66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00      $16.99      $1,121.34     $1,121.34       $560.67       $594.65          $3,398.00
 Handcuffs ($20)                                    66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00      $25.00      $1,650.00     $1,650.00       $825.00       $875.00          $5,000.00
 Belt & Holders ($64.43)                            66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00      $64.43      $4,252.38     $4,252.38     $2,126.19     $2,255.05         $12,886.00
 Flashlight ($129.99)                               66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00     $129.99      $8,579.34     $8,579.34     $4,289.67     $4,549.65         $25,998.00
 Radios & Chargers                                  66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00   $3,000.00    $198,000.00   $198,000.00    $99,000.00   $105,000.00       $600,000.00
 Training & Materials                               66.00    66.00    33.00    35.00              200.00                 23,750.00     23,750.00     23,750.00     23,750.00          $95,000.00
 Ammunition ($100 per DPO)                          26.00    27.00    26.00    27.00              106.00    $100.00      $2,600.00     $2,700.00     $2,600.00     $2,700.00          $10,600.00
 Total                                                                                                                  $459,106.81   $438,738.21   $272,849.88   $278,966.35      $1,449,661.25
FY 2013-2014
 Air Cards ($85 per month)                         218.00   218.00   218.00   218.00              218.00      $85.00     $55,590.00    $55,590.00    $55,590.00    $55,590.00        $222,360.00
 Ammunition ($100 per DPO)                         216.00   216.00   216.00   216.00              216.00     $100.00     $21,600.00         $0.00         $0.00         $0.00         $21,600.00
 Total                                                                                                                   $77,190.00    $55,590.00    $55,590.00    $55,590.00        $243,960.00




                                                                                                                                                                                  3 of 4
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          6/9/2011




SERVICES & SUPPLIES - TOTALS BY FY                                               Q1                    Q2                     Q3                   Q4       Annual total

 FY 2011/2012 Total                                                     $475,961.83           $435,689.19            $276,943.68          $301,244.53            $1,500,839.23
 FY 2012/2013 Total                                                     $459,106.81           $438,738.21            $272,849.88          $278,966.35            $1,449,661.25
 FY 2013/2014                                                            $77,190.00            $55,590.00             $55,590.00           $55,590.00              $243,960.00

SUMMARY DATA - TOTALS BY FY *
                                                                                Total Number
                         FY 2011/2012                                                                          Annual Costs
                                                                                  Of Items
 AB109 Supervision Staffing                                                         289                             $20,356,021
 Cars                                                                                68                              $2,040,000
 Fuel Costs                                                                                                            $217,600                         For budgetary purposes this document prepares for
 Building space needed                                                             28,900                              $693,600
                                                                                                                                                        100% compliance (no violations) and no early releases.
 Services and Supplies                                                                                            $1,500,839.23
 TOTAL                                                                                                              $24,808,060                         In addition, it also assumes that all offenders will be
                                                                                Total Number
                         FY 2012/2013
                                                                                  Of Items
                                                                                                               Annual Costs                             supervised on Level 3 (intensive 50:1). Actual
 AB109 Supervision Staffing
 Cars
                                                                                    557
                                                                                     68
                                                                                                                    $47,734,806
                                                                                                                     $2,040,000
                                                                                                                                                        supervision levels may vary based on risk and
 Fuel Costs                                                                                                            $217,600                         treatment effectiveness. The State assumes the rate of
 Building space needed                                                             55,700                            $1,336,800
 Services and Supplies                                                                                            $1,449,661.25                         70% recidivism, which will reduce caseload size and, in
 TOTAL                                                                                                              $52,778,868
 GRAND TOTAL OF 2 FISCAL YEARS                                                                                      $77,586,927
                                                                                                                                                        fact, there will be appropriate early releases from the
                                                                                                                                                        program. Based on the State assumption for FY 2014-
SUMMARY DATA FOR FY 2013/2014 AND THEREAFTER
            FY 2013/2014 AND THEREAFTER
                                                                                Total Number
                                                                                                               Annual Costs
                                                                                                                                                        15 at full implementation annual cost will be $57.3 and
                                                                                  Of Items
 AB109 Supervision Staffing                                                         557                             $55,236,559                         anticipated revenue at $60.5 Million.
 Fuel Costs                                                                                                            $435,200
 Building space needed                                                             55,700                            $1,336,800
 Services and Supplies (Air Cards + Training + Ammunition)                                                          $338,960.00
 TOTAL                                                                                                              $57,347,519
                                                                                                                                      Less Fixed Costs in Yrs 2011-2013
Costs per DPO and Offender                                                            Annual Costs          18 Month Costs         Annual Costs         18 Month Costs
                       Cost Per DPO

 FY2011/2012                                                                                $134,826             $202,240              $115,735                $173,603
 FY2012/2013                                                                                $144,205             $216,307              $134,744                $202,116
 FY2013/2014                                                                                $156,687             $235,031              $156,687                $235,031
                     Cost Per Offender
 FY2011/2012             6048- Offenders                                                     $4,102                $6,153                $3,521                 $5,282
 FY2012/2013           12096 - Offenders                                                     $4,363                $6,545                $4,090                 $6,116
 FY2013/2014           18133 - Offenders                                                     $3,163                 $4,744              $3,163                 $4,744
 *This three year budget shows a consistent level of staffing regardless of the expectation of fluctuation in the 2nd and 3rd year numbers of offenders supervised. This budget follows the State's assumption as the rate of offender supervision stabilizes in year four.

Funds Available for Treatment, Programs and
                                                                                 Q1                    Q2                     Q3                   Q4       Annual total
Alternative Sanctions/custody **
 FY 2011/2012 Total                                                 $6,700,000.00       $6,700,000.00         $6,700,000.00      $6,700,000.00          $26,800,000.00
 FY 2012/2013 Total                                               $14,500,000.00       $14,500,000.00       $14,500,000.00      $14,500,000.00          $58,000,000.00
 FY 2013/2014                                                     $15,300,000.00       $15,300,000.00       $15,300,000.00      $15,300,000.00          $61,200,000.00
 **Per State Assumptions there is $2,275 budgeted per offender for Services in Mental Health, Substance Abuse Treatment, Education/Vocational Training and Employment Services that are not reflected in this budget.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              4 of 4
Attachment B
                                  Page 1




Professional Standards
 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
 FISCAL YEAR 2011 - 2012


Professional Standards
     Sr. Director

      Director
  Internal Affairs

          SDPO




  DPO II - Investigators
       (2) NEW




                           6/9/2011   4:19 PM
                                                                                                                         Page 1




                                                 BUDGET SECTION
                                                    ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
                                                    FISCAL YEAR 2011 - 2012




         Senior Secretary I                      Supervising Program Analyst, Prob.               Administrative Assistant II




              SUPPORT SERVICES              JUVENILE INSTITUTIONS SERVICES                          AB 109
 1.0          Admin Services Manager I     1.0        Admin Services Manager I        1.0   Admin Services Manager I
 1.0          Program Analyst, Probation
                                                      DETENTION SERVICES                            NEW
                                           1.0        Program Analyst, Probation
               SPECIAL SERVICES                                                       2.0   Program Analyst, Probation
 1.0          Program Analyst, Probation           RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT
                                           1.0        Program Analyst, Probation                    NEW



                                                         FIELD SERVICES
                                           1.0        Program Analyst, Probation




BUDGET                                                                                                                     6/9/2011
CONTRACTS AND GRANTS MANGEMENT
DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART          ASM III


                                                 Sr. Secretary II




                                       ASM II
         ASM II                                                       ASM II




         ASM I             ASM I                          ASM I       ASM I




         ASM I             ASM I                          ASM I       ASM I




         ASM I               ITC                          ASM I       ASM I




         ASM I            Stat Clerk                  Management    Management
         (New)                                          Analyst       Analyst



       Management
         Analyst
                                                                                 FISCAL SERVICES SECTION
                                                                               PROPOSED FLOW CHART 2011-12


                                                                                                               Norma Cruz-Lawler
                                                                                                                   Fiscal Officer
                                                                                                          (*Supervising Program Analyst)



                                                                                        Monica Osuna
                                                                                        Sr. Secretary I




                                Carmen Covarrubias                     Susana Guerrero                          Sunhuan (Sophia)           Caroline Carman
                                Accounting Officer I                     Accountant II                               Barnes                  Accountant II                             Tung Dam
                                 (*Program Analyst)                 (*Accounting Officer II)                      Accountant III             (*Accounting                            Administrative
                               Federal/State Claiming            General Accounting & Financial                     Revenue                    Officer I)                          Services Manager I
                                                                        Reporting Adm.                          Actng./Cashiering          Special Programs                              AB109




   Annie Ly (starts               Mikhail Podolinnyy     Dianna Mata             Sarah Gonzales                Rosalina Crisostomo         Nelson D’Angelo        Karen Tran
       6/1/11)                       Accountant II      Account Clerk II           Secretary III                   Accountant II           Contract Program     Accounting Tech
Financial Specialist II            (*Accountant III)      Financial &            (*Accountant II)                (*Accountant III)              Auditor               II               Vacant
     Title IV-E                      Federal/State         Contract              General/Special               Financial & Contract              JJCPA          General/Special      Administrative
                                                                                                                                                                                   Services Manager I
                                                                                                                                                                                         AB109


  Lorraine Campos                    Peka Davis           Juno Shuh                Thomas Lew                      Lucia Tan                  Joann Chu          Mary Morales
    Accountant II                  Account Clerk II     Account Clerk II          Account Clerk II             Accounting Tech. II           Accountant II      Accounting Tech
    Internal Audit                  Federal/State         Financial &          (*Accounting Tech. I)            (*Accountant II)             Care of Court             I
                                      Claiming             Contract                  Revenue                       Revenue                   Wards/JJCPA         (*Accounting          Vacant
                                                                                                                                                                                     Accountant III
                                                                                                                                                                                        AB109


   Rebecca Lau                       Joanne Liu             Vacant                   Yun Fan                     Yolanda Brown                 Sherry Thu       Chan (Brandy)
 Accounting Tech II                Account Clerk II     Account Clerk II          Account Clerk II              Accounting Tech. I           Account Clerk II        Ha
      Rates                         Federal/State         Financial &             General/Special                   Revenue                (*Accounting Tech    Account Clerk II
                                      Claiming             Contract                   Accnts                    Actng./Cashiering                  II)          General/Special




 Hongjun (Vicky) Yu              Yu-H (Jasmine) Lee        Vacant                  Nilesh Vyas                   Sandra Campos               Gracie Garcia
   Accountant II                  Account Clerk II      Account Clerk II          Account Clerk II              Accounting Tech I           Account Clerk II
   Federal/State                    Federal/State         Financial &             General/Special                   Revenue                     JJCPA
     Claiming                         Claiming             Contract                   Accnts                    Actng./Cashiering




  Janet Chiing                       Tracy Wu                                                                     Vivian Chang                 Vacant
Accounting Tech I                  Account Clerk II                                                              Account Clerk II           Account Clerk II
  Federal/State                     Federal/State                                                                   Revenue                Gang Intervention
    Claiming                          Claiming                                                                  Actng./Cashiering               Pgrm




   ( * ) – Sitting against budgeted item

  L:/Org Chart 10-11/Fiscal Flow Chart 2011
  Revised 5/25/11
                                                                                                                                                   Page 1




                                                                              PROCUREMENT SECTION
                                                                                   ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
                                                                                    FISCAL YEAR 2011 - 2012




                                                                                PROCUREMENT SECTION
                                                                                    JODI ROGERS


                                       Program Analyst:                        Intermediate Typist-Clerk:     Procurement Assistant III:
                                           Vacant                                     Penny Vigil                     NEW

                                                                                                              Procurement Assistant II's:
                                                                                                                   Roberta Hargis
                                                                                                                     Nita Jacobs

                                                                                                               Procurement Assistant I:
                                                                                                                   Kimberly Austin

                                                                                                                  Procurement Aids:
                                                                                                                     Mignon Cato
                                                                                                                     Sophia Jerry
                                                                                                                     Diana Pyron
                                                                                                                     Julisa Reyes
                                                                                                                       Rosa Siu
                                                                                                                 2 - Vacant positions




L:\BudgetandFiscal\Org Chart\Procurement FY 11-12 org chart.xls\Procurement                                                                 6/9/2011   4:25 PM
                                        Probation Department
                         Administrative Services - Human Resources Division
                                        Return-to-Work Section

                                               Administrative Deputy III (UC)
                                                      DeWitt Roberts
                                                 (Bureau Chief, Probation)



 Senior Departmental                      Departmental Hurman Resources                                 Senior Secretary III
 Personnel Technician                              Manager III                                              Eileen Crowe
       Vacant                                     Craig A. Norris




                                                        Return-to-work                              Intermediate Typist Clerk (2)
                                                        Kathaleen Wells                                Catherine "Bridget" Lunt
                                               Administrative Services Manager III                            1 Vacant




       Team 1                       Team 2                                                                   Team 3
 Senior Departmental          Senior Departmental                                                      Senior Departmental
 Personnel Technician         Personnel Technician                                                     Personnel Technician

      Lena Virgil             Miriam Gomes Oprisan                                                            1 Vacant

                                                                           Departmental Personnel
                                                                                Assistant (6)
Departmental Personnel       Departmental Personnel                                                   Departmental Personnel
    Technician (4)               Technician (4)                              Trillann Minor (STC)         Technician (2)
                                                                               Maribel Becerra
    Monique Conard            Luisa Barragan (DSO)                          Thinh Q. "Jordan" Dam
  Toyea Sims (ISTC)            Dina Miller (SDPA)                              Ardath Broderick               2 Vacant
 Ereni Youssef (SDPA)
        1 Vacant                    2 Vacant                                         2 Vacant




                                                                  Currently requested items
                                                                                                                  Monday, June 6,2011
-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  LA County Probation Department
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 MANAGEMENT SERVICES BUREAU

SrGenMeintVWr
                2.0 Admin. AsSIIII Secr.tlry
                SERVICES Cook
                     Sonlo,
                     Cook
                1.0 Safety
                1.0 Management
                     GnrlSerMgr
                                           - I- U
                                          "'54
                                         l1U2
                                              I•
                                             17968
                                             17192
                                  1.0 HeadCook CAMP CAMPSERVICES
                1,0 Spedal otfloer I
                1.0SenlorTyPlstClerk
                 1.0 SafetyA$lliSl:!lnt
                               Assistant
                                            17088
                                           1192.
                                           11i59
                                             110~
                                             11H2
                                             17152
                                             17027
                                          170.0
                                            11194 CAMP ROCI".EY
                                            11i52
                                              17957
                                             17033
                                            17152
                                             11035
                                             11953
                                             17968
                                             17073
                                             11032

                                            -~            •. o
                                                              '.0-
                                                            3.0 3.0
                                           17863 INSTRUCTOR SenIor Gnr1 BUREAU 17i60LOS Cook ProbltlonDlr.=r SUPPORTProgramAl1alylt,II ServicesMaintenance 2.0
                                          17172 SUPPORT1.0 28.0 SUPPORT 2.0 2.0 1.0 Cook Cook AdmInJHAubllnt 1.0 .0 1.0 HeadClerk ManagerManagor 1.0Work.SeniorCook
                                            17908 KILPATRICKSCOTTCookMalnt't/Vli(rSenior Senior Cook M.naierl SUPPORTChfefCookClerk 1.0 HUldCook4.0 Senior Clerk-Gell
                                            MANAGEMENT 12.0 GnrlSerMgr
                                                             HOLTON
                                                                    Sr
                                                             1,0 H81dCook
                                                             1.0 Camps
                                                 III ADMIN 1.0 Sr Gem Main! VWrkor


                                                                                  II
                                                                                              H•• 1.0
                                                                                        2.0 ProcuremenlAnlst3ntll
                                                                                              Senior
                                                                                              Crwtlnstruclor Worker
                                                                                        1196110.0PADRlNOS
                                                                                  '.0 SUPPORTSa~s1.0 Manager WorkerHALLSecretary Equipment .0 1,0 Pel$onelPropertyllVorker
                                                                                        1.0 Supervising CAMP
                                                                                        1.0 PrQCUftmentAssisllntl
                                                                                          ProgramAnely1.l,Prob
                                                                                                  HeadCook
                                                                                    1.0 PROCUREMENTdOook
                                                                                  1,0 2.01.0Custodian Clerk SECTION SUPPORT 1.0 S.erellryll
                                                                                        1.0 SUPPORT SUPPORT
                                                                                   1.0 Camp$SlllVlollSDlrector,ProbaliOn 1.0lnlermedlaleTyplstClerk SrGenMaintV'«Jrker 0 S.fetylnspeetorTllrner
                                                                                         SR21.0PeraonelPropertyWorker lNSTRPOOL SelV~$Director,Probation
                                                         8.05.0 1.0 POOL Servloes 2.0InlerFoodSarviceWor1<er OKCManager SAFElY, CREW Stnior Probation Penwnal •• 8.0 PllfSOnal Property CAMPCREYJPAIGE 1.0ServicesDlreclor,Probatlon 7.0 HousekeeperLallndryWor1<er357.0 Housekeeper SuparviSfng Typist GtnMalrd'oM:>rkerMalntlr\lorktr
                                                                                    1.0 Head 1.01.0 TrlInsportalionD8puty3,0 .0 6.0lnstitullonalLaborer
                                                                                           1,0 Head
                                                                                                      ServicesOireclor,Probation MUNZ 1.0 '.0
                                                                                           1.0IntarmedleteTyplst·Cku\l; JlN
                                                                                                 HeadClerk
                                                                                           2.0 Genel1ll Cook Typlst·Clerk
                                                                                  1.0 CrewlnsInJa:or Maintenance
                                                                                           2.0 SenlorTyplst-elefk
                                                                                           1.0 Supervising
                                                             1.0 SrGen.raIM.lntWorker 1.01.0lnstltlltlonallaborer
                                                                                    RISK 3.0IntermedIateServices
                                                                                             21.0Campi
                                                                                          ProbatlonDinidor
                                                                                                 Silleretaryll
                                                                                             MANAGEMENT
                                                                                                     Crawlnllfuctor
                                                                                     M'nager T"mOperator Typlst Clerk     CAMP
                                                                                                                                I  Cook
                                                                                                                              1.0 II 1,0 Sr.
                                                                                                                                                      -
                                                                                                                                                      I-
                                                                                                                              1.0 Camps Cemps 1.0 Mlc. 'Norker 11956
                                                                                                                                     2.0 Eqllipment
                                                                                                                                   Senior TramOperatOf
                                                                                                                                      1.0 ServioEts
                                                                                                                                      SERVICES
                                                                                                                                      HeadSECURITY                          C~,
                                                                                                                                                                        20.0Properly Coo'
                                                                                                                                     1.0 LallndrySllporvlsorl .0 SupefVlsirlg
                                                                                                                                     2.0 PersonalProporty'NorkorM.In1enllnQI Typist Worker
                                                                                                                                                        Genanll lntarmediale
                                                                                                                                                                                    t
                                                                                                                                      1.0InlormediateTyplst-elerk SenlorClerk-AldaGhazarian
                                                                                                                                                                                  WorkerClerk



                                                                                                                                                                                    I
                                                                                                                                                                                               I11&51
                                                                                                                                                                                                WorIIer
                                                                                                                                                                                                 SUPPORT
                                                                                                                                                                                                  1.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                            1.0              .0 Tram Operator
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Intermediate CllstodlanLaundlYWorker Intermediate
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.0 Intermediate
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       3.0 Senior
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   CamplSerManager 7.0 1.0 Cook Clerk
                                                                                                                                                                                                 CAMP StudentProfessklnalWotker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            -1,.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  1.0lnstifulionallllboror
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2.0 Tram Oporalor
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.0 General MalnlenllnceWorker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.0lnstitullonalBarber
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.0 1.0 SrGeneMlIMlIllntl,",/ofker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Senior
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.0lnstihrtlonalHelper
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    SUPPORT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             6/9/2011
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      I            ServlonDlrector,Probalion
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                .0 CfewlniInICIor
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  1.0 SllpervlslngTyplstClerk 1.0 Washing Equipment CIer1l;
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               .0 Ug/lIVehlcleDriver
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             CENTRAL                     HAU
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Operator
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         JUVENILE 1.0 Sanlor Gen
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  1.0lntermedlateSewlngWorker
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                CAMP   SUPPORT   SVCS   2.0 Senior Cook
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        1.0 HepdCook
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        1.0 Gnrls.rMgr
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                '.0 8enlorCook
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2,0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  1.0 Sr GnrlM.lnl
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1.0 GeneralServleesMenagorlil
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           SUPPORT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Work" CAMP ROUTH
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               CMYC SUPPOR'
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              -   7.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2.0   SeolorCook   SUPPORT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     CAMP MIUER   SUPPORT   ,
                                                                                       m
                                                                                                                                                                -,-
uuChief




                                                                                                                                                           ~-'"._-'
                                    CAMP


                                                                                                                                                             ~




                i
                          Information Systems Bureau: Proposed Reorganization of Existing Resources

                         PROJECT MANAGEMENT
                 1.0    Information Technology Specialist I                 CHIEF INFORMATION
                 1.0    Senior Information Systems Analyst                                                                             INFORMATION SYSTEMS
                                                                                  OFFICE                                                    SECURITY
                        ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT                                                                                1.0     Information Systems Security Officer II
                                                                     1.0   Departmental Chief Information Officer II
                                                                                                                              1.0     Network Systems Administrator II
                 1.0    Program Analyst                              1.0   Management Secretary III
                 1.0    Senior Information Technology Aide
                        (Staff Assistant II)




                   INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS                                                                              EMERGENT TECHNOLOGIES/
                              DIVISION                                                                                       APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT &
                                                                                                                                  SUPPORT DIVISION
                  1.0    Information Technology Manager II
                                                                                                                       1.0   Information Technology Manager II
                  1.0    Senior Secretary I (Secretary III)
                                                                                                                       1.0   Senior Secretary I


                                                                                                               *
                                                                                                               1.0     Information Technology
                                                     CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE                                                                                                       BUSINESS
        NETWORK SUPPORT                                                                                                Specialist I
                                                          SERVICES                                                                                                           INTELLIGENCE/
1.0   Information Technology Supervisor                                                                                                                                    INTEGRATION UNIT
                                                     Systems Registration Support
1.0   Principal Application Developer                                                              ADMINISTRATIVE                                                       2.0     Principal Application
                                               1.0   Information Technology Support                                                    JUVENILE SYSTEMS
3.0   Network Systems Administrator                                                                  SYSTEMS                                                                    Developer (1 ADDED)
                                                     Specialist
1.0   Application Developer (VACANT)                                                                                            1.0     Information Technology          1.0     Application Developer
                                               1.0   Senior Information Technology           1.0    Information Technology
3.0   Network Systems Administrator II                                                                                                  Supervisor                      1.0     Information Systems
                                                     Support Analyst                                Supervisor                  1.0     Principal Application                   Analyst II
                                               1.0   Information Technology Aide             1.0    Principal Application               Developer
                                               1.0   Senior Information Technology Aide             Developer                   2.0     Senior Information Systems
        DESKTOP SUPPORT                              (1 VACANT)                              3.0    Senior Information                                                        WEB/MULTI-MEDIA
                                                                                                                                        Analyst
                                                                                                    Systems Analyst             1.0     Senior Application                         UNIT
1.0   Information Technology Supervisor              Help Desk Support                       1.0    Senior Application                  Developer                       1.0     Information Technology
1.0   Information Technology Support           1.0   Information Technology Supervisor              Developer                   2.0     Information Systems Analyst             Supervisor
      Specialist                               2.0   Information Technology Support          2.0    Application Developer               II                              1.0     Senior Information
2.0   Senior Information Technology                  Analyst II                                     II                          2.0     Senior Information                      Systems Analyst
      Support Analyst                          3.0   Senior Information Technology           1.0    Information Systems                 Technology Aide (1                      (VACANT)
4.0   Information Systems Analyst II                 Support Analyst II (1 ADDED)                   Analyst II                          VACANT)                         3.0     Application Developer II
                                               1.0   Information Systems Analyst II
                                                                                                                                1.0     Application Developer II                (1 VACANT)
      Wireless Blackberry/Laptop               1.0   Senior Information Technology Aide
                                                                                                   ADULT SYSTEMS
2.0   Information Systems Analyst II
      (1 VACANT)                                     Ancillary Applications Support          1.0    Information Technology                                                 MEDICAL RECORDS
                                               1.0   Application Developer II                       Supervisor                                                                 SYSTEMS
                                               1.0   Information Systems Analyst I           1.0    Principal Application
                                               1.0   Information Systems Analyst II                                                                                     1.0     Information Technology
                                                                                                    Developer
                                                                                                                                                                                Specialist I
                                                                                             3.0    Senior Information
                                                                                                                                                                        1.0     Principal Application
                                                                                                    Systems Analyst (1
                                                                                                                                                                                Developer
                                                                                                    VACANT)
                                                                                                                                                                        1.0     Senior Information
                                                                                             2.0    Information Systems
                                                                                                                                                                                Systems Analyst
                                                                                                    Analyst II
                                                                                             2.0    Senior Information
                                                                                                    Technology Aide (1
                                                                                                    VACANT)

								
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