Physical Education Unit – Dance

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Physical Education Unit – Dance Powered By Docstoc
					    Table of Contents
1) Introduction and unit questions
     2) Elemental Circle Dance
       3) Red River Jig part 1
       4) Red River Jig part 2
      5) Arts Ed. – Moccasins
     6) Language Arts Lesson
        7) Vulani Ringi Ring
    8) Background Information
            8) Resources
                         “Circle The World With Dance”
1) Unit summary:
        For this unit I will be focusing on different dances from cultures around the world
that are all performed in a circle. We will first review some basics about the elements of
dance, and then look at a traditional Métis dance and an African dance. I chose this topic
because I feel that dance is one of the best ways to incorporate multiple perspectives in
our schools. I also like how simple these dances are to teach and perform, but yet how
elegant they look when put together. The dances are also fun and very active which will
help to keep the students engaged.

2) Curriculum-Framing Questions:
       Essential Question: From the beginning of time, dance has developed in almost
              every single culture (if not every culture) on Earth. Why?
       Content Questions: What are some similarities between the dances of the world?
                           How do the 4 principles of movement relate to dance?
                           How is co-operation pivotal to dance success?

3) EPS Additional Content:
Challenge: Classroom management in the gym – keeping everyone on task for the whole
week of dance.
Building from last time: We will build on what we learned about change in movement
patterns and expand it into a formalized setting
Application of this semester: I am going to let the student have a very large amount of
personal choice in this unit – they will have a lot of responsibility in the gym (Hellison‟s
work). They will also self assess based on Hellison‟s progression.

4) Curriculum Objectives:

      perform increasingly complex movement sequences using Movement Variables of
       Body, Space, Effort and Relationships, alone and with others, with and without
       equipment
      demonstrate an increasing capacity to use the body for expression and
       communication through movement (CCT, C)
      demonstrate rhythmic and dance patterns from a variety of dance forms, alone and
       with others (CCT)
      use creative processes to develop rhythmic and dance sequences, alone and with
       others
      expand personal movement vocabulary

5) Unit progression:
        Elemental Circle dance
        Red River Jig part one
        Red River Jig (Métis) part two
        Arts Education – Making Moccasins
        English language arts – African Dance
       Vulani Ringa Ring (Africa)


                       The Elemental Circle Dance
                                      One class
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                Date:

Content (topic):
  - Reviewing and strengthening understanding of the elements of dance through a
      circle dance.
  - Students will review levels (high medium low), dynamics, and actions.

Teaching strategy:
   - Direct Instruction

Learning objectives:

      expand personal movement vocabulary
      perform increasingly complex movement sequences using Movement Variables of
       Body, Space, Effort and Relationships, alone and with others, with and without
       equipment
      demonstrate an increasing capacity to use the body for expression and
       communication through movement
      demonstrate rhythmic and dance patterns from a variety of dance forms, alone and
       with others
      use creative processes to develop rhythmic and dance sequences, alone and with
       others

Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Communication
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - Music “Sacred Spirit”
  - CD player

Advance preparation:
  - Research the elements of dance.
  - Know what fits where! (dynamics are not the same as actions, but actions have
     dynamics)

Prerequisite Learning:
   - This should be a review lesson. Students should already have a good idea of the
      elements of dance.
Presentation:
Set:
    - Students will do four “scooter laps” first on bum, second stomach, third on back,
      fourth in their own way.
    - Explain the game to the students, and explain that everyone will have to work
      together as a team in order to keep the circle as a circle!

Development:
   - Have all the students stand in a circle. Preferably around the big center circle of
       the gym (this gives them a visual to follow as they move around).
   - Hold hands and have students work as a group through the following exercises.
       For each of these exercises they will move in a circle as a group.
   - Call upon a student to come up with the movement for the element you supply
       (for example you say “a level” and the student should then say “high” and so on):
           o move at a high level, low level, and medium level.
           o different actions the group can do as a whole, such as “walking through
               wet cement” or “galloping like a young colt”
           o walk at different dynamics – hard, slow, even, uneven, ext.
   - Use a hand drum or whistle to signify when everyone it to stop, or to signify that
       you will be calling out another element soon.
Closure:
   - Cool down by playing DJ Casper “Cha-cha Slide” and having the class do the
       dance. Just follow the directions in the music!
   - Explain self assessment and have the students do their first self assessment.
   - Back in the classroom (next lesson, in ELA) discuss how each element of dance
       played into each of the others. For example if you were pretending to walk
       through wet cement that may be an action, but it also affected the dynamics of
       how you moved, even though it was not said.
   - Discuss how each student interpreted the elements differently, and journal about
       it.

Adaptations and Extensions:
  - Call out a mix of all three elements (Gallop at an uneven dynamic on a high level)
  - Have two circles so that each student gets more turns to make suggestions
  - Have a hat full of pre-written suggestions and pull them out and say them
      yourself.

Classroom Management Strategies:
   - Have a hand-drum to play rhythms
   - If a student is repeatedly causing a disruption, have them make a lap around the
       circle doing an action such as galloping, side shuffling, or doing the grapevine.
       Continue on with the lesson as normal, not calling any attention to the student
       making their lap.
                         The Red River Jig part 1
                                        One class
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                   Date:

Content (topic):
  - Students will journal about the previous lesson.
  - Students will listen to the story “Fiddle Dancer” by Anne Patton and Wilfred
      Burton. They will listen to the story in English, as read by Wilfred Burton, as
      well as part of it in Michif, a traditional Métis language.

Teaching strategy:
   - Think pair share
   - Picture books/ Book-on-tape

Learning objectives:

       Listen to a range of grade-level appropriate texts in a variety of situations for a
       variety of purposes.
      Listen attentively, courteously, and purposefully to a range of texts from a variety
       of cultural traditions for pleasure and information

Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Communication
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - The story “Fiddle Dancer”
  - CD of the readings
  - CD player

Advance preparation:
  - Make sure the CD works

Prerequisite Learning:
   - Students should know how to listen politely and intently

Presentation:
Set:
    - We will discuss what we did in the last lesson
    - Students will write their journal entries on the topic why is co-operation important
      in dance?
Development:
    - Talk about The traditional language of Michif, and where they think Michif came
      from – French and Cree – talk about any similarities they can hear to what they
      are learning in French class
   -   Then we will listen to part of the story “Fiddle Dancer” read in traditional Michif,
       I will show the pictures from the book, but cover up the English text.
   - The students will then try to figure out what the story is in English, and write
       what they think the story is about. Each student will write a re-telling that goes
       along with the pictures and the text – based on what they know about French, and
       the pictures.
   - In small groups students will share their re-tellings.
Closure:
   - We will listen to the story as read by Mr. Burton (on CD).

Adaptations and Extensions:
Wilfred Burton could come into the class to read the story himself (unfortunately he is
not available during this block.



              The Red River Jig – Part two (in gym)
                                    One or two classes
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                  Date:

Content (topic):
  - Métis Fancy Dance.

Teaching strategy:
   - Direct Instruction

Learning objectives:

      expand personal movement vocabulary
      perform increasingly complex movement sequences using Movement Variables of
       Body, Space, Effort and Relationships, alone and with others, with and without
       equipment
      demonstrate an increasing capacity to use the body for expression and
       communication through movement
      demonstrate rhythmic and dance patterns from a variety of dance forms, alone and
       with others
      use creative processes to develop rhythmic and dance sequences, alone and with
       others

Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Communication
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - The book “Fiddle Dancer” by Wilfred Burton
   -   CD player and the music “Red River Jig” by John Arcand

Advance preparation:
  - Learn the dance

Prerequisite Learning:
   - Students should have a good idea of who the Métis are, and why they are so
      important to our province and country. Each school in Regina Public is required
      to have Aboriginal content that promotes understanding and knowledge, so this
      should not be a problem.
   - This will work very nicely with Jackie‟s social studies unit. As well this will
      build upon what we are doing in the classroom for The Red River Jig part one.

Presentation:
**We have read and discussed the book in part one**
Set:
    - Review who the Métis are.
    - Ask students to recall the steps from the book.
    - Do a five to seven minute warm-up activity of playing the “mirror game,”
       students work in partners trying to mirror each others movements. While running
       around the room
Development:
    - Hand each student two rhythm sticks and listen to the music. Each time the temp
       changes, have the students hit the sticks together. This is a kinesthetic way for the
       students to not only hear the difference, but also to “experience” the difference.
       Try this twice.
    - Teach the students the dance in the book.
    - The main steps are the Resting Step, Rabbit Step, Cross Step, and the Chi Galop.
    - Students all stand in a circle and begin doing the Resting Step, as the music‟s
       tempo changes a Caller shouts out one of the three fancy steps and the students
       follow along. When the music‟s tempo changes back, the students begin the
       Resting Step again. A new Caller is chosen (just going clock-wise around the
       circle is a good idea for this) and they again listen for the change in tempo and
       call out the new step.
    - This repeats until the end of the song.
Closure:
    - Have the class break into four groups. Each group will go to a different corner
       and create there own Fancy Dance step.
    - Give them three to five minutes to pick their step.
    - Come back to the large circle and begin the dance again with yourself as the
       Caller.
    - Instead of calling a step, call a group to come into the center of the circle and
       perform their step.
    - Have the rest of the class do the new step along with the group in the center.
    - Repeat until each group has gotten a chance to show off their new step.
    - Cool down in the center by stretching if there is time.
Classroom Management Strategies:
   - If a student is using their rhythm sticks for anything other than finding the rhythm
       of the song, calmly and quietly take their sticks away from them and have them
       clap at the appropriate times.
   - Proximity control

Adaptations and Extensions:
  - Eliminate the Resting Step; rather just have students step one foot then the other
      to the beat.
  - Spend almost a full class on understanding the music‟s subtle changes.


               Arts Education – Making Moccasins
                                        One class
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                  Date:

Content (topic):
  - We will make a Métis moccasin out of fun foam. We will decorate them with
      flowers like traditional Métis ones.

Teaching strategy:
- “One-at-a-time” instructions
- hands on learning

Learning objectives:
   - Begin to understand the variety of sources for visual art ideas.
   - Develop understanding of the work of a variety of visual artists.

Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - Fun foam
  - Pipe cleaners
  - Markers
  - Scissors
  - Hand outs

Advance preparation:
  - Make the guides for cutting out the moccasins.
  - Make the hand out on traditional Métis beading work.

Prerequisite Learning:
   - The Métis have a proud and distinct culture
Presentation:
Set:
    - Read “Fiddle Dancer” and learn the dance
Development:
    - Students will chose a colour of foam, and a pipe cleaner. They will trace the
       shape of the moccasin onto the foam and cut it out. Next they will decorate the
       pieces with small dots (with the markers) this will look like bead work. Then they
       will „sew‟ the pieces together with the pipe cleaner. *Note students must not use
       any animals or animal symbols on their projects, as that is seen as extremely
       offensive in many First Nations cultures.
Closure:
    - Students can share their creations

Classroom Management Strategies:
   - Proximity control
   - If a student is getting off task, I will ask them to explain their „bead‟ design to the
       others, this will encourage on-task chatter rather than off task.`

Adaptations and Extensions:
  - We could have a Métis person come in and talk about the beading work
      themselves.
  - We could use real beads rather than just marker, but this would take three classes
      or so.


                    Language Arts – African Dance
                                         One class
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                    Date:

Content (topic):
  - Students will journal about the previous lesson
  - We will find Africa on Google Maps or on the globe
  - We will learn about African dance
  - We will do a sticky note connection activity

Teaching strategy:
   - Grand conversation
   - Brainstorming
   - Sticky note connection

Learning objectives:
    Represent to express information, thoughts, feelings, and experiences in a variety
      of forms for a variety of purposes and audiences.
    Learn about and practice the skills and strategies of effective writers.
Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Communication
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - Data projector
  - Laptop/ power point
  - Google Earth or globe
  - Sticky notes or papers with sticky tack

Advance preparation:
  - Set up data projector
  - Make Powerpoint

Prerequisite Learning:
   - Many cultures enjoy dance and use it for a variety of reasons

Presentation:
Set:
    - We will discuss what we did in the last lesson.
    - Students will write their journal entries on the topic of where do think the Métis
       people got their dance steps from?
Development:
    - We will look at a Powerpoint on the five types of African dance.
Closure:
    - We will talk about Africa and why dance is so important to them. We will then
       do a Sticky note connection activity and brainstorming. I will hand out each
       student a square of paper on which they will write (in marker so we can see it
       clearly) one key word or idea that they have picked up from my last few lessons.
       They will then come place them on the board and sit down again. Once everyone
       has their paper on the board we will think of ways that we can classify and
       organize the papers. We will work at this until every one is satisfied with our
       classification scheme.

Adaptations and Extensions:
  - Students could research the five types in more depth
  - Students could write a report on their favorite type
  - We could learn more than one dance


                              Vulani Ringi Ring
                                       One Class
Name: Rikky Lavoie                                 Date:

Content (topic):
   -   African circle dance

Learning objectives:

      expand personal movement vocabulary
      perform increasingly complex movement sequences using Movement Variables of
       Body, Space, Effort and Relationships, alone and with others, with and without
       equipment
      demonstrate an increasing capacity to use the body for expression and
       communication through movement
      demonstrate rhythmic and dance patterns from a variety of dance forms, alone and
       with others
      use creative processes to develop rhythmic and dance sequences, alone and with
       others

Common Essential Learnings (CEL’s):
  - Personal and Social Development
  - Communication
  - Critical and Creative thinking

Equipment/materials:
  - Music: Vulani Ringi Ring - Ladysmith Black Mambazo (From the CD “Gift of
     the Tortoise”)
  - CD player

Advance preparation:
  - Prepare the ball

Prerequisite Learning:
   - A basic understanding of the elements of dance

Presentation:
Set:
    - In the last ELA I would have shown the students where Africa is on the globe.
    - Warm up by doing a co-operation game with the big ball. Students must get the
      ball from one side of the gym to the other without it touching the floor, everyone
      can only use one hand. Everyone must touch the ball during it‟s trip, and no one
      can touch the ball for the full time.
    - Tell the students that we will be learning an old African children‟s dance.


Development:
   - Class stands in a circle holding hands singing the song Vulani Ringi Ring. One
      child (role A) will stand in the middle dancing their own step. The children in the
      circle all dance a resting step. (grape vine to the right, can be switched up as they
      dance)
   -   When the children sing “great big friend” the student in role A, grabs a partner
       (role B) from the circle and they spin and dance around the center of the circle to
       the beat. The circle of students skips in while raising their hands above their
       heads (still holding hands), and then back out, and lowers their hands.
   - When the song goes back to the chorus, the student in role A joins the circle,
       while the student in role B dances in the center, taking on role A.
   - Repeat
   - *** Note – The song has a narrator who explains the game as the children
       play. Lesson taken from
       http://www.discovery.mala.bc.ca/web/ogrodniksa/Process.htm
Closure:
   - Students will submit their self assessment.

Assessment:
   - See attached checklist. The majority of the marking will come from when the
      student is dancing alone in the circle, and with his or her partner.
   - Self assessment

Classroom Management Strategies:
   - Have a hand-drum to play rhythms to regain students focus on you.
   - Clearly state expectations and consequences of not meeting expectations before
       you begin to dance.
   - Calmly give disruptive students a warning; Next they will have to make a quick
       lap around the gym skipping or galloping ext (get them moving a bit more), third
       warning they will have to sit out of the dance for a round and work on a
       worksheet on African dance.

Checklist for Vulani Ringi Ring                                         name ______
Objectives        1                  2                  3                  4
Uses time with
partner in circle
to create unique
patterns (2)
Begins to use
dance to
express feelings
and ideas (3)
Identifies and
explores a
variety of sizes
and shapes in
their movement
Is able to
follow the
“resting step”
pattern (4)




                        Background Information
   -   Michif is a traditional Métis language created by blending French and Cree.
   -   It is spoken in scattered Métis communities in the provinces of Saskatchewan and
       Manitoba in Canada and in North Dakota and Montana in the United States. There
       are also pockets of speakers in northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories in
       Canada and in Minnesota and Oregon in the United States
   -            http://www.metisresourcecentre.mb.ca
   - Métis people called “the flower beadwork people”
   - Used European flower designs
   - Always symmetrical
   - African Dances
       - Warrior Dances are often performed at cultural events and at funerals. Dance
   movements mimic battlefield tactics such stabbing with the end of the horsetail. This
   dance consists of phrases of movements. These phrases are added back to back with
   slight variations within them, and make up the dance.
       - Dances of Love are performed on special accessions, such as weddings and
   anniversaries. One example is the Nmane dance preformed in Ghana. It is done solely
   by women during weddings in honor of the bride.
       - Dances of Welcome are a show of respect to visitors, as well as a show of how
   talented & attractive the host villagers are.
       - Rites of Passage and Coming of Age Dances are performed to mark the
   coming of age of young men and women. They give confidence to the dancers who
   have to perform in front of everyone. It is then formally acknowledged they are
   adults.
       - Dances of Possession and Summoning these common, and very important in
   many Traditional African Religions. They all share one common link: a call to a
   Spirit. These spirits are called Orishas in many forms of African religion. Each Orisha
   has their favorite colours, days, times, foods, drinks, music, and dances. The dances
   will be used on special occasions to honor the Orisha, or to seek help and guidance.
   The Orisha may be angry and need appeasing.
   - Source Wikipedia and Danceafrika



                                    Resources
   Anne Patton and Wilfred Burton - Fiddle Dancer
   Blumchen – “Eisblumen”
   DJ Casper - “Cha-cha Slide”
   John Arcand - “Red River Jig”
   Ladysmith Black Mambazo - “Vulani Ringi Ring” (CD Gift of the Tortoise)
   Sacred Spirit
      “Brulé”
      “Earth Drums”
      “The Cradlesong”
   Tatu – “Ya Soshla S Uma”


                                  Websites
http://www.metismuseum.ca/exhibits/expressions/
http://www.mnbc.ca/GuideBook/introduction/culture.html
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/4832/art.html
http://www.wikipedia.org

				
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