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					                                                         "TIT
                       CONTENTS

Is.                        Effects of Pan
                Nervous Prostration— Neurasthenia
                Quarantine Against Tropical Disease
                       The Use of Remedies
                        Jellies ,and Puddings
         The Spontaneity of pod's Great Out-of-doors
              . The Importance of the Teeth to Health
                     The War on the Cigarette
                        The Missing Exhibit
                Relation of Meat-eating to the Plague
        Who Should Come to the Mussoorie Sanitarium




      VoL I           NOVEMBER, 19JO               No.
h» •** " ^ *• "•_•_ "- J""^ j"--*iAA-diri-*T^idhjrk-*-i^-''--*--*--*- •*•'•*- A. A<* <p




  The Sanitarium Bath and!
     Treatment Rooms
  ELECTRIC LIGHT BATH,
   RUSSIAN BATH,
     ELECTRIC TUB BATH,
      MEDICATED BATH,
        SITZ BATH,
          NAUHEIM BATH,
           SHOWER BATH.
             SPRAY BATH,
               GRADUATED BATH,
                NEUTRAL BATH,
                 FOMENTATIONS.
                   BLANKET PACKS.
  SHEET PACKS
   PERCUSSION DOUCHE
     FILIFORM DOUCHE.
       ALTERNATE DOUCHE,
        REVULSIVE DOUCHE,
          PHOTOPHORE,
           MASSAGE (general),
             MASSAGE (special),
              SCHOTT S RESISTIVE MOVEMENTS
               SWEDISH MOVEMENTS.
                 ELECTRICITY.
                                                                                     f
    What More Could be Asked? i
   I%^^«*X^*^/WV/»<"VHA'>^»^^                                                        P




    Sanitarium Bath and Treatment Rooms, »
                            75, Park St., Calcutta                                   >
L.
   Herald of Health
   Vol. 1                Lucknow, November, 1910                        No. 11

                               Effects of Pan
                                     The Editor
  > INVESTIGATION into the cause of the       and cocaine, which arc sometimes taken
numerous cases of poisoning follow-           with pan.
ing the use of pan has demonstrated              The cases responsible for the pan
that these results were due to the            scare a short, time ago were all cases
natural poisonous alkaloids contained         of acute narcotic poisoning due to an
in the betel nut, and not to any germ         excess of the afore named alkaloids
contained in the pan as at first sup-         contained in the betel used; these
posed. Doubtless, there have been             experiences serve as a demonstration
many cases of illness and many deaths         of the real action of pan, also pointing
 from the use of pan which heretofore         out what tissues, organs, and functions
 have been attributed to other causes.        are particularly affected by it.
     Dr. Clark, health officer of Calcutta,      My own observations have led me
 has the following to say in his report       to the following conclusions: Pan is
 on the cases investigated: "The              a narcotic stimulant; its most marked
 usual .symptoms may be briefly de-           effects are due to the alkaloids arakine
 scribed as follows: (1) Tingling and          and arecolin contained in the betel
 dryness of tongue; (2) Nausea with            nut. At first the stimulating pro-
 or without actual vomiting; (3) Gid-          perties predominate, the individual
 diness with more or less stupor; (4)          having a sense of well being, and is
  Muscular weakness; (5) Pulse vari-           particularly pleased with himself.
  able; ' (6) Pupils dilated or con-           Gradually its depressing effects become
  tracted. "                                   more prominent, and in many cases
     " These symptoms certainly suggest        where pan has been habitually used
  a mild form of narcotic poisoning."          for a period of years it is responsible
  He then proceeds to show that betel          for a premature breakdown. In some
  nuts possess intoxicating and poisonous      cases its effect is most marked on the
   properties. " Betel nuts contain an          nervous system, producing irritability
   alkaloid arecolin which closely resem-       and mental confusion with various
   bles physostigmin in its action, (de-        hallucinations.
   pressing heart and nervous system).            The heart is depressed, retarding the
   Piper betel nut also contains an alka-       circulation and producing nutritional
   loid arakine, from which salts similar       disturbances; digestion is usually slow
   to cocaine have been produced. The           and imperfect, with much flatulence
   betel; leaf chewed to excess is said to      due to a lessening of the active prin-
   produce symptoms similar to those of         ciples in the digestive fluid.
   alcoholic intoxication." To this must           Its use at first markedly stimulates
    be added the toxic effects of tobacco       sexual appetite, which in the young
a-                              HERALD UF HEALTH
leads to self-abuse, and in older                 has a cleansing action on the entire
persons to sexual excess. This over-              system; but its real action is lo pro-
stimulation is frequently followed by             duce a state of auto-inloxication as
a marked depression of these func-               shown before.                    „
tions, and I feel confident that the                Dentists assure us that the use of
free use of pan is an important factor            pan is responsible for disease of the
in the rapidly increasing number of              gums and premature loss of the teeth.
sexually impotent men and women.                 The high per cent, of cancer of the
   The lime contained in pan, when               mouth in India is largely due to the
swallowed, produces local inflammation           use of pan.
which may be followed by ulceration.                This almost universal narcotic habit
Lime is an astringent and anti-acid:             among the Indian people is levying a
it produces constipation and lessens             heavy toll upon the nation. The pan
the digestive acid in the stomach.               habit in India is producing its phy-
thus interfering with the digestion              sical, mental, and moral degeneracy,
of albuminous          foods, favouring          as certainly as is the obacco habit in
fermentation and putrefaction in                 Europe and America, and the opium
the alimentary canal, as evidenced               habit in China. But there are tokens
by the foul breath and bad taste in              of an awakening manifesting them-
the mouth of pan users, which is                 selves in the form of anti-alcohol
covered by the aromatics contained in            and anti-tobacco league-, and still
pan. This covering of the symptoms               other movements that aim at finding
does not remove the cause, or its evil           the true path to health and increased
effects; like all narcotics, it is a delusion    physical endurance. Is it not time
and a snare, saying, "Peace, peace,"             that we see in India an anti-pan league
when there is no peace. Many affirm              devoting itself to the stud}' of this
that it produces a sensation of cleanli-         habit and educating (lie public regard-
ness in the mouth after meals, which is          ing its evil effects? Perfect health
largely due to its astringent action,            requires neither stimulant nor nar-
and from this thev conclude that it              cotic.

               Nervous Prostration—Neurasthenia
   [UNDEK the head of "XervousProstration."      plexity of social and commercial life.
there will appear a series of articles dealing   One of the most common disorders of
with the nature, cause, and treatment of
this condition, by Dr. W. H. Riley. a nerve
                                                 the nervous system is what is usually
specialist of large experience. These arti-      known as nervous exhaustionor nerv-
cles first appeared in the American Gnad         ous prostration, or. as physicians
Health, and are reproduced by permission.        usually term it. neurasthenia.
—EDITOR. ]
  Current literature is filled with re-                          Causes
ports of various kinds indicating the              These may be divided into two heads;
diseased and disordered condition of             namely, predisposing and exciting.
the nervous system of society at the             Some of the most important of the
present time. We are evidently living            predisposing causes are heredity, race,
in a time when the nerves and brains of          age, sex, social conditions, location,
men and women are being tried by the             certain occupations. Exciting causes
wear and tear incident to the com-               are first mental; such as, mental shocks
                           HEKALI) OF HKALTH
and mental strains, worry, anxiety,         which develops from these cells is
fright, anger, (overwork and worry          liable to be weak, to lack vigour and
associated together form the most           vitality, and to be unhealthy.
frequent exciting cause), poisons of           The important thing in this question
various kinds, diseases of other organs     of heredity is the kind of material
of the body, injuries to the body. We       which enters into the formation of
will now discuss these further in detail.   these original cells which come from
                 Heredity                   the parents. In order for these origin-
   Heredity is a word used to express       al cells to be healthy, the parents from
conditions which are transmitted from       whose bodies they come must be vigor-
parents to offspring on account of some     ous and healthy. Heredity is used to
peculiarity of (he original cell or cells   express conditions which are trans-
from which we all begin our existence.      mitted from parents to offspring on
In order for us to appreciate and un-       account of the peculiarities of these
derstand to any degree the meaning of       cells which mark the beginning of
heredity, we must first realize the fact    every human life.
that every human individual begins             This law uf heredity shows itself
his existence as a single microscopic       more distinctly in the transmission of
cell, a little animal so small that we      nervous and mental disorders than in
must use the microscope to see it. It       any other way. If the father or moth-
requires at least two of these cells to     er have a disordered or diseased nerv-
begin the life of a human being, one        ous system, particularly if they have
coming from the mother and one com-         a peculiar type of nervous system
ing from the father. After a union of       which is irritable and unstable, this
these two cells, a human life begins its    condition is very apt to be transmitted
existence. These cells which come           in a greater or less degree to the chil-
from mother and father are like the         dren. It is not often that we see a
seeds or buds on a tree, which may be       distinct disease transmitted from pa-
planted in the earth or grafted into        rent to offspring. The disordered or
another tree and will finally bear fruit.   abnormal condition which is more
The plant or tree from this seed or         often transmitted is a weakness or
gr.ift is of the same kind as the parent    tendency to disease. And less often
tree from which it came. So every           do we see a disease itself transmitted.
human being assumes the qualities,             This heredity influence, then, usually
both physical and mental, of the pa--       shows itself in certain ways. First,
rents which gave it birth. If the orig-      there may be a transmission of the
 inal cells which mark the beginning         weakness or tendency to some nervous
of the life of an individual are healthy     disorder. This is the most common
and vigorous, and have a good mea-           way. Second, a disease itself may be
sure of vitality, then the child, the        transmitted, as for instance when the
boy or girl, the man or woman, which        father has epilepsy and the son has
finally develops from these cells will      epilepsy; or the mother has hysteria
 be strong and vigorous and healthy.        and the daughter has hysteria; or the
 On the other hand, if these cells are       father has some organic disease of the
 weak, sickly, and have a small measure     nervous system and the son has the
 of vitality, the individual, the child,     same disease of the nervous system.
 the boy or girl, the man or woman,         This we call a direct transmission.
                             HERALD U* HEALTH
 Third, a disease may be transformed         degree active. In fact, there is scarce-
 as it passes from parent to child. Tn       ly any disorder of the nervous system
 this case (he father might have             but in which this cause is active to a
,epilepsy, or some other severe disease      greater or less degree. Many children
 of the nervous system, and the son          come into the world with a weak and
^suffer from some mental defect, or be-      irritable nervous system which is un-
 come insane, which sometimes hap-           able to withstand the work demanded
 pens. Nervous disorders of this kind        of it in the ordinary experiences and
 are called transformed neuroses; that       affairs of life. Such an individual at
 is, they are transformed or changed in      the age of twenty to thirty may break
 passing from parent to offspring.           down.
 Fourth, the hereditary fa dor may              Given in the order in which the
 show itself by the child's inheriting       hereditary factor is most active as a
 some nervous disorder as the result of      cause in producing functional disord-
 some vice or constitutional disease of      ers of the nervous system, we have the
 the parent. For instance, where the         following: (1) migraine, or sick head-
 father is a drunkard nnd the son is an      ache; (2) epilepsy; (3) hysteria; (4)
 epileptic or an idiot; or where the         neurasthenia, or nervous prostration.
 mother may suffer from pulmonary            It will be seen from this list that the
 tuberculosis or diabetes, and the           hereditary factor is not so active in
 daughter have hysteria. In the last         producing nervous exhaustion as it
 case the nervous disorder seen in the       is in the other diseases mentioned.
 child is the result of some constitution-   Nevertheless, it is the writer's opinion
 al disease in one or both parents.          that it is one of the most important
    The most common diseases of the          factors in causing this disease. And
 nervous system in which heredity acts       here, again. I may repeat for the
 as a contributing casual factor are the     sake of emphasis, that the thing which
 different forms of insanity, epilepsy,      is transmitted from the parent to the
 hysteria, neurasthenia, migraine, or        child is a nervous system which is
 so-called sick headache, certain pecul-     weak and irritable; and this weakness
 iar spasms of the muscles known as          and abnormal irritability of the nerv-
 convulsive tics, and the very rare          ous system may be sufficiently great
 disease myotomia. In addition to            in some oases at some time in the life
 these, there are many other organic         of the individual to amount to a dis-
 diseases of the nervous system not          tinct disease of itself, to which the
 mentioned in this list in which the         term neurasthenia may be properly
 heredity factor is to a greater or less     applied.

              Quarantine Against Tropical Disease
   DURING the period of flies and mos-       plus a reasonable amount of determin-
quitoes the average Indian home is           ation on the part of the keeper of the
daily endangered by malaria or intes-        home.
tinal diseases, or by both. Yet, in             It cannot be too strongly emphasized
nearly every case, this peril may be re-     that everj- fly that enters your home
duced almost to the vanishing point by       may be heavily laden with the germs
a small expenditure for wire-netting         of typhoid fever or some other intest-
                             HEKALD OF HEAL.TB
inal disease. Microscopically exam-            potatoes; the sudden change to tent
ined, the fly ranks as one of the most         life produced many varieties of colds;
loathsome of all creatures, vultures not       the nicknacks of the camp-followers
excepted. It feeds on filth by prefer-         upset the digestion of two men out of
ence, and its feet are so formed that          every three: on the whole, vitality was
the germs through which it walks are           at a low ebb during the first month.
carried away to be distributed wher-               But nobody was really sick. A cor-
ever it may chance to land,—in the             respondent would send to his paper
milk-pitcher, perhaps. Its possibili-          daily the names of men who had faint'
ties in the spread of disease are shown        ed during the hot afternoon drills; but
by the fact that one hundred thousand          the victims were back in line by the
bacteria have boon found adhering to           time the newspaper was published.
one fly.                                       The surgeons and the hospital stewards
    Too many people are content with            were occupied mainly with social
 the partial exclusion of flies from the        functions.
 house. Small openings are overlooked              Then the regiment was bundled off
 because a few stray flies do not cause         to Chicamauga Park, glorying in its
 much discomfort. The extraordinari-            record for health and fitness. Its new
 ly rapid rate at which flies multiply is       camp was laid out in an isolated grove
 overlooked. Lst us suppose that one            high and well drained. Its company
 fly lays her eggs in an unoccupied house       streets won the praise of the division
 that contains sufficient fly-food, and         staff. Its drinking water came from a
 that no destructive force interferes           deep well and from first to last was
  with the successive generations. It           pronounced microscopically free from
 has been estimated that the number of          infection. The food was nutritious;
 flies in that house at the end of five         every man in the regiment had become
  weeks would be about ten million!             a fair cook; rank and file were bronzed
  And yet the house-wife who pays no            and -'hard as nails."
  attention to half a dozen flies scat-             Within a few weeks, however, the
  tered through her house wonders from          surgeons were daily diagnosing typhoid
  day to day '•where all these flies come        fever; the hospital tent was crowded
  from !"                                        with patients; and now and then came
     If these carriers of disease be rigidly     the word that this man and that man
  excluded from contact with the food            had died in the general hospital. The
  eaten, the danger of diarrhoeal diseases       perplexed colonel walked the surgeons
  may be disregarded. Here is a defi-            from one end of the camp to the other
  nite, and well-authenticated instance          every morning; but there was none
  of how they quickly spread typhoid             wise enough to point his finger at the
  germs:—                                        Ciiuse. They all guessed, and guessed
     A regimcrt of healty young men,             wrong.
   most of them from one city, was mus-             It is all as clear as daylight now.
  tered into service for the Spanish-            The Chickamauga woods were full of
   American War. For several weeks               typhoid when the regiment with the
  they were encamped within their own            health record had set up its tents.
   State. It was not a joyous outing;            Within three days the new camp was.
  the food was scant and cooked by men            full of flies, which had come from
   who did not even know how to boil              other regiments. If it had occurred
                           HKKALU OK HEALTH

to one of the staff surgeons to examine    mosquitoes so few as to attract no
the fuzzy feet of a few flies, he would    notice.
have found the typhoid germs which            Before the first month had expired,
he vaintly sought in the well—and his      however, the American was tossing in
reputation would have been made.           bed with the fever that has taken its
These flies walked all over the food in    heavy toll on that coast.    And there-
every company kitchen, and the proud       after, on an average of every two weeks
record of the regiment was quickly         for six months, he had the African fe-
shattered.                                 ver. He -steadily lost flesh and
   The mosquito, as well as the fly.       strength, his complexion turned yel-
should invariably be looked upon as        iow, and there was u look about the
a red flag of danger. The important        eyes that caused more than one Euro-
thing to remember is that scientific       pean to take him aside and say, "Bet-
medicine knows only one way in which       ter get away for a while! ''
the malaria parasite can get into the         Then an army surgeon happened
human blood current—through the bite       along—a man witli a reputation as an
of the mosquito.                           expert on tropical diseases. He was
   The ease with which malaria may be      gathering data for a report on West
acquired in a region where the mosqui-     African diseases. When he met the
toes are so scarce as to produce no dis-   American he saw material for his re-
comfort is shown by the following in-      port. He punctured an ear-lobe, col-
stance :—                                  lected a drop of blood on a glass slide,
   An American and his mosquito-bar        and went off to his microscope.
landed on the west coast of Africa.           "The malaria parasites are eating up
a region which has been known for          your red blood-corpuscles,1' he said the
a century as "The White Man's              next day, as calmly as if he had an-
Grave." He knew that "African              nounced that the pigs were in the gar-
 fever" is simply a pernicious form of     den. " You have two varieties. One
malaria; and he had been taught that       of them can be killed with quinine;
without the mosquito malaria is im-        the other can't. Better run home and
possible. He determined to protect         build up your system."
himself against mosquito-bites; but he
                                             "Very well," said the American.
 also began to take five grains of
                                           "But when I come again the mosquito
quinine daily as an extra precau-
                                           that bites me must first saw his way
tion.
                                           through the bars.''— World Work.
   To his surprise, mosquitoes were not
one of the white man's burdens on that       ••SET yourself earnestly to see what
coast. Xone of the European homes          you were made to do, and then set
were screened: the familiar hum was        yourself earnestly to do it: and the
never heard on the porch after             loftier your purpose is, the more sure
twilight; and most of the beds were        you will be to make the world richer
 uncanopied. Presently the American        with every enrichment of yourself."
 forgot his mosquito-net, but kept up
his quinine. Occasionally, on awak-          "SEE all things, not in the blinding
ening in the morning, he would find        ami deceitful glare of the world's noon,
 a small red spot on hand or forehead ;    but as (hey will seem when the sha-
 but it seemed absurd to protect against   dows of life are closing it."
                             HERALD OF HEALTH

                         The Use of Remedies
                                   Mrs. E. G . White
   DISEASE never comes without a              larities. do not endeavour to adjust
cause. The way is prepared, and               the difficulties by adding a burden of
disease invited, by disregard of the          poisonous medicines.
laws of health. Many suffer in con-              Intemperate eating j s often the
sequence of the transgression of their        cause of sickness, and what nature
parents. While they are not respons-          most needs is to be relieved of the
ible for what their parents have done,        undue burden that has been placed
it is nevertheless their duty to ascer-       upon her. In many cases of sickness,
tain what are and what are not viola-         the very best remedy for the patient
tions of the laws of health. They             is to fast for a meal or two, that the
should avoid the wrong habits of their        overworked organs of digestion may
parents, and. by correct living, place        have an opportunity to rest. A fruit
themselves in better condition.               diet for a few days has often brought
   The greater number, however, suiter        7-elief to brain workers. Many times
because of their own wrong course of          a short period of entire abstinence
action. They disregard the principles         from food, followed by simple, mode-
of health by their habits of eating,          rate eating, has led to recovery through
drinking, dressing, and working.              nature's own recuperative effort. An
Their transgression of nature's laws          abstemious diet for a month or two
 produces the sure result; and when            would convince many sufferers that
sickness comes upon them, many do             (he path of self-denial is the path to
 not credit (heir suffering to the true        health.
 cause, but murmur against God be-                In health and in sickness, pure
 cause of their afflictions. But God is        water is one of heaven's choicest bless-
 not responsible for the suffering that        ings. Its proper use promotes health.
 follows disregard of natural law.             It is the beverage which God provided
 Nature bears much abuse without               to quench the thirst of animals and
 apparent resistance; she then arouses,        man. Drunk freely, it helps to supply
 and makes a determined effort to              these necessities of the system, and
 remove the effects of the ill treatment       assists nature to resist disease. The
 she has suffered. Her effort to correct       external application of water is one
 these conditions is often manifest in         of the easiest and most satisfactory
 fever and various other forms of              ways of regulating the circulation of
 sickness.                                     the blood. A cold or cool bath is an
    When the abuse of health is carried        excellent tonic. Warm baths open
 so far that sickness results, the sufferer    the pores, and thus aid in the elimina-
 can often do for himself what no one          tion of impurities. Both warm and
 else can do for him. The first thing           neutral baths soothe the nerves and
 to be done is to ascertain the true char-      equalize the circulation.
 acter of the sickness, and then go to             But many have never learned by
 work intelligently to remove (he cause.        experience the beneficial effects of the
 If the harmonious working of the               proper use of water, and they are
  system has become unbalanced by               afraid of i(. Water treatments are
  over-work, over-eating, or other irregu-      not appreciated as they should be, and
                          HEKALD OF HEALTH
to apply them skilfully requires work they really are, and wholly unable to
that many are unwilling to perform. do anything. In all these cases, well
But none should feel excused for directed physical exercise would, prove
ignorance or indifference on this sub- an effective remedial agent. In some
ject. There are many ways in which cases it is indispensable to the recovery
water can be applied to relieve pain of health. The will goes with the
and check disease. All should become labour of the hands; and what these
intelligent in its use in simple home invalids need is to have the will
treatments. Mothers, especially, should aroused. When the will is dormant,
know how to care for their families the imagination becomes abnormal,
in both health and sickness.             and it is impossible to resist disease.
   Action is a law of our being. Every      Exercise aids the dyspeptic by
organ of the body has its appointed giving the digestive organs a healthy
work, upon the performance of which tone. To engage in severe study or
its development and strength depend. violent physical exercise immediately
The normal action of all the organs after eating, hinders the work of
gives strength and vigour, while the digestion; but a short walk after a
tendency of disuse is toward decay meal, with the head erect and the
and death. Bind up an arm, even for a shoulders back, is a great benefit.
few weeks, then free it from its bands,    Notwithstanding all that is said and
and you will see that it is weaker written concerning its importance,
than the one you have been using there are still many who neglect phy-
moderately during the same time. sical exercise. Some grow corpulent
Inactivity produces the same effect because the system is clogged; others
upon the whole muscular system.          become thin and feeble because their
   Inactivity is . a fruitful cause of vital powers are exhausted in dispos-
disea.se. Exercise quickens and equal- ing of an excess of food. The liver is
izes the circulation of the blood; but burdened in its effort to cleanse the
in idleness the blood do^s not circulate blood of impurities, and illness is the
freely, and the changes in it, so neces- result.
sary to life and, health, do not take      Those whose habits are sedentary,
place. The skin, too, becomes inactive. should, when the weather will permit,
Impurities are not expelled as they exercise in the open air every day.
would be if the circulation had been summer or winter. Walking is pre-
quickened by vigorous exercise, the ferable to riding or driving; for it
skin kept in a healthy condition, and brings more of the muscle? into exer-
the lungs fed with plenty of pure, cise. The lungs are forced into
fresh air. The state of the system healthy action, since it is impossible
throws a double burden on the excre- to walk briskly without inflating them
tory organs, and disease is the result.    Such exercise would in many cases
                                         be bettor for the health than medicine.
   When invalids have nothing to Physicians often advise their patients
occupy their time and attention, their to tsikf an ocoan voyage, to go to some
thoughts become centered upon them- mineral spring, or to visit different
selves, and they grow morbid and places for change of climate, when in
irritable. Many times they dwell most cases if they would eat tem-
                                         perately, and take cheerful, healthful
upon their bad feelings until they exercise, they would recover health,
think themselves much worse than and would save time and money.
                                  EALTHFU
                           Jellies and Puddings
   To prepare Agar-agar, or vegetable           Wash the tapioca, and put to cook
gelatine, soak it in hot water for an hour    with the water and sugar in a double
or more. Remove from the water, put           boiler; cook until cleared. Pare the
into an iron or heavy bottomed kettle,        pineapple, remove the core, and slice
and pour over it boiling water, four          very thin. Put a layer of the pineap-
cups to the ounce, keeping covered            ple in a deep pan; pour over some of
while cooking. Lat it boil from eight         the tapioca, then another layer of
to ten minutes, or until it is perfectly      pineapple, and so on until all the
clear. Strain through cheese-cloth or         pineapple and tapioca are used. Serve
a wire sieve.                                 cold with cream or fruit juices.
              Lemon Jelly                                  Rice Patties
   Prepare two ounces of gelatine as           Rice, cooked, 2 cups.
above directed. To one-half cup of             Butter, li/2 tiblespoonfuls,
lemon juice, add one cup of sugar, one         Egg whites, well beaten, 2,    y
and one-fourth cups of water, and then         Sugar, 1 tahlespoonfnl,
one cup of cooked gelatine. Pour into          Nutmeg.
 moulds which have previously been wet
 with cold water, and set in a cool place       Mix, and stir over the fire till well
 or on ice to mould. Tins may be              blended; when cold, form into patties,
 served with or without whipped cream,        roll in beaten whites of eggs and then
 or beaten white of egg, flavoured with       in bread crumbs moistened with melt-
 vanilla.                                     ed butter. Bake. Serve hot with
               Orange Jelly                   sweetened cream flavoured with nut-
    To one cup of orange juice add one        meg.                               ;
 cup of sugar, one-fourth of a cup of                     Caramel Costard
 lemon juice, one-half cup of water, and        Milk, 3 cups,
 one cup of cooked gelatine. Mould,             Butter, 1 tablespoonful,
 and serve as for lemon jelly.                  Watsr, ya cup,
              Pineapple Jelly                   Sugar, 1 cup,
    To one and one-half cups of pineap-         Eggs, 6,
 ple juice add one-fourth cup of lemon          Vanilla. \'3 teaspoonful.
 juice, one cup of sugar, and one cup of        Put the butter into a saucepan and
 the cooked gelatine. Mould, and serve        set on the fire. When melted, stir in
 as the lemon jelly.                          the sugar and let cook until of a dark
    Other flavours may ba made by using       brown colour, stirring frequently to
 grape, cherry, strawberry, blackberry,       prevent burning. Xow add the water,
 or other fruit juices in tin- place of the   which should be hot, and stir until the
  pineapple.—Ilealtliful Cookery.             caramel (the browned sugar) is dis-
  Pearl tapioca, 1 cup,                       solved. Beat up the eggs and mix
                                              with the milk; add this to the caramel
             Pineapple Tapioca                and flavour with the vanilla. Pour
   Pineapple, ripe, 1,                        into custard cups, set into a shallow
   Water, 1 quart.                            pan of water, and bake until the cus-
   Sugar, l cup.                              tard is set in the middle.
                         t    f_          _

                         The Home
      The Spontaneity of God's Great Out-of-doors
                                   George Wharton James
    EVERY time I go out of doors, I am             See men and women as they follow
 impressed as never before, with the            the fashions. How different the re-
 spontaneity of natural things. How             sults from the spontaneous harmony of
 the grass grows up, each blade cleav-          the flowers, of all God's great out-of-
 ing the earth, uniting with every              doors. Incongruity and folly mark
 other blade to cover the bare places           the dress from skin to exterior, from
 with richest green ! Buds shoot forth          shoes to hats,—too close underwear,
 from every branch. Then the peach              restricting corsets, tight dresses,
 and plum trees begin to bloom. How             tight and cruelly heeled shoes, uncom-
 spontaneous all these expressions of           fortable collars, sleeves that restrict
 growth and expansion are! How each             normal action of the arms, and hats
 bud comes forth in response to the call       that seem to bo the invention of es-
 it hears, the impulse it feels, and yet        caped lunatics. And as for the me-
 how wonderfully harmonious is that            thods of hair dressing that introduce
 spontaneity !                                 great mattresses of foreign hair to
    Here are wistaria and gold-of-ophir         make untidy haymows of a woman's
 roi?es, a combination as delicious to the     queenly head, I would imprison for life
 eye as it is fragrant to the senses.          the wantons who started such fashions,
 Whence came this delicately beautiful         and pillory the foolish girls who fol-
 Japanese flower!1 Who originated \t'.         low them.
 Surely, it must be one of the sweet              And men's dress is not much better.
 thoughts of God, for man's benefit            The padded shoulders of the coats,
visualized and given (o him while here         the stiff bosomed shirts, the tight pa-
on earth, that he may dream of the             tent leather shoes, the creased trous-
life beyond. Every blossom is per-             ers, the absurd high necked collars,
fect ; yet each one is free and independ-      the sham and never-deceptive cuffs,
ent. It grew—sprang forth spontane-            the high silk hat. or the stiff and
ously in answer to the vehement de-            unventilated derby, are all proof of
mand of its whole nature.         And yet     man's lack of spontaneity and har-
you may sit and study the whole of it,        mony in dress.
every blossom, every leaf, every pen-             How hearty, spontaneous, and di-
dant cluster, for an hour, a day, a           rect is the sun, and the rain and the
week; and I defy you to find one dis-         wind,—rude, some persons might call
cordant note of shape or colour in it-        them. AVhen the time comes, the sun
all. Spontaneity and harmony —what            appears in full glory, without reserve,
a glorious combination ! What a reve-         without apology, without any blow-
lation and incitement to man !                ing of trumpets. And the rain, how
                             HKKALD OK HEALTH                                          11

it falls? Day or night, when the con-          is that they are too affected, too civil-
ditions are right, it begins to descend,       ized, too far from nature, to be spon-
and either gently or tumulttiously and         taneous, easy, frank. From the hour
peltingly it continues, washing (lie at-       of birth we restrain, restrict, confine,
mosphere and cooling it, cleansing the         suppress, change, alter instead of seek-
dust-laden trees, slaking the dust on          ing to guide the natural spontaneity
the roads, washing the streets, vivify-        of life into God-ordered channels.
ing the lawns and flower beds, supply-         The result is we grow up unnatural,
ing needed nourishment for vegetables          artificial, unspontaneous, affected. We
and grains whether in I he small gardens       say this is civilization, education, re-
of the poor or (he immense ranches             finement. T do not believe it to be the
of the rich, and bringing life and             true civilization, the true education,
 vigour everywhere. How spontaneous,           the true refinement; but a mistaken, a
 frank, generous, open, it all is!     And     wrong notion of civilization, educa-
the odour of the flowers! ITow they            tion, refinement, and takes away God-
 fill the air with their rich fragrance;       given standards and substitutes those
 and the beggar may enjoy them as               of men. The aim of one's life should
 much as the millionaire, the illiterate        be to find God's standards and conform
 as the learned, the poor as the re-            to them, regardless of meeting the
 fined.                                         false, and harmful standards of men.
     Mankind is a part of this great out-       We should come into the lives of our
 of-doors—a thought of God who creat-           fellows with the spontaneity of the
 ed it. He, possessing the power of rea-        sunshine, as does the rain, the good,
 son, may study its ways, its methods,          that God bestows alike upon the just
 and learn therefrom. All through               and the unjust. In every thought and
 nature this spontaneous expression of          act it should be one's aim to be spon-
 life is found. Everything springs glad-        taneous, acting out not the selfish,
  ly, readily, joyously, to do its allotted     evil, human, but the unselfish, noble,
  work. The sun springs upon the world           and divine.
  each morning, and delights in flooding            There is more to this spontaneity of
  the haunts of men, birds, beasts, and          nature than most of us perceive. Not
  animals with light and warmth: the             one man or woman in a million is spon-
  water flows freely, spontaneously, rea-        taneous. We dare not be. AYe are
  dily, wherever a way is made for it: the       afraid. We have been trained to be
  wind seeks out every nook and cranny,          afraid. We live unnaturally because
  every corner and hidden place, and             we have not so established the princi-
  brings its purifying influence there:          ples of life, so crystalized our thoughts,
   the rain falls on the just and the un-        that we dare not allow our actions to
   just; the grass grows as spontaneous          spring into light nnexamined. unstu-
   for a peasant as for a king, and feeds        died, iintrimmed.
   alike the squirrel and the cow. Each             O. for the hearty, responsive,
   does its best, readily, freely, spontane-     great-hearted, big souled man or
   ously, without holding-back: and in so        woman, spontaneous, ready, willing;
   doing there is a harmony, a perfection         who clasps you by the hand speedily;
   of service, (hat benefits and blesses the      who looks you in the eye readily; who
    world.                                        pours the wealth of his intellect, his
      Too often the trouble with mankind          soul, his experience, over you in a
                             HERALD UK HEALTH

generous flood; who shines warmth            every nook and cranny, every corner
and light into the darkest recesses of       and hidden place of your life; who is
your life; who sends sweeping tides of       frank, honest, open, unaffected, sin-
great winds of purity and love into          cere.

           The Importance of the Teeth to Health
   THE value of a perfect set of teeth         dentist; and it is a good rule to have
cannot be estimated. Nothing is so            the dentist examine (he child's mouth,
becoming in either man, woman, or              after three years of age, at least twice
child as an even, well preserved, clean       a year.
set of teeth. Not only are the teeth             The one great essential to a healthy
necessary for (he proper mastication          mouth is cleanliness. Most persons
of food; bill (he clearness of speech,        fail to take proper care of the teeth
the lines of the face, and, in particular,    until compelled to do so by decay of
the shape of the mouth depend upon            one or more and its painful conse-
the regularity of the teeth : and there       quences. Decay of the teeth, recession
is no reason why every person should          of the gums, and deposits of tartar
not possess a perfect set if only pro-        are preventable and are rarely found in
per care be exercised. The necessity          the mouths well cared for. Dental
of the teeth to the general well-being        caries or decay is unfortunately on the
of the individual is not sufficiently         increase, and it is only within the last
recognized, and too much stress cannot        few years (hat dentists have com-
belaid upon the necessity of teaching         pletely understood what causes it.
every man. woman, and child to                The True Cause of Decay of the Teeth
look to the care of his mouth and
                                                 Recent investigations have shown
teeth.
                                              that all decay of the teeth is caused
   Attention should ba paid to the teeth      by an acid—lactic-acid (the same acid
 at the earliest possible, age. and every     that is formed when milk sours). This
 child should bo taught to keep its          lactic-acid is formed in several ways.
 teeth clean. Care in this matter is          Food particles, which lodge between
 one of the bast methods of preserving       the teeth, becoiny infected by germs in
 the child's teeth and laying the            the mouth, undergo fermentation, and
 foundation for a vigorous develop-          produce lactic acid; the micro-organ-
 ment. Many of the contagious diseases       isms which cause decay are found in
common to childhood arise from a bad         the mouth and lodge on the surface of
condition of the mouth. Above all, it        the teeth, where they secrete the same
must bo remembered that the first set,       acid, which is very destructive to the
or milk teeth, should not of necessity       enamel of the teeth; while certain
decay; for, when properly cared for,         irregularities of the stomach and
they drop out as perfect as when first       mouth glands may produce an acid
cut, as soon as the second set develops.     condition of the saliva, which then
Early loss of the milk teeth is certain      gives rise to a slow erosion or solution
to produce an irregular second set,          of the tooth structure. Once the
which spoils the shape of the mouth          enamel is attacked by lactic acid, the
and face. If decay attacks the first         disintegration of the body of the tooth
teeth they should be filled by the           is very rapid. It is obvious from
                               HERALD OF HEALTH                                        13
   what has been said that irregular              der must be anti-acid, detergent, onh
   teeth, which are difficult to keep clean.     slightly flavoured, mildly frictional,
   are very liable to decay.                      and an efficient but harmless germicide,
      The use of acid foods or medicines,         in order to destroy the organisms
   and of tooth powders of a gritty and          which cause decay and are present in
   insoluble nature, or which contain            most mouths. It should also be soluble
   substances whk-h exert a chemical             in the fluids of the mouth, in order to
   action upon the enamel, may also be           prevent insoluble particles collecting
   an additional factor in causing de-           under the gums. These are the require-
  struction of the teeth. It may be taken        ments for a perfect, dentifrice, in ac-
   as a general rule that if the enamel of       cordance with the modern accepted
  the tooth is kept intact and the mouth         views of oral hygiene.
  healthy, decay will not occur. Decay                   How to Clean the Teeth
  always commences from the exterior                The teeth should bo cleaned at least
  of the tooth, never from the inside.           twice a day. The brush should be of
  Strong alcoholic or caustic washes             moderate size and made of soft, fairly
  injure the mucous membrane, while             long bristles, in order to reach between
  the steady use of astringent washes           the teeth and dislodge the food parti-
  and powders is injurious to the gums.         cles which invariably collect there.
  Such preparations should be used only         Remember that nine-tenths of the
  at such times as the dentist may direct,      decay of the teeth commences between
  never daily. Liquids or powders con-          the teeth. Use plenty of powder
 taining acids of any kind, alum, or            and plenty of water, and don't scrub
  cream of tartar, are all destructive to       the teeth and gums. Much harm
  the enamel; while powders containing          can be done in this way. Brush
 charcoal, powdered barks and roots,            the teeth gently, giving the brush a
 such as Peruvian bark, orris bark,             rotary motion so as to allow the
 rhatany root, are injurious because            bristles to penetrate between the teeth.
 the insoluble fibres collect under the         If the teeth are at all irregular, clean
 margins of the gums and cause either           the spaces between them with a quill
 recession or deposits of tartar. This          tooth pick or a piece of dental floss
 is strikingly shown in the use of              silk. Don't use metal or wood picks;
 charcoal, which produces a tatooed            the former are apt to injure the teeth
 appearance of the gums. Tooth pow-             and gums, and the latter are liable
 ders containing pumice or gritty sub-         to splinter. Brush the grinding sur-
 tances, if used steadily, roughen the         faces of the teeth, also the inner sur-
surface of the enamel and pave the              faces. Finally, brush the gums and
way for decay. Pumice may some-                tongue and rinse out the mouth with
times be used to remove stains; but it         water.
should be applied to the spot with a               The most important time to clean
piece of orange wood and never used            the teeth is just before going to bed.
frequently in a tooth powder.                  Dental decay is most aclivc at night,
    The ideal dentifrice should be in          when the mouth is quiet and there is
powder form; as liquid preparations            no flow of saliva to keep the teeth
are universally deficient in the cleans-       protected. It is also a wise plan to
ing properties possessed by a properly         look to the mouth after taking acid
prepared tooth powder. Such a pow-             foods or drinks.
14                           HERALD OF HEALTH

                     The War on the Cigarette
                                  Lucy Page Gaston
   THAT the innocent-looking little          sneak who will lie and even steal if
white rolls commonly called "coffin          necessary to get the means to indulge
nails" are getting in their work to a        his appetite. I have had parents as-
considerable extent among the school         sure me that their boy was a model in
boys of our land, the most casual ob-        this respect when I knew, and many
servation shows. Where a few are             others knew, that he was becoming a
bold enough to smoke publicly, it is an      cigarette fiend.
unfailing indication that often many           A pledge upon honour not to smoke
others are indulging in the habit se-        at least until he is twenty-one is a
cretly.                                      great safeguard to a boy in his early
   The cigarette habit easily becomes        teens and through the crucial years
epidemic in a school so that large num-      before his majority.
bers indulge in it, smoking either oc-         The Anti-cigarette League has for
casionally or habitually and secretly if     years done for boys in the mass what
not openly. The cruel indifference or        careful parents are doing for their own
ignorance of many parents is difficult       loved ones. Many a tempted boy has
to understand; as the cigarette habit        been saved by this simple effort by an
in the growing youth saps the vitality,      earnest organizer in a public school.
thereby stunting physical growth and         An Anti-cigarette school campaign is
stupefying the mentality. The ciga-          a great blessing to the homes of any
rette is the s^ed of the drink habit, and    community, as many cities can testify.
often the forerunner also of hideous           In America ten States have made
forms of personal impurity.                 the cigarette an out-law by absolutely
   Not only prisons and reformatories,      prohibiting the manufacture and sale
crowded to the limit with mere youths.      of cigarette and cigarette papers, and
but the populous insane asylums bear        many other States are now lining up
sad testimony to what the cigarette is      their forces for a fight to the finish
helping to make of bright promising         with the worst foe that ever threatened
boys such as to-day in our schools are      the youth of the race.
tampering with cigarettes.                     It is evident to most thinking per-
   Parents who read this word of            sons that it is necessary to strike at the
warning may well go into secret ses-        root of the evil and clear the markets
sion with their young hopefuls for a        of what can so easily find its way into
heart-to-heart talk. Parental authority     the hands of the young, the weak, and
should be sufficient in the case of any     the unwary. Practical business men.
one found guilty. A comparatively           especially employers of young help,
short indulgence, let it be remembered,     are urging the most drastic legislation
changes a boy into a contemptible           possible.

                         The Missing Exhibit
   NONE of the world's great exposi-        liquor industry. It has always suf-
tions has given full representation to      fered neglect at the hands of those
one of the leading industries of nearly     having expositions in charge. This
every country ontheglobe. This is the       may not have been due to -conscious
                           HERALD OF HEALTH                                        15

discrimination: for. perhaps, it has       saloon, he was a sober man; when he
never occurred to the liquor interest to   came out, he was like that, and he was
take advantage of such an opportunity      what you made him. If he is not a
for exploiting its products, and it        specimen of the work done inside,
may never have occurred to anyone          what is he ?"
else to urge such a display; but Mr.           If only a few of the truest represent-
Gough once saw fit in one of the great     atives of the work done by the liquor-
cities of England to suggest at least      traffic had been sent to any one of our
what might be done in this direction.      great expositions, and these had all
   Seeing a drunken man lying on the       been placed on exhibit in one building,
ground just outside of a saloon door, he   would it not have been a significant
hastened across the street to a grocery    object lesson?
store, and requested a sheet of paper.         The drunken bloat, the loafer, the
With a piece of coloured crayon, he        ragged, h'lthy gutter-sleeper, the mad-
wrote in large letters the words:          dened demon, the silly, chattering im-
"Specimen of the work done inside/'        becile, the bra/en harlot, the neglected
Then hastening to where the drunkard       home, together with the broken-hearted
lay, he pinned the paper to the man's       wife, the distracted father, the starv-
coat, and stood aside to see the effect    ing child, the hopeless epileptic—
 produced upon the passers-by. A            these give but a suggestion of the fear-
crowd soon gathered, which attracted        ful ravages the liquor traffic is making
 the attention of the saloon-keeper.        upon the homes and citizens of our
 As he came out and observed the cause      fair land. What an exhibit the liquor
 of unusual interest, he angrily asked.     products of the whole world must
 "Who did it?'' ''Which? 1 ' asked Mr.      make to him who beholds them all.
 Gough. "If you mean what is on the         past, present, and future ! And what
 paper, I did that; if you mean the         must he think of the man who. in the
 man, you did it. This morning when          face of all this devastation, lifts his
 he started for his work, he was a          voice for the continuation of the
 sober man; when he went into your          ,-vil [—Selected.

         The Relation of Meat-eating to the Plague
  FOR centuries the plague has pre-        being that a flesh diet builds up the
vailed more or less severely among the     resistance of the body to disease, thus
inhabitants of Persia, India, and other    fortifying it against the plague as
parts of the Orient. These people are.     well as against other infections.
for the greater part, rice-eaters. Flesh     Certain of the newspapers of San
foods are little used, partly because of   Francisco long refused to recognize
their expensive character, and partly      the presence of plague in the city,
because of religious scruples. The         declaring that " no plague existed, or
fact that meat is little eaten by the      ever had existed, or ever could exist
people among whom bubonic plague           among meat-eating white people."
has prevailed most extensively and         Dr. Blue, the special agent of the
constantly lias enabled the defenders      American government, who for two
of the flesh diet to construct :ui argu-
ment for a flesh diet, the contention        . (Coii.cf.uded. on Page Se f.enteen.).;
16                          HERALD OF HEALTH
                                             roundings, for the treatment of all
                                             forms of paralysis, neuralgia, nervous
          PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY               headache, locomotor ataxia, mental de-
                                             pression, and melancholia. The whole
  International Tract Society, sanitarium system is adapted to the
                                             building up and reconstruction of the
                                             nervous system.
 S. C. JVlenkel, M. B«, - Editor
                                                           Constipation
 Subscription, Fo»t gtov.           Re. '•»     Chronic and obstinate cases of con-
                                             stipation, whether from atony and dil-
 REGISTERED,                  No. A. 457 atation of the colon, dietetic errors,
                                             or spasm of the colon with contraction
                                             of the abdomen, are successfully treat-
 Who Should Visit the Mussoorie ed by the combined means of diet,
                                             hydrotherapy, electricity, and massage.
                 Sanitarium                  Our experience with this class of cases
    NEARLY all invalids would be bene- warrants us in offering encourage-
 fited by a sojourn at the Sanitarium. ment to those who suffer from this an-
 It is especially organized and equipped noying malady. Eiiteroptosis, or pro-
 to meet the needs of chronic invalids lapsus of the abdominal viscera, is also
 who have long been sick, and cannot treated with good results.
 recover at home, or who, for lack of             Bright's Disease and Diabetes
 facilities which their cases require, are     The accurate methods of diagnosis,
 not likely to get well at home.            and the facilities for careful diet reg-
            Digestive Disorders              ulation, yield specially encouraging
    Nine-tenths of the people are afflict- results in the management of these
 ed with dyspepsia; consequently, two serious and difficult diseases.
 chronic digestive disorders form 'a Cases of this class are amenable to
 large percentage of the cases treated. treatment when under the influence of
                                            the
 A great many of these cases have run else. Sanitarium regime, as nowhere
the gamut of patent medicines, stom-
 ach bitters, and dyspepsia tablets,                  Rheumatism and Gout
without securing relief; and, almost in        These painful affections are favour-
 despair of obtaining help, they turn to ably influenced by the various baths
the Sanitarium, where the systematic and other treatments administered,
lines of treatment, with the special and patients are oft-times afforded
 facilities for diagnosis and accurate speedy relief from pain and other
diet prescriptions, afford relief in the symptoms by strict adherence to the
most aggravated cases, and effect re- non-uric-acid-diet here provided. A
markable cures in the majority of sojourn at the Sanitarium cannot but
others.                                     prove of great value to those, suffer-
      Diseases of the Nervous System        ing from rheumatism.
    Among the cases successfully treated                 Liver Disorders
at this Institution, chronic diseases of       The liver is one of the vital organs
the nervous system are the most pro- most seriously damaged by modern
minent.       Functional derangements, high living. Jaundice, torpid liver,
such as nervous prostration, bra ; n fag. and biliousness are common disorders.
migraine, neurasthenia, and hysteria, The Sanitarium offers special help to
together with the milder forms of or- this class of sufferers, by means of its
ganic disturbance of the spine, brain, regulated dietary which affords the
and peripheral nerves, are treated with liver a chance to rest, as well as the
the bast results. The Institution offers hepatic douche and other special treat-
the best possible advantages, both in ments calculated to arouse ihe liver to
medical equipment and natural sur- its normal activity.
                            HERALD OF HEALTH
                                             THE RELATION OF MEAT-EAT-
Surgical Instruments                             ING TO THE PLAGUE
                                                (Concluded from Page Fifteen )
and                                          years has been at work fighting this
Hospital Requisites                          dread scourge in San Francisco, has
                                             utterly routed the defenders of this
   Oi R revised illustrated price
                                             theory, and has demonstrated to the
list is now ready.                           satisfaction of everybody that meat-
   If you have not already receiv-           eating is no defence against this grave
ed a copy, we shall be glad to send          malady.
one post free on receipt of your                 It is not the rice diet of Orientals
application for the same.                    which leads to the prevalence of plague
                                             among them, but the utter lack of
   You will find it useful for
                                             sanitation and the presence of count-
reference, and will find prices
                                             less numbers of fleas, with rats and
compare favourably with those of             other rodents which are highly subject
the best English makers.                     to this disease. As a matter of fact,
  We guarantee the quality of all            the plague seems to be peculiarly a
instruments we send out.                     meat-eater's disease. The rat is a
                                             meat-eater. He gets the disease. The
SMITH, STANISTREET &CO.,                     flea, a flesh-eater, or at least a blood-
            CALCUTTA.
                                             eater, contracts the disease from the
                                              rat and conveys it to man. While
                                             flesh-abstainers are not exempt, from
    School of Health                          (his disease, it quite likely will be
   THE new book. Have you seen it'.'          shown sometime that the meat-eater
A guide to health in the home. It             is actually more liable to contract this
contains the elementary facts of              disease than flesh abstainers. It has
physiology; a practical course in
                                              been clearly established that the fivsh-
physical culture, instruction in health-
ful cookery, and directions for the           abstainer has far greater resistance
home treatment of the most common             against fatigue than the meat-eaterhas.
diseases.                                     The physiologic reasons for this fact, so
   The author, Alfred 15. Olsen. M. IX,       well-shown by Professor Fisher's class-
Superintendent of the Surrey Hills
                                              ical experiments, ought to apply
Hydropathic, and of the Leicester
Sanitarium. England, has had a broad          equally well to resistance against
experience in eombnttinp disease in           disease.
various forms in different lamU' and
                                                  Arguments in support of flesh-
is well qualified for the work of bring--
inf>- out a book of this character.           eating are a scarce commodity these
  The book should be iu every home,
                                              days. Modem advances in physiology,
and where it is used and its instruc-          physiologic chemistry, and bacterio-
tions followed, it will prove itself to be     logy, as well as practical experience,
just what its name implies, a '• School        have left little ground for the defence
of Health."                                    of the use of animals for food.—
402 pp. Cloth, I«s. -l-s (Postage Kxt,7-a)
INTERNATIONAL TRACT SOCItT Y
                                               ./. II. Kellogg, M. D.
         19, Banks Roarl, Lucknow.
                                                •' KAT for strength."
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       For a complete list of our foods and prices, Address.

    Sanitarium Health Food Co.,
           75, Park Street, Calcutta.
  Mussoorie
* Sanitarium
*
\
*
5          This institution offers the best inducements to the true seeker f
3    after health. Its location in Mussoorie enables it to combine the
%    benefits of rest and change and a vacation in the hills with medical
^    supervision, and the advantages of the most complete and effective
jj   remedial system embracing such measures as,


o        Electric Light Bath,                                                                ^
I        Electricity in Various Forms,                                                       :
*        Hydrotherapy,
j        Massage,
*        Vibratory Treatments,
i        Carefully Regulated Diet*
Jj  Our aim is to bring to bear in one place the
j most health-promoting agencies.
j
t       For rates and further particularsf address,                                          fc
i                                          _____                                             \
i                                          ———                                               ^
j MUSSOORIE SANITARIUM, MUSSOORIE £
        F'riBt«d l».f W. K. f'nrrin, at. tbc W»t<-h[»»« Prena. 19, Banlca (toad, f-uoknow.

				
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