Strategies for Effective Managerial Writing

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					     Chapter 10:
Using Graphic Images
     Effectively



     Strategies for Managerial Writing
     2006 Thomson South-Western          Slide 1
                  Strategies for
                Graphic Illustration
Key Concept 10.1:
Effective graphic illustration is a result of
  careful planning focused on managing
  graphic resources rather than mastering
  them.




 Strategies for Managerial Writing
 2006 Thomson South-Western                 Slide 2
                    Strategies for
                  Graphic Illustration
• Section Outline:
• Establishing Your Purpose for Using an
  Illustration
• Formulating a Strategy




   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western            Slide 3
             Illustration Purposes
•   To Represent Data
•   To Reveal Relationships
•   To Compare and Contrast
•   To Show Trends




     Strategies for Managerial Writing
     2006 Thomson South-Western          Slide 4
                        More Purposes
•   To Clarify Complex Patterns
•   To Enhance Visualization of a Problem
•   To Reconstruct a Sequence of Events
•   To Create a Context for Information




     Strategies for Managerial Writing
     2006 Thomson South-Western             Slide 5
          Charts With Purposes
• Scatter plot




    Strategies for Managerial Writing
    2006 Thomson South-Western          Slide 6
                             Line Chart




Strategies for Managerial Writing
2006 Thomson South-Western                Slide 7
                            Pareto Chart




Strategies for Managerial Writing
2006 Thomson South-Western                 Slide 8
          Strategy for Graphics
• Develop a criteria for including and
  excluding information
• Develop a criteria for placement
• Consider in-text versus appendix




   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western            Slide 9
       Processes for Preparing
       Meaningful Illustrations
Key Concept 10.2:
Many software tools will help you prepare
 meaningful and effective illustrations. With
 each new generation of software, these
 tools become easier for the
 nonprofessional to master.



 Strategies for Managerial Writing
 2006 Thomson South-Western               Slide 10
           Processes for Preparing
           Meaningful Illustrations
•   Section Outline:
•   Select Appropriate Tools
•   Prepare the Information
•   When Are Samples of Each Type of
    Illustration Needed?




     Strategies for Managerial Writing
     2006 Thomson South-Western          Slide 11
                      Types of Charts
• Area Chart or Pie Chart
  – A type of illustration that uses a geometric figure,
    usually a circle or a square, to represent the total
    distribution of a given variable, such as the total tax
    revenues or total sales, and then percentages of the
    total are represented as larger or smaller slices of the
    “pie” or sections of the total area.
• Bar Graph or Histogram
  – Type of illustration that depicts each variable as a
    column or row that is filled from the base to the value
    being represented.

    Strategies for Managerial Writing
    2006 Thomson South-Western                            Slide 12
                 Charts Continued
• Chart
  – The broadest name for an illustration, it refers to
    graphs, tables, and free-hand illustrations.
• Table
  – A type of chart that places data in rows and columns
    and allows sums and other analytic products (mean,
    standard deviation, etc.) to be placed in the summary
    rows or columns.
• Flow Chart
  – A type of illustration that using various geometric
    shapes to symbolize a process or step and then
    drawing arrows or lines to show the order of the
    process.

   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western                             Slide 13
                 Charts Continued
• Graph
  – A type of chart that uses a grid created by an
    x- and y-axis to illustrate regular or standard
    quantities and thus allowing comparisons.
• Line Chart or Frequency Polygon
  – A type of illustration that locates related single
    values on the x-y-grid and then connects the
    values with a line.


   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western                       Slide 14
                 Charts Continued
• Organization Chart
  – A type of illustration that depicts the hierarchy of an
    company or agency by labeling boxes or other figures
    as either officers or offices and then showing the
    relationship between the offices with lines drawn
    between them.
• Pareto Chart
  – A type of graph that represents the total distribution of
    a given variable, such as the total tax revenues or
    total sales, as a accumulation of all the depicted
    values.

   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western                              Slide 15
                  Charts Continued
• Scattergram (Scatter plot)
  – A type of graph used for correlations that locates all
    the data points that have x and y values where the x-
    and y-axes indicate values of two variables that are
    being correlated.
• Table
  – A type of chart that places data or classes of objects
    into columns and rows, where the position may reflect
    rank or importance but does not illustrate quantifiable
    difference based on position in the chart.


    Strategies for Managerial Writing
    2006 Thomson South-Western                           Slide 16
     Prepare the Information
• Follow these steps:
  – Collect data
  – Prepare sketches (can be electronic quick
    charts created by the database program)
  – Locate samples
  – Determine placement




   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western                   Slide 17
The Final Product and Its Impact
 Key Concept 10.3:
 The ultimate goal of the writing process is to
  create an effective product. The document
  must have graphic illustrations appropriate
  to the message and must elicit the
  appropriate, desired impact on the reader.



  Strategies for Managerial Writing
  2006 Thomson South-Western               Slide 18
The Final Product and Its Impact
•   Section Outline:
•   Judging the Final Product
•   Cautions and Warnings
•   A Concluding Note




     Strategies for Managerial Writing
     2006 Thomson South-Western          Slide 19
      Cautions and Warnings
• Strive for:
  – Simplicity
  – Clarity
• Be guided by a principle of scarcity
  versus overabundance!
  – There can be too much of a good thing




   Strategies for Managerial Writing
   2006 Thomson South-Western               Slide 20

				
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