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DROWSY DRIVING PREVENTION WEEK CAMPAIGN MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

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					2007 DROWSY DRIVING PREVENTION WEEKTM
      CAMPAIGN & MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS




            National Sleep Foundation
                1522 K Street, NW
                     Suite 500
             Washington, DC 20005
                          DROWSY DRIVING PREVENTION WEEKTM
                            CAMPAIGN & MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

Since 1993, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) has been the leading national organization in raising
awareness of and combating the most dangerous consequence of inadequate or disorder sleep – drowsy
driving and fall-asleep motor vehicle crashes.

For more than a decade, NSF’s Sleep in America poll results indicate that 50 percent (97 million) of
Americans admit to driving drowsy at least once in the past year. Consistently, 20 percent (38 million)
Americans state that they have fallen asleep at the wheel at least once in the past year. Considering that
there are more than 194 million licensed drivers in the United States, these consistent findings are
shocking and demonstrate that much more needs to be done to raise awareness of the dangers of
drowsy driving.

Research studies show that young, inexperienced drivers are by far the largest at-risk group – due in part
to erratic sleep schedules as a result of biological sleep need and societal demands. Other at-risk groups
include shift workers and people working long work hours, commercial drivers, and people with untreated
sleep disorders such as sleep apnea. In early November 2007, NSF launched the first-ever annual
Drowsy Driving Prevention WeekTM (DDPW), which was created to generate widespread awareness
about the dangers of driving while fatigued. DDPW also served to kick-off NSF’s renewed commitment to
educate the public, specific at-risk groups, educators, law enforcement, and policy makers about this
enormous and preventable issue.

In short, the campaign confirmed NSF’s leadership role in drowsy driving prevention and attracted new
partners, corporate sponsors and advocates as well as engaged the media and educated the American
public.

Several highlights from the 2007 DDPW include:

    •   At least 47,502,200 media generated impressions*! (See Reaching America with Our Message
        for highlights.)

    •   A Reuter’s wire service story: Three “real life” spokespersons (individuals whose lives have been
        impacted by sleep-related crashes) as well as one of NSF’s own, Darrel Drobnich, a nationally
        recognized expert on drowsy driving prevention, were interviewed about how a moment’s
        decision to drive while sleepy can tragically change lives forever. The story reached millions of
        Americans with emotionally charged recounts of senseless crashes that could have been
        prevented – simply by understanding the dangers of drowsy driving.

    •   Significant promotional support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
        which sent a “Partner Letter” to every public health official in the nation promotion DDPW and
        announcing the launch of its new Sleep and Pubic Health Web site. CDC also announced DDPW
        in its highly regarded publication, the Morbidity and Mortality Week Report, which is also sent to
        every public health official in the nation.

    •   A diverse group of 11 committed corporate and organizational sponsors whose financial
        contributions made the campaign possible.

    •   A highly motivated, nationally recognized group of ten youth-focused partners who utilized their
        communications channels “to get the word out” about drowsy driving prevention.

    •   The newly re-launched DrowsyDriving.org provided consumers, sleep centers, students and
        media with extensive easy-to-use education materials developed for multiple audiences.

    •   The debut of the Memorials and Testimonials site on DrowsyDriving.org. This poignant and
        moving microsite serves to tell the stories of individuals whose lives have been permanently
        affected by a drowsy driving crash and preserves the memory of those who have lost their lives.
DDPW Results Report
Page 2


    •   NSF conducted a viral marketing campaign designed to reach targeted forums, message boards
        and blogs whose audience(s) correspond about issues relating to smart driving practices and the
        many issues surrounding awareness of safety behind the wheel.

    •   The active participation of NSF’s many Community Sleep Awareness Partners® (CSAPs)
        nationwide. CSAPs nationwide engaged their communities to take action and get involved in this
        life-saving education campaign.

    •   The involvement of selected colleges and universities who enlisted their student bodies to
        contribute stories to the school newspaper, disseminate drowsy driving prevention collateral and
        work with campus health services to publicize key drowsy driving prevention messages
        immediately before the heavily trafficked Thanksgiving holiday.

*Note: This estimate does not include impressions generated from outreach extended by DDPW
Partners and supporters. It is strictly an estimate of how many individuals learned about DDPW via media
sources.


Getting the Word Out
With very limited financial resources, NSF developed a DDPW launch plan that yielded excellent results.

To jump-start the campaign, NSF completely re-designed DrowsyDriving.org to include the following:

    •   DDPW Online Toolkit: NSF developed a comprehensive library of resources featuring DDPW
        campaign materials (press releases, fact sheets, key messages/talking points, teen/parent
        contract, an assortment of compelling print public service announcements); posters; education
        materials for a variety of audiences – including Spanish translations and resources for other high
        risk groups. One of the highlights of the online toolkit was video testimonials of celebrities
        including Jeopardy game show host Alex Trebek, actress Tyne Daly, and academy award-
        winning cinema photographer and film maker Haskell Wexler discussing their own drowsy driving
        crashes. These clips were donated by Haskell Wexler and taken from his film, Who Needs
        Sleep. All materials were simple to use and easily tailored to an individual or sleep center’s
        specific needs. NSF is pleased to report that the DDPW Online Toolkit proved to be very
        engaging for visitors! The average visit to the Online Toolkit was more than four minutes. By
        comparison, visits to the home page/landing page visit which lasted approximately one minute.

    •   DrowsyDriving.org also included up to the minute stories and news about drowsy driving, a press
        room and information on sleep-related/drowsy driving advocacy.

    •   Memorials and Testimonials microsite: NSF dedicated a section of DrowsyDriving.org to honor
        those whose lives have been impacted by drowsy driving related crashes. The site debuted with
        20 tragic stories of lives lost and lives changed forever. During November, there were
        approximately 25,000 visitors to the site with the Memorials and Testimonials as the most popular
        page viewed.

The DDPW Online Toolkit and Memorials and Testimonials sites were cornerstones of the campaign.
Both media and sleep centers cited DrowsyDriving.org as a valuable resource for providing information
about drowsy driving prevention in their stories and community outreach.

NSF created a media plan that initiated three waves of outreach. This strategy allowed NSF to announce
DDPW to the media and then provide opportunities for follow-up contact. The three-tiered media plan
included the following:
DDPW Results Report
Page 3


    •   September: A lead release announcing DDPW campaign details was distributed to 100 daily
        newspapers, wire services, local and national broadcast, radio, Internet as well as auto and
        trucking outlets.

    •   October: A media alert announcing the debut of the Memorials and Testimonials micro site on
        DrowsyDriving.org was distributed to the above-mentioned list.

    •   November: The State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving provided a detailed account of the
        current educational, law enforcement and legislative activities related to fatigued driving taking
        place in all 50 states.


Reaching America with Our Message
Due to financial constraints, NSF was not able to secure a clipping service to track DDPW’s media
results, so it we cannot provide a comprehensive and complete report on the total number of radio, print,
television, and web stories that covered DDPW and NSF’s messages. However, NSF can provide a good
estimate of the tracked placements via Google, Yahoo and Lexis Nexis.

Based on these limited search tools, we have determined that NSF secured more than 200 Web-based
clips reaching millions of Americans. As indicated earlier, Reuter’s wire service picked up the story on
November 2, 2007. Reuter’s reaches hundreds of newspapers nationwide and initiated a huge wave of
additional pick up. In total, we estimate that the there were at least 47,502,200 media generated
impressions garnered.

A sampling of print publications include:

    •   The Detroit Free Press                               •   The Windsor Star
    •   Good Housekeeping                                    •   The News Journal – Mansfield, OH
    •   The Houston Chronic                                  •   The Daily Lobo – New Mexico
    •   Fleet Owner                                          •   The Lincoln Courier – IL
    •   PalmBeach Post

Highlights include placement on:

    •   MSNBC.com: 30,700,000 visitors*                      •   Moneyline.com
    •   Yahoo News: 4,500,000 visitors                       •   Boston.com (Boston Globe)
    •   Yahoo Politics: 4,500,000 visitors                   •   BusinessWorld.com
    •   Yahoo Canada                                         •   Forbes.com
    •   NetscapeNews                                         •   Health and Fitness Reporter.com

A sampling of DDPW announcements include:

    •   Yahoo News: 4,500,000 visitors                       •   Families.com
    •   The New York Daily News: 600,000                     •   HealthCentral.com
    •   iVillage.com: 279,000 visitors                       •   TheCommercialAppeal.com
    •   YM.com (Teen Vogue)                                  •   TheTennessean.com
DDPW Results Report
Page 4


The State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving generated 35 web-based clips including placement on:

    •   Forbes.com                                           •   NewsAboutCars.com
    •   HoustonChronicle.com: 125,000 visitors               •   Motortrend.com
    •   PopularMechanics.com: 56,000 visitors                •   BusinesWorld.com 180,000 unique
    •   AutoChannel.com                                          visitors
    •   FleetOwner.com

    A host of local broadcast Web sites picked up the Report. Coverage included stories on sites in local
    markets including Nebraska, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Vermont, Virginia, Kansas and
    California. Many of these sites printed our press release verbatim, which included a listing of our
    Sponsors and Partners.

During DDPW, NSF fielded dozens of grassroots media requests for information and interviews. A
sample of coverage included:

    •   Two Sirius Radio (Road Dog Channel/Truckers NewsTalk Show): 1,000,000 listeners combined
    •   KO-GO News Talk Radio/San Diego, CA: 100,000 listeners
    •   KUT Radio (NPR Affiliate)/Austin, TX: 65,000 listeners
    •   KOMO Talk Radio/Seattle, WA: 25,000 listeners
    •   KOLD News 13/Tuscon, AZ: 75,000 viewers
    •   WVEC-ABC/Norfolk, VA: 100,200 viewers
    •   WCAX-CBS/Burlington, VT: 87,000 viewers
    •   WEAU-TV/Western Wisconsin: 45,000 viewers
    •   WMCH-NBC/Columbus, OH: 95,000 viewers

*Note: Estimated audience reach was included when available.


A Word About Our Sponsors
NSF extends our heartfelt thanks the following organizations for their support of DDPW:

    Leadership Level
    Respironics

    Sponsor Level
    Claritin
    HealthMonitor Network
    American Academy of Physician Assistants
    University Services

    Supporter Level
    American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine
    Board of Polysomnographic Technologists
    Evergreen Safety Council
    Sleep Research Society

    Contributor Level
    Ambulatory Monitoring
    HealthCentral.com
DDPW Results Report
Page 5


DDPW Sponsors’ benefits included:

    •   Prominent placement of company names/logos on both the highly trafficked NSF home page
        (sleepfoundation.org) – which receives 100,000 visitors per month – and on DrowsyDriving.org.

    •   NSF Alert, NSF’s weekly e-newsletter reaching close to 20,000 readers, showcased sponsor’s
        involvement a total of seven times during the weeks leading up to and during DDPW.

    •   Inclusion in a half page ad of sleepmatters, NSF’s quarterly magazine, reaching more than 800
        Community Sleep Awareness Partners and thousands of patients.

    •   The unique opportunity to initiate a company’s own media relations activities showcasing their
        support of NSF and this critical issue.

    •   Recognition in the State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving press release, which was
        distributed nationally to the short lead media.


DDPW’s Dedicated Partners
NSF generated tremendous awareness about drowsy driving prevention utilizing the resources from a
selected group of highly targeted and committed DDPW Partners. NSF thanks the following
organizations for using their own resources and communications channels to help educate young drivers
about the warning signs and counter measures of driving when sleepy.

America's Promise Alliance
ASPIRA Association, Inc.
The Bacchus Network
Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD)
Children's Safety Network
Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Inc. (FCCLA)
National Center for Child Death Review
National Organization for Youth Safety (NOYS)
National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL)
Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD)

Partner highlights included:

    •   The far-reaching world of the Web featured the first-ever DDPW announcement on all of NSF’s
        devoted Partners’ home pages. These Web site postings alone engaged and educated millions
        of young drivers and their parents.

    •   Distribution of DDPW press materials through Partners’ communications channels reached
        millions of Americans. In fact, SADD featured the DDPW launch announcement in their fall
        newsletter which was distributed to 50,000 public and private high schools nationwide.

    •   In addition to hard copy newsletters, electronic newsletters proved to be an extremely effective
        means to reach our target. NSF learned that NOYS sent three electronic newsletters reaching
        900+ contacts, who then forwarded the information to local affiliates – reaching thousands more
        who continued to generate awareness about the hazards of driving while sleepy.

    •   Local, grassroots events educated both parents and young drivers about drowsy driving
        prevention. Partners were encouraged to download NSF posters, Public Service Announcements
        and other educational resources to distribute at these local gatherings.
DDPW Results Report
Page 6

    •   Word of mouth worked wonders! The Child Safety Network (CSN) received numerous inquiries
        about teen driving safety. One such inquiry came from the Rhode Island Injury and Violence
        Manager (Department of Public Health) who needed information on teen safety to include on their
        Web site. CSN encouraged the RI Injury and Violence Manager to utilize materials in the
        DrowsyDriving.org Online Toolkit – which proved to be a big boost for their teen driver safety
        initiative locally.

    •   On November 1, Richard T. Moore, State Senator of Massachusetts, joined the Massachusetts
        Registrar of Motor Vehicles, Commissioner of Mass Highway, law enforcement officials, and
        experts in sleep medicine to commemorate the first annual DDPW in Massachusetts. Titled "The
        Dangers of Drowsy Driving and What Massachusetts is Doing to Prevent It," the event highlighted
        the deadly effects of drowsy driving and was attended by state lawmakers and drowsy driving
        activists such as Janet Raneri, whose son Major Robert Raneri was killed by a drowsy driver.

In addition to Partners, NSF also benefited greatly from Organizational Sleep Awareness Partners
(OSAPs) as well as several colleges and universities that also dedicated their own time and resources to
execute a variety of initiatives. A sampling of highlights include:

    •   The Indiana Society of Sleep Professionals rallied several state organizations to champion
        DDPW. Their initiatives included contacting all eight of Indiana University Colleges, the Indiana
        Department of Education, the Indiana Governor’s Office and the Indiana State Police. NSF
        learned that a proclamation recognizing DDPW was granted by the Governor and as a result of
        this, the Indiana Department of Education sent DDPW information to all school superintendents
        statewide. Additionally, educational events were hosted at various sleep centers.

    •   The Kansas Association of Sleep Professionals proactively sought the support of the Kansas
        Highway Patrol whom officially endorsed DDPW! Patrol officers were given information packets
        to distribute during local school and community visits. Additionally, they created their own Public
        Service Announcements for state wide distribution. Two radio stations and several local
        newspapers picked up the story.

    •   The Onondaga County Traffic Safety Program spearheaded a Traffic Safety Fair, which they held
        on November 10 in upstate New York. Students from nearby Syracuse University contacted local
        media to announce both the Fair and DDPW.

    •   Among several colleges and universities who extended their support, the College of the Holy
        Cross in Worchester, MA conducted a week-long series of events that began with sending a
        campus-wide e-mail alerting students about DDPW. Information tables/booths with a variety of
        DDPW literature were strategically placed in highly trafficked locations on campus throughout the
        week. The print Public Service Announcement featuring Katie Drentlaw (a college-aged student
        who was killed in a drowsy driving crash) was distributed and hung in a variety of locations.
        NSF’s top ten sleep tips were revised with a student focus, book marks were created and a "fact
        of the week" addressing drowsy driving and alcohol consumption reached students who – overall
        – were very receptive to the information. DDPW also received strong support from Harvard, St
        Joseph’s University, Ohio State University and Duke.

Conclusion
Overall, NSF is very pleased with the results generated from DDPW 2007. Our goal was to start small
and grow the program exponentially over the next few years – reaching a variety of high risk groups. In
order to do so, we will need additional monies as well as committed partners, sleep centers and the
general public. We are confident we can do this. It is such an important mission: Education about
drowsy driving prevention WILL save lives. NSF is deeply committed to this cause.
DDPW Promotions and Public Service Announcements
Promotions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Students Against Destructive Decisions (Sent to 50,000 Middle & High Schools)
Press Release from Massachusetts State Senator Richard Moore Regarding
Drowsy Driving Legislation and Drowsy Driving Prevention Week
                NEWS 25 Looks Into Problems with Drowsy Driving - view video

                                    Dated: 11/05/2007 16:13:44
EVANSVILLE - We've all heard of the dangers of drunk driving and distracted driving, but
what about drowsy driving? Police say that's actually a more common danger. Monday kicks
off a week-long national drowsy driving prevention campaign.

New Jersey is the only state with a drowsy driving law, but federal law requires truck drivers
to sleep, and not just when they're tired.

"You can legally run 11 hours in a row before you have to take a 10 hour break; then after
10 hours you can get up and go again," Truck Drive Rod Hodgkiss told us.

Monday, NEWS 25 discovered these numbers. Drowsy driving kills 1,550 people a year.
Dozing off is blamed in 100,000 crashes. 60% of drivers have driven while drowsy this year;
20% have actually fallen asleep.

Sgt. Todd Ringle with the Indiana State Police told us, "Drowsy driving is very dangerous.
We see it on a daily basis; we have more problems with drowsy drivers than intoxicated
drivers."

A new study from the National Sleep Foundation found things like rolling down the windows
and turning on the radio do little to keep drivers awake.

"If you notice its hard to keep eyes open, if you're yawning a lot, drifting or don't remember
passing certain areas good to stop and take a break," Ringle said.
                            http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2007/11/05/069683.html




The National Sleep Foundation's State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving
Finds Fatigued Driving to be Under-Recognized and Underreported

NSF initiates 'Call to Action' to all 50 States and D.C to do more to prevent drowsy driving and fall-
asleep crashes as part of Drowsy Driving Prevention WeekTM

WASHINGTON, Nov. 5, 2007; A new report by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) confirms that
motor vehicle crashes caused by drowsy driving continue to be under-recognized due to a lack of
uniformity in crash reporting among states. The first-ever annual State of the States Report on Drowsy
Driving found that while significant progress has been made on various fronts in the battle against drowsy
driving, much remains to be accomplished.

The report also indicates that police officers are not receiving adequate training on the impact of fatigue
on driving performance. Both the lack of uniform codes and proper training for law enforcement have
created a situation where only very conservative statistics exist. NSF also found that many drivers
licensing manuals contain false and misleading information about sleep and countermeasures to prevent
sleep-related crashes. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that drowsy driving
causes at least 100,000 police-reported crashes and kills more than 1,550 Americans each year.

"NSF will use this report to work toward establishing standard language that states may use to code sleep-
related crashes on police crash report forms and to address the impact of sleep loss in police training
programs," says NSF Acting CEO Darrel Drobnich. "This will lead to more accurate statistics that will
allow us to better recognize and better address this national tragedy."

The report consisted of a survey sent to traffic safety offices across the country and additional research by
NSF. The report updates a similar survey conducted by NSF in 1998.

The vast majority of states responding to the 2007 survey indicated that they have the ability to charge a
drowsy driver under existing laws. This was similar to the 1998 survey. However, the current report
found that there continues to be wide variance in the types of charges that would be levied. Only New
Jersey explicitly defines drowsy driving as recklessness under a vehicular homicide statute. Known as
"Maggie's Law," New Jersey's drowsy driving law has served to raise awareness of the consequences of
fatigue behind the wheel and has spurred significant action in other states. There are now at least 8 states
with 12 pending bills that address fatigued driving in various ways.

However, Maggie's Law and many of the pending bills are not optimal due to their narrow focus. NSF
plans to work with legislators in correcting this problem by releasing principles for model state legislation
that take a comprehensive approach to addressing drowsy driving.
Additionally, NSF is working in partnership with a number of universities, high schools and youth
organizations to educate young drivers about the consequences of sleepiness behind the wheel. NSF is
also reaching out to parents, teachers and the media to raise awareness of the importance of safe and alert
driving for all motorists.

In order to address the lack of education about drowsy driving and its disproportionate impact on young
people, NSF is today launching its first ever Drowsy Driving Prevention Week (DDPW) campaign. This
effort seeks to raise public awareness and increase advocacy around drowsy driving. The focus of this
year's campaign is on young drivers.

A cornerstone of DDPW is the launch of www.DrowsyDriving.org. There individuals can find
information about drowsy driving as well as an easy-to-use toolkit to help them spread the word about
this issue. The site also features a drowsy driving memorials and testimonials site that tells the stories of
those whose lives have been permanently affected by a drowsy driving crash and preserves the memory of
those whose lives were lost. The complete State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving is available at
www.DrowsyDriving.org/stateofthestatesreport. NSF plans to conduct the survey annually and release the
report during DDPW to track progress on specific issues related to drowsy driving prevention and law
enforcement.

NSF has enlisted the following group of prominent and diverse sponsors and partners to support DDPW
and to help raise awareness of the consequences of drowsy driving among their members and the public:

 Sponsors for Drowsy Driving Prevention Week 2007

 --Respironics - Lead Sponsor
 --Claritin - Sponsor
 --Health Monitor/American Academy of Physician Assistants - Sponsor
 --University Services Sleep Diagnostic & Treatment Centers - Sponsor
 --Evergreen Safety Council - Sponsor
 --American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine - Supporter
 --Sleep Research Society - Supporter
 --Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists - Supporter
 --Ambulatory Monitoring - Contributor
 --HealthCentral.Com - Contributor

 Campaign Partners for Drowsy Driving Prevention Week 2007

 --America's Promise Alliance
 --ASPIRA Association, Inc. www.sleepfoundation.org
 --The Bacchus Network
 --Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
   (CHADD)
 --Children's Safety Network
 --Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Inc. (FCCLA)
 --National Center for Child Death Review
 --National Organization for Youth Safety (NOYS)
 --National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL)
 --Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD)

 For more information, visit, www.sleepfoundation.org.
http://www.bworldonline.com
Story from Business World

Vol. XXI, No. 77
Wednesday, November 14, 2007 | MANILA, PHILIPPINES

Motoring

Falling asleep at the wheel is a big killer in the United States

NEW YORK - Darla Drentlaw was sleeping on her daughter Katie's bed, waiting for her to come home,
when she woke to the sound of police radios. When the officers knocked on her door, she knew they had
bad news.

Katie, an 18-year-old high school track star with blonde hair and a bright smile, had been driving home
from a track meet that ended late at night. She fell asleep behind the wheel about 20 kilometers from her
house in Prior Lake, Minnesota. She crashed into a dirt embankment and was killed.

"I thought it was just a bad dream, but no," said Drentlaw, 55. "I couldn't believe she fell asleep and we
lost her."

Drowsy driving kills more than 1,550 people a year in the United States and causes 71,000 injuries,
according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which estimates there are 100,000
sleep-related crashes a year.

Although studies have found the condition to be nearly impossible to fight off without a caffeinated
beverage or a nap, a surprising number of people are ignorant of the dangers.

"A lot of people roll down the window and turn on the radio when they get tired," said Darrel Drobnich, a
spokesman for the National Sleep Foundation. "That's like saying, if I'm hungry, if I roll down the
window I won't be hungry."

The foundation says 60% of drivers have driven while drowsy in the past year, and 20%, or about 32
million people, admit to having actually fallen asleep.

Tom Callaghy, 61, started to get sleepy on a Virginia highway in 2001. He and his wife, Janie, were
driving home from a competition for dogs. The last thing he remembers before dozing off is reaching over
to wake his wife.

Their van drifted into a gully on the side of the road, slammed into a tree and flipped over. Callaghy
suffered only cuts and bruises, and the dogs, which were in crates, were fine. But his wife of 33 years
was dead.

"I have guilt that will never go away," said Callaghy, a political science professor at the University of
Pennsylvania. "In many ways I don't want the guilt to go away because it's a reminder to me."

New Jersey is the only US state with a drowsy-driving law. "Maggie's Law" is named after a 20-year-old
college student, Maggie McDonnell, who was killed by a drowsy driver in 1997. The driver admitted to
being awake for 30 hours after smoking crack cocaine.

His lawyer successfully argued that there was no law in the state against falling asleep at the wheel. The
judge barred the jury from considering the driver's sleep deprivation as a factor in the crash. He was fined
$200.

Maggie's mother, Carole McDonnell, worked with her state lawmakers to pass the law, which makes
drivers liable for vehicular homicide if they have driven after being awake for 24 hours. The law, which
passed in 2003, has a penalty of 10 years in prison and a $100,000 fine.
Additionally, NSF is working in partnership with a number of universities, high schools and youth
organizations to educate young drivers about the consequences of sleepiness behind the wheel. NSF is
also reaching out to parents, teachers and the media to raise awareness of the importance of safe and alert
driving for all motorists.

In order to address the lack of education about drowsy driving and its disproportionate impact on young
people, NSF is today launching its first ever Drowsy Driving Prevention Week (DDPW) campaign. This
effort seeks to raise public awareness and increase advocacy around drowsy driving. The focus of this
year's campaign is on young drivers.

A cornerstone of DDPW is the launch of www.DrowsyDriving.org. There individuals can find
information about drowsy driving as well as an easy-to-use toolkit to help them spread the word about
this issue. The site also features a drowsy driving memorials and testimonials site that tells the stories of
those whose lives have been permanently affected by a drowsy driving crash and preserves the memory of
those whose lives were lost. The complete State of the States Report on Drowsy Driving is available at
www.DrowsyDriving.org/stateofthestatesreport. NSF plans to conduct the survey annually and release the
report during DDPW to track progress on specific issues related to drowsy driving prevention and law
enforcement.

NSF has enlisted the following group of prominent and diverse sponsors and partners to support DDPW
and to help raise awareness of the consequences of drowsy driving among their members and the public:

 Sponsors for Drowsy Driving Prevention Week 2007

 --Respironics - Lead Sponsor
 --Claritin - Sponsor
 --Health Monitor/American Academy of Physician Assistants - Sponsor
 --University Services Sleep Diagnostic & Treatment Centers - Sponsor
 --Evergreen Safety Council - Sponsor
 --American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine - Supporter
 --Sleep Research Society - Supporter
 --Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists - Supporter
 --Ambulatory Monitoring - Contributor
 --HealthCentral.Com - Contributor

 Campaign Partners for Drowsy Driving Prevention Week 2007

 --America's Promise Alliance
 --ASPIRA Association, Inc. www.sleepfoundation.org
 --The Bacchus Network
 --Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
   (CHADD)
 --Children's Safety Network
 --Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Inc. (FCCLA)
 --National Center for Child Death Review
 --National Organization for Youth Safety (NOYS)
 --National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL)
 --Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD)

 For more information, visit, www.sleepfoundation.org.
http://www.bworldonline.com
Story from Business World

Vol. XXI, No. 77
Wednesday, November 14, 2007 | MANILA, PHILIPPINES

Motoring

Falling asleep at the wheel is a big killer in the United States

NEW YORK - Darla Drentlaw was sleeping on her daughter Katie's bed, waiting for her to come home,
when she woke to the sound of police radios. When the officers knocked on her door, she knew they had
bad news.

Katie, an 18-year-old high school track star with blonde hair and a bright smile, had been driving home
from a track meet that ended late at night. She fell asleep behind the wheel about 20 kilometers from her
house in Prior Lake, Minnesota. She crashed into a dirt embankment and was killed.

"I thought it was just a bad dream, but no," said Drentlaw, 55. "I couldn't believe she fell asleep and we
lost her."

Drowsy driving kills more than 1,550 people a year in the United States and causes 71,000 injuries,
according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which estimates there are 100,000
sleep-related crashes a year.

Although studies have found the condition to be nearly impossible to fight off without a caffeinated
beverage or a nap, a surprising number of people are ignorant of the dangers.

"A lot of people roll down the window and turn on the radio when they get tired," said Darrel Drobnich, a
spokesman for the National Sleep Foundation. "That's like saying, if I'm hungry, if I roll down the
window I won't be hungry."

The foundation says 60% of drivers have driven while drowsy in the past year, and 20%, or about 32
million people, admit to having actually fallen asleep.

Tom Callaghy, 61, started to get sleepy on a Virginia highway in 2001. He and his wife, Janie, were
driving home from a competition for dogs. The last thing he remembers before dozing off is reaching over
to wake his wife.

Their van drifted into a gully on the side of the road, slammed into a tree and flipped over. Callaghy
suffered only cuts and bruises, and the dogs, which were in crates, were fine. But his wife of 33 years
was dead.

"I have guilt that will never go away," said Callaghy, a political science professor at the University of
Pennsylvania. "In many ways I don't want the guilt to go away because it's a reminder to me."

New Jersey is the only US state with a drowsy-driving law. "Maggie's Law" is named after a 20-year-old
college student, Maggie McDonnell, who was killed by a drowsy driver in 1997. The driver admitted to
being awake for 30 hours after smoking crack cocaine.

His lawyer successfully argued that there was no law in the state against falling asleep at the wheel. The
judge barred the jury from considering the driver's sleep deprivation as a factor in the crash. He was fined
$200.

Maggie's mother, Carole McDonnell, worked with her state lawmakers to pass the law, which makes
drivers liable for vehicular homicide if they have driven after being awake for 24 hours. The law, which
passed in 2003, has a penalty of 10 years in prison and a $100,000 fine.
Story From The Detroit Free Press




Sleep deficit may be impossible to make up, study finds
November 26, 2007
By KATHLEEN FACKELMANN
USA TODAY

You've got a long list of e-mails to return, bills to pay and, oh, yeah, you don't want to miss the latest episode of "The
Office."
By the time you crawl into bed, it's nearly midnight. The alarm goes off at 6 the next morning, and bingo! You've just
joined the legions of Americans who are bleary-eyed and flat-out tired most days of the week.
For years, sleep researchers have been preaching the dangers of lost sleep: People who are fatigued can't pay
attention to routine tasks, have trouble learning and are prone to a laundry list of health problems, from depression to
high blood pressure.


New research suggests an added risk to losing sleep day after day: Humans and animals that have chronic sleep
deprivation might reach a point at which the very ability to catch up on lost sleep is damaged, says Fred Turek, a
sleep researcher at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.


His research on sleep patterns in rats appeared this summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. That, together with findings from a human study, suggests people who lose sleep night after night might
not recover the alertness they need to perform well during the day.


So far the studies don't tell researchers whether the damage is permanent. But they do suggest that people who go
to work fatigued day after day might perform consistently at a subpar level.


"They may say, 'Hey, I'm doing fine. I don't need more sleep,' even as their performance on memory and attention
tests goes down," Turek says.


People who lose sleep because of a single all-nighter typically make up for it by boosting the amount of deep sleep
they get the next night, says study co-author Aaron Laposky, also from Northwestern. Deep sleep is thought to
restore alertness and helps keep memory and other brain functions in top form.


People also make up for the occasional bout of insomnia by sleeping in on weekends, Laposky says.


But is that capacity lost when sleep deprivation becomes a fact of life?


At Northwestern, researchers kept lab rats awake for 20 hours and then let them sleep for four hours. After the first
night, the rats recovered; when they were allowed to sleep, the rats fell into a deep sleep more frequently than they
did when well-rested.
But after three nights of sleep deprivation, the rats failed to show an increase in deep sleep. And at the end of the
five-day study, the animals were given a chance to sleep in, but the rats recovered almost none of the lost sleep.


"The ability to compensate for lost sleep is itself lost, which is damaging mentally and physically," Turek says.


Sleep expert David Dinges says people seem to respond to a chronic lack of sleep the same way.


Dinges, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and his colleagues studied
48 healthy people. Some got eight hours of sleep a night while others stayed up, losing from two to four hours of
sleep a night.


By the end of two weeks, the people who had lost sleep at night said they no longer felt tired during the day. But test
scores revealed a different story, according to the 2003 study published in the journal Sleep. The sleep-deprived
group had trouble paying attention, had slower reaction times and developed impairments in memory, Dinges says.


The ability to fend off sleep might have evolved to help animals and humans survive a natural disaster. People forced
to evacuate during a fire or hurricane often lose sleep for a short period, but they're more likely to make it through a
crisis alive, Turek says.


The trouble is humans have built a society that runs round the clock, Turek says. Cellphones, laptops and other
electronic devices make it easy to stay connected at all hours. All-night TV and an extended workday also can rob
sleep, says James Walsh, executive director of sleep medicine at St. Luke's Hospital in St. Louis.


Surveys now show that most people in the United States get less than seven hours of sleep a night, about an hour
less than the average sleep time 40 years ago.


No one really knows the full effect of the steady erosion of sleep time. Only a study that keeps track of lots of sleepy
humans for a long time would answer that question, Turek says.


But even if the damage can be reversed, there's plenty of scientific evidence suggesting that sleep loss is bad for
your health. For example, fatigue might play a role in obesity. And there's no question that sleep loss plays a role in
fatalities on the highway. The National Sleep Foundation says drowsy driving is the likely cause of more than 100,000
car crashes each year in the United States.


For that reason alone, Dinges and other experts recommend getting seven to eight hours of sleep on most nights.
Losing just an hour night after night can lead to foggy thinking and slow reaction times.


"The deficits can become severe," Dinges says.


People who put off bedtime to get more done might find it's wiser to make their sleep a priority. "You need to make
sure sleep time is protected," he says.
National Sleep Foundation pushes first Drowsy Driving Prevention Week
Rep. Jerry Krummel is still pushing for fatigued drivers legislation
The Times, Nov 8, 2007

  The National Sleep Foundation’s first ever Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, Nov. 15
to 11, is getting a local push from State Rep. Jerry Krummel, a Wilsonville Republican.

   Krummel tried to get a bill passed last legislative session to make it a felony when a fatigued driver
kills someone. The bill, however, did not make it to a hearing. Krummel said in a press release he
hoped that the bill would be reintroduced in 2009.

   Nine other states looked at similar legislation this year. However, New Jersey is the only state that
has enacted a law that punishes drowsy drivers. New Jersey’s Maggie Law is named after a 20-year-
old college student who was killed 10 years ago by a driver who nodded off at the wheel.

  This week is the first ever Drowsy Driving Prevention Week launched by the National Sleep
Foundation.

  The foundation is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public health
and safety.

  The week is meant to increase public awareness to the dangers of sleepy driving with an emphasis
on young people and advocating for preventative measures at the state level.

  “Where is the accountability for the sleepy driver?” asked Lorna Kautzky, widow of Eric Kautzky
who was killed by a fatigued driver in June 2005.

   Eric Kautzky, 56, was riding his bike in the bike lane along Southwest Tualatin-Sherwood Road
when a 19-year-old driver swerved and hit Kautzky from behind. The driver, who reportedly had only
three hours of sleep from the night before, did not realize he had hit Kautzky and kept driving.

   Krummel’s House Bill 3201 which did not make it to a legislative hearing last session, was drafted
at the request of Lorna Kautzky, who is now a member of the Governor’s Advisory Council for DUII.

   “We must work for responsible behavior from the sleep-impaired drivers on our roads. The sleepy
driver holds as much responsibility as any other driver,” Lorna Kautzky said in press release from
Krummel’s office.

  The driver who struck and killed Eric Kautzky was sentenced to 17 months in jail for criminal
negligent homicide.

  The National Sleep Foundation’s weeklong campaign includes a Web page at
www.drowsydriving.org. The foundation is focusing on young drivers because of statistics that show
that 55 percent of all crashes due to fatigue involved a driver 25 years old or younger.
The Mansfield News Journal

				
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