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					                           2010-2011 1st Grade Mathematics Pacing Guide

   All SLEs must be taught, but any SLE with a pink box will be reported on the report card that nine week
                                                  period.
                  Although all problem types listed should be used during the nine week period,
                  any problem type shaded purple is newly introduced in that nine week period.

                                               First Nine Weeks
 Enduring Understanding - Successful problem solvers know how to use a variety of strategies and
                             know if their answers are reasonable.
Essential Question - What are the specific strategies that have wide application in attacking problems
                                  and can help in problem solving?
                 Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                 (JRU - Join Result Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4a
                 Example: Connie had 5 marbles. Juan gave her 8 more marbles. How many marbles does Connie have
                 altogether?
                 Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4b      (SRU - Separate Result Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
                 Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave 5 to Juan. How many marbles does Connie have left?
                 Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4c      (PPW-WU - Part-Part-Whole, Whole Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
                 Example: Connie has 5 red marbles and 8 blue marbles. How many does she have?
                 Identify and use relationships between addition and subtraction to solve problems in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.5
                 involving whole numbers
                 Solve addition problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and tools
  NO.3.1.3a
                 Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
                 Solve subtraction problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and
  NO.3.1.3b      tools
                 Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
  NO.1.1.7a      Estimate the results of whole number addition problems and judge the reasonableness

  NO.1.1.7b      Estimate the results of whole number subtraction problems and judge the reasonableness

    1. Enduring Understanding - Data displays organized information that can be easily analyzed.
               1. Essential Question - What information do bar graphs and pictographs show?
 DAP.15.1.1a     Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs: bar graphs
 DAP.15.1.1b     Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs: pictographs
 DAP.14.1.1a     Data collection: identify the purpose
 DAP.14.1.1b     Data collection: collect, organize and display physical objects for describing the results
  DAP.15.1.2     Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart (i.e. 5 people ride the bus)
  DAP.16.1.1     Explore making simple predictions for a given set of data

    2. Enduring Understanding - Days of the week and months of the year are repeating patterns.
                     2. Essential Question - What repeating patterns are on calendars?
   M.12.1.1      Recognize the number of days in a week and the number of days in a month using a calendar
   M.12.1.2      Orally sequence the months of the year
   M.13.1.1      Use a calendar to determine elapsed time involving a time period of one week




  1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                       Cabot Public Schools
  2010-2011                                                       1                                                     May, 2010
                                        First Nine Weeks (cont.)
               3. Enduring Understanding - The position of an object can be described.
      3. Essential Question - What words can be used to describe the position of an object?
G.10.1.1       Extend the use of location words to include distance (near, far, close to) and direction (left and right)

     4. Enduring Understanding - Numbers can be used to represent quantities or position.
                4. Essential Question - How can quantities or position be represented?
NO.1.1.6       Recognize the number or quantity of sets up to 10 without counting, regardless of arrangement
               Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number
NO.1.1.3
               names, numerals and number words to 20 with and without appropriate technology
NO.1.1.4       Represent numbers to 20 in various forms (2 rods, 2 bundles of 10, tally marks, a rod and 10 units)
NO.1.1.8       Determine relative position using ordinal numbers (first through twelfth)
            5. Enduring Understanding - Addition and subtraction are inverse operations.
     5. Essential Question - What strategies help in learning addition and subtraction facts?

               Develop strategies for basic addition facts
               • counting all
               • counting on
                                                                                                 The electronic lesson plan
               • one more, two more
                                                                                                (NO.3.1.1) has examples of
NO.3.1.1       • doubles
                                                                                              strategies students used when
               • doubles plus one or minus one
                                                                                                    working problems.
               • make ten
               • using ten frames
               • Identity Property (add zero)

               Develop strategies for basic subtraction facts
                                                                                                 The electronic lesson plan
               • relating to addition (Think of 7-3=__ as 3+__=7)
                                                                                                (NO.3.1.2) has examples of
NO.3.1.2       • one less, two less
                                                                                              strategies students used when
               • all but one (Example: 9-8, 6-5)
                                                                                                    working problems.
               • using ten frames of the answers

               Develop an understanding of the commutative property of addition (turn around facts) using objects
NO.2.1.2a
               (The electronic lesson plan [NO.2.1.2a] has examples of strategies students used when working problems.)

               Develop an understanding of the identity property of addition (add 0) using objects
NO.2.1.2b
               (The electronic lesson plan [NO.2.1.2b] has examples of strategies students used when working problems.)

      6. Enduring Understanding - The position of a digit in a number determines its value.
            6. Essential Question - How does the position of a digit in a number affect its value?
               Use multiple models to develop understandings of place value including tens and ones
NO.1.1.5
               Example: pictures of base 10 blocks to show 23 will be ___tens and ___ones = ___
NO.1.1.1       Use efficient strategies to count a given set of objects in groups of 10 up to 100




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                        Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                       2                                                      May, 2010
                                    First Nine Weeks (cont.)
 7. Enduring Understanding - Counting and comparing are strategies to help understand how
                                 numbers relate to each other.
  7. Essential Question - What are some ways to find a number that is more than another number?
                       Less than another number? Between numbers?
             Compare 2 numbers, with less than 12 in each set, using objects and pictures with and without appropriate
             technology
             Example:
NO.1.1.9
             Set A: (XXXXXX)
             Set B: (O O O)
             Set A has more elements than set B
             Communicate the relative position of any number less than 20
NO.1.1.11
             Example: 18 is less than 20 and greater than 12
             Count on (forward) and back (backward) using physical models or a number line starting at any whole
NO.2.1.1
             number up to fifty
 A.4.1.5     Identify a number that is one more or one less than any whole number less than 100
             Compare 2 numbers, less than 100 using mathematical language of greater than, equal to (same amount
NO.1.1.10
             as), less than




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                  3                                                   May, 2010
                                          Second Nine Weeks
               Although all problem types listed should be used during the nine week period,
               any problem type shaded purple is newly introduced in that nine week period.
 Enduring Understanding - Successful problem solvers know how to use a variety of strategies and
                             know if their answers are reasonable.
Essential Question - What are the specific strategies that have wide application in attacking problems
                                  and can help in problem solving?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (JRU - Join Result Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4a
               Example: Connie had 5 marbles. Juan gave her 8 more marbles. How many marbles does Connie have
               altogether?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4b    (SRU - Separate Result Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
               Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave 5 to Juan. How many marbles does Connie have left?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4c    (PPW-WU - Part-Part-Whole, Whole Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
               Example: Connie has 5 red marbles and 8 blue marbles. How many does she have?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4e    (JCU - Join Change Unknown) ( 5 + ◊ = 13)
               Example: Connie has 5 marbles. How many more marbles does she need to have 13 marbles altogether?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (SCU - Separate Change Unknown) (13 - ◊ = 5)
   NO.2.1.4f
               Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave some to Juan. Now she has 5 marbles left. How many
               marbles did Connie give to Juan?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (PPW-PU - Part-Part-Whole, Part Unknown) (5 + ◊ = 13 or 13 - 5 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4g
               Example: Connie has 13 marbles. 5 are red and the rest are blue. How many blue marbles does Connie
               have?
               Identify and use relationships between addition and subtraction to solve problems in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.5
               involving whole numbers
               Solve addition problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and tools
  NO.3.1.3a
               Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
               Solve subtraction problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and
  NO.3.1.3b    tools
               Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
  NO.1.1.7a    Estimate the results of whole number addition problems and judge the reasonableness

  NO.1.1.7b    Estimate the results of whole number subtraction problems and judge the reasonableness




  1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                 Cabot Public Schools
  2010-2011                                                   4                                                   May, 2010
                                     Second Nine Weeks (cont.)
            8. Enduring Understanding - Numbers can be built or taken apart in different ways.
         8. Essential Question - In what different ways can numbers be built or taken apart?
                Represent a whole number less than 15 in all possible ways using composition and decomposition
  NO.1.1.2      Composition: 10 can be made by combining 1 and 9, 2 and 8, 3 and 7, 4 and 6, 5 and 5
                Decomposition: 10 can be separated into 1 and 9, 2 and 8, 3 and 7, 4 and 6, and 5 and 5.
9. Enduring Understanding - Number theory and symbols can help students choose and understand
                           number sentences used to find a missing value.
   9. Essential Question - How can number theory and symbols help students understand number
                              sentences used to find a missing value?
 NO.2.1.3a      Apply number theory: determine if a 1-digit number is odd or even
 NO.2.1.3b      Apply number theory: use the terms sum and difference in appropriate context
                Apply number theory: use conventional symbols (+,-,=) to represent the operations of addition and
 NO.2.1.3c
                subtraction
                Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving single-digit
                addition and subtraction using appropriate labels
                Example: Bob had 5 baseball cards. His friend gave him some more. Now he has seven cards. How many
  A.5.1.1
                cards did his friend give him?
                (JCU, SCU, and PPW-PU are problem types that lend themselves to using number sentences with
                missing values.)
                Recognize that “=” indicates a relationship in which the quantities on each side of an equation are equal
  A.5.1.2
                Example: 3 + 2 = 4 + 1
                                                  ,
                Recognize that symbols such as ˜Δ and ◊ in an addition or subtraction equation, represent a missing value
  A.5.1.3       that will make the statement true
                Example: ˜  +3=6, 5+7=Δ, 4=5-◊

              10. Enduring Understanding - Patterns can be found in many different forms.

              10a. Essential Question - How are increasing and repeating patterns different?
                Recognize, extend, and create simple repeating patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe
  A.4.1.6a
                them using words, pictures or symbols
                Recognize, extend, and create simple growing patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe
  A.4.1.6b
                them using words, pictures or symbols
  A.4.1.2       Identify and describe patterns in the environment

                  10b. Essential Question - How does finding patterns help in counting?
  A.4.1.3       Use patterns to count forward and backward when given a number less than or equal to 50
  A.4.1.4       Identify, describe and extend skip-counting patterns by 2s (can use T-charts, tables, etc.)

     11. Enduring Understanding - Shapes can be compared and sorted using their attributes.

                  11a. Essential Question - How can a shape be compared and sorted?

  A.4.1.1       Sort and classify objects by one or two attributes in more than one way (can use Venn diagrams, etc.)

                Compare and make geometric figures (triangle, rectangle [including square] and circle) by investigating
  G.8.1.3
                their physical characteristics independent of position or size
  G.11.1.1      Replicate a simple two -dimensional figure from a briefly displayed example or from a description
                Compare three-dimensional solids (sphere , cube , rectangular prism , cone , and cylinder ) by investigating
  G.8.1.1
                their physical characteristics
  G.8.1.2       Investigate the presence of three -dimensional objects in the environment

                 11b. Essential Question - How are plane shapes different from solids?

 1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                    Cabot Public Schools
 2010-2011                                                     5                                                    May, 2010
G.11.1.2     Recognize that new figures can be created by combining and subdividing models of existing figures




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                               Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                  6                                                  May, 2010
                                   Second Nine Weeks (cont.)
           12. Enduring Understanding - Geometric shapes can be classified by attributes.

                        12. Essential Question - What makes a shape symmetric?
 G.9.1.1      Identify a line or lines of symmetry in two-dimensional figures and justify by folding

  13. Enduring Understanding - Geometric shapes can be manipulated without changing their
                                         attributes.

                            13. Essential Question - What are transformations?

 G.9.1.2      Manipulate two-dimensional figures through slides, flips and turns




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                  Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                     7                                                  May, 2010
                                             Third Nine Weeks
               Although all problem types listed should be used during the nine week period,
               any problem type shaded purple is newly introduced in that nine week period.
 Enduring Understanding - Successful problem solvers know how to use a variety of strategies and
                             know if their answers are reasonable.
Essential Question - What are the specific strategies that have wide application in attacking problems
                                  and can help in problem solving?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (JRU - Join Result Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4a
               Example: Connie had 5 marbles. Juan gave her 8 more marbles. How many marbles does Connie have
               altogether?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4b    (SRU - Separate Result Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
               Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave 5 to Juan. How many marbles does Connie have left?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4c    (PPW-WU - Part-Part-Whole, Whole Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
               Example: Connie has 5 red marbles and 8 blue marbles. How many does she have?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4e    (JCU - Join Change Unknown) ( 5 + ◊ = 13)
               Example: Connie has 5 marbles. How many more marbles does she need to have 13 marbles altogether?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (SCU - Separate Change Unknown) (13 - ◊ = 5)
   NO.2.1.4f
               Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave some to Juan. Now she has 5 marbles left. How many
               marbles did Connie give to Juan?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (PPW-PU - Part-Part-Whole, Part Unknown) (5 + ◊ = 13 or 13 - 5 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4g
               Example: Connie has 13 marbles. 5 are red and the rest are blue. How many blue marbles does Connie
               have?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (CDU - Compare Difference Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4d
               Example: Connie has 13 marbles. Juan has 5 marbles. How many more marbles does Connie have than
               Juan?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4h    (CQU - Compare Quantity Unknown) (8 + 5 = ◊)
               Example: Juan has 5 marbles. Connie has 8 more than Juan. How many marbles does Connie have?
               Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
               (CRU - Compare Referent Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
   NO.2.1.4i
               Example: Connie has 13 marbles. She has 5 more marbles than Juan. How many marbles does Juan
               have?
               Identify and use relationships between addition and subtraction to solve problems in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.5
               involving whole numbers
               Model and represent division as sharing equally in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.6
               Example: Sharing cookies equally among four children
               Solve addition problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and tools
  NO.3.1.3a
               Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
               Solve subtraction problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and
  NO.3.1.3b    tools
               Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
  NO.1.1.7a    Estimate the results of whole number addition problems and judge the reasonableness
  NO.1.1.7b    Estimate the results of whole number subtraction problems and judge the reasonableness




  1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                  Cabot Public Schools
  2010-2011                                                   8                                                    May, 2010
                                       Third Nine Weeks (cont.)
   14. Enduring Understanding - Data displays organized information that can be easily analyzed.
 14a. Essential Question - What are some ways to organize information in T-charts and analyze the
                                             data?
               Explore the use of a chart or table to organize information and to understand relationships
   A.6.1.1
               Example: input/output table
DAP.15.1.1.d   Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs: T-chart
 DAP.14.1.1a   Data collection: identify the purpose
 DAP.14.1.1b   Data collection: collect, organize and display physical objects for describing the results
 DAP.15.1.2    Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart (i.e. 5 people ride the bus)
 DAP.16.1.1    Explore making simple predictions for a given set of data
14b. Essential Question - What are some ways to organize information in Venn diagrams and analyze
                                            the data?
 DAP.15.1.1c   Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs: Venn diagrams
 DAP.14.1.1a   Data collection: identify the purpose
 DAP.14.1.1b   Data collection: collect, organize and display physical objects for describing the results
 DAP.15.1.2    Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart (i.e. 5 people ride the bus)
 DAP.16.1.1    Explore making simple predictions for a given set of data

       15. Enduring Understanding - Monetary values can be represented in a variety of ways.

                   15. What are some ways an amount of money can be represented?
  M.12.1.4     Recognize and identify attributes of penny, nickel, dime, quarter and dollar bill
  M.12.1.5     State the values of a penny, nickel, dime, and quarter and dollar bill
  M.12.1.6     Compare the value of coins (pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters)
16. Enduring Understanding - Temperature and objects have distinct attributes that can be measured
                                     with appropriate tools.
        16. How are measuring tools selected and used to measure temperature and objects?
               Distinguish between hot and cold temperatures on a thermometer
  M.12.1.7
               Example: The higher the mercury level, the warmer the temperature is.
               Recognize attributes of measurement (length, weight, capacity and mass ) and identify appropriate tools
  M.12.1.8
               used to measure each attribute
  M.13.1.7     Select the appropriate non-standard measurement tools for length, capacity and mass

  M.13.1.8a    Estimate and measure length/width with non-standard units

  M.13.1.8b    Estimate and measure capacity/volume with non-standard units

  M.13.1.8c    Estimate and measure weight/mass with non-standard units
               Interpret qualitative change
   A.7.1.1     Example: changes in seasons, temperature, height, etc. “Today is colder than yesterday, so I need to wear
               a jacket”




  1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                     Cabot Public Schools
  2010-2011                                                     9                                                     May, 2010
                                     Third Nine Weeks (cont.)
                          17. Enduring Understanding - Time can be measured.
                                          17a. How is time measured?
 M.12.1.3    Recognize that an hour is longer than a minute and a minute is longer than a second
 M.13.1.2    Tell time to the half-hour

                            17b. How do you find how much time has elapsed?
             Determine elapsed time (to the hour) in contextual situations
M.13.1.3a
             Example: End time unknown: Lunch began at 11:00 and lasted 1 hour. When was lunch over?
             Determine elapsed time (to the hour) in contextual situations
M.13.1.3b    Example: Elapsed hours unknown: John went to Tim's house at 3:00. He left at 5:00. How long did he
             stay?

               18. Enduring Understanding - A fraction represents a part of a whole.

                 18. Essential Question - How can 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2 be represented?
             Represent commonly used fractions using words and physical models for halves, thirds and fourths
NO.1.1.12a
             Example: recognize that fractions are represented by equal parts of a whole
             Represent commonly used fractions using words and physical models for halves, thirds and fourths
NO.1.1.12b
             Example: identify and illustrate parts of sets of objects

             Model and represent division as sharing equally in contextual situations
 NO.2.1.6
             Example: sharing cookies equally among four children




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                              Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                   10                                               May, 2010
                                           Fourth Nine Weeks
              Although all problem types listed should be used during the nine week period,
              any problem type shaded purple is newly introduced in that nine week period.
 Enduring Understanding - Successful problem solvers know how to use a variety of strategies and
                                 know if their answers are reasonable.
Essential Question - What are the specific strategies that have wide application in attacking problems
                                   and can help in problem solving?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (JRU - Join Result Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4a
                Example: Connie had 5 marbles. Juan gave her 8 more marbles. How many marbles does Connie have
                altogether?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4b     (SRU - Separate Result Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
                Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave 5 to Juan. How many marbles does Connie have left?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4c     (PPW-WU - Part-Part-Whole, Whole Unknown) (5 + 8 = ◊)
                Example: Connie has 5 red marbles and 8 blue marbles. How many does she have?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4e     (JCU - Join Change Unknown) ( 5 + ◊ = 13)
                Example: Connie has 5 marbles. How many more marbles does she need to have 13 marbles altogether?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (SCU - Separate Change Unknown) (13 - ◊ = 5)
   NO.2.1.4f
                Example: Connie had 13 marbles. She gave some to Juan. Now she has 5 marbles left. How many
                marbles did Connie give to Juan?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (PPW-PU - Part-Part-Whole, Part Unknown) (5 + ◊ = 13 or 13 - 5 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4g
                Example: Connie has 13 marbles. 5 are red and the rest are blue. How many blue marbles does Connie
                have?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (CDU - Compare Difference Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
  NO.2.1.4d
                Example: Connie has 13 marbles. Juan has 5 marbles. How many more marbles does Connie have than
                Juan?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
  NO.2.1.4h     (CQU - Compare Quantity Unknown) (8 + 5 = ◊)
                Example: Juan has 5 marbles. Connie has 8 more than Juan. How many marbles does Connie have?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (CRU - Compare Referent Unknown) (13 - 5 = ◊)
   NO.2.1.4i
                Example: Connie has 13 marbles. She has 5 more marbles than Juan. How many marbles does Juan
                have?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (JSU - Join Start Unknown) (◊ + 5 = 13)
   NO.2.1.4j
                Example: Connie had some marbles. Juan gave her 5 more marbles. Now she has 13 marbles. How
                many marbles did Connie have to start with?
                Use physical and pictorial models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction
                (SSU - Separate Start Unknown) (◊ - 5 = 8)
  NO.2.1.4k
                Example: Connie had some marbles. She gave 5 to Juan. Now she has 8 marbles left. How many
                marbles did Connie have to start with?
                Identify and use relationships between addition and subtraction to solve problems in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.5
                involving whole numbers
                Model and represent division as sharing equally in contextual situations
   NO.2.1.6
                Example: Sharing cookies equally among four children
                Solve addition problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and tools
  NO.3.1.3a
                Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology
                Solve subtraction problems (TLI: in which all numbers are 20 or less) by using a variety of methods and
  NO.3.1.3b     tools
                Example: objects, mental computations, paper and pencil, and with and without appropriate technology

  NO.1.1.7a     Estimate the results of whole number addition problems and judge the reasonableness

  NO.1.1.7b    Estimate the results of whole number subtraction problems and judge the reasonableness
  1st Grade Mathematics                                                                             Cabot Public Schools
  2010-2011                                                  11                                               May, 2010
                                  Fourth Nine Weeks (cont.)
      19. Enduring Understanding - Monetary values can be represented in a variety of ways.

                 19. What are some ways an amount of money can be represented?
             Determine the value of a small collection of coins (with a total value up to one dollar) using 1 or 2 different
M.13.1.4a
             types of coins, including pennies, nickels, and/or dimes
             Determine the value of a small collection of coins (with a total value up to one dollar) using 1 or 2 different
M.13.1.4b
             types of coins, including pennies, nickels, dimes, and/or quarters
 M.13.1.5    Represent and write the value of money using the cent sign
 M.13.1.6    Show different combination of coins that have the same value

                    20. Enduring Understanding - Elapsed time can be measured.
                            20. How do you find how much time has elapsed?
             Determine elapsed time (to the hour) in contextual situations
M.13.1.3c    Example: Beginning time unknown: Mary watched a movie for 2 hours. The movie ended at 8:00. When
             did the movie begin?
 21. Enduring Understanding - Mathematical expressions and equations represent relationships
                                    among quantities.

             21. Essential Question - How is a number sentence like a balance scale?
             Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving single-digit
             addition and subtraction using appropriate labels
 A.5.1.1
             Example: Bob had 5 baseball cards. His friend gave him some more. Now he has seven cards. How many
             cards did his friend give him?
             Recognize that “=” indicates a relationship in which the quantities on each side of an equation are equal
 A.5.1.2
             Example: 3 + 2 = 4 + 1
                                               ,
             Recognize that symbols such as ˜Δ and ◊ in an addition or subtraction equation , represent a missing value
 A.5.1.3     that will make the statement true
             Example: ˜  +3=6, 5+7=Δ, 4=5-◊

  22. Enduring Understanding - The likelihood of an event depends on the possible outcomes.

      22. Essential Question - How can the possible outcomes for an event be determined?
             Describe the probability of an event as being more, less, or equally likely to occur
DAP.17.1.1   Example: There are 10 red cubes and 4 blue cubes in this bag. Which color are you more/less likely to pull
             from this bag?

       23. Enduring Understanding - Perimeter surrounds a figure, and area covers a figure.

   23. Essential Question - How can you tell how many it takes to surround or cover a figure?
 M.13.1.9    Surround a figure with objects and tell how many it takes to go around

M.13.1.10    Cover a figure with squares and tell how many it takes




1st Grade Mathematics                                                                                      Cabot Public Schools
2010-2011                                                     12                                                     May, 2010

				
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