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Section I - Windham School District

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					WINDHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT
Schools in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice




        Self-Evaluation Report
                 2004

                www.wsdtx.org
                                                   Windham School District
                                                   Self-Evaluation Report
Table of Contents                                       July 30, 2004

I. Key Functions, Powers, and Duties……………………………………………………..3

II. History and Major Events……………………………………………………………...7

III. Policymaking Structure……………………………………………………………..12

IV. Funding………………………………………………………………………………16

V. Organization…………………………………………………………………………..24

VI. Guide to School Programs…………………………………………………………...32
          Academic (Literacy) Program……………………………………………………32
          Career & Technology Education Program……………………………………….59
          Life Skills Program………………………………………………………………68
          Post-Secondary Program…………………………………………………………77
           Project RIO………………………………………………………………………84
           Recreation Program……………………………………………………………...89

VII. School Performance Evaluation…………………………………………………….93

VIII. Policy Issues………………………………………………………………………103

  IX. Comments…………………………………………………………………………106

X. Appendices………………………………………………………………………….112
           Appendix A – Programs Designed to Address Legislated Goals………………113
          Appendix B—Unit Classification………………………………………………114
          Appendix C—WSD Organizational Chart...……………………………………115
          Appendix D—Accountability Ratings………………………………………….116
           Appendix E—WSD Policy 1.07, Standards for Educational Programs..………117
          Appendix F—Annual Performance Report 2002-2003
          Appendix G—WINDHAM, Spring 2003, Volume 9, Issue




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                           Page 2 of 121
Windham School District
Self-Evaluation Project
Section I. Key Functions, Powers, Duties
A. Provide an overview of the school’s mission, key functions, powers, and duties.
Specify which duties are statutory.
Mission: The Windham School District (WSD) will provide appropriate educational
programming and services to meet the needs of the eligible offender population in the
Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) and reduce recidivism by assisting
offenders in becoming responsible, productive members of their communities.
Statutory Goals:
     (1)   reduce recidivism;
     (2)   reduce the cost of confinement or imprisonment;
     (3)   increase the success of former inmates in obtaining and maintaining employment; and
     (4)   provide an incentive to inmates to behave in positive ways during confinement or
           imprisonment. (TEC, §19.003)
Statutory Powers and Duties:
    The district may establish and operate schools at the various facilities of the Texas
    Department of Criminal Justice. (TEC, §19.002)
     The district shall:
           (1) develop educational and vocational training programs specifically designed for
               persons eligible under Section 19.005, and
           (2) coordinate educational programs and services in the department with those provided
               by other state agencies, by political subdivisions, and by persons who provide
               programs and services under contract. (TEC, §19.004)


B. Does the school’s enabling law correctly reflect the school’s mission, key
functions, powers, and duties?       Yes


C. Please explain why these functions are needed.
•    Thousands of offenders in TDCJ lack the educational background and basic skills
     necessary to obtain employment upon release or participate in advanced educational
     programs. The typical WSD student:
           •   dropped out of school in the 9th or 10th grade,
           •   functions at the 5th or 6th grade level,
           •   has an IQ of 85,
           •   has a history of academic failure,
           •   has a defensive and/or negative attitude,
           •   has low self-esteem,
           •   has little confidence in self to find employment,
           •   has limited ability to visualize a productive future,
           •   has difficulty with relationships,
           •   has difficulty controlling anger, and
           •   exhibits impulsive behavior.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                          Page 3 of 121
•    Windham School District serves as a dropout recovery program for thousands of
     offenders who never completed high school. Offenders as young as 14 years of age
     may be incarcerated in TDCJ facilities. According to the TDCJ Statistical Report for
     2002, more than 6,000 offenders were under the age of 21 and entitled to public
     school education. Additionally, more than 40,000 offenders were between the ages of
     21 and 29. Most of these offenders lack a high school diploma, have no significant
     work history, and lack other skills and credentials necessary to compete successfully
     for jobs. Many lack even the most basic academic skills, not to mention the higher
     order thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving skills required in today’s workplace.

•    Education programs serve as a prison management tool. Participation in education
     programs is tied directly to an offender’s classification status and serves as a
     behavioral incentive. Additionally, offenders who are actively engaged in productive
     activities are far less likely to create a disturbance than those who are idle. There is
     also a cost savings in terms of security operations. Education employees supervise
     thousands of offenders in classrooms every day.

•    Education is linked to a reduction in recidivism. Studies indicate that offenders with
     the highest education are more likely upon release to obtain employment, earn higher
     wages and have lower recidivism. Prison education can help lower some natural
     barriers to positive community reintegration by strengthening the intellectual,
     cognitive and life skills possessed by inmates. The higher the educational level of
     inmates at release, the better prepared they are for community re-entry and for
     employment. (Tony Fabelo, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Policy Council)

•    A recent study funded by the U.S. Department of Education found that participation
     in state correctional education programs lowered the likelihood of reincarceration by
     29 percent. Similar results have also been found in other studies, including a Federal
     Bureau of Prisons study that showed a 33 percent drop in recidivism among federal
     inmates who were enrolled in vocational and apprenticeship training. (National Institute
     for Literacy, State Correctional Education Programs, State Policy Update, March 2002)


•    In 2000, the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Council evaluated the educational
     achievement of offenders in prison and the relationship of educational achievement
     on post-release employment and recidivism. The following excerpts are highlights
     from the report:
          •    In general, inmates with higher levels of education tend to have lower recidivism
               rates.
          •    Prison education has a positive impact in reducing recidivism for those inmates who
               improve their educational level.
          •    Inmates with a 9th grade education or higher had a 37 percent lower recidivism rate
               than those with a 4th grade education or lower.
          •    High-risk offenders who learned to read had a 37 percent lower recidivism rate than
               high-risk offenders who did not learn to read.
          •    Educational achievement (moving levels or GED attainment) was associated with 11
               percent lower recidivism than non-achievement.
          •    In general, those releasees who earned a GED in prison had lower recidivism rates
               than those who did not complete one.
          •    The higher the education level of releasees, the greater their job prospects and
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                               Page 4 of 121
               earnings potential.
          •    Releasees who were employed had a 17 percent lower recidivism rate than those who
               were not employed.
          •    Releasees who earned $10,000 or more during their first year of release had lower
               recidivism rates than releasees who earned less than $10,000, regardless of age and
               offense.
          •    Compared to inmates who earned only a GED, inmates who earned a GED and a
               vocational certificate had a higher average yearly wage and were even more likely to
               be employed in the year after release.
          •    The findings suggest that present inmate educational policies have a positive impact
               on recidivism.

•    In an August 1990 performance audit of Windham School District by the State
     Auditor’s Office, it was reported that for every one percent reduction in recidivism,
     the state would avoid incarceration costs of over $6 million. [This was based on an average
     cost of over $22,000 per stay in 1990 and an estimate of at least 300 fewer offenders returning to
     prison. In FY02, the average cost per day was $44.01 with a four-year average length of stay. This
     would equate to over $64,000 per stay. Based on the recidivism rate for offenders released in 1998
     (the most current figure available), every one percent reduction in recidivism would avoid
     incarceration costs of $6,687,144.]

Are any of these functions required by federal law?

Under the provisions of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), all State
and local juvenile and adult criminal corrections facilities are required to provide a free
and appropriate public education to any youth ages 18 through 21 who, in his or her last
educational placement prior to incarceration, was identified as a child with a disability
and had an Individualized Education Program (IEP).



D. Describe any major school functions that are outsourced.                         N/A


E. Discuss any anticipated changes in federal law and outstanding court cases as
they impact the school’s key functions.
WSD is not aware of any at this time.


F. Please complete the following chart, listing citations for all state and federal
statutes that grant authority to or otherwise significantly impact the school. Do not
include general state statutes that apply to all state agencies, such as the Public
Information (Open Records) Act, the Open Meetings Act, or the Administrative
Procedure and Texas Register Act. Provide the same information for Attorney
General (AG) opinions from FY 1999-2003, or earlier significant AG opinions, that
affect the school’s operations.



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 5 of 121
                                             Windham School District
                                          Exhibit 1: Statutes/AG Opinions
                                                           Statutes
                 Citation/Title                                               Authority/Impact on School
State: Texas Education Code Chapter 19                           Enabling law that defines goals, powers, and duties
                                                                 of WSD.
Federal: P.L. 105-17 Individuals with Disabilities               Requires WSD to provide free, appropriate
         Education Act                                           education to qualified youths.
         Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act              Prohibits discrimination against persons with
                                                                 disabilities in programs which receive federal funds.

                                                        AG Opinions
                 AG Opinion Number                                                Impact on School
N/A                                                              N/A




G. Please fill in the following chart:

                                                 Windham School District
                                                 Exhibit 2: School Contacts
                        Name                      Address            Telephone &            E-mail Address
                                                                     Fax
School Head             Dr. Ron                   P. O. Box 40       (936) 291-5303         ron.bradford@wsdtx.org
                        Bradford                  Huntsville, TX     (936) 436-4031 (fax)
                                                  77342-0040
Self-Evaluation         Marjie Haynes             P. O. Box 40       (936) 291-5335         marjie.haynes@wsdtx.org
Liaison                                           Huntsville, TX     (936) 291-5360 (fax)
                                                  77342-0040




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                             Page 6 of 121
Section II. History and Major Events

Provide a time line discussion of the school’s history. Briefly describe the key events
in the development of the school, including:
•    The date the school was established
The Windham School District (WSD) was established by the authority of Senate Bill 35,
passed into law by the 61st Texas Legislature to be effective for the school year 1968-69
and thereafter. Chapter 19 of Senate Bill 1, adopted in 1995 by the 74th Texas Legislature,
reauthorized Windham School District.
•    The original purpose and responsibilities of the school
     The original purpose/responsibility of the district was to establish and operate schools
     at the various facilities of the TDCJ.
•    Any major changes in the responsibilities or statutory authority
     Changes in statutory authority:
        • Texas Education Code, Chapter 19. Schools in the Texas Department of
           Criminal Justice (effective May 30, 1995)
        • Texas Education Code, §19.005 was amended (effective September 1, 1999) to
           allow the district, to the extent space is available, to offer programs or services
           to offenders who are high school graduates.
•    School/policymaking body name and composition changes;
     The Texas Board of Criminal Justice serves as the Board of Trustees for the Windham
     School District. The nine-member Board is appointed by the governor to oversee the
     Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ), which provides confinement,
     supervision, rehabilitation, and reintegration of the state’s convicted felons. The board
     members, who are appointed for staggered, six-year terms, are responsible for hiring
     the executive director of the department and setting rules and policies which guide the
     agency. As the Board of Trustees for WSD, they are also responsible for providing
     general oversight and the hiring of the school district’s superintendent.
•    The impact of state/federal legislation, mandates, and funding;
     In the mid 1990’s, the TDCJ experienced a rapid expansion of its facilities. The
     legislature increased WSD funding to accommodate the expansion. In a five-year
     period (school years 1992-93 to 1996-97), the number of WSD school campuses
     doubled from 43 to 86; the number of students served increased from 39,799 to 70,829.
     In 2003, the legislature decreased funding for WSD by approximately 19%. Such a
     significant decrease resulted in a reduction-in-force effective September 1, 2003.

•    The impact of any significant state/federal litigation that specifically affects the
     school’s operations; and

     WSD is not aware of any at this time.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 7 of 121
•    Key organizational events, and areas of change and impact on the school’s
     organization (e.g., a major reorganization of the school’s divisions or program
     areas).

     A 19% decrease in funding for the current biennium (FY04 and FY 05) resulted in a
     significant reduction-in-force, a salary reduction, the restructuring of WSD regions, and
     reorganization of the WSD central administration. The regional offices were
     consolidated from five regions to four. The four remaining regions incurred significant
     reductions in personnel. However, considering the vast geographical distances in the
     state, the decision was made to maintain a few administrative and support staff
     positions in the regional offices in order to handle some critical functions in the most
     efficient and effective manner.

     The greatest percentage of reduction in staff occurred at the administrative level. WSD
     reduced administrative positions by 36% (54.5 positions out of 153.5), academic
     teachers by 13.5% (97 positions out of 716), and vocational teachers by 28% (72
     positions out of 253). Overall, only 17% (169 positions out of 969) of teacher positions
     were eliminated, compared to 36% for administrative positions.

                                            Personnel Reductions for 2004-2005


                                  40%

                                                 36%
                                   35%


                                   30%

                                                                                         28%
                                   25%


                                   20%


                                   15%
                                                                  13.50%
                                    10%


                                     5%


                                     0%

                                           Administrative
                                             Positions      Academic Teaching
                                                                Positions          Vocational
                                                                                Teaching Positions




Process Used in Determining Program Reductions:

•    Given the need to use an equitable process to apply to the entire statewide district,
     senior administrators in the central office (primarily Division Directors, the Deputy
     Superintendent, the Superintendent, and the School Attorney) collaborated on the
     process to use in determining where the program cuts would occur. Periodic meetings
     were held to review and agree on the number and location of the recommended
     program reductions. Recommendations were based on objective data rather than
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                       Page 8 of 121
     subjective criteria. The Superintendent also met with the regional administrators to
     explain the process being used. The Superintendent made the final decision with
     approval of the Board.
•    In recommending reductions for academic programming, the following process was
     used:
     o Reports were generated to provide the Individualized Treatment Plan (ITP) data for
       each campus. The ITP data indicates the number of high priority students on the
       campus. Priority is defined as:
           High—Under age 35 and within five years of projected release date (PRD)
           Medium—Under age 35 and within 10 years of PRD; 35 or older within five
           years of PRD; or under age 22 regardless of PRD
     o Using a ratio of 50 students per teacher, a determination was made regarding
       the number of teachers required to meet the needs of the high priority
       students. For example, if the ITP data indicated that a facility had 300 high
       priority students for the academic program, then 6 teaching positions were
       allocated.
     o In certain circumstances, consideration was given to unique facility characteristics
       and whether the educational programs were offered in more than one location on a
       unit. For example, the Gatesville unit has multiple satellite campuses, some
       facilities have trusty camps, and some have psychiatric treatment facilities in
       addition to the general population. Facilities with multiple school locations require
       more teachers than might otherwise be required. Additional teaching positions
       were allocated as needed for these types of facilities.
     o Consideration was also given to the number and type of special programs offered at
       each facility (e.g., Special Education, ESL, CHANGES, Cognitive Intervention,
       Parenting). To the extent possible, enough teaching positions were retained at each
       facility to enable that facility to continue the same program offerings.

Basically, with respect to the academic program, facilities that were serving a high
percentage of high priority students were the least affected by the RIF. Facilities that were
serving a high percentage of low priority students (older, long term offenders) were the
most affected by the RIF.

•    In recommending which Career and Technology Education (CTE) programs to reduce,
     the following factors were considered:
     o Current labor market information (potential employment opportunities for ex-
       offenders)
     o Number of students on the waiting list (district-wide) for each trade
     o Number of classes offered district-wide in each trade
     o ITP data (number of high priority students) on a campus
     o TDCJ requests to reduce the number of programs at certain facilities (problems with
       bed space, ease of transferring offenders on/off a particular facility, etc.)
     o Unit characteristics (e.g., long term offenders, medical population, maximum
       security, location and/or condition of vocational shops, ease of getting projects
       on/off the facility, etc.)
     o Needs of Texas Correctional Industries and/or TDCJ (in terms of the need for WSD
       to train workers for them)
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 9 of 121
     o Investment in shop/equipment; ease or lack of ease in relocating equipment (for
       example paint booths and greenhouses are not easy to remove or relocate); expense
       of operating a particular trade (for example, welding is expensive to operate due to
       the gases required, transporting of scrap metal, etc.)
     o Clustering of like trades (e.g., aligning construction-related trades together)
     o Location of college programs (issues related to shared shops; shared equipment;
       duplication of effort)
     o Whether industry certification was available for the trade
     o Number of industry certifications earned by students

•    Once the decision was made to reduce positions at particular facilities, the following
     process was used to determine, specifically, which teachers would be affected by the
     Reduction-in-Force:
     1. A committee comprised of three employees reviewed all unit staff to see which
        employees should be reduced. If the position was program specific, such as a single
        CTE class, then no further review was necessary.

     2. The Reduction-in-Force policy states that the following criteria, listed in order of
        importance, in each selected employment area, shall be applied to determine which
        employees are retained:
               A.   Certification
               B.   Performance
               C.   Seniority
               D.   Professional Background
               E.   Educational Background

     3. For literacy positions and double shifted CTE classes, the following process was
        used:
               A. Positions to be reduced were first reviewed to determine whether there were
                  probationary employees filling the positions. If so, the probationary
                  employee(s) were non-renewed first. The Reduction-in-Force criteria listed
                  above were employed in determining which probationary employee was
                  non-renewed, on a unit-by-unit basis. Probationary employees do not have
                  the same property rights in a job as do non-probationary employees and may
                  be non-renewed for any reason.
               B. After determining which positions to be deleted were filled by probationary
                  employees, the Reduction-in-Force Policy was then applied to non-
                  probationary employees. The Reduction-in-Force policy states that the
                  following criteria, listed in order of importance, in each selected
                  employment area shall be applied to determine which employees are
                  retained:
                    (1)        Certification
                    (2)        Performance
                    (3)        Seniority
                    (4)        Professional Background
                    (5)        Educational Background
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 10 of 121
               C. For non-probationary CTE instructors, certification, current evaluation, and
                  seniority were reviewed, in the above-mentioned order.

     4. For non-probationary literacy employees, certification (elementary and secondary
        with 6 hours of reading were rated the highest), and current evaluation was
        considered in determining who should be non-renewed, again in the above-
        mentioned order. All academic classes were considered equally, except for ESL
        and Special Education, which were considered as separate categories.

All reductions were made in accordance with Windham Policy 7.08-4, Reduction-in-Force,
as referenced above.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 11 of 121
Section III. Policymaking Structure

A. Please complete the following chart:

                                              Windham School District
                                            Exhibit 3: Policymaking Body
Member         Term/Appointment            Qualifications                 Address   Telephone, Fax, and E-
Name           Dates                       (e.g., public members;                   mail Address
                                           industry representative,
                                           etc.)
Christina      05/2001-02/2007             Attorney in private practice. P.O.       Phone
Melton         Appointed as                Serves on Boards of the        Box       (512) 475-3250
Crain,         Chairman in                 Dallas Bar Association, the    13084     Fax
Chairman       February 2003.              Baylor Health Care System      Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           Foundation, the Ex-            TX        Email
                                           Students’ Association of the 78711       susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
                                           University of Texas at
                                           Austin, and is the Past
                                           President of the Dallas
                                           Association of Young
                                           Lawyers and the Dallas
                                           Women Lawyers
                                           Association.
Oliver J.      01/2004-02/2009             President and founder of E-    P.O.      Phone
Bell                                       Team Communications, a         Box       (512) 475-3250
                                           human resource/labor           13084     Fax
                                           relations consulting firm.     Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                                                          TX        Email
                                                                          78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
Don            1999-02/2005                President of Collins & Jones P.O.        Phone
Jones,                                     Investments, LLC and           Box       (512) 475-3250
Secretary                                  serves as a member of the      13084     Fax
                                           Board of Trustees of           Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           Midland Memorial Hospital      TX        Email
                                           and the Board of Trustees of 78711       susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
                                           West Texas Boys Ranch.
                                           Active in the Kairos Prison
                                           Ministry.
Adrian A.      2001-2/2007                 Licensed real estate broker    P.O.      Phone
Arriaga                                    and owner of AAA Real          Box       (512) 475-3250
                                           Estate & Investments.          13084     Fax
                                           Serves as President of         Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           ANSA Investment, Inc., and TX            Email
                                           A.A. Arriaga Investment,       78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
                                           Inc., both real estate holding
                                           companies. Currently
                                           chairman of the State of
                                           Texas Small Business
                                           Advisory Council, Director
                                           of Lower Rio Grande Valley
                                           Development Council of
                                           Governments, and chairman
                                           of the International
                                           Ambassador Committee of
                                           the Certified Commercial
                                           Investment Institute.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                   Page 12 of 121
Judge          1999-2/2005                 Retired Harris County           P.O.      Phone
Mary           Appointed in 1999           District Judge.                 Box       (512) 475-3250
Bacon          and again in 2000.                                          13084     Fax
                                                                           Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                                                           TX        Email
                                                                           78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
Gregory        2003-2/2009                 Partner at Weil, Gotshal &      P.O.      Phone
S.                                         Manges LLP and is head of       Box       (512) 475-3250
Coleman                                    the firm’s Supreme Court        13084     Fax
                                           and Appellate Litigation        Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           Practice Group. He              TX        Email
                                           previously served as            78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
                                           Solicitor General of Texas;
                                           Law Clerk to Honorable
                                           Clarence Thomas, Associate
                                           Justice for the United States
                                           Supreme Court; and Law
                                           Clerk to Honorable Edith
                                           Hollan Jones, United States
                                           Court of Appeal for the Fifth
                                           Circuit.
Patricia       1997-02/2003                Retired in 2000 as Founder      P.O.      Phone
A. Day                                     and executive director of       Box       (512) 475-3250
                                           Victims Outreach, a non-        13084     Fax
                                           profit organization which       Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           she founded in 1986 to assist   TX        Email
                                           victims of violent crime.       78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
Pierce         2000-02/2007                Owner of VIP Livestock          P.O.      Phone
Miller                                     Company and is also the         Box       (512) 475-3250
                                           President of Moleo Gas          13084     Fax
                                           Corporation in San Angelo.      Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                           Currently Vice President of     TX        Email
                                           the Mohair Council of           78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us
                                           America and Board Member
                                           of Ranchers Lamb of Texas.
William        1998-02/2005                Retired from the                P.O.      Phone
“Hank”                                     Internationally recognized      Box       (512) 475-3250
Moody                                      accounting firm of KPMG.        13084     Fax
                                                                           Austin,   (512) 305-9398
                                                                           TX        Email
                                                                           78711     susanmch@tdcj.state.tx.us


B. How is the chair of the policymaking body appointed?

The chair is appointed by the governor of Texas.


C. Describe the primary role and responsibilities of the policymaking body.

The TBCJ is responsible for providing general oversight and the hiring of the District’s
Superintendent. The TBCJ is also responsible for setting rules and policies which guide
the District.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                    Page 13 of 121
D. List any special circumstances or unique features about the policymaking body
or its responsibilities.

The TBCJ serves a dual role. It oversees TDCJ while also serving as Board of Trustees
for WSD.


E. In general, how often does the policymaking body meet?

The WSD Board attempts to hold regular meetings at least every odd-numbered month of
the year, but shall meet at least once each quarter of the calendar year. (§492.006, Texas
Government Code)

Special meetings of the WSD Board may be called at other times by the WSD Board
Chairman.

How many times did it meet in FY 2002? In FY 2003?

Six meetings were held in FY 2002; seven meetings were held in FY 2003.


F. What type of training, if any, do the school’s policymaking body members receive
with regards to governing the school?

In accordance with Texas Government Code §492.0031, each WSD Board member is
required to complete a comprehensive training program including, but not limited to,
enabling legislation, programs, rules, budget, open meetings law, public information law,
administrative procedure law, conflict of interest laws and applicable ethics policies. In
addition, new WSD Board members receive orientation and briefing from the WSD
Superintendent and staff.


G. Does the school have policies that describe the respective roles of the
policymaking body and school staff in running the school? If so, please describe
these policies.

WSD Board adopted Policy #1.00, Windham School District Policy Statement, describes
the respective roles of the WSD Board and the District’s staff in running the District.

That policy contains provisions regarding:

•    Qualification and Selection of the WSD Superintendent – this section describes the
     qualification and selection process for the WSD Superintendent, and states that the
     WSD Board shall have final approval on the employment, evaluations, and
     termination of the Superintendent.

•    Responsibilities of the WSD Superintendent - this section states that the
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 14 of 121
     Superintendent, as the chief executive officer of the District, reports directly to the
     WSD Board; this section also enumerates the Superintendent’s responsibilities with
     respect to implementation of comprehensive educational programs to offenders
     incarcerated in the TDCJ, along with appropriate measures to evaluate the
     effectiveness of WSD programs.

•    Authority of the Superintendent – this section provides that the authority to
     administer, organize, manage, and supervise the daily operations of WSD is delegated
     by the WSD Board to the Superintendent who may, in turn, delegate this authority to
     staff as appropriate; in addition, this section delineates various examples of this
     delegation of authority from the WSD Board to the Superintendent, including, but not
     limited to: employment, discharge, and nonrenewal or termination of employees;
     power to prescribe policies, procedures, and regulations; authority to structure the
     organization of the District to improve operations; overseeing the fiscal management
     of the District; litigation settlement authority up to prescribed amount; and
     implementation of personnel policies.


H. How does the policymaking body obtain input from the public regarding issues
under the jurisdiction of the school? How is this input incorporated into the
operations of the school?

By statute and rule, the WSD Board is required to provide access and opportunity for
public comment on issues within the jurisdiction of the Board; persons outside the
District who wish to have items placed on the Board agenda are invited to follow
prescribed procedures contained in applicable rules; twice a year at the first and fourth
regularly called meetings of the Board, which are typically held in January and July, an
opportunity shall be provided for public presentations on issues that are not part of the
Board’s posted agenda.

In addition, correspondence to the Board from the public on significant WSD issues and
questions are often referred to the WSD Superintendent and appropriate staff to
investigate, study, and develop an appropriate response.

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice holds an annual Public Awareness Corrections
Today (PACT) conference. Presentations are provided on a variety of topics, including
WSD educational programs. Following each presentation, the public is generally invited
to provide comments or ask questions. Board members are typically in attendance at the
conference.

At times, Board members are invited to attend meetings of offender family organizations,
such as the Texas Inmate Family Association.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 15 of 121
Section IV. Funding

A. Describe the school’s process for determining budgetary needs and priorities.

In order for WSD to fulfill its mission of providing appropriate educational programming
and services, adequate funding is essential.

Each department head, regional administrator, and principal is responsible for controlling
his/her budgets.

In January of each year, budget instructions are given to each unit (campus), regional
office, and administrative department.

At the beginning of this budget process, each regional administrator is provided with
current budget reports showing their campuses’ current budgets along with YTD
expenditures (by program). They are provided with a total dollar amount allowed for
their region and, based on funds appropriated, are required to stay within those dollar
amounts.

At each campus, the principal works with teachers, counselors, diagnosticians, librarian,
and support personnel, to prepare a budget request that reflects their needs to properly
provide educational programs and services for their students. Each campus reviews their
needs, prioritizes those requests, and then submits their budget proposal to their regional
administrator. At this point, the regional administrator may communicate with the
principal in person, by phone, or through written communication with regard to their
request. Once the regional office has approved the budget request, it is transmitted to the
Windham Business Office in Huntsville.

The deadline for receiving all budgets in the Business Office is around the end of March.

Once all requests are received, the data is compiled by the Budget Coordinator and
reviewed by the Administrator for Business Services, Division Director for
Administrative and Business Services, and the Superintendent. At this point, programs
and positions are reviewed to confirm their effectiveness in completing the district’s
mission.

After review, the Windham School District budget is printed and submitted to the Texas
Board of Criminal Justice at the July board meeting for approval.

Once approved, proper budget information is provided to each campus, regional office,
and administrative department.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 16 of 121
B. Show the school’s sources of revenue. Please include all local, state, and federal
appropriations, all professional and operating fees, and all other sources of revenue
collected by the school.

                                      Windham School District
                      Exhibit 5A: Sources of Revenue – Budget Year 2003 (Actual)
                        Source                                      Amount
Local1                                                                                       $     108,046.00
State (Foundation School Program)                                                            $ 71,115,423.00
Federal                                                                                      $   2,954,022.00
                            2
Continuing Education                                                                         $   3,583,806.00
                                      3
Contract (Recreation & Echo)                                                                 $   2,928,286.00
                4
Project RIO                                                                                  $   3,377,126.00
        5
Other                                                                                        $       21,100.00
Operating Transfers-In                                                                       $      176,009.00
TOTAL REVENUES                                                                               $ 84,263,818.00
1
    Interest earned
2
    Funding comes from TDCJ Strategy C.2.2 Academic/Vocational Training. Windham enters into a MOU with
    TDCJ for Post Secondary Academic & Vocational Training
3
    Contract (Recreation & Echo) funding comes from TDCJ Strategy C.1.2 Institutional Goods/Services. Windham
    enters into a MOU with TDCJ for Libraries, Radio & TV, and Inmate Recreation.
4
    Funding comes from TDCJ Strategy C.2.2 Academic/Vocational Training. Windham enters into a MOU with TDCJ
    to administer the Project RIO program. TDCJ gets the funding from the Texas Workforce Commission via an
    interagency contract.

5
    Vocational shop project fees

                                       Windham School District
                          Exhibit 5B: Sources of Revenue – Budget Year 2004
                         Source                                     Amount
Local                                                                                        $     145,000.00
State (Foundation School Program)                                                            $ 57,569,745.00
Federal                                                                                      $   4,229,037.00
Continuing Education                                                                         $   2,447,204.00
Contract (Recreation & Echo)                                                                 $   3,513,235.00
Project RIO                                                                                  $   3,259,735.00
Other                                                                                        $       20,000.00
Operating Transfers-In                                                                       $      135,000.00
Estimated Fund Balance Forward                                                               $   1,090,432.00
TOTAL REVENUES                                                                               $ 72,409,388.00



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                      Page 17 of 121
                            Foundation School Program Funds
                                        FY 2004
                                        6.77%

                                0.11%




                                                                        Salaries


                                                                        Capital/Minor
                                                                        Equipment

                                                                        Operating



                                                       93.12%




                  BUDGET SALARY ALLOCATION
                                        FSP, TITLE I & TITLE II
                                               FY 2004

                                                 13%
                                                                Teachers
                                                                Professional Support Staff
                                                   1%
             67%
                                                                Central Administrative
                                                   7%
                                                                School Administrative
                                                  1%
                                                                Educational Aides
                                                 11%
                                                                Auxiliary Staff




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                          Page 18 of 121
                                      Windham School District
                               Budgeted Salary Allocation by Categories
                               Foundation School Program, Title I & II
                                              FY 2004


                   STAFF                         FTE COUNT           TOTAL $          % of Salary

Total Personnel                                    1,289            $55,638,243                  100.00%

Teachers
        Academic                                    583             $26,804,533
        Vocational                                  180              $8,010,664
        Sp Ed                                        52              $2,421,935
        TOTAL                                       815             $37,237,132                   66.93%

Professional Support Staff
         Support Staff                             22.5              $1,123,900
         Counselors                                 88               $4,388,158
         Diagnosticians                             13                 $638,512
         Librarians*                                23               $1,117,464
         Psychologist                                2                 $104,880
                                                   148.5             $7,372,914                   13.25%

Central Administrative
         Division Directors/Adm Officers            10                 $599,466
         Superintendents                            1                   $87,278
                                                    11                 $686,744                      1.23%

School Administrative
        Principals                                  64               $3,716,759
        Asst Principals                             1                   $54,315
        Regional Administrators                     4                 $261,016
                                                    69               $4,032,090                      7.25%
Educational Aides
        Deaf Interpreters                           4                   $95,664
        Testing Specialist                          13                 $348,322
                                                    17                 $443,986                      0.80%

Auxiliary Staff
         Business                                  14.5                $436,377
         Human Resources                             3                  $92,031
         Computer Services                           17                $730,629
         Secretaries/Clerks                         194              $4,606,340
                                                   228.5             $5,865,377                   10.54%


*
    Additional librarians are funded by TDCJ; see paragraph related to Library Services on page 90




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                          Page 19 of 121
C. If you receive funds from multiple federal programs, show the types of
federal funding sources.

                                Windham School District
                  Exhibit 6A: Federal Funds - Budget Year 2003 (Actual)
                       State/Federal
   Type of Fund                        State Share    Federal Share     Total Funding
                       Match Ratio
Youthful Offender                                      $ 1,292,498.25    $ 1,292,498.25
ESEA Title I – Part
                                                       $ 656,956.18      $ 656,956.18
D
Voc Crim Offender                                      $ 693,011.72      $ 693,011.72
ESEA Title II                                          $ 197,422.46      $ 197,422.46
ESEA Title IV                                                  $     3,894.01    $     3,894.01
IDEA- B                                                        $    93,826.46    $    93,826.46
IDEA B – Cap Bldg                                              $     1,738.00    $     1,738.00
ESEA Title V Innov                                             $    14,675.42    $    14,675.42
TOTAL                                                          $ 2,954,022.50    $ 2,954,022.50


                                        Windham School District
                              Exhibit 6B: Federal Funds - Budget Year 2004
                               State/Federal
    Type of Fund                              State Share    Federal Share      Total Funding
                               Match Ratio
Youthful Offender                                              $ 2,407,430.00    $ 2,407,430.00
ESEA Title I – Part
                                                               $   795,489.00    $   795,489.00
D
Voc Crim Offender                                              $   728,996.00    $   728,996.00
ESEA Title II                                                  $   177,326.00    $   177,326.00
ESEA Title IV                                                  $     4,294.00    $     4,294.00
Idea B                                                         $    99,241.00    $    99,241.00
Idea B – Cap Bldg                                              $     1,552.00    $     1,552.00
ESEA Title V Innov                                             $    14,709.00    $    14,709.00
TOTAL                                                          $ 4,229,037.00    $ 4,229,037.00


D. If applicable, please provide detailed information on fees collected by the school.
                                Windham School District
            Exhibit 7: Fee Revenue and Statutory Fee Levels – Fiscal Year 2003
Description/      Current Fee/      Number of          Fee Revenue        Where Fee
Program/          Statutory         persons or                            Revenue is
Statutory         maximum           entities paying                       Deposited (e.g.,
Citation                            fee                                   General
                                                                          Revenue Fund)
N/A


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 20 of 121
E. Show the school’s expenditures and FTEs by program(s)
                                 Windham School District
         Exhibit 8A: Expenditures and FTEs by program – Budget Year 2003 (Actual)
 Program    Budget FTEs     Actual FTEs as   Federal Funds    State Funds     Total Actual
              – FY 2003      of 8-31-2003      Expended        Expended       Expenditures
Academic        1127.5           936.5         $ 949,943.10 $49,572,929.63 $50,522,872.73
Voc                        273                   242        $   693,011.72   $12,716,793.96   $13,409,805.68
Life Skills               191.5                  186        $    18,569.43   $ 9,456,369.00     $9,474,938.43
Cont. Ed.                   24                   16.5       $ 1,292,498.25   $ 3,583,805.51    $ 4,876,303.76
Recreation                  36                    30                   -0-   $ 2,928,285.67    $ 2,928,285.67
Project RIO                135                   117                   -0-    $3,377,126.00    $ 3,377,126.00
TOTAL                     1787                   1528       $ 2,954,022.50   $81,635,309.77   $84,589,332.27

                                          Windham School District
                      Exhibit 8B: Expenditures and FTEs by program – Budget Year 2004

  Program           Budget FTEs            Actual FTEs as   Federal Funds     State Funds        Total Actual
                     – FY 2004              of 11-30-2003     Budgeted         Budgeted           Budgeted
Academic                900.5                   856.5       $ 1,073,608.00   $40,629,038.00      $41,702,646.00
Voc                        190                   184        $   728,996.00   $ 9,067,738.00      $ 9,796,734.00
Life Skills               196.5                  185.5      $    19,003.00   $ 9,263,401.00      $ 9,282,404.00
Cont. Ed.                   8                     8         $ 2,407,430.00   $ 2,447,204.00      $ 4,854,634.00
Recreation                 43.5                   42                   -0-   $ 3,513,235.00      $ 3,513,235.00
Project RIO                120                   112                   -0-   $ 3,259,735.00      $ 3,259,735.00
TOTAL                    1458.5                  1388       $ 4,229,037.00   $68,180,351.00      $72,409,388.00

F. Please fill in the following charts for all categories that apply:
                                Windham School District
              Exhibit 9A: Expenditures by Function - Fiscal Year 2001 (Actual)
Instruction                                                               $ 41,483,851.86
Instructional Resources                                                   $ 1,665,063.52
Curriculum                                                                $      95,549.84
Instructional Adm.                                                        $ 3,790,037.83
School Adm.                                                               $ 5,944,477.30
Guidance/Counsel                                                          $ 5,031,109.78
Project RIO                                                               $ 3,198,471.00
Recreation                                                                $ 12,415,167.02
Continuing Education                                                       $ 3,225,621.66
General Adm.                                                               $ 2,680,851.71
Data Proc.                                                                 $    962,082.71
Total Expenditures                                                         $ 80,492,284.23

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                           Page 21 of 121
                                Windham School District
              Exhibit 9B: Expenditures by Function - Fiscal Year 2002 (Actual)
Instruction                                                                $ 50,693,376.46
Instructional Resources                                                    $ 2,224,907.88
Curriculum                                                                 $      96,776.56
Instructional Adm.                                                         $ 3,933,590.44
School Adm.                                                                $ 7,139,341.72
Guidance/Counsel                                                           $ 6,228,143.59
Project RIO                                                                 $ 3,650,768.00
Recreation                                                                  $ 2,869,160.97
Continuing Education                                                        $ 3,537,229.97
General Adm.                                                                $ 2,869,533.51
Data Proc.                                                                  $ 1,019,461.31
Total Expenditures                                                          $ 84,262,290.41

                                Windham School District
              Exhibit 9C: Expenditures by Function - Fiscal Year 2003 (Actual)
Instruction                                                                $ 50,413,454.71
Instructional Resources                                                    $ 1,947,525.23
Curriculum                                                                 $     98,237.25
Instructional Adm.                                                         $ 3,850,705.28
School Adm.                                                                $ 7,110,897.13
Guidance/Counsel                                                           $ 6,181,715.15
Project RIO                                                                $ 3,377,126.00
Recreation                                                                 $ 2,928,285.67
Continuing Education                                                       $ 4,876,303.76
General Adm.                                                               $ 2,753,208.98
Data Proc.                                                                 $ 1,051,873.11
Total Expenditures                                                         $ 84,589,332.27

                                Windham School District
            Exhibit 9D: Expenditures by Function - Fiscal Year 2004 (Budgeted)
Instruction                                                               $ 43,423,068.00
Instructional Resources                                                   $ 1,387,019.00
Curriculum                                                                $     95,233.00
Instructional Adm.                                                        $ 2,419,525.00
School Adm.                                                               $ 5,489,340.00
Guidance/Counsel                                                          $ 4,763,386.00
Project RIO                                                               $ 3,259,735.00
Recreation                                                                $ 3,513,235.00
Continuing Education                                                      $ 4,854,634.00
General Adm.                                                              $ 2,322,925.00
Data Proc.                                                                $    881,288.00
Total Expenditures                                                        $ 72,409,388.00
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                  Page 22 of 121
G. Please indicate for each of the above years the number of students served, the
number receiving GEDs and/or degrees, and the average length of time in school for
the students.

                                                      2000-01            2001-02           2002-03
    Academic (Literacy) Participants                      54,608             52,639            55,067
          GEDs Awarded*                                    5,534              5,347             4,723
    Vocational Participants                                16,236             16,100            15,298

    Life Skills Participants**                             30,017             34,381            46,953

    Total Participants in All Programs                     83,667             83,337            83,785
    (unduplicated count)
    Avg. Hours in School                                       271               270                266

*  The decrease in GEDs awarded in 2003 reflects implementation of the revised GED test and revised
   eligibility criteria
** Life Skills participants reported for 2000-01 and 2001-02 do not include Parenting and Perspectives &
   Solutions participants




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                               Page 23 of 121
  Section V. Organization

 A. Please fill in the chart below:

                                                  Windham School District
                                 Exhibit 10A: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2003
     Headquarters and                      Location           Number of Budgeted    Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                           FTEs, FY 2003       as of August 31, 2003
Headquarters                      Huntsville                          155                    126
Region I                          Huntsville                          16                      8
Region II                         Teague                              21                      6
Region III                        Rosharon                            17                      10
Region IV                         Beeville                            16                      10
Region V                          Snyder                              17                      6
Allred Unit                       Iowa Park                           20                      23
Beto Special Unit                 Tennessee Colony                    17                      16
Beto Unit                         Tennessee Colony                    22                      17
Boyd Unit                         Teague                              25                      22
Briscoe Unit                      Dilley                              26                      21
C T Terrell Unit                  Rosharon                            25                      19
Central Unit                      Sugar Land                          20                      19
Clemens Unit                      Brazoria                            26                      21
Clements Unit                     Amarillo                            28                      26
Coffield Unit                     Tennessee Colony                    19                      19
Cole SJ                           Bonham                              17                      16
Connally Unit                     Kenedy                              23                      20
Dalhart Unit                      Dalhart                             17                      12
Daniel Unit                       Snyder                              19                      17
Darrington Unit                   Rosharon                            19                      15
Dominguez SJ                      San Antonio                         31                      27
Duncan TF                         Diboll                               8                      8
Eastham Unit                      Lovelady                            16                      13
Ellis Unit                        Huntsville                          14                      11
Estelle Unit                      Huntsville                          35                      32
Ferguson Unit                     Midway                              26                      25
Formby SJ                         Plainview                           17                      17
Garza                             Beeville                            19                      20
Gatesville Unit                   Gatesville                          27                      25
Gist SJ                           Beaumont                            26                      23
Glossbrenner SAFP                 San Diego                            8                      8
Goodman Unit                      Jasper                              13                      12
Goree Unit                        Huntsville                           3                      3
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                Page 24 of 121
                                                  Windham School District
                                 Exhibit 10A: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2003
     Headquarters and                    Location             Number of Budgeted    Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                           FTEs, FY 2003       as of August 31, 2003

Gurney TF                         Tennessee Colony                    14                      13
Halbert SAFP                      Burnet                               7                      6
Havins SAFP                       Brownwood                            7                      8
Henley SAFP                       Dayton                               8                      7
Hightower Unit                    Dayton                              17                      15
Hilltop Unit                      Gatesville                          13                      13
Hobby Unit                        Marlin                              19                      20
Hodge MROP                        Rusk                                23                      22
Holliday TF                       Huntsville                          15                      15
Hughes Unit                       Gatesville                          19                      12
HuntsvilleUnit                    Huntsville                          12                      12
Hutchins SJ                       Dallas                              26                      22
Jester III Unit                   Richmond                            21                      20
Johnston SAFP                     Winnsboro                            7                      6
Jordan Unit                       Pampa                               21                      15
Kegans SJ                         Houston                              3                      3
LeBlanc Unit                      Beaumont                            13                      11
Lewis Unit                        Woodville                           23                      23
Lopez SJ                          Edinburg                            24                      21
Luther Unit                       Navasota                            25                      25
Lychner SJ                        Humble                              30                      26
Lynaugh Unit                      Ft Stockton                         27                      25
McConnell Unit                    Beeville                            20                      11
Michael Unit                      Tennessee Colony                    22                      18
Middleton TF                      Abilene                             15                      15
Montford Unit                     Lubbock                             10                      8
Moore TF                          Bonham                              14                      14
Mt View Unit                      Gatesville                          11                      10
Murray Unit                       Gatesville                          19                      14
Neal Unit                         Amarillo                            20                      19
Ney SAFP                          Hondo                                6                      5
Pack Unit                         Navasota                            20                      18
Plane SJ                          Dayton                              30                      27
Polunsky Unit                     Livingston                          23                      19
Powledge Unit                     Palestine                           18                      17
Ramsey I Unit                     Rosharon                            23                      19
Ramsey II Unit                    Rosharon                            14                      9
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                Page 25 of 121
                                                  Windham School District
                                 Exhibit 10A: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2003
     Headquarters and                      Location           Number of Budgeted    Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                           FTEs, FY 2003          as of August 31, 2003

Roach Unit                        Childress                           28                         18
Robertson Unit                    Abilene                             21                         21
Rudd TF                           Brownfield                           9                         8
Sanchez SJ                        El Paso                             21                         18
Sayle SAFP                        Breckenridge                         7                         7
Scott Unit                        Angleton                            10                         5
Segovia TF                        Edinburg                            25                         22
Smith Unit                        Lamesa                              22                         22
Stevenson Unit                    Cuero                               26                         18
Stiles Unit                       Beaumont                            18                         14
Telford Unit                      New Boston                          21                         18
Torres Unit                       Hondo                               24                         22
Travis CJ                         Austin                              16                         14
Wallace Unit                      Colorado City                       23                         20
Ware Unit                         Colorado City                       15                         15
Wheeler SAFP                      Plainview                           10                         9
Woodman SJ                        Gatesville                          21                         20
Wynne Unit                        Huntsville                          23                         21

             TOTAL                                                   1787                       1528


                                                    Windham School District
                                     Exhibit 10B: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2004
     Headquarters and                      Location           Number of Budgeted         Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                           FTEs, FY 2004           as of November 30, 2003
Headquarters                      Huntsville                         117.5                            116
Region II                         Teague                               6                               5
Region III                        Rosharon                             6                               4
Region IV                         Beeville                             8                               7
Region V                          Snyder                               6                               6
Allred Unit                       Iowa Park                           19                              19
Beto Special Unit                 Tennessee Colony                    11                              13
Beto Unit                         Tennessee Colony                    21                              18
Boyd Unit                         Teague                              16                              16
Briscoe Unit                      Dilley                              23                              23
C T Terrell Unit                  Rosharon                            20                              18
Central Unit                      Sugar Land                          19                              19
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                   Page 26 of 121
                                                  Windham School District
                                     Exhibit 10B: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2004
     Headquarters and                      Location        Number of Budgeted           Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                        FTEs, FY 2004             as of November 30, 2003

Clemens Unit                      Brazoria                          24                            21
Clements Unit                     Amarillo                          23                            23
Coffield Unit                     Tennessee Colony                  18                            18
Cole SJ                           Bonham                            16                            16
Connally Unit                     Kenedy                            18                            16
Dalhart Unit                      Dalhart                           15                            13
Daniel Unit                       Snyder                            19                            14
Darrington Unit                   Rosharon                          13                            12
Dominguez SJ                      San Antonio                       40                            29
Duncan TF                         Diboll                            6                              6
Eastham Unit                      Lovelady                          14                            10
Ellis Unit                        Huntsville                        10                            10
Estelle Unit                      Huntsville                        30                            28
Ferguson Unit                     Midway                            23                            22
Formby SJ                         Plainview                         17                            16
Garza                             Beeville                          15                            15
Gatesville Unit                   Gatesville                        25                            27
Gist SJ                           Beaumont                          27                            23
Glossbrenner SAFP                 San Diego                         8                              8
Goodman Unit                      Jasper                            10                            10
Goree Unit                        Huntsville                        4                              3
Gurney TF                         Tennessee Colony                  8                              9
Halbert SAFP                      Burnet                            7                              7
Havins SAFP                       Brownwood                         8                              7
Henley SAFP                       Dayton                            8                              8
Hightower Unit                    Dayton                            15                            13
Hilltop Unit                      Gatesville                        13                            12
Hobby Unit                        Marlin                            20                            20
Hodge MROP                        Rusk                              19                            20
Holliday TF                       Huntsville                        9                             11
Hughes Unit                       Gatesville                        13                            12
Huntsville Unit                   Huntsville                        10                            10
Hutchins SJ                       Dallas                            26                            21
Jester III Unit                   Richmond                          18                            18
Johnston SAFP                     Winnsboro                         7                              7
Jordan Unit                       Pampa                             15                            14
Kegans SJ                         Houston                           3                              3
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 27 of 121
                                                  Windham School District
                                     Exhibit 10B: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2004
     Headquarters and                     Location         Number of Budgeted           Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                        FTEs, FY 2004             as of November 30, 2003

LeBlanc Unit                      Beaumont                          11                            12
Lewis Unit                        Woodville                         20                            20
Lopez SJ                          Edinburg                          21                            18
Luther Unit                       Navasota                          19                            18
Lychner SJ                        Humble                            26                            28
Lynaugh Unit                      Ft Stockton                       22                            21
McConnell Unit                    Beeville                          15                            15
Michael Unit                      Tennessee Colony                  18                            18
Middleton TF                      Abilene                           8                              9
Montford Unit                     Lubbock                           4                              4
Moore TF                          Bonham                            14                            14
Mt View Unit                      Gatesville                        9                              9
Murray Unit                       Gatesville                        17                            16
Neal Unit                         Amarillo                          16                            18
Ney SAFP                          Hondo                             5                              4
Pack Unit                         Navasota                          16                            17
Plane SJ                          Dayton                            31                            29
Polunsky Unit                     Livingston                        18                            15
Powledge Unit                     Palestine                         14                            14
Ramsey I Unit                     Rosharon                          20                            18
Ramsey II Unit                    Rosharon                          10                             8
Roach Unit                        Childress                         23                            22
Robertson Unit                    Abilene                           15                            15
Rudd TF                           Brownfield                        8                              8
Sanchez SJ                        El Paso                           20                            17
Sayle SAFP                        Breckenridge                      7                              8
Scott Unit                        Angleton                          3                              2
Segovia TF                        Edinburg                          23                            23
Smith Unit                        Lamesa                            20                            20
Stevenson Unit                    Cuero                             17                            15
Stiles Unit                       Beaumont                          12                            10
Telford Unit                      New Boston                        15                            14
Torres Unit                       Hondo                             18                            18
Travis CJ                         Austin                            17                            15
Wallace Unit                      Colorado City                     18                            18
Ware Unit                         Colorado City                     13                            14
Wheeler SAFP                      Plainview                         9                             10
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 28 of 121
                                                     Windham School District
                                     Exhibit 10B: FTEs by Location - Fiscal Year 2004
     Headquarters and                    Location             Number of Budgeted              Number of Actual FTEs
      Regional Schools                                              FTEs, FY 2004             as of November 30, 2003

Woodman SJ                        Gatesville                             21                             19
Wynne Unit                        Huntsville                             19                             19

           TOTAL                                                       1458.5                          1388




                                          Budgeted Versus Actual FTEs

                             1787
      1800
                                        1528
      1600                                                      1458.5
                                                                           1388
      1400
      1200
      1000                                                                                          Budgeted FTEs
        800                                                                                         Actual FTEs*

        600
        400
        200
           0
                            FY 2003                            FY 2004

 * Actual FTEs as of 08/31/03 (FY 03) and 11/30/03 (FY 04)




                  Demographics of WSD Professional Staff by Degree
                                                  As of August 28, 2003

                      Teachers               Administrators &              Counselors            Librarians
                                               Professional
                                              Support Staff
                 Number       Percent       Number        Percent        Number     Percent   Number     Percent
 Bachelor             459    54%                     63        28%               2 2.67%           17 42.50%
 Master               247 29.06%                    133     59.11%              73 97.33%          23 57.50%
 Doctorate              4   .47%                      4      1.78%               0      0           0      0
 None                 140 16.47%                     25     11.11%               0      0           0      0
 Total                850                           225                         75                 40
 Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                       Page 29 of 121
                  Demographics of WSD Professional Staff by Degree
                                             As of March 10, 2004
                     Teachers               Administrators &      Counselors                Librarians
                                              Professional
                                             Support Staff
                  Number     Percent       Number       Percent    Number    Percent    Number    Percent
Bachelor             428 56.39%                   58      28.02%       3 4.62%               17 40.48%
Master               228 30.04%                  119      57.49%      62 95.38%              25 59.52%
Doctorate              3   .40%                    5       2.42%       0      0               0      0
None                 100 13.18%                   25      12.08%       0      0               0      0
Total                759                         207                  65                     42


                    Years of Experience When Beginning WSD Employment
                                    (As of March 10, 2004)

                                 9.89
            10                                                                 8.57

              8

              6                                           4.22
              4

              2

              0
                         Academic                   Vocational              Total


                   Average Years of Experience for WSD Employees
                                            As of March 10, 2004
           Type                           Number         Average Years of   Average Years of
                                                         State Experience   WSD Experience
Academic Teachers                                  524                17.69             7.58
Vocational Teachers                                176                13.56             9.34
Special Education                                   49                16.69             8.61
Teachers
Title I & II Teachers                                    10                  15.30                    8.30
Administrative,                                         272                  15.59                    8.42
Professional Support,
& Auxiliary Staff
Total                                                  1031                  16.36                    8.16

B. Does the school have an FTE cap for fiscal years 2003-2005?                         No

C. How many temporary or contract employees did the school have as of August 31,
   2003?   Zero
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 30 of 121
D. Please fill in the charts below:

                                         Windham School District
                          Exhibit 11A: Equal Employment Opportunity Statistics
                                             Fiscal Year 2001
Job Category                   Total                       Minority Workforce Percentages
                               Positions           Black              Hispanic            Female
                                            School    Civilian   School   Civilian   School  Civilian
                                                      Labor               Labor              Labor
                                                      Force %             Force %            Force %
Officials/Administration              254 7.48%       5%         11.02% 8%           47.64% 26%
Professional                         1074 8.9%        7%         8.9%     7%         52.4%   44%
Technical*                                            13%                 14%                41%
Para-Professionals                    253 8.7%        25%        14.23% 30%          96.44% 55%
Administrative Support**                              16%                 17%                84%
* Included in Officials/Administration Total
** Included in Professional Total

                                         Windham School District
                          Exhibit 11B: Equal Employment Opportunity Statistics
                                             Fiscal Year 2002
Job Category                   Total                       Minority Workforce Percentages
                               Positions           Black              Hispanic            Female
                                            School    Civilian   School   Civilian   School  Civilian
                                                      Labor               Labor              Labor
                                                      Force %             Force %            Force %
Officials/Administration              256 8.2%        5%         9.77%    8%         48.83% 26%
Professional                         1057 9.17%       7%         8.7%     7%         53.5%   44%
Technical*                                            13%                 14%                41%
Para-Professionals                    246 10.16% 25%             15.04% 30%          96.75% 55%
Administrative Support**                              16%                 17%                84%
* Included in Officials/Administration Total
** Included in Professional Total

                                         Windham School District
                          Exhibit 11C: Equal Employment Opportunity Statistics
                                            Fiscal Year 2003
Job Category                   Total                     Minority Workforce Percentages
                               Positions         Black              Hispanic            Female
                                          School    Civilian   School   Civilian   School  Civilian
                                                    Labor               Labor              Labor
                                                    Force %             Force %            Force %
Officials/Administration              225 8%        5%         9.33%    8%         49.78% 26%
Professional                          965 8.9%      7%         8.8%     7%         51.7%   44%
Technical*                            117 18%       13%        12%      14%        68%     41%
Para-Professionals                    221 10.41% 25%           17.19% 30%          96.83% 55%
Administrative Support**                            16%                 17%                84%
* Project RIO
** Included in Professional Total

E. Does the school have an equal employment opportunity policy?

Yes. WSD 7.01-2, Employment of Personnel, Equal Opportunity Employment

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 31 of 121
Section VI – Guide to School Programs
Please complete this section for each of the school’s programs (or each of the school’s
functions, activities, or services if more appropriate).

A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Academic (Literacy) Program
Location                                         88 schools
Contact Name                                     Marjie Haynes
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 1127.5
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      936.5
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 900.5
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    856.5

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.

The academic (literacy) program provides adult basic education for offenders functioning
below the 6th grade level and secondary level adult education for offenders working
toward attainment of a GED. The academic program includes the provision of Title I,
English as a Second Language, and Special Education services.

On any given day, WSD currently serves more than 16,000 offenders in the literacy
program. Approximately 56% (9,000) of these students are functioning at the 6th grade
level or above.


C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created? Describe any
statutory or other requirements for this program or function.

The academic (literacy) program was created in 1969 in response to legislation (Senate
Bill 35, 61st Legislature) authorizing the provision of educational programs for
incarcerated offenders. Chapter 19 of Senate Bill 1, adopted in 1995 by the 74th Texas
Legislature, reauthorized Windham School District.

TEC, §19.004 states that the district shall:
          • develop educational and vocational training programs specifically
             designed for persons eligible under Section 19.005.

[See Appendix A: Programs Designed to Address Legislated Goals]


D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                  Page 32 of 121
The functions of this program have not changed from the original intent.

Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?
Not in the foreseeable future.

E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected.

Offenders classified as General Population Levels 1, 2 and 3, excluding offenders in
administrative segregation and death row, are eligible for participation in this program if
1) they do not have a high school diploma or GED; or 2) they have a high school diploma
or GED but do not have claimed or verified college hours and do not meet the eligibility
criteria to take the college entrance exam. [Offenders with high school diplomas or
GEDs are served on a space available basis.] Participation by offenders who are General
Population Level 4 may be considered on a case-by-case basis with the warden’s
approval. State Jail confinees who are Low Risk or Medium Risk Levels J1 and J2 are
eligible for participation in academic programs. [See Appendix B: Unit Classification]

Educational needs are determined at intake and entered on the TDCJ mainframe. TDCJ
utilizes the information to the extent possible when determining unit assignments;
however, offenders are assigned to facilities based on security considerations (for
example, age, type of offense, custody level, etc.). Security takes precedence over
education; therefore, offenders cannot always be assigned to facilities that offer a
particular educational program (for example, a particular vocational trade). WSD
requests transfers for offenders to access particular educational programs and TDCJ
makes every effort to accommodate the requests. During the 2002-2003 school year,
TDCJ approved 834 of 1,061 transfers requested by WSD.

Offenders are selected for enrollment in WSD programs based on the automated
Individualized Treatment Plan (ITP) process. The ITP is a plan of treatment for an
individual offender. The plan outlines programmatic activities and services for an
offender, and prioritizes his/her participation in recommended programs based on the
offender's needs, program availability and projected release date. Offenders who are less
than 35 years of age and within five years of projected release have the highest priority
for enrollment in the academic program (based on recidivism studies and recommendations from
the Criminal Justice Policy Council).

ITP Process:
• Newly received offenders are reviewed so treatment needs can be identified and
   addressed. Recommended program/activities are documented on the ITP by the use
   of a two-digit key rating system. The need key reflects the offender’s need level for a
   particular program. The program key prioritizes the offender’s placement based on
   the offender’s presumptive release date, receive date and program eligibility criteria.
• Offenders are prioritized for enrollment in academic and vocational programs based
   on need, age, and projected release date.
• Selection of students occurs through an automated process.
• Counselors at each facility generate a computer printout that lists offenders by ITP
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 33 of 121
      priority codes. As seats become available in classrooms, the list is used to select
      offenders for enrollment in classes.
•     Offenders less than 35 years of age and within 5 years of projected release have
      the highest priority for enrollment in academic and vocational classes.

Offenders who do not have a high school diploma or GED are expected to participate in
academic programs. Refusals are indicated on the ITP. Offenders are counseled that
participation refusals may negatively affect parole considerations.

Provide a statistical breakdown of persons or entities affected.
             Program Area                        Enrollment on November    Total Participants
                                                        30, 2003              2002-2003
    Adult Basic Education (< 6.0)                                  7,096
    Adult Secondary Education                                      9,652                55,067
    (6.0 or above)
    Special Education                                              1,120                  2,437
    English As a Second                                            1,006                  2,601
    Language
    Title I                                                         219                   1,005


F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and procedures.

The Superintendent reports directly to the Board and serves as the chief executive officer of the
WSD. The Superintendent is responsible to the WSD Board of Trustees for providing a
comprehensive educational program to offenders incarcerated in the TDCJ.

Central office functions are divided into four divisions: Division of Instruction, Division of
Operational Support, Division of Administrative and Business Services, and Division of
Continuing Education. Division Directors provide administrative oversight for these
divisions and report to the Superintendent. [See Appendix C: WSD Organizational Chart]

The Division Director for Instruction is responsible for the provision of a curricular
framework for the academic program, including standards and
benchmarks, and for the coordination of a comprehensive staff development plan for the
district. Educational Specialists (program specialists) in the Division of Instruction provide
pre-service training, coordinate the curriculum revision process, and provide staff
development and technical assistance.

WSD schools, located throughout the state, are divided geographically into four regions. A
regional administrator is assigned to each region. The principals of the schools in each
region report to the regional administrator. The regional administrators report to the
Superintendent. Offices for the regional administrators are located at TDCJ facilities in each
region:
     • North Texas Region—Boyd Unit (Teague)
     • Gulf Coast Region –Darrington Unit (Rosharon)
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                        Page 34 of 121
         •    South Texas Region—Garza Unit (Beeville)
         •    West Texas Region—Daniel Unit (Snyder)

 The four regional administrators spend the vast majority of their time providing direct
 assistance to unit personnel concerning daily operational issues. They routinely visit the
 units in their regions.
Principals provide instructional leadership for the teachers at each school. Instructional
Specialists are available in each region to support the principal by assisting teachers with
instruction-related issues.

Communication Process:
Every effort is made to communicate effectively. Despite diligent efforts, the geographic
complexities of operating a statewide school district can hinder communication.

Written communication is distributed through an internal truck mail          Communication Process
system, first class mail, the TDCJ telex system, and/or through an
internal e-mail system. Principals are expected to distribute written
                                                                                 Central Office
communication to appropriate personnel. Copies of written
communication are placed in staff mailboxes.
                                                                                   Regional
WSD also communicates information through a web site. WSD                           Office

employees have access to an intranet page on the web site.
Frequently used documents, including the WSD Policies and                          Principal

Procedures Manual, approved textbook list, vocational equipment
lists, phone lists, and other documents for internal use are posted on             Teachers

the intranet page.

Verbal communication is conveyed through telephone calls, principals’ meetings, staff
development sessions and/or campus visits. The superintendent makes a concerted effort to
visit campuses and speak with teachers. Personnel from the central office periodically visit
each campus and speak with teachers throughout the school year.

WSD regional offices convene Teacher Advisory Committees. Teachers on each campus
select a teacher to serve as a campus representative on the committee. In addition, periodic
surveys are conducted by the Division of Instruction to ascertain the needs and elicit
comments or suggestions from teachers. Teachers are encouraged to ask questions,
communicate concerns, and/or identify areas of need at any time.

Process Used Related to the Development of the Curricular Framework:
   • Using the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills as a baseline, staff members in the
       Division of Instruction extracted certain elements appropriate for an adult education
       program. Through a stakeholder review and approval process, the selected elements
       were compiled to form the Windham Essential Knowledge and Skills. A copy of the
       document is available upon request.

     •       In a collaborative process with representatives from various stakeholder groups from
             each region (e.g., teachers, principals, instructional specialists), educational
             specialists in the Division of Instruction guided the process of developing standards
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                          Page 35 of 121
          and benchmarks for the academic program. These standards and benchmarks are
          currently used to provide a curricular framework for teachers. A copy of the WSD
          Standards and Benchmarks is available upon request.

     •    The Division of Instruction provided each school with copies of recommended
          curricular resources for the academic program. At the time the curricular resources
          were provided, they were generally being used in the State’s adult education
          programs, for example:

          o    Adult Literacy Curriculum (Education Service Center, Region 20)
          o    Project FORWARD (TEA, Division of Adult & Community Education)
          o    A Curriculum Resource Guide for Economics (TEA)
          o    Adult ESL Learner Outcomes Curriculum (Texas A&M University-Kingsville)
          o    East Texas State University Occupational Investigation

     •    WSD also invested in a comprehensive K-12 computerized (software) curriculum
          entitled Project ABCD (developed and distributed at the time through the Texas
          Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development). This curricular resource
          is made available to teachers via a computer in the teacher workroom.

     •    Schools are free to use these curricular resources or others. If they identify a
          curricular resource they’d like to use, they submit a written request so the Division of
          Instruction can evaluate the curricula, approve their request if appropriate, and add it
          to the recommended list (this process only pertains to curriculum guides—not
          instructional materials).

     •    Schools are free to purchase and use instructional materials of their choice. They
          typically order instructional materials from publishers of adult education materials,
          such as Steck-Vaughn, Contemporary, Cambridge, etc.

     •    Exceptions:
          o In the Literacy I—Reading program, teachers are required to use a program of
             instruction entitled the Laubach Way to Reading. This remedial program has
             proven to be effective with adults who have not learned to read.
          o In the Special Education program, teachers are required to use a program of
             instruction entitled LANGUAGE! This program has been recognized as an
             appropriate intervention for students with dyslexia.
          o These exceptions are made due to the requirement to use research-based
             materials. Also, as students transfer from one facility to another, this assures
             continuity in their educational program.

     •    WSD does select and use some state-adopted textbooks. Since WSD does not offer a
          Texas high school diploma program or teach classes by grade level or subject area
          (e.g., 1st grade, 3rd grade, algebra, chemistry, biology), the need for and use of
          textbooks is limited. Grade level textbooks are typically not appropriate for adults.
          WSD uses a textbook selection committee, comprised mainly of teachers. The WSD
          adopted textbook list is sent to the schools along with ordering information. In
          addition, the textbook list is posted on the WSD intranet page.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 36 of 121
Pre-service Training and Staff Development:
Similar to public schools, WSD provides comprehensive pre-service and inservice training
for all employees.

Pre-Service:
New employees are processed through the WSD central office. Five days of pre-service
training activities are provided for teachers, including orientation, review of policies and
procedures, security training (1 ½ days), and curriculum training (2 –3 days) as appropriate
for their academic or vocational teaching assignment.

In addition, program-specific pre-service training is provided to prepare teachers for
teaching assignments in special program areas (e.g., CHANGES, Cognitive Intervention,
Parenting, Perspectives & Solutions). Two days of training are provided for the
CHANGES, Parenting, and Perspectives and Solutions programs; four days of training are
provided for Cognitive Intervention.

Planning:
Six days per year are provided for planning. Four of the planning days are scheduled in the
school calendar and are standard for every school. For the current school year, those four
scheduled days are: 09/02/03, 01/05/04, the Monday after Spring Break (varies by facility),
and 07/26/04. Two of the planning days are designated for certain months (a day in May
and a day in June), but the schools have discretion regarding the actual date selected.
Planning days may include activities related to shared decision making, analysis of student
performance data, school committee meetings, teacher preparation, faculty meetings,
preparing campus improvement plans, or conducting activities in support of campus
improvement plans.

Staff Development:
Four days per year are set aside in the school calendar for staff development. For the current
school year, individual schools may select a day in October, a day in February, and two days
in August for staff development. Staff development days are primarily devoted to campus-
based activities for the purpose of improving student achievement. Staff development is
needs based and results-driven, typically focusing on curricular and instructional issues.
Activities may include study groups, individual research, peer coaching, workshops,
seminars, conferences and other activities designed to improve student achievement.

In addition to these scheduled days, teachers may be selected to attend periodic staff
development workshops or training offered by education specialists in the WSD central
office. They may also request to attend professional conferences, workshops at Education
Service Centers, and other professional development opportunities.

Facilities/School Locations:
Offenders are housed at different types of facilities based on their offense and classification
status (see table below). As a result, all facilities house offenders with educational needs. In
order to provide educational services to the targeted population, WSD offers educational
programs at each of the different types of facilities operated by the TDCJ Correctional
Institutions Division (CID). Each facility was constructed with a planned number of
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 37 of 121
classrooms/shops allocated for education. The school facilities belong to TDCJ.

                                                 TDCJ Units
                             (Yellow Highlighting Denotes WSD Program Locations)
                                       Unit
Unit Name                                   Operator Gender           Type          Region County
                                       Code
ALLRED                                    JA     CID       Male       Prison          V          Wichita
                                                                   Private State
BARTLETT                                  BL     CCA       Male                     Private Williamson
                                                                        Jail
BETO                                      B      CID       Male       Prison          II        Anderson
BOYD                                      BY     CID       Male       Prison          II        Freestone
                                                                   Private State
BRADSHAW                                 BH      CCA       Male                     Private        Rusk
                                                                        Jail
BRIDGEPORT                               BR      GEO       Male    Private Prison   Private        Wise
BRISCOE                                  DB      CID       Male       Prison          IV            Frio
BYRD                                     DU      CID       Male       Prison           I          Walker
CENTRAL                                   C      CID       Male       Prison          III       Fort Bend
CLEMENS                                  CN      CID       Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
CLEMENTS                                 BC      CID       Male       Prison          V           Potter
CLEVELAND                                CV      GEO       Male    Private Prison   Private       Liberty
COFFIELD                                 CO      CID       Male       Prison          II        Anderson
COLE                                      CL     CID       Male      State Jail       II          Fannin
CONNALLY                                 CY      CID       Male       Prison          IV          Karnes
                                                                     Transfer
COTULLA                                   N4     CID       Male                       IV         LaSalle
                                                                     Facility
DALHART                                  DH      CID       Male       Prison          V           Hartley
DANIEL                                    DL     CID       Male       Prison          V           Scurry
DARRINGTON                               DA      CID       Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
                                                                   Private State
DAWSON                                    JD     CCA     Co-Gen                     Private       Dallas
                                                                        Jail
DIBOLL                                   DO      CCA       Male    Private Prison   Private      Angelina
DOMINGUEZ                                 BX     CID       Male      State Jail       IV          Bexar
                                                                     Transfer
DUNCAN                                    N6     CID       Male                        I         Angelina
                                                                     Facility
EASTHAM                                   EA     CID       Male       Prison           I         Houston
ELLIS                                     E      CID       Male       Prison           I          Walker
ESTELLE                                   E2     CID       Male       Prison           I          Walker
ESTES                                     VS     GEO       Male    Private Prison   Private      Johnson
FERGUSON                                  FE     CID       Male       Prison           I         Madison
FORMBY                                    FB     CID       Male      State Jail       V            Hale
                                                                     Transfer
FT. STOCKTON                              N5     CID       Male                       IV          Pecos
                                                                     Facility

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                              Page 38 of 121
                                                                  Transfer
GARZA EAST                                NI     CID    Male                       IV            Bee
                                                                  Facility
                                                                  Transfer
GARZA WEST                               NH      CID    Male                       IV            Bee
                                                                  Facility
GATESVILLE                               GV      CID   Female      Prison          VI          Coryell
GIST                                      BJ     CID    Male      State Jail       III       Jefferson
GLOSSBRENNER                             SO      CID    Male       SAFPF           IV          Duvall
                                                                  Transfer
GOODMAN                                  GG      CID    Male                        I          Jasper
                                                                  Facility
GOREE                                    GR      CID    Male       Prison           I          Walker
                                                                  Transfer
GURNEY                                   ND      CID    Male                       II        Anderson
                                                                  Facility
HALBERT                                   BB     CID   Female      SAFPF           VI          Burnet
HAVINS                                    TH     CID    Male      State Jail       VI          Brown
HENLEY                                    LT     CID   Female     State Jail       III         Liberty
HIGHTOWER                                 HI     CID    Male       Prison          III         Liberty
HILLTOP                                   HT     CID   Female      Prison          VI          Coryell
HOBBY                                    HB      CID   Female      Prison          VI           Falls
HODGE                                    HD      CID    Male       MROP            II        Cherokee
                                                                  Transfer
HOLLIDAY                                  NF     CID    Male                        I          Walker
                                                                  Facility
HOSPITAL
                                         HG      CID   Co-Gen      Medical         III       Galveston
GALVESTON
HUGHES                                   AH      CID    Male       Prison          VI          Coryell
HUNTSVILLE                               HV      CID    Male       Prison           I          Walker
HUTCHINS                                  HJ     CID    Male      State Jail       II          Dallas
JESTER I                                  J1     CID    Male       SAFPF           III       Fort Bend
JESTER III                                J3     CID    Male       Prison          III       Fort Bend
JESTER IV                                 J4     CID    Male     Psychiatric       III       Fort Bend
JOHNSTON                                  JT     CID    Male       SAFPF           II          Wood
JORDAN                                    JN     CID    Male       Prison          V            Gray
KEGANS                                   HM      CID    Male      State Jail       III         Harris
KYLE                                      KY     GEO    Male    Private Prison   Private        Hays
LEBLANC                                   BA     CID    Male       Prison          III       Jefferson
LEWIS                                     GL     CID    Male       Prison           I           Tyler
                                                                Private State
LINDSEY                                   LN     CCA    Male                     Private        Jack
                                                                     Jail
LOCKHART*                                 TC     GEO   Female   Private Prison   Private      Caldwell
LOPEZ                                     RL     CID    Male      State Jail       IV         Hidalgo
LUTHER                                    P2     CID    Male       Prison          VI          Grimes
LYCHNER                                   AJ     CID    Male      State Jail       III         Harris
LYNAUGH                                   LH     CID    Male       Prison          IV          Pecos
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                           Page 39 of 121
MCCONNELL                                ML      CID    Male       Prison          IV            Bee
MICHAEL                                   MI     CID    Male       Prison          II        Anderson
                                                                  Transfer
MIDDLETON                                NE      CID    Male                       VI          Jones
                                                                  Facility
MONTFORD                                  JM     CID    Male     Psychiatric       V          Lubbock
MOORE, B.                                BM      CCA    Male    Private Prison   Private        Rusk
                                                                  Transfer
MOORE, C.                                CM      CID    Male                       II          Fannin
                                                                  Facility
MT. VIEW                                 MV      CID   Female      Prison          VI          Coryell
MURRAY                                   LM      CID   Female      Prison          VI          Coryell
NEAL                                     KN      CID    Male       Prison          V           Potter
NEY                                       HF     CID    Male      State Jail       II         Medina
PACK                                      P1     CID    Male       Prison          VI          Grimes
PLANE                                     LJ     CID   Female     State Jail       III         Liberty
POLUNSKY                                  TL     CID    Male       Prison           I           Polk
POWLEDGE                                  B2     CID    Male       Prison          II        Anderson
RAMSEY I                                  R1     CID    Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
RAMSEY II                                 R2     CID    Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
ROACH                                    RH      CID    Male       Prison          V         Childress
ROBERTSON                                RB      CID    Male       Prison          VI          Jones
                                                                  Transfer
RUDD                                     RD      CID    Male                       V            Terry
                                                                  Facility
SANCHEZ                                   RZ     CID    Male      State Jail       IV         El Paso
SAYLE                                     SY     CID    Male       SAFPF           VI        Stephens
SCOTT                                    RV      CID    Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
                                                                  Transfer
SEGOVIA                                  EN      CID    Male                       IV         Hidalgo
                                                                  Facility
SKYVIEW                                   SV     CID   Co-Gen    Psychiatric       II        Cherokee
SMITH                                    SM      CID    Male       Prison          V          Dawson
STEVENSON                                 SB     CID    Male       Prison          IV          DeWitt
STILES                                    ST     CID    Male       Prison          III       Jefferson
TELFORD                                  TO      CID    Male       Prison          II          Bowie
TERRELL                                   R3     CID    Male       Prison          III        Brazoria
TORRES                                    TE     CID    Male       Prison          IV         Medina
TRAVIS CO                                 TI     CID   Co-Gen     State Jail       VI          Travis
                                                                  Transfer
TULIA                                     N3     CID    Male                       V          Swisher
                                                                  Facility
VANCE                                     J2     CID    Male       Prison          III       Fort Bend
WALLACE                                  WL      CID    Male       Prison          V          Mitchell
                                                                  Transfer
WARE                                     DW      CID    Male                       V          Mitchell
                                                                  Facility

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                           Page 40 of 121
WHEELER                                  WR      CID       Male       State Jail      V            Hale
                                                                    Private State
WILLACY CO                                WI     CCA       Male                     Private       Willacy
                                                                         Jail
WOODMAN                                  WM      CID     Female       State Jail      VI          Coryell
WYNNE                                    WY      CID       Male        Prison          I          Walker
YOUNG MEDICAL
                                         GC      CID       Male       Medical         III       Galveston
FACILITY COMPLEX

                                        Parole Confinement Facilities
                                       UNIT
              NAME                          OPERATOR GENDER            TYPE         REGION COUNTY
                                       CODE
BATEN                                       NJ   CID       Male          ISF        Private        Gray
BRIDGEPORT                                TC     CCA     Female     Private PPT     Private        Wise
                                                                    Private Work
LOCKHART*                                 TC     GEO       Male                     Private      Caldwell
                                                                      Program
MINERAL WELLS                             TC     CCA       Male     Private PPT     Private Palo Pinto
EAST TEXAS                               XQ      MTC     Co-Gen      Private ISF    Private       Gregg
NORTH TEXAS                               XL     GEO       Male      Private ISF    Private       Tarrant
SOUTH TEXAS                              XM      CSC       Male      Private ISF    Private       Harris
WEST TEXAS                               XN      CCA       Male      Private ISF    Private        Terry

  *The Lockhart Private Prison and Private Work Program are co-located.


                                 KEY TO OPERATOR AND TYPE OF FACILITY

CID - Correctional Institutions Division          TDCJ - Texas Department of Criminal Justice
ISF - Intermediate Sanction Facility              CCA - Corrections Corporation of America
MROP - Mentally Retarded Offender
                                                  CSC - Corrections Services Corporation
Program
                                                  GEO - Global Expertise in Outsourcing (formerly
MUF - Multi-Use Facility
                                                  WCC)
PD - Parole Division                              MTC - Management and Training Corporation
                                                  SAFPF - Substance Abuse Felony Punishment
PPT - Pre-Parole Transfer Facility
                                                  Facility

Private Facilities:
WSD is not directly involved with private prison facilities. However, TDCJ frequently
utilizes WSD in a consultant capacity by asking WSD to:
     • Review the educational components of private prison contracts;
     • Assist with operational reviews of privately-operated facilities;
     • Review the curricula for various educational programs proposed by the private
        vendors; and
     • Assist with teacher certification as needed.


G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                              Page 41 of 121
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.       N/A

H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                    2002-2003
 Strategy B.2.5, TEA                             General Revenue        $49,572,929.63
 Appropriation
 ESEA, Title I                                    Federal Grant            $656,956.18
 ESEA, Title II                                   Federal Grant            $197,422.46
 IDEA-B Formula                                   Federal Grant             $93,826.46
 IDEA-B Capacity Building                         Federal Grant              $1,738.00

                                                    2003-2004
 Strategy B.2.5, TEA                             General Revenue        $40,629,038.00
 Appropriation
 ESEA, Title I                                    Federal Grant            $795,489.00
 ESEA, Title II                                   Federal Grant            $177,326.00
 IDEA-B Formula                                   Federal Grant             $99,241.00
 IDEA-B Capacity Building                         Federal Grant              $1,552.00

I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.

Current funding does not enable WSD to provide academic education for all offenders
who exhibit academic needs. On a given day, WSD has more than 16,000 offenders
enrolled in academic programs at 88 facilities. Thousands more are in need of academic
education, but WSD is limited by funding.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                 Page 42 of 121
                                                 Academic Program
                                                 November 30, 2003



            70,000
                                                                          60,172
            60,000


            50,000


            40,000


            30,000                     18,874
            20,000


            10,000


                0

                                Enrolled                            Eligible

       Eligible is basically defined as the number of offenders who do not have a GED or high school diploma. This is
       actually an under representation of those eligible. For various reasons, some offenders with GEDs or high
       school diplomas are still considered eligible for the academic program (e.g., offenders with high school
       diplomas who cannot read; offenders with GEDs who seek to enroll in college but do not yet meet the criteria
       required to take the college entrance exam).

       The majority of the 18,874 students enrolled on 11/30/03 were under age 35 and within 5 years of projected
       release.


Due to factors such as turnover (offenders entering and leaving the system every day) as
well as daily changes in offender custody levels, the number of “eligible” offenders is
fluent from day to day and differs for each program area. The complexities of the
eligibility criteria, as well as allowable exceptions (such as decisions based on space
availability or custody levels that require consideration by the warden on a case-by-case
basis), make it difficult to capture an exact figure. Additionally, eligibility criteria differ
by program area.

The number of classrooms at each facility places a physical limitation on the number of
students that can be served at a particular facility. Depending on the number of
classrooms and the population at each facility (i.e., the number of offenders
designated as high priority for educational services), school programs are operated
on single or double-shifts. Each teaching shift is 7 hours (six hours of instructional
time; one hour of planning time). Therefore, classrooms may be in use 14 hours per day
with respect to Windham programs, or longer if evening college classes are offered.

The majority of prison and state jail facilities were designed and built with an established
number of classrooms and/or shops dedicated for education. At some facilities, WSD has
expanded into selective areas outside of the Education Department; however, in general,
other areas of prison facilities (for example, day room areas located next to housing
areas) do not provide a quiet environment conducive to learning. Unlike public schools,
even if WSD had the resources, it would not have the discretion to add classrooms,
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                          Page 43 of 121
portable buildings, etc., inside a prison compound.

WSD has established maximum class sizes for each program based on security factors
and a student/teacher ratio designed to foster a quality instructional program. Security is
a paramount consideration. Overcrowding of classrooms creates an unsafe situation.
Therefore, consideration has been given to the physical size of the classrooms and the
number of desks or tables that can be arranged to reasonably accommodate full-sized
adults and allow room for safe movement within each room. Typically, the Education
Department has only one correctional officer assigned to provide security for hundreds of
offenders at a time.

To the extent resources allow, WSD maximizes use of the space available for education
at each facility. The need for education exceeds WSD’s capacity—even with programs
double-shifted at many facilities. WSD could expand programming at some facilities if
resources allowed; an additional education “shift” could be added at some facilities and
more offenders could be served.


J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.

Volunteers (individuals or organizations) provide literacy tutoring at a few facilities. In
general, however, these initiatives serve relatively few offenders, are not comprehensive
in terms of curricular content, do not involve the use of trained or certified teachers, and
are unpredictable since they are subject to the propensity, skills, and schedule of the
volunteer(s). Typically, volunteer initiatives of this nature are conducted by faith-based
volunteers whose primary purpose is to help offenders learn to read the Bible.


K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.

Any volunteer tutoring initiatives not associated with WSD are scheduled so as not to
conflict with the school schedule. In many cases, volunteers work with offenders who
are not enrolled in WSD programs (for example, offenders assigned to administrative
segregation).




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 44 of 121
L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary
understanding of each program or function.

An achievement test, the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE), is administered to all
incoming TDCJ offenders to determine each offender’s level of educational functioning.

Based on their individual achievement scores, students are assigned to beginning
(Literacy I), intermediate (Literacy II), or advanced (Literacy III) level classes.
Students with reading skills below the fourth grade level may be enrolled in Literacy I--
Reading, a special program designed to provide intensive instruction in reading.

Literacy classes are non-graded and competency-based. Students generally attend
literacy classes three hours per day. The TABE test is administered periodically
throughout the school year to monitor student progress. Offenders move from one
literacy level to the next based on the results of the TABE test.

Understanding the wide range of learning needs, learning styles, prerequisite skills, and
interests of their students, literacy teachers provide differentiated instruction using a
variety of teaching strategies. Literacy teachers also work collaboratively with Career
and Technology Education (CTE) teachers to promote workplace competencies and
learning in real-world contexts. In all programs, emphasis is placed on the skills
employers demand, such as personal qualities, cultural sensitivity/tolerance, teamwork,
decision-making, and problem solving.

Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) labs are available at most campuses, providing
opportunities for diagnostic, prescriptive, computer-based instruction to support and
enhance the academic program.

A supplemental Title I program is provided for educationally underachieving students
who are 21 years of age or younger. The students who participate in this program are
enrolled in a three-hour Title I class in addition to a three-hour Literacy class each day.
The Title I teacher works collaboratively with the regular teacher to reinforce and/or re-
teach literacy and math concepts. Interactive computer equipment and computer-assisted
instruction are used in the Title I program to provide remediation of basic skills and
encourage participatory learning.

Title II funds are used to reduce class size at two facilities—Clemens and Hilltop. These
facilities house the TDCJ Youthful Offender Program (ages 14-17) for males and females
respectively. Hiring an additional teacher at each facility enables WSD to reduce the
size of the Literacy classes at these facilities from 25 to 20 students per class. Title II
funds are also used to provide intensive professional development activities for teachers.

A comprehensive referral and assessment process is used to identify offenders who may
be in need of Special Education services. Special instruction is provided for students
with learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, mental retardation, vision and/or
hearing impairments, orthopedic impairments, other health impairments, traumatic brain
injury, and speech impairments. Certified Special Education teachers employ a wide
variety of instructional strategies and materials to address each student’s individual
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 45 of 121
learning style. Special computer equipment is used to meet the unique needs of students
who are blind or have significant visual impairments. Related services are provided
when needed. These services include interpretive services for deaf students, assistive
technology, and needed support services. Students in the Special Education program who
are not able to demonstrate progress in the regular academic curriculum may be
considered for placement in an Adaptive Skills class. Adaptive Skills is a Special
Education class that focuses primarily on functional literacy and life skills.

Windham also provides a special program for eligible students who exhibit limited
English proficiency. A language assessment is administered to determine a student’s
level of proficiency in English. Students who demonstrate a significant lack of English
proficiency are recommended for placement in the English as a Second Language (ESL)
program. Certified ESL teachers provide intensive instruction in English language
development, reading and writing.

WSD serves as a testing center for the General Educational Development (GED)
program. During the 2002-2003 school year, the GED test was administered to 6,333
students. A total of 4,723 (74.6 percent) earned a GED certificate.

                                          GED Testing 2002-2003



      7,000
                              6,333

      6,000
                                                          4,723
      5,000


      4,000
                                                                       Number of Examinees
      3,000


      2,000


      1,000


         0

                         Tested                      Passed



              Letter (as written; names edited) from the GED file:

       I would like to thank the whole Windham Schools System.

       I am 49 yrs. old. I never dreamed I would have a GED. I was kicked out of
       the Dallas schools when I was 12 yrs. old with a 6 grade education. That
       was in 1962. I have never attended any other school.

       The high quality teachers Windham has is just wonderful. All of them were
       real professionals. Mrs. J. took me to a GED in 6 months.

       Joseph Harlan (November, 1998)




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 46 of 121
M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.

The following information was obtained from a National Institute for Literacy (NIFL)
publication entitled State Correctional Education Programs, State Policy Update (March
2002):

•    The majority of state correctional education programs are administered by a central office
     within the state’s Department of Corrections; other states administer correctional education
     through central offices operating either through the state’s Department of Education or
     independently. Some states contract out their correctional education services. There are pros
     and cons to each type of governing structure, with each type having a notable effect on the
     correctional education program in areas such as funding, teacher certification requirements,
     whether instructors are viewed as correctional officers or simply as instructors, and the
     acceptance of education in the correctional institution.

•    Correctional education programs are also impacted in many states by state-passed mandatory
     education laws. These laws require inmates who score below a certain grade level on a
     standardized test (e.g., the Test of Adult Basic Education) to attend correctional education
     courses while in prison. At least 26 states have instituted mandatory education laws, with
     most requiring adults who score below the 8th grade level to participate in educational
     programming for a specified period of time or until they meet a set achievement level. The
     Federal Bureau of Prisons has also implemented a mandatory education policy, requiring
     inmates who do not have a high school diploma or a GED to participate in literacy programs
     for a minimum of 240 hours or until they obtain their GED. While the 8th grade level
     continues to be the most common achievement level states use, more and more states are
     moving to the high school diploma or GED achievement level.

•    Enrollment in correctional education is also required in many states if the inmate is under a
     certain age, as specified by that state’s compulsory education law.

•    Like programs that provide adult education to the general population, correctional education
     programs generally include the following types of courses:
         o Basic literacy skills (reading, writing, calculating, speaking, listening, and problem
             solving)
         o General Educational Development (GED)
         o Post Secondary
         o Special Education
         o English as a Second Language (ESL)
         o Life Skills
         o Vocational

•    How correctional education is structured and offered in each state may differ, but the
     underlying rationale and benefits of correctional education are the same nationwide. As
     recidivism studies illustrate, correctional education lowers the likelihood of reincarceration
     and, in turn, protects the public from future crimes, as well as additional fiscal and social
     costs.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                            Page 47 of 121
             Administration of Adult Correctional Education Programs
                                    Frequency                   Percent
 Department of Corrections              18                        42.9
 Correctional School                    9                         21.4
 District
 Decentralized System                   8                         19.0
 Department of Education                4                          9.5
 Other                                  3                         7.1
Survey of State Correctional Education Systems: Analysis of Data from 1992 Field Test, Office of
Correctional Education, U. S. Department of Education




         Adult Facilities (N=42) Offering Correctional Education Programs
                                    Number of States        Average Percent of
                                         Offering          Institutions Offering
                                                               Within State
 Academic Education                         41                       __
        ABE                                 40                       91
        GED Instruction                     40                       92
        High School                         26                       62
           Coursework
        ESL                                 27                       57
 Vocational Education                       42                       69
 Post Secondary Education                   38                       60
 Special Education                          33                       39
 Life and Social Skills Training            39                       79
Survey of State Correctional Education Systems: Analysis of Data from 1992 Field Test, Office of
Correctional Education, U. S. Department of Education




       Educational Programs                      State Prisons                  Federal Prisons
                                                     2000                            2000
 With an education program                                    91.2%                         100.0%
        Basic adult education                                 80.4%                          97.4%
        Secondary education                                   83.6%                          98.7%
        College courses                                       26.7%                          80.5%
        Special education                                     39.6%                          59.7%
        Vocational training                                   55.7%                          93.5%
 Without an education program                                  8.8%                           6.5%
 Number of facilities                                          1,307                              -
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Special Report, Education and Correctional Populations, January 2003
(Revised 4/15/03)




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                Page 48 of 121
                                Comparison of Correctional Education in States
                                     With Largest Prison Populations

                                  2001                     2001 number                                      2002 GEDs
           State               Population1              enrolled in FT or PT               % Enrolled1       awarded
                                                             education1
    California                    162,765                      29,123                             19.3        1,700

    Federal                       145,416                         38,8812                         31.2        4,934

    Florida                        71,319                         10,175                          15.1        1,588

    Georgia                        43,836                           N/A                           N/A          482

    Illinois                       45,281                         11,785                          26.0        1,5453

    Louisiana                      34,954                          1,396                           9.0         435

    Michigan                       48,028                          8,319                          17.6        2,130

    New York                       70,197                         27,4962                         39.2        1,752

    North Carolina                 31,534                           N/A                           N/A         1,257

    Ohio                           45,833                          8,070                          18.5        1,5313

    Pennsylvania                   36,607                         10,357                          28.5         782

    Texas                         149,519                         35,332                          26.2        5,534
1
  Source – Corrections Yearbook 2001
2
  Numbers were listed as part time students; all other states were full time or a combination of the two.
3
  2003 GED numbers




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                                 Page 49 of 121
                               Certification and Funding in Correctional Education1


                      State                             Teacher Certification                           Funding Source2

    California                                    All                                           Department of Corrections

    Florida                                       All                                           Department of Corrections

    Georgia                                       Certification for offenders                   Department of Corrections
                                                  under 21 only – part time
                                                  teachers do not require
                                                  certification
    Illinois                                      All                                           Department of Corrections –
                                                                                                Administered through School
                                                                                                District
    Louisiana                                     All                                           Department of Corrections
                                                                                                and Community Colleges for
                                                                                                vocational programs
    Michigan                                      All                                           Department of Corrections

    New York                                      All – masters degree is                       Department of Corrections
                                                  required within 5 years for
                                                  academic teachers
    North Carolina                                Certification for offenders                   Department of Corrections
                                                  under 21 only – contract with                 and Community College
                                                  community colleges for                        contact hours
                                                  others
    Ohio                                          All                                           Department of Corrections –
                                                                                                Administered through School
                                                                                                System (charter school)
    Pennsylvania                                  Certification for offenders                   School funded directly from
                                                  under 21 only – most others                   state appropriations
                                                  are certified and state will
                                                  reimburse for certification
                                                  courses
    Texas                                         All                                           Texas Education Agency
1
    Source: WSD Internal Survey, January 2004
2
    Primary source of funding; most states indicated that they also receive other sources of funding, especially federal funds and grants.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                                               Page 50 of 121
                                                 Cost Comparisons
                                 WSD                    California            Florida              New York
                               SY 2002-03                                     2002-03              CY 2002
 Cost Per
 Contact Hour                             $3.64         No Response          Not Available         Not Available

 Cost Per
 Participant                           $891.57          No Response          Not Available              $1,230.00
 Per Year
 Total                            $74,700,115           No Response          Not Available           $58,111,291
 Expenditures
 Total                                   83,785         No Response                  25,481                47,245
 Participants
Source: WSD informal survey through telephone or e-mail, February 2004


                                             Salary Comparisons
                                                   Base Salary          Number of Days              Daily Rate
 Windham School District                            $29,088                 220                      $132.22
 (SY 2003-04)
 Texas Public Schools1                              $34,390                     187                   $183.90
 California                                        No Response               No Response            No Response
 Florida                                            $31,427                     265                   $118.59
 (SY 2002-03)
 New York                                           $29,107                     185                   $157.34
 (CY 2002)                                 (+ extra for summer)         (+ optional summer)
      Source: WSD informal survey through telephone or e-mail, February 2004
      1
        TASB/TASA 2003-04 teacher survey - average starting salary for new teachers (in districts with more than
       10,000 students)


                          Average           Number of        Daily Rate         Average           Daily Rate
                           Salary             Days                              Years of         Adjusted for
                                                                               Experience          Years of
                                                                                                  Experience
 Windham               $48,153                    220          $218.88             16.81         $218.88
 School
 District
 Texas                 $41,780                    187          $223.42             11.92         $223.42+
 Public
 Schools3
 California             No Response          No Response     No Response       No Response         No Response
 Florida               $42,114                    265          $158.92              4.4          $2004
                       (academic)                                                                [estimate for a
                       $44,748                                                                   teacher with 16.8
                                                  265          $168.86              7.4          years of service]
                       (vocational)
 New York              Not Available        Not Available    Not Available    Not Available      Not Available
     Source: WSD informal survey through telephone or e-mail, February 2004
     1
       Experienced teachers are more attracted to and accepting of a prison environment than beginning teachers.
     2
       TEA Snapshot 2002
     3
       TASB/TASA 2003-04 teacher survey – weighted average salary for districts with more than 10,000 students
     4
       Florida’s salary increased an average of $878 for each year of service.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                          Page 51 of 121
                                                                    Program Comparison by State
                                                                            College
State                          GED               HS   Voc.                                                    Life Skills                         Target Populations
                                                                    Academic          Voc.
                                                                                                  Pre-Release
                                                                                                                                     Law states 60% of inmates < 9 to be enrolled
California                       X               X     X               X
                                                                                                  Workshops on topics related        prior to release
                                                                                                  to health, drugs and parenting
                                                                                                                                     Inmates with no high school diploma or GED
                                                                                                                                     must participate in the literacy program for a
                                                                                                  Parenting
                                                                                                                                     minimum of 240 hours or until they obtain a
Federal                          X                     X               X                X
                                                                                                                                     GED. Non-English-speaking inmates must
                                                                                                  Recreation and Wellness
                                                                                                                                     take ESL. Good time can be taken away for
                                                                                                                                     dropping out.
                                                             Provide proctors for                 Life skills training is included   All inmates are ranked based on risk and
Florida                          X                     X     correspondence                       in academic and vocational         need. Students with the most need are
                                                             courses                              classes.                           selected from the top 500.
                                                                                                                                     Education is voluntary.
                                                             Inmates can take                                                        Priority System:
                                                             correspondence                                                          1 – 22 and younger
Georgia                          X                     X                                          Life Skills class
                                                             courses with                                                            2 – within 4 yrs of release
                                                             Warden’s approval                                                       3 – all others
                                                                                                                                     (Can usually serve all who apply)
                                                                                                  Corrections Organized for
Louisiana                        X                     X               X                                                             Participation is voluntary.
                                                                                                  Re-entry
                                                                                                                                     All who score below 6.0 on the TABE are
                                                                                                                                     required to attend school 90 days or until they
                                                                                                                                     score above 6.0.
Illinois                         X                     X               X                X                         X
                                                                                                                                     Those above 6.0 may volunteer for school.
                                                                                                                                     Waiting lists are prioritized base on length of
                                                                                                                                     sentence, number of sentences, and age.
                                                                                                                                     Parole can be postponed if GED not
                                                             Correspondence
Michigan                         X                     X                                                          X                  achieved. Law waived for special ed., age
                                                             courses
                                                                                                                                     65+ or ESL.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                               Page 52 of 121
                                                                      Program Comparison by State
                                                                            College
State                          GED               HS   Voc.                                                    Life Skills                        Target Populations
                                                                    Academic          Voc.
                                                             One Youthful                         Offered by Program Services
                                                             Offender Facility                    staff:
                                                             provides college                     • Transitional Services
                                                             academic classes.                         Program
                                                                                                  • Pre-Release Classes
                                                                                                                                    Priority is given to inmates under 21 with no
                                                             Classes are offered on               • Aggression Replacement
                                                                                                                                    HS diploma or GED. All inmates under 65
New York                         X                     X     other campuses by                         Training
                                                                                                                                    are required to attend class until their TABE
                                                             colleges, but are not                • Life Skills                     reading and math scores are at least 9.0.
                                                             coordinated or funded
                                                             through the education                Offered by Education Unit:
                                                             department.                          • Youth Offender Program
                                                                                                  • Community Preparation
                                                             Correspondence
                                                                                                                                    Those scoring below 5th grade level are
                                                                                                  Character & Ethics, Anger
                                                                                                                                    required to take academic classes for a
                                                                                                  Mgt.,
                                                                                                                                    specified length of time.
                                                                                                  Pre-Employment Training,
North Carolina                   X                     X               X                X
                                                                                                  Art Appreciation, Parenting,
                                                                                                                                    All others are voluntary. Placement is
                                                                                                  Cognitive Behavioral
                                                                                                                                    decided by each facility. Release date and
                                                                                                  Training, and JOBSTART
                                                                                                                                    length of sentence are considered.
                                                                                                  Character Education is a
                                                                                                  graded course of study in all
                                                                                                  academic and vocational           Required by law to serve all offenders
                                                                                                  classes,                          without a HS diploma or GED.
Ohio                             X               X     X                                X
                                                                                                  Life skills are imbedded in all   Various priority enrollment and screening for
                                                                                                  curricula.                        other programs.

                                                                                                  Release Preparation
                                                                                                                                    School is mandatory for inmates scoring
                                                                                                  Life skills are “intertwined”     below 8th grade level on TABE.
Pennsylvania                     X               X     X               X                X         with academic and vocational
                                                                                                  programs                          All others are voluntary - first come first
                                                                                                                                    served.
Source: WSD informal survey through telephone or e-mail, March 2004


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                               Page 53 of 121
                                                                                Status of Mandatory Education in Adult Corrections

                                    Mandatory    Legal
STATE                               Education    Basis    Achievement Level Program Length                     Comments
Alabama                                  no                                                          Special Education is mandatory. Court can mandate education programming as part of sentence.
Alaska                                   no                                                          Legislature considering a law to include loss of “good time” for non-participation.
                                                                  th                                  th
Arizona                                 yes       law            8 grade               360 hours     8 grade literacy requirement is tied to earned release credit.
Arkansas                                yes      policy            GED                   open        1997 moved from mandatory K-7 to K-12. All inmates currently being served.
California                               no                                                          Law states 60% of inmates < 9 to be enrolled prior to release
Colorado                                 no                                                          Can’t get all inmates that need education into classrooms.
Connecticut                              no                                                          Legal district can mandate. Voluntary programs have priority student lists.
Delaware                                 no                                                          Good time can be earned in the voluntary programs.
                                                                           th
Florida                                 yes       law                  9               150 hours     Mandatory Literacy Program (MLP) law passed but not fully funded; “gain time” for GED.
Georgia                                  no                                                          Law utilizes existing ACA and CEA standards to establish education programs.
Hawaii                                  yes       law       Participation or          Completion     Educational programming is a pre-condition of parole.
Idaho                                    no                                                          Judges may require GED completion included in a “retained jurisdiction” option.
Illinois                                yes       law            > 6.0 Ave.           45 – 90 days   Teacher assessment determines TABE testing and length of mandatory duration.
Indiana                                  no                                                          All programs including ABE and GED voluntary.
                                                            th
Iowa                                    yes       law     >6 progress GED                open        Sanctions imposed or parole delayed for refusal to participate. “earned time” for participation.
Kansas                                   no                                                          Mandated to provide Special Education. All other programs are voluntary.
Kentucky                                 no                                                          School incentives include pay and good time for GED, technical diploma or college degree
Louisiana                                no                                                          Law states prison shall provide educational programming. Participation is voluntary.
Maine                                    no                                                          Fall 2001 – Legislature established a committee to study the issue of Correctional Education.
Maryland                                yes       law              GED                 120 days      Law in effect since 1978.
Massachusetts                           yes       law            >5.9 TABE            4-6 months     Originally skeptical of potential work rate. However 90% opt to stay in education post 5.9.
Michigan                                yes       law              GED                  Waivers      Parole can be postponed if GED not achieved. Law waived for special ed., age 65+ or ESL.
Minnesota                                no                                                          Must have HS/GED to get a raise at work.
Mississippi                             no                                                           Mandatory education attendance can be administered by sentencing judge.
Missouri                                yes      policy            GED                   open        GED attainment assists in parole consideration.
Montana                                 yes      policy            > 6.0                 1 year      Student signs 3 mo. Commitment. Non-completion has parole consequences.
Nebraska                                 no                                                          GED may be part of an inmates “personalized plan”
Nevada                                   no                                                          60day sentence reduction for passing GED. Discussion about attainment of GED before release.
New Hampshire                            no                                                          Policies in place to help internal motivation to attend educational programming.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                             Page 54 of 121
                                                                      Status of Mandatory Education in Adult Corrections

                                    Mandatory    Legal
STATE                               Education    Basis    Achievement Level Program Length           Comments
New Jersey                               no                                                   Parole may be delayed if inmate does not participate in school.
New Mexico                              yes       law           GED          up to < 18 mos   Inmate Literacy Act requires participation if inmate has greater than 18 months or less than 10 yrs.
                                                               th
New York                                yes      policy       9 grade            open
                                                               th
North Carolina                          yes      policy       6 grade          4 months       Superintendent may require an inmate to participate.
North Dakota                             no                                                   Performance based sentence reduction as a means to mandate education <GED regardless of age.
Ohio                                    yes       law           GED            100 days       Law was unanimously passed by legislature in 2001.
                                                               th
Oklahoma                                yes       law         8 grade            open         GED is encouraged through achievement credits which weighs heavily for parole.
Oregon                                  yes       law      <230 on CASAS       135 hours      Inmates may be required to attend school if “incarceration plan” dictates such.
                                                               th
Pennsylvania                            yes      policy       8 grade          200 hours      $10 cash incentive for attainment of GED. No job assignment for school refusal.
Rhode Island                             no                                                   A study done indicated mandatory education would have negative budget implications.
                                                               th
South Carolina                          yes      policy       8 grade            open         Youthful offenders have mandatory education by law. Sentence extension possible for non-attendance.
South Dakota                             no                                                   Individual plans can include mandatory education. Parole release tied to completion of plan.
Tennessee                                no                                                   Parole uses educational transcripts in decision making process.
Texas                                   yes       law       individualized       open         Enrollment based on priorities of “individualized treatment plan”. Law requires program participation for parole
Utah                                     no                                                   Fiscal impact killed recent bill; parole board looks positively on GED completion.
Vermont                                 yes       law         < age 21        HS Diploma      Statutory language requires all youth under age 21 without HSD/GED to attend school.
Virginia                                 no                                                   Not considering mandatory education at this time.
Washington                              yes       law        GED or >22        open to 22     Inmates under age 22 are mandatory until age threshold or GED achieved.
West Virginia                            no                                                   Law require participation at the 18 – 24 year old facility; GED participation required for job assignment
Wisconsin                                no                                                   Lack of participation by inmates “in need” may affect his/her security reduction or parole.
Wyoming                                  no                                                   Court & Probation together may mandate educational programming.
Federal Bureau of Prisons               yes       law           GED            240 hours      Good time can be taken away for dropping out. Law has tripled demand for program
Source: 50 State Survey; Jerry McGlone, Ohio Director of Correctional Education




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                   Page 55 of 121
                                                                   Teaching Staff Survey

             State                    Annual Work Schedule            DOC Employees?                      Certification         Salary Range
                                                                                                           Required?
Alabama                               229 days                     No                             Must meet college        $37,820 - $75,949
                                      (3 college semesters)        Technical College              requirements
Alaska                                Year round*                  No                             No credential required   No answer
                                                                   Full-time teachers
Arizona                               208 days                     Yes, academic                  No answer                $32,883 – $57,649
                                                                   No, vocational                                          academic
                                                                   Voc – Community College                                 Vocational paid CC rate
Arkansas                              180 days                     No                             Yes, both academic &     $31,200 - $42,700
                                      (August – May)               DOC School Board               vocational               same
California                            Year round                   Yes                            Yes, both academic &     $42,000 - $60,000
                                                                                                  vocational               same
Colorado                              Year round                   Did not respond
Connecticut                           223 days                     Yes                            Yes, both academic &     $47,300 - $90,007
                                                                                                  vocational               same
Delaware                              Year round                   Did not respond
Florida                               Year round                   Yes                            Yes, both academic &     Not clear
                                                                                                  vocational
Georgia                               All teachers are part-time   Yes                            No, for both             $16 - $22 per hour
                                                                                                                           8 – 29 hours per week
Hawaii                                220 days                     Yes                            No, for both             $30,000 - $40,000
Idaho                                 240 days                     Yes                            Yes, both academic &     $15 - $25 per hour
                                                                                                  vocational
Illinois                              Year round                   Yes, academic                  Just academic            $35,940 - $65,220
                                                                   Vocational are contracted
Indiana                               Year round                   Did not respond
Iowa                                  Year round                   No, Community College          Just academic            $24,000 - $56,000
Kansas                                236 days                     No, Greenbush/Southeast        Yes, both academic &     $28,674 - $57,179
                                                                   Kansas Education Service       vocational
                                                                   Center
Kentucky                              Year round                   No, Kentucky Comm. &           Yes, both academic &     $26,040 - $55,800
                                                                   Tech College                   vocational
Louisiana                             180 days                     Need to contact correct
                                                                   person
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 56 of 121
                                                             Teaching Staff Survey

             State                    Annual Work Schedule      DOC Employees?                       Certification        Salary Range
                                                                                                      Required?

Maine                                 Year round             Yes                             Yes, both academic &    $35,000 - $60,000
                                                                                             vocational
Maryland                              Year round             No, Maryland Department         Yes, both academic &    $34,000 - $71,000
                                                             of Education                    vocational
Massachusetts                         189 days               Yes (some contracted)           Yes, academic           $31,888 - $58,487
                                                                                             Vocational, soon
Michigan                              Year round             Yes                             Just academic           $32,000 - $60,000
Minnesota                             Year round             Yes, academic                   Yes, both academic &    $27,000 - $70,000
                                                             Voc. Higher Education           vocational
Mississippi                           Year round             No, State Dept. of              Yes, both academic &    No response
                                                             Education                       vocational
Missouri                              Year round             Yes and no (some                Yes, both academic &    $28,000 - $44,500
                                                             contracted through local        vocational
                                                             colleges)
Montana                               Year round             Yes                             Yes, both academic &    $27,129 - $44,839
                                                                                             vocational
Nebraska                              Year round             No, Metropolitan Comm.          No, bachelor degree     $13.16 - $15.00 per hour
                                                             College                         preferred
                                                             No vocational programs at
                                                             this time (They were cut.)
Nevada                                                       Did not respond
New Hampshire                         Year round             Did not respond
New Jersey                            Year round             Yes                             Yes, both academic &    $39,381 - $53,934
                                                                                             vocational
New Mexico                            220 days               Yes                             Yes, both academic &    No response
                                                                                             vocational
New York                              40 weeks               Yes                             Yes, both academic &    $35,000 - $49,000
                                      Sept. 1 – June 30                                      vocational
North Carolina                        Year round             No, Community College           Just academic           No response
North Dakota                          Year round             Yes, all but one                Yes, both academic &    No response
                                                                                             vocational
Ohio                                  Year round             Yes                             Yes, both academic &    $30,000 - $62,000

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                            Page 57 of 121
                                                             Teaching Staff Survey

             State                    Annual Work Schedule      DOC Employees?                  Certification          Salary Range
                                                                                                 Required?
                                                                                        vocational
Oklahoma                              Year round             Yes                        Just academic           $31,940 - $49,920
Oregon                                230 days               Did not respond
Pennsylvania                          Year round             Did not respond
Rhode Island                          180 days               Yes                        Yes, both academic &    $30,630 - $55,687
                                                                                        vocational
South Carolina                        Year round             Did not respond
South Dakota                          Year round             Did not respond
Tennessee                             Year round             Yes                        Yes, both academic &    $32,400 - $71,676
                                                                                        vocational
Texas                                 220 days               No, Windham School         Yes, both academic &    No response
                                                             District                   vocational              [Editor’s Note: See page 43]

Utah                                  229 days               Return to sender
Vermont                               Year round             Yes                    Yes, both academic &       $30,732 - $47,833
                                                                                    vocational
Virginia                    Year round                No, Dept. of Correctional     Yes, both academic &       $32,130 - $52,761
                                                      Education                     vocational
Washington                  Year round                No, Community & Tech.         Must meet college          No response
                                                      Colleges                      standards
West Virginia               Year round                No, WV Dept. of               Yes, both academic &       No response
                                                      Education                     vocational
Wisconsin                   Year round                Yes                           Yes, both academic &       Response not clear
                                                                                    vocational
Wyoming                     Year round                Yes                           Only Special Education     $29,640 - $39,492
                                                                                    teachers
Source: Survey compiled by William Wood, Deputy Director, Division of Inmate Training and Education, Massachusetts Department of Correction
(received by WSD via email on March 5, 2004)

*Year round was not defined for most states. Windham School District programs are considered year round.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 58 of 121
A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Career and Technology            Education
                                                 Program
Location                                         69 schools
Contact Name                                     Marjie Haynes
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 273
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      242
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 190
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    184

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.

The Career and Technology Education (CTE) program provides vocational training in
32 occupational fields. The vocational courses, a combination of classroom instruction
and application of skills in a fully equipped shop, are designed to provide training to
entry-level industry standards. CTE courses range from full-length courses (600 hours)
to short courses (45 to 200 hours). The district also coordinates an On-The-Job Training
(OJT) program and provides an Apprenticeship program that is registered with the
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training of the United States Department of Labor.

WSD provides training to entry-level industry standards and administers industry
certification tests (e.g., Automotive Service Excellence, National Center for Construction
Education and Research, etc.) to qualified offenders who voluntarily commit their own
resources to pay the industry registration fees.


C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created? Describe any
statutory or other requirements for this program or function.

The school district was created in 1969 to provide academic and vocational programs for
incarcerated offenders (Senate Bill 35, 61st Legislature). Chapter 19 of Senate Bill 1,
adopted in 1995 by the 74th Texas Legislature, reauthorized Windham School District.

TEC, §19.004 states that the district shall:
      (1) develop educational and vocational training programs specifically designed
          for persons eligible under Section 19.005.


D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.

The functions of this program have not changed from the original intent.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 59 of 121
Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?

Not in the foreseeable future.

E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected.

Offenders classified as General Population Levels 1, 2 and 3, excluding offenders in
administrative segregation and death row, are eligible for participation in this program if
specific criteria are met. The criteria include assessed aptitude and interest in the trade, no
claimed or verified participation/completion of a college vocational course inside TDCJ,
and less than 30 claimed/verified college academic hours.

Offenders who are less than 35 years of age and within five years of projected release
have the highest priority for enrollment in the program.

Vocational training needs are determined at intake or when offenders are within five years
of projected release. TDCJ utilizes the information to the extent possible when
determining unit assignments; however, offenders are assigned to facilities based on
security considerations (for example, age, type of offense, custody level, etc.). Security
takes precedence over education; therefore, offenders cannot always be assigned to
facilities that offer a particular vocational trade. WSD requests transfers for offenders to
participate in vocational classes and TDCJ makes every effort to accommodate the
requests. During the 2002-2003 school year, TDCJ approved 834 of 1,061 transfers
requested by WSD. TDCJ also buses offenders daily from one facility to another in close
proximity in order for offenders to participate in vocational classes (particularly female
offenders in the Gatesville area). During the recent reduction-in-force, however, WSD
eliminated some of the programs that were dependent on busing.
Provide a statistical breakdown of persons or entities affected.
          Program Area             Enrollment on November 30, 2003 Total Participants
                                                                      2002-2003
         Regular Course                                      3,635             15,298
         Short Course                                           17                319
         Apprenticeship                                        342                876



F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and
procedures.
The Superintendent reports directly to the Board and serves as the chief executive officer of
the WSD. The Superintendent is responsible to the WSD Board of Trustees for providing a
comprehensive educational program to offenders incarcerated in the TDCJ.

Central office functions are divided into four divisions: Division of Instruction, Division
of Operational Support, Division of Administrative and Business Services, and Division
of Continuing Education. Division Directors provide administrative oversight for these
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 60 of 121
divisions and report to the Superintendent.

The Division Director for Instruction is responsible for the provision of industry standard
curriculum for the vocational program and for the coordination of a comprehensive staff
development plan for the district. Vocational program specialists in the Division of
Instruction provide pre-service training, coordinate the curriculum revision process,
coordinate professional development for vocational teachers, and provide technical
assistance.

WSD schools, located throughout the state, are divided geographically into four regions.
A regional administrator is assigned to each region. The principals of the schools in each
region report to the regional administrator. The regional administrators report to the
Superintendent.

Principals provide instructional leadership for the teachers at each school. Instructional
Specialists are available in each region to support the principal by assisting teachers with
instruction-related issues.


G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.          N/A


H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                 2002-2003
 Strategy B.2.5, TEA Appropriation                           General         $12,716,793.96
                                                             Revenue
 Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education          Federal Grant     $693,011.72
 Act


                                                 2003-2004
 Strategy B.2.5, TEA Appropriation                           General          $9,067,738.00
                                                             Revenue
 Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education          Federal Grant     $728,996.00
 Act




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 61 of 121
I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.
Current funding does not enable WSD to provide vocational education for all offenders
who exhibit vocational training needs. On a given day, WSD provides vocational
training to approximately 3,600 offenders. Thousands more are in need of vocational
training, but WSD is limited by funding.

The number and physical location of vocational classroom/shop facilities are also
limiting factors. Some TDCJ facilities, many of the State Jails for example, were
constructed without vocational shops. While many offenders can be transferred among
facilities to access vocational training, some offenders (e.g., state jail confinees) are not
eligible for transfer.

                          Career and Technology Education Program
                                     November 30, 2003


                                                                      60,742
               70,000

               60,000

               50,000

               40,000

               30,000

               20,000
                                      3,635
               10,000

                   0


                               Enrolled                         Eligible

       Eligible is basically defined as the number of offenders who report no prior (or an inconsistent) work history, no
       (or limited) job skills, no prospects for employment upon release, no previous participation/completion of a
       college vocational course, and less than 30 hours of claimed/verified college hours.


On a snapshot date of February 11, 2004, Individualized Treatment Plan records
indicated that 7,432 offenders had received vocational assessment and were pending
enrollment in Career and Technology Education courses.

The number of vocational shops at each facility places a physical limitation on the
number of students that can be served at a particular facility. Additionally, facilities that
were designed and built without vocational shops pose a challenge. At these facilities,
WSD tries to provide vocational programs that can be delivered in academic classrooms
(e.g., Business Computer Information Systems, Computer Maintenance Technician,
Technical Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting, etc.).

During the recent RIF, WSD consolidated programs and reduced its vocational
programming by approximately 28%--in spite of the fact that most offenders have few, if
any, identifiable job skills. Vocational training is job specific. The number of offenders
in need of vocational training far exceeds the current capacity.



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                             Page 62 of 121
J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.
Post-secondary vocational programs provide similar services; however, post-secondary
programs target a different segment of the offender population. WSD vocational
programs target offenders who are not eligible for, or who do not have the resources or
desire to participate in college programs.
Offenders who have completed WSD vocational programs are frequently selected for job
assignments within Texas Correctional Industries (TCI), the TDCJ Facilities Division, or
other TDCJ divisions/departments where they have an opportunity to apply the skills
learned in training. Providing trained workers for the TDCJ reduces the cost of
incarceration.
In FY02, approximately 7,300 offenders participated in the daily operations of Texas
Correctional Industries. Few of the TCI job assignments emphasize training; most
emphasize production. By contrast, Windham School District provided formal vocational
training in free world trades to 16,100 offenders during the 2001-02 school year. Of
those, 2,731 offenders committed their own resources to attain industry certificates.
WSD provides vocational training programs at most facilities, including facilities that do
not operate a prison industry.
Most jobs in prison industries (e.g., mattress factories, soap factories) do not realistically
prepare offenders for high-skill, high-wage employment.
Offenders may learn incidental skills through other TDCJ job assignments; however,
performing specific, limited, often menial-natured tasks (e.g., hoeing weeds, folding
laundry) is not comparable to a comprehensive vocational training program leading
toward industry certification in a trade.
Most TDCJ jobs do not qualify for On-the-Job training (OJT) credit. OJT credit is only
available for job assignments where an employable skill is learned. An employable skill
is defined as specialized OJT training or knowledge in recognized occupations where
employment opportunities exist in industry and business in the State of Texas.

K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.
Offenders are assigned to TDCJ jobs that do not conflict with the school schedule.
College classes are scheduled so as not to conflict with WSD secondary level classes.

L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary
understanding of each program or function.
With respect to vocational course offerings, WSD considers work force information
including labor market conditions, employment trends, earnings in occupations, skill
requirements, and availability of education and training resources. Projected employment
opportunities for ex-offenders and industry standards guide decisions to restructure
vocational courses, add new courses, or discontinue courses no longer considered viable
for the labor market.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 63 of 121
Career and Technology Education (CTE) courses range from full-length courses (600
hours) to short courses (45 to 200 hours). Regular (full-length) CTE courses are taught
six hours per day. These courses include:
 Automotive Specialization                                Landscape Design, Construction & Maintenance
 Bricklaying                                              Machine Shop
 Business Computer Information Systems I & II             Major Appliance Service Technology
 Business Image Management and Multimedia                 Mill and Cabinetmaking

 Computer Maintenance Technician                          Painting and Decorating
 Construction Carpentry                                   Personal and Family Development
 Culinary Arts                                            Piping Trades
 Custodial Technician                                     Plant Maintenance
 Diesel Mechanics                                         Sheet Metal
 Diversified Career Preparation                           Small Engine Repair
 Electrical Trades                                        Technical Introduction to Computer-Aided
                                                          Drafting
 Graphic Arts                                             Truck Driving
 Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration   Welding
 Horticulture


Short courses are offered periodically to prepare offenders for specific prison jobs (for
example, boiler or water/wastewater operators).
The Apprenticeship program provides training opportunities in a variety of craft and
trade areas. The concept of the program is to train apprentices in the practical and
theoretical aspects of their craft through actual work experiences augmented by related
instruction. Apprenticeship programs are available at 26 facilities.
WSD coordinates On-The-Job Training (OJT) for TDCJ. The OJT program provides
the opportunity for offenders to learn employable skills while performing assigned jobs.
WSD coordinates the development of a master training plan for each job and provides
administrative oversight of the program.
In addition to supporting the TDCJ, WSD vocational programs often play an important
role in supporting community service projects throughout the state. WSD Construction
Carpentry shops are often asked to build walls and roof trusses for Habitat for Humanity.
WSD Mill & Cabinetmaking shops are often involved in building kitchen and bathroom
cabinets for these houses. Community service projects provide meaningful application of
skills, and help offenders make positive contributions to society.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                              Page 64 of 121
Letter (as written; names edited) from the CTE file:

     You had asked me in the past to write a letter containing the procedures taken to get where I am
     today as far as my employment is concerned. This is such a letter.


     First of all, I picked up a newspaper to find out what companys were hiring & if there were
     positions available which my training in your class qualified me for. BINGO!! There is a
     company, U.S. Contractors, that hires employees for the local chemical plants.


     I went and filled out a application for a position as a boilmaker after finding out what the
     requirements were. Later that afternoon I had to return to take a craftsman test. Guess what?
     My score was an 88. I was very pleased!

     Next I took my paper work to the local Texas Rehab Commission office to find out what assistance
     was available to obtain tools & work clothes. TRC was able to help me get my position at work by
     assisting me in ways I never dreamed possible. Tools - $897.22, work clothes - $218.54, steel toe boots
     – $124.99, & safety glasses - $109. God has been sooo good! All I had to do was get motivated & keep
     focused.


     To this day I have gone from a boilmaker to a pipefitter’s helper & still working for U.S.
     Contractors. I am currently making $12.50 an hour and working 6 days a week, 12 hours a day.
     Yes, $1,100 per week gross pay and netting $839.74. My future is looking good.

     I’d like to say thank you for being so hard on me as one of your students. I learned so very much in
     your class and I now have the opportunity to apply it to a sound future. Like you once said,
     “They can’t computerize plumbing.”


     If you so desire, I am hereby granting permission to send copies or share this letter with those
     necessary to prove that you and your vocational class does help some of us ex-offenders in re-
     establishing our lives on the outside of prison walls upon release.


     Elaine P. (November, 2001)        [Editor’s Note: Female student who completed Piping Trades/Plumbing]




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                                 Page 65 of 121
M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.


            Adult Facilities (N=42) Offering Correctional Education Programs
                                        Number of States          Average Percent of
                                            Offering         Institutions Offering Within
                                                                         State
 Academic Education                            41                         __
         ABE                                   40                         91
         GED Instruction                       40                         92
         High School Coursework                26                         62
         ESL                                   27                         57
 Vocational Education                          42                          69
 Post Secondary Education                      38                          60
 Special Education                             33                          39
 Life and Social Skills Training               39                          79
Survey of State Correctional Education Systems: Analysis of Data from 1992 Field Test, Office of
Correctional Education, U. S. Department of Education



       Educational Programs                      State Prisons                  Federal Prisons
                                                     2000                            2000
 With an education program                                    91.2%                         100.0%
        Basic adult education                                 80.4%                          97.4%
        Secondary education                                   83.6%                          98.7%
        College courses                                       26.7%                          80.5%
        Special education                                     39.6%                          59.7%
        Vocational training                                   55.7%                          93.5%
 Without an education program                                  8.8%                           6.5%
 Number of facilities                                          1,307                              -
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Special Report, Education and Correctional Populations, January 2003
(Revised 4/15/03)



Common vocational programs offered by state correctional institutions include: auto
body repair/mechanics, brick masonry, carpentry, electronics, painting/drywall,
plumbing, printing, and welding. [National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) publication entitled State
Correctional Education Programs, State Policy Update (March 2002)]

For additional comparison with other states, please refer to the tables on pages 48-57 of
this document.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                Page 66 of 121
                                                 Vocational Programs

 Results of a survey regarding whether vocational programming/instruction is
 offered within state institutions through contracts with local colleges and/or in-
 house delivery systems.

                               Disaggregated Responses by State (N = 24)
                                                                    Some instruction is
                   All instruction is        Most instruction is       contracted            All instruction is
                      contracted                contracted             externally            provided by DOC
   State               externally               externally
    AK
    AR
    AZ
    CT
    GA
     HI
     IA
     IL
     IN
    MD
    MI
    MN
    NE
     NJ
    NM
    NY
    OH
    OR
    PA -
   Adult
    PA -
  Juvenile
    RI -
   Adult
    RI -
  Juvenile
    TX -
   Adult
    TX -
  Juvenile
    VA
    WV
    WY
Source: Report to the Council of State Directors of Correctional Education (March 1, 2004)




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                       Page 67 of 121
A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Life Skills Program
Location                                         85 schools
Contact Name                                     Marjie Haynes
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 191.5
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      186
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 196.5
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    185.5

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.

Life Skills programs are generally defined as programs that address self-development,
communication skills, job and financial skills, interpersonal and family relationships, and
stress and anger management. The general purpose of Life Skills programming is to help
offenders live more successfully and function better in their multiple roles as members of
a family, community, and workforce. In WSD, Life Skills programming includes:

Changing Habits and Achieving New Goals to Empower Success (CHANGES) – a 60-
day life skills program designed to prepare offenders for release. The program content
includes family relationships and parenting, civic and legal responsibilities, victim
sensitivity, health maintenance, employability, money management, and other related life
skills.

Cognitive Intervention – a 60-day program that teaches offenders to meet their needs
without trespassing on the rights of others. Through instruction and exercises in
interpersonal problem solving, the program helps offenders: develop personal
accountability and responsibility, develop anger management, develop impulse control,
overcome criminal thinking, create positive attitudes and beliefs, and set goals.

Parenting – a 30-day communication-based, interactive program that supports the
development of healthy family relationships. The program addresses compassionate
assertiveness, empathic/active listening, empowerment, and other skills to strengthen
family relationships.

Perspectives and Solutions – a 15-day tolerance program for incoming offenders. In this
program, offenders explore cultural diversity, personal identity, stereotypes, prejudice,
and discrimination (including racial, ethnic, religious, gender, age, sexual orientation, and
physical disability).

C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created? Describe any
statutory or other requirements for this program or function.
Programming in the Life Skills area has been developed:
    • to meet the four legislated goals of the district as delineated in TEC, §19.003,
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 68 of 121
      •    to address the specific needs of offenders, and/or
      •    in response to requests from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

The CHANGES program was created in 1993 to address the legislated goal to reduce
recidivism. Literacy alone does not ensure a successful transition to independent living.
In order to successfully return to society, offenders leaving correctional facilities need an
array of life skills. The CHANGES program provides specific reintegration
programming to prepare offenders for release.

The Cognitive Intervention program was developed during the 1995-1996 school year
and implemented during the 1996-1997 school year to address three legislated goals:
reduction of recidivism, reduction in the cost of confinement, and to assist offenders in
behaving in positive ways during confinement.

The Parenting program was implemented during the 2000-2001 school year at the
request of the TDCJ, State Jail Division. WSD provides the Parenting program in
support of family, community involvement, and transition initiatives of State Jail
facilities. The program meets the judicial requirement for certain offenders to participate
in a parenting program. In many cases, the participants are allowed additional visitation
privileges with their children. This serves as an incentive for offenders to behave in
positive ways while incarcerated and helps to break the criminal cycle that is often
perpetuated from generation to generation. [Fifty-five percent of state and federal prisoners in
1999 were parents of minor children. Studies have shown that children of incarcerated parents are more
likely to be depressed, emotionally withdrawn, rebellious, and prone to criminal behavior. National Institute
for Literacy, State Correctional Education Programs, State Policy Update, March 2002]

The Perspectives and Solutions program was developed in response to hate crimes
legislation and implemented in 2001 at the request of the TDCJ. In accordance with Art.
42.014 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, if it is determined that a defendant
intentionally selected the person (or property) against whom the offense was committed
as a result of bias or prejudice, a judge may, as a condition of punishment, require
attendance in an educational program to further tolerance and acceptance of others. The
Perspectives and Solutions program was developed to meet this need. It is provided at
four large intake facilities to ease transition to incarceration and reduce the number of
interpersonal conflicts that create disciplinary cases. The reduction of disciplinary cases
addresses the WSD legislated goal to reduce the cost of confinement.


D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.

The Life Skills programming has not changed from its original intent; however, the scope
of the program offerings has broadened over time.

Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?

Not in the foreseeable future.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                   Page 69 of 121
E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected.

CHANGES -- Offenders who are within two years of projected release are eligible to
participate in the CHANGES program.

Cognitive Intervention -- Offenders may be served at any time during their sentence. The
class primarily targets those who are referred by the staff for disciplinary infractions, poor
attitudes, and poor problem solving skills.

Parenting -- Offenders who are eligible for WSD programs may participate in the
Parenting program. Highest priority is given to offenders who are parents, less than age
35, and within five years of projected release.

Perspectives and Solutions-- The program is mandatory for offenders with a hate crimes
designator. Unit Classification provides a list of potential students, which may be
supplemented by referrals from other departments. Highest priority for enrollment is
given to offenders who are first-time offenders less than 35 years of age.

Provide a statistical breakdown of persons or entities affected.
          Program Area      Enrollment on November 30, 2003 Total Participants
                                                               2002-2003
   CHANGES                                            5,531             27,343
   Cognitive Intervention                             2,461             12,872
   Parenting                                            407              4,377
   Perspectives & Solutions                             230              2,361


F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and
procedures.

The Superintendent reports directly to the Board and serves as the chief executive officer of
the WSD. The Superintendent is responsible to the WSD Board of Trustees for providing a
comprehensive educational program to offenders incarcerated in the TDCJ.

Central office functions are divided into four divisions: Division of Instruction, Division
of Operational Support, Division of Administrative and Business Services, and Division
of Continuing Education. Division Directors provide administrative oversight for these
divisions and report to the Superintendent.

The Division Director for Instruction is responsible for the provision of a curricular
framework for the Life Skills programs and for the coordination of staff development.
Educational Specialists (program specialists) in the Division of Instruction provide pre-
service training, coordinate the curriculum development/revision process, and provide
professional development and technical assistance.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 70 of 121
WSD schools, located throughout the state, are divided geographically into four regions.
A regional administrator is assigned to each region. The principals of the schools in each
region report to the regional administrator. The regional administrators report to the
Superintendent.

Principals provide instructional leadership for the teachers at each school. Instructional
Specialists are available in each region to support the principal by assisting teachers with
instruction-related issues.


G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.                       N/A

H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                 2002-2003
            Strategy B.2.5, TEA Appropriation General Revenue $9,456,369.00
            ESEA, Title IV                    Federal Grant       $3,894.01
            ESEA, Title V                     Federal Grant      $14,675.42

                                                 2003-2004
            Strategy B.2.5, TEA Appropriation General Revenue $9,263,401.00
            ESEA, Title IV                    Federal Grant       $4,294.00
            ESEA, Title V                     Federal Grant      $14,709.00




I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.

Current funding does not enable WSD to provide life skills education for all offenders
who exhibit needs in this area. On a given day, WSD has more than 8,000 offenders
enrolled in life skills programs. More are in need of life skills programming, but WSD is
limited by funding.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 71 of 121
                                                 Life Skills Programs
                                                  February 11, 2004


     35,000
                                  31,230
     30,000


     25,000


     20,000                                                      16,757    Enrolled
     15,000
                                                                           Pending Enrollment

     10,000
                         5,332
      5,000                                              2,464

         0

                      CHANGES                     Cognitive Intervention




J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.
At some facilities:
    • TDCJ Chaplaincy offers a type of guided, spiritual-based, self-study course
      (Voyager) that may touch on topics similar to those covered in the WSD
      CHANGES program.
    • TDCJ Substance Abuse offers a cognitive-based program for offenders with a
      history of substance abuse; the goal/emphasis is substance abuse
      education/prevention.
    • Volunteers may offer marriage and/or parenting seminars through the TDCJ
      Chaplaincy.



K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.
TDCJ initiatives are scheduled so as not to conflict with WSD school schedules. Many
of these initiatives enhance or support WSD programs or reach segments of the TDCJ
population that would otherwise not receive programming.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 72 of 121
L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary
understanding of each program or function.
CHANGES -- The CHANGES class is structured to provide 60 days of classroom
instruction. Individual class sessions are three hours per day. The program is facilitated
rather than taught through a direct instruction approach. The program consists of
instruction in personal development, interpersonal relationships, civic and legal
responsibilities, victim sensitivity, health maintenance, employability, re-entry into
society, and related life skills issues. These practical, everyday issues are explored within
the context of developing self-esteem, a positive mental attitude, accurate thinking for
self-assessment and life planning, self-discipline, appropriate interpersonal skills and
values definition and clarification. CHANGES is the primary rehabilitation program that
satisfies early release requirements for the Parole Board.
Cognitive Intervention -- The Cognitive Intervention program is structured to provide 60
days of classroom instruction. Individual class sessions are three hours per day. The
program assists offenders in changing their criminal thinking and behavior to prosocial
thinking and behavior. The class is facilitated rather than taught through direct
instruction, with student activities taking two-thirds of the class time. The program is
competency-based in its design. Students must demonstrate knowledge of the basic
concepts and skills taught in the class, and they must be able to demonstrate adequate
application of these skills to the instructor. The Criminal Sentiments Scale is used as
both a pre and post assessment with participants in the Cognitive Intervention program.
The assessment measures attitudinal change toward more prosocial thinking.
Additionally, WSD has developed a computerized program to compare the number of
disciplinary cases participants receive prior to participation in the program versus the
number of cases received after completion of the program.
Parenting -- In collaboration with the Texas organization, Family Forward (formerly
Parents Anonymous of Texas), WSD delivers The Middle Way Parent Program. The
program is structured to provide 30 days of classroom instruction. Individual class
sessions are three hours per day. The Parenting class is facilitated rather than taught
through a direct instruction approach.
Perspectives and Solutions -- The Perspectives and Solutions (tolerance) program is
structured to provide 15 days of classroom instruction. Individual class sessions are three
hours per day. The program is facilitated rather than taught through a direct instruction
approach. Perspectives and Solutions is provided at four large intake facilities to ease
transition to incarceration and reduce the number of interpersonal conflicts that often
result in disciplinary cases.

Excerpts (as written; names edited) from a student letter regarding the
CHANGES program:

  I am writing you today because I wanted to let you know what a positive
  experience I had in the CHANGES class here on the Ellis Unit in Coach H.’s
  class. My completion of the CHANGES class has made me a better person.
  Coach H. has made a lasting impression on me and, this impression, may
  well keep me out of this place in the future.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 73 of 121
Letters (as written; identifiers edited) from the Cognitive Intervention file:

  Producer Susie Cohen, KXAN-TV in Austin, ran segments on the WSD Cognitive
  Intervention program on February 18th and 19th, 2004. Immediately after the
  segments aired, she received the following unsolicited e-mail:

  EmailTo: news36@kxan.com
  FormName: Contact KXAN News 36
  Name: Diane Triska Kyle, Texas
  Topic: Dangerous Minds
  EmailAddress: Diane0561@aol.com
  Question: I am a graduate of the Cognitive Intervention/Turning Points class. My instructor
  was Betty Oyervides at the Lane Murray Unit in Gatesville. I was in this class on 9/11 and
  because of this class, I was able to accept my family's devestation by changing my
  thinking. I have been an ex-offender for almost two years and want you to know that I credit
  the class and Mrs. Oyervides with a very large part of the changes in my life. I am not
  proud that I spent 27 months in prison, but I am proud of the changes in my thinking, thus
  my actions, because I was allowed to take Cognitive Intervention. It was a very difficult
  class to take and many women feared Mrs. Oyervides because of her teaching style. I
  proudly show off my certificate in my home and continue to use the
  skills I was taught every day of my life. If you would like to call or have questions, my phone
  number is 268-4276 and my cell is 558-2637. I am very proud of your news station for
  running this piece--Thank you.
  Sincerely,
  Diane Triska

       I completed the hours required for Cognitive Intervention on January 27, 2003. Thanks a
       million, I personally gained a newer insight about some habits, both good and not so good
       that I have. On some of the good habits, I now know how to improve them or use them more
       effectively. About those bad ones, I am going to be working harder to change or do away
       with completely.


       I guess, I most of all enjoyed the fact that improvement is needed, everyday of our lives. I
       now can and will set goals and know how to look for ways to work out the obstacles that
       will come my way, as I strive to gain a positive conclusion to my goals. I also realized the
       importance and need to stop and think…immediately!


       I always stop and think, but now I know how to do it with more time left to make the
       correct decision. I had done this some, but not being aware about it’s importance; I had not
       paid full attention to the real down to earth meaning of a need to stop and think;
       especially, taking action, I know that’s important.


       I would highly recommend this program. I’ve been in the system several years and feel that
       everyone of us can gain something from Cognitive Intervention. I may take the time to
       write to you again and give you an update on the progress I make in my life, and it’s
       impact on others that I meet each day.


       Respectfully yours,


       Gilbert G. Ybanez (February, 2003)



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                   Page 74 of 121
Student comments (as written; names edited) from Parenting evaluations:

•    It has changed my life, not to mention my child’s future. I feel inspired
     to really make a difference in mine and my child’s life.
•    It gave me an entirely new outlook on parenting and recognizing where
     my parents fell short. I understand them & myself a lot better now.
     Therefore my son has a brighter future!
•    The Middle Way has really taught me a lot! I am a pre-school teacher &
     have attended various workshops, but I have never grasped information
     like I have in here!
•    Taught me to step up to the plate and hold myself accountable—and
     allow my children to hold me accountable as well.
•    I feel the program is very constructive and I believe this program should
     be instilled in all high schools. Stop abuse before it starts.
•    Spanking is not the answer. I’ve learned that talking to my kids is better
     than yelling. I can still get my point across. Mrs. W. has taught me a
     new way of learning for raising my kids to become loving, respectful, &
     obedient people.


Student comments (as written) from Perspective & Solutions evaluations:

     •    The name of the course sums up how I must change my beliefs
          and attitudes. I must consider my perceptions of life’s everyday
          problems and seek solutions that will meet my needs over time.
          If my behavior is not meeting my needs then I must recognize it
          and be willing to change the beliefs in my belief window. The
          course has provided several models that will assist me in making
          the necessary changes.
     •    This course has changed my beliefs and my way of thinking.
          Before this class, I did not think of others. I thought only about
          me. I only thought of how my behavior would benefit me. Now, I
          think about the consequences my actions have on my family, my
          friends, and myself.
     •    This course has made me realize that everyone in life is different
          and I really need not judge people by the way they look or act.
          Everyone needs to be given a chance in life to prove themselves
          and I hope to always look at people this way. I also will stress to
          my children once I have some that they need to look and judge
          people on a one on one basis. I really feel as it starts with the
          younger kids so we can teach them not to hate. I have also
          learned a new and better way to deal and look at problem
          solving. That has really helped me to think before I act and I
          have already started using it in my everyday life. In all, I first
          thought negative about this class but it has really been a good
          class and I have learned a lot and wish I could stay in it longer.
     •    This course has changed my beliefs and attitudes by teaching me
          to look at my beliefs, review and study my beliefs to see if they

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                           Page 75 of 121
          will benefit me over time, and if they don’t then I need to
          change that belief to one that will benefit me over time. The
          course also has changed my attitude about certain issues with
          the way one looks at things like prejudice issues and the
          differences in groups of people in different cultures.




M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.

An area of need within the inmate population that is being addressed by more and more
correctional education programs is the development and improvement of life skills.
[National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) publication entitled State Correctional Education Programs, State
Policy Update (March 2002)]



In the August 1996 issue of Corrections Today, a publication of the American
Correctional Association, the CHANGES program received national recognition in an
article entitled Programs That Work.


            Adult Facilities (N=42) Offering Correctional Education Programs
                                        Number of States          Average Percent of
                                            Offering         Institutions Offering Within
                                                                         State
 Academic Education                            41                         __
         ABE                                   40                         91
         GED Instruction                       40                         92
         High School Coursework                26                         62
         ESL                                   27                         57
 Vocational Education                          42                          69
 Post Secondary Education                      38                          60
 Special Education                             33                          39
 Life and Social Skills Training               39                          79
Survey of State Correctional Education Systems: Analysis of Data from 1992 Field Test, Office of
Correctional Education, U. S. Department of Education


For additional comparison with other states, please refer to the tables on pages 48-57 of
this document.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                 Page 76 of 121
A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Post-Secondary Program
Location                                         46 Facilities
Contact Name                                     Bob Evans
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 24
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      16.5
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 8
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    8

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.
Through contractual agreements with two-year and four-year colleges and universities,
the WSD Division of Continuing Education provides academic and vocational post-
secondary credit and non-credit educational opportunities for offenders within TDCJ.
Qualified offenders work toward four types of associate degrees, four types of
baccalaureate degrees, and/or a master’s degree. Offenders are responsible for the costs
associated with these programs. Offenders may pay at registration from Inmate Trust
Fund Accounts, qualify for grants or scholarships through the college/university, or
reimburse the state after release as a condition of parole.
During FY03, two-year academic programs were available on 40 TDCJ units (34 units in
FY 04), using faculty and staff from the various colleges. Four-year programs were
available on seven TDCJ units (4 units in FY 04) and one unit offered a master’s
program. In addition to the academic college programs, college level vocational credit
classes were conducted on 30 TDCJ units (30 units in FY 04) using instructors from
various two-year colleges.

C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created?
Records indicate that various college programs have been offered since 1965-66.
Describe any statutory or other requirements for this program or function.
General Appropriations Act, House Bill 1, 78th Legislature, Regular Session, Article V,
Strategy C.2.2 & Rider 42
Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by the Higher Education Amendments of
1998, Title VIII, Part D, Section 821, P.L. 105-244

D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.
As a result of the recent reduction in funding, college programming has been reduced for
FY 2004.
Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 77 of 121
Not in the foreseeable future.

E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected.
Post-secondary academic programs are provided through interagency/interlocal contract
with colleges and universities servicing the geographic areas where units are located. All
offenders participating in these programs must meet the academic criteria for admission
as outlined in the respective college or university bulletin. TDCJ has academic criteria
that must also be met, as well as the requirement that all offenders receive security and
classification clearance before entry into the program. Eligible offender students will be
responsible for all tuition, fees, and tests, known as State Reimbursable Costs. As a State
Reimbursable Cost, the state will pay for only the cost of the offender’s initial academic
course each semester. Additional courses each semester are at the expense of the student,
through personal funds, scholarships or grants. The Youthful Offender Grant, which is
awarded by the United States Department of Education, enhances the academic program
for offenders 25 years of age and younger. The youthful offender students are allowed
the opportunity to take a full-time academic course load without the barriers of a state
reimbursable cost.
Post-secondary vocational programs are provided through interlocal contract with
colleges serving the geographic areas where units are located. All offenders participating
in these programs must meet the vocational criteria for admission as outlined in the
respective college or university bulletin. TDCJ has vocational criteria that must also be
met, as well as the requirement that all offenders receive security and classification
clearance before entry into the program. Eligible offender students are responsible for all
tuition, fees, and tests, known as State Reimbursable Costs. State Reimbursable Costs
include tuition and fees for college credit vocational courses for each qualified offender
student. The Youthful Offender Grant, which is awarded by the United States
Department of Education, enhances the vocational program by allowing eligible youthful
offenders to take vocational courses with no requirement to reimburse the cost after
release.
Provide a statistical breakdown of persons or entities affected.
                 Program                               Participation 2002-2003
 Junior College Academic                                                             7,102
 Senior College Academic                                                               786
 Graduate College Academic                                                              88
 Vocational College Credit                                                           3,394
 Vocational College Non-Credit                                                       1,562
F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and
procedures.
The WSD Division of Continuing Education is responsible for supervising and
administering post-secondary programs. The Division Director for Continuing Education
reports to the Superintendent. A program administrator, who reports to the Division
Director for Continuing Education, coordinates college activities. Principals provide
general oversight of college programs on their campuses.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 78 of 121
G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.
In FY 2003, post-secondary programs were made available to offenders through
contractual agreements with the following two-year and four-year colleges and
universities:
          Alvin Community College                         Odessa College*
          Amarillo College                                Palo Alto College
          Austin Community College                        Sam Houston State University
          Blinn College                                   South Plains College
          Central Texas College                           Southwest Texas Junior College
          Clarendon College                               Tarleton State University
          Coastal Bend College                            Texas State Technical College – West Texas
          Kingwood College                                Trinity Valley Community College
          Lamar State College – Port Arthur               University Of Houston – Clear Lake
          Lee College                                     Western Texas College
          Midland College

*With the exception of Odessa College, all of these colleges are participating in FY 2004.

H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                     2002-2003
 TDCJ Strategy C.2.2                             General Revenue                           $3,583,806.51
 Academic/Vocational
 Training*
 Youthful Offender Grant**                       Federal Grant                            $ 1,292,498.25

*WSD enters into a MOU with TDCJ for Post Secondary Academic & Vocational Training.
**Formula Grant - A grant that the U. S. Department of Education is directed by Congress to make to
  grantees, for which the amount is established by a formula based on certain criteria that are written into
  the legislation and program regulation; directly awarded and administered in the Department’s program.

  Allocation of Funds – From the funds appropriated pursuant to the U S. Department of Education for
  each fiscal year, the Department Secretary shall allot to each State an amount that bears the same
  relationship to such funds as the total number of students eligible in such State bears to the total number
  of such students in all States.

  An eligible youth offender is defined as an individual, age 25 or younger, which is incarcerated in a State
  prison and is within 5 years of release or parole eligibility.

                                                     2003-2004
 TDCJ Strategy C.2.2 Academic/Vocational                             General               $2,447,204.00
 Training*                                                           Revenue
 Youthful Offender Grant**                                           Federal Grant         $2,407,430.00



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                    Page 79 of 121
I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.
No. Offender interest exceeds the amount of funding available from the state. A
reduction in funding has resulted in longer waiting lists for post-secondary programs.
Offenders who can pay for courses may enter into programs; however, many offenders
are indigent.


J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.
WSD provides secondary level academic and vocational programs. Participation in and
completion of WSD programs (earning a GED, for example) assists offenders in meeting
the eligibility criteria for college enrollment. Seventy-three percent of the offenders
currently enrolled in college courses participated in WSD secondary level educational
programs.


K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.

To avoid duplication of effort, offenders may participate in the WSD academic program
only until they achieve a GED and meet the eligibility criteria to take the college entrance
exam. Any remedial programming that may be needed after that is provided through the
college program.

College classes are scheduled so as not to conflict with WSD classes. In many cases,
college vocational programs share shops and equipment with WSD.



L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary understanding
of each program or function.
Junior College Academic Program – Includes classes that lead to Associate in Arts, Associate
in Science, Associate in Applied Science, Associate in General Studies, and Associate of Science
Technology degrees. Advancement toward and completion of a degree is emphasized.

Senior College Academic Program – Includes classes that lead to a Bachelor of Science,
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, and Bachelor of Business
Administration degrees. Advancement toward and completion of a degree is emphasized.

Junior College Credit-Hour Vocational Program – Included training in 23 different
occupational trades in FY 03 (21 trades in FY 04). This training is provided through shop
training and classroom instruction. Junior college vocational programs were available on 30
units in FY03 (30 units in FY 04). Courses include such trades as:
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 80 of 121
          Air Conditioning/Refrigeration                       Drafting
          Auto Body Repair                                     Electronics
          Auto Electronics*                                    Graphic Arts
          Auto Mechanics                                       Horticulture
          Auto Transmissions                                   Machinist*
          Computer Networking                                  Masonry
          Computer Repair                                      Office Administration
          Construction Carpentry                               Substance Abuse Counselor
          Culinary Arts                                        Truck Driving
          Data Processing                                      Web Authoring
          Dental Lab/Technology                                Welding
          Diesel Mechanics

          *Trades available in FY 03 that are no longer available in FY 04

Junior College Workforce Non-Credit Program – Workforce education classes are a broad-base
series of courses that are offered through continuing education units (CEU) and are conducted in
a competency-based format. These courses are designed to provide a flexible and quick response
to business, industry and student needs for intensive preparatory, supplemental, or skill
enhancement education. Workforce courses have specific occupational instructional objectives.
Junior college workforce programs were available on 13 units in FY03 (13 units in FY 04).

                              Program                              Degree/Certificates Awarded
                                                                           2002-2003
      Associate Degree                                                                                444
      Baccalaureate Degree                                                                             69
      Master’s Degree                                                                                  13
      Junior College Vocational Credit                                                              1,964
      Certificate
      Junior College Vocational Non-Credit                                                          2,422
      Certificate


Institutional Benefits:
•    College programs enhance WSD’s ability to achieve the four statutory goals by providing value-
     added benefit to programs initiated by WSD. Higher educational achievement scores are associated
     with lower recidivism rates.
•    Required out-of-cell time is provided in a positive way. Attending college class in the school setting
     is more productive and beneficial than idle time spent in a cell.
•    Participation in college requires good conduct and behavior. For eligibility, offenders must meet at
     least Line Class I Status with no major disciplinary conviction for 6 months prior to enrollment.
•    Disciplinary infractions among participants are low compared to the non-participant offender
     population.
•    Offender college students are traditionally among the most productive workers in prison work
     assignments.



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                             Page 81 of 121
Recidivism Information:
•               In a 1994 study of Texas data, staff examined data for offender students who had earned an associate,
                a baccalaureate or a master’s degree while incarcerated between 1986 and 1992 and who had left the
                system. There were 883 offenders who had earned degrees while incarcerated and been released
                between 1986 and 1994. Of that number, only 24.7 percent had returned by June 1994. This
                recidivism rate compared with that of 43 percent reported by the Criminal Justice Policy Council for
                the entire prison system. [Texas Department of Criminal Justice, 1994; unpublished document]

•               In an audit report entitled Behind the Walls: The Price and Performance of the Texas Department of
                Criminal Justice (1994), the State Comptroller’s Office stated, “post-secondary education has a
                definite and dramatic effect on recidivism.”

•               Studies in Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, Wisconsin, and New York have shown a clear and
                fairly consistent correlation between collegiate studies and reduced recidivism.

•               In November 2002, education staff within the Windham School District of the Texas Department of
                Criminal Justice reviewed available program data to determine whether that same positive effect was
                operational in Texas among offenders who receive college degrees and certificates while incarcerated.
                Offender students (N=406) who earned an associate, baccalaureate, master’s degree, or vocational
                certificate while incarcerated and left the system in 1999 were measured. The following chart
                provides the breakdown of return rates per degree.


                                                                       100.0%
                            100                      86.7%
                                   74.6%

                             80
    Percent of Completers




                             60
                                                                                                  Remained Free
                             40            25.4%                                                  Returned
                                                             13.3%
                             20

                              0
                                  Associate        Baccalaureate       Master's

This data appears to confirm the findings of other studies that have demonstrated a link between
attainment of a college degree and decreased levels of recidivism. The data also indicates an inverse
relationship by type of degree—lower recidivism for higher levels of education.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                    Page 82 of 121
Letter (as written; names edited) from the College file:

     Dear Bob Evans

     Hello. I am writing to you in regards to a bill I owe CTC for a vocational
     I took in 1996.

     The very first thing I want to say is a big Thank You!! I took Office
     Administration, and since my release I have used it to find a good
     productive job. I work for a company called Hamilton Ryker as a
     Administrative Assistant. I love my job. With this company and the
     education background I have, I have the chance of advance in this
     company that I may never have had. Three weeks after release I had this
     job. That in itself is amazing.

     I pay my debt with much gratitude. Please encourage other students to
     continue on with their education even if incarcerated. It will pay off in
     more ways than one.

     Again thank you

     Sincerely,

     Patricia L. Patterson                       [August 2001]




M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.


        Educational Programs                              State Prisons                 Federal Prisons
                                                              2000                           2000
 With an education program                                                91.2%                      100.0%
        Basic adult education                                             80.4%                       97.4%
        Secondary education                                               83.6%                       98.7%
        College courses                                                   26.7%                       80.5%
        Special education                                                 39.6%                       59.7%
        Vocational training                                               55.7%                       93.5%
 Without an education program                                              8.8%                        6.5%
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Special Report, Education and Correctional Populations, January 2003 (Revised
4/15/03)




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                Page 83 of 121
A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Project RIO
Location                                         81 Facilities
Contact Name                                     Bob Evans
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 135
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      117
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 120
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    112

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.
Although WSD provides administrative oversight of the in-prison component of Project
RIO (Re-Integration of Offenders), it is not funded through the Foundation School
Program funds and is not considered an education program.

The Project RIO program works in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission
(TWC) to link educational and vocational training with job placement. Participants are
provided the knowledge and skills necessary to make the transition to productive
employment. Project RIO staff members assist offenders with the transition from
training within TDCJ to post-release employment by collecting the documents required to
establish work eligibility for qualified participants.
Objectives:
•    Provide Project RIO services to eligible offenders by generating an Individual Service
     Strategy, an application for employment, and by securing documentation necessary
     for future employment.
•    Provide career assessment that assists offenders in making realistic educational and
     work participation decisions while incarcerated to occupational choices post-release.
•    Provide vocational assessment for RIO participants to identify realistic career paths,
     appropriate areas for skill-based employment opportunities and applicable workforce
     development training.
•    Identify offenders for appropriate job placement in prison industry or other TDCJ
     work assignments for appropriate workforce skills training.
•    Maintain partnerships with free world industry and employers to keep informed with
     respect to current labor market trends regarding employment and workforce demands
     with local Workforce Development Boards.


C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created?
Project RIO was initiated in 1985 in Dallas and Tarrant counties as a pilot program for
adult prison parolees. Legislative funding was provided in 1989 and a coordinated effort
between the Texas Employment Commission, Texas Department of Criminal Justice and
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 84 of 121
the Parole Division was initiated.
The Texas Workforce Commission, in collaboration with the Texas Department of
Criminal Justice and the Windham School District, administers Project RIO. The project
provides a link between education, training and employment during incarceration with
employment after release.
Describe any statutory or other requirements for this program or function.
General Appropriations Act, House Bill 1, 78th Legislature, Regular Session, Article V,
Rider 38 and Article VII, Rider 11; Texas Government Code §501.097; Chapter 306,
Texas Labor Code

D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.
In 1995, the 74th legislature established the Texas Workforce Commission and the Project
RIO program was placed under their authority. The TWC receives the legislative
funding, sets performance measures for ex-offender services, and subsequently contracts
with TDCJ for the in-prison component of the program.
Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?
Not in the foreseeable future.

E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected.
Offenders within 18 months of projected release, or within 36 months of projected release
and under the age of 35 are eligible for Project RIO. Staff members develop an
Individual Service Strategy (ISS) plan with the offender to identify a career path and to
serve as an assessment and evaluation tool. An important component of career path
identification is accessing information regarding employee needs, employment
information based on the latest labor market trends, and industry-driven occupations in
the area where the offender plans to reside after release.

Provide a statistical breakdown of persons or entities affected.

                                                             2002-2003
 Total Project RIO Program Contacts                                              70,181
 Clients Released with Individual Service
 Strategies                                                                      27,823

F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and
procedures.

The WSD Division of Continuing Education is responsible for supervising and
administering the Project RIO program. The Division Director for Continuing Education
reports to the Superintendent.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                 Page 85 of 121
A program administrator, who reports to the Division Director for Continuing Education,
coordinates Project RIO activities. Project RIO specialists, located at the prisons and
state jails, are an integral part of the faculty at each facility. Principals provide oversight
on a day-to-day basis.

G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.

N/A

H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                 2002-2003
 TDCJ Strategy C.2.2 Academic/Vocational Training General Revenue $3,377,126.00


Windham School District administers the Project RIO program for TDCJ. TDCJ receives the
funding through an interagency contract with the Texas Workforce Commission.

                                                 2003-2004
 TDCJ Strategy C.2.2 Academic/Vocational Training General Revenue $3,259,735.00


I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.

Current funding limits the number of offenders who can be served.

J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.

Workforce services are available to offenders after release. The services are delivered by
a network of over 250 Local Workforce Development Board one-stop centers and
satellite offices across the state.


K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.

The TWC contracts with the TDCJ for the in-prison component of the program.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 86 of 121
L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary
understanding of each program or function.

Institutional Benefits:
•    Participation in Project RIO requires good conduct and behavior.
•    When Project RIO participants complete a vocational trade, an attempt is made to
     place them in unit job assignments related to their training. This helps to reduce the
     cost of confinement.
•    Project RIO participants are more likely to obtain and maintain employment when
     released due to participation in educational and other treatment programs while
     incarcerated.
•    Project RIO provides incentives to offenders to behave in positive ways during
     confinement by assisting them with the development of self-esteem and behavioral
     skills that promote self-sufficiency.

Cost Effectiveness:
•    In fiscal year 1990, it was estimated that Project RIO saved the state approximately
     $4 million per year by obtaining employment for ex-offenders and helping them stay
     out of prison. [Study by Texas A& M University]

Impact of Project RIO Upon Employment:
•    The 2000 Criminal Justice Policy Council study reviewed the employment
     contribution of Project RIO. Participation in Project RIO was determined by
     matching the 10,000 study participants’ social security numbers to the Texas
     Workforce Commission Project RIO database. The study revealed a relationship
     between involvement in Project RIO and positive employment outcomes. Eighty-six
     percent (86%) of releasees who were served by Project RIO were employed at some
     time during the first year after release compared to 62% of releasees not served by
     Project RIO. [Impact of Educational Achievement of Inmates in the Windham School District on
     Recidivism, Criminal Justice Policy Council, August 2000]

•    FY 03 data from the Texas Workforce Commission indicates that 70% of Project RIO
     ex-offenders released from TDCJ who register with the Texas Workforce
     Commission secure employment.

Impact of Employment Upon Recidivism:
•    A strong association between unemployment and recidivism has consistently been
     observed in most recidivism studies. In 2000, the Texas Criminal Justice Policy
     Council conducted a study of the Texas Workforce Commission component of
     Project RIO. Employment and wage data were gathered from the Unemployment
     Wage Record database maintained by the Workforce Commission. The report had a
     study sample of approximately 10,000 first time releasees who exited the TDCJ in
     1997 and 1998. The rate of return to prison for employed releasees was 17% lower
     than unemployed releasees. The overall recidivism rate for employed offenders in the
     study was only 15%. The most significant impact was among high-risk offenders
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                         Page 87 of 121
     served by Project RIO who had lower recidivism rates. [Impact of Educational Achievement
     of Inmates in the Windham School District on Recidivism, Criminal Justice Policy Council, August
     2000]

Excerpts from a letter (as written) regarding Project RIO:
• I got a job with Sterlite temp force in Ennis it pays 8.50 a hour at night
     12 hr shifts They pay you every week its very uplifting and exciting to be
     working on a good job everything you told came true in every way
     imaginable…
•    You prepared me mentally with encouragement and good advice and
     that always goes a long way in life.
•    I always think back on the things that you stressed in Project RIO about
     the payment of the jobs that RIO had connected my Parole officer was
     telling me that Project RIO had hooked a lot of people up with good
     quality jobs that had just got out that is a good omen to have behind
     you and I want to thank you for the time and effort that you put in to
     helping a young man like myself to get back established in life.
     [January 2004]



M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.

The Texas Project RIO program was the first program of its kind in the country;
consequently, many states looked at the Texas model when they adopted similar
programs.

In June 1998, the Project RIO program was featured in an issue of Program Focus.
Program Focus is a publication sponsored by the National Institute of Justice, the
National Institute of Corrections, and the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of
Correctional Education. The publication focuses on various approaches to offender job
training, placement, and retention.

After the Project RIO program was highlighted in the Program Focus publication,
visitors from other states such as Georgia, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and New York
visited the Texas Project RIO program.

Three states—Georgia, New Mexico, and Oklahoma—have modeled their programs after
Project RIO. [National Institute for Literacy, State Correctional Education Programs, State Policy Update, March
2002]


The criteria used by other states in their selection processes are unknown. The
assumption is that other states recognized the value of an integrated model. The model
offers a continuum of services, with pre-employment issues addressed prior to release.

In the June 1998 Program Focus report cited above, Georgia reported that the Project
RIO model was attractive because of “its ability to get three different agencies with
different missions to work together on a mutual concern—getting inmates ready for life
after prison.”

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                     Page 88 of 121
A. Please complete the following chart:

                                    Windham School District
                 Exhibit 12: Program or Function Information – Fiscal Year 2003
Name of Program or Function                      Recreation
Location                                         All Facilities
Contact Name                                     Bob Evans
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2003                 36
Number of Actual FTEs as of August 31, 2003      30
Number of Budgeted FTEs, FY 2004                 43.5
Number of Actual FTEs as of November 30, 2003    42

B. What are the key services of this function or program? Describe the major
activities involved in providing all services.

Recreation is a TDCJ initiative. It is not a Physical Education program with identified
learning outcomes.

The primary goal of the Recreation program is to provide TDCJ offenders on each facility
the opportunity for daily exercise and relaxation on a planned and supervised basis through
various recreation programs. Approved exercise equipment is provided and maintained on
all types of general population recreation yards, in each gymnasium, and in a variety of
special recreation areas specifically designed for offenders requiring administrative
segregation. Recreation program activities also extend into the offender housing area
dayrooms where television programming and table games are provided. Many offenders
also choose to participate in the arts and crafts program, and spend time reading books and
magazines provided for sedentary recreational use.
Recreational Programs:
G1, J1, G2, J2, G3 Custody Recreation
G4, J4 Custody Recreation
G5, J5 Custody Recreation
Administrative Segregation Recreation
Programmatic Recreation
Television/Radio Programming
Arts and Crafts Program
Library Services

C. When and for what purpose was the program or function created?

In May 1985, the TDCJ entered into a stipulation in the case of Ruiz v. Estelle, 503 F.
Supp. 1265 (S.D. Tex. 1980). This stipulation, among other things, required the TDCJ to
construct recreation facilities, set minimum requirements for offender out-of-cell time,
outline minimum activity requirements and provide professional staffing.

Describe any statutory or other requirements for this program or function.

General Appropriations Act, House Bill 1, 78th Legislature, Regular Session, Article V,
Rider 43
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 89 of 121
D. Describe any important history not included in the general history section,
including a discussion of how the services or functions have changed from the
original intent.
The functions of this program have not changed from the original intent.

Will there be a time when the mission will be accomplished and the program or
function will no longer be needed?
Not in the foreseeable future.

E. Describe who or what this program or function affects. List any qualifications or
eligibility requirements for persons or entities affected. Provide a statistical
breakdown of persons or entities affected.
G1, J1, G2, J2 and G3 Custody Recreation - Each offender is given the opportunity to be
involved in recreational and other non-programmatic activities a minimum of four (4) hours
for each scheduled weekday and seven (7) hours participation on scheduled weekends and
holidays.
G4 Custody Recreation - Each offender is given the opportunity to be involved in
recreational and other non-programmatic activities a minimum of four (4) hours for each
scheduled weekday and five (5) hours participation on scheduled weekends and holidays.
J4 Custody Recreation – Each offender is given the opportunity to be involved in
recreational and other non-programmatic activities a minimum of two (2) hours for each
scheduled weekday and four (4) hours participation on scheduled weekends and holidays.
G5 Custody Recreation - Each offender who works or is medically unassigned, will receive
two (2) hours of outdoor recreation each weekday and two (2) hours on Saturday, Sunday,
and holidays.
J5 Custody Recreation – Each offender who works or is medically unassigned, will receive
one (1) hour of outdoor recreation each weekday and one (1) hour on Saturday, Sunday, and
holidays.
Administrative Segregation Recreation - Offenders in any category of administrative
segregation for more than seventy-two (72) hours shall be provided opportunity for physical
recreation out of their cells in conformity with the level to which they have been assigned.
On those days when offenders are eligible for recreation privileges, the security staff will
contact each offender to determine whether the offender wishes to take his/her exercise time.
Programmed Recreation Activity - Offender involvement in programmed recreational
activities may be considered a privilege, which extends beyond court ordered requirements.
Required participation criteria will allow only those offenders who exhibit the best behavior
to become involved.
Television and Radio Programming - Offenders who are G1, J1, G2, J2, G3, G4, J4 and
Level I protective custody will be provided basic television programming and may receive
FM radio signals. Religious television programming may be provided at times to those
offenders who are restricted from television privileges.
Arts and Crafts Program - Offender participation in the arts and crafts program is a privilege
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 90 of 121
and is treated as such. Qualified offenders are issued craft cards on a first-come, first serve
basis.
Library Services - Libraries are open a sufficient number of hours to provide an opportunity
for school participants to use the facility twice a week and general population offenders once
a week.

WSD employs professional librarians and library aides to maintain libraries at 85
facilities for the TDCJ. Library books, newspapers and magazines are purchased with
Recreation funds. During the 2002-2003 school year, WSD employed 42 librarians.
Nine of those positions were funded through the Recreation funds. For the 2003-
2004 school year, 19 of the 42 positions are budgeted through the Recreation funds.

F. Describe how the program or function is administered. Include flowcharts,
timelines, or other illustrations as necessary to describe school policies and
procedures.

The WSD Division of Continuing Education is responsible for supervising and
administering the Recreation program. The Division Director for Continuing Education
reports to the Superintendent.

A program administrator, who reports to the Division Director for Continuing Education,
coordinates recreation program activities.

G. If the program or function works with other local units of education, please
include a brief, general description of these entities and their relationships to the
school.

N/A

H. Identify all funding sources and amounts for the program or function, including
federal grants and pass-through monies. Describe any funding formulas or funding
conventions. For state funding sources, please specify (e.g., general revenue,
appropriations rider, budget strategy, fees/dues).

                                                 2002-2003
 TDCJ Strategy C.1.2 Institutional                    General
 Goods/Services                                       Revenue                   $2,928,285.67

Windham School District enters into a MOU with TDCJ for Libraries, Radio & TV, and Inmate
Recreation.

                                                 2003-2004
 TDCJ Strategy C.1.2 Institutional                    General
 Goods/Services                                       Revenue                   $3,513,235.00

I. Are current and future funding resources appropriate to achieve the program’s
mission, goals, objectives, and performance targets? Explain.

Current funding is adequate to operate the Recreation program as presently defined.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                        Page 91 of 121
J. Identify any programs internal or external to the school that provide identical or
similar services or functions. Describe the similarities and differences.

N/A

K. Discuss how the program or function is coordinating its activities to avoid
duplication or conflict with any other programs listed in Question J and with the
school’s customers. If applicable, briefly discuss any memorandums of
understanding (MOUs), interagency agreements, or interagency contracts.

The TDCJ and Windham School District have an MOU under which Windham School
District will be reimbursed for salaries and operating costs associated with the
recreational programs.

L. Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary
understanding of each program or function.

Recreational programs are used as offender management tools by unit administration.
The TDCJ Recreation program can assist an offender in developing fitness and
conditioning, in developing skills and attitudes appropriate for group participation, and in
the constructive use of leisure time.

During fiscal year 2003, the Recreation Department struggled to provide the basic non-
programmatic recreational requirements due to a number of factors, including staffing
shortages. Many of the programs that were non-court ordered and programmatic in
nature, such as intramurals and weightlifting, were discontinued. On May 15, 2003, as
part of the agency’s reduction in force (RIF), the unit-level Recreation Program Specialist
position was eliminated. Administrative concentration from that point forward has been
centered on providing the basic court-ordered requirements for non-programmatic out-of-
cell time and recreation activities. Most Arts and Crafts programs that were operational
at the beginning of 2003 continued to operate the entire year.

The Recreation Department Administrator also supervises the Recreation
Communications Department and assumes responsibility for the procurement,
installation, and repair of all television sets, satellite systems, antenna systems and FM
radio systems located on each facility throughout the TDCJ. The Recreation
Communications Department also coordinates the contracting of telecable services for
facilities that have cable access.


M. Please compare and contrast the school to other states’ prison education systems.

Most states have recreational staff. At this time, Texas has elected to operate the
program with correctional officers.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 92 of 121
Section VII. School Performance Evaluation


A. What are the school’s most significant accomplishments?

•    WSD successfully met the challenges presented by the rapid prison expansion in the
     1990s.
•    WSD awards the most GED (high school equivalency) certificates in the State of
     Texas.
•    Educational achievement in prison was associated with an 11% decrease in the
     two-year recidivism rate of offenders (Criminal Justice Policy Council, 2000).
•    The WSD CHANGES (reintegration) program plays a vital role for the TDCJ in
     meeting the needs of offenders with FI-R votes (consideration for early release
     contingent upon successful completion of a rehabilitation program). In 2001-02,
     6,742 offenders received an FI-R vote. An average of 52% of these offenders per
     month meet the requirement for early release through completion of the CHANGES
     program. Early release results in a cost savings for the TDCJ and helps address
     capacity (bed space) issues. [In FY02, the average cost per offender per day was $44.01
     with a four-year average length of stay.]
•    A recent study by the Criminal Justice Policy Council indicated that the Cognitive
     Intervention program had a positive impact on high-risk offenders. The recidivism
     rate for high-risk offenders who completed the program was 26.7% compared to a
     35.5% recidivism rate for high-risk offenders who did not complete the program.
•    WSD provides vocational training to industry standards and administers industry
     certification tests (e.g., Automotive Service Excellence, National Center for
     Construction Education and Research, etc.) to qualified offenders who voluntarily
     commit their own resources to pay the industry registration fees. In a January 2002
     edition of the Industry Certification and Licensure Guide, the Texas Education
     Agency reported a statewide total of 8,628 industry certificates/licenses issued in
     public schools during the 2000-2001 school year. Of those, students in Windham
     School District were listed as earning 2,446.
•    According to a June 2000 report by the Criminal Justice Policy Council (Impact of
     Educational Achievement of Inmates in the Windham School District on Post-Release
     Employment), offenders who earned a vocational certificate in prison had higher
     employment rates and wages earned than offenders who did not earn a vocational
     certificate. Additionally, offenders who participated but did not complete a
     vocational certificate had higher employment rates than offenders who did not
     participate in vocational training.
•    In the CJPC study, it was determined that releasees who were employed had a 17
     percent lower recidivism rate than those who were not employed. Releasees who
     earned $10,000 or more during their first year of release had a lower recidivism rate
     than releasees who earned less than $10,000, regardless of age and offense.



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 93 of 121
B. Describe the internal process used to evaluate school performance, including how
often performance is formally evaluated and how the resulting information is used
by the policymaking body, management, and the prison system.

In June of 1998, an Accountability Committee comprised of teachers, counselors,
principals and administrators met for the first time. After a series of meetings and an
intensive review of data, the Accountability Committee developed an accountability
system for Windham and conducted a preliminary study. The system was approved by
the Superintendent in February 1999 and officially implemented in September 1999.
The accountability system was designed to:
    • Increase student performance;
    • Reward good performance and adjust poor performance in a process of continual
        campus improvement;
    • Encourage involvement and collaboration among teachers rather than isolation;
    • Reflect the activities of other district initiatives including the reading program,
        staff development, school assistance teams, and campus improvement planning.

The accountability system measures eight areas: progress in 6 areas on the Test of Adult
Basic Education (TABE), percent of students completing Career and Technology
Education (CTE) courses, and the percent of student attendance. Based on historical
data, the established standards are high, but realistic. Campuses are rated as exemplary,
recognized, acceptable or low performing. [See Appendix D: Accountability Ratings]

•    The TABE has three subtests areas, reading, language and math. The accountability system
     measures student progress in two categories for each of these three areas, low level for
     students whose TABE score in that subtest is below 6.0 and high level for those with a TABE
     score of 6.0 and above. Progress is defined as a .3, or one-third of a year gain. Students who
     pass the GED test during the year are also considered as making progress. The typical WSD
     student is enrolled in literacy classes for just over 200 hours a year, or one-third of the WSD
     school year. Many WSD students have learning and/or physical disabilities, which may limit
     their ability to progress at a faster pace.

•    The percent of students completing CTE courses is measured by taking the total number of
     students dropped compared to the number successfully completing the course. These courses
     are typically 600 hours in length and cover approximately six months.

•    School attendance is critical to the success of students. In the prison environment, there are
     many factors beyond the control of the school. Measuring the percent of attendance allows
     WSD staff to work with TDCJ security staff to get students to school.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                            Page 94 of 121
       Campus                                    Accountability WSD Measures and Criteria
       Ratings*
                               Percent Making                 Percent of CTE               Percent of Student
                            Progress** on TABE             Certificates Earned by             Attendance
                           Subtests for E.A. Ranges          CTE Participants
                             0 – 5.9 and 6.0 and
                                    Above
                                  1999-2000                     1999-2000                       2000-2001

  Exemplary                             75                           80                             95


  Recognized                            65                           75                             95


  Acceptable                            55                           70                             92


  Low Performing                    Below 55                     Below 70                       Below 92

*Campus rating depends on meeting all of the achievement, vocational, and attendance rate standards for the rating
category.
**Progress is defined as a .3 or higher grade equivalent gain, passing the GED, or achieving TASP eligibility




Campuses are ranked yearly and data is sent out periodically throughout the year for use
by each campus. Campuses have access to progress reports for their facility which show
student progress in the TABE areas. The student multi-reference report (SMRR), an
individual criterion-referenced report derived from each student’s performance on the
TABE, is also used on the campus and allows teachers to see areas of mastery and
weakness. Accountability data is often reviewed and discussed during campus and
regional in-service. Upon the completion of campus evaluations, programming at an
individual campus may be reviewed and modified. Assistance is given to the campus
regarding areas of needed improvement and campus improvement plans are modified as
needed. The data is also shared with the unit wardens, so that Windham staff may
coordinate with security staff if there is a need for improvement. Campus assistance
teams frequently include teachers and administrators from other campuses who share
their ideas and techniques.

The Accountability Committee meets periodically throughout the year to discuss any
issues regarding accountability, including requests for waivers due to unusual
circumstances. Each year, the Accountability Committee reviews data from the previous
year. Longitudinal data indicates that improvement has occurred each year in student
achievement, completions in CTE courses, and in the percent of attendance.

In addition, other data relative to the performance of each campus is reported and
analyzed on a regular basis. This includes monthly class size and enrollment reports.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                           Page 95 of 121
Individualized Treatment Plan data is analyzed and used for determining appropriate
staffing at facilities to meet the needs of priority offenders.

Also, WSD implements an internal monitoring process designed to ensure that each
campus complies with district policies, procedures and standards. Each unit receives an
on-site visit once every three years for compliance monitoring. In the ensuing years, desk
audits are conducted for compliance purposes.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                 Page 96 of 121
                                                         Accountability Systems Side by Side
                              TEA Standard Accountability                TEA Alternative Accountability                           WSD Accountability

TAAS           Exemplary – at least 90.0% passing each of           Commended – at least 30.0% passing each of Exemplary – at least 75.0% making progress on
               R, M, W (all students and each student               R and M (all students and each student each of R, M, W TABE* subtests and 80.0%
Passing Rates
               group) and 90.0% passing SS (all students)           group)                                     passing Career & Technology Education (CTE)
– Spring 2002
               Recognized – at least 80.0% passing each of          Acceptable – at least 30.0% passing each of Recognized – at least 65.0% making     progress on
R = Reading    R, M, W (all students and each student               R and M (all students)                      each of R, M, W TABE subtests          and 75.0%
M= Mathematics group) and 80.0% passing SS (all students)                                                       passing CTE
                                                                    Needs Peer Review – below 30.0% passing
                      Acceptable – at least 55.0% passing each of   in R or M (all students)                    Acceptable – at least 55.0% making     progress on
W = Writing
                      R, M, W (all students and each student                                                    each of R, M, W TABE subtests          and 70.0%
SS = Social           group) and 55.0% passing SS (all students)                                                passing CTE
Studies
                      Low-performing – below 55.0% passing in                                                        Low-performing – below 55.0% making progress
                      any of R, M, W (all students or any student                                                    on each of R, M, W TABE subtests or below
                      group) or below 55.0% passing SS (all                                                          70.0% passing CTE
                      students)
                                                                                                                     *Test of Adult Basic Education
2000-2001             Exemplary – 1.0% or less (all students and    Commended – 6.0% or less (all students and       No WSD Equivalent
Dropout Rate          each student group)                           each student group)
                      Recognized – 3.0% or less (all students and   Acceptable – 10.0% or less (all students)
                      each student group)
                                                                    Needs Peer Review – above 10.0% (all
                      Acceptable – 5.5% or less (all students and   students)
                      each student group)
                      Low-performing – above 5.5% (all students
                      or any student group)
2000-2001             Not included as a Base Indicator              Commended – 94.0% or higher (all students)       Exemplary – 95.0% or higher
Student
                                                                    Acceptable – 80.0% or higher (all students)      Recognized – 95.0% or higher
Attendance
                                                                    Needs Peer Review – below 80.0% (all             Acceptable – 92.0% or higher
                                                                    students)
                                                                                                                     Low-performing – below 92.0%
TLI Growth            Not included as a Base Indicator              Commended – 85.0% of all students with current   No WSD Equivalent
                                                                    and previous TAAS scores must demonstrate TLI
                                                                    growth
                                                                    Acceptable – Not a Base Indicator
     Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                           Page 97 of 121
                             TEA Standard Accountability        TEA Alternative Accountability                        WSD Accountability

Additional           None                                  Commended – Must meet the campus-              No WSD Equivalent
Indicators                                                 selected Additional Indicator(s) (from the
                                                           choices specified in this 2002 Alternative
                                                           Education Accountability Manual)
                                                           Acceptable – Must meet the campus-selected
                                                           Additional Indicator(s) (from the choices
                                                           specified in this 2002 Alternative Education
                                                           Accountability Manual)
Not Rated            No campuses are not rated             Not Rated – less than 10 long-term students    One campus not rated (the facility houses the
                                                           for the school year                            TDCJ Mentally Retarded Offender Program)


Standard Accountability System Procedures and Notes
A district or campus must pass each and every applicable standard to be rated Exemplary, Recognized, or Academically Acceptable /
Acceptable. If every standard for a rating is not met, then the next lower rating is assigned if the conditions for the next lower rating are
met. For example, a campus with a 53 percent passing rate in writing for economically disadvantaged students would be rated Low-
performing even if all other standards for the Acceptable rating were met.

For 2002, there were no additional performance requirements for campuses.

* Please note: Because of a change in the state-testing program, 2002 ratings were utilized for 2003 for districts, and campuses were not
rated in 2003.




    Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                 Page 98 of 121
C. What are the school’s biggest opportunities for improvement?
Evaluation data provides the basis for planning and decision-making relative to WSD’s
continuous program improvement efforts. Data for the past few years indicates that WSD
has been making great strides with respect to targeting the right offender for the right
program at the right time. Given the logistics of a statewide school district, the problems
inherent in a prison environment, and the demographics of the offender population, this is
not an easy task, and remains an area of focus for continuous improvement.
Other areas for improvement include:
• Improving communication with both internal and external publics;
• Raising awareness of the mission and values of correctional education for external
   publics;
• Maintaining the ability to recruit and retain quality teachers, administrators, and
   support personnel;
• Focusing on effective programs and instructional strategies for adult offenders;
• Maintaining vocational shops aligned with industry standards;
• Improving the use of instructional technology (including the use of distance learning
   as appropriate).




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                  Page 99 of 121
D. Are there any other entities that could perform any of the school’s functions?

There are other entities that could possibly perform many of the functions that the WSD
performs. The support functions like computer services, human resources, warehousing,
and business functions could all possibly be outsourced. The WSD would lose the
control it now exercises over the support function if outsourced. The WSD would lose a
great deal of its flexibility in dealing with a prison environment for a school district. It
would be very difficult to write a contract that would encompass all the variables that
could occur in a prison environment. Contractors or vendors would only see their
function and not how they fit in the total package.

At times, other entities have questioned whether the TDCJ could potentially perform
some of the business and/or personnel functions for WSD. WSD contends, however, that
due to the complexity of the total corrections function, the TDCJ could not perform those
functions as efficiently and effectively as they are currently being performed.

WSD has a single focus—providing quality correctional education programs for
offenders. The TDCJ is a massive agency with approximately 40,000 employees and a
myriad of criminal justice responsibilities. The TDCJ is not knowledgeable of, or
experienced with, State Board for Educator Certification requirements or the Teacher
Retirement System. It is doubtful they could absorb WSD business and/or personnel
functions with their existing staff. It is also probable that the district would incur
substantial delays in hiring teachers and/or receiving instructional materials due to the
sheer volume of hiring and purchasing that occurs within the TDCJ. Security would
reasonably take precedence over education. The priority for hiring would most likely be
placed on the employment of correctional officers. Equipment and supplies needed to
ensure security would likely be purchased before educational materials. Resultant delays
in hiring teachers and receiving instructional materials would negatively impact the
mission and goals of the district. Vacant teaching positions would result in a loss of
contact hours, leaving WSD unable to generate the contact hours necessary to earn its
appropriation.

Having the ability to perform its own functions enables WSD to ensure delivery of
quality correctional education programs without being less than high priority in the
complex TDCJ operations.

WSD will continue to review the entire operation of the district, looking for potential
opportunities to operate more efficiently to achieve the stated goals.

Under the existing operational structure, Windham School District derives benefit from
its close relationship and long history with the TDCJ. For example, WSD employees
travel in TDCJ vehicles to perform administrative functions, provide staff development,
and deliver program support. Both entities cooperate to increase their efficiency and
effectiveness. This same type of cooperation might not be possible if various entities
required contractual agreements to perform different functions.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 100 of 121
E. What process does the school use to determine satisfaction with its programs and
   how does the school use this information?

The process involves the systematic and objective collection, analysis, and reporting of
information or data, including student achievement data (pre- and post-measures),
accountability data, recidivism studies, and periodic teacher and student surveys. The
teacher and student surveys are designed to address both process and outcomes. The
information is shared with all employees through staff development activities and
documents, such as the annual performance report and the district and campus profiles. If
the information indicates that a particular objective is not being met district-wide, or on a
particular campus, then technical assistance is provided and/or appropriate curricular or
instructional changes are made to remedy the situation.

In addition to the formal process, WSD considers informal information from offender
family organizations, legislators, TDCJ personnel, community organizations, and other
individuals or entities.



F. Describe the school’s process for handling complaints against the school,
including the maintenance of complaint files and procedures for keeping parties
informed about the process. If the school has a division or office, such as an
ombudsman, for tracking and resolving complaints, please provide a description.

The District has a comprehensive process for handling complaints. The process consists
of three components, each of which are discussed below:

1. TDCJ Ombudsman Program
   The TDCJ Ombudsman Program, while strictly speaking not a WSD program, often
   fields complaints from the public regarding WSD offender students (e.g., a student’s
   parent). These complaints are investigated by appropriate WSD staff.

     The TDCJ Ombudsman Program was established as a central point of contact to assist
     in communication between TDCJ (WSD) and the public. The program, authorized by
     §493.016, Texas Government Code, serves the following functions:
         • Acts as a liaison between TDCJ (WSD) and the general public;
         • Responds to informational inquiries regarding agency policies, procedures, or
           actions;
         • Responds to questions concerning a specific offender;
         • Facilitates problem resolution;
         • Makes appropriate referrals to agency staff; and
         • Acts as a contact and information resource for special interest groups.

     The Ombudsman Program maintains files on each complaint, and tracking procedures
     are utilized to assure prompt response.

2. Offender Grievance Program
   The Offender Grievance Program was developed to help offenders communicate with
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 101 of 121
     staff regarding concerns affecting their incarceration. Often, such concerns involve
     WSD staff, policies, or procedures. The grievance process provides an offender an
     opportunity for problem resolution at two distinct administrative levels. Files are
     maintained on each offender grievance, and tracking procedures are utilized to assure
     prompt response.

3. Employee Grievance Policy
   WSD has a comprehensive, Board adopted employee grievance policy that is
   designed to provide a timely and orderly process for the resolution of employee
   complaints. It is a fundamental right of every WSD employee to file a grievance
   regarding any employment-related matter that is within the District’s authority to
   modify. Not only does Employee Grievance Policy #7.26 encourage employees to
   seek relief for employment-related complaints, the policy strictly forbids retaliation
   against any employee for bringing a complaint under the policy. Files are maintained
   on each employee grievance. A grievance must be resolved in accordance with strict
   timelines contained in the grievance policy.

G. What process does the school use to respond to requests under the Public
Information (Open Records) Act?

Windham School District subscribes to the proposition that all persons are entitled to full
and complete information regarding the affairs of government and the official actions of
those who represent them as public officials and employees.

Windham School District adheres to the guidelines and procedures of the Public
Information Act and promptly releases requested information that is not confidential by
law, either constitutional, statutory, or by judicial decision, or information for which an
exception to disclosure has not been sought. The Administrator for Human Resources
serves as the Custodian of Records for the district and is tasked with the responsibility to
coordinate, review, and promptly respond to all requests under the guidelines of the
Public Information Act.

All requests for access to public records must be in writing and may be submitted through
postal mail, facsimile transmission, electronic mail, or in person according to Windham
School District procedures. The request must include enough description and detail
about the information requested to enable the Custodian of Records to accurately identify
and locate the information requested. The requested information must be produced and
released within 10 working days from receipt by the Custodian of Records. If the
production of copies requires a financial charge to the requestor, the Custodian of
Records shall provide written notification of the pending charges to the requestor. If the
requested information is unavailable at the time of the request for examination because
the documents are in active use or in storage, the Custodian of Records shall certify this
fact in writing to the requestor and set a date and hour within a reasonable time when the
information shall be available for inspection or duplication.

All information collected, assembled, or maintained by Windham School District
pursuant to law or in connection with the transaction of official business is public
information and available to the public during normal business hours.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 102 of 121
    Section VIII. Policy Issues

    The purpose of this section is to briefly describe any potential policy issues that would
    help the school improve its operations. This section is intended to give the Sunset
    Commission a basic understanding of the issues so more information can be collected
    during the detailed research on the school. Some questions to ask in preparing this
    section may include: (1) How can the school do a better job in meeting the needs of its
    students? (2) What barriers exist that limit the school’s ability to get the job done?

    Emphasis should be given to major policy issues and issues appropriate for resolution
    through changes in state law. Issues related to funding or actions by other governmental
    entities (federal, local, quasi-governmental, etc.) may be included, but the Sunset
    Commission has no authority in the appropriations process or with other units of
    government. If these types of issues are included, the focus should be on solutions which
    can be enacted in state law. Focus should also be given to areas where the school can
    improve its interaction with other state agencies.

    This section contains three components:

    1) Brief Description of Issue. Often this is best presented as a question, e.g., Should the
    school be required to…?

    2 Discussion. Include enough background information to give context for the issue.
    Information helpful in building context includes:

•   What is the general scope of the issue?
•   What is the school’s authority (statutory or other) related to the issue?
•   What is the current practice or situation related to the issue?
•   Any previous legislative action related to the issue?

    3) Possible Solutions and Impact. Provide specific recommendations to solve the
    problem. Keep in mind each issue may have multiple and /or competing solutions. Feel
    free to include a more detailed discussion of each proposed solution. This section should
    also include the impact of the proposed solution, including:

•   Will the proposed change impact any entities or interest groups?
•   How will the performance of the school be impacted by the proposed change?
•   What are the benefits of the recommended change?
•   What is the fiscal impact of the proposed change?

    Please complete this section for each policy issue. Copy and paste boxes A through C as
    many times as needed to discuss each issue.




    Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 103 of 121
A. Brief Description of Issue

One area of concern involves the Windham salary schedule and the ability of the district
to be competitive in salaries with specific geographic areas of the state and with certain
personnel positions.

B. Discussion

Windham pays its teachers at each of its facilities comparable to what the local school
district pays its teachers up to a maximum of $3,804 above the state salary schedule.
Local school districts pay their teachers up to $12,860 above the state salary schedule.
This wide disparity in salaries puts Windham at a distinct disadvantage in the recruitment
and retention of quality teachers. Administrative and support personnel positions are
associated with the salaries paid to teachers, so these positions are affected as well.

Traditionally, WSD has had difficulty attracting applicants in certain parts of the state,
particularly metropolitan areas where educators are paid higher salaries. El Paso, Austin,
Dallas, and Edinburgh are specific areas that the district has had the most difficulty in
attracting applicants. One particular teaching area that has been problematic is the
recruitment of vocational teachers for computer courses. Potential applicants with
degrees and appropriate computer skills are not interested in the salary Windham is able
to offer. Similarly, the district has difficulty in attracting applicants for diagnostician,
counselor and principal positions because of the low salaries.



C. Possible Solutions and Impact

A comprehensive study of the district's salary schedule is needed. Such a study should
compare Windham salaries with not only local school districts, but should consider the
salary structure of the Texas Youth Commission since it has facilities across the state like
Windham. The participation of the Texas Education Agency in the study would lend
expertise and objectivity, and possibly, assist with obtaining support in the legislature if it
is determined that increased appropriations are needed to bring Windham salaries in line
with those of public schools and/or the Texas Youth Commission.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 104 of 121
A. Brief Description of Issue

There is a need to establish a process by which the operations and programs of the
Windham School District are externally evaluated on a periodic basis.

B. Discussion

Public school systems in Texas are reviewed by the State under the public school
accountability system. A similar system should be developed and administered on a
periodic basis for WSD to ensure that the district is operating effectively and efficiently.
Currently, WSD has developed its own internal accountability system as a means to
evaluate the effectiveness of the district’s schools, and this internal system should
continue to be utilized. In addition, WSD has adopted a set of education standards for the
operation of its programs, and these standards could possibly be the basis of accreditation
standards with TEA. [See Appendix E: WSD Policy 1.07, Standards for Educational
Programs] The development and periodic implementation of an external review would
enhance the credibility of school district performance data and provide an objective view
of school district performance and operations. This process would ensure both internal
and external review and evaluation.

The recent Criminal Justice Policy Council (CJPC) studies have provided a wealth of
data about the WSD programs and performance. With the elimination of the CJPC, there
is currently no organization in place to undertake future studies of this nature.

C. Possible Solutions and Impact

Funding to develop an external accountability system for WSD should be allocated. The
system could be developed under the direction of the TEA or by contract with external
consultants/contractors. A timeline for the development and an implementation schedule
of the accountability system should be required. Consultation is needed between WSD
and TEA to agree on accreditation standards for the district and periodic review by TEA.
Such a process would ensure oversight by TEA and provide TEA officials with more
visibility of WSD programs and operations.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                   Page 105 of 121
Section IX. Comments

Please provide any additional information needed to gain a preliminary understanding of
the school.

How does Windham School District assist the Texas Department of
Criminal Justice?

•    Through a shared database, WSD assists the TDCJ with data and statistics pertaining
     to education.

•    WSD provides literacy and reintegration programs that assist the TDCJ in fulfilling
     obligations outlined in the following:
         o Government Code §501.005 Literacy Programs
         o Government Code §501.096 Reentry Program for Long-Term Inmates

•    WSD provides additional librarians to support operation of the libraries.

•    Offenders with improved reading skills are better able to fully participate in other
     TDCJ treatment/rehabilitation programs.

•    Offenders with limited English proficiency participate in the English as a Second
     Language (ESL) program, learning to speak and understand English. The offenders
     are then better able to communicate with correctional staff and better able to
     understand and follow oral and written directions. This results in less need for TDCJ
     to provide interpreters, and fewer disciplinary incidents caused by language barriers.

•    Federal law (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) requires the provision of
     Special Education services to offenders with disabilities. The WSD Special
     Education program assists TDCJ by meeting the unique educational needs of
     offenders with learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional disturbance,
     orthopedic impairments, vision impairments (blind) and hearing impairments (deaf).

•    The WSD Cognitive Intervention program is specifically designed to meet the
     legislated goals to reduce recidivism and provide incentives for offenders to behave in
     positive ways during confinement. The curriculum is designed to help offenders
     overcome criminal thinking and behavior and teach them problem-solving skills. In
     1999, a disciplinary study indicated a 38.3% reduction in the number of disciplinary
     cases for program completers. Sixty-one percent of the program completers exhibited
     a reduction in the number of disciplinary cases. This results in a significant cost
     savings for the TDCJ. With regard to reductions in recidivism, a recent study by the
     Criminal Justice Policy Council indicated that the program had a positive impact on
     high-risk offenders. The recidivism rate for high-risk offenders who completed the
     program was 26.7% compared to a 35.5% recidivism rate for high-risk offenders who
     did not complete the program [Source: Biennial Report to the 78th Texas Legislature, January
     2003 (page 42)]. The CJPC approximated the cost of the Cognitive Intervention
     program to be $497 per offender. The potential cost savings to the TDCJ (fewer

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 106 of 121
     disciplinary cases) as well as the cost savings to taxpayers (reduction in recidivism)
     yield a significant return on this investment.

•    WSD provides a pre-release (reintegration) program that plays a vital role for the
     TDCJ in meeting the needs of offenders with early release votes. Completion of the
     CHANGES program fulfills the Parole Board requirement for participation in a
     rehabilitation program in order to qualify for early release. During the 2002-2003
     school year, 27,343 offenders participated in the CHANGES program.

•    WSD vocational training supports Texas Correctional Industries (TCI). For example,
     offenders who successfully complete the WSD truck driving program work as truck
     drivers; offenders who complete the WSD drafting program may work in the
     Geographical Information System (GIS) facility; offenders who complete the WSD
     computer maintenance technician program may work in the computer recovery
     plants; offenders who complete the WSD sheet metal or welding programs may work
     in the Stainless Steel and Metal Fabrication facilities.

• The apprenticeship and OJT programs operated throughout the TDCJ are coordinated
     through WSD. WSD is responsible for the procedural guidelines, coordination of the
     program, approval of training plans and programs, the maintenance and distribution
     of the list of approved occupations, and the awarding of completion certificates.
     WSD contracts with instructors to provide the required classroom component of the
     apprenticeship program.

•    When the recidivism rate is lower, there may be a cost avoidance for Texas in
     that new prisons may not need to be built. There is no savings for TDCJ when
     recidivism is reduced because of Education. The prisons remain relatively full
     regardless of the recidivism rate. The average cost per day in FY 02 according
     to the Criminal Justice Policy Council was $44.01 per day with a four-year
     average length of stay. This would equate to a $64,000 cost avoidance per
     offender that did not recidivate.

Why should WSD continue to be an entity that is separate and distinct
from TDCJ?

•    WSD has a single focus—providing quality correctional education programs for
     offenders. The TDCJ is a massive agency with approximately 40,000 employees and
     a myriad of criminal justice responsibilities. The WSD budget would only
     approximate 2.5% of the TDCJ budget. Given the complexity of the TDCJ mission,
     education might receive low priority and become just another one of the many things
     they do.

•    As a school district, WSD receives Foundation School Program (FSP) funding. FSP
     funds are dedicated by law and cannot be diverted to other uses. Use of FSP funds
     mandates accountability and ensures quality of education through compliance
     monitoring and financial audits by TEA.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 107 of 121
•    Recognition as a local education agency (LEA) qualifies WSD for participation in the
     state-adopted textbook program and for receipt of federal educational grant monies.
     WSD currently receives federal grants under Title I, Title II, Title IV, Title V, IDEA-
     B, and Carl Perkins. For the 2003-2004 fiscal year, these federal grants total
     $1,821,607.

•    Recognition as a school district assures the provision of certified teachers. Offenders
     exhibit a history of academic failure, significant educational deficits, and a high
     incidence of learning disabilities. The wide array of learner needs, abilities, rates of
     learning and behavioral deficits that offenders manifest are not typical of the public
     school or adult education free world classrooms. Offenders need highly qualified
     professional teachers; in fact, they need the best teachers.

•    As an educational entity, WSD has worked diligently to establish collaborative
     partnerships with free world businesses and industry (e.g., National Center for
     Construction Education and Research, Associated General Contractors, Associated
     Builders & Contractors). In so doing, industry representatives have become familiar
     with the quality of WSD educational programs, have donated equipment and
     materials to WSD shops, and have provided industry training for WSD teachers.
     Through these industry associations, WSD has developed an extensive list of
     potential employers for ex-offenders.

•    The Andersen Consulting firm, contracted by TEA in 1990 to conduct a
     programmatic and governance study of Windham School District, addressed quality
     assurance. “Defining Windham’s status as a semi-independent school district [i.e.,
     accredited and funded through TEA] is critical to the continued success of Windham
     programs and hence to the accomplishment of both TDCJ and TEA goals.” [Report on
     the Comprehensive Study of the Windham School System, Texas Education Agency, June 1990]

•    During a performance review by the State Comptroller’s office in 1992, auditors took
     the position that Windham should continue to be accredited and monitored by TEA
     against standards established specifically for such a unique school district. [Schools
     Behind Bars: Windham School System and Other Prison Education Programs, Texas Performance
     Review, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, December 1992]

What effectiveness studies have been conducted on Windham School
District?

•    WSD has been the subject of a number of studies and reviews in the last 12 years.

     •    A Comprehensive Study of the Windham School System, Andersen Consulting,
          1990
     •    Performance Audit Report of Windham Schools and Project RIO, Office of State
          Auditor, August 1990
     •    Performance Review: Schools Behind Bars, Windham School System and Other
          Prison Education Programs, Comptroller of Public Accounts, December 1992
     •    An Overview of the Windham School District, Criminal Justice Policy Council,
          February 2000

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                          Page 108 of 121
     •    Educational Achievement of Inmates in the Windham School District, Criminal
          Justice Policy Council, April 2000
     •    Impact of Educational Achievement of Inmates in the Windham School District on
          Post-Release Employment, Criminal Justice Policy Council, June 2000
     •    Impact of Educational Achievement of Inmates in the Windham School District on
          Recidivism, Criminal Justice Policy Council, August 2000
     •    Select Committee—Interim Report to the 77th Texas Legislature, 2000
     •    District Effectiveness and Compliance (DEC), Texas Education Agency, May
          2003

What cost savings are associated with correctional education?

•    Numerous studies over the years in many states have demonstrated an inverse
     relationship between level of educational attainment and recidivism (the higher the
     level of educational attainment, the lower the recidivism level). However, with the
     multiple, complex variables involved, obtaining cost data to substantiate this
     relationship is elusive—even in the hands of trained research experts.

•    While it appears that increases in educational attainment and decreases in recidivism
     co-occur, rates of change in recidivism do not imply a causal relationship with
     programmatic experience. Without well-designed experimental or quasi-
     experimental research designs, programs cannot be isolated and studied in terms of
     causal relationships. Numerous questions surround construction of an experimental
     design, and additional resources would be needed to engage in experimental research.
     For credibility purposes, this process would best be performed by an external source.

•    In the past, the Criminal Justice Policy Council performed studies related to
     reductions in recidivism. It is our understanding that this activity now falls under the
     auspices of the Legislative Budget Board.

•    Recidivism studies are complex and require access to various databases (e.g., TDCJ,
     DPS, Texas Workforce Commission, etc.). In theory, WSD might be allowed access
     to the various databases; however, the district does not have the analytical capacity to
     conduct recidivism studies on a routine basis. When the Criminal Justice Policy
     Council conducted the studies of WSD, it is our understanding that they had at least
     five people working on the project for approximately 18 months. To study the impact
     of WSD programs on recidivism, WSD participants would have to be tracked by
     program participation, grade level attainment, and other relevant factors such as age
     and risk level. Participants would have to be matched by control factors (e.g., age,
     grade level at entry, risk factor) and compared to non-participants. After release,
     participants and non-participants would have to be tracked for 1, 2, or 3 years. WSD
     does not have the capacity or the resources to conduct complex, comprehensive
     studies of this magnitude. WSD would need an in-house core of analytical experts
     who could design and conduct such studies on a continuous basis.

•    With respect to WSD, previous studies by the Criminal Justice Policy Council have
     indicated that WSD educational programs have a positive impact on the reduction of

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                    Page 109 of 121
     recidivism. The reduction of recidivism may be viewed in general as a cost
     avoidance for the State.

•    Ex-offenders, who have completed higher levels of education, are more likely to
     attain meaningful employment at a living wage, become taxpayers, and are likely to
     be less reliant on assistance from social service agencies.

 Studies Related to Return on Investment
•    The Correctional Education Association received a grant from the U.S. Department of
     Education, Office of Correctional Education, to study the impact of prison education
     on post-release recidivism and employment. The study involved more than 3,000
     inmates released from Maryland, Minnesota, and Ohio in 1997-98. The results of the
     study indicated that correctional education participants had lower recidivism rates for
     re-arrest, re-conviction and re-incarceration. Correctional education reduced
     reincarceration rates by 23% (from 31% to 22%). Based on the cost of incarceration
     for one year, every dollar spent on education returned more than two dollars in
     savings. There were also uncalculated savings in welfare costs, the reduction in
     police and court processing costs, and the reduction in crime. [Three State Recidivism
     Study, Correctional Education Association, September 2001]

•    A 1997 study, Costs-Consequences Analysis for Florida’s Workforce Development
     Programs, indicated that the money invested in correctional education in the state of
     Florida has had a positive return on investment for Florida taxpayers.
•    “One million dollars spent on correctional education prevents about 640 crimes, while
     that same money invested in incarceration prevents 350 crimes. Correctional
     education is almost twice as cost effective as a crime control policy.”
     “Additionally, correctional education may actually create long-run net cost savings.
     Inmates who participate in education programs are less likely to return to prison. For
     each re-incarceration prevented by education, states save about $20,000. One million
     dollars invested in education would prevent 26 re-incarcerations, for net savings of
     $600,000 in the future.”
     “Clearly, spending on prison education saves states money in the long run due to the
     prevented re-incarcerations of its participants. But states will not save this money if
     they do not make this investment—prisoners will just keep coming back.” [Correctional
     Education as a Crime Control Program, UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research,
     Department of Policy Studies, Prepared for the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Correctional
     Education, 2003]

Considerations

•    The mission of Windham School District is to reduce recidivism by assisting
     offenders in becoming responsible, productive members of their communities. All
     WSD programs are specifically designed to achieve that mission.

•    Data indicates that 77,950 offenders are currently within five years of projected
     release. These offenders will return to their communities. With the current downturn
     in the economy, those with less education and fewer skills will be hardest hit,
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                               Page 110 of 121
     particularly ex-offenders who often have greater difficulty securing employment. Ex-
     offenders who have not attained a high school diploma or GED, or who have not had
     vocational training, have minimal chances for employment. Ex-offenders who cannot
     obtain employment in occupations that pay a living wage often resort back to criminal
     activity to survive.

•    Recidivism is detrimental to our state. It equates to an increase in criminal activity,
     unsafe communities, more citizens being victimized, and continued expense to
     incarcerate those who, studies indicate, would likely have chosen a different path if
     the opportunity for education and job training had been provided for them during
     their first incarceration. WSD fights crime through education.

•    Research indicates that education is the most effective and economical method of
     lowering recidivism.

•    Windham School District is viewed as a national leader in correctional education and
     has a 30-year track record of demonstrated success. WSD programs provide hope to
     offenders who typically have little confidence in themselves to find employment and
     limited ability to visualize a productive future. The benefits offenders derive from
     correctional education programs are immeasurable.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                     Page 111 of 121
                                            Appendices



Appendix A - Programs Designed to Address Legislated Goals

Appendix B - Unit Classification

Appendix C – WSD Organizational Chart

Appendix D – Accountability Ratings

Appendix E – WSD Policy 1.07, Standards for Educational Programs

Appendix F – Annual Performance Report 2002-2003

Appendix G – WINDHAM, Spring 2003, Volume 9, Issue 2




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report               Page 112 of 121
                                                                                   Windham School District
                                                                         Programs Designed to Address Legislated Goals                                                         Appendix A

                                          Goal 1: Reduce Recidivism               Goal 2: Reduce Cost of                     Goal 3: Increase Success of            Goal 4: Provide Incentive to
                                                                                  Confinement                                Former Offenders in Obtaining          Behave in Positive Ways
                                                                                                                             and Maintaining Employment
Academic (Literacy)                       Increases in achievement are            Literate offenders are better able to      Provides GED credential leading to     Improves self-esteem
                                          associated with decreases in            read and understand rules, participate     better employment opportunities
                                          recidivism                              in treatment programs, etc.                upon release

English as a Second Language              Improved ability to communicate in      Provides assistance to TDCJ by             Improves ability to listen, speak,     Offenders are better able to
                                          English assists with daily living and   identifying and assisting offenders        understand and read English;           understand and follow signs, rules,
                                          employment                              who exhibit limited English                enhances the ability to secure         instructions, etc.
                                                                                  proficiency; reduces the need for          employment upon release
                                                                                  interpreters; reduces disciplinary
                                                                                  cases caused by language barriers

Career & Technology Education             Provides job-specific training to       Provides training for TDCJ industry        Provides job specific, entry-level     Improves self-esteem; vocational
(CTE)                                     entry-level industry standards in       jobs (e.g., boiler operators,              training to industry standards in      skills assist offenders in obtaining
                                          high-skill, high-wage careers;          construction workers, auto                 high-skill, high-wage careers          better job assignments within TDCJ
                                          employment reduces recidivism           mechanics, wastewater operators,
                                                                                  etc.)

CHANGES                                   Targets FI-R offenders or those         Addresses personal development,            Addresses career planning and          Satisfies early release requirements
                                          within two years of release; provides   interpersonal relations, health and        employment (finding and keeping a      for Parole Board
                                          life skills program specifically        wellness, victim awareness, etc.;          job)
                                          designed to prepare offenders for       satisfies early release requirements
                                          success upon release                    for Parole Board
Cognitive Intervention                    Targets offenders nearing release;      Targets offenders with institutional       Addresses employment-related “soft     Participation in program typically
                                          provides instruction in pro-social      adjustment problems; cost savings          skills” (e.g., goal setting, problem   results in improved behavior and
                                          attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors       realized in fewer disciplinary cases       solving, choices and consequences,     attitude
                                                                                                                             time management, etc.)
Parenting                                 Program supports the development        Parenting programs are provided at         Improved family                        Communication-based, interactive
                                          of healthy family relationships and     State Jails in response to family          relationships/dynamics fosters less    program
                                          teaches compassionate assertiveness,    support, community involvement and         dysfunctional behavior & improves
                                          empathic/active listening,              transition initiatives of the State Jail   stability                              Participants engage in an
                                          empowerment and other skills to         Division                                                                          introspective process of positive
                                          strengthen family relationships.                                                                                          personal change
Perspectives & Solutions                  Program addresses cultural diversity    Program provided at intake to assist       Program addresses cultural diversity   Offenders explore cultural diversity,
                                          and problem solving—concepts            offenders with adjustment to               and problem solving—concepts           personal identity, stereotypes,
                                          important in everyday life              incarceration                              important in the workplace             prejudice, and discrimination
                                                                                                                                                                    (including racial, ethnic, religious,
                                                                                  Program developed in response to                                                  gender, age, sexual orientation, and
                                                                                  legal option for judge to require                                                 physical disability). Students also
                                                                                  offenders convicted of hate crimes to                                             receive extensive exposure to
                                                                                  participate in a tolerance program                                                problem-solving techniques.

Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                             Page 113 of 121
                                                                                            Appendix B


II. UNIT CLASSIFICATION

A. Custody Levels

On the unit/facility, an offender is given a custody designation, which indicates several things. It tells
where and with whom he will live, how much supervision he will need, and what job he can be assigned
to.

An offender's custody level depends on his current institutional behavior, his previous institutional
behavior, and his current offense and sentence length. If he violates rules, he will be placed in a more
restrictive custody. If he complies with the rules, he will be assigned a less restrictive custody level.

Institutional Division Custody Levels:              State Jail Division Custody Levels:

1.   Maximum, (Administrative Segregation)                  1.   Special Management
2.   General Population Level 5 (G5)                        2.   High Risk (J5)
3.   General Population Level 4 (G4)                        3.   Medium 2 (J4)
4.   General Population Level 3 (G3)                        4.   Medium 1 (J2)
5.   General Population Level 2 (G2)                        5.   Low Risk (J1)
6.   General Population Level 1 (G1)

Maximum custody, Special Management or Administrative Segregation refers to offenders who must
be separated from the general population because they are dangerous, either to other offenders or staff,
or they are in danger from other offenders. Additionally, offenders who, according to the SCC, are
members of security threat groups designated by TDCJ, may be given this custody level. These offenders
leave their cells, for the most part, only for showers and limited recreation. Offenders assigned to
Administrative Segregation in expansion cellblocks do not leave their cells to shower due to the physical
configuration of the cells.

General Population Level 5 (G5) custody or High-Risk custody refers to offenders who have assaultive
or extensive disciplinary records. G5 custody offenders must live in cells. They may not work outside the
security fence without direct, armed supervision.

General Population Level 4 (G4) custody or Medium 2 means the offender must live in a cell, with few
exceptions, and may work outside the security fence under direct armed supervision.

General Population Level 3 (G3) refers to offenders who may live in dorms or cells inside the main
building of the unit. G3 offenders are ineligible to live in dorms outside the main building of a unit, inside
the security fence. G3 offenders will be generally assigned to field force and secure jobs inside the
perimeter as designated by the Warden. They may work outside the security fence under direct armed
supervision.

General Population Level 2 (G2) or Medium 1 custody refers to offenders who may live in dorms or
cells inside the security fence. They may work outside the security fence under direct armed supervision.

General Population Level 1 (G1) or Low Risk custody allows offenders to live in dorms outside the
security fence. They may work outside the security fence with periodic unarmed supervision.

Note: Offenders in all of the above general population custody levels may also be given a safekeeping
status if they need some level of protection from other offenders.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                             Page 114 of 121
                                                                                                                                                                          Appendix C


                                                                                  WINDHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT
                                                                                     Central Administration


                                                                                                  Board of Trustees
                                                                                          Christina Melton Crain, Chairman




                                                                     Public Information
                                                                                                     Superintendent                   General Counsel
                                                                           Officer
                                                                                                    Dr. Ron Bradford                   Mike Durham
                                                                       Bambi Kiser




                                              Administrative                                                                                                 Administrative
                                                Assistant                                                                                                      Assistant
                                               Kelly Hoot                                                                                                   Charlene Moriarty




                                                                                              Division of Administrative and
               Department of Human Resources            Division of Operational Support             Business Services             Division of Instruction    Division of Continuing Education
                Dr. Jim Hamilton, Administrator             Richard Yawn, Director                    David McNutt,              Marjie Haynes, Director            Bob Evans, Director
                                                                                                  Chief Financial Officer




                                                                                              Regional Administrators
                                                                                                  Dr. Judi Benestante
                                                                                                    Gerald Bennett
                                                                                                    David Chagoya
                                                                                                      Bruno Mata




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                                                      Page 115 of 121
                                                                              Appendix D




               Number of Campuses in Each Accountability Rating
                                          By District and Region
                                                2001-2002
                                Exemplary      Recognized        Acceptable          Low
                                                                                  Performing
WSD                                    7            27               42                6
Region I                               1            3                 8                1
Region II                              2            4                10                2
Region III                             2            4                 8                1
Region IV                              0            9                 7                1
Region V                               2            7                 9                1



               Number of Campuses in Each Accountability Rating
                                          By District and Region
                                                2002-2003
                                Exemplary      Recognized        Acceptable          Low
                                                                                  Performing
WSD                                    7            23               43                9
Region I                               1            4                 7                1
Region II                              2            2                12                2
Region III                             0            8                 5                2
Region IV                              1            5                 8                2
Region V                               3            4                11                2




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                Page 116 of 121
                                                                                Appendix E



Standards for Educational Programs                                                                     1.07
                                                                                              (04-05-01)


Administration                                                                                     1.07-1

1.      There is a policies and procedures manual for the governance of educational programs and
        evidence of implementation and practice of those policies and procedures. The policy and
        procedures manual should cover at a minimum: administration of education programs,
        program development and improvement, student management, and daily program operations.

2.      A complete set of policies and procedures is available at an accessible location in the school.

3.      Each facility has a certified educator responsible for the instructional program and the
        coordination and supervision of educational staff.

4.      The education program is primarily funded with funds designated for education purposes only
        and is sufficient to provide adequate services.

5.      The chief correctional education position in the state administers a line item budget for the
        system-wide correctional education program and/or for each separate institutional education
        program.

6.      There is a written policy and procedure governing offender participation in educational
        programs, which complies with TDCJ directives.

7.      The overall unit schedule is designed to accommodate the instructional time frames required
        for education programs.

8.      Offender workers are available to assist in the school’s operation.

9.      Academic programming through high school or GED and secondary level vocational training
        are provided to students at no cost.

10.     There is system-wide evidence of implementation and practice for education program
        evaluation.

11.     Evaluations are used for program planning, improvements and accountability purposes.

12.     There is a process for providing educational input into both the system-wide and the
        institutional classification system.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 117 of 121
13.     School calendar is established to meet a minimum of 220 days.

Curriculum and Instruction                                                                        1.07-2

14.     Written policy, procedure, and practice provide for a comprehensive education program,
        available to all offenders who are eligible, that includes the following:

        •       Educational philosophy and goals
        •       Literacy instruction focusing on adult basic education and GED preparation
        •       Special education
        •       English as a Second Language
        •       Vocational education
        •       Pre-release/life skills
        •       Community college and university post-secondary education programs
        •       Other education programs as dictated by the needs of the offender population

15.     Appropriate curricular resources are used to provide an instructional framework for all
        programs, courses.

16.     Appropriate instructional strategies (that support the instructional framework) are evidenced,
        including teaching in a relevant context and the use of other principles of brain-based
        learning.

17.     Literacy curricular resources contain employment skills and workplace (SCANS)
        competencies.

18.     Accommodations are made for students with language and learning problems; special
        programs (Special Education, ESL), which comply with applicable laws and regulations, are
        available for students who need specialized instruction.

19.     Instructional materials are appropriate for adult offenders and sufficient for appropriate
        instruction. Equipment, supplies, materials and facility are appropriate for courses/programs
        taught.

20.     Literacy classes are grouped according to functional level of students, where possible.

21.     Appropriate safety measures are followed in CTE classes.

22.     CTE projects are appropriate to the course/program being taught and comply with TDCJ
        directives.

23.     Full time secondary level CTE instructors teach courses designed to meet entry-level industry
        standards.

24.     There is a written policy or procedure for student/teacher ratio(s) appropriate for each
        course/program.

25.     An incentive system is utilized to recognize students for educational attainment.
Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 118 of 121
26.     Educational programs allow for scheduling which enables open entry and exit and education
        schedules maximize student attendance.

Personnel and Training                                                                             1.07-3

27.     Written policy and procedure provide for the selection, retention, evaluation, professional
        growth, and promotion of education personnel on the basis of specified qualifications and
        state and federal law.

28.     All professional education staff involved in the delivery of educational services must be
        certified by State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) for their assignment.

29.     The education staff is compensated at rates at least commensurate with the Texas Education
        Agency state salary schedule based on degree, experience and assignment.

30.     New correctional education staff is provided a minimum of 40 hours of pre-service orientation
        and training which includes the procedures and principles of providing educational services in
        a correctional setting.

31.     Correctional educational staff receives 40 hours of in-service training each year.

32.     There is an average annual turnover of professional staff of 10% or less for the previous 5-
        year period, which is not to include employment separation due to illness, death, disability or
        retirement.

33.     Contracted personnel (substitutes, college and part-time instructors) are provided appropriate
        orientation and training.

34.     Teacher performance is evaluated by an appropriately trained and certified education
        administrator using an approved evaluation instrument.

35.     The performance of non-teaching staff is evaluated annually according to policy.

36.     Substitutes are utilized as needed to provide continued instruction.

Counseling and Testing                                                                             1.07-4

37.     There is policy and procedure(s) and evidence of implementation and practice for educational
        counseling services for students.

38.     Each school has an on-going orientation program to inform prospective students of available
        educational programs including requirements and established admission criteria.

39.     There is an intake process, which includes initial screening, assessment, and evaluation to
        determine the educational needs of each offender.



Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                       Page 119 of 121
40.     Appropriate procedures are developed for assessment and placement in all programs
        according to education criteria.

41.     Placement procedures for CTE and pre-release programs are appropriate so that students can
        successfully accumulate skills and contact hours for completing the course.

42.     Educational achievement tests are administered to incoming offenders in a timely manner and
        are administered a minimum of three times a year to students.

43.     Staff administering TABE and GED is trained in appropriate test administration.

44.     Appropriate security procedures are followed for test administration and storage of TABE and
        GED test booklets.

45.     Appropriate criteria are followed for identifying students eligible to take GED.

46.     Potential CTE students receive vocational assessment and career path counseling prior to
        placement in CTE courses.

Student Records                                                                                   1.07-5

47.     Appropriate personnel are responsible for orienting offenders concerning workforce
        programs, and collecting and providing documents which establish work eligibility.

48.     Daily attendance records are maintained for each class and the facility compiles and maintains
        both monthly and yearly totals of contact hours.

49.     Student participation records (SPRs) are maintained showing: date of enrollment, drop date,
        attendance hours, and certificates earned for each class.

50.     Educational achievement scores and GED results for individual students are maintained and
        posted in a timely manner.

51.     Analysis of test results is performed on a regular basis to monitor student progress and
        evaluate programs.

Library Services                                                                                  1.07-6

52.     The facility maintains and/or provides comprehensive library services that include, but are not
        limited to, a reference collection containing general and specialized materials, and planned
        and continuous acquisition of materials to meet the needs of the education staff and offenders.

53.     An appropriately SBEC certified staff member who assists in coordinating and supervising
        library services is available to the institution.

54.     Written policy, procedure, and practice provide for the selection, training and use of offenders
        as library assistants according to TDCJ directives.


Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 120 of 121
55.     School library has sufficient holdings.

56.     The library schedule provides required weekly access to offender population.

Continuing Education                                                                              1.07-7

57.     There is system-wide policy and procedure(s) and evidence of implementation for post
        secondary educational programs.

58.     Offenders are responsible for all college tuition, fees and test costs associated with college
        courses. The offenders must either pay the cost at registration or agree to reimburse the state
        after release as a condition as parole.

59.     All faculty and staff that provide instruction to offenders students are employed by the college
        and are supervised by the college.

60.     All contracts with colleges, universities and proprietary schools are approved by WSD
        Division of Continuing Education.

61.     Financial aid arrangements for college programs are provided by the contracting
        colleges/universities and must be approved by the WSD Division of Continuing Education.




Windham School District Self-Evaluation Report                                      Page 121 of 121

				
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