Cold Blooded Evil by P-IndependentPublis

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On 2 December, 2006, the naked body of a woman was discovered in a brook at Thorpes Hill, Hintlesham, a sleepy village just south of Ipswich, Suffolk. She was identified as Gemma Adams, aged 25, who worked as a prostitute in Ipswich's red light district. While tragic and shocking, this seemed like an isolated event. But six days later, on 8 December, the body of Tania Nicol, 19, was found also naked in a waterway near Copdock Mill. Journalists poured into Ipswich and the surrounding area. When a third body, that of Anneli Alderton, 24, was discovered just two days later in Nacton, fear set in among the local community. Crimes like this weren't supposed to happen in that rural area and the police seemed to have little to go on. Women were reluctant to go out after dark and the authorities advised them to venture out in pairs. The police knew they were in a race against time to get a result. Two further bodies were discovered. Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29, were found on 12 December. All the victims were prostitutes. All had worked in Ipswich's red light district. All five had been strangled. Police were drafted in from forces all over the country. Then two arrests were made and one man was remanded in custody to await trial. This is the shocking story of the Ipswich killings, from the discovery of the bodies to the impact on the families of the victims and the biggest police investigation ever mounted in Suffolk. This is a series of murders which produced more fear and terror than any in Britain since those carried out by the Yorkshire Ripper 25 years earlier.

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									Cold Blooded Evil
Author: Neil Root
Table of Contents

Prologue vii

1 The Dawning of Disbelief 1

2 The Tragedy Deepens 19

3 An Epidemic of Fear and Paranoia 45

4 The Terror, The Terror 73

5 A Nervy Development 109

6 Unmasking The Killer 133

7 The Quest for Justice 173

8 Ripples and Aftershocks 251

Appendix: Interview with Detective Chief Superintendent Stewart Gull 273
Description

On 2 December, 2006, the naked body of a woman was discovered in a brook at Thorpes Hill,
Hintlesham, a sleepy village just south of Ipswich, Suffolk. She was identified as Gemma Adams, aged
25, who worked as a prostitute in Ipswich's red light district. While tragic and shocking, this seemed like
an isolated event. But six days later, on 8 December, the body of Tania Nicol, 19, was found also naked
in a waterway near Copdock Mill. Journalists poured into Ipswich and the surrounding area. When a third
body, that of Anneli Alderton, 24, was discovered just two days later in Nacton, fear set in among the
local community. Crimes like this weren't supposed to happen in that rural area and the police seemed to
have little to go on. Women were reluctant to go out after dark and the authorities advised them to venture
out in pairs. The police knew they were in a race against time to get a result. Two further bodies were
discovered. Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29, were found on 12 December. All the victims
were prostitutes. All had worked in Ipswich's red light district. All five had been strangled. Police were
drafted in from forces all over the country. Then two arrests were made and one man was remanded in
custody to await trial. This is the shocking story of the Ipswich killings, from the discovery of the bodies
to the impact on the families of the victims and the biggest police investigation ever mounted in Suffolk.
This is a series of murders which produced more fear and terror than any in Britain since those carried
out by the Yorkshire Ripper 25 years earlier.
Excerpt

In early December 2006 most people were winding
down, mentally preparing for the relaxed limbo-land
that the average British Christmas brings. The decorations
were coming down from the attic and being dusted off, the
Christmas lights checked, cards written and sent, and
office parties planned. It was the usual drill in the run-up
to the festive period, a time to relax and catch up with
friends and family.


The town of Ipswich in Suffolk was no different from
anywhere else. The town itself and the sleepy villages
surrounding it had no idea that their pleasant repose was
about to be shattered. There was no sense that this
Christmas would be different to any other. But the events
of the following weeks would unfold at a ferocious pace
and the people of the area would never see life in the
same way again. Sinister events of this magnitude can
only cast a shadow on the psyche of a community.


The media storm that blew up would gather pace until it was a terrifying whirlwind – local, then national
and
finally international coverage. From brief mentions to
headlines, and then to blanket coverage. There was to be
no escape for the people of Ipswich and no release for the
British nation as a whole, as every day brought new
revelations, suspicions and finally arrests.


George Orwell once wrote that the reason we like to read
about murder is because it feels so removed from us. We
can sit in our cosy living rooms, letting family life continue.
It only happens to other people. Unless we are directly
connected to a homicide victim, we can indulge our morbid
curiosity and ‘safe’ fear with little emotional investment.
Perhaps we feel a slight shiver as we draw the curtains,
thankful that we are comfortable in our homes, tucked up
in warm beds. We feel sympathy and compassion, but the
lack of any real impingement on our daily lives allows us to
sleep well. Especially if the murder victim seems to have
lived in a very different world from our own.


But it was not like that for the families of five young
women in Ipswich and the surrounding area that winter.
The women in question may have worked as prostitutes
and lived a life most of us know only from newspapers,
books and films. They may have had different
experiences. But no one should judge them. They too
were human beings with feelings and aspirations that
were probably very little different from our own.


The shockwaves will go through that part of Suffolk for
years, with Ipswich and the villages around it forever
changed, if not scarred by these terrible crimes. The evil
of these actions is hard to understand and explain. On one
hand these are extreme and thankfully rare events, yet on
the other hand we may be reminded of the writer Hannah Arendt’s famous quotation about ‘the banality of
evil’.
Horrors might be difficult to comprehend but try to
understand them we must. This is the story of the Ipswich
stranglings.


SATURDAY, 2 DECEMBER 2006

THORPES HILL, HINTLESHAM, SUFFOLK

11:50am


The Suffolk landscape in winter can be very beautiful, the
falling leaves gently rustled by the wind a reminder of
time passing and the inevitability of the life cycle. The
bare branches of centuries-old trees stand in haunting
silhouette against the white sky. This is the real English
countryside, where the rustic majesty of the fields is
richly veined by meandering brooks and streams. In such
a tranquil setting it is easy to forget about the essential
violence of nature.


The small...
Author Bio
Neil Root
Neil Root was born in London in 1971 and is a graduate of Manchester University where he obtained an
MA in Creative Writing. He has non-fiction articles, short stories and poetry published and a play
produced at the Camden People's Theatre in London. He is alsoa lecturer and teacher. He lives in
London.

								
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