Cornwall County Council

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					Cornwall County Council
Highways: Network Management

January 2002




          Best Value Inspection
               Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management



Best value
        The Government has placed a duty of best value on local councils to
        deliver services to clear standards – of cost and quality – by the most
        economic, efficient and effective means available. Best value is a
        challenging new performance framework that requires councils to
        publish annual best value performance plans and review all their
        services every fi ve years.

        Councils must show that they have applied the 4Cs of best value to
        every review:
        ! challenging why and how a service is being provided;
        ! comparing their performance with others’ (including organisations
          in the private and voluntary sectors);
        ! embracing fair competition as a means of securing efficient and
          effective services; and
        ! consulting with local taxpayers, customers and the wider
          business community.
        Councils must demonstrate to local people that they are achieving
        continuous improvement in all of their services. The Government has
        decided that each council should be scrutinised by an independent
        inspectorate, so that the public will know whether best value is being
        achieved. The purpose of the inspection and of this report is to:
        ! enable the public to see whether best value is being delivered;
        ! enable the inspected body to see how well it is doing;
        ! enable the Government to see how well its policies are working
          on the ground;
        ! identify failing services where remedial action may be necessary;
          and
        ! identify and disseminate best practice.
        The Local Government Act 1999 requires all best value councils to
        make arrangements to secure continuous improvement in the way
        their functions are exercised, having regard to a combination of
        economy, efficiency and effectiveness. From 1 April 2000, best value
        councils must prepare best value performance plans for each
        financial year and conduct best value reviews for all their functions
        over a fi ve-year cycle. This report has been prepared by the Audit
        Commission (‘the Commission’) following an inspection under
        Section 10 of the Local Government Act 1999, and issued by the
        Commission in accordance with its duty under Section 13 of the 1999
        Act.


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Contents
Best value                                                                    2

1   Summary and recommendations                                               4

             Scoring                                                          5

             Recommendations                                                  7

2   Profiling Cornwall County Council                                         9

             The locality                                                     9

             Cornwall County Council                                         10

             Highways: network management in Cornwall County Council         12

             The Council’s best value review                                 14

3   Findings: How good are the services?                                     17

             Are the Council’s aims clear and challenging?                   17

             Does the service meet the aims?                                 19

             How does performance compare?                                   24

4   Findings: What are the prospects for improvement?                        32

             Does the best value review drive improvement?                   32

             How good is the improvement plan?                               35

             Will the Council deliver the improvements?                      38

5   Appendix: What did the inspectors do?                                    40

             Documents examined                                              40

             Reality checks undertaken                                       41

             Interviews conducted                                            41




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                Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management



1 Summary and recommendations
Summary

      1   Cornwall is the westernmost part of England’s south-west
          peninsula, covering an area of 354,920 hectares. Because of its
          geography and location, Cornwall has retained much of its unique
          culture. There are many Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and
          farming plays an important role in the local economy. It is divided
          into six districts. It has a population of nearly half a million people.
      2   The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for Cornwall in 1995 was
          £3,476 million. This was the second lowest in the country after the
          Isle of Wight, and was 71.5 per cent of the UK average and 68.8
          per cent of the European Union average. The average gross weekly
          earnings for full-time adult employees in April 1999 were the lowest
          in Great Britain, being £297.10 compared with an average of
          £400.10.
      3   To reflect the economic situation, Cornwall has been designated as
          an ‘Objective 1’ area. Objective 1 is the highest priority designation
          for European aid to help reduce differences in social and economic
          conditions within the European Union. Money is available from
          European Union budgets for projects in Cornwall that will help to
          raise prosperity to a level above 75 per cent of the European Union
          average. The European money will have to be matched with
          funding through grants from various public bodies and from the
          private sector.
      4   Cornwall County Council employs 9,646 (full-time equivalent) staff
          and has an overall budget of £380 million for the 2001/02 financial
          year. Capital expenditure for 2001/02 is planned at £44.3 million.
      5   No political group has a majority. There are 79 councillors:
          Conservatives 9, independent 24, Labour 9, Liberal 1, Liberal
          Democrats 35 and others 1. The Council has replaced the
          traditional committee system with a nine-member Executive with a
          Leader. Each Executive Member has responsibility for a service
          portfolio. There are four Policy Development and Scrutiny
          committees, a Planning (Development Control) Committee,
          Regulatory Board and a Standards Committee.
      6   During late August and early September 2000 we inspected the
          Network Management (Highways) Services of the County Council.
          Cornwall has 266 km of trunk roads funded from central
          government. The County Council maintains 7,173 km of county
          roads, including 476 km of principal (A) and 577 km of (B) roads.
          There are 4,306 km of public rights of way and 288 km of the
          National Cycle Network.


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                            Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


           7      The review had initially been identified as dealing with the theme of
                  ‘transport and the economy’; this is one of the principal themes in
                  the local transport plan (LTP). However, from the documents we
                  examined prior to the on-site inspection it was clear that the review
                  related almost totally to highways network management issues. At
                  the initial briefing we therefore advised the Council that we would
                  examine the review for highways network management only. The
                  wider economic issues will need to be picked up in the economic
                  development review that starts this year.

Scoring
           8      We have assessed the Council as providing a ‘Good’ two-star
                  service which has promising prospects for improvement.1 Our
                  judgements are based on the evidence obtained during the
                  inspection and are outlined below.



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1
  The scoring chart displays performance in two dimensions. The horizontal axis shows how good
the service or function is now, on a scale ranging from no stars for a service that is poor (at the left-
hand end) to three stars for an excellent service (right-hand end). The vertical axis shows the
improvement prospects of the service, also on a four-point scale.




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           Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


9    We believe that the highways network management service is a
     ‘Good’ two-star service. Cornwall County Council has developed
     the services provided in a manner that is generally very well
     regarded by stakeholders. They perform in the best 25 per cent
     nationally in many cases and take into account the views of local
     people. Positive features displayed include:

     ! links between the different aims of the service and the Council;

     ! effective management with a commitment to meeting the overall
       aims;

     ! good range of partnerships with consultation generally well
       handled;

     ! a call centre that was highly regarded by users; and

     ! most national performance indicators demonstrated best 25 per
       cent performance.

10   However, some aspects do require further attention:

     ! Not all aims were easily measurable and were therefore difficult
       to challenge.

     ! There was no clear link through to several Objective 1 issues,
       particularly the ‘Connecting Cornwall’ project.

     ! Not all partnerships were fully effecti ve.

     ! Some of the benchmarking work needed to be advanced to
       develop key local performance indicators.

11   There were a number of reasons why we judge that the service has
     promising prospects for improvement:

     ! Staff and councillors have a strong commitment to improve the
       service.

     ! Parts of the service have been challenged and councillors are
       aware that a focus on results is necessary.

     ! Consultation has been quite extensive and linked to the local
       transport plan issues.

     ! Resources are in place to support improvement.

     ! There is a good track record of the service making
       improvements.


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                 Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


      12   Alongside these positive points, we considered that the service had
           some areas where further improvements could still be made:

           ! Scoping of the themed services needs to be more clearly
             defined so that resources are effectively deployed.

           ! External stakeholders need to play a greater part in the process.

           ! The action plans need to have a greater focus on outcomes that
             will benefit users.

           ! More of the actions carried out should be exposed to
             competition.



Recommendations

      13   We recommend that the Council should:

           ! improve services to the community and partners by ensuring
             that the actions set out in the improvement plan are focused on
             ‘SMART’ outcomes (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic
             and timetabled) - with clear links to the local transport plan (LTP)
             and the County Council’s own programmes (by March 2002);

           ! improve users’ awareness of service issues by publicising the
             services’ standards on issues like complaints and response
             times (by March 2002 and continuing);

           ! continue to improve customer service by establishing whether
             the Call Centre can be used to support other county services (by
             April 2002); and

           ! provide a clearly and consistently competitive service, by
             carrying out market testing of those services which have so far
             had no detailed evaluation (by autumn 2002).




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                  Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


Acknowledgement

           We would like to thank the staff of Cornwall County Council who
           made us welcome and met our requests both efficiently and
           courteously.

           Mike Browne
           Trevor Smale
           Darren Gray
           Inspectors

           Best Value Inspection Service
           Audit Commission Southern Region
           Dominions House
           Lime Kiln Close
           Stoke Gifford
           Bristol
           BS34 8SR

           Tel: 0117 988 7700
           Fax : 0117 988 7701

           Email:      m-browne@audit-commission.gov.uk
                       d-gray@audit-commission.gov.uk
                       t-smale@ audit-commission.gov.uk

           Website:    www.bestvalueinspections.gov.uk




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2 Profiling Cornwall County Council
The locality
        14     Cornwall is the westernmost part of England’s south-west
               peninsula. It has an estimated 697 kilometres of coastline, and the
               sea forms the northern, southern and western boundaries. To the
               east, Cornwall borders Devon. The county has an area of 354,920
               hectares and is divided into six districts. The county is 132km long,
               and the distance between the north and south coasts varies from
               72km at the widest in the east, to only 8km in the west of the
               county. Despite a past history of mining, over a century of growth as
               a holiday area and some more recent development of
               manufacturing industry, Cornwall remains essentially rural in
               character.




        15     Cornwall had a population of 492,600 people in 1999. Small
               households (one- or two-person) containing people of pensionable
               age comprise over one-third of all households in the county. Less
               than one-third of the population live in towns of over 10,000
               inhabitants, compared with an average of four-fifths across the
               whole of England and Wales. Because of its geography and
               location, Cornwall has retained much of its unique culture. There
               are many Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and farming plays
               an important role in the local economy. The 1991 population census
               indicates that 99.5 per cent of the population of Cornwall and the
               Isles of Scilly was white.


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       16   The revised Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for Cornwall in 1995
            was £3,476 million. This was the second lowest in the country after
            the Isle of Wight. 1995 figures produced by the European Union in
            March 1998 show that Cornwall’s GDP is 71.5 per cent of the UK
            average and 68.8 per cent of the European Union average. The
            average gross weekly earnings for full-time adult employees in April
            1999 were the lowest in Great Britain, being £297.10 compared with
            an average of £400.10.

       17   In Cornwall 23 per cent of employment is in the public administration,
            education, health, recreation and welfare sector. Other major
            employment sectors are retail and wholesale (17.7 per cent), hotels
            and catering (10.1 per cent) and manufacturing (10.1 per cent). In
            November 2000 there were 9,311 people registered as unemployed
            in Cornwall. This represents 4.3 per cent of the total workforce. The
            average for Great Britain was 3.4 per cent. Unemployment in
            Cornwall had fallen by 19.3 per cent from November 1999, while the
            fall in unemployment for the whole of Great Britain was 12.9 per cent.

       18   Cornwall is an Objective 1 area. Objective 1 is the highest priority
            designation for European aid to help reduce differences in social
            and economic conditions within the European Union. Money is
            available from European Union budgets for projects in Cornwall that
            will help to raise prosperity to a level above 75 per cent of the
            European Union average. The European money will have to be
            matched with funding through grants from various public bodies and
            from the private sector.


Cornwall County Council
       19   Cornwall County Council employs 9,646 (full-time equivalent) staff
            and has an overall budget of £380 million for the 2001/02 financial
            year. Capital expenditure for 2001/02 is planned at £44.3 million.

       20   No political group has a majority. The total of 79 councillors is
            comprised of Conservative 9; Independent 24; Labour 9; Liberal 1;
            Liberal Democrat 35; and others 1. The Council has replaced the
            traditional committee system with a nine-member Executive with a
            Leader. Each Executive Member has responsibility for a service
            portfolio. There are four Policy Development and Scrutiny
            committees, a Planning (Development Control) Committee,
            Regulatory Board and a Standards Committee.




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21   The County Council’s mission is:

           ‘To ensure the provision of high quality services which
           enhance the social, economic and environmental well being of
           Cornwall.’

22   Its vision is:

           ‘To be the democratic body championing the aspirations of the
           whole of Cornwall.’

23   The County Council’s core values are quality, accessibility, fairness
     and sustainability. These are supported by seven aims:

     ! to provide leadership for the people of Cornwall and represent
       them locally, regionally, nationally and internationally;

     ! to promote the social well-being and independence of all
       individuals within the community;

     ! by promoting the achievement of high levels of educational
       attainment, to contribute to the social and economic well-being
       of the community;

     ! to provide a range of emergency and regulatory services locally
       that contribute to the community’s health and safety;

     ! to generate sustainable economic growth and use the
       opportunity offered by Objective 1 to increase absolute
       prosperity in Cornwall, bringing it in line with the UK average
       during the life of the programme;

     ! to recognise Cornwall’s natural and historic environment, its
       strong culture, heritage and local distinctiveness, and conserve
       these for the benefit of the community; and

     ! to undertake strategic land use and transport planning,
       development control and improvement of road safety,
       accessibility and integration, leading to a more efficient transport
       system.

24   The services for which the Council is responsible include strategic
     planning, transport and highways, personal social services,
     education, libraries, youth services, waste disposal, and consumer
     protection.




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Highways: network management in Cornwall County Council
       25   The railways and strategic network of major roads through the
            County, and the major ports, airports, and ferries, are shown below.




       26   The County has 266 km of trunk roads funded from central
            government and maintained by the Highways Agency through a
            supervisory contract with Mott Macdonald Ltd and a works contract
            with Amey plc. The County Council maintains 7,173 km of county
            roads, including 476 km of principal (A) and 577 km of (B) roads.
            Maintenance work for these is undertaken by the Council’s own in-
            house contractor CORMAC. There are 4,306 km of public rights of
            way and 288 km of the National Cycle Network.

       27   The rail network comprises a main line from Penzance to Plymouth
            and five branch lines to St. Ives, Falmouth, Newquay, Looe, and
            Gunnislake respectively.

       28   There are eight year-round river ferry crossings. A sea ferry
            operates from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly. Cornwall has a range
            of small and medium-sized ports. Of these, the most important ones
            are at Fowey and Par (serving the china clay industry), Falmouth
            (largely ship repair and some freight handling) and Truro.

       29   The county’s principal civil aviation facility is at Newquay Cornwall
            Airport providing daily scheduled services to London (Gatwick).
            Facilities are also provided at Penzance Heliport (helicopters) and
            the Land’s End Aerodrome (fixed wing) for scheduled services
            between the mainland and the Isles of Scilly.

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30   Transport services are administered from the Council’s Planning,
     Transportation and Estates Department. That department currently
     employs a total of 328 (full time equivalents) staff on highway and
     transport functions.

31   The County’s net revenue budget for highways and transportation
     was:

     ! 2000/01 - £35.4 million

     ! 2001/02 - £40.4 million

32   Capital Expenditure planned for 2001/02 is £15.8 million. Net
     service revenue expenditure for 2000/01 includes the following:

     ! Highway Maintenance - £21.8 million

     ! Transportation - £2.2 million
33   The Council’s aims and policy objectives for transport are set out in
     its local transport plan (LTP). They are stated below.

34   Aim - To reduce the adverse impact of transport, in order to
     promote health, and protect and enhance the built and natural
     environment.

     Objectives:

     ! to contribute to the reduction of forecast growth in CO2 and
       other harmful emissions from transport, through management of
       congestion and travel demands; and

     ! to increase the proportion of journeys made by sustainable and
       more energy-efficient forms of transport.

35   Aim - To contribute to an efficient local economy, and to support
     sustainable economic growth.

     Objectives:

     ! to cater for the efficient and effective movement of people and
       goods within Cornwall, and to reduce peripherality, through the
       maintenance of existing transport networks and by strategic
       investment to upgrade facilities; and

     ! to manage problems on the transport network to relieve
       congestion and improve efficiency.




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                  Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


       36   Aim - To promote accessibility to work, facilities and services for all
            people, especially those without a car.

            Objectives:

            ! to improve social inclusion by providing travel choice, especially
              in rural areas;

            ! to improve access to the transport system to enable the mobility-
              impaired to make journeys; and

            ! to support the retention of local retail, education, healthcare and
              leisure facilities so as to minimise the need to travel, and to
              foster the integrated delivery of services at the local level.

       37   Aim - To promote the integration of all forms of transport and
            reduce the need to travel through co-ordinated transport and land
            use planning.

            Objectives:

            ! to work in partnership to achieve an efficient and integrated
              transport system; and

            ! to ensure that patterns of future development maximise the
              scope for reducing the length and number of journeys,
              particularly by car, and encourage sustainable transport
              provision.

The Council’s best value review
       38   The review of ‘Highways and Transportation – Economy theme’
            commenced in April 2000 and a brief was agreed in August 2000.
            The brief was developed through an initial report and an options
            report into a final report. This went to the Council’s Community Life
            Scrutiny Committee and Executive Committee prior to agreement
            by the County Council.

       39   Management of the review process was through the:

            ! Service Review Board – composed of councillors and chief
              officers – responsible for the oversight and strategic direction of
              the review; and

            ! Service Review Team – composed of officers involved in the
              provision of the services and an ‘objective officer’ from another
              service area (in this case an IT specialist) – this has considered
              the detailed analysis and recommendations.


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40   The Council developed a ‘fundamental service review toolkit’ to
     support the review process. This gives guidance on the structure
     and role of service review teams, the planning of the review,
     analysis of information and the application of the 4Cs. The Council
     also has a consultation strategy.

41   The principal service areas (and their budgets) covered by this
     review were:


     Structural maintenance                        £ 11.398m

     Streetworks                                   £ 0.253m

     Traffic management                            £ 0.738m

     Road adoptions                                     N/A

     Area based initiatives                        £ 0.861m

     Highway structural maintenance                £ 1.953m

     Grant aided projects                          £ 0.171m

     Bridge assessment and strengthening           £ 2.148m


42   The options considered included:

     ! service delivery:

             ! communication and consultation;

             ! network management;

             ! organisation;

             ! funding and procurement;

     ! service specific:

             ! winter maintenance;

             ! highway maintenance;

             ! streetworks authority;

             ! road adoptions; and

             ! traffic management.


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43   The report combined a number of these options into single action
     plans and recommended actions in an implementation programme.
     Although the report was intended to be a ‘cross cutting best value
     review of the services… to explore how they contribute to an
     efficient local economy, and support regeneration and sustainable
     economic growth’ (source: service review brief), the outcome was a
     report focused on network management issues. With the agreement
     of the Council, this report deals with those highway network
     management issues, not the broader economic areas.




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3 Findings: How good are the services?

Are the Council’s aims clear and challenging?
       44   Inspectors look to see how a council has agreed the keys aims for
            the service being inspected, how clear these aims are to the people
            that receive the service and whether these reflect the corporate
            aims of the organisation as a whole.

       45   The aims of Cornwall County Council in respect of transport issues,
            as set out in the local transport plan, are as follows:

            ! reduce the adverse impact of transport, in order to promote
              health, and protect and enhance the built and natural
              environment;

            ! improve road safety for all travellers;

            ! contribute to an efficient local economy and to support
              sustainable economic growth;

            ! promote accessibility to work, facilities and services for all
              people, especially those without a car; and

            ! promote the integration of all forms of transport and reduce the
              need to travel, through co-ordinated transport and land use
              planning.

       46   It is important that a service has clearly stated aims which outline
            the main reasons for why it exists for customers. Cornwall County
            Council has set out clear aims as shown above, and these can
            easily be related to highway issues. For example, Cornwall County
            Council ensures the safety of its highway users in one way by
            repairing all dangerous road defects within 24 hours.

       47   These aims are connected to the needs of the customer on the
            highway. While undertaking the inspection, the following comments
            typify the response received by people representing the general
            public:

                 ‘Cornwall County Council is keeping up well with the
                 standards required on local roads.’ (Parish council representative)

                 ‘There were problems with a town centre project, Cornwall
                 County Council sensibly changed the plans after consultation
                 with us.’ (Town council representative)




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48   From investigations on site, it was obvious that the aims were
     widely known by both officers of the Council and those members of
     the public closely associated with the Council, such as parishes and
     town councils.

49   In our opinion the above aims have a clear link to the overall vision
     of the Council, that being:

     ! seeking and listening to the views of the whole community,
       being responsive to their needs and aspirations and involving
       them in shaping service delivery;

     ! seeking to provide effective services, by efficient and economic
       methods that strike the right balance between value for money
       and environmental sustainability;

     ! ensuring Cornwall’s interests are effectively represented
       nationally and regionally; and

     ! recognising the value of the contribution of every member of
       staff in achieving the departmental and corporate aims and
       objectives.

50   However, not all of these aims are easily measurable, and it will be
     difficult for the Council to check progress against these goals unless
     they can be measured. In addition, because they cannot easily be
     measured, it is also difficult to assess how challenging they are, as
     the Council cannot compare such aims with other councils or similar
     bodies.

51   The Council also needs to develop its links with a county-wide
     project called ‘Connecting Cornwall’. This project involves both the
     private and public sectors. It sets out to improve the road, rail, air,
     and sea transport links with the county as a key element of the
     delivery of the European Objective 1 programme. While undertaking
     the inspection we saw that the links between the highways network
     maintenance group and the delivery of the Connecting Cornwall
     strategy were not strong enough. This was despite the Director of
     Planning, Transportation and Estates chairing the working group
     and other officers having roles in the delivery frameworks. Officers
     with a potential interest did not always know about some of the
     projects within the strategy. These links need to be developed to
     maximise the use of resources and ensure a single connected
     vision for the future of the highways in Cornwall.




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                  Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


       52   Since the on site inspection, Connecting Cornwall has been
            awarded £165,000 of Objective 1 funding. This will enable projects
            to be developed. It should also enable closer links between the
            projects and highway network management.

       53   Finally, the outcome focus of the highways group is weak:

                 ‘The plan was weak in terms of outcomes.’ (Senior officer)

                 ‘Don’t really know what the improvements would be.’ (Senior
                 officer)

            The Council needs to identify these outcomes to ensure that they
            are achieving what they set out to achieve. Without such detailed
            outcomes it will be difficult to measure success.

Summary

       54   The aims of the highway network maintenance service are clear,
            with links to both corporate and wider objectives. They are
            consistent with community views, as demonstrated above.
            However, a lack of an outcome focus makes them less challenging.

Does the service meet the aims?
       55   Having considered the aims the Council has set for the service,
            inspectors make an assessment of how well the Council is
            performing in meeting these aims. This includes an assessment of
            performance against specific standards and targets and the
            Council’s approach to measuring whether it is actually delivering
            what it sets out to do.

       56   Both our investigations on site and our pre-inspection evidence
            shows that the service is well managed and staff at all levels have a
            strong commitment to meeting the aims of the service. This is
            further reinforced by the enthusiasm of staff towards their own
            personal progress within the field of highway network maintenance
            and related fields.

       57   Within the highways group, partnerships are being developed with
            the main interested group of the community b y invol ving chief
            officers. This practice ensures that the public is given evidence of
            the engagement of chief Council officers in the development of such
            partnerships, and provides access to these officers that would
            usually be difficult to achieve:

                 ‘Meeting with the chief executive and chief officers are
                 absolutely invaluable.’ (Town council representatives)


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           58   Feedback received from those interviewed while on site in Cornwall
                resulted in a positive attitude to the efforts of the highways network
                maintenance group.

Helpline

           59   The helpline was one area that received a significant amount of
                praise from both officers and the general public, and the reality
                checks that we undertook with the helpline confirmed these positive
                thoughts.

           60   Both the set-up of the processes and the implementation of the use
                of the helpline are impressive. This results in significant time saving
                to technicians and engineers in undertaking their daily work:

                     ‘The set-up of the helpline has resulted in me spending more
                     time doing the job, rather than answering longwinded queries.’
                     (Officer)

           61   In addition, the response times to queries left with the helpline were
                less than 24 hours where the defect could be repaired, and all
                enquiries were responded to within 48 hours. Some of the calls
                were replied to immediately while the caller was on the phone.

           62   The helpdesk also handles Internet and email enquiries to the
                service and replies to them within the same timeframes as the
                telephone enquiries. This activity is hoped to be increased for the
                future and will help the Council meet its e-government targets for
                2005.

           63   This work has enabled the group to meet its aims of making the
                service more accessible to the public. The use of the helpline is so
                advanced and respected that County councillors use it to log their
                enquiries rather than going direct to the relevant officers. Evidence
                of the future development of the helpline, including the training of
                helpline staff in more technical matters and the improvement of the
                IT facilities, will help the Council to further meet its aims.

           64   However, we found that there was some evidence of people being
                unaware of the existence of the helpline:

                     ‘I didn’t know there was a helpline, I may well have used it if
                     there was.’ (Parish council representative)

           65   Considering the fact that the person represented a parish council
                and was therefore a key stakeholder in the maintenance of the
                highway network, they should have been aware of the existence of
                the helpline. This was an isolated incident however, and not
                representative of the positive broader picture.


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General liaison

         66   Liaison with members of the public and parish/town councils is
              prompt and well maintained. We saw evidence that most letters
              were replied to within the specified Council time scales of 14 days.
              Positive comments were made by people in focus groups.

                   ‘Although I didn’t like the answer in the letter, they did reply
                   quickly, and the response was easy to understand.’ (Parish
                   council representative)

         67   The correspondence was normally well received by the enquirer
              and resulted in a satisfied customer at the end of the day. There is
              some evidence that the communication with the public can result in
              a heightening of the end user expectation:

                   ‘Sometimes we have to wait for months for action.’ (Rural parish
                   council)

                   ‘Communication is not always effective locally.’ (County
                   councillor)

         68   This is an issue of managing user expectations to ensure that they
              are fully aware of the outcome of the works to be implemented,
              including size, timescale and possible disruption to the network.
              Greater clarity is required when informing the public of the impact of
              highway schemes.

         69   Communication with both parish and town councils is often of a
              reactive rather than proactive nature. However, we do recognise
              that with over 200 parish and town councils in Cornwall, a diverse
              approach is needed. Often it is only when the parish/town council
              contacts the Council with an enquiry, that the engineer will contact
              the body concerned. Several of these groups expressed a wish to
              have surgeries to deal with all their enquiries at one time. While we
              appreciate that this can be a drain on resources, the benefits of
              such proactive management of the customer would help the Council
              to achieve it targets of being more accessible to the end user. The
              Council plans to develop a mechanism to better monitor details of
              site meetings.

         70   The Council does not yet make full use of the possibilities of
              electronic service delivery, although it does have plans for this in
              the future.




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Co-operation between departments

        71   We saw several areas where the department liaises on a regular
             basis with sections such as the road safety team, the traffic
             management team and the IT department.

        72   On each of the above occasions, the contact had resulted in either
             joint working on projects to ensure a reduction in resource
             requirement, or the cancellation of works in the same area that may
             have caused undue disruption to traffic:

                   ‘We talk regularly to the maintenance teams when we are
                   about to implement a new traffic management scheme.’
                   (Officer)

        73   This close organisational relationship helps the service to be
             delivered in a more co-ordinated and cost-effective manner,
             resulting in better value for the end user.

General network maintenance

        74   Reality checks of the general state of the highway show that the
             roads in Cornwall are generally in good condition. The network
             maintenance teams had prioritised the repairs and maintenance of
             the highway network in line with what would be particular
             requirements for this type of network.

        75   A code of practice exists to deal with the prioritisation of work. This
             was endorsed by the councillors. However, it was not subject to
             consultation. In order to ensure that the service is delivered in line
             with the needs of the users of the highway, the service must ensure
             that councillors do agree priorities after undertaking consultation
             with the end user. We note that data from the helpline is used to
             support service delivery.

        76   While our inspections indicated that roads were in a good condition,
             some concern was raised in a meeting with local councils about the
             state of the unclassified and minor road network:

                   ‘The minor roads are beginning to get in a terrible state and
                   need some urgent attention.’ (Parish council representative)

        77   While we accept the fact that minor roads with little traffic flow are of
             a lower priority, their prioritisation needs to be clarified for the
             benefit of the users.

        78   All other areas of maintenance such as gully emptying, winter
             maintenance and grass cutting were considered to be of a good
             standard and were not of concern to us during the inspection.

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         79   From our inspection assessment of the repairs made to the road
              and pavement network, we found that the standard of work
              completed through the contract with Cornwall’s contractor is
              satisfactory. Customers we spoke to who were happy with the
              quality of the end product support this view.

         80   We saw from our road inspections that the Council is using
              appropriate materials to repair the roads. For instance, modern
              materials such as thin coat surfacing are being used to maximise
              cost-effectiveness.

Relationships outside Cornwall County Council
         81   The service has developed key relationships with parishes, town
              and district councils, although this is not consistent across the
              county:

                   ‘Some district councils just are not interested.’ (Officer)

         82   The above statement typifies the state of some relationships at
              present. This is recognised by the service, but inconsistent
              methodology for improvement was evident while undertaking this
              inspection. It is important that Cornwall County Council develops
              these relationships to maximise the possibility of partnership
              working and joint funding of schemes. It will also reduce the
              possibility of design work being completed twice, by both the district
              and county councils, or one assuming the other is doing it and
              progress being delayed.

         83   Relationships with statutory undertakers, such as cable laying
              companies and the general utility companies, are not consistent.
              Evidence on site from focus groups showed that some companies
              were digging in the same carriageway and limited co-ordination of
              works was evident. We noted that the Council often gets the blame
              for the actions of others.

         84   In some cases, such as the cable laying companies, the Council
              has gone to great lengths to ensure the smooth introduction of
              these facilities. The introduction of ‘whereabouts’ reports and
              newsletters for the public has ensured that the public is aware of
              the whereabouts and expected standards of the work being carried
              out.




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      85   An important area where relationships must be clear and developed
           is with the Highways Agency. The Agency is a key partner in the
           highway network for Cornwall. The Council should ensure that the
           relationship is fully effective. Some comments from within the
           Council identified that the partnership was not as effective as it
           could be:

                 ‘Relationships with the Highways Agency have deteriorated
                 over the last few years.’ (Senior officer)
                 ‘The reclassification of the A39 was not handled positively.’
                 (Senior officer)

      86   The view of the Agency is that relationships generally are good, but
           that more could be done to strengthen the partnership:

                 ‘The relationship with the County is good, but could be very
                 much better.’ (Highways Agency representative)

      87   Typical examples of areas where the relationship could be
           improved are winter and general maintenance. The County at
           present uses the trunk road for its winter maintenance operations,
           yet turns its gritters off when travelling on the trunk road. In turn the
           Highway Agency’s lorries grit the trunk road. Several gritters can be
           using the trunk road in any one programme, and there is no co-
           ordination. It would be expected that improved partnership working
           would be in place. This is important as the Agency has an important
           impact on the delivery of other improvements, including Objective 1
           funding. Improved working protocols should be put in place to
           ensure that the Objective 1 programme can be delivered, and to
           maximise the possibilities of partnerships and joint funding
           opportunities.

Summary
      88   The community is generally very supportive of the work carried out,
           though some inconsistency was identified. Links with all partners
           and other programmes need to be clarified.

How does performance compare?
      89   In order to judge the quality of a service it is important to compare
           the performance of that service against other suppliers across a
           range of sectors and the best 25 per cent of councils. The aim is not
           exact comparison, but an exploration of how similar services (or
           elements of services) perform in order to identify significant
           differences, the reasons for them and the extent to which
           improvements are required. This will enable a council to determine
           how it can achieve a performance that will put it into the best 25 per
           cent of councils.

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90    From evidence gathered both on site and prior to the inspection, the
      network maintenance service supplied by Cornwall County Council
      compares favourably against national performance indicators. The
      following series of graphs demonstrates their present position
      against other similar-sized county councils in England. Each graph
      has a short explanation of the significance of each result.

91    The first graph below demonstrates the number of serious road
      traffic accidents for every 1 million miles travelled by vehicles on
      principal roads in the county of Cornwall. As can be seen by the
      graph, Cornwall has among the lowest number of accidents and
      can therefore be considered to be achieving best value.



     The number of serious accidents per 1,000,000 miles travelled
         by a vehicle on principal roads (ACPI 1999/2000 - P2b)




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92   Highway maintenance has an important role to play in the reduction
     and prevention of accidents on the highway. In our opinion, the
     service providers in Cornwall fully understand the implications of
     road safety and make efforts to ensure that the safety of road users
     is considered at all times. The following graph demonstrates this,
     showing the percentage of repairs to dangerous damage on the
     roads that is repaired within 24 hours. Cornwall County Council
     achieves 100 per cent in this statistic, again within the best 25 per
     cent of county councils.


Percentage of repairs to dangerous damage to roads and pavements
  which were carried out within 24 hours (ACPI 1999/2000 - P2a)




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93   The next graph below shows the number of days major Council
     roadworks were in place per mile of road. Cornwall again is within
     the best 25 per cent of councils for this statistic. This good work
     results in less disruption to the traveller using the roads in the
     county. Bearing in mind the high tourist traffic to the area, keeping
     the roads open to Cornwall will result in more satisfied people
     visiting the area by road transport.




     Number of days major Council roadworks were in place per
              mile of busy road (ACPI 1999/2000 - P3)




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94    The cost of the maintenance of the highway in Cornwall for every
      100 miles travelled by vehicles is within the lowest 25 per cent of
      councils in England. The graph below demonstrates this and shows
      that the Council is providing a cost-effective repair and maintenance
      service. Further work to improve cost savings will help Cornwall to
      remain in this good position.




     The cost of highway maintenance per 100 miles travelled by a
                     vehicle (ACPI 1999/2000 - P4)




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95   It is important that facilities are in place for pedestrians with
     disabilities to cross the road in both safety and comfort. The county
     has a very good record for the supply of facilities for disabled
     persons at pedestrian crossings. As shown by the next graph
     below, it is again within the best 25 per cent of councils in England,
     and over 90 per cent of pedestrian facilities do cater in some way
     for disabled usage.




     The percentage of pedestrian crossings with facilities for
              disabled people (ACPI 1999/2000 - P5)




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96   In terms of the percentage of streetlights working as planned,
     Cornwall had work to do to get into the best 25 per cent, as the next
     graph shows. However, performance was improved in 2000/01,
     putting the County on the margins of the top performers.




       The percentage of streetlights not working as planned
                      (ACPI 1999/2000 - P1)




97   The percentage of roads that have reached a point at which repairs
     to prolong their useful life should be considered, can be seen in the
     final graph on the next page. Cornwall again performs well in this
     statistic, with only around 7 per cent of roads needing this attention.
     This shows good long-term management of the highway network,
     and will reduce the costs for expensive repairs to the roads.




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          The percentage of principal roads which have reached the point at
            which repairs to prolong their future life should be considered
                                (ACPI 1999/2000 - P2c)




      98     Cornwall would benefit from developing the use of local
             performance indicators which would drive improvement. This would
             result in better knowledge and reporting to the public of how well
             the Council is doing in achieving a good service for the customer.

Summary
      99     Most of the relevant national indicators show that Cornwall County
             Council has best 25 per cent performance. Attention needs to be
             given to the improvement of local performance indicators.




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4 Findings: What are the prospects for improvement?

Does the best value review drive improvement?
       100 The best value review is the mechanism for ensuring that councils
           deliver continuous improvement in the services they provide. In
           coming to our judgement, we considered the following issues, which
           we believe are key to delivering significant improvement:

            ! the acceptance, at all levels of the Council, of the need and
              opportunity to make major improvements;

            ! the plans for improvement having challenging targets and time
              scales;

            ! the Council having the capacity and the resources to carry out
              all of the improvements; and

            ! the Council having a performance management system in place
              to oversee the implementation of the plan.

       101 We recognise that the best value review formed part of a continuing
           improvement process. We did not consider the review in isolation,
           but looked at how it fitted within this overall process and its
           contribution to achieving the right improvements.

       102 In the course of our inspection, we saw that the LTP identifies the
           traffic management and highways actions that are needed in the
           medium- to long-term, to achieve the Council’s transport aims. We
           agree with the comments of the Government Office for the South
           West (GOSW) which said:

                  ‘The LTP is a considerable improvement on last years…the
                  county has built on the extensive public consultation exercise
                  undertaken…The plan is well written and well laid out.’

       103 Having already identified and planned actions through the LTP
           process, the Council used the best value review (BVR) to build on
           this and to consider how the aims and strategies could be delivered.
           We largely endorse the approach taken.




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        104 The councillors and staff involved in the review were generally very
            positive about several aspects of the process. We were impressed
            that the councillors interviewed had a clear impression of problems
            and needs that was focused on community needs and results, not
            just improving internal processes. Staff told us:

                  ‘The BVR has made people more aware of why they are doing
                  things.’

                  ‘Interviews with councillors did help – they knew what was
                  going on.’

       105 The review was initially intended to deal with broader issues of how
           highways and transportation contribute to the economic well-being
           of the county. However, the eventual content of the report
           concentrated almost entirely on highways and network management
           issues. For example, there was no detailed reference to how the
           review might help to deliver the aims and projects of the
           ‘Connecting Cornwall Taskforce’. This had been set up as a joint
           public and private sector initiative to support delivery of key projects
           through the Objective 1 programme.

       106 This scoping problem was recognised by those involved:

                  ‘would have been a different BVR if we had used Connecting
                  Cornwall as a base document.’

                  ‘We need a clearer brief in future.’

                  ‘We only talked briefly about (the economy).’

                  ‘The BVR didn’t have much on the economy.’

       107 As we advised the Council at the briefing, this judgement has been
           produced for the highways and network management highlighted in
           the review, not the broader aspects of how the service supports the
           economy of Cornwall. Advice has been given to the Council’s
           officers to ensure that those economic matters, which are of vital
           importance to the county, are picked up in other reviews.

Challenge

        108 We consider that the challenge of the highway management
            activities was reasonably robust, with each element of the service
            being subject to an option appraisal. The use of an all-day
            ‘challenge’ event was a very useful exercise, appreciated by those
            who were involved:

                  ‘(the day) had a lot of initial cynics but a good range of views
                  was expressed.’

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          109 It was disappointing that the opportunity was not taken to involve an
              external challenger on the review team or board. While participants
              considered that the internal ‘objective officer’ had played a useful
              role, the overview was perhaps not sufficiently focused on the user
              perspective. The challenge was therefore not rigorous enough to
              enable demonstrable change to be achieved.

Consult

          110 We were impressed that the consultation built on the very e xtensive
              LTP consultation rather than duplicating it. The GOSW welcomed
              the close involvement of consultees in determining objectives and
              strategy. The LTP consultation had involved a wide range of
              stakeholders and involved several techniques including focus
              groups and conferences. The results of this consultation were used
              in the review.

          111 We noted that the Council had intended to involve a number of
              stakeholders in consultation on the review itself. In the e vent,
              interviews were held with only a limited number of those who had
              been initially identified. This was disappointing. If the larger
              audience had been involved, the issue highlighted above about the
              scoping of the review might have been more apparent before the
              review progressed too far. We consulted some focus groups, and
              these clearly showed that while there was knowledge of the issues,
              there was little awareness that a review had been carried out. There
              had also been a lack of contact with some key partners, including
              the Highways Agency.

Compete

          112 While competition has been widely used for works contracts, it has
              been limited on design and supervision contracts. This was
              accepted by some of the managers to whom we spoke:

                     ‘fair to say we have not done much under BV.’

          113 The Council has used the private sector for some transportation
              work, usually for consultancy activities. It is just re-tendering the
              major contract that has been delivered by CORMAC in recent years.
              It uses this term contractor to carry out the construction work
              necessary for traffic management schemes. Through sub-
              consultancy work, market testing of the professional services has
              been carried out. Work is also being done to investigate the
              potential of partnership agreements for other activities.




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Compare

          114 The Council tried to compare its work with other organisations,
              including other county councils and a ‘Celtic’ group of councils.
              While considerable data was prepared, it was not clear how any
              meaningful comparisons were arrived at that then influenced
              subsequent actions. The Council does have best 25 per cent
              performance in most of the national performance indicators
              affecting this service. However, it would be valuable to build other
              indicators to cover issues such as:

               ! effectiveness of schemes implemented;

               ! contact with the public;

               ! work with other organisations;

               ! volume of work handled;

               ! costs;

               ! staffing levels; and

               ! work processes.

       115 We do note that the Council is planning to work with other councils
           to develop better comparisons, some of which will be more relevant
           to local circumstances.

Summary
       116 The BVR dealt with highway and network management rather than
           the broader economic issues that had been identified at the start of
           the process. As a review of that more limited area it was generally
           well prepared. External challenge could have helped to give a
           broader perspective and a greater user focus. Compete was also an
           area that was less well dealt with.


How good is the improvement plan?
       117 A best value review should produce an improvement plan that sets
           out what needs to improve, why, and how that improvement will be
           delivered. It should contain targets which are not only challenging
           but also designed to demonstrate and ensure the continuous
           improvement necessary to put the service among the best 25 per
           cent of councils within five years.




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118 As the best value review focused on how to ensure that the
    improvements and actions previously identified were achieved, it
    focused on internal management processes to deliver the Council’s
    highways and network management aims and objectives. Those
    objectives have been validated by the local LTP process and partly
    endorsed by the GOSW. The LTP has a good assessment of
    transport problems and issues, backed by data, together with a
    programme of actions.

119 The Council plans to address a wide range of issues through this
    review:

     ! service delivery:

             ! communication and consultation;

             ! network management;

             ! organisation;

             ! funding and procurement;

     ! service specific:

             ! winter maintenance;

             ! highway maintenance;

             ! streetworks authority;

             ! road adoptions; and

             ! traffic management.

120 On a more generic level, we noted that the review is looking to
    implement an improved and county-wide approach to town
    regeneration schemes, linked to the availability of e xternal funding
    (mainly from the European Objective 1 programme and the South
    West Regional Development Agency/Single Regeneration Budget).
    This was endorsed by the GOSW as being:

           ‘very strong in its approach to individual towns within the
           county.’




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121 To ensure that this work can happen, the review also identified a
    range of actions that focused around internal improvements such
    as:

     ! staffing levels;

     ! communications both internal and external;

     ! document management;

     ! project management; and

     ! environmental sustainability.

122 The review’s improvement plan also includes the intention to
    engage more effectively with the private and voluntary sectors and
    other councils. This is linked to various issues including improved
    consultation and communication. We found that the plan was well
    considered and detailed.

123 It was noted that there had been slippage in the process. This could
    explain for example why there had been less external consultation
    than initially intended. Also, many of the actions were focused on
    internal changes rather than on results that would benefit the
    community. While the service has many activities in the best 25 per
    cent already, that e xternal emphasis should always remain as a
    service focal point. We noted that GOSW had also commented in
    relation to the LTP that:

           ‘too often the outputs/targets are too general to allow progress
           to be measured.’

124 We were also aware that there was not always a clear link between
    the review actions and targets and those of other budget and policy
    frameworks. That was raised as an issue with us by staff:

           ‘difficult to see how (budgets) fit to themed reviews.’

125 We were advised that this was now being dealt with. Similarly, we
    saw some evidence that other financial processes had not always
    been transparent, but that had also been put right.




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Summary

       126 In coming to our judgement, we considered the following issues,
           which we believe are key to delivering significant improvement:

            ! the acceptance, at all levels of the Council, of the need and
              opportunity to make major improvements;

            ! the plans for improvement having challenging targets and time
              scales;

            ! the Council having the capacity and the resources to carry out
              the improvements; and

            ! the Council having a performance management system in place
              to oversee the implementation of the plan.

       127 We believe that the plan was detailed, although it focused on
           internal processes, not external outcomes. However, there is clear
           evidence of support from stakeholders for many of the issues that
           the plan addresses.

Will the Council deliver the improvements?
       128 Inspectors look for evidence that a council will deliver what it has set
           out in the improvement plan. We look for a track record of managing
           change within the Council and, ideally, within the service itself. The
           plan should also have sufficient support from councillors,
           management, staff, service users and other stakeholders,
           particularly those responsible for delivering it.

       129 The Council has allocated additional priority to this work and has
           made budget provision for an increase in staffing. In the Design and
           Management Consultancy, for e xample, the number of staff within
           the service was 379 at March 2001 but can increase by 50 in
           2001/02. The additional funding coming from the Government
           should help to ensure that prioritised actions and projects will be
           implemented.

       130 There is a clear commitment from councillors, staff and the wider
           community to ensuring that the improvements in traffic management
           measures are carried out. Historically, the Council has a good track
           record of effective implementation of projects. Its high rating against
           national performance targets, and its award as a Rural Centre of
           Transport Excellence, evidence this. It was also recently ranked
           second among all county councils in a national survey of
           transportation. The call centre at Scorrier was rated as an excellent
           innovation by almost everyone we spoke to, and its enhanced use
           has potential for delivering even greater customer satisfaction.

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      131 Most partners are committed to working with the service, and we
          saw evidence from across the county that relationships have
          improved in recent years. Joint training and development work is
          being done with some district councils and business groups in
          towns. A strong relationship with the Highway Agency, which is a
          key partner, needs to be built.

      132 The mechanisms to monitor performance against overall aims and
          objectives are in place and being improved. We particularly liked
          the secondment and job rotation that had been introduced. This has
          helped to develop staff, transfer knowledge across several service
          areas and strengthen the Council’s culture. This range of
          professional development activities should be continued and ideally
          enhanced. There is a shortage of professional and technical staff at
          present, and the Council will need to ensure that it retains the
          capacity to deliver the actions.
      133 Revisions to both officer and councillor performance management
          systems should further support this. We are satisfied that those
          systems will be adequately monitored, especially as they will be
          reported to the DTLR each summer. Councillors will need to ensure
          that they do remain appropriately involved in this, as one officer
          advised us that:

                 ‘Members do find it difficult to deal with performance
                 management issues.’

      134 While we have noted that the review has not covered the broader
          economic areas, it will still be important that those issues are
          reflected in the action plans. This is especially the case with
          potential Objective 1 schemes. We note, for example, that GOSW
          commented (on the Grampound scheme) that:
                 ‘It is not clear to us that this proposal links well to others within
                 the Objective 1 programme.’

Summary

      135 Cornwall County Council has accepted the need to continue to
          continuously improve this service. It has a good track record and
          has most of the required mechanisms in place. Critically, it has the
          strong benefit of a committed staff and many enthusiastic partners
          in the community, although work is still needed with some partners.

      136 There is a substantial improvement plan to support many of the
          necessary changes. The Council has the staff either in place or
          being recruited, and funding is available. The plan’s aims and
          objectives will be monitored. Thus, we have concluded that
          Cornwall County Council’s highways and network management
          service has promising prospects for improvement.

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5 Appendix: What did the inspectors do?
      137 The purpose of best value inspection is to make two judgements.
          The first is, how good is the service being inspected? The second
          is, how likely is it to improve? We carried out a range of different
          activities to enable us to reach our judgements.

Documents examined
      138 Before going on site we reviewed a range of documents which had
          been provided in advance by the Council for us or which we
          obtained from the Council’s website. This included:

           ! Best Value Performance Plan 2001–2002;

           ! Best Value Review Methodology (Toolkit);

           ! Corporate Mission, Vision and Core Values Statement;

           ! organisation and structure documents;

           ! financial information;

           ! Local Agenda 21 strategy;

           ! ‘Connecting Cornwall’ strategy statement

           ! staff management documents – staff development, human
             resources, equal opportunities statements;

           ! Best Value Service Review;

           ! Service Vision Statement;

           ! service plans;

           ! departmental publications and leaflets;

           ! relevant committee papers;

           ! BVPI General Survey;

           ! documents relating to Objective 1; and

           ! Local Transport Plan.




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Reality checks undertaken
       139 When we went on site we carried out a number of different checks,
           building on the work described above in order to get a full picture of
           how good the service is. These on-site ‘reality checks’ were
           designed to gather evidence about what it is like to use the service
           and see how well it works on the ground. Our reality checks
           included:

            ! site checks to various parts of the county road network;

            ! enhancement schemes carried out at various town and village
              locations;

            ! Scorrier call centre and depot; and
            ! Truro Tourist Information Centre.

Interviews conducted
       140 We also met a range of different people involved with the service:

            Paul Allen            Revenue Programme Manager
            Rob Andrew            Chief Engineer (Projects and Best Value)

            Mrs Breckon           Former Councillor
            Pauline Brown         Business Services Manager, Treasurers Department

            Richard Fish          Highways and TPP
            Tim Foster            Design and Maintenance

            Mike Gillbard         Councillor
            Roger Hargreaves      Chief Engineer (Passenger Transport)

            Arthur Hooper         CORMAC
            Mike Kent             Office Manager, Scorrier

            Tony Ladner           Network Manager
            Peter Moore           Chief Engineer (Transportation)

            David Pattison        Assistant Chief Executive
            Nick Powell           Deputy Director

            Lawrence Reed         Radio Cornwall
            Bryan Skinner         Group Engineer (Traffic and Transportation)


                                Page 41 of 42
      Cornwall County Council – Highways: Network Management


Mark Stephenson      Chief Engineer (Engineering Services)

Peter Stethridge     Director of Planning, Transportation and Estates
Matt Stribley        Structures Design

Geoff Tate           Assistant Chief Executive
Tim Wood             Chief Engineer (Structures)

Divisional Surveyors Group:
Steve Copeland
Steve Ewing
Kevin Bryant

Staff group:
Jon Carlyon             Street Works
Steve Ba yley           Project Manager
Emma Skoyles            Traffic Unit
Chris Cawrse            Area Supervisor
Parish Council Representatives Group:
Mrs George              St Just
Mr Anquin               Camborne
Mr Bennett              Portreath
Mr Beer                 Cubert
Mrs Oates
Mr Percy
Mr Scott

District Council Representatives Group:
Sandra Russell          Restormel District Council
Angie Carveth           Carrick District Council

Staff Group: PT&E Design and Management Consultancy – Area Surve yors:
David Ma yhew
Robert Constance
Brian Doney
Teresa Frost
Mike Peters
Dave Stark




                   Page 42 of 42

				
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