PDS08 Proceedings by dfgh4bnmu

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									                   2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Table of Contents
1 .......Poster Sessions
   1 ....... Are You Talking To Me? What It Means To Be A Teacher
             Candidate In A PDS Setting
   1 ....... Experiences And Opportunities Provided Teacher
             Candidates In A PDS
   2 ....... Integration Of Theory And Practice: A Challenge Of A New
             Graduate School System Of Teacher Education In Japan
   2 ....... Learning To Teach In The Real World
   3 ....... Literacy And Learning In The Inclusive Classroom - A Case
             Study
   3 ....... Moving Forward, Learning Together: Tutoring A Young
             Reader In A Professional Development School
   4 ....... Teaching Fellows At Ohio University: Invaluable Resource
             To Support The Work Of PDS Partnerships
   4 ....... The Impact Of Intern-Mentor Collaboration On Emerging
             Readers
   5 ....... Walk Around The Block
   6 ....... Walk Around The Block: Reynolds Middle School
7 .......Question #1: How does professional
         development successfully engage
         constituent groups within the PDS?
   7 ....... 21st Century Learning, PDS Style
   7 ....... A Balanced Act: The Impact PDS Interns Have On Mentors
   8 ....... Addressing Schools And Students With High Needs . . .
             TOGETHER!
   9 ....... Alabama A & M University And The Huntsville City
             Schools – The English Language Learners Professional
             Development Academy (ELL-PDA) Partnership
   10 ..... All Participants? Seeking The Voices Of Pre-Adolescents In
            The Professional Preparation And Supervision Of
            Prospective Teachers In The PDS Through Participatory
            Action Research
   10 ..... An Environment Of Educational Excellence
   11 ..... Best Practices In Action Research: A Partnership Approach
            To Teacher Training And Professional Development
   11 ..... Building An Action Research Team
   12 ..... Building Connectivity Between Theory And Practice:
            Professional Development School-Based University
            Coursework
   12 ..... Classroom Action Research: Using Professional
            Development To Address The Achievement Gap




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         13 ..... Co-Planning: Utilizing School/University Collaboration To
                                  Design And Present K-12 PDS Graduate Coursework On
                                  Differentiated Instruction
                         13 ..... Co-Teaching Revisited: An Inside Look At The Progress
                                  And Growing Pains Of Implementing Collaborative
                                  Internships
                         14 ..... Combining Foreign Language Majors In The Multicultural
                                  School Setting To Promote Language Development Of Pre-
                                  Service Teachers And Extend Support To Bilingual And
                                  ELL Learners
                         15 ..... Continuing With A Virtual Hand: How The PDS Project Can
                                  Enhance The Educational Technology Experience
                         15 ..... Continuous Growth For Special Education Interns And
                                  Mentors Through Focused Professional Development
                                  Opportunities
                         16 ..... Cracking The Standards Code: The Role Of Action
                                  Research In Standards-Driven Education
                         16 ..... Cultivating Confident Professionals In An At-Risk Setting
                         17 ..... Cultural Diversity Comes Home
                         17 ..... Developing Depth And Establishing Maintainable
                                  Structures Through Innovative Pre-Service Teacher
                                  Preparation Practices
                         18 ..... Developing Professional Development School Programs
                                  That Engage Constituent Groups And Focus On Student
                                  Learning.
                         19 ..... Developing School Leadership In The Context Of PDS
                         19 ..... Developing Teachers As Leaders In PDS: Both Pre-Service
                                  And In-Service
                         20 ..... Dialogue Journals At A PDS: Pre-Service Teachers Write
                                  With Elementary Students In A Professional Development
                                  School
                         20 ..... Disseminating Differentiated And Cognitively Complex
                                  Classroom Questioning Strategies Throughout A Title 1
                                  School
                         21 ..... Effectively Utilizing PDS Partners: Connecting PDS Partners
                                  For Professional Development
                         21 ..... Engaging All PDS Participants: Family Literacy Events
                         22 ..... Engaging Faculty In Transformative Professional
                                  Development Initiatives: The Institute For University-
                                  School Partnership And BRAVE Experience
                         23 ..... Engaging Teacher Candidates And Other Members Of The
                                  PDS Community In The Mixed Method Action Research
                                  Design To Determine The Most Appropriate Decisions To
                                  Improve Teaching Practices And The PDS Environment
                         23 ..... Engaging The Participant Of The PDS School And Raising
                                  Student Achievement Through A Voluntary Staff
                                  Development Program
                         24 ..... Enhancing Field Experiences Through The PDS
                                  Collaboration


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               2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

25 ..... FEA + PDS = Collaborative Teacher Recruitment And
         Continuous Professional Development
25 ..... Findings Of Measurable Teaching Effectiveness Impact For
         A PDS Teacher Professional Development Program In
         Urban But NOT Rural Partner Districts: Why And What Are
         We Doing About It?
26 ..... From “Classroom” To “CLASSROOM” – An Experiment In
         Collaboration
26 ..... Getting Digital Dirt On Your Hands
27 ..... Give + Gain = Change
27 ..... Grassroots Professional Development: Taking Professional
         Development Back
28 ..... Growing Stronger: How One PDS Developed From A
         Straightforward Clinical Placement Site Into A Full
         Partnership In Which Pre-Service Teachers Play An Integral
         Part In The Professional Development School’s
         Comprehensive Improvement Plan
28 ..... How Do I Know They Learned From What I Taught?
         Developing Pre-Service Teachers’ Assessment Literacy
         Through EPIC-ST
29 ..... How Does PDS Engage Each Professional Constituent For
         The Development Of Future Teachers?
30 ..... Implementing Inclusive Practice: Partnering In An Urban
         PDS Learning Community
30 ..... Implementing Informal Science In The Elementary
         Classroom: Addressing The Needs Of Constituent Groups
         Within The PDS Through Community Collaboration
31 ..... Is Co-Teaching Effective? Teacher Candidates In PDS
         Schools Find Out For Themselves
31 ..... Learning Together In A Special Education PDS
32 ..... Leveraging The Collaborative Strengths Of A School-
         University PDS Teacher Education Partnership: Piloting An
         Intensive Clinical Performance-Based Assessment Process
33 ..... Listening To Learn: Using Inquiry Communities To Provide
         REAL On-Going Professional Development
34 ..... Making Inquiry And Collaboration Our Practice
34 ..... Making Teaching And Learning Visible Through
         Documentation: A Professional Development Model
35 ..... Mentoring The Mentor: Everyone On The Same Page
35 ..... Nine Years On A Shoe String - How And Why Do We Keep
         Going?
36 ..... Onsite At A PDS: The Impact Of ‘What We Believe’ On
         Elementary And Undergraduate Students
37 ..... Participation In “The Kennett Experience” Leads To
         “Victory Lane”
37 ..... PDS Initiatives That Benefit Candidates, Teachers,
         Students, And The Community
38 ..... PDS Learning Communities: Questioning Everything,
         Engaging All

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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         38 ..... PDS Partners Wrestling With Inclusive Change: One
                                  School’s Story
                         39 ..... PDS – S.O.S.! (Professional Development School - Site
                                  Offered Snippets)
                         40 ..... PDS Summer Teaching Academy: Changing Confidence In
                                  The Classroom
                         40 ..... PDS - Partnership And Sustainable School Improvement:
                                  Alignment Of Teacher Leadership In Pre K-7, Leadership At
                                  The School Level, Leadership At The District Level, And
                                  Leadership At The System Level
                         41 ..... Personal Journeys In A PDS: From Teacher Candidate To
                                  Intern To Full-Time Teacher
                         41 ..... Practicing What We Believe: A Focus On Our Collaborative
                                  Learning Community
                         42 ..... Presenting A Curriculum Expo
                         42 ..... Pre-Service/In-Service: Who’s Teaching Whom?
                         43 ..... Principals And Inquiry; How They Make It Happen
                         44 ..... Professional Development In A Middle School RTI Pilot:
                                  Steps In Learning By Doing
                         44 ..... Professional Development: Models Of Research-To-Practice
                                  In The PDS
                         45 ..... Professional Developmental Schools And Early Childhood
                                  Education: Interactive Competencies Of Students,
                                  Beginning And Veteran Teachers
                         46 ..... Professional Development That Works
                         46 ..... Professional Development Through Shared Expertise And
                                  Supervision
                         47 ..... Project REACH: Teachers And Candidates Learning
                                  Together About Practices That Support Diverse Students
                         47 ..... Project SOAR: Launching A Professional Development
                                  School
                         48 ..... Prospective Teachers And PDS Teachers Learn Together
                                  The Meaning Of “Teacher Leadership” In The Benedum
                                  Collaborative
                         49 ..... Put “Super” Back In Supervision: Creating Meaningful
                                  Experiences For All Stakeholders
                         49 ..... Reaching Out And Moving Forward: Successfully Building
                                  And Sustaining Meaningful Professional Development
                                  Spanning The P-16 Continuum
                         50 ..... Reading Revolution: Professional Development For
                                  Technology Integration That Supports 21st Century Skills
                                  In K-12 Classrooms
                         51 ..... Redefining Continuous Professional Development: A
                                  Model For Job-Embedded Multilayered Professional
                                  Development
                         51 ..... Reflection Through Digital Stories: An Examination Of Pre-
                                  Service Educators’ Experiences In Professional
                                  Development Schools



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                2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

52 ..... Response To Intervention: An Opportunity To Share
         Knowledge And Build Bridges Between PDS Partners
53 ..... Rounds: An Innovative Way To Provide Pre-Service
         Teachers With Meaningful Opportunities For Observation
         And Mentorship
53 ..... School And University PDS Personnel: Doing The Work
         Together
54 ..... Science Methods: A Catalyst Approach To Building A
         Professional Development Environment
54 ..... Self-Directed Teacher Appraisal: Teachers Working To
         Achieve Important PDS Goals
55 ..... Sharing Professional Development Opportunities, Enriching
         Our PDS Learning Community
56 ..... Starting Off On The Right Foot: Understanding
         Expectations And Effective Communication - A Mentor
         Teacher/Intern Workshop
56 ..... Successful Professional Development During The Workday
57 ..... Supporting ALL Learners And Seeing Real Results . . .
         Bigger And Better Than Ever!
57 ..... Supporting Mathematics Instruction Through Learner-
         Centered Professional Development
58 ..... Supporting Student Teachers Through A PDS Teaching
         Seminar
58 ..... Taking Action: From Classroom Research To Collaborative
         Reflection
59 ..... Teacher Education Workshop Series: Sailing Ahead To
         Improve Practice Through Research-Based Professional
         Development
60 ..... Ten Years And Counting! - A Successful Professional
         Development School Partnership
60 ..... The Critical Role Of The Building Principal In An Effective
         Professional Development School
61 ..... The Discursive Nature Of Mentoring: How Participation In
         A Mentoring Relationship Influences The Identities And
         Practices Of Prospective And Practicing Teachers In A PDS
61 ..... The Ins And Outs Of Writing Workshop
62 ..... The Journey Back: A Case Study Examining The Impact Of
         The Re-Enculturation Of A Hybrid Teacher
62 ..... The Real NIU Experience: Boot Camp For Pre-Service
         Teachers
63 ..... The Three Student Project: How Two Urban PDSs Are
         Raising Student Achievement And Engaging In Practical
         Professional Development
63 ..... The TIPping Point (Teacher-Intern-Professor): A
         Preparation And Practice Triage At Work
64 ..... Thinking Outside The Box: Using Rounds And Co-
         Teaching To Promote Professional Development




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                            65 ..... Together, We Can: A Holonomous Partnership Between
                                     The Masters Of Education In Teaching Program And The
                                     Moanalua Complex
                            66 ..... Transforming A University/School District Partnership Into
                                     A Professional Development School Model
                            66 ..... Turning Learning Inside Out: Professional Development In
                                     A PDS
                            67 ..... Unfolding Drama In The Classroom - Developing Thinking
                                     And Learning Styles Through The Use Of Opera
                            68 ..... Using Action Research Video Findings To Institute Change
                                     And Improvement In A Holistic PDS Partnership: A Room
                                     With Three Views
                            68 ..... Using University-School Partnerships To Enhance Your
                                     Professional Development: A Different Look
                            69 ..... We Believe . . . In The “PD” In Professional Development
                                     Schools!
                            69 ..... Welcoming And Orienting Interns To PDS: A Collection Of
                                     Ideas From A School District And University Partnership
                            70 ..... What It Means To Be A Professional Development School:
                                     Moving Forward With What We Believe
                            70 ..... Why New Teachers Are Leaving: Novice Teachers Need
                                     Support
                            71 ..... Win-Win Collaborations Between PDS School And
                                     University Personnel
                            71 ..... Working Together To Make It Work
                            72 ..... You Learn From Me, I Learn From You: A PDS Partnership
                                     Practices Professional Preparation And Professional
                                     Development
                         73 .....Question #2: How is best practice
                                 defined, implemented, and shared within
                                 and beyond the PDS?
                            73 ..... A Cultural Experience: The Sharing Of Literature Through
                                     Best Practices
                            73 ..... A New Definition Of Professional Development Schools:
                                     Taking The University To The School
                            74 ..... A Study Of Student Achievement And Professional
                                     Development Within A Professional Development School
                                     Setting
                            75 ..... A Summer Authors’ Institute: Sharing Within And Beyond
                            75 ..... A Whole School Inquiry Into Democracy: Solving The
                                     Lunchroom Dilemma
                            76 ..... Aligning NCATE, NCLB And The Nine Essentials Of A PDS
                            77 ..... Arts Alive: A Network-Wide Arts Collaboration
                            77 ..... Best Practice: Examining And Reflecting On Student
                                     Learning
                            78 ..... Best Practice Strategies Across The Curriculum
                            78 ..... Blazing New Trails

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               2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

79 ..... Broadening The Literacy Spectrum: Modeling Best Practice
         In A PDS Cohort
79 ..... Building Bridges For English Language Learners With
         Academic Vocabulary Instruction
80 ..... Building On Best Practice In An Urban PDS: Focusing On
         Student Learning
80 ..... Bullying In Schools: Tips For Supporting PDS Schools And
         Teachers In Minimizing Issues Related To Bullying
81 ..... Closing The Achievement Gap: The Effects Of Small Group
         Instruction On The Literacy And Mathematics
         Achievement Of Urban PDS Students
81 ..... Collaborating On Researched Best Practice: Sustaining A
         Twenty-Year Partnership
82 ..... Collaboration And Best Practice: Looking Inside The PDS
         To Enhance All Student Learning
83 ..... Creative Ways To Provide Professional Development
83 ..... Data That Delivers: School-Wide And University
         Collaboration
84 ..... Data-Driven Math Interventions Through School,
         University, And Family Partnerships
84 ..... Dedication And Professionalism With “Generation Me”
85 ..... Digging Deeper: Using Video Analysis To Unearth The
         Intricacies Of Novice Teacher Reflection And Supervisory
         Practices
86 ..... Effects Of Specialized In-Service Professional Development
         Activities On Elementary School Students’ Reading
         Achievement
86 ..... Elementary And Secondary PDS Experiences: Teaching
         Best Practice Through Critical Pedagogy
87 ..... Encouraging Best Practices Through A Mentor Preparation
         Course
88 ..... Engaging A Local High School In Partnership Work
88 ..... Engaging Various Constituency Groups In The PDS Model
89 ..... English In Engineering? Collaboration For Motivation In
         The Language Arts
89 ..... Enhancing The Quality Of Action Research Conducted By
         Prospective And Practicing Teachers In The PDS
90 ..... Following Our Belief: Using The Teacher Work Sample To
         Impact K-12 Learning And Teacher Efficacy
91 ..... Giving Back To The Children: Best Practices In An
         Elementary Education/Special Education Professional
         Development School
91 ..... Global Studies In PDS Classrooms Serve As A Catalyst For
         21st Century Education
92 ..... Grand Rounds: Building Capacity Within A PDS Model
92 ..... Growing As A Professional Development School:
         Expanding And Enriching
93 ..... If The Pace Car Would Move . . . We Could Go Forward!
         Maneuvering Our Way Around Scripted Programs
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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         93 ..... Implementing Inquiry In The Middle School: Successful
                                  Projects That Increase Student Motivation And Academic
                                  Achievement
                         94 ..... Improving Effective Technology Integration Through
                                  Simultaneous Renewal
                         94 ..... Inclusion And Communication Strategies: PDS Parents,
                                  Schools, Universities, And Communities Within The
                                  DREAMS Initiative To Increase Academic Efficacy In
                                  Urban African-American Male Students
                         95 ..... Inquiry In Action
                         96 ..... Integrating Subject Areas As A Basis For Literacy
                                  Development For English Language Learner (ELL) Students:
                                  An Emphasis On Co-Teaching And Collaboration
                         96 ..... Involving All PDS Stakeholders In Creating A Friendship
                                  Garden
                         97 ..... Kids On The Move: Intervention Groups As An Action
                                  Research Project
                         97 ..... Knowing Students First
                         98 ..... Leading By Example: An Inquiry Into Teaching Action
                                  Research
                         99 ..... Learning For All: Inquiry Into Transfer Theory At A PDS
                         99 ..... Leonardo – Art, Math And Science Explorations 2.0. How
                                  The Visual Arts Can Contribute To Advancing Math And
                                  Science In Professional Development Schools: A Workshop
                                  Presentation
                         100 ... Leveling Best Practice: All Together At The PDS Site
                         100 ... Maintaining Professional Development School
                                 Partnerships: Sustaining Best Practices
                         101 ... Moving From Theory To Practice Implementing Essential 4:
                                 Developing The Continuum From College Student To
                                 Professional Teacher
                         102 ... PDS Commitment: Time, Energy, And Effort
                         102 ... Portfolio Assessment In The City: Pre-Service Teachers’
                                 Evidence Of “Social Justice”
                         103 ... Providing A Strong Foundation For Middle Level Education
                                 In A PDS
                         104 ... RAIS Of Light: A Model For Linking Stressed-Out Interns’
                                 Action Research Projects With School Improvement Plans
                         104 ... Reciprocal Relationships: Sustaining Partnerships And
                                 Improving Preparation, Practice, And Policy
                         105 ... Reflections From The Trenches: First Year Teachers
                                 Identify Best Practices From Quincy University’s PDS
                         105 ... Roundtable Discussion: How Do You Teach Cultural
                                 Diversity? Let’s Talk About Best Practices!
                         106 ... School-University Partnership That Models Best Practice
                         106 ... Science Inquiry In The Elementary Classroom
                         107 ... “Social Justice” Teaching And City Schools: PDS vs. Non-
                                 PDS Teachers’ Considerations Of Progressive Ideals


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                  2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

   107 ... Successfully Unsuccessful Part II: Validating An
           Assessment Rubric Designed To Assist PDSs With
           Teacher Candidates Experiencing Dispositional Difficulties
   108 ... Teacher Candidates Engaging Families In Cross-Cultural
           Connections
   108 ... Teaching Action Research In A PDS: Do the Lessons Last?
   109 ... Teaching And Learning 21st Century Skills Within The
           Context Of Urban Professional Development High Schools
   109 ... The Effect Of The Study Of Action Research In A PDS On
           Action Research Agenda By A PDS Candidate
   110 ... The Integration Of Technology In The Collaborative
           Internship Practicum: Mentor, Intern, And Technological
           Best Practices
   110 ... The Psychological Underpinnings Of Race And
           Pedagogical Excellence: An Interactive Presentation Of
           Race And Educational Outcomes
   111 ... The Roles Of Student Leadership
   112 ... Transforming A Reading Assessment Class Into A PDS
           Reading Clinic
   112 ... Trepidation To Transformation: Transforming Urban
           Practicum Students’ Experiences
   113 ... Triple E = Excellence: A Mental Health Prevention Model
           “Saturday School”
   113 ... Universal Access To Teaching In The Environment The
           PDS Way
   114 ... Using A Guided Literacy Practicum Within A PDS Model
   114 ... Utilizing Literature Circles To Develop Future Teachers As
           Readers
   115 ... What Do They See And Hear? Comparing The Effects Of
           Classroom Audio And Video Recording On Pre-Service
           Teachers’ Self-Evaluations
   116 ... What Matters In A PDS?
117 ...Question #3: What is involved in the
       creation and managing of a PDS?
   117 ... “And They Wrote Reflectively Ever After...” Reflection As
           Development Through Journals
   117 ... An Evolving Story: The Role Of Continual Reflection And
           Communication In Defining Successful PDS Partnerships
   118 ... Building And Managing A Professional Development
           School Partnership
   118 ... Collaboratively Creating And Maintaining Several PDS
           Sites
   119 ... Communication, Community, And Commitment:
           Opportunities And Challenges Of Formalizing Shared
           Agreements
   119 ... Creating And Managing A Successful PDS: A Study In
           Participatory Democracy


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                            120 ... Creating And Managing Our PDS Through
                                    Transformational Leadership And A Change In Our School
                                    Culture
                            120 ... Creating PDSs In A Unique “3x3” Urban Partnership
                            121 ... Creation Or Redesign: Managing A PDS Is Much The Same
                            121 ... Developing A PDS Mindset
                            122 ... Encouraging And Finding “Voice” In Forums For Ongoing
                                    Growth Of The PDS Partnership
                            122 ... Expanding Professional Development Schools In Las Vegas,
                                    Nevada: The Process And Structures For Moving Forward
                            123 ... Exploring 21st Century Communication Tools To Support
                                    PDS Partnerships
                            123 ... Get Ready, Get Set, Go!: Establishing A Meaningful PDS
                                    Partnership
                            124 ... How It All Came Together
                            124 ... It Takes A Village: How We Created Our Professional
                                    Development Schools In Burlington, North Carolina.
                            125 ... Managing The Complexities Of A Professional
                                    Development School As A New Principal
                            125 ... Moving Forward: Involving All PDS Stakeholders To Put
                                    Beliefs Into Practice
                            126 ... Moving Forward With Assessment
                            126 ... Moving Forward With Technology: Sharing PDS Best
                                    Practices At The Local And State Level
                            127 ... PDS Re-Defined: Making Our PDS Work Purposeful
                            127 ... Pitfalls And Positives Of Creating A PDS: What Steps Are
                                    Necessary In Creating And Managing A PDS?
                            128 ... Strategies For Setting Up Mentors And Interns For A
                                    Successful PDS Experience
                            129 ... Sustaining A School District-University Collaborative:
                                    Supporting Mentors Through A Clinical Faculty Liaison
                            129 ... Teacher Education Is Everybody’s Business: The
                                    Continuing Development Of A Professional Development
                                    High School
                            130 ... The Dream Team: Challenges And Lessons Learned
                                    Establishing A New PDS At The Middle Level
                            130 ... Third Times A Charm: The Birth Of Three PDS Partnerships
                                    Of One Professor
                            131 ... Three-Way Sharing: PDS Day On Campus
                            131 ... Using NCATE Standards To Improve Your PDS
                            132 ... Working Toward A Formal Agreement
                         133 ...Question #4: What does it take to run a
                                PDS day-to-day and to sustain it over
                                time?
                            133 ... A Day In The Life Of A Professional Development Middle
                                    School


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                2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

133 ... A PDS Partnership – More Than A “Family Affair!”
134 ... Adding To The Plate: High School PDS Sites And Multiple
        Reform Initiatives
134 ... An Effective Belief In PDS
135 ... Building Stronger PDS Relationships Through
        Accreditation: Before, During, And After
135 ... Changing Roles, Changing Structure, And Keeping PDS
        Work Alive
136 ... Children’s Literature As Instructional Resources: Selecting
        And Interpreting Cultural Literature In The Classroom
136 ... Collaborating Across Partnerships: Benefits And
        Challenges
137 ... Comparing Pre-Service Teachers’ Perceptions Of Their
        Learning Across PDS Contexts
137 ... Daily Focus, Strong Collaboration - Moving Us Forward
138 ... Deliberately Using The PDS to Prepare Future Teacher
        Educators
138 ... Effective Professional Development In Middle School
        Mathematics Education: Sustainability Within And Beyond
        A PDS
139 ... Experiencing PDS
140 ... Factors That Limit Success: Four Years Of Research On
        Why Interns Fail
140 ... From An “F” School To An “A”: The Journey Of One
        Urban Professional Development School Moving Forward
        With Beliefs Intact
141 ... From Good To Great: How Georgia State Partners Moved
        PDS Work To What Really Mutually Matters!
142 ... He Said/She Said: A PDS Partnership From Two Views
142 ... I Can Take Care of That!: Utilizing Teachers As The
        Strength Of A PDS School
143 ... If You Build It They Will Come: Creating And Sustaining A
        PDS Partnership Outside Of The University Community
143 ... It’s All About The Tools . . .
144 ... Keeping A Long Distance Relationship Thriving: How To
        Make A Long Distance Partnership Work
145 ... Keeping The Spirit Alive When The Torch Is Handed Off
145 ... Keys To Success: Essential Components For Effective PDS
        Partnerships At Ohio University
146 ... Leadership Roles In A PDS School: Providing Something
        For Everyone
146 ... Lessons Learned: Ten Years In PDS
147 ... Meeting The Challenge: Sustaining A Secondary PDS
147 ... Mentors, Start Your Engines . . . Sustaining A PDS Through
        Strong Mentoring
148 ... Multi-Tasking To The Max: Functions, Frustrations, And
        Rewards Of First-Year PDS Coordinators


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         148 ... Notes On A Successful Urban High School Partnership -
                                 What We Learned From The Students And How It Shaped
                                 The Future
                         149 ... PB&J’S For P-16 Faculty
                         150 ... PDS Leaders: The Next Generation
                         150 ... Present At The Creation: Building A High School PDS Site
                         151 ... Realizing/Nurturing A P-16 Partnership Focused On
                                 Simultaneous Renewal: Programs That Work
                         151 ... Rebuilding The Engine: We Have A Whole New Pit Crew -
                                 How Do We Get To Victory Lane?
                         152 ... Resources, Roles, And Relationships For Sustainability In
                                 The PDS
                         152 ... Roles And Responsibilities: An Eriksonian Perspective
                         153 ... Running On Empty But Trying To Stay In The Race: How
                                 To Provide Adequate Funding And Faculty Support For
                                 PDS Work At A Small University
                         153 ... Site-Based Clinical Coordination: So What?
                         154 ... Striving For The Checkered Flag To Sustain Successful
                                 PDS: Cautions, Red Flags, And Open Straight-Aways
                         154 ... Sustaining A PDS For 18 Years Because We Believe . . .
                                 Success For All!
                         155 ... Sustaining An Elementary Education/Special Education
                                 Professional Development School When Key Personnel
                                 Change
                         155 ... Sustaining An Elementary Science Methods And Student
                                 Teaching PDS
                         156 ... Sustaining And Increasing PDS Partnerships In Rural
                                 Settings
                         157 ... The “3 Cs” Of A Successful PDS Partnership
                         157 ... The “Draft”: Collaboration Of Three Teacher Prep Programs
                                 And Their Partner Schools
                         158 ... The Many Interfaces Of The Ellicott City Triad’s PDS
                         158 ... The PDS Site Coordinator: The Link Between The Partner
                                 School And The University
                         159 ... The Use Of Paraprofessionals To Support Inclusive
                                 Education
                         159 ... Using Technology To Support Communication In
                                 Professional Development Schools
                         160 ... What To Do When The Money Runs Out: A PDS’s
                                 Attempt To Institutionalize And Sustain The Work Of The
                                 Partnership After Three Years Of External Funding




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

P OSTER S ESSIONS

Are You Talking To Me? What It Means To Be
A Teacher Candidate In A PDS Setting
Richard Bettini and Casey McHugh, University of Wisconsin LaCrosse


       Field Experience – the traditional route or in a PDS setting – that was
the question. Our placements in the PDS were, for one by choice and the
other random. The University of Wisconsin – La Crosse, in partnership
with the School District of La Crosse, is entering its sixth year of a
secondary PDS. This semester experience places a heavy emphasis on
active classroom involvement and the larger learning community experi-
ence, as well as offering a general methods course on site. This poster
session will be a visual presentation of the various aspects of involvement
UWL teacher candidates have in the PDS setting, from the classroom to
broader school activities such as chaperoning the homecoming dance. A
final aspect of this poster session will be the balancing of on-site coursework
with the on-site field experience.


Experiences And Opportunities Provided
Teacher Candidates In A PDS
Amy Henchey, Rachel Mooney, and Bryana Loos, Buffalo State College


       Partnership, collaboration, and professional development are impor-
tant components of the Buffalo State College Professional Development
School Consortium. Teacher candidates are significant stakeholders in
this collaboration as representatives who not only support PDS initiatives
and the PDS mission, but also make daily impact on young learners,
participate in classroom research, and contribute to the professional
learning community. Two undergraduate teacher candidates and one
graduate assistant, through a process of departmental nominations and
recommendations, are selected to support and work with the PDS Director,
PDS Advisory Council, and PDS Consortium. Updating website informa-
tion, preparing materials for Consortium events, data collection and
analysis, disseminating information regarding PDS events during special-
ized orientations for teacher candidates, and other daily operations are just
some of the student representatives’ responsibilities which aid the PDS’s
growth and development. These teacher candidates have early opportu-
nities to develop leadership and collaboration skills through their experi-
ence in the Advisory Council, the guiding body of the PDS, where their
voices are highly respected and lend significant real world perspectives.
In conjunction, all teacher candidates in our PDS have extensive oppor-
tunities for professional development through volunteer experiences,
expressing suggestions for improvement and enhancement of the PDS, as
well as attending Consortium meetings and exploring possibilities for
professional presentations. This poster session will highlight the impor-
tant role played by teacher candidates in the structure, learning commu-
nity, and governance of the Buffalo State College Professional Develop-
ment School Consortium.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Integration Of Theory And Practice: A
                         Challenge Of A New Graduate School System
                         Of Teacher Education In Japan
                         Masaaki Ito and Misaki Abe, Nara University of Education


                                In our new Graduate School of Education, the curriculum is designed
                         to integrate theory and practice, which is composed of coursework and
                         four practicums. The starting points and goals of each course and
                         practicum are clearly indicated and connected in the “curriculum frame-
                         work.”
                                For example, we have a course called “Characteristic Curriculum
                         Development According to the Educational Goals.” Here we studied the
                         importance of each teacher’s awareness of educational goals of the school
                         where he or she belongs. Then, throughout the course, we had a role play
                         to organize our original school curriculums and school goals as school
                         teachers do in their real school contexts.
                                In Practicum One and Two, we visited neighboring elementary and
                         junior high schools to observe classes with a focus on understanding
                         school goals. After the observations, we discussed the possibilities of
                         improving classes and various points of view among graduate students,
                         classroom teachers, and professors. On the basis of the theoretical
                         viewpoints and skills that we learned through the discussion, we moved
                         forward to Practicum Three. We were supposed to be aware of the
                         educational goals of schools before we start a month-long practicum.
                         Conducting lessons, classroom management, and pupils’ guidance were
                         our issues during the practicum. Furthermore, we were required to commu-
                         nicate with guardians and colleagues to make appropriate relationships.
                                In this presentation, we will show what we have acquired at this stage
                         of the newly developed teacher education system in Japan.


                         Learning To Teach In The Real World
                         Chris McCurry, Louisiana State University Shreveport
                         Heather Rose-Brian, Midway Elementary Professional Development School


                               This poster session will present a visual representation of on-site
                         coursework assigned in multiple methods courses to support pedagogical
                         understandings. Pictures and graphs will exemplify a model classroom,
                         observation experiences, mini-lessons, small-group tutorial sessions,
                         student achievement data, and reflections from teacher candidates partici-
                         pating in method courses taught on-site at Midway Elementary Profes-
                         sional Development School (MEPDS). The opportunity to participate in a
                         partnership between Louisiana State University in Shreveport and MEPDS
                         provides teaching and learning in a real world environment while being
                         supported by university faculty and PDS staff/faculty.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Literacy And Learning In The Inclusive
Classroom - A Case Study
Amanda Badami, William Paterson University


       The project I will present at the poster session will be a case study
that I completed this fall semester. My case study is a critical assessment
for the course, CIEE 229-01, Literacy and Learning in the Inclusive
Classroom. The case study will consist of a collection of all the work I have
done with a first grade student at a William Paterson University College
of Education Professional Development School.
       This case study will contain student assessment artifacts, evidence
of best practices in literacy instruction, and my reflections. As a teacher
education candidate, my case study will consist of my new understanding
of the fundamentals of literacy and learning. This new knowledge about
literacy and learning will be gained through the semester from my professor’s
instruction, and it will be exercised through the tutoring sessions I am
currently doing with a first grade student.
       This student is an emergent reader and writer attending William B.
Cruise Memorial School #11, a PDS in Passaic. All of the strategies I will
be practicing with this student are designed to make the tutoring sessions
with this student as effective as possible and to give me the chance to gain
the needed experience for becoming a successful future educator.
       By presenting my case study, I will have the opportunity to represent
William Paterson University as one of the founding members involved in
the National Association for Professional Development Schools (NAPDS).
I look forward to presenting during the poster session for two reasons.
First, I will represent my university’s efforts and involvement in the
NAPDS. Second, this poster presentation will also give me the opportunity
to be involved in an endeavor that will enhance my knowledge and
experience as a future educator.


Moving Forward, Learning Together: Tutoring
A Young Reader In A Professional
Development School
Keri Harris, William Paterson University


       In this presentation, I will share my experience of working with a
second grade student on literacy tasks over a semester. This experience
is part of an undergraduate course in the elementary teacher education
program at William Paterson University. The school in which I worked with
this young student is a Professional Development School partner located
in Passaic, New Jersey.
       The case study on which this presentation is based is comprised of
the work samples done by the student during our weekly tutoring sessions,
as well as my instructional plans, anecdotes, and reflections. The case
study is the culminating project in the course and is meant to showcase
my inquiry into how a child develops in literacy learning, and how my
planning, assessment, and reflection helps foster a child’s literacy growth.
It will also be evident that my knowledge of literacy instruction and of the
ways in which assessment informs instruction has grown over the semes-
ter. Part of what I’ll present will be what I perceive as the benefits of


                                                                                3
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         participating in a field-based course, including the support offered by the
                         course instructor and the classroom teacher, the opportunity to practice
                         my craft under their guidance, and the pleasure derived from helping a child
                         learn new skills.


                         Teaching Fellows At Ohio University:
                         Invaluable Resource To Support The Work Of
                         PDS Partnerships
                         Jenny Troutman, Chauncey Elementary School
                         Melanie VonWahlde, West Elementary School
                         Katelyn Outcalt, East Elementary School
                         Kate Faulkner, The Plains Elementary School


                                The purpose of this poster presentation is to share the unique role
                         of the graduate teaching fellow in the PDS Model at Ohio University.
                         Teaching fellows are licensed teachers who share a classroom and teach
                         half-time concurrent with enrollment in a master’s degree program in the
                         College of Education.
                                Teaching fellowships are offered by the Center for Professional
                         Development School Partnerships. A primary responsibility of each PDS
                         is to provide dedicated early field experiences for undergraduate students
                         preparing to become teachers, under the leadership of a site-based PDS
                         liaison teacher. The liaison also serves as mentor teacher for the teaching
                         fellow. Together, the liaison and teaching fellow share the liaison’s
                         classroom and teaching responsibilities. The liaison uses release time to
                         provide coordination and support services for the PDS teachers who are
                         sponsoring undergraduates in their classrooms.
                                The teaching fellows receive a graduate assistantship appointment
                         that pays their tuition and stipend, but they are interviewed and selected
                         by the PDS administrators and teacher liaisons. The teaching fellows are
                         also required to follow the PDS academic calendar while they complete their
                         graduate studies.
                                The poster session will explore the many roles and experiences of the
                         teaching fellow and what they do to support the work of the Professional
                         Development School. It will also give information regarding how each
                         presenter is using his/her experience in the PDS to support their graduate
                         studies and research interests.
                                Presenters are not only current teaching fellows, but also former PDS
                         partnership students.


                         The Impact Of Intern-Mentor Collaboration
                         On Emerging Readers
                         Cassandra Graves, Corinne Ponder, Jennifer Ruark, and Staci Stonnell,
                         Salisbury University


                               Many variables come into play when identifying the reasons for
                         student achievement, and educators acknowledge that it is misleading to
                         claim that any one factor is primarily responsible. It is possible, however,
                         to document student achievement before and after intensive interventions



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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

– interventions made possible by the collaboration between interns and
mentors supporting emerging first grade readers in a PDS setting.
       The investigators, three Salisbury University interns, have individu-
ally assessed and recorded the scores of all 76 students in the first grade
at Snow Hill Elementary School on the Houghton-Mifflin Emerging Reader
Survey during the first weeks of school in the fall of 2008. As part of their
internship experience and related action research project, the interns and
their mentors have developed and are implementing prescriptions for
individual and small group intervention during the fall semester and will
reassess students in weeks 8 and 16 of the term.
       One of the first grade mentor teachers, Clara Outten, earned her
M.Ed. in Reading at Salisbury University. She monitors this project as both
mentor for one of the interns and as instructor for the ELED 411 internship
seminar. Keith Conners, SU professor and PDS liaison, serves as the
internship supervisor for the three interns.
       In addition to sharing findings and limitations of the investigation
and detailing strategies used in the interventions, the poster presentation
will discuss the impact of the PDS-driven collaboration among stakehold-
ers – including school leaders, professional colleagues, parents, and
future teacher education candidates.


Walk Around The Block
Jeremy Fritz, Millersville University


      As student teachers at an urban middle school, we participated in a
project known as Walk around the Block (WAB). This assignment serves
as a means to create an understanding of the neighborhood that we will be
teaching and learning from until the culmination of the school year.
Through this experience of researching the school district and the faculty
and students that encompass it, we begin our bond with the community.
      Furthermore, studies of area schools for comparison and legal
decisions that affect schools as well as federal mandates, such as No Child
Left Behind, led us to look at our school through social, economic and
cultural lenses. C.S. Lewis said, “...to be on the inside of some door which
we have always seen from the outside is no mere neurotic fancy, but the
truest index of our real situation.” Student teachers may be filled with
anxiety and apprehensions that can hinder their ability to function in a
classroom environment. We shared our discoveries with one another and
became better acquainted and therefore better prepared to face the
challenge ahead of us.
      The presentation consists of an oral presentation coupled with a
PowerPoint that provided our fellow students with a first-hand view of our
new surroundings. This and the assignment guide will be made available
to the attendees to help them gain an in-depth understanding of their
respective school.




                                                                                5
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Walk Around The Block: Reynolds Middle
                         School
                         Lindsay Gemmill, Meghan Cross, and Abby Lavery, Millersville University


                                As interns at Reynolds Middle School, we began our field experience
                         with little knowledge about the world of urban education. The culture
                         within an urban school is unique, and in order to create a successful
                         learning environment one must be knowledgeable about their students’
                         way of life.
                                As required for our post-baccalaureate internship within the School
                         District of Lancaster, we conducted an in-depth assessment of external and
                         internal environments at Reynolds Middle School. In order to better
                         understand the needs of our students, we felt it essential to not only
                         examine the school itself but also the urban neighborhood in which the
                         students dwell. This project is called Walk Around The Block and it closely
                         examines both the physical and emotional climates of the students and
                         their interactions with each other and faculty.
                                While conducting this project, we were able to interview students,
                         teachers, and other administrators about topics related to the school’s
                         history, student academic experiences, and student life outside of school.
                         We were able to accurately capture both the external and internal environ-
                         ments through photography and artwork. The project was presented to
                         other post -baccalaureate interns in the School District of Lancaster.
                                Each of us has greatly benefited from this project and can better
                         relate to our students and understand their needs. We feel as though it
                         would be extremely beneficial for any teacher new to a school to “walk
                         around the block.”




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Q UESTION #1: H OW                       DOES
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SUCCESSFULLY ENGAGE CONSTITUENT
GROUPS WITHIN THE                        PDS?

21st Century Learning, PDS Style
Nasia P. Butcher and Jennifer Morris, Gilmer County High School


       This presentation illustrates how an original Professional Develop-
ment School partnership can be used as the basis for professional
development activities. This is just what happened between Glenville State
College and Gilmer County High School in central West Virginia. Two years
ago the Dean of Teacher Education was asked to serve on the Gilmer
County Technology Committee. This request seemed natural since all of
our partner schools rely on the expertise of individuals throughout our
partnership service area. However, these two educational institutions
could not imagine what would grow out of this extended association. This
past summer, Glenville State College and Gilmer County High School were
each able to obtain grant funding for teacher training. These two organi-
zations worked together to provide four intensive days of training which
involved both current and pre-service classroom teachers. All of the 21st
Century conference participants received training in electronic
whiteboards, E-Beam technology, GPS devices, electronic portfolios,
digital tablets, and specific electronic resources available over the internet.
Participants are still being monitored to measure the effectiveness of this
training in public school classrooms. We have found so many ways to
cultivate our PDS partnership to include more opportunities for all those
involved. This extended partnership will serve as a model that we can try
to emulate with our other PDS partner schools.


A Balanced Act: The Impact PDS Interns Have
On Mentors
Jodi Kamin, Grays Woods Elementary School
Deana Washell and Cindy Cowan, Park Forest Elementary School
Brian Peters, Easterly Parkway Elementary School


       In a Professional Development School community, much attention
is focused on the learning experience of interns in preparing them for the
teaching profession. Is the scale balanced? We believe the internship
experience greatly impacts classroom practices and teaching philosophies
of the veteran teachers who mentor these interns. Join us as we present
our findings regarding the professional and personal growth of mentors
in our PDS community. In this session, we will share research that supports
these beliefs after eleven years of building a professional community of
life-long learners through The Pennsylvania State University’s collabora-
tive with the State College Area School District.
       Impacts to be presented at this session include:
        • advancing skills with leading edge technology;
        • co-teaching advantages;
        • infusing new teaching strategies;

                                                                                  7
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                •   brainstorming powers on a daily basis;
                                •   viewing children through multiple lenses;
                                •   self reflection;
                                •   “raising the bar for the mentor” – teaching and modeling;
                                •   power of collaborative assessment; and
                                •   best practices for meeting the needs of all children.


                         Addressing Schools And Students With High
                         Needs . . . TOGETHER!
                         Mary Goebel, Black Hills State University


                                 Project SELECT is an innovative, accelerated program dedicated to
                         excellence in teacher preparation at the secondary level, with certification
                         as its final outcome. Project SELECT meets the needs of individuals who
                         have been in the workforce in other professions and now desire to teach.
                         From its inception, this program was designed to contribute to school
                         improvement initiatives in high-needs schools.
                                 Project SELECT’s partner, the Rapid City Area Schools, includes
                         four Professional Development School sites. North Middle School and
                         Rapid City Central High School were the original PDS sites, selected
                         primarily for their Native American diversity and high-needs populations.
                         North Middle School will be the school highlighted here to describe the
                         partnership addressing the high needs of this school community.
                                 North Middle School (NMS) was selected as the first Project SELECT
                         partner because of its commitment to the training of teachers, its large
                         Native American student population, and its placement in school improve-
                         ment as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act. Project SELECT supports
                         and contributes to the NMS school improvement plan to address the needs
                         of students at risk.
                                 This presentation will address innovative teacher training practices,
                         strategies, and interventions to address the needs of students with high
                         needs, as well as realistic dialogue regarding addressing student achieve-
                         ment, dealing with the economic and cultural challenges in a high needs
                         school, and the development of a learning community in a school-
                         university partnership. The panel will also share representative data
                         illustrating achievement gains, new teacher placement, and retention in
                         schools with high needs.




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                    2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Alabama A & M University And The Huntsville
City Schools – The English Language Learners
Professional Development Academy (ELL-
PDA) Partnership
Karen Foster, Alabama A & M University
Alan Malone, McDonnell Elementary School
Ruben Flores, Southwest Boys & Girls Club


      The English Language Learners Professional Development Acad-
emy (ELL-PDA) Partnership was formed by Alabama A & M University and
the Huntsville City Schools for the 2008-2009 school year to facilitate the
following Professional Development School goals:
       • increase the achievement and language acquisition of English
         Language Learners (ELL) attending McDonnell Elementary
         School;
       • increase professional development in topics related to the areas
         of English Language Learners (e.g., second language acquisi-
         tion, differentiated instruction, and literacy development) re-
         ceived by teachers working at McDonnell Elementary School;
         and
       • increase the field experience placements and professional devel-
         opment, in areas related to ELL instruction, received by pre-
         service candidates enrolled in education programs at Alabama A
         & M University.
      McDonnell Elementary School was selected as the ELL-PDA part-
nership school because of the following unique characteristics:
       • over 34%, or 140 of the 415 students, were identified as ELL
         students;
       • it was the only elementary school in Huntsville selected to
         participate in the 2008-2009 English Language Learner-Profes-
         sional Development Academy (ELL-PDA), a federally- funded
         program;
       • the Southwest Boys & Girl Club, directed by a Hispanic who
         speaks fluent Spanish, is housed on the campus and supports the
         after-school homework program; and
       • the leadership at the school (the principal is a graduate of
         Alabama A & M University) is receptive to collaborating with
         Alabama A & M University in the training of pre-service candi-
         dates completing programs in education.
      The presentation will demonstrate how the teachers received profes-
sional development training through the English Language Learners
Professional Development Academy; how they, in turn, presented training
for pre-service candidates; and how the collaboration and training was
enhanced through the unique partnership with the Boys and Girls Club,
housed on the campus at McDonnell Elementary School.




                                                                              9
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         All Participants? Seeking The Voices Of Pre-
                         Adolescents In The Professional Preparation
                         And Supervision Of Prospective Teachers In
                         The PDS Through Participatory Action
                         Research
                         Darby Delane, University of Florida
                         Yayle Barton and Christine Anne Ellis, Newberry Elementary School


                                 A university partner and two prospective teachers from a PDS will
                         ask us to consider who we mean by “all participants” when we conceptu-
                         alize the Nine Essentials that define a PDS. We are particularly interested
                         in considering this question when applied to “innovative practice” and
                         “ongoing collaboration” in school-university partnerships. Who are the
                         “constituent groups” that we are seeking to successfully engage in the
                         business of professional development? This university supervisor (PDS
                         site coordinator) and two prospective teachers conducted a participant
                         action research study to promote the voices of 4th grade students in the
                         central mission of preparing prospective teachers in their PDS. PDS
                         stakeholders wanted to know if inviting pre-adolescents to collaborate in
                         the supervision process of prospective teachers would impact their 4th
                         grade academic performances and how they negotiated their school
                         identities. In particular, these pre-adolescents worked closely with the
                         supervision team in a “community of practice” which met during formal and
                         informal observations of the prospective teachers in the classroom. Their
                         perspectives were included as key data for prospective teachers to
                         consider in their own professional growth. Some of their insights and ideas
                         were put directly into action in the classroom. Participant observation by
                         the site coordinator, interviews of 4th grade students and PDS educators,
                         and document collection occurred over a four-month period. Results will
                         be shared and the implications for how we position students as stakehold-
                         ers in the PDS will be discussed. Finally, implications of this experience for
                         the learning of these two prospective teachers will be explored.


                         An Environment Of Educational Excellence
                         Kaye Pepper, Kim Hartman, Rosemary Oliphant-Ingham, and Sarah
                         Blackwell, University of Mississippi
                                Partnerships are essential in order to prepare the most effective
                         teachers for the 21st century. The North Mississippi-University of Missis-
                         sippi Partnership is training teachers for the classrooms of the future.
                         Together we prepare individuals who empower others to take responsibil-
                         ity for their own learning and professionals who choose to continue to
                         develop by becoming master teachers.
                                This session’s presenters will describe the collaborative practices
                         of the Professional Development Schools and the university as they work
                         together to train preservice teachers in elementary, secondary, and special
                         education programs. The discussion will include the experiences provided
                         preservice teachers during their program, as well as requirements of the
                         program. In addition, the presenters will discuss the impact of the partner-
                         ships on clinical instructors’ teaching methodologies and classroom
                         practices. Finally, participants in this session will be provided with
                         concrete examples of how to elicit and maintain the interests of constituent
                         groups.

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Best Practices In Action Research: A
Partnership Approach To Teacher Training
And Professional Development
Robert P. Pelton, Stevenson University


       John Dewey focused extensively on the power of experience in
learning. He was right. Experience leads to learning, and learning informs
the way we go about constructing new experiences. That is what action
research is all about. Action research is a powerful experiential strategy
that guides pre-service and in-service teachers to develop the skills and
dispositions of reflective practitioners. This session will address the role
of the IHE and PDS in the professional preparation of future educators, in
the continuing professional development of educators already in the field,
and describe how PDS partners work together to make action research
happen.
       Action research can take many forms and provide many functions
for a classroom teacher. Participants will be provided an overview of the
workable forms and functions of action research and describe how schools
of education support teachers and teacher candidates to apply these
approaches in their own classrooms. The perspectives of nearly thirty
action research experts from around the country, who work closely with
and support action research, will be provided.
       Topics discussed will include: getting started with action research,
exploring contextual issues, communicating and negotiating with stake-
holders, exploring the role of school specialists, and understanding and
using data. Strategies such as teacher work sample methodology,
videography, and lesson study will be addressed. A question-and-answer
session and follow-up opportunities will be provided.


Building An Action Research Team
Elizabeth Brandjes, Julie Henry, Ian Lewis, and Kara Schwabel, Canisius
College
Michael Muscarella and Michele Sprada, Lindbergh Elementary School


       Action research is the process of studying a real school problem or
situation with a focus on improving one’s own teaching practice or to
enhance the functioning of a school. In this project, a cohort of student
teachers worked at two schools collaboratively with cooperating teachers,
the building principals, the School Planning Teams, and faculty from the
college to complete a joint action research project answering research
questions identified by the School Planning Teams. Full-time faculty
members from the college served as supervisors for the student teachers
and were co-instructors for their required action research class. Teachers
met with college faculty and student teachers after school to design the
research. Student teachers helped to gather data, and the teams worked
together to analyze data and to prepare presentations at the schools and
at the college. Student teachers met with college faculty to discuss the
structure and progress of the data gathering during their action research
class.
       At the same time, we studied the process of establishing Action
Research Teams and solicited feedback from the cooperating teachers,
student teachers, building principals, and School Planning Teams about

                                                                               11
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         how this model worked. We found benefits for the school, teachers,
                         students, teacher candidates, and college faculty. This session will share
                         the processes used to establish this model and feedback from various
                         participants about how the project enhanced their own professional
                         development.


                         Building Connectivity Between Theory And
                         Practice: Professional Development School-
                         Based University Coursework
                         Susan L. Swars, Georgia State University
                         Cassandra Matthews and Janita Richardson, Nesbit Elementary School


                                University coursework held on-site and integrated at Professional
                         Development Schools allows for systematic and intentional connectivity
                         between teacher preparation programs and K-12 schools so pre-service
                         teachers can build connectivity between theory and practice. This presen-
                         tation describes the collaborative planning and implementation between
                         university and PDS partners involved in holding undergraduate courses
                         in elementary education at an elementary PDS site. These courses included
                         six hours of literacy methods, three hours of science methods, three hours
                         of mathematics methods, and two hours of classroom management.
                         University faculty taught the methods courses and a PDS faculty member
                         taught the classroom management course. Collaborative activities embed-
                         ded in the courses, such as a Science Fair and Family Math Night, facilitated
                         both pre-service and in-service teacher development in a meaningful way
                         and were beneficial to elementary students. In addition to a description of
                         the courses, findings will be presented related to a research project that
                         investigated the effectiveness of the courses through the perspectives of
                         the pre-service teachers. Certain affordances and constraints were asso-
                         ciated with holding the courses in a PDS setting.


                         Classroom Action Research: Using
                         Professional Development To Address The
                         Achievement Gap
                         Ron Beebe, University of Houston - Downtown
                         Diane Corrigan and R.D. Nordgren, Cleveland State University
                         Edward Weber, Paul Finucan, Jim Heffernan, Karen Mortensen, and Sarah
                         Sells, Cleveland School of Science and Medicine


                               This presentation describes the classroom action research con-
                         ducted by pairs of pre-service teachers and mentors collaborating during
                         the student teaching experience in the Master of Urban Secondary
                         Teaching (MUST) Program at Cleveland State University. Action research
                         was implemented by the faculty of a “small school” at one of CSU’s
                         Professional Development School sites, John Hay High School in the
                         Cleveland Metropolitan School District, to determine strategies to in-
                         crease the achievement of their African-American male students.
                               The presentation will address the action research projects com-
                         pleted by MUST pre-service teachers and the four research questions
                         developed by the John Hay Campus faculty members:


12
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

       1. How does introducing positive male role models in the curriculum
improve student achievement?
       2. Does an increase in positive attitudes toward reading increase
student achievement?
       3. Does the use of podcasting in the classroom increase student
comprehension of subject area content?
       4. Does single gender grouping increase student achievement?
       The methodology, data collection, survey results and achievement
test scores from the individual classroom studies and the small school
project will be shared.
       This presentation addresses Question #1 by focusing on the profes-
sional development of pre-service and in-service teachers via classroom
action research conducted cooperatively by university faculty, in-service
teachers, the school administrator, and pre-service teachers at a PDS site.


Co-Planning: Utilizing School/University
Collaboration To Design And Present K-12
PDS Graduate Coursework On Differentiated
Instruction
Elizabeth Neville and Beverly German, Towson University


       Differentiated instruction is a non-negotiable “assumption” in every
classroom, yet the reality in many classrooms is that teachers feel ill-
equipped to embed differentiated strategies into their daily lessons. As
classrooms become more diverse and assessment stakes elevate, this
critical component of instruction must be addressed for teachers and
administrators. This session will focus on a university and school system
partnership which plans professional development that is meaningful and
applicable to K-12 teaching and learning. A model for designing a skeletal
graduate course syllabus and an initial course presentation involving
selected master K-12 teachers and administrators to complete the final
content, presentation, and project guidelines will be presented. Also
included is a plan for presenting multiple sections of the course throughout
the school system to teachers and administrators each semester in order
to maximize immediate implementation of differentiated instruction and
responsive teaching. Suggestions for logistical supports, such as MOUs,
billing options, and strategic locations for course presentations will be
shared.


Co-Teaching Revisited: An Inside Look At The
Progress And Growing Pains Of Implementing
Collaborative Internships
Keith J. Conners, Stacie Siers, Ron Siers, Cassandra Graves, Corinne Ponder,
Jennifer Ruark, and Staci Stonnell, Salisbury University
Clara Outten, Snow Hill Elementary School


      A common concern among school officials in the age of NCLB is what
happens when novice teacher candidates assume major instructional roles
in classrooms facing high-stakes testing expectations. Among the re-


                                                                               13
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         sponses by leading universities is the adoption of a co-teaching relation-
                         ship between intern and mentor, with the expectation that the mentor
                         teacher will remain engaged in instruction while hosting an intern. While
                         promising in theory, implementing a paradigm shift from “mentor disen-
                         gagement” in traditional student teaching arrangements to “sharing the
                         lead voice” in truly collaborative internships is easier said than done.
                               At the 2007 PDS National Conference in Las Vegas, presenters from
                         Salisbury University’s PDS partnerships filled their session room to
                         overflowing by demonstrating “21 Strategies in 21 Minutes” for mentors
                         co-teaching with interns. Since then, the SU model has been refined, over
                         500 mentor teachers have been formally trained in co-teaching, and action
                         research investigations have begun to document the benefits of collabo-
                         ration for P-12 student achievement.
                               This session will demonstrate some new and re-tooled co-teaching
                         strategies for interns and mentors working together. It will also present
                         examples of action research investigations that have helped to document
                         the benefits of co-teaching in PDS settings on P-12 student achievement.
                         Those in attendance will be given an opportunity to submit questions and
                         problem scenarios from their respective settings that will be addressed by
                         interns, mentors, and university supervisors with extensive co-teaching
                         experience.


                         Combining Foreign Language Majors In The
                         Multicultural School Setting To Promote
                         Language Development Of Pre-Service
                         Teachers And Extend Support To Bilingual And
                         ELL Learners
                         Idalia Marin, Stephanie Spooner, and Shawn LaPlante, Chesebro Elementary
                         School
                         Michael Morris, Annette Vilarreal, and Rachel Lynn, Northern Illinois
                         University


                                With the onset of Bilingual/ELL and LEP learners in Illinois taking
                         the LSAT in English and the increased standards of the NCLB movement,
                         schools with significant populations of these learners are seeking innova-
                         tive ways to support students toward increased learning. Bilingual and
                         ELL teachers are often difficult to find and certainly at a premium, and
                         bilingual volunteers are a scarce commodity. The Chesebro-Northern
                         Illinois University Professional Development School began its first year
                         by incorporating teacher candidates in Spanish as a foreign language
                         (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) to complete field experiences in
                         bilingual classrooms to increase achievement in literacy and reading.
                         These pre-service teachers also helped to develop and implement an after-
                         school Spanish class. The partnership activities promoted language
                         development for Spanish pre-service teachers in an authentic setting while
                         lowering the teacher-student ratio and increasing student interaction. The
                         after-school program bridged multicultural connections by using Spanish-
                         speaking children as a model for speaking while their English peers enjoyed
                         learning a new language.
                                As part of their pre-service coursework, the elementary teacher
                         candidates (College of Education) participated in professional develop-
                         ment workshops related to Bilingual/ELL student achievement issues. The

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                    2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Chesebro teachers and principal conducted the workshops, thus connect-
ing classroom practice into teacher education. The elementary pre-service
students are encouraged to participate in the after-school language
programs.
       In this presentation, both in-service and pre-service teachers will
share their experiences and share a variety of strategies on how they
organized and implemented this successful PDS model.


Continuing With A Virtual Hand: How The
PDS Project Can Enhance The Educational
Technology Experience
Christopher M. Irovando, Conackamack Middle School


       This presentation will address the achievements and/or successes
of the NJCMS PDS program at the middle school level. The participants in
this presentation will discuss the value of the three-year old PDS project
for Conackamack Middle School and our emphasis on professional devel-
opment opportunities in Smart Board technology. Working with Kean
University’s Center for Innovative Education and the New Jersey Consor-
tium of Middle Schools, Conackamack Middle School sought to identify
specific technology needs that were not being addressed within the school
district. The NJCMS PDS program identified technology training as a focus
for 2008-2009. Several needs arose as a result: 1) securing professional
development based on current trends in educational technology, 2)
funding initiatives to purchase technology based on the professional
development, 3) offering guidance in constructing classroom lessons
utilizing the technology, and 4) ensuring that student teachers are exposed
to current trends in educational technology.
       Our NJCMS PDS program noted that while it is important to develop
quality teachers, it is as important to provide opportunities for veteran
teachers to expand their knowledge base through professional develop-
ment. This presentation will inform participants on how to identify a
technology, encourage turn-key training, and provide both support and
resources to implement new technologies to enhance student achieve-
ment. Demonstrations/discussions of acquired technology, as well as
discussions of future initiatives, will be provided.


Continuous Growth For Special Education
Interns And Mentors Through Focused
Professional Development Opportunities
Ken Evans and Debi Gartland, Towson University


      Continuous growth should be a major objective for all parties
working within a PDS structure. One key element for the continued growth
of our interns, mentors, and university supervisors is the implementation
of focused professional development activities. This presentation will
provide participants with detailed information related to how the Towson
University Elementary Education/Special Education dual certification
program works with our partners to develop and implement appropriate
staff development activities for our interns and mentors. Professional


                                                                              15
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         development primarily supports the key outcome of student achievement
                         through increasing participants’ knowledge and skills. Professional devel-
                         opment activities are presented at school sites, university classrooms, and
                         during system-wide training opportunities and may be focused on indi-
                         vidual school goals, system priorities, or program initiatives.
                               Time will be allotted for questions and discussion by the partici-
                         pants. As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to
                         describe effective strategies for developing and implementing appropriate
                         professional development experiences for PDS partners.


                         Cracking The Standards Code: The Role Of
                         Action Research In Standards-Driven
                         Education
                         Robert P. Pelton, Stevenson University
                         Susan Pillets, The Chatsworth School
                         Cheryl Wittmann and Maggie Madden, Maryland State Department of
                         Education


                                This presentation will clarify the role of standards in education and
                         describe how to effectively put them to use through action research.
                                Standards-driven education is here to stay. Most Americans are
                         convinced that clear academic standards will lead to improved student
                         achievement. Governmental agencies, accrediting bodies, institutions of
                         higher education, local education agencies, specialized professional asso-
                         ciations, and the like have fallen in line with the notion that high standards
                         equate to effective teaching. Each has identified standards that they
                         believe are critical to successful educational programs.
                                Today’s teachers in training are constantly being asked to “use the
                         standards” as they develop their teaching practice; however, this is a
                         daunting task. Many new teachers are confused about how to effectively
                         implement the various standards, which leads to a discrepancy between
                         what standards-based proponents expect and what teachers actually do
                         in the classroom. This is in part due to how pre-service teacher preparation
                         programs go about training new teachers in how to effectively use
                         standards (Burns and Swanson, 2000).
                                Participants in this presentation will discover how the mystery
                         between standards-driven education and classroom practice can be solved
                         by using action research as a bridge between standards, teaching prac-
                         tices, and student achievement.


                         Cultivating Confident Professionals In An At-
                         Risk Setting
                         Angela Angers, April Hoffman, Tiffany Nay, and Shannon Puglisi, Dean
                         Petersen Professional Development School


                               Dean Petersen Professional Development School is an At-Risk
                         school located in inner-city Las Vegas, one mile from the Las Vegas Strip.
                         Finding and retaining quality teachers in an At-Risk school is often
                         difficult. This presentation focuses on the multi-faceted approach of an
                         elementary education cohort program, in conjunction with the university,


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

to develop confident professionals. Our partner university, UNLV, is
located within one mile of our school, thus creating an environment for
collaboration.
      In this presentation, we will look at the roles of the primary constitu-
ent groups of the cohort program, the interns and the mentor teachers. As
former interns, and now 2nd year teachers at Petersen, we have a unique
perspective on the program. We will take a close look at what this PDS
program does well on both sides to create confident professionals who
want to STAY in this At-Risk school.


Cultural Diversity Comes Home
Terry W. Mullins and Anita Reynolds, Concord University


       Schools in a PDS partnership are often engaged in examining new
avenues to address diversity issues in their schools and communities. The
desire to build respect and appreciation for people of different and varied
ethnicities often overlooks, however, the cultural diversity in one’s own
communities and classrooms. Even in communities that may appear to be
ethnically homogenous, diversity may be a part of the story of the
community and its people.
       In fact, for centuries observers have contemplated the origins of the
people in the Southern Appalachian Mountains known as Melungeons.
In an earlier epoch of American history, any group that did not fit into easy
identification as white, African, or American Indian was called mulatto,
mestizo, or mustee and often forced to deal with the discrimination and
baggage that went with not being a part of the ethnic majority. These
descriptive terms and the French-derived “melungeon,” share their root in
the Latin verb miscere, “to mix.” This presentation examines these unique
people.
       The focus of this session will, therefore, challenge educators to
examine the cultural experiences of people in their own communities. As
they better understand those differences, educators will recognize how
such differences have shaped their own values and the values of the
students that they teach. They will also be reminded that cultural diversity
is not just a 21st century phenomenon but a part of the strands that have
woven American history for centuries.


Developing Depth And Establishing
Maintainable Structures Through Innovative
Pre-Service Teacher Preparation Practices
Julie McGough and Marcie Brown, Hodge Elementary School
Leansa Bryan, Ivy Yee-Sakamoto, Sally Alonzo Bell, Greg Kaiser, and Aaron
Bud Weatherby, Azusa Pacific University


       Question #1 (“How does professional development successfully
engage constituent groups within the PDS?”) guides the development of
this session to (1) explore the continuing journey from establishing a new
PDS program to setting policy and developing structures for a maintain-
able, growing program; and (2) link this journey with the development of
two innovations introduced into the PDS pre-service teacher program



                                                                                 17
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         aimed at increasing achievement among all students, but especially among
                         the English language learners.
                               First, in an effort to maximize the teacher candidates’ fieldwork
                         experience of observation and participation prior to their clinical practicum,
                         they were charged with key responsibilities in the English Learner Inter-
                         vention Project (ELIP). ELIP is an intervention program designed to raise
                         academic achievement among the school’s fourth and fifth grade English
                         language learners by providing them with additional support. Specifically,
                         PDS teacher candidates were taught to conduct running records and
                         fluency checks to collect data on all fourth and fifth graders’ reading levels
                         and fluency throughout the school year. Under the guidance of master
                         teachers, the reading methods instructor, and the clinical practicum
                         seminar instructor, the candidates used this data to design and deliver an
                         intervention program for 30 fourth graders and 30 fifth graders to receive
                         intensive language support focused on reading fluency, comprehension,
                         and vocabulary development as well as developmental spelling.
                               Second, the PDS candidates designed, implemented, and evaluated
                         a series of parent/family activities, such as Family Reading Night, to
                         support parental involvement in their children’s academic activities.
                               Data assessing the effectiveness of these innovations for increasing
                         learning among PDS candidates and elementary school students will be
                         presented.


                         Developing Professional Development School
                         Programs That Engage Constituent Groups
                         And Focus On Student Learning.
                         Tracy Rock, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
                         Jennifer Baucom and Jody Neil-Shaughnessy, Shady Brook Elementary
                         School


                               Shady Brook PDS is committed to developing programs that incor-
                         porate all members (school faculty, university faculty, teacher education
                         candidates, community members, and parents) and focus on improving
                         student learning. In this session two programs will be presented to discuss
                         the roles and contributions of PDS members and lessons learned. The
                         following highlighted programs are the means by which relationships of
                         PDS members are developed, PDS goals are achieved, teachers are en-
                         gaged in on-going professional development, and students’ learning is
                         enhanced:
                               The Literacy for Democracy (LFD) program works in economically
                         disadvantaged communities to improve children’s literacy and academic
                         achievement through service learning engagement with university teacher
                         education students. Teacher education students take a reading and social
                         studies methods course on the Shady Brook campus and work with
                         university and school faculty to develop and implement an after-school
                         program. The after-school program is centered on service learning projects
                         identified by community stakeholders. As these groups of students
                         collaborate, the teacher education students support students’ reading and
                         writing with explicit tutoring and literacy strategies.
                               The English Language Learner program is a 12-week program that
                         involves 3 hours of instructional time each week for ELL parents and
                         students and is conducted on site at Shady Brook. The classes for adults


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

are taught by Shady Brook’s ELL staff, and tutoring for students is
conducted by UNC Charlotte teacher education students enrolled in a
reading methods course. Several community agencies work together to
provide transportation for participants, snacks, and babysitting services
during the class time.


Developing School Leadership In The Context
Of PDS
Craig S. McClellan, Fairmont State University
James Phares, Marion County Schools


       Providing meaningful professional development is often a challenge
for district and school building leadership. At the same time, colleges and
universities are often criticized for leadership preparation programs that do
not adequately prepare leaders for today’s schools. By utilizing Profes-
sional Development School networks, the goals of both these processes
can be successfully combined to result in stronger professional develop-
ment and leadership preparation programs. This session will describe the
planning and development processes that were used to build a principal
preparation program by Fairmont State University and its PDS partners.
The session will explore the progress of the planning group that began by
identifying local school district leadership needs and desired program
outcomes and then worked backwards resulting in something different
than expected. The joint work not only facilitated a new university
specialization program, but also helped team members envision how the
same work could be responsive to the professional development needs of
partnering school districts. Session discussion will include how joint goals
were accomplished by abandoning traditional 3-credit hour courses of
face-to-face isolated instruction in favor of 1-credit hour modules aligned
with leadership preparation standards and focused on relevant Profes-
sional Development School leadership topics. In this model, the solo
university instructor was also abandoned in favor of teaching teams that
also include practicing school administrators.


Developing Teachers As Leaders In PDS: Both
Pre-Service And In-Service
Louis L. Warren, East Carolina University


      Leadership in professional development among teachers and with
administrators should be shared in order to bring committed ownership to
the visions and purposes of Professional Development Schools. Leader-
ship among teachers does not just happen. Teachers need professional
development in what true leadership is, why leadership is important in the
classroom, how to develop teacher leadership, and how to successfully
use leadership skills. At East Carolina University, a Teacher Leadership
Academy has been implemented to help pre- and in-service teachers
develop their leadership skills. In-service teachers from the PDS work
closely with a group of pre-service teachers through various avenues of
instruction and experiences, both on the university’s campus and at the
PDS. Hear the techniques used and the success of this important profes-
sional development.


                                                                                19
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Dialogue Journals At A PDS: Pre-Service
                         Teachers Write With Elementary Students In A
                         Professional Development School
                         Cecile M. Arquette, Erin Nichols, and Jamie Taylor, Bradley University


                                A PDS coordinator and education professor and two of her under-
                         graduate co-researchers will discuss how a PDS dialogue journaling
                         project provided on-going training for teachers and a place for pre-service
                         teachers to become involved at a PDS site. Over the past 3 years, 33
                         different classes of K-4 children, nearly 175 pre-service teachers, and 18
                         classroom teachers have participated in the project.
                                The dialogue journal project began in the fall of 2006, when univer-
                         sity students in two of Dr. Arquette’s language arts methods classes
                         began writing to primary students at Whittier Primary School. A dialogue
                         journal is writing done between a student and another person. In this case,
                         K- 4 students wrote to pre-service teachers on a weekly basis. In 2007, Dr.
                         Arquette collected interview data from both participant teachers and
                         university students. In this, the third year of the project, Dr. Arquette
                         decided to solicit help from her pre-service teachers to interview primary
                         school participants. Two of these students, Jamie Taylor and Erin Nichols,
                         became her research partners.
                                The presentation will include results of the interview data, which
                         shows how the PDS provided a real-world venue for the pre-service
                         teachers to practice a writing improvement strategy with young students.
                         In addition, pre-service teachers had access to student writing samples to
                         use when leaning about writing assessment in their university classes.
                         How the PDS teachers were supported in professional development will
                         also be discussed.


                         Disseminating Differentiated And Cognitively
                         Complex Classroom Questioning Strategies
                         Throughout A Title 1 School
                         Corrie Orthober, Bellarmine University


                                The success of an educational institution relies heavily on the
                         organic creativity of its faculty. However, creating new and innovating
                         instructional strategies can be a waste of time unless the strategies are
                         disseminated throughout the institution in a meaningful way. Over the past
                         three years, a professional relationship has been forged between Bellarmine
                         University and Iroquois High School Magnet Career Academy that has
                         enabled faculty to create innovating questioning strategies and spread
                         them through the school using professional developments.
                                This session will illustrate teacher-developed group assessment
                         reports for the students and to guide class discussions. These methods
                         ensure that each student participates in class discussions. The methods
                         also structure teacher questioning so that teachers ask differentiated
                         questions during class discussions.
                                Teacher analysis of the content learned or not learned within a unit
                         of study, based on formative assessments, can provide data for class
                         discussions and create a solid framework for analysis of student knowl-


20
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

edge. In recognition of this, we have endeavored to create a template to
guide class discussions so that students can have a historical conversa-
tion among themselves that is crafted to reflect students’ abilities to recall,
comprehend, apply, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge.
      Our methods have proved extremely effective in engaging students.
Therefore, we disseminated the methods across Iroquois High School. The
high school is a Title I school with about 70% of the student body having
access to Title I programs. The school is ethnically diverse and educates
a large immigrant population from Latin America, West Africa, and the
Middle East.


Effectively Utilizing PDS Partners: Connecting
PDS Partners For Professional Development
Tonga Balch, Indiana State University


       Highly effective professional development is critical for schools
today, particularly given financial and time constraints. University liaisons
are in a position to provide on-going professional development support
for the school they work with. This may include their personal expertise or
that of university faculty members whom the liaison engages to facilitate
professional development at the school. The network of professional
development support has been expanded to include other PDS sites. This
presentation will showcase how one PDS school provided professional
development for another school within the PDS Partnership.
       Arlington High School shared a desire for professional development
that would enhance the recent incorporation of projects-based learning in
a block schedule format. Administrators were seeking additional profes-
sional development relative to time utilization and maximization. Dialogue
at the university level centered on who would provide the best information
to Arlington faculty, a professor or a practitioner in the field who was
successfully utilizing block scheduling. The consensus was that fellow
PDS K-12 faculty members would be the most effective as they have had
positive and negative experiences that would be beneficial to Arlington
High School. The university liaison served as the conduit for connecting
PDS partners and facilitating the professional development experience.
This presentation will discuss the details of this partnership in a discus-
sion/dialogue format.


Engaging All PDS Participants: Family
Literacy Events
Sherry DuPont, Christine Walsh, Marilyn Lees-Yensick, Megan Newmeyer, and
Ashley Zaboroski, Slippery Rock University
Patti Messett, West Hill Elementary School


       Family literacy events offer all PDS constituents – teacher candi-
dates, university faculty, in-service teachers, and families – the opportu-
nity for professional development. Each semester Slippery Rock Univer-
sity teacher candidates enrolled in field experience and student teaching
plan and implement an interactive event where families join their children
to participate in learning activities.



                                                                                  21
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                This collaborative endeavor requires reflective planning for all
                         constituents. Reading coaches in the schools meet with the teacher
                         candidates to discuss the areas of academic need and topics relevant to
                         the parents. With these topics in mind, university faculty and teacher
                         candidates study the neighborhoods where the children and their families
                         live through a cultural tour and reflective assignment. Then university
                         faculty model activities and materials designed to address the areas of
                         need. They also show the integration of the curriculum by modeling the use
                         of social studies content to engage in family literacy experiences.
                                Teacher candidates work in partnerships to develop activities
                         centered around a theme to foster learning interactions among K-6 learners
                         and family members. To extend this learning, the candidates also design,
                         explain, and distribute materials that families can use with their children at
                         home. They model how the materials can be adapted to address other
                         curricular areas. Student teachers mentor the teacher candidates enrolled
                         in field experiences. In-service teachers witness the integration of curricu-
                         lum and they receive copies of materials that are distributed to the parents.
                         Constituents engage in sharing feedback through a survey that is distrib-
                         uted to parents, teacher candidates, and K-6 learners.


                         Engaging Faculty In Transformative
                         Professional Development Initiatives: The
                         Institute For University-School Partnership
                         And BRAVE Experience
                         Rona Milch Novick and Scott J. Goldberg, Yeshiva University


                                This presentation will discuss the development and mission of the
                         Institute for University-School Partnership and highlight how one of its
                         programs, BRAVE, successfully engages constituent groups at both the
                         pre- and post-service levels. The Institute was created based on the
                         expressed need of Jewish schools throughout North America for high
                         quality culturally and religiously sensitive professional development and
                         consultation. Fusing the intellectual capital and research expertise of
                         Yeshiva University with the wisdom, creativity, and experience of teachers
                         and leaders in the field, the Institute advances the professionalism and skill
                         sets of current and future educators through collaborative professional
                         development that offers schools the opportunity for transformative growth.
                                BRAVE, a program developed to promote responsible social leader-
                         ship and decrease bullying in schools, invites established teachers from
                         participating schools from across North America for an intensive training
                         program to become turn-key trainers at their sites. Pre-service teachers are
                         invited to attend the training, as well, building awareness of student social
                         issues and creating a cohort of interested professionals. Training content
                         focuses on the specifics of bully prevention as well as salient professional
                         development and implementation challenges such as developing buy-in.
                         BRAVE is now planning programs for these “turn-key trainers” to support
                         the teachers and projects in other schools in their region. This iterative
                         training process is bolstered by the ongoing analysis and reporting of
                         student, family, and teacher data in the aggregate, at the same time as each
                         school is trained and benefits from school-specific data analysis and
                         reporting.



22
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Engaging Teacher Candidates And Other
Members Of The PDS Community In The
Mixed Method Action Research Design To
Determine The Most Appropriate Decisions To
Improve Teaching Practices And The PDS
Environment
Diane Davis, College of Notre Dame of Maryland
Marjorie Leppo, Howard University


       A renewed and increased interest in action research continues to
emerge in Professional Development Schools and universities across the
country. This impetus is largely due to teachers who now view their
classrooms as rich venues for improving and affirming the curriculum and
its impact on students. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the
importance of using the mixed methods research design to gather quanti-
tative and qualitative data within the Professional Development School
environment. The mixed method design capitalizes on the uniqueness of
quantitative and qualitative differences but also emphasizes the synergy
between the two approaches.
       The presentation will include the following topics:
       1. Define and discuss the characteristics of quantitative and quali-
tative research methods and how each supports the other.
       2. Identify several differences in the philosophical framework for
qualitative and quantitative research.
       3. Discuss the values of using the mixed method approach when
conducting action research.
       4. Describe and give examples of the data-gathering techniques that
can be employed using qualitative and quantitative data.
       5. Discuss examples of the use of the mixed method approach by
teacher candidates and Professional Development Schools.
       In many instances the teacher candidates are the “catalyst” for
change within the Professional Development School. Their action re-
search many times is the leverage needed to modify instruction. The
presentation will highlight several mixed method action research projects
conducted by teacher candidates during their internship experiences.
Another example within the presentation highlights the role of members of
the PDS community in determining program modifications and/or candi-
date preparation.


Engaging The Participant Of The PDS School
And Raising Student Achievement Through A
Voluntary Staff Development Program
Suzanne Horn, Patrice Petroff, Amy Thornburg, Darilyn Butler, Chris Law,
and Mark Birkholz, Queens University of Charlotte
Paul Bonner, Myers Park Traditional School


       We have created a professional development program at our PDS
site that is completely voluntary for pre-service teachers and faculty of the
K-6 school. We developed the program by surveying Queen’s faculty

                                                                                23
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         about talents they could provide and surveying Myers Park faculty asking
                         what they would like to participate in through staff development. Through
                         the surveys and the creation of a steering committee the program was
                         developed. We would like to talk about the creation process and the staff
                         development offered. There are no school-wide staff development meet-
                         ings. Teachers pick and choose what they would like to participate in from
                         the modules offered. We have over two-thirds of the faculty participating
                         from the K-12 school and 100% participating from the university. Many
                         teachers have signed up for more than one activity. (Activities include
                         active math strategies, active teaching, parent night for study skills, first
                         grade parent night focused on reading, kindergarten parent workshops on
                         reading with the use of student created books, diversity training for
                         teachers to help close the achievement gap, and active academic tasks.)
                         Each offering has been designed to give one credit toward licensure
                         renewal and all of the topics are pertinent to issues that the school and all
                         educators struggle with in today’s teaching. We would love to share how
                         we have created a positive staff development program that teachers don’t
                         dread attending and pre-service teachers learn about the realities and
                         struggles of teaching.


                         Enhancing Field Experiences Through The
                         PDS Collaboration
                         Frank Carrano, Southern Connecticut State University


                                Question #1 seems to be directed toward some of the activities that
                         we have been involved in over the past three or four years. The Profes-
                         sional Development Schools collaboration at Southern Connecticut State
                         University is evolving. The initial efforts were directed at identifying
                         schools that would agree to become affiliated with the university as sites
                         for student field experiences. The program still has a major focus on the
                         improvement and enhancement of field experiences for our teacher candi-
                         dates. The PDS collaboration has provided opportunities for university
                         instructors to better define their goals and objectives for field experiences
                         as well as working collaboratively with school administrators and teachers
                         to implement those objectives.
                                Field experiences have been the primary focus for the PDS collabo-
                         ration because we recognize that field-based learning is critical for our
                         aspiring teachers. Teachers and students are interacting more effectively
                         because of this initiative. School principals and superintendents also see
                         the value to this collaboration.
                                We are beginning to identify sites for focused field experiences that
                         will provide opportunities for candidates to concentrate in a specialized
                         area. Our instructors are learning from students how classroom teachers
                         are meeting, in particular, the challenges of diversity and assessment. We
                         are also beginning to pay more attention to the actual issues that our
                         partner schools are involved in with respect to student performance and
                         engagement. We hope to be able to provide opportunities for our candi-
                         dates to participate in school-based professional development together
                         with the classroom teachers. We are developing further goals to expand
                         these opportunities, recognizing that the schools themselves are the most
                         authentic organizations for introducing our candidates to the realities of
                         the classroom. We expect our PDS collaboration to yield benefits that will
                         provide a framework for course content.


24
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

FEA + PDS = Collaborative Teacher
Recruitment And Continuous Professional
Development
Jennifer Mascott, Patty Otero, and Donna Culan, Howard County Public
School System


       As PDS partnerships strive to provide professional development
that engages all of our constituent groups, we often overlook an important
audience and our opportunity to influence this audience. This eager
audience would be our high school students who are themselves consid-
ering teaching as a profession. Within our secondary PDS partnerships,
we have looked to connect the interns and university representatives with
existing Future Educators Association clubs. As a part of this session we
will talk about the various ways we have encouraged this collaboration and
the benefits to students, the universities, and the school system.


Findings Of Measurable Teaching
Effectiveness Impact For A PDS Teacher
Professional Development Program In Urban
But NOT Rural Partner Districts: Why And
What Are We Doing About It?
Dale Scott Ridley, Arizona State University


       The ASU CTEL enjoys highly formalized PDS partnerships with ten
high-poverty urban and rural school districts across the state of Arizona.
Partner district programming consists of district-based, initial teacher
certification programs (delivered face-to-face) and graduate-level profes-
sional development for in-service teachers in reading, mathematics, and
science – all via live, interactive videoconferencing. Annual program
evaluation research, utilizing blind, rubric-scored ratings of teaching
performance videotapes with inter-rater reliability data, indicates that
urban, but NOT rural, teachers participating in the “Content Academies”
out-perform non-participating urban teachers matched for years of teach-
ing experience on general teaching effectiveness, student engagement,
and use of inquiry-based pedagogy.
       Dialogue with urban and rural partner district leadership suggests
that the significant impact of the Content Academies for the urban teachers
is the result of both rigorous programming and strong district administra-
tive links to and expectations of Content Academy participants. In short,
professional development had a greater impact on observed teaching
effectiveness when principals noted which teachers were engaging in the
professional development, regularly observed their teaching, and commu-
nicated high expectations.
       Leveraging the close professional relationships within the PDS
partnership, a plan was created to require principals of Content Academy
participants to conduct semester “walk throughs” and participate in the
scoring of Clinical Performance-based Assessments (required of Content
Academy participants). At the heart of this presentation is the concept of
leveraging a school-university PDS partnership to change and improve the
teacher professional development paradigm.


                                                                              25
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         From “Classroom” To “CLASSROOM” – An
                         Experiment In Collaboration
                         Alan Sturrock, St. Mary’s College of Maryland


                                Using Bolman and Deal’s conceptual framework for understanding
                         organizations, including the creation of new systems, this presentation
                         attempts to chronicle, from multiple points of view, the journey of an idea
                         that bubbled up from the school system: How does a teacher/instructional
                         resource teacher/vice principal/principal become an adjunct faculty mem-
                         ber at the collaborating Institute of Higher Education?
                                Conversations involving all PDS constituents – classroom teachers,
                         instructional resource teachers, interns, and university faculty – began to
                         focus on and design a series of four modules around the following themes:
                         the two cultures; INTASC principles as a bridge; the something of
                         curriculum, instruction and assessment; emerging/continuing research on
                         adult learners; and content area SPAS.
                                Mentoring quickly became the lynchpin to connect the aforemen-
                         tioned frameworks, and a series of three sessions were designed to be
                         delivered by a staff development specialist who has extensive experience
                         in her field and who is also an active member of the FCPS/Hood College/
                         Mount St. Mary’s College PDS. Our intent is to place interested school
                         system interns with willing IHE faculty members to assist not only with the
                         above themes, but also to model what thoughtful, reflective pre-service
                         might look like.
                                The plan will be implemented in December and January of this school
                         year, and we will share the results (from the points of view of an intern, a
                         classroom teacher, an instructional resource teacher, and the director of
                         intern placements) at the March Conference.


                         Getting Digital Dirt On Your Hands
                         Patrick A. Hannigan, Armstrong Atlantic State University


                               Ossabaw Island off Georgia’s coast was the setting for a unique
                         educational experience for teachers and students of several Savannah
                         Chatham Public Schools this past summer. This project was designed to
                         encourage minority students from Savannah Chatham Public Schools to
                         pursue careers in science, math, engineering and technology. Students
                         and their teachers worked with “nationally recognized” professors from
                         AASU in an exciting and intellectually stimulating environment for ten
                         days. The students lived in a unique 19th century facility, in an 18th century
                         environment, using 21st century technology to create an electronic field
                         guide and place sensors to collect data in a pristine, natural habitat. This
                         data is streamed into the classrooms for teachers to use in their daily
                         lessons
                               OssaBest is an ongoing, NSF-funded, cooperative venture between
                         Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah Chatham County Public
                         Schools, and the Ossabaw Foundation.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Give + Gain = Change
Karen A. Sealander and April Brady, Northern Arizona University
Mary Lou Duffy, Florida Atlantic University - Jupiter


       One goal of the PDS relationship is the focus on preparation of future
educators and the continuing professional development of in-field educa-
tors. This presentation showcases a pilot project between a university and
a public elementary school designed to build on knowledge as it relates to
Response to Intervention (RTI) and inclusion.
       PRAXIS is a decade-old cooperative PDS partnership between Killip
Elementary School and the College of Education at Northern Arizona
University. PRAXIS teacher candidates are undergraduate dual majors
who spend three semesters on-site at Killip School.Our pilot group was
comprised of nine general education cooperating teachers hosting nine of
our undergraduate PRAXIS teacher candidates in their classrooms. The
purpose of the pilot was three-fold: 1) to provide PRAXIS teacher candi-
dates with an opportunity to implement RTI and effective teaching
practices for students with special needs in a general education environ-
ment, 2) to provide an opportunity for the general education cooperating
teacher to keep the special needs student in the general setting while still
providing effective instruction and using RTI, and 3) to allow the PRAXIS
teacher candidate and the host teacher to collaborate in planning, teach-
ing, and managing the special needs learners in the general education
environment, thus building the skill base of each.
       In this presentation the pilot project will be described. The percep-
tions and satisfaction data of the PRAXIS teacher candidate and host
teacher as it relates to the initial preparation and the continuing profes-
sional development of the host teachers will be discussed.




Grassroots Professional Development: Taking
Professional Development Back
Carol Muniz, Morgantown High School


       One benefit of being a Professional Development School is the
empowerment it provides to its faculty. It makes sense that teachers plan
and present their own professional development. Follow the story of how
a high school in Morgantown, West Virginia, took on professional
development for their faculty and built a successful program now in its
second year. The session discusses the development of the after-school
staff developments, the funding sources for the program, the support the
university provides, how the pre-service teachers are involved, and how
we developed a professional learning community. You too can do this.




                                                                                27
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Growing Stronger: How One PDS Developed
                         From A Straightforward Clinical Placement
                         Site Into A Full Partnership In Which Pre-
                         Service Teachers Play An Integral Part In The
                         Professional Development School’s
                         Comprehensive Improvement Plan
                         Bonnie Fisher, College of St. Catherine
                         Nancy Flynn and Beth Tierney, Randolph Heights School


                                In 2004, Randolph Heights Elementary School (RHS) responded
                         eagerly to an invitation from the College of St. Catherine (CSC) teacher
                         education program to join them in a project focusing on literacy training
                         for pre-service teachers. From the beginning, students taking the elemen-
                         tary licensure course, Emerging Literacy, were placed in RHS classrooms
                         during their literacy block where, in addition to observing and assisting
                         with signature literacy practices, they conducted small guided reading
                         groups for struggling readers. Two years later, CSC moved the college
                         course from the campus to RHS; immediately after class students went to
                         “Literacy Lab” in RHS classrooms.
                                By the fifth year, college instructors, pre-service teachers, the
                         principal, and RHS mentor teachers were working collaboratively to
                         prepare pre-service teachers using streamlined procedures to align all
                         college work at RHS with both Minnesota State Initial Teaching Licensure
                         Standards and Randolph Heights’ School Comprehensive Improvement
                         Plan. Professional development opportunities were increased for all stake-
                         holders. Some highlights from the collaboration’s fifth year are:
                                 • Mentor teachers co-lead onsite class
                                 • CSC instructor participates on RHS site council
                                 • RHS principal participates on panel at CSC regarding student
                                   teaching placement and experiences
                                 • CSC faculty and RHS staff participate together in a book study
                                   group
                                 • Guided reading groups target students scoring below profi-
                                   ciency on the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments
                                 • RHS Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment scores increased
                                   significantly


                         How Do I Know They Learned From What I
                         Taught? Developing Pre-Service Teachers’
                         Assessment Literacy Through EPIC-ST
                         Cathy J. Siebert, Matthew J. Stuve, and Peggy Lewis, Ball State University
                         Barb Lumbis, Anderson High School


                               A multi-year collaboration between Ball State University, the Indi-
                         ana Humanities Council, Indianapolis Public Schools, and the Ball State
                         Professional Development Schools Network, EPIC (Evidence-based Pro-
                         fessional and Instructional Change) supports teachers in the following
                         three areas: curriculum development, assessment literacy, and collabora-


28
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

tion and dissemination technologies for teachers. In the spring of 2008, a
pilot version of EPIC was conducted with student teachers placed in the
Anderson Professional Development Schools. Currently in its third itera-
tion, the EPIC-ST initiative concentrates on supporting pre-service teach-
ers’ curriculum development and enhancing their understanding of using
assessment data to inform instruction. Furthermore, it introduces the
student teachers to critical reflection through video narrative.
       This presentation will briefly outline the original EPIC project
involving in-service teachers, describe the history and purpose of the
EPIC-ST project involving pre-service teachers, and share preliminary
findings regarding our pre-service teachers’ progress in learning how to
use assessment data to answer the question, How do I know what my
students learned from what I taught?” In addition, participating teachers
and pre-service teachers will share what they consider the professional
development benefits of participating in these projects, as well as the
challenges and obstacles to changing their practices.


How Does PDS Engage Each Professional
Constituent For The Development Of Future
Teachers?
Gayle Jones and Cathy Woody, Crest Ridge Elementary School
Dawna Buchanan and Cassandra Molsen, University of Central Missouri


       The University of Central Missouri and our local school district
created a PDS partnership in 2000. One of the goals of the partnership has
been to develop a “training ground” for PDS teacher candidates. These
students may then be hired by the local school district after completing
their internship and student teaching.
       This presentation will discuss the professional preparation of future
educators, as well as the real-life hands-on practices associated with
having predominately urban and suburban university students learning in
a rural setting. The continuing professional development of educators
already teaching and the essential collaboration between the school and
the university are essential tools for a successful PDS experience for all
involved in the education of students.Some questions asked and an-
swered will be:
        • What key personnel meet regularly to provide expertise in design-
          ing the professional preparation?
        • What are the roles of higher education faculty, classroom teach-
          ers, principals and teacher candidates in professional develop-
          ment?
        • Does PDS....
            1. impact university personnel experiences/learning?
            2. impact teacher’s professional development?
            3. benefit the school district?
            4. impact student learning?
       This presentation will elaborate on these questions as well as share
narrative accounts. We will share our thoughts on valuing expertise within
a community, which we believe is a central belief for professional devel-
opment.


                                                                               29
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Implementing Inclusive Practice: Partnering In
                         An Urban PDS Learning Community
                         Michael Trymbiski, 13th & Union Elementary School
                         Bonnie Hamwi, Margaret Place, Susan Seidenstricker, and Rodney Warfield,
                         Albright College


                                Co-teacher, reflective partner, advocate, observer, sounding board,
                         questioner, and analyzer of data - a few of the roles assumed by college
                         professors partnering with teachers in an urban Professional Development
                         School in Pennsylvania. Challenged to bring a more relevant model of
                         professional development to our PDS learning community, principal
                         Dorothea Miller linked three fourth grade teachers with three members of
                         the education faculty of the neighboring college. Initiated by one of her
                         fourth grade teachers, Mrs. Miller embraced the partnering project with a
                         focus on improving instruction and enhancing student achievement.
                         College faculty responded favorably, expressing interest in providing
                         quality field experiences for pre-service teachers and in honing personal
                         understanding of instruction in the urban setting.
                                In spring 2008, we initiated three partnerships with the goals of 1)
                         supporting the initiation of inclusive practice and 2) improving the reading
                         and mathematics achievement of the fourth grade population of English
                         language learners and special needs students. Education students worked
                         with the faculty partners to collect and analyze data and to design and
                         implement differentiated instruction in the fourth grade inclusive class-
                         rooms. Preliminary data collection suggests positive achievement results
                         for the ELL population, with less success for the special needs population.
                                In the second year, we added a fourth pair of participants, providing
                         support for a first-year teacher in an inclusive classroom. Two new fourth
                         grade teachers replaced first-year participants. Renewing our focus on
                         inclusive practice in the fourth grade team, we encounter numerous
                         challenges and celebrate countless successes – learning together.


                         Implementing Informal Science In The
                         Elementary Classroom: Addressing The Needs
                         Of Constituent Groups Within The PDS
                         Through Community Collaboration
                         Leslie Sena and Lawana Postell-Walden, Bethune-Cookman University


                               Bethune-Cookman University and Volusia County Schools formed
                         a partnership that supports education reform and realizes shared educa-
                         tion goals. These goals include designing exemplary practices that in-
                         crease student achievement, preparing teacher candidates, and providing
                         quality professional development opportunities to sustain professional
                         learning communities to classroom teachers.
                               In August of 2008 Bethune-Cookman University (B-CU) and Westside
                         Elementary partnered with the Orlando Science Center (OSC) to implement
                         a Teachers of a New Era (TNE) grant- funded Summer Science Institute
                         project. Nine classroom teachers and four B-CU teacher candidates
                         participated in a three-day professional development workshop focusing
                         on informal science learning centers in the classroom. The program was
                         composed of three workshops. The Orlando Science Center facilitated a


30
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

two-day on-site training, and Bethune-Cookman University professors
conducted a one-day professional development workshop. B-CU teacher
candidates were full participants in the workshops, collaborating directly
with classroom teachers and faculty. B-CU faculty provided information
about planning, evaluating, and building informal science learning centers
in the classroom. Classroom teachers and B-CU candidates worked in
collaborative grade level teams to design lessons for the 2008-2009 school
year.
      This session will present findings from the project addressing
classroom teachers’ and B-CU teacher candidates’ perceptions about
informal science and the impact of this project on participants’ science
content knowledge.


Is Co-Teaching Effective? Teacher Candidates
In PDS Schools Find Out For Themselves
Srimani Chakravarthi, University of St. Francis


      The role of the special educator has drastically changed over the past
few years, with students with disabilities being increasingly served in
general education classrooms. The importance of collaborative co-teach-
ing has been highlighted in truly meeting the needs of all learners in the
classroom. Various models of effective co-teaching have been proposed
by special education professionals. The effectiveness of such models is
only beginning to be researched.
      In the present study, an attempt was made to use school partnerships
to create opportunities for teacher candidates in special education and
general education to come together to plan and execute a co-teaching
lesson. Candidates who were student teaching in two elementary schools
were chosen for the study. One of the elementary schools had full inclusion
in place, while the other was soon adopting it. The candidates were from
the special education and elementary education programs. They were
involved in the co-teaching training provided by the university faculty
with input from the co-operating teachers from schools. Co-planning
lesson plan formats and opportunities to plan were provided. The result
was a 4-day co-taught unit, wherein the candidates demonstrated their
strengths in pedagogy, content, and specialized instruction. Data was
gathered from surveys of teacher candidates and the students from both
schools. The co-teaching model was found to be very successful by the
candidates, by their co-operating teachers, and by the students.


Learning Together In A Special Education PDS
Pete Kelly, Joseph Sencibaugh, and Bev Peters, Truman State University
Mariann Gibson, Kirksville Middle School


       The Truman/Kirksville Schools PDS is a highly collaborative part-
nership in special education between a small liberal arts university and a
rural school district in Missouri. Our mentor teachers have a powerful voice
in our PDS and have taken real ownership for our program. Together, we
aim for a seamless, integrated connection between coursework and clinical
practice. No doubt, this collaboration is complex and messy, but we believe
it improves the quality of our work.


                                                                               31
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                               Students complete a semester-long, half-day Monday through
                         Friday field experience the semester prior to internship. Faculty who teach
                         methods courses also supervise pre-interns’ field experiences. This con-
                         nection creates powerful opportunities to connect theory to practice.
                         Shared teaching and learning experiences facilitate critical dialogues
                         between mentors, pre-interns, and faculty. Methods courses have been
                         restructured into flexible modules and assignments are applied learning
                         experiences connected with field experiences. These changes more pow-
                         erfully connect learning and teaching. We believe this structure facilitates
                         authentic, applied, and relevant professional development for all members
                         of our PDS.
                               During this presentation, we will share our efforts aimed at collabo-
                         rative professional development within our PDS. This work occurs in
                         mindful ways, including Teacher Talk Seminars and joint trainings. Other
                         times, we learn together in unexpected ways. To substantiate the impact
                         of our collaborative PD efforts, we will share program evaluation results
                         from the past three years. This project is in its fourth and final year of
                         support from an OSERS Personnel Preparation Grant from the US DOE.


                         Leveraging The Collaborative Strengths Of A
                         School-University PDS Teacher Education
                         Partnership: Piloting An Intensive Clinical
                         Performance-Based Assessment Process
                         Adam Kay, Dale Scott Ridley, and Coleen Maldonado, Arizona State
                         University
                         Michelle Rojas, Lattie Coor School
                         Linda Califano, Madison Park Middle School
                         Angie Linder, Longview Elementary School
                         Cecilia Lynch, Palomino Elementary School
                         Paula Tseunis, Mirage Elementary School
                         Franklin Elliott, Mesa View Elementary School
                         Rebecca Grijalva, Joe Carlson Elementary School
                         Norma Garcia, Gadsden Elementary School District
                         Sonia Saenz, Indian Oasis-Baboquivari School District
                         Mary Tierney, Sonofan Sky Elementary School


                                According to numerous critics and national reports, there is a sizable
                         and longstanding gap between the academic coursework and clinical
                         experience components in many teacher education programs. A majority
                         of teachers and principals surveyed in Levine’s 2006 Educating School
                         Teachers placed the highest reform priority on striking a better balance
                         between professional knowledge preparation and field experience (i.e.,
                         stronger connection between theory and practice, longer duration for
                         clinical experiences, more careful placements, closer supervision).
                                This presentation illustrates the critical importance of genuine
                         school-university PDS partnerships in fostering improvements in teacher
                         preparation. Specifically, this is the story of the “good, bad, and ugly” of
                         piloting an intensive, semester-by-semester clinical performance-based
                         assessment (CPBA) process designed to increase programmatic rigor,
                         better integrate practice and theory, and prepare a stronger new teacher.
                                Each semester, the CPBA process requires teacher candidates to
                         submit a portfolio that includes a description of lesson context (i.e.,


32
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

background on the community, school, and students), a lesson plan that
effectively addresses the key context issues, and a mini-assessment that
measures students’ mastery of the learning objectives. Teacher candi-
dates teach the lesson while videotaping themselves using a mini-camcorder.
After a careful analysis of student achievement and the videotape of
teaching, teacher candidates create a redesigned lesson to foster the
learning of previously non-mastering students. Teacher candidates also
videotape this lesson and repeat the self-analysis process. School and
university teacher educators teaching courses in the program collectively
evaluate teacher candidates’ teaching and reflectivity portfolio looking for
evidence of theory-practice integration.




Listening To Learn: Using Inquiry Communities
To Provide REAL On-Going Professional
Development
Stacey Leftwich, Susan Browne, and Valerie Lee, Rowan University
Steven Hempel, Dorothy L. Bullock Elementary School


       This research documents, analyzes, and interprets the impact of
inquiry groups when used with both teachers and administrators. The
study presents data from two inquiry groups made up of teachers who are
currently participating in a PDS partnership and one inquiry group made
up of principals who are in the planning stages of becoming PDS partners.
This is also a study of three university professors who are active PDS
liaisons. The professors speak to the complexities of studying others who
concurrently are studying themselves. The professors are interested in
studying the ways inquiry communities provide on-going professional
development for members served in a PDS.
       The research was conducted across three sites in three different
contexts. Johnstone Elementary teachers use inquiry groups to help
practicing teachers conduct action research in their classrooms. Bullock
Elementary teachers use an inquiry community to identify, remediate, and
provide systematic instructional techniques to aid classroom teachers’
writing instruction. The final setting is made up school principals who use
inquiry groups to help plan for the creation of a PDS partnership. The data
collection spans from September 2008 through January 2009. Data come
from multiple sources.
       Preliminary findings suggest two conclusions: a) There exist un-
tapped possibilities for new understandings about teaching and planning
when teachers’ and administrators’ reflections on their teaching and
planning are examined more carefully than the practices they implement or
the behaviors they observe and b) Forming inquiry communities within
schools fosters opportunities to question and interpret innovative prac-
tice and initiatives.




                                                                               33
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Making Inquiry And Collaboration Our
                         Practice
                         Janeen Volsey, California State Polytechnic University Pomona
                         Linda Freedman, Collegewood Elementary School


                               Recent educational reform initiatives urge teacher education pro-
                         grams to offer pre-service candidates exemplary field-based experiences.
                         Pre-service teachers participating in the PDS at Collegewood Elementary
                         School are challenged to emulate the best practices modeled at the
                         university and implemented in the classroom. Implementing, maintaining,
                         and sustaining a PDS is a labor-intensive process both for the university
                         and school faculty. This presentation will serve to outline the specific
                         programs that serve to incorporate pre-service teachers into the
                         Collegewood community.
                               Currently the PDS is in its fifth year of implementation. University
                         courses are presently offered on the elementary campus. A research
                         project is being implemented that involves university faculty from three
                         colleges, school site faculty, and student teachers. Two graduates of the
                         PDS program have been hired as full-time teachers and have subsequently
                         served as cooperating teachers. Pre-service teachers who take the math
                         methods course at the PDS collaborate with their instructor and classroom
                         teachers to conduct a Family Math Night for the school.
                               Cohen and Ball (1999) suggest pre-service teachers should not
                         simply be immersed into the daily life of a teacher by a sustained compre-
                         hensive student teaching program, but that they learn “in and from
                         practice.” University faculty have structured anchor assignments, asso-
                         ciated with methods courses, to allow for implementation in classrooms,
                         reflection, revising, and re-teaching. The student teaching component of
                         the program is structured to allow for on-going inquiry and reflective
                         practice for the student teachers.


                         Making Teaching And Learning Visible
                         Through Documentation: A Professional
                         Development Model
                         Jennifer Asman, Stephanie Bolen, Lindsay Paradis, and Patricia Pinciotti,
                         East Stroudsburg University


                               Authentic assessment of student learning is a challenge in the
                         current testing culture, particularly with our youngest learners. Clearview
                         Elementary PDS, inspired by work done in the Reggio early childhood
                         centers in Italy, has been exploring the Documentation process to make
                         both student learning and their teaching visible within the school culture
                         (Project Zero & Reggio Children, 2001). Teachers in this K-2 building
                         visited Reggio influenced schools, took graduate early childhood courses,
                         and engaged in conversations with teacher candidates and faculty from
                         East Stroudsburg University to explore the Documentation process as an
                         authentic assessment method. Harvard’s Making Learning Visible Project
                         (2005) defines a Learning Group as a “collection of persons who are
                         emotionally, intellectually, and aesthetically engaged in solving problems,
                         creating products, and making meaning.” This inquiry process engaged
                         various stakeholders in conversations and creative products about stu-


34
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

dent learning and the impact the work itself had on their teaching. Teachers
at Clearview, teacher candidates, and faculty from ESU formed flexible
learning groups to record, interpret, and share student learning in a variety
of exciting visual formats. Through this group learning process, teachers
found new languages to share the range of student learning while also
examining its influence on prospective teaching. The resulting shared
aesthetic accounts explored ways to make student learning more public to
the entire school community and deepen learning by influencing future
teaching. Documentation became a viable professional development
process to shape learning and craft teaching for Clearview students,
teachers, ESU teacher candidates, and faculty.


Mentoring The Mentor: Everyone On The
Same Page
James B. Tuttle, Shepherd University
Sherry Hetzel, Jefferson County Schools


       Often, the mentor is the forgotten partner in a PDS partnership.
Collaboration among peers is a crucial part of a successful partnership, but
with time constraints, new trends in education, cultural impacts on instruc-
tion, and everyday demands on a classroom teacher, this collaboration
seems to be lost in the shuffle. Professional development needs to be an
integral and effective part of the partnership between the university and
the public schools. Our proposed plan of action will be mentor workshops
that bring varied perspectives together to analyze and revise our current
mentoring program. We will achieve this goal through “cross-walking” the
public school evaluation system with the university grading policy,
conducting book studies on current educational trends, and bringing our
“old school” counterparts in alignment with our “new school” members.
       Our presentation will define how our partnership successfully
engages constituent groups within our PDS. We will showcase our
partnership’s successes through professional development that has been
provided, including mentor workshops, book study, surveys, evaluation
review/alignment, SAKAI web-based discussion instrument, and discus-
sions. Presenters will share our experiences on the stumbling blocks, our
“light bulb moments,” and our celebrations throughout the history of our
unique and growing partnership.


Nine Years On A Shoe String - How And Why
Do We Keep Going?
Charles A. Duncan, University of Louisiana Lafayette


      Over the past nine years, J. W. Faulk Elementary School and the
University of Louisiana Lafayette have worked as Professional Develop-
ment School partners with very limited resources. The partnership has
continued through two College of Education deans, two principals, two
university liaisons and numerous cooperating teacher turnovers. This
presentation will include discussion of the trials and tribulations of the
ongoing relationship, its successes, and the benefits to all involved in this
valuable, albeit sometimes difficult, partnership.



                                                                                35
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                               J.W. Faulk is a pre-K-5th grade public school with over 97 % of its
                         students receiving free or reduced lunches. The ongoing nature of this
                         particular partnership evidences a symbiotic relationship. Candidates are
                         referred to as teacher interns (TI) to convey their roles as partners in the
                         classroom. TIs attend faculty and grade level meetings and in-service
                         workshops in addition to a weekly meeting with their university liaison. In
                         addition to feedback from their liaison and cooperating teachers, TIs are
                         evaluated during walk throughs by the school assistant principal and the
                         principal, using the same format used for full-time teachers.
                               Perspectives from administrators, cooperating teachers, teacher
                         interns, students, and the university liaison will be shared. What are the
                         benefits to the school, its staff, and the university when there are few, if
                         any, financial incentives? This and other questions will be answered
                         during the presentation. Audience members will be encouraged to ask their
                         own questions and share their insights regarding the difficulties and
                         benefits of similar partnerships.


                         Onsite At A PDS: The Impact Of ‘What We
                         Believe’ On Elementary And Undergraduate
                         Students
                         Denise Fitzpatrick, Christina Flynn, and Mary Lebron, William B. Cruise
                         Memorial School #11
                         Marie Donnantuono and Julie Rosenthal, William Paterson University


                                Holding on-site teacher education courses at a Professional Devel-
                         opment School provides quite a ripple effect. First and second grade
                         classrooms become an arena for a field-based literacy course where
                         children, future teachers, and course co-instructors learn with and from
                         each other. Our data show that students benefit from individual attention
                         and targeted instruction; candidates’ professional growth is fostered in an
                         authentic context; and course co-instructors continue to learn.
                                Children appear to benefit emotionally and academically. Qualitative
                         data reveal that consistent, ongoing attention from a caring adult increases
                         children’s motivation to read. Quantitative data indicate that children
                         involved in the program scored better on several standardized measures
                         than did their non-tutored peers.
                                Teacher candidates learn how assessment informs instruction by
                         planning best practices literacy lessons to address the needs of learners
                         with whom they work. Evidence of candidates’ progress in understanding
                         course content will be demonstrated through entries from their weekly
                         reflections and course entry and exit polls.
                                Three of these classroom teachers will be part of this presentation.
                         Since they are co-instructors of this field-based course, they will illuminate
                         how their students benefit from an entire year of “tutoring” in language arts
                         literacy instruction.
                                Data presented includes examples of candidates’ assessment-driven
                         instructional plans and weekly reflections, samples of children’s work and
                         results of standardized assessments, and co-instructors’ observations of
                         candidate-student interactions. The classroom teachers and university
                         faculty will also share how teaching this course has impacted their
                         professional development.



36
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Participation In “The Kennett Experience”
Leads To “Victory Lane”
Sally Winterton, West Chester University of Pennsylvania


      “The Kennett Experience” is in its third year as a professional school
program. Discussion for the professional school concept was initiated by
the Director of Personnel who contacted the local regional comprehensive
university intending to capitalize on the existing long-term relationship for
early field and student teaching experiences. This program became a
collaborative effort among four entities: university faculty in three differ-
ent departments (Elementary Education, Literacy, Professional and Sec-
ondary Education) and, of course, the school district. The district was
seeking to “grow their own” teachers, hoping that pre-service teacher
candidates who spent an academic year in the schools would consider
employment in the district. The district is in a rural area and has 4100
students, of which 35% are Hispanic and 5% are Afro-American.
      This presentation will address Question #1 (“How does professional
development successfully engage constituent groups within the PDS?”)
by:
       • describing the components of the program;
       • sharing how technology is embedded in the reading practicum
         and student teaching semesters through teacher candidates’ 24/
         7 access to university-provided laptop computers for the aca-
         demic year;
       • describing technology usage by pre-service teacher candidates;
       • conveying the pre-service teacher candidates’ opinions of their
         participation in “The Kennett Experience;”
       • relating the teacher candidates’ community participation activi-
         ties, accomplishments, and professional development opportu-
         nities; and
       • sharing the school and university faculties’ professional devel-
         opment activities.
      In addition, the participants’ “Victory Lane” accomplishments will
be reported. Time will be permitted for question and answers.


PDS Initiatives That Benefit Candidates,
Teachers, Students, And The Community
Donna Metlicka, University of St. Francis


       This presentation will highlight several initiatives involving the
University of St. Francis and the Joliet Public Schools that make up the
Joliet Professional Development Schools Partnership. These initiatives
involve on-site, university-based, and after-school activities that encour-
age continued development, student achievement, and differentiated
instruction. Highlighted activities will include an after-school reading
clinic, science lessons, math boxes, and physical education programs.




                                                                                37
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         PDS Learning Communities: Questioning
                         Everything, Engaging All
                         Mary M. Witte, Baylor University
                         Lindsey Stevens, Tammy Johnston, Lorraine Randazzo, and Meghan
                         Robinson, Hillcrest Professional Development School


                               Hillcrest PDS was the first Professional Development School be-
                         tween the Waco Independent School District and Baylor University which
                         began in 1993. After fifteen years of continuous collaboration, Hillcrest
                         PDS and Baylor faculty found themselves needing a way to rejuvenate and
                         strengthen the partnership. With leadership from the university dean and
                         the superintendent of the school district, the constituents now have a
                         framework by which common goals have been identified and can be
                         achieved. With the realization that true professional development that is
                         meaningful and self-directed leads to the excitement of educators and
                         ultimately student success, Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)
                         were implemented. As a result, a kindergarten/first grade learning commu-
                         nity decided to conduct action research projects within the K-1 environ-
                         ments as our learning communities’ strategy. This session will describe
                         how veteran teachers, teacher candidates, university faculty, and campus
                         and district administrators worked together to question everything and
                         engage all.


                         PDS Partners Wrestling With Inclusive
                         Change: One School’s Story
                         Angela Gregory, University of Florida
                         David Hoppey, West Virginia University
                         Lacy Redd, Newberry Elementary School


                                School-university partnerships emerged in response to the need for
                         additional collaborative arrangements to support educational change,
                         thus providing vehicles to jointly support teacher education and school
                         improvement (Fullan, 2001; Richert, Stoddard, & Kass, 2001). The Newberry
                         Elementary PDS has embraced an inquiry-oriented stance for school
                         improvement and teacher education by integrating professional develop-
                         ment for in-service educators while simultaneously providing prospective
                         teachers with active learning opportunities aligned with university teacher
                         preparation goals. This session will share data from a broader longitudinal
                         ethnographic study in one beginning elementary PDS and focus on how
                         on-going professional and teacher candidate preparation became inter-
                         connected. Findings from this study describe how one elementary PDS
                         wrestled with inclusive education reform and improved student perfor-
                         mance by shifting participant roles, relationships, and praxis through an
                         inquiry-oriented approach to school improvement. Additionally, findings
                         from this study highlight the importance of theoretical and organizational
                         alignment between school, university, and district participants. Data from
                         this study will be presented using the NAPDS’s “9 Essentials” framework
                         in order to generate discussion and implications for future work in other
                         PDS contexts. This session is suitable for in-service teachers, university
                         supervisors, university faculty, school administrators, and district level
                         personnel. The overarching goal of this session is to illustrate how one
                         elementary school collaboratively engaged in-service teachers, prospec-


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

tive teachers, university supervisors, school administrators, and univer-
sity/district level personnel as full co-teaching participants to achieve a
common mission for inclusive education.


PDS – S.O.S.! (Professional Development
School - Site Offered Snippets)
Patrick Smith, Pleasant Valley Elementary School
Dora Tartar, Pleasant Valley School District


        Professional Development Schools are fortunate to have the oppor-
tunity to host pre-service teachers. This workshop offers the PDS students
an inside view of how the specific building they are in works. A series of
weekly “snippets” are offered to better acclimate the students to the school
climate. Employees from various departments of the school will act as guest
speakers and help present a snippet. This workshop is very flexible and is
able to lend itself to any Professional Development School.
        Each snippet offered is accompanied by a “fact sheet” containing the
information presented for that particular snippet. Important contacts,
procedures, and school policies will be covered. The end result is a binder
full of useful information that will come in handy for the students when they
return to student teach and better prepare them for their future.
        Snippet suggestions may include but are not limited to the following
helpful topics:
        1. Building Policies and Procedures (Professional Dress, Transpor-
tation Forms, Field Trip Documents, Docushare etc)
        2. Technology Department (email, white board usage, internet
policies, equipment trainings and usage).
        3. Special Areas (Art, Music, Library, Physical Education)
        4. Classroom Maintenance and Management (lesson plans, state
standards and behavior management suggestions).
        5. Confidentiality - Health and Guidance Departments
        6. Building Programs - Reading and Math
        7. Actions and Expectations - Do’s and Don’ts as a future educator.
        8. Midway Q and A- Snippet reserved for questions and answers
from the PDS students. Administration invited.
        9. Mandated Reporters - Role and responsibilities for children in our
charge, procedures and policies. The Law.
        10. Safety Awareness - Building crisis procedures and policies.
        11. Tutoring/ Remediation Programs - Extended offerings for stu-
dents
        12. “Pick Your Snippet” - What do PDS students want to know? A
great opportunity to personalize experience.
        “Site Offered Snippets” will give the students a better picture of what
to expect before, during, and even after student teaching.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         PDS Summer Teaching Academy: Changing
                         Confidence In The Classroom
                         Michael Shriner and Rebecca Libler, Indiana State University


                                Concurrent session attendees will glean information garnered as a
                         result of a series of several different professional development workshops
                         held during a summer teaching academy in 2008. All participants attending
                         the various workshops were currently affiliated with one of 20 different
                         Professional Development Schools associated with Indiana State Univer-
                         sity. Following a brief overview of the different workshops, special focus
                         of this particular session will entail: (a) a quantitative summary of the
                         various characteristics of workshop participants; (b) an overview of the
                         overall effect size change in perceived confidence in the classroom as a
                         result of workshop participation; and (c) specific pre/post-test statistically
                         significant findings related to workshop participants’ changes in confi-
                         dence as a result of their attendance.




                         PDS - Partnership And Sustainable School
                         Improvement: Alignment Of Teacher
                         Leadership In Pre K-7, Leadership At The
                         School Level, Leadership At The District Level,
                         And Leadership At The System Level
                         Winfried Roelofs, Domstad University Utrecht
                         Willy van Dijk-Roest, Catholic School Districts Amersfoort and Utrecht


                                The past decade Professional Development Schools were imple-
                         mented in the Netherlands to promote sustainable school improvement.
                         Collaborative action research by teachers and teacher candidates became
                         part of the strategic planning of school improvement processes. As part
                         of the teacher preparation this research became the core of the curriculum
                         of the bachelor and master programme of Domstad University in Utrecht.
                         While the bachelor programme provides a certificate to start as a teacher
                         in pre K-7, the master programme prepares teachers in their roles as teacher
                         leaders in school improvement processes.
                                Research on the PDS partnerships in the Netherlands shows that the
                         integration of initial teacher preparation, collaborative action research,
                         school improvement, and staff development demands a critical mass of
                         leadership. The school system as well as the university system have to be
                         focused on the same goal: improvement of student achievement through
                         professional development of teaching. This common goal has to be
                         reached by teachers, interns, teacher educators, principals, district admin-
                         istrators, university faculty and the dean of the university. In this session
                         the key players of the PDS partnership share the common structures and
                         culture of learning that contribute to sustainable school improvement and
                         professional growth.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Personal Journeys In A PDS: From Teacher
Candidate To Intern To Full-Time Teacher
Denise Fitzpatrick and Christina Flynn, William B. Cruise Memorial School
#11
Marie Donnantuono and Julie Rosenthal, William Paterson University


      In this presentation, two teachers at a Professional Development
School will share their journey from teacher candidate to full-time teacher
in the school. Of interest is how the nature and climate of the school,
encountered first during an on-site literacy course, shaped these women’s
desire to remain at the school for their part-time practicum and then full-
time student teaching. Both women, after experiencing their teacher
education in the school, were hired there as full-time teachers.
      For this case study analysis, teachers were interviewed about their
experiences and their initial and ongoing perceptions of the school. How
did the university-school partnership affect their learning experience as
students? In what ways did their cooperating teachers and the university
support their growth from student teacher to teacher? What were their
experiences as novice teachers? Were there support systems in place as
they were inducted into the profession? As full-time teachers in the school,
how does the school-university partnership support their work and
professional growth? What programs in the school-university partnership
are they involved in, and how does this involvement impact them profes-
sionally?
      These teachers will speak from the position of moving forward and
coming full circle with what they believe. As university students, they were
involved in the then-beginning school-university partnership as students
in the on-site literacy course. Both now co-teach the course. They were
mentored in the PDS; they now mentor aspiring teachers. They speak to
the question of what it means to be a player in a Professional Development
School.


Practicing What We Believe: A Focus On Our
Collaborative Learning Community
Wendy Paterson, Leslie K. Day, and Amy B. Henchey, Buffalo State College


       The Buffalo State College PDS believes that professional develop-
ment of all stakeholders is a critical component of our successful PDS work.
This year we have embarked on self-reflection using the NAPDS Nine
Essentials; during the summer months the PDS Advisory Council reviewed
our collective strengths and suggested plans of action for areas of growth
based on these Essentials. This preliminary work was then shared at the
annual fall PDS Retreat where the Consortium continued brainstorming
goals for our three-year plan. At the retreat, principals, mentoring teachers,
administrators, college faculty, and teacher candidates worked together to
review the Essentials and pinpoint areas to be included in our action plan.
In addition to these suggestions, the Consortium identified two particu-
larly strong areas: Essential Two, creating a school-university culture
committed to the preparation of future educators that embraces active
engagement in the school community, and Essential Three, ongoing and
reciprocal professional development for all participants encouraging
continuous learning. As we continue our successful engagement of our


                                                                                 41
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         constituent groups, our PDS Consortium has identified two main themes
                         for its regularly scheduled and well-attended meetings throughout the
                         school year: Response to Intervention (RTI) and the role of differentiated
                         instruction and monitoring our growth as a PDS using the Nine Essentials
                         as a yardstick. These themes will be the focus of our learning community,
                         providing opportunities for our stakeholders to learn from one another and
                         from experts in these fields as well. Our teacher candidates will play
                         important roles in this community by attending Consortium meetings,
                         collaborating with our ACEI professional teacher organization, complet-
                         ing a variety of school-community activities and projects at their sites, and
                         by participating in the governance and goal setting of the PDS. These
                         opportunities provide teacher candidates with a meaningful introduction
                         into the real world of the teaching profession and its community of
                         dedicated believers.


                         Presenting A Curriculum Expo
                         Cynthia L. Gissy, Greg Boso, and David Cumberledge, West Virginia
                         University at Parkersburg


                               The Partnerships Project is the Professional Development School
                         partnership that involves West Virginia University at Parkersburg and
                         twelve elementary schools in a four county area.
                               The Partnerships Project piloted a new event, a Spring 2008 Curricu-
                         lum Expo, to successfully engage all constituents.
                               This first Curriculum Expo had attendees that including teachers,
                         teacher candidates, college faculty, and community experts. All stakehold-
                         ers were invited to attend and present on best practices, current research,
                         new initiatives, 21st Century Skills, technology, cooperative learning,
                         favorite classroom practices, or other areas of interest. Presentations were
                         made on twelve different topics. New professional contacts were made,
                         networking opportunities were available, and lunch was provided. Partici-
                         pants received materials and resources to take home, review, and imple-
                         ment in their classrooms. Each attendee and presenter also received a copy
                         of the book Teaching for Tomorrow by Ted McCain. All evaluations
                         received were positive and suggestions were made for longer sessions in
                         the future! Planning, organizing, implementation, and follow-up will be
                         reviewed. Come see what we have planned for a bigger and better
                         Curriculum Expo in the future.


                         Pre-Service/In-Service: Who’s Teaching
                         Whom?
                         Gail Epifanio, Rowan University


                                Lakeside Middle School in-service teachers take their role as Rowan
                         University clinical adjuncts very seriously. This co-supervisory model
                         empowers university and school educators as they collaborate in the
                         supervision of pre-service educators. They also share a commitment to
                         provide quality educational experiences for teacher candidates as they
                         unite in a learning community with student achievement as its goal. Yet,
                         these experienced educators will be the first to tell you how much they are
                         learning from the Rowan teacher candidates they are co-supervising.
                         What are they learning? The pre-service teachers are using technology on

42
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

a regular basis to impact student learning and the in-service teachers are
discovering how they can do the same!
       During this session the presenters will share the excitement through
the video stories of in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, and middle
school students. The stories include examples of the innovative use of
technology across the content areas as the technology coach supports
both in-service and pre-service teachers with their projects. Integration of
technology across the curriculum has been the key to establishing a
professional development partnership between university and school.
       The university PDS liaison, along with the partner school’s technol-
ogy coach, will also describe the clinical adjunct co-supervisory model and
explain the role of all stakeholders in this PDS partnership. The audience
will leave with an understanding of a successful teaching/learning process
for both in-service and pre-service teachers as they utilize technology to
motivate their middle school learners.




Principals And Inquiry; How They Make It
Happen
Keith Tilford, Illinois State University
Lacy Redd, Newberry Elementary School
Jim Brandenburg, Alachua Elementary School


        This presentation will be based on a series of interviews conducted
with two effective principals in a 10-school elementary PDS network in the
southeast. The purpose of the presentation is to share how these two
principals facilitated teacher inquiry in their respective schools. The
phenomenological dissertation study, using Seidman’s 1998 model for
interviewing, took place in the 2006-2007 school year.
        Barth (1990) argued in his book, Improving Schools from Within, that
the principal plays a pivotal role in leading teachers to grow and learn. The
Standards for Professional Development Schools from the National Coun-
cil for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (2001) identify the important
element of teacher inquiry in Standard I, indicating the pivotal role it plays
in Professional Development School work.
        Through this presentation, the researcher plans to share findings
related to Lacy’s and Jim’s efforts to foster teacher inquiry in their
individual schools. After a brief presentation of the interview data and
findings, the principals will share their perspectives on teacher inquiry and
how they have integrated it into the culture of their schools. Near the end
of the session, participants will be provided an opportunity to ask
questions of the presenters and also share their experiences with creating
a school culture that fosters teacher inquiry.




                                                                                 43
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Professional Development In A Middle School
                         RTI Pilot: Steps In Learning By Doing
                         Nina Dorsch, Northern Illinois University
                         Barbara Landis, Britt Mattern, Charri Trembley, and Kris Weiss, Kaneland
                         Middle School


                                Learning about and learning to are very different processes in
                         professional development. This session explores university-school syn-
                         ergy in professional development that occurred as Kaneland Middle
                         School (KMS) piloted Response to Intervention (RTI). The pilot experi-
                         ence became a journey of steps in learning by doing for both school and
                         university partners.
                                Stepping Up involved a KMS/NIU team being willing to venture into
                         uncharted territory. While RTI has been implemented in many elementary
                         schools, few middle school models could guide the team.
                                Stepping In included training in screening and progress monitoring
                         tools, cohort study, visits to RTI sites (including other NIU partner
                         schools), and weekly meetings as the team experienced full immersion in
                         the RTI process.
                                Stepping Back was a period of reflection and reworking as the team
                         searched for alternative interventions, conducted universal CBM testing,
                         and analyzed data.
                                Stepping Out entailed conducting interventions even as the need for
                         added and/or changed structures and resources became apparent, exem-
                         plifying the mantra that in trying and learning in a pilot, “you won’t go to
                         hell for it.”
                                Stepping Forward marked a summer of creating a CORE building team
                         and developing and adding to interventions in reading while expanding the
                         RTI pilot to include additional areas; this was a time when lessons learned
                         by doing could be applied.
                                Stepping Beyond: In all of the team’s learning steps, blurring of
                         boundaries (seeking expertise in each other and learning from each other)
                         was evident, suggesting implications for university collaboration across
                         programs in working with partner schools on RTI.


                         Professional Development: Models Of
                         Research-To-Practice In The PDS
                         Stephen B. Graves and Elizabeth Larkin, University of South Florida
                         Mary Condron, Ballard Elementary School


                               USF faculty in the Department of Childhood Education and Literacy
                         Studies (GELS) are engaged in collaborative research projects in two local
                         PDS sites. This presentation will describe the ways in which our pre-
                         service teacher candidates are actively involved in professional develop-
                         ment activities through research projects in these two Manatee County
                         Schools. The presenters will also describe ways in which the schools
                         participate both in the preparation of USF intern teachers and in the
                         research projects to build the teachers’ knowledge and skills. In still
                         another layer of professional development, the USF faculty members are
                         able to inform their instruction and supervision of pre-service teachers
                         based on research findings and collaboration with the school’s faculty.


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                    2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

The two research projects include a literacy and technology initiative in
an after-school program and a single gender classroom study in four 4th
grade classrooms. The USF LitTechs volunteer to work with students on
projects of their own design, using a variety of technologies such as
podcasting, creating electronic stories, or writing song lyrics, and their
insights about how these new tools shape literacy learning is the focus of
one study. The single gender classroom study is comparing the learning
environments of mixed gender groupings and single gender groupings to
explore how teaching and learning may differ. The focus of our presenta-
tion will be on how the teaching and learning relationships of interns,
teachers, and researchers thrive in a climate of continuous professional
development for all participants.


Professional Developmental Schools And Early
Childhood Education: Interactive
Competencies Of Students, Beginning And
Veteran Teachers
Ruud J. Gorter, INHolland University


       This presentation gives answers to the question how professional
development successfully engages different partners in the PDS. We did
a best practice research with two Professional Development Schools in the
Netherlands attempting to improve the effects of early childhood educa-
tion programmes. The two PDSs use evidence-based programs for early
childhood learning in which incoming and veteran teachers of playgroups
(children aged 2; 6-4 years of age) and kindergarten classes (4-6 years)
collaborate.
       PDS partners are the elementary school and accompanying
playgroup, both teacher’s training colleges for K-2 (and for playgroup
teachers), and educational service agencies and the research institute. Our
research focuses on the quality of adult-child Interaction during instruc-
tion. Students and new and veteran teachers learn from each other how to
support and challenge children’s language and reasoning skills by attend-
ing joint courses and observing each other In the classroom and giving
feedback to each other. Videotapes of adult-child interactions are pro-
duced three times a year for all persons involved and are used as training
materials. Rating scales of interactive competence were completed by the
participants themselves, and an observer.
       We will show results of the learning process of students and
beginning and practicing teachers, as well as their evaluation of the
interventions used. In addition the question will be addressed of how best
practices are defined.




                                                                              45
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Professional Development That Works
                         Paul Maloney and Carmela Colosimo, Hillside Avenue School
                         Deanne Opatosky, Brookside Place School
                         Lisa Andretta, Livingston Avenue School
                         Greer Burroughs, Seton Hall University


                                The PDS is a learning community that supports the integrated
                         learning and development of p-12 students, teacher candidates, and PDS
                         partners through inquiry-based practice (NCATE 2001). Our PDS partners
                         believe that people learn best in the context of learning together rather than
                         apart and that inquiry-based practice sits at the crossroads of education
                         reform and school improvement. After eight years of coming and staying
                         together, our PDS governance group decided it was time to work together
                         in the area of professional development. The group decided that partici-
                         pating in traditional approaches to professional development, such as
                         workshops, seminars and teaching clinics, often resulted in gains for some
                         but lacked implementation across district and university. The group
                         decided that a more comprehensive approach was needed.
                                The committee engaged a group of over 40 teachers, administrators,
                         candidates, parents, and university faculty in a unique professional
                         development experience. The partners agreed to examine a common
                         concern confronting all of them. In this case they identified transfer of
                         learning as one of the roadblocks to student learning. They spent two years
                         in small and large study groups to build their knowledge base, used
                         acquired learning to conduct action research, challenged assumptions and
                         beliefs, and made recommendations to the district’s curriculum council and
                         the university’s department of educational studies and publications.
                                In this presentation the group will share the experience and how they
                         engaged in group inquiry to address a specific challenge while reflecting
                         and growing together. They will share the power of the process and
                         discuss lessons learned and barriers to avoid.




                         Professional Development Through Shared
                         Expertise And Supervision
                         Jody Eberly, Arti Joshi, and Harlene Galen, The College of New Jersey


                                Findings will be shared from our second year in our initiative to
                         strengthen our PDS model. This PDS is between our 4-year teaching
                         college and one of the schools where we place senior year student
                         teachers. Our model provides multiple opportunities for professional
                         development for all: teacher candidates, cooperating teachers, and college
                         faculty. In the first year, the PDS model took the form of shared supervision
                         which featured co-supervision of teacher candidates by three college
                         supervisors and nine cooperating teachers. This year the PDS model, while
                         sustaining the shared supervision aspect, expanded to include shared
                         expertise among the constituent participants. Each of the three constitu-
                         ents received shared expertise through participation in three facets of this
                         model. The first facet involved joint post-observation conferencing by
                         cooperating teachers and college faculty with the teacher candidates on
                         their teaching. The second facet took place in the context of the on-site
                         senior student teachers’ capstone seminar, which is a weekly course


46
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

typically taught by college faculty concurrently with student teaching. In
our model, this course involved not only typical college faculty’s instruc-
tion but also cooperating teachers as guest instructors teaching specific
topics. The last facet involved the college faculty’s assistance in two areas
of professional development requested by the school’s teachers and
administrators: facilitating the school community’s understanding of
multicultural home-school relations and working with kindergarten teach-
ers on more developmentally appropriate curriculum development. Our
presentation will elaborate primarily on these three facets of shared
expertise as professional development for all three constituents.


Project REACH: Teachers And Candidates
Learning Together About Practices That
Support Diverse Students
Theresa McCormick and Charles Eick, Auburn University
Janet Womack, Auburn City Schools


       Project REACH (Reclaiming Educators’ and Childrens’ Hope) was
a PDS-sponsored book study for elementary teachers and candidates
designed to support levels of confidence and classroom practices in
culturally diverse classrooms. Many teachers feel challenged in develop-
ing personal and academic relationships with diverse students and in
applying instructional strategies that encourage all students to achieve.
The intent of this study was to foster growth in participants’ awareness,
knowledge, application of teaching skills, and critical reflection in teaching
diverse students of color. In this book study, teachers and their candidates
read From Rage to Hope by Dr. Crystal Kuykendall, followed by listening
to Dr. Kuykendall in person on practices supporting diverse students.
Candidates read and reflected on each chapter together in their seminar
course face-to-face and through an electronic discussion board. This
approach paralleled what teachers did at each participating school. Data
were analyzed for both groups from surveys on awareness and knowledge,
reflective writing on book chapters, and final reflective summaries and
discussions on the impact on thinking and practice. Impact on thinking and
practice emerged in four common categories for both groups: (1) treating
all students with equality and hope, (2) embracing student diversity in
planning and teaching, (3) awareness of how teacher attitude and behavior
impacts students, and (4) fostering parent-home communication and
school relationships. Results will compare candidates’ novice thinking
with teachers’ practical thinking in these categories.


Project SOAR: Launching A Professional
Development School
Elizabeth Ann Cook, Cypress Point University Elementary School
Lynn V. Clark, University of Louisiana at Monroe


      The presentation describes how the NAPDS Leadership Forum
served as a launching pad for a powerful collaboration between a site
principal and a university professor that successfully engaged constitu-
ent groups within the PDS. The shared inquiry began with two questions:
How might you impact student learning if a large number of teacher


                                                                                 47
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         candidates were made available to your site on a regular basis? and How
                         might regular access to a P-12 classroom enrich the learning experiences
                         of your teacher candidates? The result is a two-phase project which brings
                         over 60 teacher candidates to the PDS site to work weekly with over 300
                         elementary students on research-based literacy strategies. In Phase I,
                         teacher candidates work with small groups of primary students on indi-
                         vidual reading interventions (DIBELS) for 30 minutes a week. In Phase II,
                         teacher candidates implement writing conferences (Four Square and 6+
                         Trait Writing) with small groups of intermediate students. These ongoing
                         interventions require university faculty and teacher candidates to hold
                         one three-hour class a week on site.
                               Using words and images from the classroom, the presenters (the site
                         principal and the university professor) describe how the NAPDS prin-
                         ciples of shared decision-making, on-going partnerships, assessment-
                         based interventions, and reciprocity of resources helped the nascent
                         Professional Development School to SOAR. We will also discuss how a
                         collaborative website housed on the university system allowed constitu-
                         ent groups within the PDS to provide timely feedback into the process, as
                         well as coordinate the next week’s activities.


                         Prospective Teachers And PDS Teachers Learn
                         Together The Meaning Of “Teacher
                         Leadership” In The Benedum Collaborative
                         Sarah Steel and Diane Yendol-Hoppey, West Virginia University


                                “The term teacher leadership refers to that set of skills demonstrated
                         by teachers who continue to teach students but also have an influence that
                         extends beyond their own classrooms to others within their own school
                         and elsewhere.” (Danielson, 2006) This concept of teacher leadership is at
                         the heart of the work in the Benedum Collaborative, a school/university
                         partnership among West Virginia University and thirty-one public schools.
                         Through a complex governance structure developed over eighteen years
                         of collaborative work, teachers have been serving in such leadership roles
                         as professional development coordinators, teacher education coordina-
                         tors, and mentor teachers.
                                In concert with the development of these teacher leaders in PDSs,
                         prospective teachers enrolled in the Benedum Collaborative Five-Year
                         Teacher Education Program are also exploring this notion of teacher
                         leadership. Through a variety of learning experiences in the program,
                         prospective teachers are being mentored into a profession that focuses on
                         teacher leadership. In the final semester, all prospective teachers enroll in
                         a Teacher as Leader course where they specifically focus on concepts such
                         as: (1) teacher as exemplary practitioner, (2) teacher as decision-maker and
                         researcher, (3) teacher as advocate and change agent, and (4) teacher as
                         collaborator. In this presentation, we will share findings revealed through
                         a book study conducted by a selected group of teacher leaders from PDSs,
                         prospective teachers enrolled in the Teacher as Leader course, the Director
                         of the Collaborative, and the PDS Coordinator. Through reflection on the
                         readings, on the experiences, and on the journals kept by members of the
                         group, teacher leadership roles in the Benedum Collaborative will be
                         explored. Each constituent group’s reflection will contribute to the profes-



48
                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

sional development of these participating members of the Benedum
Collaborative.


Put “Super” Back In Supervision: Creating
Meaningful Experiences For All Stakeholders
Bev Peters and Pete Kelly, Truman State University
Kathy Childers, Kirksville R-III School District


       Learning to teach students with disabilities is complicated, and
effective supervision is paramount to a successful student teaching/
internship semester. This presentation will provide insight, strategies,
activities and checklists from the stakeholders in the Truman State Univer-
sity and Kirksville R-III partnership that prepares graduate students to
become effective special education teachers. It will also focus on the
process that not only assisted beginning teachers but strengthened the
skills of the mentor teachers in this Special Education PDS.
       The partnership between Truman State University and Kirksville R-
III School District has identified that effective supervision and mentoring
ensures quality teaching experiences and optimal learning for students. It
also ensures that mentor teachers enter into reflective practice that
strengthens their mentoring skills and also their basic skills and knowledge
in working with special needs students. The partnership identified com-
mon areas of concern for prospective special education teachers. As an
outgrowth of these concerns, the stakeholders in the partnership have
developed a comprehensive program to address the unique supervisory
needs of prospective special education teachers while simultaneously
creating opportunities for veteran teachers to learn and grow in their field.
       A panel of stakeholders will share insight, specific activities, strat-
egies, and checklists that have provided pre-interns/interns/student teach-
ers with effective supervision and support prior to their first job in the field.
The mentor teacher will also focus on the benefits she has received as a
result of her participation in this program.
       This presentation addresses how veteran special education teach-
ers and university personnel serving as supervisors/mentors can truly put
the “super” back in supervision and positively impact all stakeholders.


Reaching Out And Moving Forward:
Successfully Building And Sustaining
Meaningful Professional Development
Spanning The P-16 Continuum
Stephanie Koprowski, Ana Maria Schuhmann, and Dorothy Feola, William
Paterson University


       Being a Professional Development School should go beyond a title;
it should be demonstrated in a sound process of building professional
relationships that serve and benefit all stakeholders. While meeting the
needs of the university partnership through field placements, equal
importance should be given to the designated PDS and their faculty
development as well. The PDS model at William Paterson University has
expanded to provide meaningful and engaging professional development


                                                                                    49
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         utilizing a variety of opportunities such as teacher-centered workshops on
                         instructional strategies, content-driven sessions to encourage pre-ser-
                         vice and in-service teachers to obtain additional teacher licensure in critical
                         areas of shortage, and assisting in the creation of professional learning
                         communities to support the emergence of teacher leaders. These extensive
                         offerings range from novice to advanced topics utilizing several IHE and
                         LEA agencies and provide pre-service candidates and in-service teachers
                         from a variety of urban and suburban PDSs a plethora of opportunities
                         which would not exist without this valuable relationship. Data will be
                         provided to support the success of this model, as we hope to encourage
                         our PDS colleagues to reach out and build meaningful professional
                         development opportunities that benefit all stakeholders in the P-16 con-
                         tinuum.


                         Reading Revolution: Professional Development
                         For Technology Integration That Supports 21st
                         Century Skills In K-12 Classrooms
                         Denise Lindstrom, Fairmont State University
                         Melissa Kent, Bruceton K-8 Public School


                                Rapid advancements of information and communication technolo-
                         gies (ICTs) are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize and
                         participate in civic life. Unfortunately many educators are unfamiliar with
                         newer ICTs like online social networks, wikies, blogs, instant messaging
                         and massively multi-player online role playing games (MMORPG). Conse-
                         quently many educators are unable to take advantage of student motiva-
                         tion and interest to use these technologies to improve student motivation
                         to engage in foundational literacy building activities. Traditional models
                         of professional development for technology integration are characterized
                         as “sit and get” or “one-time-only” workshops and have proven ineffec-
                         tive in supporting technology use in schools. Instead, it is recommended
                         that new models of professional development for technology integration
                         be ongoing and integral to the professional lives of teachers. Reading
                         Revolution is an example of how Fairmont States’ PDS Partnership is
                         supporting one classroom teacher in using an online social network to meet
                         existing literacy learning goals and develop 2150 century literacies along
                         side her students. Examples of how the PDS Partnership provided technical
                         assistance, opportunities for a variety of hands-on learning experiences,
                         and allowed for spontaneous and authentic connections to be made
                         between technology use and student learning will be provided by the
                         classroom teacher. A discussion will follow focused on how this type of
                         professional development for technology integration may be supported
                         more systematically throughout the partnership to take advantage of the
                         funding and collegiality emerging between university faculty, K-12 teach-
                         ers and teacher candidates as a result of the partnership.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Redefining Continuous Professional
Development: A Model For Job-Embedded
Multilayered Professional Development
Merilyn Buchanan, California State University Channel Islands
Sima Beshid, Charmon Evans, and Linda Ngarupe, University Preparation
School


       A partnership of teachers, the administrator, and the university
liaison at University Preparation School at California State University
Channel Islands (UPS) implemented a multilayered infrastructure of job-
embedded professional development. In our model teachers engage daily
in effective professional development through a variety of learning com-
munities. These range from staff-wide experiences in cross-grade councils
to grade level collaborative teams to individual professional development
activities. These multiple learning communities provide opportunities for
building leadership capacity and developing collaboration skills, as well
as increasing teachers’ content knowledge and expanding their pedagogi-
cal strategies to positively impact student learning.
       Teacher candidates are included in the various activities alongside
their cooperating teachers. Candidates take into their careers experience
of team planning, models of cooperative interaction, participation in action
research, and an expanded repertoire of teaching methods. Additionally,
they have high expectations for their own professional development.
       Current implementation processes and the multilayered approach
have evolved at UPS from a desire to improve student learning while
fulfilling the professional development needs of the teachers. The design
of the job-embedded professional development was research-based,
drawing from Berliner (1986), Clandenin and Connelly (1991), Darling-
Hammond and Baratz-Snowden (2007), Roberts and Pruitt, (2003), and
Samson (2002), as well as DuFour and Eaker (2002, 2005) and Reeve’s (2004)
work on learning communities.
       On-going data collection reveals teachers’ high levels of satisfac-
tion with both the organizational structures and the degree to which their
personal professional development needs are being met. The successes
as well as pitfalls and lessons learned will be discussed.




Reflection Through Digital Stories: An
Examination Of Pre-Service Educators’
Experiences In Professional Development
Schools
Sharon Hayes, Jason Jude Smith, and Sarah Steel, West Virginia University


      Pre-service teachers in West Virginia University’s Five Year Teacher
Education Program create digital stories during their Year Three Practicum,
a clinical experience supported by periodic seminars. This assignment
encourages our pre-service teachers to reflect on their experiences work-
ing with children and practitioners in their assigned PDS and to develop
digital stories where they visually represent their understandings of
classroom environments, teaching practices, and students. These stories


                                                                               51
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         are told in a PowerPoint presentation, which consists of photographs
                         taken by the pre-service teachers and a narration of the nascent under-
                         standings our students are developing of teaching and learning.
                                In this presentation we will share faculty analysis of a sample of the
                         digital stories completed by students in the 2010 cohort of the Teacher
                         Education Program. Through the grounded theory approach, a number of
                         themes regarding students’ understanding of teaching and learning
                         emerged. We will share how these themes have broadened and deepened
                         our understanding of how the digital story assignment facilitates the
                         development of our pre-service teachers as reflective practitioners, espe-
                         cially with respect to reflection on their experiences with students, teach-
                         ers, and real-world classrooms. Furthermore, we will share how we used our
                         findings to uncover barriers that constrained or prohibited reflective
                         practices, as well as how the reflection embodied in the digital stories
                         affected the professional practices of our pre-service teachers. Ultimately,
                         the findings will be used to make informed judgments about modifying the
                         digital story assignment to better align with our goal of developing
                         teachers who are reflective practitioners.


                         Response To Intervention: An Opportunity To
                         Share Knowledge And Build Bridges Between
                         PDS Partners
                         David Hoppey, Johnna Bolyard, and Aimee Morewood, West Virginia
                         University


                                 The presentation highlights how West Virginia University’s
                         Benedum Collaborative collaborated with their PDS partner schools to
                         proactively address the inherent challenges of implementing the Re-
                         sponse to Intervention framework. The overarching goal of this session
                         is to illustrate how university faculty collaboratively engaged in-service
                         teachers, prospective teachers, and school administrators in job-embed-
                         ded professional development focused on improving learning outcomes
                         for all students. The purpose of the project was to align resources and
                         provide support by sharing university faculty members’ expertise for PDS
                         teams of practicing teachers, pre-service teachers, school administrators,
                         and university faculty members. Specific technical assistance and profes-
                         sional development topics include: (1) building professional learning
                         communities focused on developing common school goals; (2) embedding
                         universal screening and ongoing progress monitoring into a systemic
                         data-based decision making process; (3) developing and implementing
                         research-based best practices for core instruction and targeted supple-
                         mental instruction and interventions in the areas of in literacy and math;
                         (4) assisting school-based teams in clarifying teachers’ roles and respon-
                         sibilities; and (5) developing flexible scheduling procedures to provide the
                         necessary instruction and interventions to meet the needs of all students.
                                 This session is suitable for in-service teachers, university supervi-
                         sors, university faculty, school administrators, and district level person-
                         nel. Data from this study will be presented using the NAPDS “9 Essentials”
                         framework in order to generate discussion and implications for future work
                         in other PDS contexts. Benefits, challenges, and next steps also will also
                         be shared from different stakeholders’ perspectives.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Rounds: An Innovative Way To Provide Pre-
Service Teachers With Meaningful
Opportunities For Observation And
Mentorship
Elizabeth Powers-Costello and Jane Zenger, University of South Carolina


       The “rounds” model of observation is an innovative method that
enables pre-service and induction year teachers to observe teachers in
multiple settings. Borrowing from medical models of interns working with
a master doctor and actual patients, educational rounds enable interns to
observe practicing teachers and then have time to engage in thoughtful
conversations with those teachers directly following the observation
session. This model is being implemented under the direction of Jane
Zenger, Director of the University of South Carolina Teacher Quality
Collaborative, in a variety of P-12 schools in Columbia, South Carolina.
Presenters include Dr. Zenger, classroom teachers, and USC faculty
members who have included rounds in their practicum and class experi-
ences. The presenters will share their experiences and insights gained from
their rounds observations, as well as helpful strategies for implementation
of the model in teacher education programs. This presentation directly
addresses Question #1 (How does professional development successfully
engage constituent groups within the PDS?) because it focuses on PDS
relationships that are aimed at the professional preparation of future
educators and on the continuing professional development of educators
already in the field. This presentation will be particularly useful for those
interested in mentoring, observation, reflection, and working with pre-
service teachers.


School And University PDS Personnel: Doing
The Work Together
Jill Miels, Ball State University
Karen Boatright, Jennifer Nichols, Mary Hendricks, and Jo Burnside,
Rhoades Elementary School


      Ball State University has a long history of working successfully with
schools throughout the state of Indiana to prepare future teachers. The
practices and procedures associated with the Professional Development
Schools Network at Ball State University have been institutionalized and
recognized for a process of true collaboration with its individual partners,
as well as serving as a role model for other institutions. After eleven years
of working in the Professional Development Schools arena, there is much
to be learned from both the larger Network and from individual school
stories that guide our practice. This session will be an examination of the
responsibilities of a University PDS Liaison, two school administrators, a
school adjunct faculty member, and a teacher in one elementary PDS. The
adjunct faculty member has been involved in the PDS initiative since its
inception. The classroom teacher went through the pre-service portion of
the PDS program at the school and now supervises incoming pre-service
teachers. Professional development defines ‘doing the work of schools’
at Rhoades and will focus on the successful collaborative work at Rhoades
Elementary including:


                                                                                53
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                               • Tuesday Talks for pre-service and new in-service teachers;
                               • use of data and research to drive instruction;
                               • shared supervision and co-teaching models; and
                               • required ‘extra’ experiences.
                              Depending on the size and make-up of the audience, the presenters
                         may break into small groups to discuss roles represented by the audience
                         and presentation group.


                         Science Methods: A Catalyst Approach To
                         Building A Professional Development
                         Environment
                         Leigh Ann Haefner, Karen Pletcher, Timothy Slekar, and Katherine Imler,
                         Penn State Altoona
                         Vince DiLeo and Tracy Flynn, Logan Elementary School


                               Penn State Altoona and the Altoona Area School District have had
                         by all accounts a traditional relationship in that the district hosted pre-
                         service teachers for field experiences and student teaching. Full-time
                         supervisors did school-based supervision and there was little contact
                         between university faculty and classroom teachers. Recently, however, a
                         visionary group of teachers and their principal contacted our teacher
                         education program director to inquire about developing a partnership
                         around science. The primary intent of this science partnership was to
                         provide support for the classroom teachers, while also providing an
                         environment to mentor pre-service teachers in those same classrooms.
                         This year, two university courses are taught off campus in the school
                         (science methods and a classroom learning environments course), and
                         university faculty spend three days a week in classrooms providing
                         planning, resources, and/or science instructional support to classroom
                         teachers. Participating teachers host a pre-service teacher (enrolled in both
                         courses) for their pre-student teaching (fall) and student teaching experi-
                         ences (spring).
                               We will share our experiences from this first year as we strive to
                         develop our emerging roles, identities, and goals for the future that support
                         a meaningful and sustainable relationship capable of growing into a
                         multidisciplinary Professional Development School partnership. Included
                         will be perspectives from the principal and university administration,
                         classroom teachers and university faculty, and pre-service teachers in-
                         volved in this program. Specifically, we will share our struggles and
                         successes as we strive to engage all stakeholders and cultivate shared
                         goals for professional development of teachers and pre-service teachers.


                         Self-Directed Teacher Appraisal: Teachers
                         Working To Achieve Important PDS Goals
                         Veronica McCauley and Annette M. Zito, Farmersville Elementary School
                         Judith A. Duffield, Lehigh University


                               In 2007, our school district adopted a teacher appraisal system that
                         allows tenured teachers to choose to complete a self-directed project
                         instead of the traditional principal observation and debriefing session.


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

These projects are proposed and approved by the principal in the fall and
carried out during the year. Teachers submit a progress report in January
and a final report in May, which they present to the staff. Sixty-seven
percent of the teachers chose to participate in this program during year one.
       Teachers chose a variety of projects for their self-studies, the
majority of which focused on the school goal of increasing reading
comprehension. In four of the six grade levels, the teachers worked
together as a team on the projects. Three of these group projects and two
other individual projects focused on developing teaching skills and
expanding how they used curricular resources in teaching reading compre-
hension. Four other projects focused on involving parents and the school
community in education. For one of these, the teachers developed a CD for
parents of incoming kindergarten students to allay their fears and address
concerns. Another project resulted in an orientation packet for intern
teachers.
       These projects allowed teachers to become active participants in
their own evaluation process, while helping define and implement best
practice. They developed projects that allowed them to become better
teachers and members of the community. Through the presentations to the
faculty, the participating teachers were able to share what they had learned
with the rest of the staff.


Sharing Professional Development
Opportunities, Enriching Our PDS Learning
Community
Jennifer Ford, Marie Viola, and Rita Croteau, Andrew Peabody School


       The Cambridge/Lesley PDS, a 14-year partnership involving Lesley
University and two Cambridge K-8 schools, focuses on the preparation of
pre-service educators and the continuing education of veteran teachers
and university faculty. A primary goal of this collaboration is to form a
learning community in which all constituencies have opportunities to grow
professionally. Our presentation will describe these various opportunities
and engage participants in an exchange of ideas for enriching professional
development within PDS partnerships.
       Learning experiences for our pre-service teachers include monthly
intern meetings focusing on reflective practice, site-based seminars led by
university liaisons and school professional staff, book discussion groups,
and participation in Cambridge Public School professional development
events. Lesley University students also engage in activities beyond their
classrooms: involvement in after-school homework centers and tutoring
programs; participation in school-sponsored family events; and atten-
dance at staff and cluster meetings.
       Cambridge and Lesley faculty take part in book groups and in on-site
professional development courses and workshops based on needs iden-
tified by the school steering committees. Teachers and Lesley students
participate in classroom “rounds,” observing and analyzing the teaching
practices modeled in various classrooms; present at a bi-annual mini-
conference; and attend Lesley institutes and special events. Interns and
their mentors collaborate on classroom-based inquiry projects.
       Cambridge and Lesley faculty and administrators present together
at conferences and institutes. Cambridge faculty are guest speakers,

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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         adjunct faculty, and practicum supervisors at the university. All of these
                         activities enrich the professional lives of PDS constituencies and focus on
                         improving academic achievement for K-8 students.


                         Starting Off On The Right Foot: Understanding
                         Expectations And Effective Communication - A
                         Mentor Teacher/Intern Workshop
                         Laurie A. Palmer, University of Delaware


                               Building a strong and effective working relationship is essential for
                         mentor teachers and interns to have an effective and successful clinical
                         experience for interns, teachers, and their students. By providing profes-
                         sional development for mentor teachers and interns together, they can
                         work as a team to build strategies that will have a positive impact on their
                         work together during field placements.
                               Starting Off on the Right Foot is a workshop presented to teachers
                         and interns in our partnership prior to the start of each field experience.
                         Topics include establishing a mutual understanding of roles and expecta-
                         tions; building a trusting relationship; qualities of a strong mentor and
                         intern; expectations of the experience; verbal and nonverbal communica-
                         tion; giving and accepting suggestions, help, and advice; giving and
                         receiving feedback; and talking about the tough issues. Interns and mentor
                         teachers work as partners throughout this workshop, participating in
                         various exercises related to the topics presented. We have found that the
                         outcome of this workshop has been a strong and more effective relation-
                         ship between our interns and teachers, better coaching and feedback by
                         our mentor teachers, improved reflection and using feedback to improve
                         instruction, improved problem solving between interns and teachers, and
                         less problems that require supervisor intervention.
                               Participants in this session will receive an outline of the key compo-
                         nents of this workshop, descriptions of activities used, and copies of a
                         handout.


                         Successful Professional Development During
                         The Workday
                         Linda Taylor, Ball State University


                                For the past four years, Castleton United Methodist Nursery School
                         has implemented a professional development program during the course
                         of the workday. This session will share the story of how one early
                         childhood program developed this system and how it has changed over
                         time. During the first year, the program director, two classroom teachers,
                         and a university faculty member taught the four courses that each staff
                         member received at some point during the year. A survey at the end of the
                         training revealed the benefits and drawbacks perceived by the staff
                         members. This information was used to develop the next year’s profes-
                         sional development. During subsequent years, the program has changed
                         to involve more teachers taking leadership roles in the process. One
                         consistent aspect each year has been that each training includes pre- and
                         post-class surveys about the content of the course. Data has been



56
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

collected each year for each course, as well as for the overall program and
is shared with the entire staff at the beginning of the next school year.


Supporting ALL Learners And Seeing Real
Results . . . Bigger And Better Than Ever!
Reana Anderko, Michelle Bosak, and Nancy Hardter, Lincoln Elementary
School
Gina R. Scala, East Stroudsburg University


      NCLB and IDEA have mandated accountability and emphasis on
assessment. All students need to show progress within the general
education curriculum. Schools are assessed on the documented AYP. How
are individual needs met successfully in urban schools when resources are
minimal and stakes are high? The PDS partnership addressed these issues
in the entire third grade within the reading, literacy, and language arts
content areas. By identifying best practices and utilizing the PDS partner-
ship model, traditional teaching was relinquished in favor of an exciting,
student-driven model of successful instruction. The results have clearly
indicated success for all students. Teachers are very invested, and
professional development has been implemented to continue to add to the
professional skills of the faculty. AYP was achieved, which seems to be
the priority of many schools. As the school realized its success, the entire
school replicated the procedures which were so effective for all students.
The three initiatives, RTI, PBIS, and full inclusion, were implemented. PDS
students returning as student teachers continue to support best practices
for ALL. The presentation will identify the steps that were developed, the
outcomes, future directions, and current data supporting the success for
the students. In addition, a district-wide initiative supporting literacy &
inclusion has been initiated.


Supporting Mathematics Instruction Through
Learner-Centered Professional Development
Drew Polly, University of North Carolina Charlotte
Torrieann Dooley, David Cox Road Elementary School


       Various models of professional development have emerged in the
past few decades. Recommendations include that professional develop-
ment be ongoing, relevant to teachers’ daily work, and give teachers
ownership of the activities. Based on the American Psychological
Association’s Learner-centered Principles, learner-centered professional
development provides a framework for comprehensive opportunities for
teacher learning that are relevant and based on teachers’ typical classroom
activities.
       This presentation will share the details and impact of the first two
years of classroom-based professional development related to mathemat-
ics instruction at a Professional Development School. In an effort to
support reform in mathematics instruction in an elementary school, a
university faculty member and a classroom teacher have collaborated on
a weekly basis. These collaborative activities include co-planning, co-
teaching, and examining student work.



                                                                               57
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                               Findings will be shared during the presentation. Through classroom
                         observations, data indicate that the teacher implements more worthwhile
                         mathematical activities and poses more higher-level questions during
                         instruction. During the presentation, both the university faculty and
                         classroom teachers will share their perspectives, highlight implications,
                         and give suggestions related to this model of professional development.


                         Supporting Student Teachers Through A PDS
                         Teaching Seminar
                         Joyce Frazier, Cindy Hopper, and Drew Polly, University of North Carolina
                         Charlotte


                                Research indicates a need to provide adequate support for student
                         teachers. At UNC Charlotte, our undergraduate pre-service teachers
                         participate in a year-long internship where they spend a year in the
                         classroom where they will complete their student teaching. In the first
                         semester, pre-service teachers are in the schools one full day a week and
                         participate in a variety of activities. In the second semester, pre-service
                         teachers are in schools full time. Our data from student teaching observa-
                         tions and student teacher surveys indicated a need to increase support for
                         students in the beginning of their year-long internship.
                                This presentation describes the development of a teaching seminar
                         for 20 elementary school pre-service teachers who are in the first semester
                         of their year-long internship. These pre-service teachers are completing
                         their student teaching in UNC Charlotte’s seven Professional Develop-
                         ment Schools. The seminar topics are based on the needs of pre-service
                         teachers, as determined by data from previous pre-service teachers and the
                         perceived needs of pre-service teachers in the seminar. An overview of the
                         seminar, materials, resources, and suggestions for implementation will be
                         provided.




                         Taking Action: From Classroom Research To
                         Collaborative Reflection
                         Patricia Marlin, Nolan Correa, and Vicky Brown, University High School


                                Professional development is the most common means for implement-
                         ing change in the classroom. For most teachers in the United States,
                         professional development means being presented with new strategies and
                         ideas with limited opportunities to share their own opinions and experi-
                         ences. This, however, is not the case with pre-service and in-service
                         teachers at a large urban secondary Professional Development School.
                                Based on various research studies, professional development that
                         occurred in the school environment encouraged collaboration among
                         teachers and focused on issues related to learning and ultimately had
                         positive results in effecting teacher change (Kwakman, 2003; Phillip, 2003).
                         Action research as a form of professional development is a vehicle that can
                         be used by educators to untangle some of the complexity that occurs in the
                         classrooms, raise teachers’ voices in discussions of instructional prac-
                         tices, and consequently, result in changes in the classrooms and in student
                         performance (Dana & Yendol-Silva, 2003).


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      The focus of this presentation will be on the implementation of action
research in a Professional Development School. Presenters will share the
impact action research had on both secondary in-service and pre-service
teachers’ professional growth. In addition, presenters will share how
action research affected secondary students. More specifically, this
session will:
       • describe the process to implement action research in a Profes-
         sional Development School;
       • share the impact action research had on the professional devel-
         opment of in-service and pre-service teachers;
       • share the impact action research had on secondary students; and
       • discuss barriers, issues, successes, and future endeavors for
         action research.


Teacher Education Workshop Series: Sailing
Ahead To Improve Practice Through
Research-Based Professional Development
Jennifer Nelson and Melissa Robinson, University of Memphis


      The Office of School-Based Clinical Practice at the University of
Memphis is expanding the professional growth of pre-service teachers
through the Teacher Education Workshop Series. Survey and focus group
feedback indicated the need to create a support center cultivating the
acquisition of skills needed for improved professional performance. The
purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how the Office of School-
Based Clinical Practice developed and implemented the Teacher Education
Workshop Series.
      The Teacher Education Workshop Series was constructed to bring
together practitioners, university faculty, staff, and students to improve
practice through developmental activities. The series continues to achieve
the following outcomes: 1) conduct college and community-based re-
search to identify areas of need; 2) extend program opportunities by
providing meaningful research-based professional development and re-
sources for pre-service teachers; 3) improve student preparation for
professional careers in various Memphis metropolitan schools and com-
munities; and 4) foster effective communication between the College of
Education and community stakeholders.
      Session attendees will learn how the Teacher Education Workshop
Series was created and implemented. In addition to addressing how the
Teacher Education Workshop Series successfully engages pre-service
teachers, presenters will also describe key program challenges, successes,
and future plans. Further, they will provide guidance to other universities
seeking to implement professional development programs and support
learning communities for novice and in-service teachers.




                                                                               59
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Ten Years And Counting! - A Successful
                         Professional Development School Partnership
                         Dorothy Feola, Marie Donnantuono, Julie Rosenthal, and Deborah Leverett,
                         William Paterson University
                         Deborah Hudzik, Passaic Public Schools


                                Reflecting on a ten-year urban Professional Development School
                         partnership using employment data and interviews, we will share an
                         analysis of the impact of a PDS partnership on the preparation of new
                         teachers and their success as tenured teachers. We will also explore how
                         the sustained professional development of in-service teachers led to
                         teachers becoming school and district leaders.
                                In 1999, William Paterson University began a partnership with the
                         William B. Cruise Memorial School #11 in Passaic, New Jersey. The
                         partnership will celebrate its tenth anniversary in the spring. This session
                         will investigate how the partnership developed and how, in 2008, teacher
                         candidates are incorporated as full participants in the PDS. We will also
                         explore how the PDS relationship provided in-service teachers with
                         professional development which led to leadership roles within the school
                         district and how the district, recognizing the impact of the PDS partnership,
                         now supports the Professor in Residence model using district funds.
                                Preliminary findings suggest that teacher candidates who were
                         prepared in this PDS and are now tenured teachers there received what
                         could be described as “induction support” well before they were hired and
                         that their “formal” induction years were less stressful and more productive.
                         In-service teachers who participated in PDS initiatives went on to become
                         leaders in the school and in the district and cite the PDS partnership as an
                         impetus to continue their own professional development.


                         The Critical Role Of The Building Principal In
                         An Effective Professional Development School
                         Wendy Moore, Village Elementary School
                         Dee Holmes, Emporia State University
                         Kim Kirk, Timmerman Elementary School


                                The presenters will share the model developed by Emporia State
                         University’s Professional Development Schools in collaboration with
                         USD #253 Emporia Public Schools focusing on the role and responsibilities
                         of the PDS principals. The district is home for seven Professional Devel-
                         opment Schools working in collaboration with ESU. The Director of the
                         Emporia Professional Development Schools, and two district principals,
                         Mr. Kim Kirk and Mrs. Wendy Moore, will explain the critical role of the
                         building administrator in creating and maintaining an effective PDS. The
                         content will cover: the responsibilities of building principals, including
                         their involvement with the Emporia Teacher Council; conducting profes-
                         sional seminars; identifying mentor teachers; participating in the inter-
                         viewing and screening of candidates for placements at the PDS sites;
                         supervising interns; providing on-going feedback to interns, mentors, and
                         the university site coordinators; collaborating with course instructors;
                         participating in joint decision making with the Department of Early Child-
                         hood and Elementary Teacher Education; and giving continuous feedback
                         to the Director of the Emporia PDS concerning the knowledge level of the


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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

interns when they interview for a teaching position and the level of skills
and professionalism they demonstrate during their first year of teaching.
The principals will give examples of the benefits to the district from this PDS
partnership. The emphasis will be on how the PDS principal has a key role
in maintaining the high standards and effectiveness of this PDS program.
Questions from the audience will be welcomed.


The Discursive Nature Of Mentoring: How
Participation In A Mentoring Relationship
Influences The Identities And Practices Of
Prospective And Practicing Teachers In A PDS
Sharon B. Hayes, West Virginia University


       In this study I investigated how mentors and mentees utilized
discourse in negotiating their relationship and what role the mentoring
relationship played in their co-construction of knowledge about teaching
and learning, as well as the transformation of their individual identities and
practices. In addition, this study also explored how the context of a PDS
influenced the interactions and transformations of both the prospective
and practicing teachers. The following two questions guided my research:
How does the context of a PDS influence the nature of the mentoring
relationship that develops and evolves between the prospective and
practicing teacher? and How do these mentoring relationships and the
discourses and context in which the mentor and mentee are situated
transform their identities and practices?
       My findings revealed that the nature of the mentoring relationships
that developed was influenced by the context of the PDS and the mentors’
understandings of their roles as teacher educators. Moreover, each
mentoring relationship was influenced by the discourses that constructed
the larger sociopolitical context in which the mentors and mentees were
situated and influenced the ways in which the activities of mentoring were
understood and enacted.
       Tensions existed between the larger political context in which these
mentors and mentees were situated and the local understandings of their
Professional Developments Schools as to how prospective teachers
should be mentored into a community of practice. The implications of these
tensions for teacher education and professional development within a PDS
will be discussed.


The Ins And Outs Of Writing Workshop
Nancy Boggs, Mary Brown, Emily Carpenter, and Tonia Griffin, A. C. Moore
Elementary School


      In collaboration with the Diverse Pathways Project at the University
of South Carolina, A.C. Moore Elementary implemented a professional
development model that focused on Writing Workshop. The model utilizes
the expertise of a university professor who provides professional devel-
opment and support while teachers implement workshop strategies. The
professor facilitates professional development sessions and study groups
as well as conducts demonstration lessons.



                                                                                  61
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                The Writing Workshop implementation resulted in many successes
                         and a few roadblocks. Over the course of the year, the teachers study
                         experts such as Katie Wood Ray to learn about teaching strategies that are
                         vital to the success of workshop. The teachers quickly discovered that the
                         strategies proved useful far beyond the writing block.
                                The presentation will focus on the implementation of Writing
                         Workshop and the benefits they will enjoy, as well as the pitfalls teachers
                         should avoid. The presenters will be able to provide a unique perspective
                         on the process because they are all in different phases of implementation.


                         The Journey Back: A Case Study Examining
                         The Impact Of The Re-Enculturation Of A
                         Hybrid Teacher
                         Rebecca West Burns and Bernard Badiali, Penn State University


                                Our Professional Development School offers a unique opportunity
                         for classroom teachers to be reassigned as supervisors for one to three
                         years. Removed from the typical daily routines of classroom teaching,
                         these hybrid teachers take on a new identity as a Professional Develop-
                         ment Associate (PDA). With this identity comes a new set of responsibili-
                         ties. These individuals focus their attention on supporting pre-service
                         teachers (interns) and in-service mentors. Working with interns and
                         cultivating the triad relationship of mentor, intern, and PDA becomes their
                         primary activity. Lesson planning, administrative duties, and students’
                         learning become a secondary focus. When their time as PDA expires, little
                         is known about the transition from PDA back to classroom teacher. This
                         presentation will present the preliminary findings from an exploratory case
                         study examining one such individual as she experiences this “journey
                         back” and the impact of her experiences in a Professional Development
                         School on her re-enculturation.




                         The Real NIU Experience: Boot Camp For
                         Pre-Service Teachers
                         Judith Cox-Henderson, Northern Illinois University
                         Jennifer Gould, Jefferson High School


                                The REAL NIU Experience summer camp was designed to motivate
                         at-risk high-school students to attend college. It developed over the past
                         four years into much more. Most importantly, it has been very successful
                         in improving high school students’ motivation and goal-setting, but it has
                         also had a wonderful “side effect” on the pre-service teacher community.
                         Thus far, thirty pre-service teacher candidates have had the opportunity
                         to participate in this summer camp, serving as camp counselors. The NIU
                         students refer to the experience as a “boot camp for student teachers.”
                                Working as camp counselors has provided multiple opportunities
                         for pre-service teachers to interact with high school students in meaningful
                         ways; to try out their “teacher voices;” to learn and practice professional
                         conduct; to use good judgment in a wide variety of situations; to learn and
                         practice setting limits with high school students; to gain insight into the


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

emotional and social side of teen-agers; and to gain insight into their own
strengths and weaknesses in regard to handling the multitude of problems
that arise when working with adolescents.
       This presentation will focus on the mutually beneficial relationship
between three elements of the PDS (college faculty, pre-service teachers,
and K-12 students) and will argue that the college-bound camp could not
have been so successful without the strong ties between the high school
and university. It will focus on the benefits to the pre-service teachers who
report that being camp counselors was a crucial piece of their pre-service
training.


The Three Student Project: How Two Urban
PDSs Are Raising Student Achievement And
Engaging In Practical Professional
Development
Regina Holley, Pittsburgh Lincoln Elementary Technology Academy
Kevin Bivins, Jennifer Violi, Una Davoren, Alison Henry, and Lindsey Knab,
Pittsburgh Fulton Elementary School
Monte Tidwell, Indiana University of Pennsylvania


       This presentation will address Question #1. The presentation will
describe a successful project that was collaboratively designed and that
engages student teachers, teachers, university instructors, and principals
in a data-driven, reflective process of continuously tailoring instruction to
students who benefit from more individualized instruction and attention.
While we will share data on advances in student achievement, we will
especially focus on the collaborative and professionalizing benefits that
have come out of this project.




The TIPping Point (Teacher-Intern-Professor):
A Preparation And Practice Triage At Work
Gwen Benson, Susan Ogletree, Dee Taylor, Bill Curlette, and August Dale,
Georgia State University
Qualyn McIntyre, Atlanta Public Schools
Karen Ross, L.O. Kimberly Elementary School


      TIP is a research-based model created at Georgia State University
among PDS relationships (teacher practitioners, university faculty, and
teacher candidates). The TIP triage engages in research to meet the needs
of each person and to address student achievement of the P-12 classes for
intern placement. Find out how this model became a venue for PDS
professor research, authentic classroom inquiry, fertile ground for teacher
preparation, renewal for veteran cooperating teachers, a venue to engage
graduate assistants’ classroom skills, and the sharing of a genuine respect
and value for each others’ expertise. Presenters will share the structure at
the elementary and secondary partner school levels, how the model
prepared interns hired in full-time positions, the TIP research findings, and
the TIP expansion. See how the TIP model aligns with Cross Career
Learning Communities and brings novice and veteran teachers together as


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         full community participants (following teacher-friendly structured proto-
                         cols that work in TIP/CCLC professional learning community meetings).
                         Results come from real time facilitated meeting opportunities for teachers/
                         interns/professors, along with other cross career teachers to share and
                         solve day-to-day classroom challenges and successes. Find out what
                         teachers and professors find beneficial for teacher preparation, practice,
                         and university-teacher liaison reflection and relationships.


                         Thinking Outside The Box: Using Rounds And
                         Co-Teaching To Promote Professional
                         Development
                         Connie Bowman and Rebecca Aicher, University of Dayton


                                Historically there has been a disconnect between university pro-
                         grams and clinical experiences, even though research (Guyton, 1989;
                         McIntyre, 1984; and Giebelhaus & Bowman, 2002) has supported clinical
                         experiences as being crucial components for candidates in teacher educa-
                         tion programs. This disconnect has been between theory and practice. As
                         Darling-Hammond (2006) notes in Powerful Teacher Education, clinical
                         experiences need to be tied to the coursework, yet the traditional model of
                         front-loading theory with little or no application to practice is used in many
                         teacher education programs. With this approach, the candidate is not able
                         to analyze teaching and learning in order to ground the theory being
                         presented in the courses. Shulman (2005) further extends this research by
                         addressing signature pedagogies: the way professionals are trained for
                         their profession. Shulman maintains that professionals, regardless of their
                         profession, must be prepared to act, to perform, and to practice.
                                In order to accomplish this, two professional development compo-
                         nents have been added to our Clinical Practice Model. This includes
                         rounds from the medical model and co-teaching that align with research on
                         professional growth of pre-service and in-service teachers as they discuss
                         the “how to” of teaching by making connections between coursework
                         (theory) and field experiences (practice). The strategies of rounds and co-
                         teaching assist the university and its partners in implementing “act,
                         perform, practice” to our clinical field experience and professional devel-
                         opment embedded in the practice of both worlds. This engages all parties
                         in conversations about teaching and learning, best practices, and system-
                         atic professional development. These conversations presented qualita-
                         tive and quantitative data that was used to improve practice, empower
                         clinical educators, and develop a program that prepares candidates to
                         address the multiple demands and realities of teaching.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Together, We Can: A Holonomous Partnership
Between The Masters Of Education In
Teaching Program And The Moanalua
Complex
Cristy Kessler, University of Hawaii
Caroline Wong and Gordon Nakamori, Moanalua Middle School
Kenton Wong, University Laboratory School
Devin Oshiro, Red Hill Elementary School


       The Moanalua Complex/Masters of Education in Teaching Program
(MEdT) at the University of Hawaii has created and sustained a learning
community to reflect the concept of holonomy, described by Costa and
Garmston as a phenomenon with the dual characteristics of being both a
part and a whole at the same time. Holonomy looks at both our independent
and interdependent tendencies. A holonomous partnership seeks av-
enues of growth for every individual in the learning community so that
individuals become independent and self-actualizing while functioning
and growing interdependently.
       This presentation will discuss two major components of our partner-
ship:
       1. School Portrait: an open-ended assignment designed to focus
MEdT candidates’ attention on the culture, habits, and beliefs of our
partnership schools. The goal is to create a focused inquiry question;
collect data from faculty, administration, and/or students; and put together
a presentation of the findings and recommendations to be used for
professional development for in-service faculty.
       2. Seminars as Professional Development Opportunities for In-
service/Pre-service Educators: MEdT on-site classes and seminars inte-
grate research and instructional practices which are the same as those that
actively engage the classroom teachers. MEdT students are grounded in
standards-based lesson planning as well as strategies to differentiate
instruction, address multiple intelligences, and integrate metacognitive
reflections to strengthen their learning. Assessments focus on critical
thinking, problem solving, and application to real-life situations, and may
involve service learning. Based on this model, pre-service teachers are able
to work collaboratively with in-service teachers and develop a shared
knowledge and language that focuses on improved teaching and student
learning.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Transforming A University/School District
                         Partnership Into A Professional Development
                         School Model
                         Joseph Corriero, Lynn Romeo, Harvey Allen, and Kathleen Corriero,
                         Monmouth University
                         William O. George III and Jill A. Takacs, Hazlet Township Public Schools
                         Loretta Zimmer, Middle Road School


                                Interested in developing a Professional Development School? At-
                         tend this session and interact with university and school district faculty
                         as they share their experiences at turning an existing university/school
                         district partnership between a small university (Monmouth University)
                         and a 3300 student school district (Hazlet Township Public Schools) into
                         a formal PDS relationship. Addressing conference question # 1 (How does
                         professional development successfully engage constituent groups within
                         the PDS?), our panel will discuss how they used professional growth
                         opportunities as the stimulus for developing shared conceptions of
                         effective teaching and learning to create the basis for a “learning commu-
                         nity.” Viewing schools as “centers of inquiry” and clinical teaching
                         laboratories, the leadership team created a forum to forge professional ties
                         through the continuous, sustained professional development of pre- and
                         in-service teachers, administrators, parents, and university personnel in
                         order to promote standards-based instruction leading to enhanced stu-
                         dent learning. Examples of collaborative experiences the panel will discuss
                         include:
                                 • student teaching seminars including weekly reflective exercises;
                                 • Three-year mentoring program;
                                 • faculty/parent workshops in unit planning, math, and literacy;
                                 • creation of Hazlet’s Professional Development Council (includ-
                                   ing university professors);
                                 • program evaluation; and
                                 • Hazlet administrators and faculty participating in university
                                   programs.
                                This session will demonstrate how faculty from the school district
                         and university model promising and productive relationships as they work
                         as partners in a pre-K-16 setting to enhance the learning of children, pre-
                         and –in service teachers, administrators, and university faculty in re-
                         defined organizational roles.


                         Turning Learning Inside Out: Professional
                         Development In A PDS
                         Bernard Badiali and Rebecca West Burns, Penn State University
                         Donnan Stoicovy, Lindsi Ciuffetelli, and Paige Harris, Park Forest
                         Elementary School


                               As a result of the Professional Development School collaborative
                         between the State College Area School District (SCASD) and The Penn-
                         sylvania State University (PSU), professional development has become an
                         integral part of the everyday practices of teachers. Teachers continually
                         seek opportunities to further develop and hone their skills.


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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

       In the summer of 2005, teachers at Park Forest Elementary School
(PFE) participated in a PDS course that has ultimately resulted in an
ongoing scientific, phenomenological study of our schoolyard since its
inception over three years ago. Two teacher inquiries have been written
and presented about the Schoolyard Project (SYP), with one addressing
student interest and learning and the other identifying curriculum integra-
tion needs. To address the blending of the two inquiry outcomes, a survey
of teachers was completed that underscored the need for professional
development to address teacher concerns. A professional development
plan was written and a grant proposal submitted and received to support
the teachers in this curriculum integration. Our goal was to take the current
curriculum and integrate it with the SYP to extend learning beyond the
boundaries of the classroom to another alternative, inviting, and engaging
environment.
       Teacher volunteers were solicited with half of the faculty participat-
ing. Teachers have self selected themselves into project teams to address
their varying needs. Some common themes and strategies from groups
have been proposed that would not be possible without the PDS processes
and involvement.
       Presenters will update participants about the professional develop-
ment project and its impact on student learning, teacher attitudes, and
professional development.


Unfolding Drama In The Classroom -
Developing Thinking And Learning Styles
Through The Use Of Opera
Tyra Tripp and Dollye T. James, Paradise Professional Development School


      This session will discuss how a constituent group (mentor teacher,
teacher candidate, and school counselor) successfully engages in estab-
lishing behavioral norms and building a classroom community. Another
goal of this collaboration is to teach children to identify their learning styles
and multiple intelligences. By doing so, the children learn to become active
participants and to self-advocate in the educational process as they build
on their individual strengths. Drama will be used to integrate the content
area skills. Children will demonstrate their mastery of literacy, social
studies, math, and the arts by participating in a culminating, multi-
disciplinary theatrical production in the spring. The refinement of this
production allows opportunities for the children to apply their developing
higher order thinking skills.
      This full-day, fully-inclusive, general education kindergarten class
at Paradise Professional Development School consists of 28 five-year-old
children. Of this group, 40% are English language learners. The use of
classroom community is a proactive measure to facilitate the development
of personal/social/academic skills for this at-risk population.
      The presenters will provide concrete examples of how this process
is implemented in a primary classroom. Attendees will participate in
practical learning activities such as “What’s Your Learning Style?” and
“How Are You Smart?” and/or selected scenes from The Three Piggy
Opera by Carol Kaplan and Sandi Becker.




                                                                                    67
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Using Action Research Video Findings To
                         Institute Change And Improvement In A
                         Holistic PDS Partnership: A Room With Three
                         Views
                         Linda A. Catelli, and Clyde Payne, Dowling College
                         Valerie Jackson, Joan Carlino, and Gina Marie Petraglia, Belmont
                         Elementary Professional Development School


                                The purpose of the session is to present action research video
                         findings and the use of the findings to institute change and improvement
                         in a holistic Professional Development School partnership. The action
                         research studies were conducted by members of the partnership (i.e.,
                         supervising teachers, student researchers, and professors) and focus on
                         videotaped teaching performances of recent cohorts of teacher candi-
                         dates. Data and findings from the studies were used during this past
                         academic year to initiate and coordinate changes in aspects of the pre- and
                         in-service teacher education program and in the supervision of teacher
                         candidates. At last year’s PDS National Conference, we presented a
                         comparison of the PDS’s video research findings from earlier (1998) and
                         recent (2005/6) studies, along with a strategic model to initiate and monitor
                         change and improvement. For purposes of this year’s 2009 conference,
                         members of the PDS will present findings from recent action research video
                         studies and how the findings were used to institute coordinative change
                         in the PDS and its holistic school-college agenda for educational improve-
                         ment. From the perspective of (a) the college’s dean and director, (b) the
                         school’s principal, supervising and cooperating teachers, and (c) the
                         teacher candidates and student researchers, each presenter will identify
                         findings and how they used the findings, from their respective positions,
                         to make changes in the PDS partnership. The session contributes to
                         Essential 5 and is intended to promote dialogue among PDS practitioners,
                         researchers, students, teacher educators, and administrators regarding
                         how to use the results of deliberate investigations to improve aspects of
                         a PDS partnership.


                         Using University-School Partnerships To
                         Enhance Your Professional Development: A
                         Different Look
                         Quantina T. Haggwood and Ulanda James, University of South Carolina


                                The primary goal of the Diverse Pathways Teaching Project is to
                         develop a highly qualified teaching force. One strategy utilized to accom-
                         plish this goal is to use a university-school partnership to affect teacher
                         quality. Improving teacher quality will enhance the clinical experiences of
                         interns. Through a university-school partnership, the project provides
                         sustained professional development to three partner schools. A univer-
                         sity professor has been assigned to each school based on the professors’
                         expertise and the schools’ needs. Observations, professional study groups,
                         and model lessons are some of the strategies implemented to provide
                         relevant professional development and teacher support.
                                The benefits for interns and practicum students are two-fold. The
                         students benefit from having access to research-based professional


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

development, with the opportunity to implement strategies learned imme-
diately. Implementation with the support of a university professor and
coaching teacher is an important advantage of this model. The interns also
benefit from the increased knowledge of the coaching teachers, as well as
their increased use of research-based instructional strategies. This pre-
sentation will focus on the implementation of this model and the benefits
schools can expect.


We Believe . . . In The “PD” In Professional
Development Schools!
Rebecca Libler and Brad Balch, Indiana State University
Holly Pies, Vigo County School Corporation
Kathleen Sharp, Indianapolis Public Schools


       First established in 1992, the Indiana State University PDS Partner-
ship is a collaboration between the university and 19 schools in five school
districts. From its very inception, the partnership has focused on renewal,
professional growth, and continuing education of all participants as a
means to create optimal learning environments for pre-service teachers
and p-12 students. Our formal agreements address monetary support for
professional development coming from both school district and university
coffers. We also seek grant resources for added professional development
opportunities. This session will provide participants with overviews of 15
different sustainable strategies/models currently in place for successfully
engaging teachers, principals, aspiring principals, university faculty, and
pre-service teachers within the ISU/PDS Partnership in professional
development. Data on effectiveness of many of the strategies will also be
provided.


Welcoming And Orienting Interns To PDS: A
Collection Of Ideas From A School District And
University Partnership
Nancy Smith and Amy Welch, Emporia State University


       The Emporia State University/Olathe School District PDS partner-
ship is in its 16th year. Our PDS site has grown to include 53 interns placed
in 8 elementary schools. Interns spend an entire school year in a PDS. One
of the strengths of this nationally recognized partnership is the profes-
sional development provided to interns and mentors. In this presentation,
we would like to share how district and university personnel have worked
collaboratively to plan experiences that prepare interns to successfully
work in the school district, how we have utilized intern and mentor
feedback, and how we support interns and mentors as they work together.
We will share specific information about the following professional
development activities:
        • Intern preparation before arrival We have developed several
           events to help get to know and orient the interns before they arrive
           in the school district. We will share our interview/placement
           process, district welcome event, and pre-orientation topics.
        • August Training The district and the university partner to
           provide a week of training and orientation for both mentors and

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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                  interns. The interns attend district training offered for new
                                  teachers and sessions specifically designed for them. The univer-
                                  sity offers training for both new and veteran mentors and for
                                  interns.
                                • Ongoing Training The interns attend monthly training offered for
                                  new teachers in the district. They also attend weekly university
                                  seminars. Mentors and interns have separate monthly meetings
                                  with university coordinators.


                         What It Means To Be A Professional
                         Development School: Moving Forward With
                         What We Believe
                         Mary Lou DiPillo, Gail Saunders-Smith, Betty Greene, and Nicole Storey,
                         Youngstown State University
                         Kathie Carlile, Liberty Local Schools
                         Pam McCurdy, E.J. Blott Elementary School


                                The Youngstown State University and Liberty Local School District
                         partnership is celebrating its third year of collaboration. The liaison
                         continues to grow and strengthen, especially in professional develop-
                         ment. The center point of the relationship concerned building excellence
                         in teacher candidates by ensuring that those who teach and mentor them
                         are afforded powerful, reciprocal opportunities for growth.
                                The 2008-2009 school year launched an initiative whereby teacher
                         candidates experience a full-year placement with the same teacher, pre-
                         clinical through student teaching. Teacher candidates participate in the
                         opening and closing of a classroom and all that is involved, from curriculum
                         through management. During the course of the school year, collaborative
                         professional development opportunities are offered that involve Liberty
                         teachers and YSU teacher candidates and faculty.
                                This session, featuring a teacher and her teacher candidate, will
                         highlight the various types of professional development events currently
                         in place and will preview future opportunities. Participants will learn:
                                • the steps involved in establishing a continuous, pre-clinical
                                   through student teaching, arrangement;
                                • the steps involved in designing and producing media tools such
                                   as DVDs and websites for use in professional development; and
                                • ways to secure shared opportunities for professional develop-
                                   ment for school and university faculty and teacher candidates.


                         Why New Teachers Are Leaving: Novice
                         Teachers Need Support
                         Ted Price, West Virginia University
                         Dorothy Stafford, Orange County Department of Education


                               Far too many teachers leave the profession after a difficult first or
                         second year of teaching leading to a shortage of teachers, especially
                         secondary credentialed teachers in English, math, science, and special
                         education. Clearly, these novice teachers need support. Not only do they
                         need support, they need to be supported and mentored differently based


70
                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

on their age and career experiences. Induction, in-servicing, training, and/
or mentoring should be differentiated to meet professional growth activi-
ties that are sensitive to the two types of novice teachers: first-career and
second-career teachers. Secondary teachers’ maturity, prior experiences,
and life stage are significant. Specifically, at the secondary level, second-
career teachers valued formative assessment activities along with mentor
support more than secondary first-career teachers. But even with acknowl-
edged specific supports, both groups insisted that support of some type
was vital to success, and maybe, more importantly, vital to new folks
remaining in their chosen teaching profession.


Win-Win Collaborations Between PDS School
And University Personnel
Elizabeth Powers-Costello, University of South Carolina
Parthenia Satterwhite, Mary Jade Haney, and Tracee Walker, Horrell Hill
Elementary School


       The University of South Carolina has enjoyed a close collaboration
with Horrell Hill Elementary School in Columbia, South Carolina, for almost
two decades. Over the years, Horrell Hill not only has become an extremely
successful Professional Development School but also has become an
active part of the Professional Development School Network by actively
participating locally and nationally at conferences such as the PDS
National Conference. This school serves as role model for providing
exemplary opportunities for professional growth and development for pre-
service teachers, in-service teachers, school administrators, and univer-
sity faculty alike. The presenters, serving in a variety of roles in either or
both settings, present a broad array of collaborative projects between both
institutions, such as curriculum workshops, teacher study and support
groups (e.g. a first year teacher critical reflection group), research on
teaching and pedagogy, student intern mentorship, and innovative
coursework for pre-service undergraduates (e.g. social studies buddies
that pair pre-service undergraduates and elementary students to work on
shared learning activities). The participants also share insights gained as
well as practical advice for engaging in win-win type collaborations that
enhance professional development for personnel in both settings. This
presentation provides useful insights into Question #1 (How does profes-
sional development successfully engage constituent groups within the
PDS?) because it directly addresses how all constituents work together for
a mutually beneficially PDS relationship.


Working Together To Make It Work
Carolyn Kazemi, Woodlawn Elementary School
Vicki Fagliarone Taylor, Ashlawn Elementary School
Jean Massie, Dogwood Elementary School
Pamela Klobukowski, Marymount University


       This presentation will address Question 1 (How does professional
development successfully engage constituent groups within the PDS?) by
describing how separate PDS partnerships between Marymount Univer-
sity (a private institution based in Arlington, Virginia) and two diverse, yet
varied in size, Northern Virginia public school systems, share university


                                                                                 71
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         and school system resources with interns, mentor teachers, coordinators,
                         and university faculty. The collaboration among the two school systems,
                         the university, and 15 public schools, provides preparation for graduate-
                         level interns to become effective, confident, highly sought after teachers,
                         specifically groomed to be hired by their respective school systems, and
                         encourages professional growth and development for all stakeholders.
                                The triad, consisting of Marymount University, Arlington Public
                         Schools, and Fairfax County Public Schools, plans and shares resources
                         for intern recruitment, mentor training, intern coaching, and adjunct
                         teaching. Personnel across the partnerships join together for state and
                         national level conference presentations/attendance, long-range planning,
                         and program evaluation. All stakeholders directly benefit from common
                         training and shared professional knowledge that comes from the collabo-
                         ration.
                                The presenters will offer examples of how frequent collaboration
                         between the university and the personnel of its two separate PDS school
                         systems enhances the partnership’s ability to operate independently of
                         each other to prepare interns as future teachers trained in the county-
                         specific initiatives of each separate school district.


                         You Learn From Me, I Learn From You: A PDS
                         Partnership Practices Professional Preparation
                         And Professional Development
                         Debbie Williams, Dave Gustavson, Ruth Ray, Candi Bagley, Ashley Brown,
                         and Chris McCurry, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
                         Heather Rose-Brian, Midway Elementary Professional Development School


                                For the past five years a partnership between LSU-Shreveport and
                         the Midway Elementary PDS (MEPDS) community has embraced teacher
                         candidates by supporting learning from and with each other. Each semes-
                         ter, including summer terms, teacher candidates participate in one hour
                         small-group tutorial sessions for grades 3-5 at MEPDS. The project began
                         as an opportunity for teacher candidates to experience the instructional
                         format (pre-testing, instruction, post-testing) to support learning of low
                         achieving students enrolled in MEPDS. It has become institutionalized
                         over the past three years as a project to meet the needs of students working
                         one-half to two levels below grade level. Teacher candidates administer a
                         battery of assessments to determine strengths and weaknesses in reading
                         and writing literacy. Literacy lessons are modeled during university class
                         sessions held on-site. Teacher candidates prepare and teach lesson plans
                         to meet the students’ appropriate reading levels, using a variety of
                         materials and resources, including trade books, basal materials, and pair-
                         it texts. Post-testing provides the data supporting change over time in
                         student learning. Teacher candidates attend grade level meetings, dis-
                         cussing the best way to meet the needs of low achieving students at
                         MEPDS.
                                Parallel to this project are professional development sessions sup-
                         porting instructional techniques and reading approaches the teacher
                         candidates were applying in tutorial sessions. Teachers are able to support
                         teacher candidates in new learning and, in turn, teacher candidates are able
                         to support classroom instructional techniques. Project timeline and results
                         will be presented using pre- and post-test data, case studies, anecdotal
                         notes, and reflections.

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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Q UESTION #2: H OW IS BEST PRACTICE
DEFINED , IMPLEMENTED , AND SHARED
WITHIN AND BEYOND THE PDS?


A Cultural Experience: The Sharing Of
Literature Through Best Practices
Jennifer Russell, University of St. Francis


      The University of St. Francis, along with Parks Cultural Studies
Academy, are members of the Joliet Professional Development School
Partnership and are collaborating to strengthen the teacher preparation
programs in the areas of social sciences and fine arts. Parks, a dual language
school, submerses the students in yearly cultural themes to be studied in
all subject areas. USF candidates, while enrolled in social studies and
science methods, have an opportunity to work with this diverse group of
students.
      Candidates select a children’s literature book based on one of the
yearly cultural themes that is suitable for 2nd or 3rd grade students.
Candidates prepare a best practices lesson to share a book that is aligned
with the Illinois Teaching Standards. Teacher candidates are then encour-
aged to create an activity that:
       • Incorporates the use of best practices in social studies/geogra-
          phy/fine arts into the lesson
       • Encourages some type of hands-on activity
       • Has the students develop a better sense of the culture
       • Encourages the students to learn more about that particular
          culture
      A key feature is that students from Parks come to participate in the
lessons at the USF campus, which provides them with an increased level
of college awareness.
      The conference presentation will focus on sharing the best practices
lessons and activities created by the candidates that include the continued
observation by in-service teachers at Parks. Presenters will also share exit
interviews from Parks students, Parks teachers, and USF candidates as to
the effect this experience has.


A New Definition Of Professional Development
Schools: Taking The University To The School
Van Cooley, Walter Burt, and Mark Rainey, Western Michigan University


       One of the challenges facing educational leaders is the need to re-
engineer schools. No Child Left Behind and other reform initiatives have
forced leaders to look beyond district professional development and seek
assistance from universities. Professional Development Schools can play
a critical function in reform. To expand the PDS role, leaders must build a
bridge between PK-12 and universities. This expansion of PDS strength-
ens the undergraduate programs, graduate programs, and helps to provide
leaders (teachers and administrators) the opportunity to increase student
learning.


                                                                                 73
CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                The focus of this presentation is on Milwood Magnet School for
                         Science, Research, and Technology. The school had been dissolved, with
                         the principal removed and most of the teachers reassigned. University
                         professors collaborated with teachers and administrators to create a
                         learning community. Through a graduate class sponsored by the univer-
                         sity and planned with district leaders, teachers worked in groups to identify
                         curriculum shortcomings and address discipline, parenting issues, inter-
                         nal and external communications, after-school student programs, and
                         operational procedure. In addressing these issues, teachers developed
                         problem statements, used data to define the extent of the problem, and
                         created realistic solutions to bring about meaningful change. Teacher and
                         administrator collaboration resulted in improved discipline, better commu-
                         nication between teachers, improved communication between parents,
                         and the emergence of teacher leaders.
                                PDSs have the opportunity to move beyond the traditional frame-
                         work. Placing novice teachers in dysfunctional schools inhibits teaching
                         and student learning. Expansion of the PDS movement to serve veteran
                         teachers and administrators provides the best opportunity to improve
                         education.


                         A Study Of Student Achievement And
                         Professional Development Within A
                         Professional Development School Setting
                         Debbie Williams, Yong Dai, and Cay Evans, Louisiana State University in
                         Shreveport
                         Brandi Rivers, Walnut Hill Elementary-Middle School
                         Keitha Rogers, Southern Arkansas University


                                The longitudinal quasi-experimental study examined the relation-
                         ship between student achievement and teacher professional development
                         to determine if there was a correlation between professional development
                         received and student achievement. Questions guiding the research were:
                         (a) Is there a correlation between the professional development teachers
                         received and student achievement within a Professional Development
                         School setting? and (b) What are the levels of student growth between pre-
                         test and posttest on a standardized instrument?
                                Participants in the study were twelve students from kindergarten
                         through fifth grade enrolled continuously in an urban elementary school
                         following the Professional Development School model. Of the twelve
                         students (ten females, two males) participating in the study for the five year
                         period, all were African-American. The researcher collected data from a
                         standardized assessment administered as a pre-and posttest annually.
                         Data from selected subtests was utilized for the study. Test data was
                         analyzed using a correlated t-test. Percentile correlation, mastery level, and
                         test items were summarized to determine student achievement.
                                Professional development data was collected based on the number
                         of hours required by each teacher and the content of the professional
                         development meetings. Teacher accountability was studied to assess
                         implementation of resources in classroom practice. The transfer of profes-
                         sional development into the classroom was expected to increase student
                         achievement as evidenced by pre-and posttest data.



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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      Matrices displaying data from all sources were created and used to
identify patterns correlating professional development and student achieve-
ment. Findings of the study have implications for classroom practice,
student achievement, and professional development.


A Summer Authors’ Institute: Sharing Within
And Beyond
Katherine M. Kapustka, Sharon J. Damore, Barbara Rieckhoff, and Catherine
Larsen, DePaul University
Rachel Gemo, Saint Benedict Elementary School
Sara Duffy, Louisa May Alcott School


      Creating and supporting P-12 educational leaders who serve the
profession by providing exemplary educational experiences for their P-12
students and mentoring pre-service and early career teachers is of critical
importance in 21st century P-12 and university-based education. This
session, led by university faculty, a school administrator, and a first grade
teacher, will explore how a summer “Authors’ Institute” for PDS educators
served as an exciting opportunity for these teachers and administrators to
develop their leadership skills by participating in a writing institute that
asked them to identify topics and venues for publishing and research,
write, revise, and reflect on the impact of the process on both classroom
practices and the mentoring of pre-service and early career teachers.
      While one of the Nine Essentials for PDSs is “engagement in and
public sharing of the results of deliberate investigations of practice by
respective participants,” often the sharing of results is left to tenure-track
faculty involved with PDSs for whom publication is a key component of
their work. While P-12 educators are intimately connected with the daily
work of PDSs and are ultimately responsible for the academic achievement
of their P-12 students, the time and support necessary to prepare written
pieces for publication are difficult to find. The summer authors’ institute
described here allowed for the creation of a professional learning commu-
nity where PDS educators united around the common goals of identifying
best practices in their PDS network and sharing these best practices
through manuscripts intended for publication.


A Whole School Inquiry Into Democracy:
Solving The Lunchroom Dilemma
Bernard Badiali, Penn State University
Donnan Stoicovy, Amy Hawbaker, and Gail Romig, Park Forest Elementary
School


      Inquiry takes many forms in our PDS, ranging from intern to teacher
to principal inquiries. It shapes the conversations that we have with one
another. Inquiry has become a regular embedded practice in our school.
This presentation will demonstrate how a principal shared her vision of the
school lunchroom. Then, with the support of students, staff, and faculty,
made it into a more pleasant place for everyone through an all-school
inquiry.
      Using protocols to initiate conversations with faculty, staff, and
students, each contributed the pieces necessary for a total school commit-


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         ment to improving a lunchroom. Students learned the principles and
                         practices essential in a democracy to help shape and develop a vision into
                         a reality. This all-school inquiry took shape in classrooms, all-school
                         gatherings, and small group discussions bringing the school to consensus
                         and ultimately improving the school’s lunchroom. Within the whole
                         process, students found that they had a voice in their school and how to
                         use it responsibly. All members of the school community realize that
                         coming together to solve problems is not only feasible but the only
                         conscious way to make a difference.
                               This presentation will share processes and procedures that empow-
                         ered success in this school. Through the best practice of inquiry, all school
                         community members came together to accomplish something with pride,
                         ultimately realizing that other school problems/issues may be resolved in
                         a similar manner. Participants will walk away with the knowledge that
                         inquiry mixed with a strong sense of community will accomplish anything.


                         Aligning NCATE, NCLB And The Nine
                         Essentials Of A PDS
                         Pam Campbell and Cyndi Giorgis, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
                         Ruth Devlin and Maureen Stout, Paradise Professional Development School
                         Hilary Jones and Sue Steaffens, Dean Petersen Professional Development
                         School
                         Eva White, Clark County School District


                               Paradise and Petersen Professional Development Schools, located
                         in Las Vegas, Nevada, are committed to enhancing teacher preparation,
                         professional development, and research, with the ultimate purpose being
                         improved student achievement. Both are considered high-needs schools
                         with high rates of student transience, poverty, and English Language
                         Learners. Addressing the diverse needs of students under these circum-
                         stances, while simultaneously addressing the requirements of No Child
                         Left Behind, the NCATE Assessment Standards for PDSs, and the Nine
                         Essentials of a PDS is a challenge, but one to which Paradise and Petersen
                         are committed.
                               In this session, presenters will share strategies and activities that are
                         being implemented in each PDS to integrate the Nine Essential PDS
                         Practices into addressing and aligning NCATE Assessment Standards for
                         a PDS and the requirements of NCLB. These include ongoing NCATE self-
                         assessments, collaborative strategic planning and budget development,
                         implementation of research-based programs/practices, and engaging par-
                         ents and the wider UNLV and Las Vegas Community. These practices are
                         disseminated through collaborative professional development, research,
                         and scholarship activities, in addition to PDS websites, newsletters,
                         brochures, and outreach to the media.
                               Opportunities for discussion and conversation among presenters
                         and participants will be provided and encouraged.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Arts Alive: A Network-Wide Arts Collaboration
Catherine Larsen, DePaul University


       Music, drama, dance, and the visual arts come together in a very
public way in this seven school PDS collaborative. This session describes
the evolution of a team of PDS arts teachers providing improved and
enhanced educational opportunities for P-12 students.
       One of the nine essentials of a PDS as defined by NAPDS describes
“ongoing and reciprocal professional development for all participants,
guided by need.” Unfortunately, the type of professional development
often provided by a PDS tends to focus primarily on curricular areas
considered by some educators to be mainstream, excluding many impor-
tant areas of education for P-12 students. One such curricula area that is
critical to the development of the whole child is the arts, yet professional
development opportunities in the arts are not often available.
       A key component of many PDSs has been the development and
ongoing support of professional communities of practice. In an unusual
take on this hallmark of effective professional development, arts educators
from a PDS network of public and private schools in a large urban area
created their own study group. Initial sharing of existing resources and
effective practices led to regular ongoing professional development, peer
observations, increased reflective practice, leadership within and across
network schools, development of conference presentations locally and
nationally, and, ultimately, a network-wide arts exhibit on the university
campus. This session documents the events leading up to this significant
public display representing pre-K-12 students and their multiple cultural
perspectives and the sharing of best practices within and outside the
network that resulted.


Best Practice: Examining And Reflecting On
Student Learning
Tenna Gray and Kathy Humphries, Capital High School
Katherine M. Kress, Stonewall Jackson Middle School
Brenda Wilson, West Virginia State University


       The history of inequity of educational outcomes in the U.S. is part
of the impetus toward the current emphasis on accountability in P-12
education. The renewed interest in accountability for P-12 learning has
sparked interest in accountability at all levels of education, including
monitoring of teacher education programs and their public school partner-
ships. This new emphasis encourages programs that prepare teachers to
find answers to the question, “How do we know that teacher candidates
have a positive effect on P-12 student learning?” This presentation
showcases a project that helps the institution answer that question and
includes information that will assist other teacher education programs with
implementing such a program.
       Presenters will discuss this project, which is a simplified action
research study that undergraduates complete during their student teach-
ing semester. With the help of cooperating teachers and college supervi-
sors, teacher candidates examine and reflect on the effect of their teaching
on students. Teacher candidates develop an instructional unit, design and
administer assessments, and modify instruction based on the results of


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         assessments. Projects are evaluated on both the degree of improvement
                         of student achievement and whether the documents give evidence of data-
                         based decision making. Presenters from the IHE and public schools will
                         give their perspectives on the project and their perceptions of the effect
                         it has had on improving candidates’ teaching skills and on increasing
                         communication among stakeholders.


                         Best Practice Strategies Across The
                         Curriculum
                         Larry Bice, Michele Vosberg, Joyce Meier, and Nancy Spalla, Clarke College


                                The Professional Development School offers a unique opportunity
                         for college pre-service teachers, classroom teachers, and college profes-
                         sors to practice and share in teaching and learning with best practice
                         strategies. Best practice strategies are research-based strategies that meet
                         the needs of students with diverse learning styles and that require
                         students to be metacognitive learners.
                                In this dynamic, interactive presentation we will share our best, easy-
                         to-use, and effecting learning strategies such as ABC Charts, Math
                         Journals, Readers’ Theatre, 3-2-1 Strategy, and Bio Poems. We will
                         demonstrate examples from math, science, social studies, and language
                         arts and share ideas for how to use these strategies in any subject area and
                         with any grade level. If you are looking for ideas for Monday morning this
                         session is for you.


                         Blazing New Trails
                         Paula Stephens, Sally Short, Joanna Supler, and Laura Gisler, Meadowfield
                         Elementary School


                                Through our University of South Carolina PDS partnership research
                         project, we identified the Paideia instructional model, which provides a
                         framework for incorporating best practices school-wide. We will share how
                         our Paideia adventure transformed instructional best practices at
                         Meadowfield.
                                Paideia is a philosophy of education that encompasses academic
                         equity and rigor, democratic participation, and specific teaching practices.
                         Three primary goals of a Paideia school are to prepare every student to earn
                         a good living, participate actively in democratic self-governance, and be
                         a lifelong learner. To achieve these goals, Paideia teachers stress increas-
                         ing self reliance and self discipline.
                                The Paideia model incorporates three complementary teaching
                         techniques: 1) direct instruction for factual knowledge, 2) academic coach-
                         ing for skill development and 3) seminar discussions for deeper under-
                         standing of ideas and values. Paideia classrooms feature units of study,
                         called coached projects, that integrate curriculum across subject areas.
                         Paideia schools successfully increase students’ ability to solve problems,
                         work collaboratively, think conceptually and coherently about a range of
                         subjects, and present ideas orally and in writing.
                                Attendees of our presentation will receive a packet of information
                         containing an overview of the Paideia instructional model that highlights
                         benchmarks from inception to full program implementation. Examples of


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

coached projects and seminar texts will be shared, and teachers will tell the
story of their transformation from interns in our Meadowfield Professional
Development School to Meadowfield Paideia teachers.


Broadening The Literacy Spectrum: Modeling
Best Practice In A PDS Cohort
Marilyn J. Narey, East Stroudsburg University
Dora Tartar, Pleasant Valley School District


       Best practices in literacy instruction focus upon developing the
learner’s ability to make meaning of diverse texts (print, film, Internet).
Although these texts include verbal and visual elements, teacher educa-
tion programs tend to only prepare the pre-service teacher for verbal
literacy development. Rarely is there an attempt to explicitly connect verbal
and visual meaning making processes applicable to multimodal texts. As
a result, most classroom teachers enter the field unable to go beyond telling
learners to look at illustrations to predict the storyline of a book or to draw
a picture of a story event. This deficiency has become increasingly
problematic over the past decades with the explosion of multimodal texts
encountered in daily life that have the potential to influence thought and
action. Without the means to develop both visual and verbal literacy,
teachers cannot adequately prepare learners to critically and effectively
make meaning within this multimodal culture.
       As one component of our instruction targeted to addressing this
deficiency, we have developed the Poetry Book Project in order to model
basic interconnectivity among visual and verbal meaning making pro-
cesses to our PDS cohort students. In this conference presentation we
describe our co-taught verbal/visual literacy session at the university,
provide examples of students’ completed poetry books, explain our
assessment tool and strategies, and discuss the subsequent impact of the
project on the teachers and students at the PDS partner school as the
university students use their poetry books in the classroom and share them
with the broader PDS community.


Building Bridges For English Language
Learners With Academic Vocabulary
Instruction
Angela Angers, April Hoffman, Tiffany Nay, and Shannon Puglisi, Dean
Petersen Professional Development School


      With an English Language Learner population of over 60%, Petersen
Professional Development School looked to the research of Robert J.
Marzano to best meet the learning needs of our students. Using Building
Academic Vocabulary: Teacher’s Manual (Marzano & Pickering, 2005) as
our cornerstone and our extremely enthusiastic ELL strategist, our staff
worked together to create an implementation plan for this best practice. We
will discuss how these strategies are shared with various constituents.
      In this interactive presentation, you can expect to go home with lots
of great ideas to take and implement right away. Presenters will share how
we have worked to build academic vocabulary in various grade levels (K-
5) and with many different ability levels. Activities range from choosing

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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         terms from an academic vocabulary word list, to teaching the selected
                         terms, and finally reviewing terms with highly motivating games and
                         activities!


                         Building On Best Practice In An Urban PDS:
                         Focusing On Student Learning
                         Jill Miels, Ball State University
                         Karen Boatright, Jennifer Nichols, Mary Hendricks, and Jo Burnside,
                         Rhoades Elementary School


                                Ball State University has a long history of working successfully with
                         schools throughout the state of Indiana to prepare future teachers. The
                         practices and procedures associated with the Professional Development
                         Schools Network at Ball State University have been institutionalized and
                         recognized for a process of true collaboration with its individual partners,
                         as well as serving as a role model for other institutions. After eleven years
                         of working in the Professional Development Schools arena, there is much
                         to be learned from both the larger Network and from individual school
                         stories.
                                This session will include an examination of the activities defined and
                         developed to provide professional development for in-service teachers
                         and continual growth for pre-service teachers and for 750 PK-6 students
                         in one urban elementary PDS. The presentation group represents constitu-
                         ents from all PDS stakeholders who will describe how certain ideas have
                         developed into ongoing work in the school. Presenters will discus such
                         topics as:
                                • Use of data and research to drive instruction
                                • Additional tutoring for struggling students
                                • Variety in grade level placements for pre-service teachers
                                • School-wide action research
                                • Expanding use of technology in teaching and in supervision
                                • Dissemination of findings beyond the school
                                The collaboration and planning processes that occur before project
                         implementation will be presented along with the integration of PDS work
                         and NCLB mandates.


                         Bullying In Schools: Tips For Supporting PDS
                         Schools And Teachers In Minimizing Issues
                         Related To Bullying
                         Margaret Kernen, Jerri Saltz, and Anne Varian, University of Akron


                                School districts across the country are increasingly struggling with
                         problems related to bullying. The Center for Disease Control reports that
                         10% of students regularly miss school because of fear from unsafe learning
                         environments. The National Center for Education Statistics reports that,
                         in the 2005-06 school year, 86% of public schools reported that one or more
                         serious violent incidents had occurred. This 2007 report also provides
                         statistics which reveal that, in 2005, 24% of public schools described
                         bullying as a daily or weekly problem and 28% of students ages 12-14


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                    2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

reported that they had been bullied at school. During the 2003-2004 school
year, 10% of teachers in city schools reported that they had been threat-
ened with injury or had been physically attacked. The occurrence of
aggression at this level challenges all members of the school community
(students, teachers, administrators, and staff) to develop and maintain a
safe and productive learning environment. Since 2007, The University of
Akron Student Teaching Office has been providing Conflict Resolution
Education to teachers and student teachers working in our PDS schools
through the program Conflict Resolution Education in Teacher Education
(CRETE). Among the four highly interactive training days is one specifi-
cally devoted to understanding, preventing, and effectively responding to
bullying in schools. This session will share some of the information and
strategies presented to participants during the training.


Closing The Achievement Gap: The Effects Of
Small Group Instruction On The Literacy And
Mathematics Achievement Of Urban PDS
Students
Barbara Purdum-Cassidy, Baylor University
Bill Shepard, Bettye Keathley, and Patricia Morgan, Mountainview
Elementary School


      NCATE 2000 Standards require evidence to demonstrate that teacher
candidates have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to
positively impact P-12 student learning. The purpose of this session is to
describe the results of a study designed to examine the effectiveness of
focused, small-group instruction on elementary students’ literacy and
mathematics achievement in an urban PDS. Specifically this presentation
will:
       • Describe the small group tutoring model developed as part of the
         collaboration between PDS mentor teachers and the university
         supervisor
       • Share the research design
       • Share results related to student achievement and candidate
         instructional practices
       • Describe the impact on the local partnership
       • Analyze and discuss transferability to other institutions


Collaborating On Researched Best Practice:
Sustaining A Twenty-Year Partnership
Donna Cole, Tracey Kramer, Ron L. McDermott , and Nimisha Patel, Wright
State University


      This presentation highlights a collaboration effort between a select,
mid-size university and its twenty-year partner P-12 school district. Two
conference factors are merged in this proposal. First, this partnership has
been sustained for over two decades as a result of the constant quest to
research best practices and infuse the agreed upon practices into each
partners’ work. The central project being addressed currently is an
endeavor to enhance students’ learning outcomes in the partner school via


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         co-teaching. One could use the foundational base of sustainability (Fullan,
                         2005) to analyze capacity building and both short term and long term results
                         within teacher education programs. All partners must address the moral
                         commitment of public service and a vision aligned with changing contexts
                         at all levels. Key factors used to continue momentum within a seasoned
                         partnership will be analyzed. A brief overview of changes in significant
                         stakeholders (from lead administrators to educators) will be presented. The
                         strategies implemented to sustain the partnership will be the focus of the
                         interactive dialogue between the presenters and the participants. The
                         backgrounds of the presenters are a major factor in telling the story: a full
                         professor (now field director), a lead administrator from the select district
                         (now partnership coordinator) and a classroom educator (now district
                         gifted coordinator) will explain the various levels of sustainability neces-
                         sary to insure a viable, continuing partnership.
                                 The current researched best-practice selected by Wright State
                         University, in partnership with Fairborn City Schools, is co-teaching.
                         Building on the excellent work of St. Cloud University, the partnership has
                         attended St. Cloud workshops, examined their research findings, and
                         brought a specialist from St. Cloud to the PDS to provide leadership in
                         infusing the practice, both at the PK-12 level and in teacher preparation.
                                 Building a concrete plan for sustainability through personnel changes,
                         program changes, and accountability changes is the goal for this partner-
                         ship endeavor. Being able to share current successes and challenges will
                         impact similar partnerships throughout the country. A major goal is to
                         explain how a policy for promoting a culture of sustainability in Colleges
                         of Education and their partners (Arts and Sciences and pK-12 schools)
                         increases student achievement in both institutions.


                         Collaboration And Best Practice: Looking
                         Inside The PDS To Enhance All Student
                         Learning
                         Marcy Keifer Kennedy and Grace Essex, Ohio University
                         Michelle Chapman, Chauncey Elementary School
                         Janet Idleman, The Plains Elementary School


                                The purpose of this presentation is to share how “best practice” is
                         defined and implemented by PDS partnerships at Ohio University.
                                Presenters will discuss the definition of “best practice” and the
                         rationale for having pre-service teachers complete a year of work with a
                         PDS partnership. Presenters will then discuss the key components to
                         effectively implementing the partnership model.
                                Examples to be shared include collaborative efforts between the
                         university and the Professional Development Schools to implement mutu-
                         ally beneficial programming. Before each academic quarter begins, meth-
                         ods instructors, faculty coordinators, and teacher liaisons in each of the
                         Professional Development Schools come together to share and discuss
                         course expectations for the upcoming courses and how those expectations
                         can best be met in each of the PDS classrooms. The goal of each meeting
                         is to not only share information regarding course content but to also share
                         how pre-service teachers can best incorporate their activities into the
                         mission of helping to support the learning and development of the children
                         in their PDS classrooms.


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      Other programming to be shared ranges from providing individual
support to children through assessment of learning needs and develop-
ment of intervention plans to the planning and implementation of an
Integrated Methods Teaching Day at the end of each academic quarter.
The presentation will conclude with questions and answers regarding how
best practice is implemented and shared in the PDS programs at Ohio
University.


Creative Ways To Provide Professional
Development
Annette M. Zito and Veronica McCauley, Farmersville Elementary School
Judith A. Duffield, Lehigh University


       What are the professional development needs of our faculty? How
do we address them? These are two key questions we will focus on in our
session. Determining the needs of our faculty is done through a wish list
of things each teacher feels are important issues that need to be addressed.
This is collected at the end of each school year and combined with the
district and school goals defined by assessments and issues related to
student achievement. At the end of each meeting, feedback is collected on
needs through the use of exit slips. Learning Walks provide feedback from
those outside the school on things that the school is doing well and those
that need improving. Additional surveys are regularly conducted to
determine professional development needs, particularly when deciding if
the need is related to everyone or to sub-groups of teachers.
       Professional development is addressed in multiple ways. We con-
duct most school business electronically, saving faculty meetings for
professional development and related team planning. We have district in-
service days and before-school meetings devoted to professional devel-
opment. We also hold a summer institute the week before school starts. We
have used substitutes and teaching interns to release teachers for short
blocks of time during the day to receive intensive in-service on technol-
ogy-related skills.
       This session will provide examples of the types of professional
development opportunities we make available, how resources from the
school district and university play a part, and how other schools might
design similar opportunities in their partnerships.


Data That Delivers: School-Wide And
University Collaboration
Rebecca Panagos, Leah Shipley, and Jenel Darrow, Lindenwood University
Melvin Bishop and Melissa Armbruster, Harris Elementary School


       For the past four years, one university professor has held elementary
reading methods classes at local elementary schools. In exchange for the
principals’ and teachers’ support, the university professor provides in-
services and offers graduate workshop credit to the K-4 teachers. Previ-
ously, the university professor and partner coordinator delivered profes-
sional development offerings to all teachers through in-service format
before school or on early release days, coordinating with the principal and
literacy coach. Determination of topics resulted from in-service needs


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         evidenced through state mandated testing or new literacy curricular
                         programs introduced to the teachers. With a new initiative utilizing a site-
                         based, building-designed Pyramid of Interventions, university students
                         and the professor collaboratively work on the grade level teams to collect
                         and analyze data and teach a pyramid of interventions to the K-4 grade level
                         students as prescribed by the data teams. Data teams and K-4 teachers
                         receive on-going professional development based around individual
                         student and class data analysis. University students receive in-depth
                         training on best practices for literacy assessment and early interventions.
                         Not only does the collaborative partnership maintain a quid pro quo
                         agreement with no monies exchanged, but the new Pyramid of Interven-
                         tions Initiative began and operates on a shoe-string budget.


                         Data-Driven Math Interventions Through
                         School, University, And Family Partnerships
                         Karen Callender and Margaret Denny, Louisiana State University
                         Toni Peters, Families Helping Families of Greater Baton Rouge
                         David Strauss and Joni Nabors, West Baton Rouge Parish Schools
                         Michelle Kauffman and Margaret Pelham, Port Allen Elementary School


                                The strong family component coupled with the use of data-driven
                         math interventions for making decisions and leading instructional plan-
                         ning make the Louisiana State University-West Baton Rouge District
                         Special Education Professional Development Schools a unique partner-
                         ship. Participants in this session will learn how university teacher candi-
                         dates and family partners in a rural Louisiana school district PDS play a role
                         in providing math interventions for K-3 students. The presenters will
                         discuss Response to Intervention (RTI) and describe how the AIMSweb
                         software program assists in identifying students for targeted assistance
                         and how the system provides benchmarking, progress monitoring probes,
                         and assessments. The tutoring program which involves university teacher
                         candidates and the Families Helping Families program that work in con-
                         junction with this intervention system will be highlighted. The presenters
                         will show samples of data (district, school, grade, classroom, and indi-
                         vidual) and describe how it is used to make data-driven decisions.


                         Dedication And Professionalism With
                         “Generation Me”
                         Celeste Granthum, Michelle Tharpe, Melinda Walters, Lynne Mills, Carolyn
                         Corliss, Brooklyn Middleton, and Lakayla Johnson, Auburn University
                         Montgomery


                                In order for best practices to be implemented in Professional Devel-
                         opment Schools, the partnership between the PDS schools and the
                         university must be a functional one. Anything which can strain that
                         relationship must be recognized and dealt with. In the Auburn University
                         Montgomery Mentor Teacher Project, teachers in PDSs in Autauga,
                         Chilton, Elmore, and Montgomery County schools and Alex City, Auburn,
                         and Tallassee City Schools assume the role of both cooperating teacher
                         and university supervisor with their interns. While this program has been
                         generally very successful, one area of concern has been the generation gap
                         between veteran educators and “Generation Me” interns. The vast differ-


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

ence in perceptions about what professionalism and dedication entail can
sometimes lead to dissention between the intern and the mentor teacher,
resulting in strained relationships between the school and the university.
When this occurs, the viability of the partnership is jeopardized. Present-
ers in this session will share how the university utilizes the interns’ seminar
class to prevent conflict. Input from mentor teachers is used to structure
class discussion so that the “Generation Me” interns have a better
understanding of what is expected of them while in the schools. The role
of the mentor teacher project coordinator in facilitating positive relation-
ships between the schools and the university and minimizing conflicts
between the generations will also be examined. The presenters will discuss
the viewpoints of “Generation Me” interns and the “Non-Generation Me”
supervising teachers and how they differ.


Digging Deeper: Using Video Analysis To
Unearth The Intricacies Of Novice Teacher
Reflection And Supervisory Practices
Rebecca West Burns, Penn State University
Deana Washell, Park Forest Elementary School


       Reflection in teacher education is a powerful experience in support-
ing teacher learning, yet research tells us that this abstract notion is
difficult for novice teachers. Classrooms are complex spaces, and it is this
complexity that causes novice teachers to stumble and focus only on the
superficial aspects of the classroom. Current reflective practices rely on the
memory and perceptions of the discussants, but video provides a perfor-
mance artifact as evidence to the experience and exists as a conversation
catalyst for the discussants. Like novice teacher reflection, the decision-
making during a supervisor/novice teacher conference is quite opaque.
Video also provides an artifact for reflection and discussion about super-
visory practices.
       Video has typically been cumbersome, but as technology progresses
the tools are becoming more user-friendly. Studio Code is a video analysis
tool that provides a systematic way of coding essential elements of the
practice under examination. This experience can be tailored to the indi-
vidual needs of the participants and provides on-demand access to the
desired footage without the unwieldy task of fast forwarding and rewind-
ing.
       Our presentation will show examples of how this analysis tool was
used to improve the reflective practices of novice teachers as well as their
supervisors. Elements of audience participation will be embedded in our
presentation. The audience will be videotaped and live coded as an
engaging component of the experience and to demonstrate the power
behind this tool.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Effects Of Specialized In-Service Professional
                         Development Activities On Elementary School
                         Students’ Reading Achievement
                         Debbie Williams, Christy Jarrett, Cay Evans, and Yong Dai, Louisiana State
                         University in Shreveport
                         Keitha Rogers, Southern Arkansas University


                                This correlational study examined the relationship between special-
                         ized training offered to in-service teachers in a Professional Development
                         School and reading achievement. Questions guiding the study were: (a) Is
                         there a significant increase in reading student achievement during 2nd and
                         3rd grade of the twelve students who attended this PDS school from
                         kindergarten through fifth grade? and (b) Is there a relationship between
                         the in-service professional development required by the PDS and the
                         reading achievement of the twelve students measured on the Development
                         Reading Assessment (DRA) test?
                                Of the original 61 kindergarteners enrolled during the first semester
                         at an urban elementary school, only twelve students were still enrolled at
                         the end of the fifth grade. These twelve students became the participants
                         in the study. Data were collected from an individually administered
                         criterion-referenced reading assessment to determine instructional read-
                         ing level, guide the classroom instructional program, identify appropriate
                         supports and interventions, and document progress over time. A corre-
                         lated t-test was used to determine the mean differences between the pre-
                         and post-test statistical significance.
                                Professional development data was collected. Data showed in-
                         service teachers received professional development covering various
                         aspects of pedagogy, student assessment, portfolio assessment, class-
                         room management, technology, and best practices in content instruction.
                         The study explored distinguishing elements of the literacy professional
                         development.
                                Tables and charts were created to display data and identify signifi-
                         cant patterns. Findings of the study suggest implications for a relationship
                         between student reading achievement and classroom reading instruction
                         and professional development as set forth in the PDS model.


                         Elementary And Secondary PDS Experiences:
                         Teaching Best Practice Through Critical
                         Pedagogy
                         Jean Ann Foley, Northern Arizona University


                                Each and every educator must strive to be an effective change
                              agent. (Fullan, 1993)
                               At our midsized southwestern state university, we are applying to
                         the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
                         Through this process, the education unit has developed a conceptual
                         framework that stresses critical thinking and inquiry for preparing teacher
                         candidates. As faculty in the College of Education, we are charged with
                         updating the curriculum in our elementary and secondary professional
                         development programs to better align with the vision of the education unit:
                         “to develop educational leaders who create tomorrow’s opportunities.”

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      In our efforts to update our courses and experiences in our Profes-
sional Development Schools, we have made curricular changes that focus
on reading the discourse of schools to identify inconsistencies in what we
know to be best practice and the reality of the culture of schools. In this
session we will first share our curricular changes; second, we will describe
and discuss the results from our own perspectives and those of our
students and PDS faculty; finally we will invite discussion about how
others might use critical thinking and inquiry in their PDS programs.
      The changes in our curriculum represents a shift from an instrumen-
tal philosophy of prescribed lessons on instructional strategy and the
practice of teaching to one of critical thinking and discourse about teacher
practice and the teacher candidate’s role in affecting positive change
through leadership. In this session, we will focus on practical imagining
of what we can do as educators to become leaders and change agents for
improving teaching and learning in a PDS environment.


Encouraging Best Practices Through A Mentor
Preparation Course
Jim Nolan, Sonja Brobeck, Kathleen Sillman, and Eve Shellenberger, Penn
State University


       The task of serving as a mentor for a pre-service teacher is extremely
complex. In addition to modeling best teaching practices, mentor teachers
must enable the novice to understand the teacher thinking and decision-
making processes that lie behind the overt behaviors. Most effective
teachers require preparation in order to become effective mentors as well.
       The purpose of this presentation will be to share a graduate level
course that has been designed and used effectively (in a course format as
well as a study group format) to prepare mentor teachers to serve as
mentors for pre-service teachers in professional development and partner
schools. The course has two interrelated strands: a conceptual component
and a skills component.
       The conceptual piece of the course uses readings drawn from
literature on teacher education, pre-service teacher development, mentoring,
and instructional supervision to enable prospective mentors to under-
stand a variety of concepts including the complexity of the mentoring role,
qualities of effective mentoring, the nature of today’s college students,
pre-service teacher development, relationship building within the student
teaching triad, co-teaching strategies, and the notion of cognitive appren-
ticeship and coaching as the foundation for mentoring.
       The skills component of the course uses videos, demonstrations,
and hands-on activities to enable mentors to sharpen their skills in the
areas of communication and active listening, data collection, feedback and
conferencing strategies, and summative evaluation skills. The presenta-
tion will focus on sharing the course outline and resources as well as
engaging participants in sample hands-on activities.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Engaging A Local High School In Partnership
                         Work
                         Tom Poetter and Jay Kimiecik, Miami University
                         Jean Eagle, Talawanda Schools
                         Vicki Brunn, Talawanda High School


                                 From the beginning of our school-university partnership work in
                         2001, we focused on the quantity and quality of engagement of the local
                         public high school in the work of the partnership and in improving the
                         experience of secondary education for all citizens in our locale. In the public
                         eye, the high school had sometimes - and most times unfairly - received
                         criticism from the university and wider community regarding leadership,
                         climate, academic/extra-curricular offerings, and facilities. While facilities
                         still remain a key issue, the partnership, with tremendous support from
                         people and resources inside the high school, has helped to create a
                         stronger public story focusing on excellence and opportunity in the high
                         school. Several key strategies have paved the way for a new discourse
                         about the high school inside and outside the partnership:
                                  • Supporting the transition from middle to high school with pro-
                                    gramming for freshman addressing the whole child with hopes of
                                    increasing retention and graduation rates and the overall stron-
                                    ger well-being of the individual and family;
                                  • Extending professional development and access to materials for
                                    teachers in AP courses;
                                  • Collaborating on public relations connections and the simulta-
                                    neous creation of new academic opportunities through the
                                    school’s revived student newspaper; and
                                  • Sharing resources, personnel, and experiences through univer-
                                    sity tutors, student interns, and faculty members involved at a
                                    much greater level than before and in unique, effective ways.
                                 Our presentation discusses the nature of these four strategies, their
                         component parts and how they work in the setting, and our perceptions
                         of formative outcomes and next steps along the way to building a quality
                         partnership between the high school and university for the long-term
                         future.


                         Engaging Various Constituency Groups In The
                         PDS Model
                         Michael Pregot, Iona College
                         Michael Segvich, Rice High School


                                A Professional Development School model was initiated this school
                         year between Iona College in New Rochelle and Rice High School in
                         Harlem, NY. This workshop will focus on the varied structure and tiers of
                         PD programs and an analysis of their success in implementation. In all,
                         there are four basic types of professional development programs planned:
                                • The first type of training deals with engaging high school faculty
                                   members to reflect on ways to improve instructional delivery.
                                   These activities include pre-service training, in-service academic
                                   coaching, individual teacher PD goal-setting, and the establish-
                                   ment of a school-wide mentoring program.


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      • A second tier of training would include programs utilizing the
         range of collegiate resources such as assigning student teachers/
         interns, completing field experiences for education majors, devel-
         oping collegiate courses within the secondary environment, and
         sharing collegiate facilities in an exploratory manner.
      • Still another type of professional development would focus on
         the students themselves. Examples of this would include action
         research projects, identifying measurable goals for student
         achievement, individualizing a career plan, and active student
         participation in PDS goal setting.
      • Parents and the general community have been asked to partici-
         pate in redefining the school’s academic goals, assisting in PTO
         activities, projecting the future needs of their children’s educa-
         tional program, and reacting to current written institutional goals.
      As an emerging program, we intend to host an interactive group
discussion in terms of developing and implementing the PDS model in an
urban setting.


English In Engineering? Collaboration For
Motivation In The Language Arts
Rene Segler and Kim Izumo, Fremont Professional Development Middle
School


       As a new PDS, Fremont Professional Development Middle School
uses the unique approach of teaming and academic academies focused on
student interests. Fremont has two academies, one for engineering and the
other for communications. A portion of the English Language Arts
department is encompassed in the Engineering Academy. The presenta-
tion discusses the use of coordinated lesson planning in the area of English
language. Joint planning and the use of data-driven methods aid in
teaching the genres of reading and writing to students in the academy.
Team-planned lessons pay close attention to sequencing and provide
continued reinforcement of the language arts curriculum. In addition, team
planning incorporates methods which engage and motivate literacy devel-
opment and require students to be actively involved in making meaning
from text. Through the use of coordinated activities, students find the
interconnectedness of reading and writing in their chosen area of interest.


Enhancing The Quality Of Action Research
Conducted By Prospective And Practicing
Teachers In The PDS
Nancy Fichtman Dana, University of Florida
Diane Yendol-Hoppey, West Virginia University


       The PDS movement is tightly coupled with the teacher researcher
movement, as one of the leading organizations that advocates for and
supports Professional Development Schools, the Holmes Partnership,
states one general guiding principle for creating PDS sites is that they must
include a commitment to making reflection and inquiry a central part of the
school (Holmes Group, 1986, 1990). Hence, in PDSs across the nation,


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         action research is conducted by interns as a part of the professional
                         preparation of future educators as well as by mentor teachers as part of the
                         continuing professional development of educators already in the field. In
                         these PDSs, much of the action research conducted has contributed
                         significantly to enhanced educational opportunities for P-12 students
                         (Dana, Yendol-Hoppey, & Snow-Gerono, 2006), as prospective and prac-
                         ticing teachers take action for improvement based on what they have
                         learned as a result of their research and, in addition, share the results of their
                         classroom-based research with others.
                               Since engagement in action research by prospective and practicing
                         teachers is being utilized as one primary vehicle to enhance the education
                         of students in PDS sites, a closer look at the quality of action research is
                         warranted. Yet, to date, there has been little conversation in PDSs about
                         teacher research quality. The purpose of this session is to discuss ways
                         we can enhance the quality of action research conducted in PDSs through
                         the exploration of five quality indicators, as well as four critical junctures
                         in the coaching of the action research process.


                         Following Our Belief: Using The Teacher
                         Work Sample To Impact K-12 Learning And
                         Teacher Efficacy
                         Joseph Sencibaugh, Truman State University
                         Suzann Copeland, Kirksville R-III School District


                                According to Willard-Holt & Bottomly (2000), the connection be-
                         tween coursework and field experience must be clear in order for field
                         experiences to have the greatest impact on pre-service candidates. Profes-
                         sional Development Schools provide opportunities to bridge the gap
                         between research and practice. Candidates demonstrate best practices
                         according to the research while supervised by mentor teachers. Evaluation
                         of the candidates’ teaching effectiveness frequently focuses on peda-
                         gogical skills without considering the impact on student achievement.
                         Beginning in the fall of 2009, Truman State University will pilot a program
                         that requires pre-service candidates in special education to complete a
                         Teacher Work Sample, which will assess their proficiency in designing
                         instruction to meet the needs of students P-12.
                                The Teacher Work Sample is designed for candidates to scrutinize
                         the effect their pedagogical skills have on student learning. The Teacher
                         Work Sample serves as both a planning and a reflection tool, directing
                         candidates to describe their learning goals, lesson structure, and assess-
                         ment strategy prior to teaching. After teaching a lesson, candidates utilize
                         assessment data to analyze student learning and reflect on potential
                         adjustments for succeeding lessons (Henning et al, 2005). Specifically,
                         Teacher Work Samples are exhibits of teaching performance that provide
                         direct evidence of a candidate’s ability to design and implement standards-
                         based instruction, assess student learning, reflect on the teaching and
                         learning process, and provide credible evidence of a candidate’s ability to
                         facilitate learning of all students.
                                Presenters will discuss the process for implementation, shared
                         responsibilities, evaluation of student performance, intended outcomes,
                         and the development of action plans for improving the collaborative
                         partnerships for preparing highly qualified special education teachers.


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Giving Back To The Children: Best Practices
In An Elementary Education/Special Education
Professional Development School
Debi Gartland, Towson University


       This session addresses Question #2 in that the focus will be on the
how our Elementary Education/Special Education (EESE) Professional
Development School is providing improved and enhanced educational
opportunities for P-5th grade students and how we share the results of best
practices incorporated in the dual certification major of our undergradu-
ates. Presenters will be a Towson University faculty member, as well as
school-based mentors and interns. We will describe specialized in-school
projects aimed at changing the challenging behaviors and academic
achievement levels of at-risk children and children with disabilities. We will
also describe some of the successful after-school service learning projects
aimed at children and their families, particularly English Language Learn-
ers. Session attendees will have plenty of opportunities for discussion,
questions, and idea exchanges. As a result of attending our presentation,
session participants will be able to identify and replicate best practices
used in our EESE PDS.


Global Studies In PDS Classrooms Serve As A
Catalyst For 21st Century Education
Stan Maynard and Barbara Maynard, Marshall University
Daniele Perez, Kellogg Elementary Model School
Victoria Smith, Geneva Kent Elementary School


       21st Century Learning is the focus of the West Virginia Department
of Education’s first K-5 Model School at Kellogg Elementary in Wayne
County. Kellogg Elementary PDS is collaborating with Geneva Kent
Elementary PDS in Cabell County and Thurgood Marshall Elementary PDS
in Lynwood, California, to strengthen all 21st Century teaching and
learning elements with a focus on best practices in global studies. The
Marshall University Professional Development School Partnership recog-
nizes the importance of global studies for the students of today to be
successful in the world of tomorrow. These best practices are impacting
the in-service teachers as well as the pre-service teachers as the two share
information with one another. Focusing on global studies, Kellogg El-
ementary, Geneva Kent, and Thurgood Marshall have established a
partnership through distance learning technology as well as on-site
collaboration that has positively impacted all the stakeholders in the
educational system.
       Various strategies and creative learning activities composing a
rigorous and relevant curriculum have been implemented, evaluated, and
shared not only among the three Professional Development Schools, but
with other schools in the partnership. The opportunities afforded the
students in all the schools involved have raised the standard from global
awareness to a deeper understanding of the international community. The
pre-service teachers are benefiting from their involvement in these best
practices and will continue the implementation into future classrooms
resulting in the enhancement of learning opportunities for students.


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Grand Rounds: Building Capacity Within A
                         PDS Model
                         Donna Cooner and Rodrick S. Lucero, Colorado State University
                         Tom Myers and Jennifer Roth, Fort Collins High School


                                The strong partnership between Fort Collins High School and
                         Colorado State University is stronger than ever! Grand Rounds have
                         allowed us to expand our influence, while effectively managing dwindling
                         resources. Grand Rounds were piloted at our partnership site last fall and
                         have grown considerably since their implementation. Grand Rounds allow
                         students to gain an understanding of the total school environment beyond
                         their content and beyond their professional responsibilities. This year, we
                         have added another strand to the Grand Round model which revolves
                         around a four day experience in an experiential educational setting. Our
                         partnership has expanded with the inclusion of the High Trails Outdoor
                         Education Center. The results have been inspiring, as teacher candidates
                         have found a venue to practice their “teacher voice” in a non-traditional
                         setting. Teacher candidates have reported that since this experience they
                         are more confident, more certain of their career choice, and more enthused
                         about the profession. Furthermore, they report that the strategies they
                         learn in this outdoor setting will help them create relevance for their
                         students regardless of the content or the setting.


                         Growing As A Professional Development
                         School: Expanding And Enriching
                         Kathy Evans, Shawn Suber, Felicia Sellers, Rice Creek Elementary School
                         Megan Burton, University of South Carolina


                               Rice Creek Elementary has been a Professional Development School
                         with the University of South Carolina for over ten years. Through this time,
                         the partnership has evolved and is now thriving for teachers, pre-service
                         teachers, university faculty, and students within this community. Re-
                         cently, courses have been taught on site for school faculty and pre-service
                         teachers, interns have been placed on site, and research projects were
                         conducted to inform both the school and education community at large.
                               This fall pre-service teachers taking a course on site spent time
                         working with elementary students during their course time, making content
                         games and providing information to teachers from the time spent with the
                         elementary students. This course and others are planned for the future.
                         There have been study groups and M. Ed. courses offered on site to
                         faculty. One benefit often overlooked are the informal conversations
                         between university and K-5 faculty, due to the collaborative, informal
                         working relationship that has been established. Each of these activities has
                         enhanced the professional community, supported individual growth, and
                         had a positive impact upon students.
                               This partnership is successful partly because of the openness and
                         mutual respect between K-5 and university faculty. In addition, the
                         administration is very supportive and provides materials and facilities
                         necessary to be successful. This administrative support helps new teach-
                         ers see the value in this work and contributes to this partnership. This
                         session will briefly describe the history of the partnership; the current work
                         will be shared in addition to the vision for the future.

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

If The Pace Car Would Move . . . We Could
Go Forward! Maneuvering Our Way Around
Scripted Programs
Michelle Tharpe, Celeste Granthum, Melinda Walters, Lynne Mills, and
Carolyn Corliss, Auburn University Montgomery


       In the “NASCAR” world ... what if every car had to look exactly the
same, drive at the same speed, and finish at the same time? It just wouldn’t
work! With the mandates for using one-size-fits-all scripted programs,
many PDS partnerships are finding if to be very difficult to implement best
practices. Although Auburn Montgomery has established positive re-
lationships with eight school systems, this situation can potentially
compromise the objectives that the college has identified for teacher
candidates. In this discussion forum, we would like for participants to come
together and share ideas for ways to support the classroom teacher and
the teacher candidates who are faced with the challenge of maintaining a
positive learning environment.


Implementing Inquiry In The Middle School:
Successful Projects That Increase Student
Motivation And Academic Achievement
Brian McCants and Jeffrey Burden, Hand Middle School


      Having partnered with Dr. Jane Zenger and Dr. Mary Earick of the
University of South Carolina, we were motivated to implement several
inquiry-based projects at our school. By allowing our middle level students
the opportunity to investigate several school issues, we discovered that
they became more engaged in their learning and had greater interest in our
classes. Our inquiry projects included an investigation of South Carolina’s
ecology and social sciences, genetics, the acoustics of our building, and
blending music to our Carolina Fence Garden.
      Inquiry allowed our students to take the direction of each project in
a way that was interesting to them. Each project addressed multiple
standards and multiple disciplines. Inquiry is the foundation of science
education. By blending inquiry science into the related arts curriculum,
more students had the opportunity to benefit from these investigations.
      These projects were very interesting to our students as they were
able to study the standards using real-life, in-school situations. Having
taken a course on inquiry from USC, we as teachers realized that students
being involved in their own learning was rewarding for them and for us as
well. We found an increase in student achievement for these standards.
This presentation discusses the specifics of these projects and how our
students learned from them.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Improving Effective Technology Integration
                         Through Simultaneous Renewal
                         Cathy J. Siebert, Vanessa L. Wyss, and Karen A. Dowling, Ball State
                         University


                                Undoubtedly, the rapid, continuous evolution in technology poses
                         immense challenges to teachers. Trying to remain current with what is
                         available and how to literally use the technology is difficult for teachers
                         who are confronted with implementing instruction to diverse students that
                         results in authentic student learning, improved standardized test scores,
                         and meeting AYP demands for their schools. Conversely, while our pre-
                         service teachers are typically very well-prepared in the use of a variety of
                         technologies, they struggle to think critically about when and why to
                         implement the use of the technologies in their instruction.
                                One of the greatest strengths of PDS relationships is the opportunity
                         for simultaneous renewal. With Ball State University nationally recognized
                         as the Most Unwired Campus and, according to Sperling, at the forefront
                         of “exploring innovative ways to use new technology,” our students
                         pursue post-secondary education in an incredibly technology-rich envi-
                         ronment. As part of our pre-service teacher education program for second-
                         ary education majors, pre-service teachers participate in a sequence of
                         courses (Teaching in the Middle/Junior High Schools and Teaching in the
                         Senior High Schools) which include significant time in content classrooms.
                         In addition, a significant number of student teachers are placed within our
                         secondary PDS schools.
                                This presentation presents the variety of ways our pre-service
                         teachers influence the technology capacity of in-service teachers during
                         practicum and student teaching field experiences in our partnerships and
                         considers ways in which experienced teachers work with our pre-service
                         teachers to think through pedagogical issues related to the use of technol-
                         ogy in instruction.


                         Inclusion And Communication Strategies: PDS
                         Parents, Schools, Universities, And
                         Communities Within The DREAMS Initiative
                         To Increase Academic Efficacy In Urban
                         African-American Male Students
                         Susan C. McClendon and Lawanda Cummings, Georgia State University


                               This presentation will address Question #2: How is best practice
                         defined, implemented, and shared within and beyond the PDS? The implicit
                         goals of any PDS initiative are improved and enhanced educational
                         opportunities for P-12 students. The D.R.E.A.M.S. (Developing Relation-
                         ships to Empower African-American Mentee’s Success) Initiative, a
                         program spawned from the Georgia State University PDS, was created to
                         address issues in African-American male students’ psychosocial devel-
                         opment, their awareness of educational and occupational opportunities,
                         and to boost their perceived capacity to be academically successful and
                         navigate educational settings. To ensure academic success of urban male
                         students within three PDS schools, strategies for inclusion and communi-
                         cation were developed and implemented to incorporate parents, school

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

administrations, the university, and community members. The ecological
framework acknowledges that a student’s development is determined by
his/her experiences within multiple settings and the number and quality of
the connections between those settings (Bronfenbrenner, 2004). The
D.R.E.A.M.S. Initiative engages multiple settings and stakeholders through
parent meetings, school-based clubs sponsored by teachers, a university-
based summer institute for high school students, and a bi-annual youth
summit conference open to community members and practitioners within
the school system. This presentation examines the strategies employed to
promote inclusion of all stakeholders and dissemination of best practices
and program effect to practitioners, parents, and the research community.
Participants will gain insight in 1) tailoring findings to different audiences,
2) using multiple modalities of communication to get the information out,
and 3) the necessity of empirical research to validate best practice.


Inquiry In Action
Barbara Dire and Lusungu Sibande, Forest Heights Elementary School


       Forest Heights Elementary is a partner school with the University of
South Carolina Diverse Pathways project. During the last five years, a team
of teachers has worked to examine their instructional practices in order to
facilitate more meaningful experiences for their students.
       Carnival of the Animals is a project that integrates visual and
performing art, music, science, and English language arts. The purpose of
the project was to provide an integrated experience for second grade
students. Students focused on learning about various aspects of animals
and their habitats. In their music classes, the students learned songs and
dances that mimicked those animals. They learned how to expand their
knowledge of lines, texture, and colors as they brought their animal
drawings to life as a part of their art classes. The culmination of the
experience was a winter performance by the 2nd graders for the entire
school body where they shared their poems, art work, songs, and dance.
       Another project, partially funded through USC Diverse Pathways,
was the creation of the Junior Scientists Organization. The Junior Scien-
tists are a group of fourth and fifth grade students who wanted to
investigate coastal ecology and the Earth’s natural processes. The group
engaged in a six month study which included multiple field studies to a
barrier island and research with an oceanographer and atmospheric
scientist.
       The two featured learning experiences are a demonstration of how
Forest Heights Elementary is moving forward to create meaning learning
experiences for its students.




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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Integrating Subject Areas As A Basis For
                         Literacy Development For English Language
                         Learner (ELL) Students: An Emphasis On Co-
                         Teaching And Collaboration
                         Marna Armbrister and Karon Lee, Paradise Professional Development School


                               Best practices will be defined by a process that includes a brief
                         overview of the Clark County School District’s (CCSD) policy of teaching
                         English to ELL students through content areas by including a strong
                         English language development component that emphasizes cooperative
                         learning, hands-on activities, visuals, demonstrations, modeling and by
                         way of feedback determining which mix of methodologies achieves the
                         best results.
                               Implementation will involve a mini-interactive and science-math-
                         word study integrated lesson with student work samples, followed by
                         questions, comments, and evaluation.
                               Sharing within the PDS community will be demonstrated by examples
                         of collaboration between general education, special education, and the
                         English Language Learner (ELL) specialist. Additionally, a second-year
                         teacher new to third grade is being mentored and supported through our
                         actions with the clear intent to ease the transition from the primary to the
                         intermediate level.
                               Sharing beyond the PDS community will be explored through our
                         Action Research Project sponsored by the Research and School Improve-
                         ment division of CCSD in collaboration with the University of Nevada Las
                         Vegas’ College of Education. Students from the university frequently
                         observe classroom instruction; as a result we have recruited these observ-
                         ers, once introduced to the methodology, to be part of our research data
                         collection.


                         Involving All PDS Stakeholders In Creating A
                         Friendship Garden
                         Nichola Perillo, Paradise Professional Development School
                         Pamela Campbell, University of Nevada Las Vegas


                                In response to the need for increased hands-on science participation
                         for students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten, a proposal to develop
                         a “Salsa and Flower Garden” was developed and implemented at Paradise
                         PDS in Las Vegas, Nevada. This research-based project incorporated
                         curriculum standards in mathematics, earth science, life science, literacy,
                         writing, social studies, art, and nutrition, while involving administration,
                         teachers, pre-k through fifth grade students, families, community busi-
                         nesses, and university staff in planning, as well as implementation. Our
                         Garden Project Committee, which incorporated administration, teachers,
                         community businesses, and university staff, provided enhanced educa-
                         tional activities and knowledge with the progress of natural life forms for
                         children who live in an area of Las Vegas that affords no opportunity to
                         plant or till the earth.
                                Our conference session will outline the inception of the project, the
                         foundation of the mission, planning and development, the procurement of


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

donated materials, architectural assistance and labor by community part-
ners, the involvement of students, parents, UNLV educational interns, the
local news media, and all stakeholders both inside and outside of the
Paradise PDS. We will share our tips and techniques for intertwining
curriculum strands, sharing our ongoing project with our community, and
a chronological presentation of the steps involved toward this valuable
learning instrument.


Kids On The Move: Intervention Groups As An
Action Research Project
Sherry DuPont, Christine Walsh, Marilyn Lees-Yensick, and Megan Newmeyer,
Slippery Rock University
Patti Messett, West Hill High School


       In our PDS culture, we define best practice by asking, “What is the
best practice for the K-6 learners in Sharon City Schools?” This ongoing
inquiry is accomplished through action research and involves the student
teachers, cooperating teachers, literacy coaches, and university faculty.
Within the climate of NCLB, this question propels our decision-making
process as we dialogue to determine how we can impact the learning of K-
6 students.
       Implementation of best practice begins when student teachers and
cooperating teachers collaboratively analyze data from various assess-
ment tools. Once a focus area is determined, the student teachers conduct
a literature review, establish a protocol for intervention, and complete the
IRB process. During each intervention session, student teachers complete
a documentation log to record their decision-making processes. It requires
them to answer three central questions:
        • What interventions were used? (listing the activity, method, and
           materials)
        • What did I observe/notice? (noting the performance of individual
           students)
        • What will I do next? (reflecting on next steps for subsequent
           sessions).
       As reflective practitioners, student teachers meet with university
supervisors to discuss the logs and their emerging data analysis.
       The entire school faculty is invited to hear the results and implica-
tions of these inquiries as we celebrate the learning of each PDS participant.
Student teachers prepare Power Point presentations to share results of
their inquiries. They are also encouraged to present at local and national
conferences and foundational grants are provided to cover their travel
expenses.


Knowing Students First
John Ward, Meghan Cross, Lindsay Gemmill, Abby Lavery, and Jeremy Fritz,
Millersville University


       A key methodology of our urban middle school internship program
is the weekly presentation by interns of three data-rich case examples of
specific students. Interns present actual student work, discuss their
insights about students, and discuss how they will respond to these

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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         students. Interns focus for a full year on a student with an IEP, an English
                         Language Learner, and a purposefully chosen third student. After discus-
                         sion of the case examples, interns lead discussion of assigned pedagogical
                         texts and use case examples to make connections between theory and
                         practice. Data are recorded from internship presentations and are posted
                         on a group-accessible online database using Google Docs.
                                This methodology is based on the idea that knowing students well,
                         their learning strengths and needs, their personal qualities and contexts,
                         and what they actually know and can do is key to “teaching students” and
                         not just teaching subject matter. This quality is typically considered part
                         of the “art” of teaching and is rarely explicitly taught in traditional teacher
                         education. The Professional Development School model provides a unique
                         opportunity to explicitly coach strategies for reflection, assessment, and
                         teacher practice that focus on student learning.
                                Faculty and interns together collect, analyze, and present several
                         forms of data including data from case examples collected over a six-month
                         time period and analysis of the impact on intern practice through qualita-
                         tive interviews, teaching observations, and quantitative measures of
                         intern knowledge of students correlated with teacher collected and stan-
                         dardized measures of student learning.


                         Leading By Example: An Inquiry Into Teaching
                         Action Research
                         Jason Jude Smith, Diane Yendol-Hoppey, and Sharon Hayes, West Virginia
                         University


                                One of the core requirements for pre-service teachers in the Five Year
                         Teacher Education Program at WVU is to design and conduct action
                         research. By substituting action research for the more traditional Master’s
                         thesis, a particular image of rigor has been created for this capstone
                         activity. To date, action research has been a tool for actualizing multiple
                         purposes in education including: teacher professional development, cul-
                         tivating an inquiry stance, and creating opportunities for teacher voice.
                                While we have worked to create a rigorous and purposeful endeavor
                         in which our students develop identities as teacher researchers, some of
                         our students have had difficulty developing an inquiry stance and under-
                         standing that action research should be “a part” of their practice. As core
                         faculty members engaged in designing the components of the action
                         research and the seminars which explain the goals and processes of action
                         research, we feel it is important to study this problem. We further believe
                         that conducting action research to answer the questions we have about
                         the consequences of our course design is a meaningful way to study the
                         problem and to model best practices for our students with respect to
                         reflection and inquiry.
                                This presentation will focus on data collected from our fourth year
                         students who have spent significant time in the PDSs in which they will
                         conduct their action research and are crafting proposals which will guide
                         them during the next academic year. We utilize survey data, field notes, and
                         artifacts to identify the concerns and misconceptions of our students in
                         an effort to problematize our facilitation of action research. We will also
                         discuss changes we will make to the course and the action research process
                         which seek to address these problems.


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Learning For All: Inquiry Into Transfer Theory
At A PDS
Lourdes Z. Mitchel and Alisa Hindin, Seton Hall University
Lori Moonan, Brookside Place Elementary School


      Action researchers typically ask questions which are directed at
improving the quality of their own practice, their understanding of their
practice, and the social context in which the practice is located. In order to
serve as an instrument of change, our PDS governance committee, after
eight years of self-study, began to wonder why transfer of learning was
not occurring across all segments of the learning community. As a best
practice the group used an inquiry approach to examine the question of
transfer of learning.
      University faculty questioned transfer of learning across courses
and application to the field experiences. Administrators questioned why
after much professional development in math education change was so
slow, while language arts faculty and teacher leaders were concerned
about the lack of transfer of literacy practices. All members of the learning
community expressed concern as to why students lacked transfer from one
problem to another within a course, from one year in school to another,
between school and home, and from school to workplace. To examine
current instructional practices the group decided to study the research and
to conduct a quantitative study that would examine the degree to which
university faculty and third through fifth grade teachers used transfer
practices during instruction and assessment.
      In this presentation we will briefly share findings and discuss how
conducting inquiry is defined as best practice, how best to implement
research within a district and university, and how findings within and
beyond the PDS can be shared.


Leonardo – Art, Math And Science
Explorations 2.0. How The Visual Arts Can
Contribute To Advancing Math And Science In
Professional Development Schools: A
Workshop Presentation
Michael Henry, Paradise Professional Development School
Pam Campbell, University of Nevada Las Vegas


      The Paradise Professional Development School is located on the
University of Nevada Las Vegas campus. Some of the challenges at
Paradise include an abnormally high student transient rate (62%), ninety
percent of the students qualify for free and reduced lunch, and 60% are ELL.
      Art Specialists have the unique opportunity to reach all students
within the school community. By utilizing best practices and cross-
curriculum explorations, they can contribute to the overall success of the
Professional Development School experience. Art lessons can aid non-
English speakers with nonlinguistic representations that reinforce math
and science standards. The arts can contribute to higher level thinking and
problem solving as art programs can go beyond the Spatial/Mechanical,
Logical/Mathematical Multiple Intelligences.


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                                This presentation will provide:
                                 • Art lesson plans utilizing instructional strategies and cross-
                                   curriculum experiences with an emphasis on math and science
                                   test preparation
                                 • Art tips and strategies that integrate math and writing standards
                                 • A “make and take” art/math lesson
                                Instructors without the benefit of an art specialist can also easily
                         utilize these lesson plans and strategies in their classrooms.


                         Leveling Best Practice: All Together At The
                         PDS Site
                         Lyn Krenz, Asa Packer Elementary School
                         Stacey Leon, Governor Wolf Elementary School
                         Dawn Roman, Lincoln Elementary School
                         Judy Hartzler, Pleasant Valley Elementary School
                         Nancy Daniels and Sue Ellis, Resica Elementary School
                         Alison Rutter and Katherine DiSimoni, East Stroudsburg University


                                 One strength of our PDS at ESU is the way in which many of our
                         mentor/co-operating teachers have learned to work with multiple individu-
                         als in their classrooms to promote best practice for teaching and learning
                         at all levels. Having an apprentice teacher situated in a classroom with a
                         returning resident student teacher has challenged the traditional norms of
                         the student teaching dyad. These seasoned master teachers have ac-
                         cepted that challenge and have worked with a number of classroom mixes
                         over the last five to eight years with varying degrees of success. While
                         creative and efficacious teachers in their own right, these teachers have
                         not only guided new teachers into the field, but have gained in terms of their
                         own personal professional development from reflecting on their practices
                         with these pre-service teachers. Their analyses of these experiences,
                         discussions and journaling with their apprentices and student teachers
                         have given them insights into the process of learning to teach and
                         continuing to learn about teaching. While these teachers have shared their
                         successes and challenges locally and informally with the PDS staff and one
                         another, this presentation offers them the opportunity to share their
                         strategies and learning experiences with others. The teachers will share in
                         a panel format 1) the elements of their best teaching practice, 2) the ways
                         they have found to best transform pre-service teachers and 3) the ways in
                         which this transformation process has affected their own teaching.


                         Maintaining Professional Development School
                         Partnerships: Sustaining Best Practices
                         Teresa Jayroe, Margaret Pope, and Rebecca Robichaux, Mississippi State
                         University


                               Pre-service teachers in the senior elementary/middle level methods
                         block (SEMB) take methods courses with intense field-based experiences
                         prior to the student teaching semester. Pre-service teachers are
                         collaboratively placed with K-6 classroom teachers in two rural school
                         partnership districts. The following semester these pre-service teachers



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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

are collaboratively placed in approximately 25 school districts for the
student teaching experience.
       In each SEMB school district, classroom teachers work directly with
university supervisors (SEMB professors) and teacher candidates as they
plan and prepare lessons, interact with K-6 students, implement lessons,
and begin to assess student learning. SEMB university supervisors use
the Teacher Intern Assessment Instrument (TIAI) to complete informal
observations and formal assessments and provide on-going, consistent
feedback to teacher candidates as they work in classrooms. Classroom
teachers also provide on-going, consistent feedback through daily con-
ferences and weekly evaluation forms to the pre-service teachers.
       When teacher candidates progress to student teaching, they con-
tinue to be informally and formally assessed using the TIAI. However, a
large majority of the daily informal feedback during this semester is
provided by the classroom teachers. University supervisors provide
weekly feedback along with formative and summative assessments over
the 16 week student teaching experience.
       Data from the TIAI indicate that pre-service teachers exhibit continu-
ous growth from the SEMB semester through the student teaching
semester. Best practices are shared by classroom teachers and university
supervisors through meetings and conferences throughout the semesters.
Best practices are continually refined based on feedback from classroom
teachers, university supervisors, and pre-service teachers.


Moving From Theory To Practice
Implementing Essential 4: Developing The
Continuum From College Student To
Professional Teacher
Rebecca Griffith, Edward Clark, Drema Morris, and Dawn Poore, Avery
County High School


       Often pre-service teachers and beginning teachers (ILTs) are taken
into a classroom, given a roll book, a policy manual (if that!), and a textbook,
then told to get busy. Most spend valuable weeks to months floundering,
afraid to ask questions about basic classroom management and essentials
about the school. To alleviate this, Avery County High School began a
program acquainting pre-service teachers and ILTs with the whole school,
as well as best practices, classroom management, an opportunity for
reflection, and practical advice from a team of veteran teachers.
       We began with an after-school session titled “Conversations With
Teachers” which answered questions pre-service teachers and ILTs often
have. Quickly we realized our pre-service teachers and ILTs had questions
about our school, but most were concerned about classroom management.
To acquaint them with the school, each member of our PDS took a topic and
began showing our pre-service teachers and ILTs the other side of the
school once each week for 15 minutes after school. We also held after-
school sessions on classroom management where our pre-service teachers
and ILTs reflected on situations they encountered, asked any questions
they wanted, and got practical advice from a panel of seasoned teachers.
This gave the pre-service teachers and ILTs many perspectives and
methods from which they could choose.



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                         PDS Commitment: Time, Energy, And Effort
                         Jill C. Miels, Ball State University
                         Mary Hendricks, Rhoades Elementary School


                                Rhoades Elementary, MSD Wayne Township, Indianapolis has
                         been a Professional Development School in the Ball State PDS Network for
                         eight years. It has been recognized for its collaborative work by the Holmes
                         Partnership, by AACTE and ATE as part of the larger PDS Network, and
                         by the USDOE as a National Blue Ribbon School. More recently, Rhoades
                         has been labeled a “failing school” as defined by NCLB. With a rapidly
                         changing urban population, the Rhoades/BSU partnership has extended
                         every effort to make student learning the focus of their PDS works. This
                         session will offer an examination of the activities defined and developed
                         to provide ongoing sustainability. The presentation group represents
                         constituents from the university, the school, and a pre-service teacher
                         representative. Presenters will discuss the work at Rhoades in relation to
                         navigating roles, responsibilities, time, energy, and efforts that have
                         allowed the partnership to prosper over the last eight years. Topics will
                         include:
                                • Integration of PDS work and NCLB mandates
                                • Formal and informal roles of presenters
                                • Tangible rewards
                                • Intangible rewards
                                • University promotion and tenure
                                • Using data for instructional purposes


                         Portfolio Assessment In The City: Pre-Service
                         Teachers’ Evidence Of “Social Justice”
                         Diane G. Corrigan, Shawn Washington, and R. D. Nordgren, Cleveland State
                         University
                         Edward Weber, Paul Finucan, Jim Heffernan, Sarah Sells, and Karen
                         Mortensen, Cleveland School of Science and Medicine


                                This presentation describes the portfolio assessment method uti-
                         lized to determine future urban teachers’ integration of social justice across
                         three semesters of training. The presentation focuses on the assessment
                         system requirement that pre-service teachers select their own criteria each
                         semester to add to the four point “social justice” rubric provided. The
                         researchers posed three questions to study the implementation of this
                         system with three recent cohorts of future teachers:
                                1) Based on the “social justice”-related criteria interns have selected
                         across the three semesters of their pre-service training, what is the nature
                         of these future city teachers’ understanding of “social justice?”
                                2) How do these pre-service teachers’ concepts of “social justice”
                         evolve during their three semesters in the program, as they move across
                         the community, school, and classroom settings?
                                3) What is the evidence of proficiency with this notion of “social
                         justice” to which other urban- and social justice-focused licensure pro-
                         grams might look when preparing teachers?




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

       Data and findings include the criteria interns have identified, ex-
amples of artifacts they have selected as evidence of their proficiency with
their notions of social justice, and reflections describing the artifacts that
interns have identified across the school, community, and classroom
settings. This continuum might be the basis upon which assessment
systems of future and veteran urban teachers are structured.
       This presentation addresses Question #2 by describing best prac-
tices. The portfolio assessment system presented is implemented and
shared by pre-service teachers and faculty within the PDS, university, and
other urban schools.


Providing A Strong Foundation For Middle
Level Education In A PDS
Randy M. Wood and Krystal Goree, Baylor University


      This presentation will discuss the preparation of BU Middle Level
Certificate Program candidates to enter the teaching profession. Examples
of learning opportunities provided for these pre-service teachers to
develop the eighteen competencies will be discussed along with how they
match the seven National Middle School Association Standards:
       • Young Adolescent Development (NMSA standard 1)
            Candidates are introduced to the major concepts, principles,
            theories, and research related to young adolescent develop-
            ment.
       • Philosophy and School Organization (NMSA Standard 2)
            Baylor teacher candidates are introduced to the philosophical
            and historical foundations of developmentally responsive
            middle level schools.
       • Curriculum and Assessment (NMSA Standard 3)
            Candidates are expected to conduct assessments using mul-
            tiple strategies and implement curriculum.
       • Teaching Fields (NMSA Standard 4)
            Candidates apply the knowledge gained through their educa-
            tion curriculum requirements to specific teaching tasks.
       • Instruction and Assessment (NMSA Standard 5)
            Candidates are introduced to the major concepts, principles,
            theories, and research related to effective instruction and
            assessment.
       • Family and Community Involvement (Standard 6)
            Candidates develop an appreciation for the larger community
            context within which schools exist.
       • Professional Roles (Standard 7)
            Candidates are expected to join and become active in the
            CMLA Baylor chapter.
      The presenters will:
       • relate the seven NMSA Standards to the BU Middle Level
         eighteen benchmarks;




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                                • describe how PDS middle schools can develop programs that will
                                  support their high achieving college students and low achieving
                                  middle level students; and
                                • describe best practices that connect the middle level program to
                                  parental involvement and student achievement.


                         RAIS Of Light: A Model For Linking Stressed-
                         Out Interns’ Action Research Projects With
                         School Improvement Plans
                         Clara Outten, Snow Hill Elementary School
                         Keith Conners, Stacie Siers, Dennis Pataniczek, Corinne Ponder, Cassandra
                         Graves, Staci Stonnell, and Jennifer Ruark, Salisbury University


                                 An action research investigation tackled by an intern/mentor team
                         in 2007 has given life to an ongoing program at Snow Hill Elementary
                         School, a Title I school in Salisbury University’s PDS partnership. Dubbed
                         RAIS (Readers Accelerating through Intern Support), the program targets
                         first graders with skill deficiencies as identified by the Houghton-Mifflin
                         Emerging Reader Survey. Using activities and scaffolding strategies
                         developed by interns and mentors, targeted students receive 20 minutes
                         of daily intervention - made possible by the steady flow of interns and
                         teacher candidates (future interns) placed at Snow Hill. Data collection and
                         analysis become an integral part of interns’ involvement in their school and
                         fulfill the requirements of the action research assignment without creating
                         undue stress.
                                 Interns often experience considerable anxiety about conducting
                         action research investigations during the assignment-heavy internship
                         year. In this session, the presenters will outline the template provided to
                         interns for action research and the support provided by mentors and
                         university personnel in guiding their projects. PDS stakeholders will
                         describe how the RAIS program is linked to the school’s Middle States
                         Accreditation for Growth plan and how the school improvement-linked
                         data collection activity serves as a model for interns placed in other
                         schools. The presenters will also discuss strategies for using action
                         research projects to increase school leaders’ involvement in PDS and for
                         helping future interns become invested in similar school improvement
                         projects.
                                 A related session featuring the RAIS program will be part of the
                         intern poster session on Saturday.


                         Reciprocal Relationships: Sustaining
                         Partnerships And Improving Preparation,
                         Practice, And Policy
                         Van Dempsey and Jaci Webb-Dempsey, Fairmont State University
                         Debbie Johnson, White Hall Elementary School


                                Public schools and Schools of Education are often called upon to
                         implement state educational policy mandates; sometimes those mandates
                         are a good fit and help serve to improve teaching and learning, but other
                         times they are difficult to implement and may have unintended negative


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

consequences. The best of all possible worlds is when policies are
informed and well-understood by those constituents who will ultimately
be responsible for their implementation. In West Virginia, Professional
Development School partnerships create a unique resource for the devel-
opment and implementation of educational policy around teacher prepa-
ration and teacher practice. One of the strengths of PDS-based teacher
preparation is the coherence and coordination of expectations and central
practices. When there is reciprocity in the relationships within and among
partnerships, and between partnerships and state policymakers, there is
the potential for mutually beneficial policy development and coherent and
coordinated implementation. This session will discuss issues related to
establishing and maintaining reciprocal relationships across all levels in
the policy system. Several examples of the impact of PDS partnerships in
policy development and implementation will provide a context for this
discussion, including: 1) the incorporation of results of research on the
effect of a PDS-based teacher education program on the preparation of
program graduates into the discourse around the development of a state
mentoring system for novice teachers and 2) the integration of new state
teacher and principal standards into the redesign of preparation programs.


Reflections From The Trenches: First Year
Teachers Identify Best Practices From Quincy
University’s PDS
Ann K. Behrens, Quincy University
Thomas Conley, Quincy High School


       K-12 practitioners have indicated that first-year teachers coming
from the Quincy University Professional Development School model are
exceptionally well-prepared. First-year teachers and senior teacher candi-
dates who have experienced the Professional Development School model
of teacher training were asked to reflect on the most useful aspects of their
preparation. Immersed in the K-12 setting from their initial pre-professional
courses in education, teacher candidates participate in a wide variety of
interactions with both public and parochial school students. Which were
most beneficial in preparing them for their own classrooms?
       The practices they found to be most beneficial in the areas of
classroom management, instructional strategies, planning and interacting
with parents will be shared with workshop participants. This survey has
caused university instructors to adjust their own course expectations and
schedules to incorporate these best practices.


Roundtable Discussion: How Do You Teach
Cultural Diversity? Let’s Talk About Best
Practices!
Doris Grove and Jane Harstad, Penn State University
Jeff Tranell, Park Forest Middle School


      The State College Professional Development School partnership
wants to discuss best practices when it comes to teaching cultural
diversity and multicultural education to our interns. We have been learning


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         and growing with our teaching practices and are always looking for
                         valuable and culturally responsive resources and practices. Research-
                         based information dealing with this issue will be provided, and we would
                         love to hear your thoughts, ideas, and practices. What do you teach?
                         When do you teach it? How do you teach it?


                         School-University Partnership That Models
                         Best Practice
                         MeShelda A. Jackson, James Pelech, and Ovid Wong, Benedictine University
                         Denise Spells, St. Ethelreda Catholic School


                                This presentation describes a unique partnership between an el-
                         ementary Catholic school and a Catholic university. The primary purposes
                         of this partnership are to (a) improve student achievement at the elemen-
                         tary school, (b) enhance the efficacy of the faculty at the elementary school
                         and the university, and (c) provide pre-service teachers an opportunity to
                         put theory into action. The first phase of this partnership began with an
                         assessment of teacher content knowledge and pedagogy. The second
                         phase aligned the identified needs of teachers to research-proven prac-
                         tices. This presentation includes the data from the first phase and the
                         impact of that data on the second phase; how best practice was defined,
                         implemented, and shared with the school and university. It will demon-
                         strate improved and enhanced educational opportunities, including teach-
                         ing through a collaborative approach which includes but is not limited to
                         video conferencing, modeling, co-teaching, co-planning, and teacher in-
                         service. As a team we have been able to create a unique learning community
                         that benefits both institutions.


                         Science Inquiry In The Elementary Classroom
                         Betsy Elliott, Grace Farnum, and Christina Russell, Guinyard Elementary
                         School
                         Anna Rast, Sandy Run Elementary School


                                Through a grant with Diverse Pathways we have continued to get
                         our science program on the right track. This grant started with a simple
                         weather station, weather instruments, and classroom sets of books that
                         made it possible for our students to have hands-on experiences with the
                         implementation of our state standards. Through this grant and our collabo-
                         ration with the University of South Carolina, we have been able to bring
                         in consultants (Jane Zenger, Saudah Collins, and Phyllis Carey) who
                         brought their expertise in different areas to enhance our students’ knowl-
                         edge.
                                Through summer classes, workshops, and a local field trip spon-
                         sored through Diverse Pathways, many doors have been opened to
                         enhance our students’ knowledge and achievement in the classrooms.
                         Through the sharing of valuable information among our county’s elemen-
                         tary schools and with other PDS schools in Richland County, we are better
                         equipped to put best practices to use in our classrooms. The teachers are
                         able to plan, reinforce, and enhance the science curriculum with hands-on
                         experiences and activities for the students. The challenges of scheduling,
                         funding, and resources had to be worked out for successful implementa-
                         tion. Through Diverse Pathways we were able to obtain and utilize valuable


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

materials. Some of these materials include the Anderson Five Curriculum,
AIMS activities, Project Wild activities, FOSS kits, and STC kits. Diverse
Pathways has provided our classrooms with numerous hands-on materials
and books. As a result, through inquiry-based instruction, we are ensuring
classrooms of future scientists.


“Social Justice” Teaching And City Schools:
PDS vs. Non-PDS Teachers’ Considerations Of
Progressive Ideals
Kristien Zenkov, George Mason University
Diane G. Corrigan, Amanda Rutkowski, Joshua Piscura, and Shawn
Washington, Cleveland State University


       This presentation will report on the results of a 21-item web-based
survey of the relevance of social justice ideals to approximately 75 in-
service graduates of an urban, social justice-oriented, PDS-based licen-
sure program, approximately half of whom are now working in PDS schools
and half of whom are not. The results of this study address three questions:
       1) What is the evidence of new city teachers’ understandings of
social justice as they begin their employment in PDS and non-PDS urban
schools?
       2) What does social justice teaching look like to in-service urban
educators - in PDS sites as compared with non-PDS sites - in this world of
narrowing notions of teaching, curricula, assessments, and teacher qual-
ity?
       3) What are the supports for and impediments to the consideration
of this concept of social justice in in-service city teachers’ pedagogies and
curricula - in PDS and non-PDS sites?
       The presenters will share findings from the survey, including a
typology of lessons these teachers identified as related to social justice
and the extent to which this program’s graduates are interested in and able
to continue to focus on this social justice outcome, paying particular
attention to the nature of the site (PDS or non-PDS) in which they are
employed.
       This presentation addresses Question #2 by describing the prepa-
ration of future educators based on social justice ideals and assessing the
best practices incorporated by these teachers within PDS versus non-PDS
sites.


Successfully Unsuccessful Part II: Validating
An Assessment Rubric Designed To Assist
PDSs With Teacher Candidates Experiencing
Dispositional Difficulties
Debbie Anderson and Bruce Brydges, SUNY Potsdam


      This session will highlight the use of a newly developed rubric
designed to assess dispositional criteria of all teacher candidates in a
School of Education in northern New York. More specifically the present-
ers will focus on its use to identify and improve the dispositions of


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         candidates experiencing difficulty in their program of studies and student
                         teaching placement within PDSs. The process of developing the assess-
                         ment rubric format will be outlined, as well as its implementation through-
                         out the candidate’s program of studies and field work. Use of this rubric
                         as a more objective tool to help all stakeholders deal effectively with
                         dispositional issues will be discussed - including perspectives from the
                         coordinator from the university field experiences office, the faculty super-
                         visor, the sponsor teacher, and the school administrator. The various
                         technologies facilitating this rubric’s use will also be demonstrated.
                         Relevant and analyzed assessment data collected from the semesters in
                         which it has been used will be presented, including case studies by teacher
                         candidate supervisors and PDS sponsor teachers using this new format.
                         The pros and cons of this new assessment tool will be compared to
                         previous tools used for assessing dispositional issues, as well as how the
                         data can be used to improve both training and outcomes. Come and enjoy
                         an innovative model for supporting PDSs in facilitating assessment for
                         improvement with the sometimes “fuzzy” area of dispositional evaluation.


                         Teacher Candidates Engaging Families In
                         Cross-Cultural Connections
                         Maria Ceprano and Nancy Chicola, Buffalo State College
                         Amanda Yard, Enterprise Charter School


                                Involving parents in the development of their children’s literacy and
                         appreciation of diversity has long been a goal of schools and educators.
                         Studies directed at increasing parental involvement in their children’s
                         academic pursuits show the need for developing culturally responsive
                         programs with respect to specific groups. This presentation describes how
                         two methods instructors worked together with the staff of an urban-based
                         Professional Development School and engaged teacher candidates in the
                         planning and implementation of a project that successfully involved
                         parents in their children’s literacy and multicultural understandings.
                                In implementation and outcome, the project is responsive to Ques-
                         tion 2 (How is best practice defined, implemented, and shared within and
                         beyond the PDS?). A brief introduction on the research-based consider-
                         ations for the design and implementation of the project as it pertained to
                         the specific community for which it was directed, and the benefit for the
                         teacher candidates in terms of integrated curriculum planning and profes-
                         sional/disposition training will be presented. The introduction will be
                         followed by a multi-media power point presentation showing how two
                         classes of teacher candidates collaborated in producing a Multicultural/
                         Literacy Fair. The outcomes of the fair as it pertained to participation,
                         learning, and attitude formation on the part of the parent/child community,
                         the teacher candidates, and the PDS staff will be shared with the audience.


                         Teaching Action Research In A PDS: Do the
                         Lessons Last?
                         Jeffrey Scheetz, East Stroudsburg University


                                The purpose of my presentation is to share with attendees the results
                         of a study recently conducted with graduates of the ESU secondary PDS


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

program. These former PDS students were required to take a course in
action research as part of the program. I wanted to know if the “habits of
mind” we sought to develop in our PDS students were carried over when
they became full-fledged teachers. Specifically, are PDS graduates likely
to continue to be reflective decision makers in their schools because they
had a course in action research? The results of the survey will be used to
make adjustments to our action research course. It is hoped that the
presentation will help to share best practice concerning action research in
a PDS with a wider audience.


Teaching And Learning 21st Century Skills
Within The Context Of Urban Professional
Development High Schools
R.D. Nordgren and Shawn Washington, Cleveland State University


       Recently, much scholarly attention has been given to what were
formerly considered “non-academic” skills: communication, collabora-
tion, problem solving, critical thinking, and self-directedness (e.g., Conley,
2005; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2006). How these skills are
taught, learned, and assessed is crucial to the P-16 community if we are to
prepare our students to be productive workers in a knowledge-based
economy and participatory citizens in a public democracy (Conley, 2003;
Cuban, 2003; Daggett, 2005; Sehr, 1997).
       This presentation shares the trials and tribulations of 36 pre-service
teachers in urban Professional Development High Schools who work
diligently toward fostering these skills in their classrooms. In their 4-month
long practicum, they are required to teach a 2-week unit of instruction that
incorporates 21st Century Skills and assesses these at both a high
cognitive and high application level. (The pre-service teachers are in the
Master of Urban Secondary Teaching Program.) Assessments and data
from these unit plans will be shared along with the pre-service teachers’
own stories about their triumphs and struggles to implement these in their
classrooms.


The Effect Of The Study Of Action Research In
A PDS On Action Research Agenda By A PDS
Candidate
Angela Ferri and Jeanne Tunks, University of North Texas


       Action research, the research method choice of PDS teachers and
candidates, provides a venue for examination of practice, with an intention
for taking action that improves teaching and learning. The study of action
research by a PDS candidate inspired the candidate to initiate action
research in her final semester as a student teacher. The case study of fifty
action research projects, developed and presented by mentor teachers and
candidates in the spring of 2008, led to the inception of an action research
project by the candidate who studied these initial projects. This research
examines the effect of this candidate’s study of the action research projects
on her own development and completion of an action research project in
a different PDS program.


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                                The ultimate purpose behind the candidate research is to evaluate
                         an action research project with the influence of data (accumulated from the
                         fifty other studies) demonstrating the goals, benefits, and possible limita-
                         tions of action research. In studying action research, the candidate found
                         that all of the projects were initiated to achieve one or more of these four
                         goals: support or refute the validity of a teaching strategy, improve the
                         everyday efficiency of the classroom, improve motivation of students to
                         perform better academically and behave effectively, and empower stu-
                         dents. One study, concerning reduction of transition times, aimed to
                         achieve the last three of the four goals and was chosen by the candidate
                         as a project to emulate and improve upon, utilizing the gathered data on
                         action research.


                         The Integration Of Technology In The
                         Collaborative Internship Practicum: Mentor,
                         Intern, And Technological Best Practices
                         Ron Siers, Sara Elburn, and Stacie Siers, Salisbury University


                                The recent construction of Salisbury University’s Teacher Educa-
                         tion and Technology Center has provided an appropriate venue for
                         technological integration in our teacher education programs and PDS
                         partnerships. The need to educate preservice teachers about technology
                         is an issue at the forefront of best practices. If preservice teachers are to
                         adequately and effectively integrate technology in their future class-
                         rooms, it is paramount that they be prepared during the internship
                         practicum. Technological best practices are shared at SU through profes-
                         sional development workshops.
                                At the 2008 PDS National Conference in Orlando, presenters from
                         Salisbury University’s PDS partnerships shared a phenomenological look
                         at the collaborative internship experience. Since then, the presenters have
                         looked at the integration of technology in the collaborative internship
                         practicum and the subsequent dissemination of best practices.
                                This session will demonstrate best practices for collaboration during
                         the internship practicum that can be infused with methodologies for
                         technology integration. Those in attendance will be given an opportunity
                         to actively participate in technology-rich collaborative environments.
                         Participants will glean an understanding of how technological collabora-
                         tive strategies will benefit mentor, intern, and students in PDSs.
                                Session attendees will be given an opportunity to submit questions
                         and challenges from their environments that will be addressed by the
                         presenters who have vast technological experience.


                         The Psychological Underpinnings Of Race And
                         Pedagogical Excellence: An Interactive
                         Presentation Of Race And Educational
                         Outcomes
                         Miles Anthony Irving, Georgia State University


                              Decades of educational mistreatment suggest that past and current
                         educational reform has been largely ineffective in rectifying African

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Americans poor school matriculation, class grades, and test scores when
compared to their European American counterparts (Cokley, 2002a; Tucker,
1999; Kaplan, 1999). According to the 2001 National Center of Educational
Statistics’ (NCES) “Our Nation Report Card,” 65% of African American
students have achievement levels that fall below basic skill levels com-
pared to only 19% of white students. While many researchers, psycholo-
gists, and educators have offered different theories in an attempt to explain
the disparity between the educational achievement of African American
students and white students, the research suggests that race and racism
remain as relevant challenges to educational excellence (Dittmann, 2004;
Chamberlin, 2004).
       Using students’ culture in the classroom has been found to be an
effective way to incorporate the student into the academic process
(Ladson-Billings, 1995; Hilliard, 1995). However, racism, stereotypes, low
expectations, and European ethnocentrism may all inhibit teachers from
effectively valuing and utilizing African children’s culture in the class-
room. This presentation will utilize an interactive multimedia experience to
engage the participants in effective pedagogical practices that expose
racism in the educational environment. In addition, this presentation will
demonstrate powerful exemplars of how classroom expectations can
impact the classroom experiences of students. This dynamic presentation
will disseminate effective knowledge regarding race and educational
excellence, demonstrate the challenges preventing educational change,
and interactively teach the tools necessary to implement high quality
educational experiences for African children.


The Roles Of Student Leadership
Caroline J. Allen and Maureen Stout, Paradise Professional Development
School


      This presentation will cover a best practice model for fostering and
encouraging student leadership within a PDS environment. Simulating a
“real world” experience of our government and making decisions that
directly affect their daily lives is a priceless opportunity that they would
otherwise not have. Student Council empowers the students to:
       • Have a voice in how decisions are made at our school
       • Possess ownership of our learning community
       • Get a glimpse of what government, politics, and leadership really
          mean
       • Become role models to their peers and younger individuals
       • Take the tools and experiences that they have acquired and
          implement them in their future lives
      Students in grades 3-5 at Paradise PDS come from a background of
diverse experiences. Student Council participants would benefit greatly by
working cooperatively to solve problems, create ideas, and increase their
understanding of working toward a common goal.
      Paradise PDS Student Council candidates are required to apply for
the office of their choice. Campaign posters are created and displayed
around the school. Speeches are written and all candidates are videotaped
so that the student body can view and become aware of their platforms.
Computerized elections are held for grades 3-5, votes are tabulated, and
winners are sworn in the following day during the morning ceremony.


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                         Student Council is a structure that allows all participants a forum for
                         ongoing governance, reflection, and collaboration. The guidelines and
                         model that we use are from the National Association of Student Councils
                         (NASC).


                         Transforming A Reading Assessment Class
                         Into A PDS Reading Clinic
                         Eva Garin, Bowie State University


                                This session will describe how I transformed an undergraduate
                         reading assessment class into a PDS reading clinic. When I began teaching
                         this class I believed there should be opportunities for our pre-service
                         teachers to authentically assess students’ reading strengths and instruc-
                         tional needs. In the past pre-service teachers learned about reading
                         assessment in the confines of their university classrooms and completed
                         case studies with K-6 students that they identified on their own. Two
                         research questions framed the PDS reading clinic: What is the impact of
                         the PDS reading clinic on K-6 students’ learning? What is the impact of the
                         PDS reading clinic on the pre-service teachers’ self efficacy? Data will be
                         shared that documents the growth of the K-6 children and the teacher
                         candidates who tutored them. I will share the reading assessments that we
                         used in the PDS reading clinic and talk about how we worked collaboratively
                         with one elementary PDS site to develop our PDS reading clinic. I will also
                         share a pre-post survey that I used with teacher candidates that documents
                         their growth in self-efficacy.


                         Trepidation To Transformation: Transforming
                         Urban Practicum Students’ Experiences
                         Davene D. Heckman, Bloomsburg University


                                How does a university practicum supervisor really prepare future
                         teachers for the awesome responsibility of nurturing and teaching every
                         child in his/her charge (Elmoore, 2002; Gross, 2004; NCTQ, 2006; Neuman
                         & Belano, 2006; Sernak, 1998; Shapiro & Purpel, 2004; Shapiro & Stefkovich;
                         2005; Young, Peterson, & Short, 2002)? Now couple that question with a
                         student population that ranges from 55 to 65% Hispanic on any given day/
                         grade. In addition, this school has a 70% “Free and Reduced Lunch”
                         population.
                                This presentation will attempt to briefly outline the university
                         practicum supervisor’s guidance in the students’ life-altering experience
                         of teaching high percentages of children with language and cultural
                         differences from their own (Neuman &Celano, 2006) as possibilities replace
                         fear (Best Practice Symposium, 2002; Blanchard, 1999; Brough , Bergman,
                         & Holt, 2006; DuFour, 2002; Gross, 2006; Heckman, 2006).




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Triple E = Excellence: A Mental Health
Prevention Model “Saturday School”
Dollye T. James and Patricia Marquez, Petersen Professional Development
School
Marty Kulesza, Fremont Professional Development Middle School
Wendy Hoskins, University of Nevada Las Vegas


       The presentation will include an overview of a best practice model
that promotes academic success and mental health prevention focusing on
student efficacy, empowerment, and engagement. This model comes out
of the needs of teachers, parents, students, and support staff and is based
on a needs assessment recently conducted at Petersen Elementary. Our
collaboration will include Professional Development School counselors
and the UNLV Department of Counselor Education faculty and students.
This comprehensive plan will service the at-risk population of students
and families between grades pre-kindergarten through eighth. The areas
of greatest concern that will be addressed include:
        • truancy/absenteeism/dropout rate
        • retention issues
        • emerging mental health issues
        • parental/caretaker involvement
       All schools are within close proximity of the University of Nevada
Las Vegas campus and serve an urban, underprivileged population of
children. It is proposed that we implement a prevention model Saturday
School designed to provide the elementary schools with the tools to
support the personal/social needs of students and facilitate student
transition to the partnering PDMS. The results will be measured using pre/
post assessments.
       UNLV graduate students from the Department of Counselor Educa-
tion, under the supervision of licensed school counselors and UNLV
professors, will develop a unique practicum/internship program by provid-
ing academic success strategies, social skills, and mental health services
to identified students. The model will follow the guidelines of the Annual
Guaranteed Level of Service (AGLS), the ASCA Model, and the nine
required essentials of a Professional Development School.


Universal Access To Teaching In The
Environment The PDS Way
Alison Rutter, Katherine DiSimoni, and Gina Scala, East Stroudsburg
University
Judy Hartzler, Pleasant Valley Elementary School


      Unfortunately, teachers frequently decide not to conduct field trips
in the environment due to challenges presented by meeting various
students’ needs in the outside environment. In our PDS, we live by our
mantra of being inclusive practitioners for all learning. As a major part of
our elementary science program is implementing the environmental edu-
cation programs project WILD (PW) and Project Learning Tree (PLT), we
decided we needed to confront these fears head on. We initially model
these programs’ activities to our pre-service teachers at the outset of the
semester and then have them in turn teach lessons to their classes. Part of


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                         this instruction now includes one of our special education professors
                         introducing ways to ensure these activities are inclusionary and differen-
                         tiated for all learners. We have recently extended this experience to allow
                         our students the opportunity to explore teaching these lessons with a
                         variety of children in an outside learning setting by holding a Project WILD
                         Day or a Project Learning Tree Day. A cohort of our students (about 20-
                         25) work together in teams to teach PW or PLT to the classes at a specific
                         grade level at one of our PDS sites. Our pre-service students are expected
                         to ensure that their “Days” are also inclusionary. Inasmuch, their plans
                         must overcome the very real physical limitations of the environment. Our
                         presentation will provide suggestions and examples (handouts) we have
                         used for overcoming the obstacles that many teachers fear. A Q & A
                         discussion will follow.


                         Using A Guided Literacy Practicum Within A
                         PDS Model
                         Sandra J. Stone, Northern Arizona University
                         Brian Stone, Mountain School


                               The purpose of this session is to describe how a guided literacy
                         practicum operates within a PDS model. A brief overview of the compo-
                         nents of the Northern Arizona University DeMiguel/Knoles PDS program
                         will be highlighted. In this program, which has successfully operated for
                         12 years, PDS interns work with mentor teachers on a daily basis in
                         classrooms following the mentor teacher’s guidelines for involving the
                         interns in positive learning experiences. In addition to the daily experi-
                         ences, a literacy professor integrates theory and practice by teaching
                         interns literacy strategies and immediately providing interns with the
                         opportunity to use these strategies with children during two semesters in
                         mentor and/or practicum teachers’ classrooms. Two days a week for a half-
                         hour the interns work with individual or small groups across grade levels
                         including multi-age classrooms. The professor supervises the interns
                         during this guided practicum.
                               This session provides “best practices” examples of the literacy
                         strategies used and the operation of how mentor teachers, interns, and the
                         professor are involved in this process. Participants will also learn how
                         authentic assessment is used with the interns and children and how the
                         professor gains insight in order to integrate the theory into practice.
                         Discussion from a former PDS intern will highlight the benefits of this
                         approach for future teachers. The benefits for the professor, mentors
                         teachers, and children will be discussed as well. These best literacy
                         practices are shared within and without the PDS program and examples are
                         noted.


                         Utilizing Literature Circles To Develop Future
                         Teachers As Readers
                         Linda K. Rogers, Rhonda M. Sutton, Jennifer Asman, and Elise Clifford, East
                         Stroudsburg University


                               Reading is a complex process. It requires the reader to be engaged
                         with text on many levels. This engagement draws on social, personal, and


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

cognitive experiences for comprehension. It is vital that reading professors
facilitate pre-service teachers’ awareness of reading processes. This
awareness sets the stage for understanding reading instruction. This
presentation will share the metacognitive awareness of pre-service teach-
ers and how this awareness impacts literacy instruction in a PDS site. It is
the researchers’ belief that metacognitive awareness is the foundation of
understanding effective reading instruction. Pre-service teachers begin
this metacognitive journey a semester before the Apprentice II semester
in a PDS site. During the Apprentice II semester, data was gathered through
reflective journaling in which pre-service teachers reflected on the pro-
cesses used to understand text that was read and discussed in literature
circles. These reflections and discussions focused on their awareness of
the strategies (comprehension, fix-up, etc.), when they were used to make
sense of text, and how this awareness assisted them in understanding
effective reading instruction. In addition to reflective journaling and
literature circle discussions, the pre-service teachers reflected on their
awareness and usage and its impact on the reading instruction they
planned.


What Do They See And Hear? Comparing The
Effects Of Classroom Audio And Video
Recording On Pre-Service Teachers’ Self-
Evaluations
Daniel Bergman, Wichita Sate University


       This presentation will share results and analysis of research into the
reflective practices of teachers. The purpose of this study is to differentiate
the effects of audio and video self-taping on pre-service teachers’ self-
evaluations of classroom instruction. Participants include those enrolled
in the general methods course for secondary educators and its school-
based fieldwork counterpart. The two general methods sections met
during the spring semester, allowing for two groups of participants. The
audio group used audio recorders during their fieldwork experiences to
monitor their classroom teaching; the video group used video recording
equipment for their fieldwork experiences.
       Data indicates multiple findings about the impact of recording in
general, as well as results specific to each format. Analysis includes
summaries of all participants and comparisons between the audio and
video groups. Participants generally do not behave differently whether
they are video- or audio-recording themselves. In their self-evaluations,
participants in the audio group more frequently addressed questions and
responses, praise, and wait-time, while those in the video group gave more
attention to non-verbal behaviors such as facial expressions and gestures.
Both groups focused more on the role of curriculum over instruction, and
annoying mannerisms were the most frequently identified teacher behav-
ior among participants. Participants identified self-improvement as the
primary reason for recording their teaching, yet cited time constraints,
embarrassment, and distractions as reasons why they would not record
themselves. Implications for research, teaching, and teacher education in
PDSs are discussed, including methods for enhancing and increasing the
habit of teacher recording and self-reflection.



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                         What Matters In A PDS?
                         Teresa Filbert and Sue Small, University of Maryland Baltimore County
                         Teresa Spray, Stevens Forest Elementary School


                                Over time we redefine best practices to keep the PDS current with the
                         realities that our students encounter in local schools. Reflection on our
                         practice and evaluation of our work are integral as we support pre-service
                         and in-service teachers across their careers.
                                In early 2008, three UMBC faculty embarked on a qualitative research
                         project to investigate how teachers who graduated from the Early Child-
                         hood Education Program at UMBC perceived the impact of their internship
                         in a PDS on their subsequent classroom experiences. Using interpretive
                         inquiry as the primary approach, the project focused on self-reflection and
                         critical analysis by participants who completed a written questionnaire and
                         took part in a videotaped focus group.
                                Findings identified benefits of being trained in a PDS as a mentor’s
                         knowledge, experience, and advocacy; the development of professional
                         dispositions; the year-long time frame in a PDS; and observation of child
                         development in the school setting. Former interns noted the costs of
                         working in a PDS as the anxiety related to being closely monitored by the
                         PDS community and feeling a need to excel as representatives of UMBC.
                         They also discussed how the PDS could have better prepared them for
                         classroom management/discipline challenges, one current focus among
                         PDS faculty.
                                The results of this study will be shared with UMBC faculty, teachers
                         in the local schools, current interns, and teacher educators in other
                         institutions to inform current practice as we strengthen the alignment of
                         our PDS program with the reality of today’s classrooms.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Q UESTION #3: W HAT                       IS INVOLVED IN
THE CREATION AND MANAGING OF A
PDS?

“And They Wrote Reflectively Ever After...”
Reflection As Development Through Journals
Jodi Kamin, Grays Woods Elementary School
Kristen Dewitt and Susan Lunsford, Penn State University
Christine McDonald and Lindsi Ciuffetelli, Park Forest Elementary School


       This presentation focuses on the use of reflective journals as a tool
for improving practice and for fine-tuning observations made by interns.
As pre-service interns begin the journey from college student to profes-
sional educator, many issues and questions arise; concerns and discov-
eries surface that require personal and professional reflection. A weekly
journal not only becomes a record of development over time but also a
resource for reflection to improve teaching practice.
       When shared with a university or district supervisor who adds
thought-provoking questions and comments, this journaling discourse
pushes the intern’s thinking and understanding into his own teaching
practice. Questions interspersed by the supervisor guide the intern to
further wonderings and reflections that, because they are documented,
can be revisited throughout the course of the internship.
       In this session a mentor teacher and professional development
associates from the Penn State-State College Area School District School
Partnership will share journal reflections and real-life examples of how their
teaching practice improved based on the journaling process. Ideas for
journal topics as well as developmentally appropriate reflections will also
be shared. Perspectives from former interns on the importance of journaling
as a pre-service teacher and as a beginning teacher will be shared.


An Evolving Story: The Role Of Continual
Reflection And Communication In Defining
Successful PDS Partnerships
Michael Patte and Caryn Terwilliger, Bloomsburg University


      Mutual collaboration between school and university faculty and
administration is a vital component in the creation, management, and
sustainability of an effective Professional Development School. Focus
groups, reflective journals, and surveys from PDS participants provide a
rich data set for enhancing school-university partnerships. Reflecting on
the experiences of two distinct Professional Development Schools, the
presenters share how continual reflection and communication are crucial
in shared governance by identifying mutually beneficial program goals
that subscribe to the nine essentials of a PDS. Through the process,
flexibility for on-going improvement is highlighted and assists in design-
ing experiences that advance the College of Education’s conceptual
framework and districts’ strategic plans for guiding pre-service and
practicing teachers’ professional development.



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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         Building And Managing A Professional
                         Development School Partnership
                         Marci Greene, Florida Gulf Coast University
                         Tim Ferguson, Veterans Memorial Elementary School


                                This presentation will highlight the process used in the development
                         of a Professional Development School partnership between Florida Gulf
                         Coast University and the District School Board of Collier County. The
                         presenters will explain the one-year planning cycle that resulted in con-
                         stituents in both arenas agreeing to formalize the school district/university
                         working relationship by creating a PDS, the process used to actively
                         engage all parties in crafting the written agreement, and the current
                         management plan. The process used in the development of a written PDS
                         agreement between the university partner and three schools located in
                         Collier County will be shared and the final document will be distributed. Our
                         agreement outlines the following components: partner roles, PDS objec-
                         tives, instructional activities, internship opportunities, professional de-
                         velopment partnerships, model program development, action research,
                         faculty exchange, and graduate degree cohort programs.
                                The established PDS partnership is governed by a Leadership
                         Advisory Board (LAB) made up of representation from the university
                         partners, school-based and district personnel, along with parents and
                         community members. The LAB provides oversight of the PDS agreement
                         serving in an advisory capacity for identified PDS activities and special
                         projects.
                                The presentation will provide a historical overview of the PDS
                         partnership from initial conception through the second year of implemen-
                         tation. Presenters will highlight the benefits of the PDS partnership from
                         three perspectives: the university, the individual school, and the school
                         district as well as share obstacles that were encountered along the way.


                         Collaboratively Creating And Maintaining
                         Several PDS Sites
                         Wren M. Bump, University of Houston Clear Lake
                         Joan Maier, Sam Houston State University


                                One university working with ten school districts and over fifty PDS
                         sites can be a daunting task. How can the requirements and standards of
                         the program be maintained? How can all the involved parties have a voice?
                         Several structures were created to frame this multi-faceted partnership at
                         one suburban university. A written agreement that specifies all the roles,
                         responsibilities, and requirements was created. A committee that consists
                         of 51% school district personnel was created to be in charge of the
                         application process for PDS sites. A smaller committee made up of district
                         supervisors and university supervisors was also created that meets
                         regularly throughout the semester to revise and align the syllabi for the
                         two-semester internship; place the interns in their districts; discuss and
                         update the assignments; and reflect on what is working, what is not
                         working, and what needs to be changed. This is the committee that actually
                         governs the internship program and makes all the major decisions that are
                         involved.



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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

       In an effort to improve our communication and high standards, we
developed a checklist that includes the Nine Essentials. We asked all of
our university and district supervisors, our dean, and our teacher educa-
tion faculty to comment on each of these essentials and how they were
being implemented in our program. Our next step is to use the comments
to further improve our program. We would like to share this process with
other PDS programs.


Communication, Community, And
Commitment: Opportunities And Challenges Of
Formalizing Shared Agreements
Rocio Delgado and Pat Norman, Trinity University
Erica Gonzalez, Hawthorne Academy


       In 1991, Trinity University established a long-term Professional
Development School partnership with Hawthorne Academy, one of our
original PDS campuses. A single university teacher educator created and
sustained the partnership at this school campus over a fourteen year
period. Although a single formal written agreement between the school
district and university existed, many informal practices and ways of “being
a PDS” had been established and reinforced informally and on the ground
at the PDS campus. The university teacher educator’s untimely demise
created both opportunities and challenges in re-negotiating shared expec-
tations and formal agreements.
       This presentation explores from the university’s perspective how
formal written documents were used to assess the state of the partnership,
develop shared understandings of what it means to be a PDS, and
determine whether and how to move the partnership forward. Specifically,
we will share and analyze two documents: (1) the “Partnership Covenant
for a Partnership School” and (2) the “Roles and Responsibilities of
Interns, Mentors, School Liaison, University Liaison, and School Princi-
pal.” In addition, we describe and analyze a recently created PDS committee
that meets monthly to assess, inform, and establish agreed-upon policies
and practices. Finally, we identify three threads that run throughout our
governance work: communication; community; and commitment.


Creating And Managing A Successful PDS: A
Study In Participatory Democracy
James B. Tuttle, Shepherd University


        The Shepherd University/Jefferson County/Berkeley County (West
Virginia) PDS unit was begun in 2003-2004 through the collaborative vision
of Jefferson County teachers and a Shepherd professor. Our growing unit
continues to use the original collaboratively-written documents put in
place, including the allocation of roles and assigned responsibilities; these
agreements continue to serve well. These and all other documents the unit
uses for ongoing governance, reflection, and communication are available
for all members of our unit, all the time, online originally through WebCT,
now through Sakai.
        Shepherd University recently switched to Sakai as its online center
for courses. We worked together to create identities for non-Shepherd PDS

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                         participants, and a module for the PDS has been constructed using the
                         same tools and offering the same powerful benefits for PDS governance,
                         reflection, and communication as for university courses. Our PDS unit also
                         uses the online FIPSE PDS standards database for ongoing management
                         of needs and unit activities.


                         Creating And Managing Our PDS Through
                         Transformational Leadership And A Change In
                         Our School Culture
                         Shelli Barton, Saint Leo University
                         Kim Rulison, Pasco Middle School


                                This session highlights the early stages of a transformation leader-
                         ship model used in: 1) writing goals for our PDS relationship that support
                         school goals and pre-teacher needs, 2) maintaining communication among
                         our PDS leadership team and maintaining participation from all parties, and
                         3) following and tracking of our goals. The process of developing our goals
                         with our leadership team of teachers fostered a team atmosphere that
                         afforded each a voice in the process that continues at monthly meetings.
                         All goals will be reviewed in this session. One of the goals our teachers
                         formed was that of learning about school culture and changing school
                         culture among faculty in order to provide more quality placement positions
                         for pre-interns and final interns. The structure, roles, and governance of
                         the goals will be reviewed, as well as some case studies of selected teachers
                         and pre-interns of their experiences in this process.


                         Creating PDSs In A Unique “3x3” Urban
                         Partnership
                         Janice L. Nath, University of Houston - Downtown


                                In 2006, an urban university began a partnership (termed a “3x3”)
                         with a large urban/suburban school district and an outlying community
                         college to provide a “seamless” transfer from the community college
                         partner. Thus, students are now able to accomplish three critical achieve-
                         ments: an associates degree, a bachelors degree, and their state teachers’
                         certification. Within this process, education students have extensive
                         fieldwork requirements at the community college and university level,
                         resulting in the establishment of new PDSs for regular and bilingual teacher
                         candidates within the partnership district. The first group has recently
                         graduated (Summer 2008), and all of these teacher candidates have been
                         hired by the district in which they were placed for their fieldwork. This
                         session will describe the process of working with these partners to create
                         this unique program and its PDSs that are working for the benefit of all three
                         partners. The university, with its mission to serve urban students, felt that
                         it was unable to serve many teacher candidates located in outlying,
                         increasingly diverse areas of the city due to gas prices, growing traffic
                         congestion, and lack of public transportation. This created some concern
                         that enrollment would continue to decline. The district, growing in size and
                         diversity, faced increasing difficulty in retaining teachers in areas where
                         minority populations were filling its schools (and where PDSs were



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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

established). This partnership has resulted in a surge of enrollments both
in the community college and within the Department of Urban Education.


Creation Or Redesign: Managing A PDS Is
Much The Same
Gary L. Willhite, Rita Chen, Cindy M. Duley, Joyce Shanks, Tim Gerber, and
Kathy J. Thomas Willhite, University of Wisconsin LaCrosse
Deborah Markos, Logan High School
Jac Lyga, Irving Pertzsch Elementary School


       Communication, trust, interest, and need are a few of the words used
to describe the creation of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse PDS
Partnership with the School Districts of La Crosse and Onalaska. Our PDS
partnerships are entering their 6th year of operation in a variety of configu-
rations: one has a reading emphasis, another a Spanish language empha-
sis, one a science, technology, engineering and math emphasis, and
another is connected to a general methods course for secondary students.
Our partnership is at a crossroads with sustainability and growth. We have
operationalized a written agreement and yet have specialized PDS sites in
practice - one size may or may not fit all. As we review our partnerships
against the new document What It Means to Be a Professional Develop-
ment School and the nine essentials, our internalized structure for gover-
nance, reflection, and communication is a significant avenue to the
continual management of our partnerships. This session will be an over-
view of the original mechanism for implementing the PDS partnership and
the subsequent mutually-crafted written agreement. The remaining dis-
cussion will address how we have “managed” the challenges of limited
placement availability, specialization, sustainability, and growth as related
to the nine essentials of a PDS.


Developing A PDS Mindset
LaVonne Peterson, East Moline School District #37
Tracy Greer, Glenview Middle School
Cindy Dooley and LaVerne Logan, Western Illinois University


       This presentation is designed to describe the process by which a
Professional Development School relationship is being crafted between
the East Moline, Illinois School District #37 and Western Illinois Univer-
sity. We will share the two-year story of our Professional Development
School relationship from the “idea stage” through a newly generated
formal agreement, guided by the NAPDS document What It Means to Be
a Professional Development School.
       Participants in this session will hear from representative teachers,
principals, university faculty, and administrators, all of whom were mem-
bers of a two-year planning committee. Specific elements of the presenta-
tion include: the role of research in planning a PDS, the role of site visits
in planning a PDS, methods and strategies employed to foster “buy-in”
from constituents, and a discussion of potential barriers and how they were
overcome.
       The presentation would likely benefit those who are seeking strat-
egies and approaches for beginning a Professional Development School
relationship. Handouts and resources will be incorporated into our story.

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                         Encouraging And Finding “Voice” In Forums
                         For Ongoing Growth Of The PDS Partnership
                         Deb Theiss, Carl Grigsby, and Nicole Nickens, University of Central Missouri


                               With more than eleven years of collaborating with rural area schools,
                         the PDS partnership with the University of Central Missouri was now
                         focused on sustaining and supporting ongoing growth of the program.
                         Several organizational structures were put in place to provide continued
                         governance, reflection of all participants, and effective communication. To
                         measure the success of our program, data was collected over a two-year
                         period to provide concrete evidence in the efforts to fully implement an
                         effective collaboration between the university and public schools. This
                         has given participants a forum to reflect on best practices and a voice that
                         has encouraged a renewed sense of vision for future work.


                         Expanding Professional Development Schools
                         In Las Vegas, Nevada: The Process And
                         Structures For Moving Forward
                         Pam Campbell, Cyndi Giorgis, and Sherri Strawser, University of Nevada Las
                         Vegas
                         Ruth Devlin and Maureen Stout, Paradise Professional Development School
                         Kim Izumo and Antonio Rael, Fremont Professional Development Middle
                         School
                         Hilary Jones and Sue Steaffens, Dean Petersen Professional Development
                         School
                         Eva White, Clark County School District


                                Four years ago, there were only two existing Professional Develop-
                         ment Schools inLas Vegas: Paradise and Petersen, both elementary schools.
                         While both were called “PDSs,” they were actually PDSs in name only. PDS
                         activities were limited to a single cohort program for approximately twenty
                         pre-service students in general education and there were minimal profes-
                         sional development and/or research activities.
                                Then, through a collaborative initiative among representatives from
                         the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)
                         and the Clark County School District (CCSD), stakeholders came together
                         to renew and re-create Paradise and Petersen PDSs. Through sustained
                         conversations that continued for a full academic year, a Memorandum of
                         Understanding (MoU) that formalized governance processes and struc-
                         tures was created. In the three years that have followed, both Paradise and
                         Petersen PDSs have been transformed into active, vibrant, thoughtful
                         PDSs with greater engagement by the university and school district, as well
                         as the wider Las Vegas community. Then, last spring, the process was
                         repeated and Fremont PDS, a middle school, was restructured as the third
                         UNLV/CCSD PDS.
                                In this session, presenters will share both the process and the
                         products of creating, maintaining, and expanding the work of the PDSs.
                         The structures for governance (Governing Board and individual PDS
                         Coordinating Councils) will be described. It is through the governance
                         structures that all three PDSs maintain ongoing conversations and reflec-
                         tions about their practice and collaborate in planning for the future.



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Opportunities for discussion and conversation among presenters and
participants will be provided and encouraged.


Exploring 21st Century Communication Tools
To Support PDS Partnerships
Barbara Owens and Denise Lindstrom, Fairmont State University
JoAnn Gilbert, Nutter Fort Elementary School


      Fostering on-going governance, reflection, and communication
between participants in a PDS partnership can be challenging. The
Fairmont State PDS partnership is currently the largest PDS partnership in
West Virginia with the recent inclusion of forty K-12 schools within a large
geographic area. The mountainous terrain and long distances between
schools and the university make face-to-face meetings cumbersome. 21st
century technologies like electronic social networking and video-
conferencing can help facilitate the kind of collaboration and communica-
tion needed for a successful and healthy partnership. Currently our
partnership is exploring the use of Ning, an online social networking site,
and video conferencing with Adobe Connect to supplement face-to-face
meetings in ways that foster collaboration, improve decision making
processes, and improve efficiency in the dissemination of information
among university liaisons, site coordinators, and cooperating teachers. In
addition, uses of these information and communication technologies to
enrich the clinical and student teaching experiences of teacher candidates
will be considered. Professional development is essential in preparing
educators to integrate technology into their teaching practices in ways
that more fully prepare students for life in the 21st century. These
technology-rich experiences also have potential to improve teachers’ self-
confidence in using new ICT so that they may consider integrating them
into their own teaching practices. Examples of how the partnership
provides educators with access, time, and support to utilize these tech-
nologies so that they may become more “fearless” in their use of technol-
ogy will be provided.


Get Ready, Get Set, Go!: Establishing A
Meaningful PDS Partnership
Jennifer Craft, Montgomery Blair High School
Andrea Speaks, Sligo Creek Elementary School


       Effective Professional Development School partnerships require
comprehensive training, meaningful time to collaborate, and a continuous
improvement model in order to build a program that promotes successful
relationships. The action steps used in establishing a meaningful partner-
ship that is mutually beneficial to the university and the partnering schools
will be discussed. The session will detail the strategic planning meetings
and include copies of all the handouts used during the process. The
planning process used with both the elementary and high school will be
outlined. In an era of high stakes testing and increased accountability, the
two schools will discuss the specific benefits and challenges of collabo-
ration and communication. In addition, recruitment of mentor teachers will




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                         also be addressed. Time will be allocated to allow session participants to
                         ask specific questions related to the strategic planning process utilized.


                         How It All Came Together
                         Gena Riley, John Hammett, Slenda Haynes, Roland Thornburg, and Jordan
                         Barkley, Jacksonville State University
                         Eric Mackey, Jacksonville City Schools
                         Bob Phillips and Bridgett Vernon, Kitty Stone Elementary School
                         Mike Newell and Ann Powell, Jacksonville High School
                         Diedre Vital, parents


                                Four major elements were critical in the creation of the Jacksonville
                         Professional Development School (JPDS), a joint venture of Jacksonville
                         City Schools (Alabama) and Jacksonville State University: (1) strong
                         central figures in the university and public schools; (2) powerful, well-
                         presented ideas; (3) inclusion of key university and public school figures
                         early in the planning process; and (4) adequate resources. Important
                         factors in the implementation stage were careful attention to communica-
                         tion and to nurturing relationships. The Jacksonville Professional Devel-
                         opment School focuses on three specific goals: (1) to develop and offer a
                         comprehensive field-based collaborative pre-service teacher preparation
                         program; (2) to create and manage comprehensive programs for extended
                         development of teaching professionals in the Jacksonville City Schools;
                         and (3) to provide a setting for educational professionals to come together
                         to examine, evaluate, and reflect on teaching and learning. The presenta-
                         tion will include a brief physical description of the PDS, discussion of
                         systematic reflection and disciplined inquiry in the PDS, a mutually-crafted
                         written agreement, and outlines of the program goals and curriculum
                         content of the pre-service and in-service programs and specific program
                         plans for 2009-2010.


                         It Takes A Village: How We Created Our
                         Professional Development Schools In
                         Burlington, North Carolina.
                         Jean Rohr and Judith Howard, Elon University


                                The Elon University School of Education, along with its two public
                         school partners, are currently involved in the creation of a Professional
                         Development School partnership in Burlington, North Carolina. Since we
                         are in the early stages of our PDS partnership, our presentation will focus
                         on the creation of a PDS rather than the management of the PDS. We have
                         relied on the structure of the Professional Development Schools plan
                         proposed by the National Association for Professional Development
                         Schools as a frame on which to shape the creation of our PDS partnership.
                         Our session will underscore the steps we have taken in developing our PDS
                         partnership. The presenters will take the audience through all phases of
                         the evolution of our PDS, ranging from initial decision making to final
                         agreements. We will discuss the creation of: our mission statements;
                         professional development endeavors; placements and field experiences
                         for our pre-service teachers; efforts to demonstrate respect for the skills
                         and expertise of all the stakeholders in the PDS; research and scholarship
                         activities; formal contracts detailing the expectations of the public school,

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

school district, and the university; and decisions regarding specific roles
of personnel and resources. Additionally, we will highlight the develop-
ment of broad community involvement in our PDS along with sustainability
efforts to ensure PDS successes.


Managing The Complexities Of A Professional
Development School As A New Principal
Susan Steaffens, Dean Petersen Professional Development School
Maureen Stout, Paradise Professional Development School
Antonio Rael, Fremont Professional Development Middle School
Eva White, Clark County School District
Sherri Strawser, University of Nevada Las Vegas


       The complexities of a Professional Development School can be
overwhelming, especially to a new principal. This session will discuss the
impact that being a Professional Development School has on a new
principal. Three principals will discuss their successes and challenges as
they have undertaken this new role.
       There are three Professional Development Schools in the Clark
County School District. One elementary school, Paradise PDS, has been
a Professional Development School for nine years, but now has a new
principal. Dean Petersen PDS opened six years ago as a Professional
Development School. The current principal has only been there for one
year. The newest addition, Fremont PDMS, formerly a middle school, just
came on board this year. The current principal was appointed in March,
2008. Each of these schools is different, yet with one common factor - they
all follow the PDS structure. What is different is where they all are in the
PDS continuum.


Moving Forward: Involving All PDS
Stakeholders To Put Beliefs Into Practice
Maggie Madden and Cheri Wittmann, Maryland State Department of
Education
Nancy Neilson, Baltimore City Schools
Evelyn Randall-Perry, Morgan State University


      Maryland’s Professional Development School Standards provide
guidance for PDS stakeholders to implement successful PDS partnerships.
Representatives from university education departments, school systems
and schools use the PDS Standards in their strategic planning process
(Essential 7). How does an institution involve the university as a whole and
its community partners in supporting the mission of the PDS? Presenters
will describe strategies used by Morgan State University and Baltimore
City Public Schools to create and manage PDS partnerships which maxi-
mize the resources of both. Presenters will share articulation agreements
and describe a variety of ways in which key PDS stakeholders (the
university PDS coordinator and the local school system PDS contact) use
limited resources to achieve common goals (Essentials 6 and 9). A
description of strategies used to involve those outside the immediate PDS
to meet the needs of the partners will be provided (Essential 1).



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                         Moving Forward With Assessment
                         Nancy Norris-Bauer, William Paterson University
                         Martha Mobley, Kean University


                               The adoption of the NCATE PDS standards in 2000 established a
                         framework for PDS assessment. The goal was to have standards which
                         addressed applicant quality, candidate and graduate performance, and
                         unit operations. The goals of those standards and the reality of actually
                         implementing an effective assessment system is the challenge for institu-
                         tions of higher education who have not one or two PDS relationships, but
                         a larger network of twenty or more schools.
                               Most work related on assessment has focused on candidate perfor-
                         mance or the performance of P-12 students in PDS schools compared to
                         non-PDS schools. Developing AND implementing an assessment system
                         for networks of Professional Development Schools are parallel goals for
                         two metropolitan universities committed to preparing educators for urban-
                         rim districts. PDSs at both institutions are established creating multiple
                         opportunities for developing and implementing successful protocols and
                         expectations while addressing basic competencies of prepared teacher
                         candidates, assessment of professors in residence, teacher satisfaction,
                         examination of site support, and impact on K-12 student learning.
                               In an era of accountability, school districts providing financial
                         support for PDS relationships want to be involved in the development of
                         assessment systems and protocols. All stakeholders have a vested
                         interest in developing instruments which provide reliable data and docu-
                         mentation while not becoming too detailed to maintain over time.
                               This session will present some protocols currently being used by
                         two different institutions with large networks of Professional Develop-
                         ment Schools.


                         Moving Forward With Technology: Sharing
                         PDS Best Practices At The Local And State
                         Level
                         Judy Beiter, Anne Arundel County Public Schools
                         Donna Culan, Howard County Public School System
                         Jeanne Imbriale, Baltimore County Public Schools
                         Maggie Madden and Cheri Wittmann, Maryland State Department of
                         Education
                         Barbara Onofrey, Mount St. Mary’s University


                               PDS practitioners (representing schools, school systems, higher
                         education institutions, and state department of education) have come
                         together to use technology to communicate within their PDSs and with
                         other PDS practitioners statewide (Essential 7). At the school system level,
                         use of technology has broadened the outreach and scope of individual
                         partnerships, connecting them across higher education institutions (Es-
                         sential 1). Presenters will describe uses of technology to facilitate commu-
                         nication about best practices. At the state level, Maryland sponsors
                         meetings for school and university partners in various parts of the state
                         (Essential 1). Stakeholders indicated a need for “hybrid” communication,
                         combining face-to-face and electronic meetings (Essential 3). A team
                         representing the state department of education, higher education, and

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school systems collaborated to develop a process, using Elluminate video
conferencing software, to facilitate statewide discussion and sharing
among PDS practitioners. Presenters will describe the developmental
process, possible uses, and lessons learned from early implementation.


PDS Re-Defined: Making Our PDS Work
Purposeful
Cathy J. Siebert and Peggy Lewis, Ball State University


       Creating, maintaining, and growing a successful Professional Devel-
opment School Network has proven to be a complex challenge for many
schools, colleges, and departments of education. The Ball State University
network has accomplishments to relate, lessons learned to share, and plans
for continued growth to discuss.
       Reflecting on our first decade, we consider the context of our next
phase of work as “PDS Redefined.” One major realization is that our PDS
work needs to be more purposeful. To this end, we are re-framing and
constructing a new model for network reporting.
       Annual goals at each site are now set to respond to NCATE PDS
Standards. Periodic site reviews will assess the strength and relative health
of network partnerships through self-evaluation and collaborative discus-
sions. This site visit provides a forum for discussing the partnership and
revealing potential next-steps. The Nine Essentials presents a platform for
this discussion and for revisions in partnership agreements that are more
connected to a PDS initiative that directly impacts P-16 learning.
       The outcomes of this re-defined structure will provide us with
specific evidence to support policy changes at local and state levels. Our
partners will be able to use the data to answer the questions, “What does
it mean to us to be a Professional Development School?” and “How do we
document increased student achievement as a direct result of our PDS
efforts?” By sharing our story and network plans, we anticipate discussion
and dialogue among session participants.


Pitfalls And Positives Of Creating A PDS: What
Steps Are Necessary In Creating And
Managing A PDS?
Melanie Hurley, Black Hills State University


       The creation of PDS partnerships is not linear in design; rather it
involves orchestrated agreements happening simultaneously with all
participants. In July of 2007, I was hired to redesign the senior year at Black
Hills State University. We decided to move the College of Education’s
senior year into a PDS model. Little information is available providing
institutions with examples of contracts, structures, or criterions, nor what
structures should be in place to establish and sustain the PDS mission.
       This proposal is designed to provide participants an overview of the
NCATE PDS Standards and how these effect the development of the PDS.
Participants will walk through step by step: how to create a PDS before the
PDS is launched, criteria for clinical faculty, criteria and contracts for
school districts, organization of a PDS governing committee, structures of


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                         the PDS with methods schedules, professional development, and PDS
                         research questions. Participants will learn how structures assist in deter-
                         mining professional development to sustain communication and gover-
                         nance once the PDS is launched. Participants will leave the session with
                         a jump start on how to develop and implement a PDS. Examples of sample
                         contracts, PDS research, and a sample of a PDS handbook will be shown.
                         Designing on-going governance, reflection, and communication in PDS
                         partnerships cannot be an afterthought, rather foreseeing the future with
                         a vision of what the PDS work can do, and this must begin during the PDS
                         development and continue throughout the life of the partnership.


                         Strategies For Setting Up Mentors And Interns
                         For A Successful PDS Experience
                         Cindy Cowan and Christine McDonald, Park Forest Elementary School
                         Jennifer Tranell, Panorama Village Elementary School
                         Kristen Dewitt and Susan Lunsford, Penn State University


                                In the past ten years, we in the PDS at Penn State have learned what
                         is needed for interns and mentors to have a successful year. Providing
                         support and strategies to ensure a positive start to the new school year is
                         essential. We understand that it is a commitment toward fostering a strong
                         relationship between the mentor and intern. A proactive approach to
                         building this rapport involves providing opportunities and tools to em-
                         power both parties for a successful PDS experience.
                                Mentor preparation suggestions include:
                                 • A PDS guide for mentors
                                 • Fall, winter and spring mentor workshops and retreats
                                 • Professional development opportunities
                                 • Ongoing communication through monthly mentor meetings and
                                    monthly stakeholders meetings
                                 • Ongoing support from Professional Development Associates
                                Intern preparation suggestions include:
                                 • A two-week Jump Start orientation program
                                 • Year-long professional development through methods courses
                                    and seminars
                                 • Ongoing communication through weekly intern meetings and
                                    weekly reflective journaling assignments
                                 • Ongoing support from Professional Development Associates
                                This session will focus on two areas:
                                 • Strategies and ongoing support for preparing mentors that
                                    include roles, expectations, and tips for the classroom partner-
                                    ship
                                 • Strategies and ongoing support for preparing interns with the
                                    qualities needed for a successful PDS experience and beyond




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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Sustaining A School District-University
Collaborative: Supporting Mentors Through A
Clinical Faculty Liaison
Kathleen Sillman and James Nolan, Penn State University


       In 2001, a collaborative was formed between Penn State University
and Bellefonte Area School District. The university had already estab-
lished a PDS with the State College Area School District, closer in proximity,
but it was serving less than 20% of the teacher education candidates. At
the time, I was employed by the Bellefonte Area School District and had
just completed a doctoral program, but I was currently on leave and at the
university. Through discussions with the school superintendent, the
director of field experiences at the university, and me, the Bellefonte
Collaborative was established. The goal of this partnership was to identify
research-based benefits of the existing PDS and apply those to the new
partnership while using available resources to sustain it. A clinical faculty
position was created for me where I was to serve as a school-university
liaison. In this position, I continued to be employed by the school district,
with the university paying an honorarium to the school district to fill my
position with a first-year teacher.
       This presentation will focus on the role that I play in this partnership,
including teaching university courses, supervising pre-service teachers
in the same classroom with the same mentor over the entire school year,
training mentor teachers in an induction program, and teaching graduate-
level courses onsite as requested, one being a course to become a more
effective mentor. The opportunities and challenges of the liaison role will
be examined.


Teacher Education Is Everybody’s Business:
The Continuing Development Of A Professional
Development High School
Jewell E. Cooper, Carl Lashley, and Stephanie Kurtts, University of North
Carolina Greensboro
Joseph Yeager and Christine Ricci, Northern Guilford High School


       The purpose of this presentation is to describe the ongoing efforts
in the development of a comprehensive Professional Development High
School (PDHS) at Northern Guilford High School. More specifically, this
session responds to Question #3: What is involved in the creation and
managing of a PDS?
       Research is scant concerning the particulars of creating and using
a PDS partnership to prepare high school students for the 21St century
AND as an environment for the enhancement of the purposes of a PDS.
Additionally, helping teacher education become everybody’s business -
specifically, the active participation of members of the College of Arts and
Sciences, the School of Music, and the School of Health and Human
Performance, along with the School of Education - has been touted as one
of the most difficult ventures of collaboration in institutions of higher
education nationwide. In this presentation, the participants will chronicle
the activities completed during the fourth year of planning and actual
implementation of the comprehensive Professional Development High


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                         School. In an attempt to clearly answer Question #3, participants will first
                         share how they prepared higher education faculty for the PDS model in a
                         high school setting. Second, they will share their efforts related to
                         candidate preparation, inservice teacher professional development (in-
                         cluding the K-16 math initiative), collaborative research projects and
                         publications, shared resources (including university and school-based
                         management), and evaluation data results.


                         The Dream Team: Challenges And Lessons
                         Learned Establishing A New PDS At The
                         Middle Level
                         Antonio Rael and Kimberly Izumo, Fremont Professional Development
                         Middle School
                         Sherri Strawser, University of Nevada Las Vegas


                                Four years ago, the Clark County School District (CCSD) and the
                         University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) committed to shared responsi-
                         bility for continuous teacher education improvement and reform to pro-
                         mote increased P-12 student learning. School district-university partner-
                         ships that utilize a PDS model primarily have focused on elementary
                         schools. However, the nine required essentials of a PDS provide a rich
                         opportunity for joint participation to enhance middle level teacher prepa-
                         ration, promote student learning, and close the achievement gap. In 2008,
                         the John C. Fremont Middle School was restructured and joined the
                         partnership as a Professional Development School.
                                This session will focus on the challenges and lessons we have
                         learned over the course of the year as the first middle school in the
                         University of Nevada Las Vegas/Clark County School District Profes-
                         sional Development School partnership. Participants will leave with knowl-
                         edge of the steps taken by the stakeholders to cultivate a collaborative
                         middle school partnership emphasizing high quality teacher education,
                         sustained professional development, and joint participation in research.
                         Participants will be encouraged to share ideas and experiences with the
                         presenters and collaboratively discuss issues that may arise as the PDS
                         middle school partnership continues.


                         Third Times A Charm: The Birth Of Three
                         PDS Partnerships Of One Professor
                         Denise Hill, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi


                               Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and the Corpus Christi
                         Independent School District embrace a thriving Professional Develop-
                         ment School partnership including six elementary school partnerships.
                         Three of the Fall 2008 partnerships were initiated by Dr. Denise Hill,
                         Associate Professor of Teacher Education.
                               The first of the three PDS partnerships to be discussed includes
                         Schanen Estates Elementary, an elementary school serving approximately
                         500 students, 72.3% Hispanic and 68.6% economically disadvantaged.
                         This PDS was initiated and has been sustained by Dr. Hill since Fall 2002.
                         Since 2004, Schanen Estates has experienced two principals, four assistant
                         principals, and six counselors, and a faculty turnover of 68%. Today, ten

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

of its twenty-five faculty members have previously served as PSTs at
Schanen Estates.
       In Fall 2004, Dr. Hill imitated the PDS partnership with the CCISD
Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC), an EC3-Grade 5 dual lan-
guage elementary located on the campus of TAMUCC. The ECDC serves
approximately 180 students, 88.4% Hispanic and 54.1% economically
disadvantaged. Today, Ms. Mary Beth Tierce sustains that PDS relation-
ship.
       In 2005, a new CCISD elementary school was opened, Faye Webb
Elementary. Its principal had been the assistant principal at Schanen
Estates during its first two years as a PDS partner, along with nine of its
faculty members. They knew the value of the PDS relationship and
requested its own PDS partnership. Dr. Hill initiated the partnership in Fall
2005 and today Dr. Karen Paciotti continues that partnership. The cre-
ations and program development of all three partnerships will be dis-
cussed.


Three-Way Sharing: PDS Day On Campus
Anita Reynolds and Terry Mullins, Concord University


        An effective PDS partnership requires active involvement of all PDS
constituents. Providing a medium through which university faculty, P-12
educators, and teacher candidates can share instruction, information, and
input is paramount to the goals of the PDS partnership. And, if this medium
is implemented early in the teacher candidate’s preparation, this partner-
ship between P-12 and the university to improve educational practices
becomes an inherent part of the teacher candidate’s educational paradigm.
As a result, teacher candidates enter the teaching field with the expecta-
tions and anticipations of teaching P-12 as a partner with teacher education
programs in higher education and sharing information that ultimately leads
to enhanced preparation of future teachers and more effective instruction
in the P-12 classroom.
        The implementation of an on-campus PDS forum bi-annually has
provided such a medium for our PDS. The “PDS Day on Campus” provides
an opportunity for sharing between university faculty, P-12 educators, and
teacher candidates enrolled in professional education courses. This
session will provide participants with information on how this forum helps
fulfill the goals of the PDS, the agenda followed for PDS Day on Campus,
the key elements and goals of the forum, and the beneficial outcomes from
the meetings. Perspectives from university faculty, P-12 educators, and
teacher candidates on the outcomes of the forum will be presented. Also,
based on past outcomes, future plans for the biannual forum will be shared.


Using NCATE Standards To Improve Your
PDS
Susan Steaffens, Petersen PDS
Maureen Stout, Paradise PDS
Pamela Campbell, University of Nevada Las Vegas


     Petersen PDS and Paradise PDS have both utilized the NCATE
Standards for Professional Development Schools to assess where they are


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                         now and to develop goals to advance their schools. This session will
                         discuss two different formats that were used to include stakeholders in this
                         process. In addition, they will discuss how they used these findings when
                         developing each school’s School Improvement Plan. The meshing of these
                         two processes was important in the growth of these schools. It also
                         provided the stakeholders with a better understanding of what being a
                         Professional Development School means.
                               The NCATE standards address five developmental guidelines in the
                         areas of learning community, accountability and quality assurance, col-
                         laboration, diversity and equity, and structures, resources, and roles. The
                         levels assessed include beginning, developing, at standard, and leading.


                         Working Toward A Formal Agreement
                         Cynthia L. Gissy and Greg Boso, West Virginia University at Parkersburg


                                Adding a new Professional Development School to an existing
                         partnership is not a simple matter. This session will share the stages that
                         West Virginia University at Parkersburg follows. From piloting the partner-
                         ship to signing the formal document, each phase will be discussed in detail.
                         Teachers, administrators, and faculty all play an important role in devel-
                         oping a new partnership. All stakeholder roles and responsibilities will be
                         detailed and how decisions are made will be included. Forms and copies
                         of agreements will be shared. Official signing ceremony for the culminating
                         activity will be documented in an interactive presentation.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Q UESTION #4: W HAT DOES IT TAKE TO
RUN A PDS DAY - TO - DAY AND TO SUSTAIN
IT OVER TIME ?


A Day In The Life Of A Professional
Development Middle School
Lisa White-McNulty, University of St. Francis
Kimberly Pfoutz, Victoria Pelton, Bill Benoit, and Jaculin Taylor-Nowak,
Dirksen Junior High School


       Beginning in 2003, the University of St. Francis joined with two
elementary schools in Joliet District 86 to form the Joliet Professional
Development Schools Partnership (JPDSP). The purpose of the JPDSP is
to strengthen the collaborative relationships between the university and
the P-12 schools it serves. In 2006, we began exploring a partnership with
a middle school in the district.
       This presentation highlights some of the many activities that are now
part of the everyday life of Dirksen Junior High as a result of its partnership
with the university. For example, we will discuss teacher candidates in
inclusion classrooms, the Lesson Plan Handbook, math journals,
multicultural field trips, JPDSP meetings, and action research projects.
Activities such as these serve to sustain the partnership for the benefit of
students, teacher candidates, and faculty and staff at the respective
institutions.
       In addition, this presentation will offer some history on the forging
of the partnership between the university and Dirksen Junior High. We
offer a look at some of the challenges and opportunities of thriving as a
middle school in an urban, high-needs K-8 district, and how those
challenges and opportunities are being addressed to meet each partner’s
needs. We will also discuss our respective roles - principal, teacher,
university supervisor, and faculty - as we work to sustain the partnership.


A PDS Partnership – More Than A “Family
Affair!”
Joseph Oliverio, Worthington Elementary School
Paula Oliverio, Belmont Elementary School
Cynthia Gissy, West Virginia University at Parkersburg


       Two people: a husband and a wife. Both educators: one a principal
and one a first grade teacher. Two different schools: one established as a
PDS and one wanting to join and just beginning the journey. What are the
characteristics of a thriving PDS and what does it look like to an outsider
just wanting to participate? This session will deal with the “Partnership’s
Project” at West Virginia University-Parkersburg and how it has affected
this couple and the schools and students they represent. Last year you
were told of how a particular PDS relationship was “Pretty Darn Special.”
Now, come and find out just how special and how this story continues.
From early on in their marriage, they wanted the best for the students in
their care and through the philosophy and vision of this particular PDS,



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                         they can achieve this goal and make this educational endeavor a “family
                         affair.”
                                See where college faculty come into this “Family Affair” and how
                         dedication to a common cause define both formal and informal roles. See
                         how a variety of resources are used across the school-university con-
                         tinuum and what rewards and recognitions are possible.


                         Adding To The Plate: High School PDS Sites
                         And Multiple Reform Initiatives
                         Marc Turner, Blythewood High School
                         Barbara Holbrook, University of South Carolina
                         Roy Blakeney, Dreher High School
                         Kimberly Scott, White Knoll High School


                                One problem facing high schools is the never-ending rain of reform
                         initiatives coming from national, state, and local levels. It can be difficult
                         to recruit teachers and administrators for the PDS when the staff is already
                         overwhelmed by the school’s commitment to the most recent educational
                         reform programs in order to meet the demands of accountability legislation.
                                High schools in the USC PDS Ntwork have worked together to
                         identify common issues in the reform agenda of the network and their
                         respective schools. PDS leaders from Blythewood, Dreher, and White
                         Knoll high schools will present an instrument that highlights the similarity
                         of the agendas of the National Network for Educational Renewal, High
                         Schools That Work, and Smaller Learning Communities. This work endeav-
                         ors to keep faculty focused on successful educational strategies and not
                         on the various programs that these strategies serve.


                         An Effective Belief In PDS
                         Kitty Brant and Dana Moore, University of Central Missouri


                                What are the most effective ways in assisting pre-service teachers
                         in their preparation for teaching? Why do some beginning teachers
                         succeed, while other beginning teachers struggle? By empowering teach-
                         ers to be the leaders of their own learning and customizing the nature and
                         immediacy of training, transfer and application of newly learned skills into
                         classroom practice is far more assured (Zepeda, 1999).
                                University of Central Missouri early childhood, elementary, and
                         middle school majors must complete the PDS block the semester prior to
                         their student teaching. The third school district brought into the PDS
                         program is in its fifth year and has experienced much success. The goal of
                         this PDS site is to continue to provide PDS pre-service teachers additional
                         correspondence along with their weekly classroom contact with PDS
                         practitioners by networking via technology to validate that what they are
                         being taught is applicable in a “real” classroom.
                                Our belief in an effective PDS is for all to participate on an ongoing
                         basis to reflect on their implementation of chosen strategies, to expand a
                         collegial conversation about instruction, and to share reflective discus-
                         sions about classroom practice and student results.
                                In summary, the primary goal of any staff development plan should
                         be to improve student performance. By creating communities of educators

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that are collectively responsible and accountable for student learning, and
who find collective energy in the joy of working together to reach common
ends. Professionals, both practitioners and pre-service teachers, who are
engaged in staff development, can learn much from research, reflective
practice, and from each other.


Building Stronger PDS Relationships Through
Accreditation: Before, During, And After
Laura Corbin Frazier, Barbara Onofrey, and Stacey Brown-Hobbs, Mount St.
Mary’s University
Linda Civetti, Frederick County Public Schools


       This presentation will discuss the growth and development of a PDS
network through the accreditation process. It will summarize five years of
PDS activity before, during, and after an initial NCATE/Maryland state
team visit. Highlighted will be the formal PDS agreements through system-
wide and school-based memoranda of understanding, organization and
governance structures, collaborative initiatives, and recognition and
rewards for all participants.
       PDS standards guided the preparation of university and school
system stakeholders from initial meetings to final debriefings. The present-
ers will share sample artifacts from elementary and secondary school site
visits as well as from the university.


Changing Roles, Changing Structure, And
Keeping PDS Work Alive
Linda Taylor, Ball State University
Paula Morris, Huffer Memorial Children’s Center


       When a Professional Development School relationship has been in
effect for a period of time, change is bound to occur. Huffer Memorial
Children’s Center has been an early childhood PDS in the Ball State
University network for ten years. Changes at the early childhood program
level include liaisons and site council members, as well as the executive
director of the program. Changes from the university include liaisons and
the PDS network director. How consistency was maintained and how
change has been handled will be discussed as university and program
members share how the relationship has been sustained and grown over
a ten-year period. Roles of members will be discussed along with how the
structure of the site council has changed over time.




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                         Children’s Literature As Instructional
                         Resources: Selecting And Interpreting Cultural
                         Literature In The Classroom
                         Jane Harstad and Doris Grove, Penn State University
                         Debbie Patrick, Park Forest Elementary School
                         Laura Barthmaier, Easterly Parkway Elementary School


                                While most of the student teaching interns who join our PDS
                         partnership enroll already suspicious of textbooks, unfortunately they fall
                         into the trap of making carte blanche generalizations about entire resource
                         categories as being simply good or bad, right or wrong. Not yet a stance
                         informed by actual practice, they cling to the “correct answer” they
                         “learned” from their coursework prior to student teaching. As any prac-
                         ticing classroom teacher can attest, most resources have shortcomings,
                         but these can also provide a springboard to provoke complementary
                         lessons and opportune activities with great potential. Student teaching,
                         particularly in the context of a year-long internship within an established
                         PDS partnership, provides an excellent opportunity for pre-service teach-
                         ers to wed their preconceptions of theory with practice - to develop a more
                         informed and responsible relationship with a variety of instructional
                         resources.
                                For as skeptical as they may be of textbooks, many of our student
                         teaching interns enter their practicum comparatively oblivious to the
                         notion that many children’s books may be equally imperfect. In this
                         presentation we will share strategies and experiences with regard to
                         helping our student teaching interns recognize problematic matters of race,
                         class, and gender, as well as attempt to empower them to feel they can help
                         balance the scales of inequity or challenge prejudice with their own
                         instructional practice.


                         Collaborating Across Partnerships: Benefits
                         And Challenges
                         Barbara Owens and Jaci Webb-Dempsey, Fairmont State University
                         Diane Yendel-Hoppy and Sarah Steel, West Virginia University


                                As the number of school-university partnerships and Professional
                         Development School initiatives increases, there is also an increase in the
                         possibility of multiple higher education institutions to be engaged in
                         partnerships with the same school districts and, in some cases, the same
                         PDSs. Partnering across the institutional and cultural boundaries of higher
                         education and public schools to improve teacher preparation, professional
                         development, and teaching and learning has tremendous benefits for these
                         endeavors. However, the development of substantive and vital school-
                         university partnerships has also required partners on both sides of the
                         relationship to work through many challenges. When more than one
                         partnership operates across a set of common school districts and PDSs,
                         this “sharing” has the obvious potential to create additional benefits and
                         challenges. Benefits may include opportunities to pool scarce resources
                         to support professional development and to develop a richer, broader
                         collective knowledge base about strategies for improving teacher prepa-
                         ration, professional development, teaching and learning, and sustaining
                         partnerships. Challenges may include competing agendas, increased

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needs for communication and coordination of efforts, and significant
differences in institutional structures for growing and sustaining PDS
work. This session will offer a situated discussion of possible benefits and
challenges in the context of two overlapping partnerships: one a mature,
well-established partnership at a large land grant university and the other
a developing partnership at a small regional university.


Comparing Pre-Service Teachers’ Perceptions
Of Their Learning Across PDS Contexts
Jason Jude Smith and Diane Yendol-Hoppey, West Virginia University


       Throughout teacher education programs nationwide, program de-
sign should facilitate pre-service teacher learning across a multitude of
domains. While those who create programs may feel that their designs
attend to these domains, it is important to consider how, and to what extent,
those actually enrolled in these programs perceive their own construction
of knowledge. To this end, we conducted a survey last year of pre-service
teachers in a PDS-based “pre-internship experience” as part of their fourth
year (of five) program requirements. We used quantitative data analysis
techniques supported by analysis of complimentary qualitative data to
pinpoint to what extent these participants felt their host teachers, field
advisors, and course instructors facilitated their constructing of knowl-
edge across an array of learning domains. Portions of these findings were
presented at the 2008 Professional Development Schools National Confer-
ence.
       This year we administered a similar survey to pre-service teachers
in a different program which also has a fourth year (of five) PDS-based
placement. We used quantitative techniques to comparatively analyze the
responses from these two surveys in an effort to denote differences across
the two contexts. We then looked at the construction of the two programs
in an effort to determine the potential causes for differences between the
two samples and the implications these differences have for PDS programs
nationwide. Our presentation will provide highlights of this analysis,
focusing on our conclusions and how these conclusions might facilitate
program design and evaluation processes in other PDS networks.


Daily Focus, Strong Collaboration - Moving Us
Forward
Sheila R. Gloer, Baylor University
Betty Charlton, G. W. Carver Academy Middle School


      Baylor University and Carver Middle School have always focused
on the NCATE Standards to guide the partnership and now include the
Nine Essentials of PDS Work to further evaluate our program. Baylor and
Carver each have a primary mission to educate our students to be the best
they can; but both have the secondary mission to uphold the other’s
primary mission. Using this cohesion of our mission statements as a guide
makes this partnership stronger and allows us to work together, achieving
learning for both Baylor candidates and K-12 students. Some of the ways
we are achieving this are enumerated below:



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                                • Carver hosts a shadow study for sophomore novice candidates
                                   to better understand adolescent development and diversity.
                                • Seminars for junior level associates and senior interns are hosted
                                   on the Carver campus so candidates can easily be taken into
                                   classrooms to observe what is being discussed and so Carver
                                   teachers can easily demonstrate “Best Practice” teaching.
                                • The university and Carver share funds to send candidates and
                                   mentors to conferences, for book study texts, and for salaries.
                                • Carver, Baylor, and candidates share information from confer-
                                   ences, plan action research, and analyze the results.
                                • Steering and Campus Decision Making committees provide a
                                   forum for the collaboration of Carver, Baylor, candidates, and
                                   community members to reflect, self assess, and implement yearly
                                   goals.
                               In this presentation, the Carver site-based coordinator and the
                         Baylor liaison discuss how shared resources and daily collaboration
                         sustain this partnership in growth, encouraging research and learning for
                         all.


                         Deliberately Using The PDS to Prepare Future
                         Teacher Educators
                         Bernard Badiali, Rebecca Burns, Doris Grove, and James Nolan, Penn State
                         University


                               Using the conceptual framework from the Carnegie Project on the
                         Education Doctorate (CPED), this session describes how a PDS can
                         incorporate structures and activities that work to deliberately prepare
                         aspiring teacher educators for work in school-university partnerships.
                         Presenters explain and engage participants in conversations around the
                         following issues:
                                • What are the signature pedagogies of a PDS?
                                • How has the notion of apprenticeship been changed from “ap-
                                  prenticed to” into “apprenticed with?”
                                • How can the PDS use the practice of “professional rotations” in
                                  preparing future teacher educators?
                                • What would constitute an improved “capstone” experience for
                                  PDS doctorates?
                                • Why is PDS the ultimate “laboratory of practice” for future
                                  teacher educators?


                         Effective Professional Development In Middle
                         School Mathematics Education: Sustainability
                         Within And Beyond A PDS
                         Pam Hilgert, Rockford Public Schools #205
                         Portia Downey, Mary Shafer, and Helen Khoury, Northern Illinois University


                                 Project REAL initiated, over a span of five years in a large urban
                         school district (Rockford School District #205) in partnership with North-
                         ern Illinois University, a successful PDS at RESA, the largest middle school


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in Rockford. Components of a successful PDS as identified by NCATE
(2001) and NAPDS (2008) were transparent at RESA. In particular, the
middle school mathematics teachers immersed themselves in long-term
research-based professional development in middle school mathematics
education. With the support of administrators, teachers implemented
change in their instructional practices, they assumed new teacher-leader-
ship roles, they supported and coached each other as needed, they
developed into a glued nucleus that sustained the health of the PDS, and
an open invitation was extended to the mathematics teacher educators to
the student-centered classrooms. Improved and sustained student math-
ematics achievement emerged over the past three years at RESA.
       This presentation will focus on having involved educators in this
PDS journey identify and discuss formal and informal relationships formed
and actions taken (1) within the PDS, that were effective in sustaining
teachers’ professional growth and increased student mathematics achieve-
ment, and (2) beyond the PDS, at the district and university levels that led
to the support and development of a new leading master degree program
in Middle School Mathematics Education. The following questions will be
answered: (1) What did it take to sustain an effective PDS over time at
RESA, and (2) What are the sustainable benefits that emerged beyond this
PDS in Rockford School District and at Northern Illinois University?


Experiencing PDS
Patty Nugent, Sherrie Pardieck, Robert Wolffe, and Helja Antola Crowe,
Bradley University
JoNancy Warren, Illinois State University
Helen Khoury, Northern Illinois University


       At the heart of Professional Development School partnerships is the
lived experience of the people doing the work, those who experience the
curriculum and foster collaborative school/university relationships. Three
Illinois Professional Development School partnerships will discuss the
structure and sustainability of PDS partnerships. Continued conversa-
tions are helpful for beginning, developing, and mature school/university
relationships.
       The panel will address various aspects of the PDS experience from
an individual’s personality, skills, talents, communication approaches,
reflective practices, modeling dispositions that support relationship build-
ing and behaviors that encourage and empower others to participate.
Whether individuals come from a university or school, their personal
attributes, interactions, and roles affect the way the partnership develops.
       We will address challenges ranging from multi-tasking and time
management issues, to personality differences and issues from teamwork
requirements to the dynamics of school culture. Part of these experiences
might hold hidden agendas as well as unarticulated expectations and
“experience of voice” within PDS relationships. The willingness to explore
possibilities, flexibility, and the broadness of the personnel’s interests
contribute to the sustainability of the partnerships.
       The panel will address the dynamics of pre-scheduled planning
meetings to the incidental interactions, dialogue in school hallways, to the
development of PDS personnel’s attributes. We will share examples of how
preconceptions turn into accurate realities and reflect the changes in
public school environments, resources, and priorities for professional


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                         development practices. The intent of the panel presentation is to continue
                         dialogue that advances development of partnerships and strengthens the
                         work of Professional Development Schools.


                         Factors That Limit Success: Four Years Of
                         Research On Why Interns Fail
                         Bernard Badiali and Kristen Dewitt, Penn State University
                         Deana Washell, Park Forest Elementary School
                         Amy Hawbaker, Park Forest Middle School


                               This study of struggling interns began in 2004 as a result of
                         conversations during team planning meetings about one or two chronic
                         cases of poor performance by pre-service teachers in a Professional
                         Development School. As responsible instructors in the PDS, we wondered
                         why some of our students who appeared to be very qualified struggled to
                         succeed and how, if possible, we might adjust the program to avoid this
                         problem in the future. This presentation traces the systematic study of
                         struggling interns over a four-year period. It uncovers the nature of
                         interns’ struggles from three viewpoints: the interns, their mentors, and
                         their supervisors. The investigation sought to answer the following
                         questions:
                                • Why do some interns struggle?
                                • What is the nature of their struggle?
                                • How do mentors describe interns’ struggle?
                                • How do supervisors describe interns’ struggle?
                                • How do the interns describe their struggle?
                                • What are the context variables that contribute to their struggle?
                                • What are the personal variables that contribute to their struggle?
                                • What are the relationship variables that contribute to their
                                   struggle?


                         From An “F” School To An “A”: The Journey
                         Of One Urban Professional Development
                         School Moving Forward With Beliefs Intact
                         Cathy O’Farrell, Fred Nelson, and Donna Keenan, University of North
                         Florida
                         Michele Floyd-Hatcher and Kathleen Witsell, West Jacksonville Elementary
                         School


                               The presenters will trace the uneven history of one urban Profes-
                         sional Development School (UPDS) over the last seven years in which the
                         State Department of Florida awarded the school a grade of “F” in 2001 and
                         an “A” in 2008. This UPDS is part of a larger urban Professional Develop-
                         ment School enterprise involving three urban elementary schools, one
                         middle school, and one university. It is a highly successful endeavor, four
                         years ago winning the Association of Teacher Educators’ Distinguished
                         Program in Teacher Education Award. We will be addressing Question #
                         4, What does it take to run a PDS day-to-day and to sustain it over time?




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

        At the outset of our UPDS experiences, and even when we were
labeled an “F” school, three components were firmly in place.
        a) formal/informal roles played by both university and P-12 faculty,
including a Resident Clinical Faculty (RCF) member who supervises
interns and beginning teachers and a Professor-in-Residence who works
with teachers on best practices;
        b) dedicated and shared resources across the school-university
continuum, which includes both the university and school district funding
the RCF position; and
        c) rewards and recognition structures which acknowledge the work
of all participants including released time for the Professor-in –Residence
and travel for RCF and teachers to present their work.
        Additionally, we have always believed in ongoing collaboration in
which we work through differences which occasionally arise through
different school/university cultures. Our story will by told through inter-
views with past and present students, administrators, teachers, RCFs, and
Professors-in-Residence.


From Good To Great: How Georgia State
Partners Moved PDS Work To What Really
Mutually Matters!
Gwen Benson, Dee Taylor, Susan Ogletree, Mary Ariail, and Shaila Philpot,
Georgia State University


       This session will address Question #4: What does it take to run a PDS
day-to-day and to sustain it over time? Participants will travel to focus
corners during this session to learn how Georgia State University’s five-
year grant P-12 university partners moved from a good PDS partnership to
a great partnership (to borrow Jim Collin’s corporate success concept).
Come and engage in finding the funding, looking at the baseline data that
significantly improved, engaging five urban school districts, and sustain-
ing it day-to-day and over the five-year period. Come learn:
        • how partners identified and nurtured PDS relationships (formal/
          informal roles played by both college/university and P-12 fac-
          ulty);
        • how boundary spanning positions (teacher candidates to teach-
          ers, p-12 administrators to university faculty, GRAS to P-12
          researchers, etc.) developed and were actualized to enhance PDS
          goal attainment and career accomplishments;
        • how partners dedicated and shared professional development
          expertise and critical resources across the school-university
          continuum;
        • how to ensure professors get effective candidate placements/get
          research and how schools get school improvement results;
        • how the PDS incorporated a structured annual PDS planning
          retreat and district-based PDS conferences for shared planning
          and input; and receive
        • hands-on examples of publications, website ideas, meaningful
          rewards to recognize the valued PDS work focusing on outcomes
          (for higher quality teaching and improved student achievement).



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                              Visit at least three focus corners, to receive GSU’s Map for PDS
                         Success CD.


                         He Said/She Said: A PDS Partnership From
                         Two Views
                         Richard S. Druggish, Concord University
                         Shirley Bourne, Mercer Elementary School


                                Practices that can form the basis for effective collaborative work
                         between universities and schools to support new collegial relationships
                         include talking about teaching, shared planning and teaching, and devel-
                         oping pedagogical skills. Over the past four years, these practices have
                         engaged a first grade teacher (she) and a university teacher educator (he)
                         in a journey to improve their craft and their understanding of the learning
                         of their students.
                                As a teacher educator, he had searched for ways to keep in touch with
                         the ever-changing classroom. In an effort to improve and to defend his
                         beliefs on teaching, he sought a classroom teacher who would talk about
                         teaching, share teaching experiences, and allow him opportunities to
                         teach, as well as offer critique. At the same time, she, a veteran and
                         successful first grade teacher of more than twenty-five years, was eager
                         to share her craft while simultaneously discovering more about the
                         ambiguous nature of teaching young learners. The PDS partnership
                         brought them together.
                                The collaboration began with classroom observations. It grew as
                         they participated in the planning and teaching of literacy lessons. It has
                         thrived on continued conversations about their teaching. The collabora-
                         tion has culminated into a full year of team teaching in the first grade
                         classroom.
                                The presentation will be their story. In an informal sharing, he/she
                         will trace this collaboration and share with the audience what they have
                         learned that has helped them become stronger and more confident in their
                         craft, in addition to strengthening the PDS partnership.


                         I Can Take Care of That!: Utilizing Teachers
                         As The Strength Of A PDS School
                         Christopher Irovando, Conackamack Middle School


                                This presentation will address the process and time spent on the day-
                         to-day operation of a PDS in the middle school setting. The participants
                         in this presentation will discuss the value of the PDS project (three years
                         old) for Conackamack Middle School and the roles defined by the school
                         staff to create and maintain a successful program. Working with Kean
                         University’s Center for Innovative Education and the New Jersey Consor-
                         tium of Middle Schools, Conackamack Middle School sought to identify
                         specific roles and responsibilities necessary to distribute leadership in a
                         PDS school. This presentation also discusses the “behind-the-scenes”
                         collaboration needed to address such needs as professional development,
                         recognizing accomplishments of both teaching candidates and veteran
                         teachers, and community outreach to support the PDS movement.



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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

      Our NJCMS PDS program noted that administration and delegation
of PDS issues is more effective when those who benefit are directly
involved. This presentation will inform participants on how our PDS
committee:
      1. Encourages professional development attendance and peer train-
ing
      2. Assists non-tenured staff with handling the daily responsibilities
of teaching
      3. Makes crucial decisions surrounding budgets, events, and pro-
fessional development
      4. Seeks to define a vision and purpose for the PDS community
      5. Supports the goals and vision of the building and district
      Discussions of established practices, as well as discussions of
future initiatives, will be provided.


If You Build It They Will Come: Creating And
Sustaining A PDS Partnership Outside Of The
University Community
Laurie A. Palmer, University of Delaware


       The University of Delaware/Milford School District Professional
Development School is a partnership originally created to serve students
in the southern part of the state who wanted to stay in their local community
for their college education and later to teach. This program was jointly
planned and continues to be run by both the university and school district.
In an attempt to create an innovative teacher preparation program, mem-
bers from both communities met to define the components of this program
and continue to jointly govern and sustain this partnership.
       Specific components of this partnership include university faculty
located on-site where they teach all junior and senior level courses, a
strong field experience of more than 1,500 hours in the classroom for
interns, integration of courses and assignments, courses assimilating
district curriculum into course content, variable credits with courses
taught over multiple semesters allowing interns to scaffold their knowl-
edge throughout their junior and senior years, joint professional develop-
ment, and an advisory board that continues to develop this partnership.
       In this session we will share the unique characteristics of our
partnership, discuss our origin and how we built our program with input
and support from the university and district communities, and what we do
to continue to support the work and growth of this PDS.




It’s All About The Tools . . .
Denise Barth, Gena Brigman, Pam Powell, Sally Catoe, and Beth Phillips,
North Springs Elementary School


      Come join our “construction team” for a lively blueprint of how to
build a solid PDS program from the ground up. We will address the “nuts


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         and bolts” issues, resources, benefits of collaboration, and special “de-
                         signer upgrades.” Because our school has been a part of a PDS relationship
                         for six years (in a district that has been involved for twenty years), we are
                         new enough to recall the details for making the foundation and experienced
                         enough to discuss the day-to-day maintenance and goal-setting neces-
                         sary to keep the program energized as it moves upward to new heights. We
                         invite you to examine a program that welcomes interns and supports their
                         efforts throughout their year-long internship in our school. We will
                         introduce ways to make the entire faculty a part of the program, even if they
                         do not choose or do not qualify to have a student intern. We will also
                         address how our district has institutionalized PDS as part of its overall
                         commitment to the teaching profession. Once a program is a part of the
                         school and district culture, finding ways to keep it energized can be a
                         challenge. We will share ideas about how that can be accomplished in a
                         variety of ways.


                         Keeping A Long Distance Relationship
                         Thriving: How To Make A Long Distance
                         Partnership Work
                         Renee Kerzman, Lynn Mahlum, Ron Messelt, Dean Mollerud, and Lisa
                         Staiger, Minnesota State University Moorhead
                         Jeff McCanna, Aldine Independent School District


                                Working with our partner district in Aldine, Texas, we have devel-
                         oped a virtual field experience in which MSUM’s teacher education majors
                         work with one of their bilingual elementary classrooms. MSUM students
                         have the opportunity to observe and teach within this distant classroom,
                         including one hour of teaching/observation time and one hour of mentorship
                         discussion with the classroom teacher.
                                Sharing of resources is part of this entire partnership. Each semester
                         MSUM instructors travel to Aldine to visit classrooms and cooperating
                         teachers including MSUM alumni. These visits are critical in the relation-
                         ship-building between partners. This partnership includes Aldine’s teach-
                         ers and/or administration traveling to MSUM to interact with students and
                         recruit student teachers and classroom teachers. Aldine personnel make
                         campus presentations to seminar students about diversity, teaching in
                         diverse settings, and economic diversity with a focus on poverty. Students
                         learn the surprising positives of this classroom challenge and are inspired
                         about their future as teachers, including opportunities that a district like
                         Aldine offers. It opens their hearts and eyes to a larger world, and the real
                         world of education outside our tri-state area.
                                Continued partnership growth includes a new one-week immersion
                         opportunity with education candidates traveling to Aldine to experience
                         diverse classrooms and culture. Additional discussions for growth in-
                         clude offering graduate courses and professional development opportu-
                         nities.
                                Presentation topics will discuss this unique, innovative partnership:
                                1. Student teaching
                                2. Teacher retention/induction
                                3. Professional development
                                4. Interactive distance learning
                                5. One week field experience

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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Keeping The Spirit Alive When The Torch Is
Handed Off
Denise Hill and Karen Paciotti, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi


       Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and the Corpus Christi
Independent School District embrace a thriving Professional Develop-
ment School partnership. One PDS relationship includes Schanen Estates
Elementary which serves approximately 500 students, of which 72.3% are
Hispanic and 68.6% are economically disadvantaged. This PDS was
initiated and has been sustained by Dr. Denise Hill since Fall 2002.
       Fall 2004 brought a new principal, assistant principal, and counselor.
Fall 2005 brought a new elementary school, Faye Webb Elementary. Its
principal was the assistant principal at Schanen Estates during the first two
years of its PDS partnership. Nine faculty members of Schanen Estates
transferred to Faye Webb, a faculty turnover of 68%. Since 2004, Schanen
Estates has experienced two principals, four assistant principals, and six
counselors.
       The one constant at Schanen Estates since 2004 has been its PDS
relationship with TAMUCC. Through numerous programs imitated by the
PDS partnership, student achievement has continued to improve. And
today, ten of its twenty-five faculty members have served as PSTs at
Schanen Estates and have been on the other side of the PDS relationship.
Today, these ten breathe hope and leadership into the lives of the young
pre-service teachers.
       The Faye Webb Elementary principal and faculty knew the value of
the PDS relationship as well and requested its own PDS partnership. Dr.
Karen Paciotti initiated the partnership in Fall 2007 and continues that
relationship today with innovative strategies in the classrooms. All PDS
programs and activities at Schanen Estates and Faye Webb will be
discussed.


Keys To Success: Essential Components For
Effective PDS Partnerships At Ohio University
Marcy Keifer Kennedy and Grace Essex, Ohio University
Michelle Chapman and Jenny Troutman, Chauncey Elementary School
Janet Idleman and Kate Faulkner, The Plains Elementary School
Melanie VonWahlde, West Elementary School
Katelyn Outcalt, East Elementary School


        The purpose of this presentation is to investigate what it means to
be a Professional Development School at Ohio University and the relation-
ship between the key structural roles that attribute to sustaining success-
ful programming year after year.
        The model to support the work of the PDS partnerships relies on
formally defined roles and responsibilities. These roles include the Teach-
ing Fellow, the Teacher Liaison from the PDS, the University Faculty
Coordinator, and the University Methods Instructor. The Teaching Fellow
is a licensed teacher who is completing a graduate degree. The Teaching
Fellow co-teaches with the Teacher Liaison to fulfill their graduate assis-
tant appointment. The Fellow is a valuable resource to help support the
work of the Teacher Liaison and University Faculty Coordinator as they


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                         work to provide classroom placements and mentoring for pre-service
                         teachers, engage in research projects, provide professional development
                         to the PDS staff, and help to facilitate programming for students in our
                         Professional Development Schools.
                               Informal roles are developed through the interactions of participants
                         as they plan and develop programming which benefits, rewards, and
                         recognizes all partners. Program attendees will be able to hear the perspec-
                         tive of all partners, including former PDS partnership students. The
                         program will also conclude with a question and answer session regarding
                         how the formal and informal resources are used to sustain our PDS
                         partnerships from year to year.


                         Leadership Roles In A PDS School: Providing
                         Something For Everyone
                         Gregory H. Moore, South Harrison High School


                                The effectiveness of partnership work is directly correlated to the
                         degree of ownership professional and support staff and administrators
                         have in program design and implementation. Professional staff on site is
                         the expert in assessing school and personnel needs and how to best meet
                         them. An effective method to garner and sustain this commitment is to
                         include as many stakeholders as possible at the Professional Development
                         School level in a vast array of responsibilities. This presentation explores
                         how active participation by stakeholders can keep a Professional Devel-
                         opment School active, effective, and productive.
                                Because any successful collaborative program is characterized by
                         several elements, participants are afforded a wide variety of opportunities
                         playing to their strengths and talents. How then can current leaders
                         integrate a school’s resources, power, and responsibilities to efficiently
                         maximize student achievement in a PDS setting? This presentation an-
                         swers that question by discussion the following:
                                • Specific activities in assessing and delivering staff development
                                   and in hosting and mentoring pre-service teachers
                                • Incentives to keep teachers actively involved and enthusiastic
                                • Growing new leaders
                                • Collaborating with higher education and community members
                                • Administrative support
                                • Benefits of having empowered stakeholders
                                Attendees to this presentation will also be invited to share informa-
                         tion about leadership roles and the division of power and resources within
                         their own partnership structures. Ideas and suggestions will be shared to
                         enhance leadership opportunities within individual schools and within
                         partnership collaborations.


                         Lessons Learned: Ten Years In PDS
                         Angelo R. Senese, East Stroudsburg University


                               The purpose of my presentation is to share with attendees the
                         successes and challenges faced with implementing and sustaining a
                         Professional Development School. I have the unique experience of being

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the principal of my school when East Stroudsburg University approached
me with the concept of a PDS ten years ago. The questions that needed to
be asked and answered and the logistics of operations were only a few of
the hurdles. Then as Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent, I
faced the challenges of sustaining the program. Now, I am a professor in
the PDS program and responsible for sustaining this relationship. The
lessons learned from these multiple perspectives provide a road map to
those facing PDS challenges.


Meeting The Challenge: Sustaining A
Secondary PDS
Donna Faith and Allison Weese, Middletown Middle School
Jo Ellen Smallwood and Ronald Ingram, Frostburg State University


       Great excitement and energy come with building the relationships,
communication, and agreements necessary in establishing a secondary
Professional Development School. The challenge is in sustaining this
same energy and commitment by all parties - the university, the local school
system, and the individual secondary school - on a day-to-day basis.
Middletown Middle School strives on a daily basis to make its PDS more
than an agreement on paper, more than a teacher candidate placement,
more than a nice-sounding concept. This means that every student is
aware of the school’s affiliation with Frostburg. Every parent is aware of
the PDS commitment. The community recognizes the value of the PDS
partnership. Staff members participate in collaboratively planned profes-
sional development. University instruction is influenced by the reality of
the public education classroom.
       In this session, PDS partners will share the strategies/activities that
Middletown Middle School has engaged in this school year to sustain and
enhance the positive PDS efforts recognized in the most recent NCATE
visit.


Mentors, Start Your Engines . . . Sustaining A
PDS Through Strong Mentoring
Mary Lange, Pekin School District 108
Jo Murphy, University of North Texas
Adrianne Ostermeier, Springfield School District 186
JoNancy Warren, Illinois State University


      Are your mentors on the right track? Mentoring is a must skill for
anyone hosting a pre-service teacher in the classroom. The driving force
behind every confident and growing intern is the mentor. Just as interns
need developing skills and practices to become effective teachers, mentors
need fundamental techniques. Topics of conversation will include the
selection of mentors, mentor-intern relationships, assumptions and expec-
tations of the mentoring role, and co-teaching strategies. Participants will
engage in dialogue about various ideas on how to raise the bar for
mentoring. Whether you are a university liaison, school district site
coordinator, principal, or PDS director, this presentation will give you
concrete suggestions for enhancing your mentoring program.



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                                The presentation will also address essential number three, as there
                         is a critical and ongoing need for effective mentoring. Participatory
                         dialogue and information that can be put into place right away in your PDS
                         will be highlighted. A basic outline to develop your own mentoring
                         professional development that will be relative to all mentors, veterans to
                         novice, will be articulated. Mentoring as an ongoing theme for your PDS
                         should provide guided learning activities that suggest practice, reflection,
                         and feedback, and should be embedded in a series of professional
                         development activities with PDS participants (NAPDS Essential # 3). Learn
                         best practices of mentoring from two PDS sites that have collaborated for
                         this presentation. The presenters have come together from Texas and
                         Illinois representing two established PDS.


                         Multi-Tasking To The Max: Functions,
                         Frustrations, And Rewards Of First-Year PDS
                         Coordinators
                         Sherri Strawser, University of Nevada Las Vegas
                         Kimberly Izumo, Fremont Professional Development Middle School


                                In the Fall of 2008, the John C. Fremont Middle School was restruc-
                         tured and became the first middle school in the University of Nevada Las
                         Vegas/Clark County School District Professional Development School
                         partnership. Three principal goals guide the UNLV/CCSD PDS partner-
                         ship: 1) joint participation in teacher education, 2) sustained continuous
                         professional development for university and partnership school staff, and
                         3) joint participation in field-based research. The guidance and input from
                         the coordinators at the elementary schools in the UNLV/CCSD PDS
                         partnership has been exceptional; however, the middle school structure
                         creates different expectations and functions that the coordinators must
                         address.
                                In this session, presenters will share a snapshot of the multiple
                         functions of both the university and site-based coordinators during the
                         initial year of a PDS in a highly diverse, urban, Title I middle school. They
                         will discuss how the multiple roles of a coordinator (for example, PDS Site
                         Coordinator + Learning Strategist + New Teacher Mentor + Department
                         Chair) can be handled and the elements they have found to be essential in
                         sustaining and improving the partnership. Session attendees will be
                         encouraged to contribute their ideas and experiences with the presenters
                         to help us nourish and further this special partnership.




                         Notes On A Successful Urban High School
                         Partnership - What We Learned From The
                         Students And How It Shaped The Future
                         James Kilbane and Arthur Maloney, Pace University


                               Located on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Pace University High
                         School is a partnership between Pace University’s School of Education,
                         the New York City Department of Education, and New Visions for Public
                         Schools.


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      Now in its fifth year, the universal free lunch school has successfully
graduated its first class and in doing so has established a strong academic
record of accomplishment and built an extraordinary school community. In
its short history the school has received considerable recognition for
success with underachieving youngsters and been profiled in the presti-
gious Hemphill Guide (2007) as one of New York’s top urban public high
schools. In no small part we believe that the school’s success has resulted
from the Professional Development School partnership with Pace’s School
of Education. During this session our team will provide an examination of
the school’s journey through the eyes of the first graduating class, their
parents, and the teachers and professors who participated in the formation
of the school from its inception. Our research produced several insights
about the development of a new school including those regarding the
school-university relationship, the challenges inherent in such a partner-
ship, and the wealth of opportunities we see for on-going reciprocal
professional relationships.
      As part of our presentation, our audience will have the opportunity
to examine first-person reflections from students and parents regarding the
evolution of the school. This interaction will provide a counterpoint to our
conclusions so that audience members may further reflect upon the
obstacles and opportunities of growing a Professional Development
School.


PB&J’S For P-16 Faculty
Kay Clawson and Mary Brown, West Liberty State College
Andy Garber, Warwood Middle School


       Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches for P-16 faculty sounds good,
but Preventing Burnout and Jumping Ship is what really needs to happen
for P-16 faculty in long term Professional Development School relation-
ships. Continuous PDS erodes enthusiasm if there is not relief or change
built into the relationship. The following questions will be discussed with
solutions offered during the presentation:
        • What is the relationship between comfort foods and collabora-
          tion between schools and the university system? This workshop
          will discuss the pros and cons of working in a PDS for many years.
          You will learn about different approaches within the same PDS
          system. Information will be provided on how PDS collaboration
          changes depending on whether it is an elementary or secondary
          school.
        • What are the ways to prevent burnout and jumping ship when a
          colleague is tired of PDS? Attendees will learn how to prevent
          burnout in a PDS. Each team member will share techniques used
          to alleviate the feeling of being expected to participate and
          unappreciated by the university and P-12 school system. Pre-
          senters represent a faculty liaison who has worked with two
          schools and five different principals, a P--12 administrator who
          has worked in two schools with three liaisons and 75 different
          teachers, and an administrative group who have worked together
          for ten years.
       PDS relationships are political and public. The participants need to
stay energized and involved to keep the collaboration vibrant. This
presentation will be a relaxing way to enjoy healthy PB&J’S.

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                         PDS Leaders: The Next Generation
                         Lyn Krenz, Asa Packer Elementary School
                         Stacy Leon, Governor Wolf Elementary School
                         Natalie Kvacky and Danielle Dos Santos, Donegan Elementary School
                         Dawn Roman, Lincoln Elementary School


                                For the past five years, the three PDS sites in the ESU-BASD PDS
                         have been fine-tuning their grass roots leadership, working out the
                         nuances of leading from the front lines of the PDS. This year, we have
                         experienced a loss of some of those front line leaders, two in school
                         changes and one temporarily out on maternity leave. Change theory did
                         not bode any good tidings, but with careful planning and upfront aware-
                         ness, this new generation is in full swing. This challenge, known to us back
                         in the spring, allowed us to give some further thought to the relationship
                         of the school and university liaisons, as well as the relationships that have
                         been created across the partnership and among the building liaisons. We
                         have nearly started fresh with these new liaisons and advisors, but have
                         adapted well. Given the mentoring from the one remaining liaison and those
                         who have just left but want to stay involved, there have not been too many
                         occasions where we have gotten lost in the woods. Part of this early
                         success came from selecting individuals who have otherwise been active
                         in the PDS and are eager to further its cause. New clubs are being formed,
                         new fundraisers and new ideas are cropping up to bring us all closer
                         together. These three sites are pacing their change and thinking through
                         ways to work together. Not always a straight line, but the path has been
                         set for this new generation of leaders.


                         Present At The Creation: Building A High
                         School PDS Site
                         Marc Turner, Blythewood High School
                         Barbara Holbrook, University of South Carolina
                         Roy Blakeney, Dreher High School
                         Kimberly Scott, White Knoll High School


                               The success of PDS networks is often demonstrated through the
                         productive relationships established between the local university and area
                         elementary schools. However, high school sites are rarely mentioned in
                         successful PDS work. The multiple obstacles in implementing a compre-
                         hensive PDS program can be challenging due to the unique nature of
                         secondary education programs and the high school environment.
                               The high schools involved with the USC PDS in the Columbia, South
                         Carolina metropolitan area have pursued various initiatives to elevate their
                         Professional Development Schools beyond a site for intern training. In this
                         session, site personnel from three high schools will discuss their chal-
                         lenges in establishing PDS partnerships. Each school will discuss its
                         success in developing programs that meet the needs of interns, school
                         faculty, and the university. Finally, there will be an examination of the future
                         and whether elementary and high school PDS sites need separate models
                         to sustain effectiveness.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Realizing/Nurturing A P-16 Partnership
Focused On Simultaneous Renewal: Programs
That Work
Dan Lowry, University of Missouri


       The University of Missouri Partnership for Educational Renewal
(MPER) was initiated in 1994. Over the years, the partnership has grown
to include twenty-two partner districts (representing over 190,000 K-12
students), the University of Missouri College of Education, the Missouri
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, and two community
colleges. Geographically, the partnership reaches from the west side of
Missouri to the east, a distance of over 250 miles.
       With a dual emphasis on professional development and improving
student achievement, the programs that have been developed over the last
fifteen years have gained both national and international attention. These
programs were developed by our Operations Council and approved by the
Governing Board. Due to these programs that are focused on achieving our
objective of simultaneous renewal, there has been a great deal of interest
by other school districts to become a member of MPER. Presentations
regarding MPER partnership and programs have been made to numerous
organizations in states outside of Missouri, as well as requests from
Canada.
       MPER Programs include:
       • Teacher Release
       • Senior Year On-Site Program (Elementary & Secondary) Field
          Experiences
       • MU Teaching Fellows Program
       • Mental Health Leadership Academy
       • Study Group Funding
       • MPER-Funded Faculty Research
       • Partnership Grants
       MPER is unique in that the leadership for its organization is provided
by two Co-Executive Directors. Dr. Dan Lowry provides experience from
the K-12 sector of the partnership in that he has thirty-one years experience
in the public schools. Dr. Mike Pullis provides the higher education
perspective with twenty-nine years experience at the university.


Rebuilding The Engine: We Have A Whole
New Pit Crew - How Do We Get To Victory
Lane?
Melinda Walters, Celeste Granthum, Michelle Tharp, Lynne Mills, Carolyn
Corliss, Brooklyn Middleton, and Lakayla Johnson, Auburn University
Montgomery
Evelyn Boyd and Michelle Wheat, Wetumpka Intermediate School
Tina Stoddard and Misty Trussell, Wetumpka Elementary School


       Since its inception, the Professional Development School model that
is the basis for the partnership between Auburn University Montgomery
and five nearby school systems has been the backbone of the teacher


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                         preparation program. In the past year the whole “pit crew” has changed.
                         Three new clinical professors were charged with coordinating a program
                         that was in need of reform and expansion. Systems had new superinten-
                         dents; schools had new principals; the leadership at the university level
                         had changed; and, most importantly, a large number of mentor teachers had
                         moved on to other positions. The need to “rebuild the engine” that
                         powered the Mentor Teacher Program and expand it to meet the growing
                         needs of the program has been the primary focus of the new crew.
                               Presenters will provide insight into the challenge of the process of
                         change and facilitate discussion on:
                                • gathering input from all stakeholders on needed revisions,
                                • educating school administrators on the value and benefits of the
                                  program,
                                • establishing new lines of communication,
                                • recruitment and training of new mentor teachers,
                                • issues involved in the selection of pre-service teachers for the
                                  program,
                                • matching certification requirements with scripted instructional
                                  programs and testing demands,
                                • how resources are shared and generated, and
                                • specific ways to recognize individuals and institutions.


                         Resources, Roles, And Relationships For
                         Sustainability In The PDS
                         Karen Schafer, Towson University


                               You may be starting a PDS for the first time, or you may be
                         experiencing a drop from the initial level of enthusiasm and effectiveness.
                         In an interactive session, the focus will be on developing formal and
                         informal roles within the PDS leadership from the university and district
                         perspective, initiating and maintaining relationships and energy for the
                         partnership, sharing funding and financial support, on-going and embed-
                         ded professional development needs for improving student achievement,
                         and collaborating on priorities of the partnership. During this session,
                         resolutions for ongoing successful PDS partnerships will be offered from
                         the viewpoint of the presenter, as well as getting contributions from the
                         participants. Solutions will be specific, yet general enough to be applied
                         to a variety of PDS settings in order to maximize the collaboration and
                         sustainability which makes a PDS successful over time.


                         Roles And Responsibilities: An Eriksonian
                         Perspective
                         Patricia Pinciotti, Linda K. Rogers, and Andrew Whitehead, East Stroudsburg
                         University
                         Lyn Krenz, Asa Parker Elementary School


                                The East Stroudsburg University Apprentice II semester in a PDS
                         site involves all partners, teacher candidates, site liaisons, mentor teach-
                         ers, and university faculty working together in a variety of roles that


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

support communication, common understandings, inquiry, and profes-
sional growth. Moving to scale in 2003 we required the Apprentice II
semester and student teaching in a PDS for all elementary education
students. The sheer growth in numbers of teacher candidates, mentor
teachers, and faculty demanded clear expectations for all partners. Roles
and responsibilities were developed and revised jointly by ESU faculty and
site liaisons. Variations in PDS experiences and the rate individual sites
embraced inquiry and engaged in professional development opportunities
created a range of stages evident in our day-to-day PDS work. Recent
growth in the program and individual PDS sites have raised the level of
discussion to issues beyond roles and responsibilities to concerns about
autonomy and collaboration within and across PDS sites. With this in
mind, there appears to be a series of developmental stages that accompany
the growth and change in the PDS relationship. Just as Erikson views life
in development stages, with a continuum of dichotomies at each stage,
PDS relationships appear to demonstrate similar developmental stages as
they grow and flourish.
       This presentation will examine the historical transitions within PDS
relationships through lenses akin to Erikson’s Life-Span Approach. Pre-
senters will discuss how examining the past transitions will help shape
future challenges and changes for PDS partners as newly mandated
certification programs are put into place.


Running On Empty But Trying To Stay In The
Race: How To Provide Adequate Funding And
Faculty Support For PDS Work At A Small
University
Lynne Mills, Carolyn Corliss, Melinda Walters, Celeste Granthum, and
Michelle Tharpe, Auburn University Montgomery


      This presentation focuses on how the faculty and administration at
a small southern university logistically moved toward a PDS model in their
teacher education program despite initial problems associated with a lack
of funding and a lack of faculty support from the university at large. The
presenters describe the trials and tribulations of the history of the move-
ment at their university, giving hope and encouragement to faculty
members at other small universities with similar problems.


Site-Based Clinical Coordination: So What?
Pamela Pitrolo, Watson Elementary School
Carol Muniz, Morgantown High School


      In the Benedum Collaborative, an almost 20-year-old school/univer-
sity partnership in West Virginia, PDSs play a critical role in the clinical
experiences in West Virginia University’s five-year teacher education
program. PDS teacher leaders serve as site-based teacher education
coordinators who oversee placement of pre-service teachers for their
1000+ hours of clinical experiences. These PDS coordinators place stu-
dents with appropriate host teachers, coordinate assessments, observe
and give feedback to all pre-service teachers, organize and provide
professional development experiences for host teachers and pre-service


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                         teachers, and collaborate with PDS teacher education coordinators in
                         other PDSs that partner with WVU. Organizing clinical coordination in a
                         site-based model is a hallmark of the work of the Benedum Collaborative.
                         This model empowers teachers to become true teacher leaders in teacher
                         education.
                                In this presentation, two PDS teacher education coordinators will
                         share their reflections on site-based coordination. They challenged them-
                         selves to ask the “so what?” question. After several years living the role
                         of PDS teacher education coordinators, they wanted to find out if a site-
                         based clinical coordinator model made a difference for pre-service teach-
                         ers, for PDS faculty, and for the teachers serving in the role of teacher
                         education coordinator. This reflection will be in the format of a digital story
                         they created about their experiences. The story will explore the impact a
                         site-based coordination model has on pre-service teachers, on PDS
                         faculty, and on the coordinators themselves. They will also discuss the
                         impact conducting this reflective study has had on their own growth as
                         teacher leaders.


                         Striving For The Checkered Flag To Sustain
                         Successful PDS: Cautions, Red Flags, And
                         Open Straight-Aways
                         Leah Gleason, Virginia McGinnis, and Jeanne Faieta, Edinboro University of
                         Pennsylvania
                         Patricia Joint Lipchik, Patricia Shea, and Dawn Blair, Pfeiffer Burleigh
                         School


                                Creating and sustaining a PDS partnership is analogous to a road
                         race. Sometimes you take the lead, while other times mishaps occur
                         including unanticipated pit stops and accidents. The partnership might
                         also be hampered by changing teams. This presentation using race jargon
                         will discuss challenges and rewards of running and sustaining a PDS
                         partnership in an urban school setting at the elementary, middle, and high
                         school levels. Presenters will provide a glimpse into this three-year
                         initiative including white flags (starting the partnership), yellow flags
                         (challenges in sustaining, faculty awareness and involvement, school
                         reorganization, and community visibility), red flags (limited administrative
                         support, lack of communications, funding) and green flags (success and
                         ongoing projects and activities). Presenters will also address the over-
                         reaching goals of the partnership of increasing student achievement in an
                         urban setting and developing pre-service teachers’ skills. These goals will
                         enable our students to finish in the winner’s circle.


                         Sustaining A PDS For 18 Years Because We
                         Believe . . . Success For All!
                         Parthenia Satterwhite, Tracee Walker, Mary Jade Haney, Shondra Morris,
                         Claire Montgomery, and Marisa Rease, Horrell Hill Elementary


                               Educational reform efforts constantly urge teacher education insti-
                         tutions to expose general and special educators to field-based experiences
                         (Darling-Hammond, 1996; Goodlad, 1984, 1990; Holmes Group, 1986, 1990,
                         1995). Horrell Hill Elementary School and the University of South Carolina


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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

answered this professional responsibility in 1990. This collaborative
process has been sustained for eighteen years and momentum is still going
strong. Since implementation, maintenance and sustaining power has
been a reflective and labor-intensive process on a continuum for university
and school faculty. Presenters will share celebrations, challenges, and
successes of effectively keeping a PDS moving forward. The principal,
university liaison, clinical adjunct, and teacher leaders will share the
partnership structure and qualitative data from various levels of collabo-
rative projects implemented in response to reflective practices.


Sustaining An Elementary Education/Special
Education Professional Development School
When Key Personnel Change
Debi Gartland and Kim Durkan, Towson University
Erin Sloan, Waterloo Elementary School


       In our Elementary Education/Special Education (EESE) Professional
Development School, we have had numerous changes in key personnel
over the past five years, including: the College Dean, the Institution of
Higher Education (IHE) Department Chair, the IHE PDS Liaison, University
Supervisors, the local school system PDS Coordinator and representa-
tives, principals and assistant principals, school-based site liaisons, and,
of course, mentors. In this session, Towson University PDS faculty
members and a school-based PDS site liaison will describe our unique dual-
certification, undergraduate PDS, as well as describe the various chal-
lenges we’ve encountered when key personnel have changed. We will also
describe strategies and successes that have enabled us to continue to
effectively run our PDS on a day-to-day basis and to sustain it over time.
Also, we will describe how our EESE PDS is aligned with PDS Essential #8
in that both university faculty and P-12 faculty have clearly defined formal
roles and well-articulated informal roles, allowing participants from both
entities to participate on a regular basis to fulfill the mission of the EESE
PDS. It should be also noted that we will encourage a lively discussion and
exchange of ideas with audience members. As a result of attending our
presentation, session participants will leave with peace of mind and
effective strategies they can employ when they face key personnel
changes in their PDS.




Sustaining An Elementary Science Methods
And Student Teaching PDS
David Henry and Phil Gullo, Buffalo State College
Karen MacGamwell, William Street School


      The William Street School/Buffalo State College PDS is a flourishing
partnership hinging on the roles played by college and school faculty. Our
PDS partnership has two main components: (1) an elementary science and
math methods course taught on-site and (2) student teaching cohorts.
Karen MacGamwell has been principal at William Street School (WSS), a
school of 1500 students in grades 4-8, since the school opened in 1998.
After two of her teachers participated in a summer training offered by Dr.


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                         David Henry, she invited him to come work with the teachers at WSS. This
                         administrative support has been critical in sustaining this partnership. Dr.
                         Henry works at William Street School two days every week teaching the
                         math/science methods course, supervising the practicum, and partnering
                         with teachers in developing science instruction. WSS teachers are directly
                         involved in his science education grant activities and action research,
                         furthering the grant activities and sustaining the partnership. Phil Gullo
                         supervises a cohort of student teachers at WSS each semester. A majority
                         of the pre-service teachers “loop” from the methods course to the student
                         teacher cohort. Mr. Gullo is involved with the pre-service teachers during
                         the methods course, conducting seminars and observing their teaching.
                         This allows him to build relationships with these students and thought-
                         fully place them with cooperating teachers during student teaching. In our
                         presentation, we will discuss the characteristics of this partnership that
                         make it effective and sustainable, focusing on the administrative support,
                         our action research, integrated professional development, and looping the
                         methods students and the student teachers.


                         Sustaining And Increasing PDS Partnerships In
                         Rural Settings
                         Teresa Jayroe, Rebecca Robichaux, and Margaret Pope, Mississippi State
                         University


                                Sustaining a PDS relationship begins with collaboration that is
                         valued by all entities. Mutual respect, trust, and collegiality are necessary
                         for a collaborative partnership to grow and succeed. University faculty in
                         a rural setting determined the need to foster collaborative partnerships
                         with school districts over six years ago. To develop these partnerships,
                         university faculty met with school district administrators to discuss
                         quality teacher preparation. Administrators from the school districts were
                         sincerely interested in the development of professional partnerships to
                         support quality faculty and to enhance student achievement.
                                School district administrators and classroom teachers worked with
                         university faculty to define this professional partnership, including the
                         roles of all participants and the structure of the classroom experiences.
                         Classroom teachers became integral components of this partnership
                         through meetings, working with pre-service teachers, and collaborating
                         with university supervisors. Pre-service teachers and university faculty
                         work with classroom teachers and administrators to enhance the learning
                         communities in each district.
                                To garner input from pre-service teachers, they complete exit sur-
                         veys and reflective essays about the effectiveness of the collaboration. In
                         addition, classroom teachers complete exit surveys and evaluations. Data
                         gathered from exit surveys, reflective essays, and evaluations from pre-
                         service and classroom teachers will be shared at this session.
                                Six years later, this PDS partnership is thriving because all partici-
                         pants are continually part of the decision-making process. The positive
                         relationship and learning experiences with the original partnership district
                         have enabled the university to begin partnerships with other districts.




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                     2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

The “3 Cs” Of A Successful PDS Partnership
Kathy Ullrich, Stevenson University
Kristin Conley and Erica Lyons, Homestead Wakefield Elementary School


       This 10-year partnership thrives on commitment, communication,
and collaboration focusing on student achievement and teacher prepara-
tion. A formal agreement exists between the county and university, but
daily operations of the PDS are a function of the “Xs.” At the start of each
year, the principal communicates with the interns to share his expectations
for the year. His commitment continues as he visits their classrooms,
engages them in extracurricular activities, and supports them through the
hiring process. Interns reciprocate by collaborating with teachers to
conduct action research in support of student achievement. The interns’
commitment to student success is visible in after-school tutoring programs
and school-wide events that they plan and conduct each year. Teachers
throughout the school collaborate to offer professional development
workshops to help prepare the interns for the profession.
       The university’s commitment is strong. It allocates a university
faculty member to the PDS to enhance communication and collaboration
with teachers and administrators. The university secures grants to fund
school initiatives that address student achievement and to provide sti-
pends to recognize the work of teachers. There is an annual PDS confer-
ence on campus for teachers and administrators, and substitute funding
is provided. Topics such as action research, mentoring, or NCATE are
addressed; time is always scheduled to solicit feedback about the program
from the teachers. This open communication has led to changes in the
overall education program. Currently, seven university graduates teach in
the PDS - this is a testament to the success of this partnership.


The “Draft”: Collaboration Of Three Teacher
Prep Programs And Their Partner Schools
Lynn Mahlum and Renee Kerzman, Minnesota State University Moorhead
Kim Overton, North Dakota State University


       Recruiting and retaining quality field placements is a common
concern for most teacher preparation programs. The collective efforts of
three teacher preparation programs have solved this problem through the
use of the “Draft”. Two universities and one private college are competi-
tors in a community with a population of approximately 130,000. They have
collaboratively built partnerships with local schools, private and public,
within a 60 mile radius. As a result, relationships among the institutions are
strong; partnerships with school districts are no longer competitive, but
collaborative.
       The “Draft” is over a decade long and has evolved from a paper pencil
survey process to utilizing a more sophisticated electronic survey data
collection method, which is a shared resource for all three institutions.
PreK-12 partner schools find that the student teaching placement process
is smooth and efficient. They are not overwhelmed with contacts from three
different institutions and are much more likely to agree to accept a student
teacher. To maintain the integrity of these relationships, formal and
informal roles are essential. The constituents involved must be willing to



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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         openly communicate, share data and other resources, and follow the rules
                         of “the game.”
                               In the spirit of “teamwork,” the three teacher preparation programs
                         have taken a potentially competitive and difficult placement process and
                         made it a collaborative team effort. This session will provide play by play
                         details of the “Draft!”


                         The Many Interfaces Of The Ellicott City
                         Triad’s PDS
                         Ann M. Eustis, Towson University
                         Mary Peterson and Dolores Walsh, Waverly Elementary School
                         Rachel Breslow, Hollifield Station Elementary School


                                This elementary undergraduate PDS partnership, now in its ninth
                         year, reaps the benefits of a true spirit of collaboration. Classroom teachers
                         are challenged to try on new roles and sometimes create their own new
                         roles. What has resulted is a win/win for all, but especially for the university
                         faculty who previously have felt the demands and challenges impossible
                         to attain. New initiatives tried over the last two years will be highlighted
                         in this presentation, such as having former interns (who are now our
                         mentors) design and conduct intern seminars about portfolio development
                         and the use of technology in the classroom. This year, because of the help
                         of these classroom teachers, the partnership is piloting the use of elec-
                         tronic portfolios and has developed its own website. In addition, these site-
                         based leaders have helped redesign the interns’ portfolio review process
                         and assumed leadership roles as the facilitators of site-specific action
                         research projects. Recognition efforts have ranged from awarding small
                         mini-grants and stipends to providing internship hours for masters’ work
                         in instructional technology. The university has provided additional tech-
                         nical support and has purchased materials and software. In addition, the
                         school system and the university provide small stipends for mentors and
                         site liaisons.


                         The PDS Site Coordinator: The Link Between
                         The Partner School And The University
                         Paul G. Caron, University of Southern Maine


                               The University of Southern Maine’s CLASS (Collaborative Learn-
                         ing And School Success) PDS program is a development program for future
                         teachers. Like most Professional Development Schools, it provides stu-
                         dent teachers and mentors a Site Coordinator who monitors and evaluates
                         the program at the partner school sites in Auburn, Maine. The CLASS Site
                         Coordinator, however, is unique in that she is an employee of both the
                         Auburn School Department and the university.
                               The relationship between the partner schools and the university is
                         enhanced due to the role of the Site Coordinator. University faculty work
                         together with the Site Coordinator to provide teachers current research in
                         the pedagogy and in content areas. Because the Site Coordinator is
                         employed by both systems, she creates an important relationship between
                         the two: she provides information, knowledge and data; she works directly
                         with the student teachers in helping them apply their content knowledge


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                      2009 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

with appropriate pedagogical methods; and she shares the resources of
both educational communities to improve the practice of effective teaching
on the part of students, mentors, and university faculty.
      The presentation focuses on the development of this type of Site
Coordinator and how other PDS programs can improve their association
between the university and the local school district. It will also examine the
nature of a dual-contract position and the responsibilities of the position
and how this improves teacher education.


The Use Of Paraprofessionals To Support
Inclusive Education
Dustin B. Mancl and Caren Rasmussen, Paradise Professional Development
School


       Paradise Professional Development School is located on the campus
of the University of Nevada Las Vegas. As part of a large urban school
district, Paradise PDS serves students from a wide range of backgrounds
and educational experiences. Like many schools, Paradise PDS is chal-
lenged to support all students in inclusive settings where general educa-
tion curriculum is taught by highly qualified educators in their respected
fields.
       The future and trend of providing instruction to students with
disabilities within the general education setting has expanded with the
support of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act
(IDEA, 2004) and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB, 2001). IDEA
mandates all students with disabilities have access to the general educa-
tion curriculum. NCLB mandates all students to perform proficiently in
grade level curriculum by 2014. As a result, special education departments
within a school are challenged to provide high quality instruction in
inclusive settings. Another challenge that most schools face is the limited
resources of paraprofessionals to support instruction within the general
education classroom.
       Paradise PDS has implemented various techniques of educating
students with disabilities within inclusive settings. With the use of
paraprofessionals, federal mandates and student needs are being met.
Strategies of lesson planning and implementation, along with instructional
models while using paraprofessionals within the general education class-
room, will be discussed. Theories behind the methodology will be pre-
sented to support current practices utilized at Paradise PDS. A variety of
data collection procedures to demonstrate student success will also be
reviewed.




Using Technology To Support Communication
In Professional Development Schools
Oliver Dreon Jr., Nanette Dietrich, Ellen Long, Marcia Nell, and Doyin
Coker-Kolo, Millersville University


      Vital to the sustainability of a PDS is the group’s ability to collaborate
and communicate within the PDS. In our group, we have maximized
communication using several emergent technologies. In this session, we
will present these simple (and free) web-based tools that our group uses
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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

                         to function, gather data, schedule activities and meetings, and create joint
                         documents. A PDS may be spread across many schools and many
                         buildings. How does a PDS promote and sustain a sense of community
                         when mentors, interns, and university faculty may be geographically
                         distant from one another? We have found the web to be a creative space
                         for our community to gather and contribute despite our geographical
                         separation. In this session, we will share several resources that are shared
                         across our partnership to foster interaction between all of the stakeholders
                         within our group. These tools include:
                                • Wikis: Did you get that email I sent you? In a wiki, community
                                   members collaborate in a jointly-created web space to share
                                   critical resources and ideas.
                                • Google Documents: Who has the latest version of the memoran-
                                   dum of understanding? With Google Documents, community
                                   members collaborate to write documents, create presentations,
                                   and gather data.
                                • Doodle: When can you meet next week? With Doodle, community
                                   members can easily coordinate multiple schedules and effec-
                                   tively plan meetings.


                         What To Do When The Money Runs Out: A
                         PDS’s Attempt To Institutionalize And Sustain
                         The Work Of The Partnership After Three
                         Years Of External Funding
                         Sara Duffy, Louisa May Alcott Elementary School
                         Rachel Gemo, St. Benedict Elementary School
                         Sharon Damore, Katherine Kapustka, Catherine Larsen, and Barbara
                         Rieckhoff, DePaul University
                                As with numerous grant-funded initiatives, this PDS network en-
                         tered the 2008-09 academic year with uncertainty and faced a difficult time
                         of transition and challenges to sustainability without the financial support
                         of an external grant. Although institutionalization and sustainability were
                         pioneering goals, after three years of external funding toward which the
                         participants have made progress, PDS work was not yet fully integrated
                         into the existing work of all university and P-12 school partners and
                         participants. The work required continued support and participation from
                         all stakeholders in order to provide leadership, forward thinking, and
                         analysis, as well as facilitation of essential communication and collabora-
                         tive work in the service of teaching and learning for all constituents.
                         Through a process using the Nine Essentials developed by NAPDS, the
                         PDS faculty began a conversation, planning process, prioritization and
                         transition with schools of education administration, faculty and P-12
                         school leadership to continue this valued work.
                                In this session, the presenters will share highlights of this pivotal
                         academic year: shared commitments, timelines, transitional events, struc-
                         tures, research briefs (public sharing), reallocation of school of education
                         resources, faculty and P-12 personnel volunteering to continue once-
                         compensated work, and communications among and between partners in
                         the PDS network. The presenters will talk about the importance of organiz-
                         ing PDS work around the Nine Essentials when budget pressures create
                         question of value in continuing this high quality, intensive work with
                         teacher candidates and current educators in the field.


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