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Hackett Mansion Spring Garden Street

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					               (Photo by Richard F. Hope)

Hackett Mansion (165 Spring Garden Street)
        3-story brick house on a stone foundation, with a 2-story brick addition: a total of
7 bays. Projecting wood pediments over the windows and hood over the front entrance
stoop; dental roof cornice. The style has been identified as “Greek Revival/Italianate”,1
with a suggested construction date c. 1835-60.2
        The building has, in the past century, been known as the home of State Senator
William Clayton Hackett (1874-1930),3 who donated Hackett Park to the City of Easton
in 1914 in accordance with a prior (refused) offer made by his father, Joseph Hackett.
The City reconsidered, and asked Senator Hackett (now his father’s heir) to renew his
father’s donation offer.4
        W. Clayton Hackett was, at various times, President of Hackett Company, Inc.
(men’s clothes), Vice President of the Easton National Bank, Vice President of the
Lehigh Water Co., and a Pennsylvania State Senator elected in 1914 and 1918.5 Hackett
died in 1930, and is buried in Easton Cemetery.6 He left the property as a life estate to
his widow Bessie, and remainder to his daughter, Ann Hackett,7 who (under her
subsequent married name) was still listed as an owner until February 2009.8
        The property is part of original town Lot No.40, which the Penn Family sold to
John Wagener in 1793.9 After Wagener (a “Cooper”) moved to Moore Township, he
resold the property for $200 to Easton town father Samuel Sitgreaves in 1802.10 The
1802 deed spoke of a “Messuage tenement”, indicating that a house of some sort had
already been built on the property by that time.
                                             2


        Five years later (in 1807), Samuel Sitgreaves sold the Lot to George Dingler for
$1,000,11 whose estate (in 1831) subdivided the Lot and sold the corner property
(including a house) separately.12 The next three owners were all women. The property
was acquired in 1835 by Euphemia Wall13 (later Euphemia Dawes after her marriage to
Joseph Dawes), who held it for some 30 years. At the end of this period, a brick house
was standing at the corner.14 The “Greek Revival/Italianate” style of the current house at
the corner (see above) is consistent with construction during the period of Euphemia Wall
Dawes’s ownership.
          The corner house was apparently not Mrs. Dawes’s residence, but rather used
           as a rental. This appears to be the case because Mrs. Dawes retained the
           northern portion of the lot (on North Second Street) until her death,15 but sold
           off the brick house at the corner some years earlier.16
In 1855, James Fitz Randolph was apparently the tenant in the corner house, then
apparently numbered 39 Spring Garden Street under the numbering scheme in effect at
the time.17 Randolph had been a US Congressman from New Jersey in 1828-33, as well
as the holder of other political posts, and was otherwise a newspaper editor and bank
president in New Brunswick, NJ.18 In approximately 1842, James Randolph left New
Jersey and came to Easton in the “Transportation” and coal business,19 to take advantage
of Easton’s position as the hinge of the canal system that supplied coal from the
Pennsylvania coal mines to Philadelphia and New York City.20 Randolph’s career
change apparently joined the “coal and iron business” of one of his sons, Theodore Fitz
Randolph,21 who later became a governor of New Jersey.22 James Randolph appears to
have managed his sons’ coal dealership in Easton in the 1860s.23 However, by 1860,
Randolph had moved his residence farther South on North Second Street.24
          Randolph’s residence in Easton led to the burial of the only Confederate
           soldier in Easton Cemetery: a young relation whose family had been
           connected with Theodore Randolph’s iron and coal business interests in
           Mississippi.25
         By 1860, after James Randolph moved, the new tenant at 39 Spring Garden Street
was Isbon Benedict, a grocer and “spice factor” with his store at the SE corner of 3rd and
Ferry Street26 (the Benjamin Ihrie Building27). An inscription reading “Charles Benedict
-- Easton – 1850” in childish cursive handwriting was found underneath the wallpaper on
a third floor wall by the current (2009).28 Isbon Benedict did, in fact, have a young son
named Charles, who was born in 1850.29 He would probably have been learning his
cursive letters in the late 1850s, when his family replaced the Randolphs as tenants and
the walls were presumably re-papered – no doubt the occasion when he decided to
decorate it with his inscription of his name, town, and birth year.30
        In 1866, Euphemia Wall Dawes sold the corner property for $3,500 to Sarah
Milligan. The deed specifically mentions a house was built of brick on this corner
property.31 By 1870, the tenant in the corner house was Beates R. Swift.32 At that time
(in 1870-71), Swift was the Chief Burgess of Easton.33 It is accordingly likely that the
style and size of the brick house at the corner was substantial, also consistent with the
broad outline of the Hackett Mansion standing there today. In 1873, Swift moved out of
                                             3


the corner house, and purchased Euphemia Wall Dawes’s remaining North 2nd Street
house from her estate.34
          Beates Swift’s father was Dr. Edward Swift, and a brother was Dr. Edward
           Clement Swift, both noted Easton physicians resident at 46 North 2nd Street.35
           An uncle was yarn and twine (cotton thread) manufacturer John Swift, who
           lived at the house that became 42 North 2nd Street.36 Beates Swift’s 1863
           Civil War Diary (when he was a young man) was edited and published (with
           extensive commentary) by the Northampton County Historical &
           Genealogical Society in 2004. He spent most of his enlistment period on
           medical disability for a wasting sickness, grew disillusioned with the War, and
           ended up voting for an anti-war Democratic Party candidate at home despite
           his father’s strong abolitionist and pro-war sentiments.37 He later received a
           government pension for his War-related “debility”.38 Beates Swift studied
           law with Judge James Madison Porter, and thereafter with James Madison
           Porter, Jr. He and the younger Porter shared office space on North 3rd Street
           for their law practices, and took over the office after the younger Porter died
           in 1879. After some 30 years of law practice, Beates Swift retired in 1896 at
           age 56, and became an avid stamp collector.39
          The property that Swift purchased was listed as 49 North Second Street, prior
           to the inauguration of the modern street numbering scheme in 1874,40 and was
           assigned to 105 North 2nd Street in 1874.41 It was thus apparently North of the
           corner.42 Swift remained the resident at 105 North Third Street until after
           1910.43 Swift apparently further subdivided ownership of his portion of the
           property, by selling it to Elizabeth P. Porter (a sister of James Madison Porter,
           the founder of Lafayette College44) and having Ms. Porter sell a portion of her
           holding back to Beates Swift’s children.45
        In the same week that Beates Swift purchased Euphemia Dawes’s remaining
house, Sarah Milligan sold the brick house at the corner (now apparently without Swift as
a tenant) to Dr. Henry Lachenour.46 Dr. Lachenour retained ownership of the property
until 1885,47 apparently at the same time he moved down Spring Garden Street to occupy
(and expand) the Col. Thomas McKeen Mansion.48 However, Dr. Lachenour apparently
did not occupy the Hackett Mansion himself, since he is listed in the 1880 Census at
another address.49 Moreover, in 1873-74, as the modern street numbering scheme was
being adopted, no number at this point on Spring Garden Street was assigned to Dr.
Lachenour. No.151 Spring Garden Street was listed as the residence of Abram
Fangboner, and no listings were given for either Nos.157 or 165.50
        A series of owners succeeded Dr. Lachenour as owner of the brick house at the
corner in the 19th Century,51 until it was acquired by Senator W. Clayton Hackett in
1907.52 The Hackett Mansion house appears to sit where the “brick dwelling” house
stood at the corner in Euphemia Wall Dawes’s time.
          Two of the prior owners were important shoe merchants in Easton. The first
           was John A. Nightingale (owner from 1891-9353), who had purchased half of
           the Bixler Family Homestead on Northampton Street in 1852 for his shoe
           store. The Spring Garden Street house was probably his retirement home after
                                                  4


           he sold that business to W.W. Moon.54 Nightingale’s obituary in 1894 states
           that his funeral was to be held in his former residence at 167 Spring Garden
           Street.55
          The second of the two shoe salesmen was Charles M. Hapgood (owner from
           1900-0556), who had been a partner with Captain Jacob Hay in the boot and
           shoe business until 1889,57 and in 1880 had built the mansion at the corner of
           Northampton and Fourteenth Streets (in Captain Hay’s mansion housing
           development) that now serves as the Ashton Funeral Home.58
          In 1900, John Rice and his wife, Carrie, were listed at No.157,59 evidently as
           renters. Mrs. Rice was Carrie Arndt (Drake) Rice (born 1869), a daughter of
           Samuel Drake (see entry for 54 N. Third St.). Mr. Rice was from Pottstown.60
           By 1910, they had moved from this address to Clinton Street.61
In 1920, Senator Hackett expanded the property by re-acquiring in essence the northern
part of the Lot at 105 North Second Street62 that had formerly been owned by lawyer
Beates R. Swift.63 Senator Hackett died in 1930, and his daughter, Ann, inherited the
property.64 She died in 1984, leaving her (third) husband as the sole property owner until
his death in 2007. His estate sold the property to its current owner in 2009.65


1
       Survey Card, City of Easton Building Description Survey (Area 1 Zone B), 165 Spring Garden
       Street (for Application for downtown Historic District, approved by City Council Resolution 12
       May 1982).
2
       City of Easton, Pennsylvania Historic Resource Survey Form, Attachment: Building Description
       Survey Area 1 Zone B (City Council Resolution approved 12 May 1982).
3
       Obituary, “Former State Senator Hackett Who Died Yesterday, Had Active Career”, EASTON
       EXPRESS / EASTON ARGUS, Thursday, 11 Dec. 1930, p.1; see 1910 Census, Series T624, Roll
       1381, p.27A (W. Clayton Hackett, age 35, dry goods merchant); 1920 Census, Series T625, Roll
       1609, p.90B (Clayton Hackett, age 45, bank VP).
4
       Article, “The World War I dedication grove”, in Easton Is Home, Heritage Edition 2004 59
       (Easton Is Home 2004). Joseph Hackett had served a term in the Pennsylvania State Assembly
       from 1879-82. Obituary, “Former State Senator Hackett Who Died Yesterday, Had Active
       Career”, supra.
5
       Obituary, “Former State Senator Hackett Who Died Yesterday, Had Active Career”, EASTON
       EXPRESS / EASTON ARGUS, Thursday, 11 Dec. 1930, p.1.
6
       Notice, “Funeral of Former State Senator Hacket”, EASTON EXPRESS / EASTON ARGUS, Thursday,
       13 Dec. 1930, p.9.
7
       Deed, Ann Hackettt Orchard to Ann Hackett (William) Orchard, 236 556 (23 Feb. 1965)(recitals),
       referring to Will of W. Clayton Hackett at 34 W.B. 227 (died 10 Dec. 1930; wife Bessie died 21
       Oct. 1961); Deed, Ann Hackett Gerhardt (formerly Ann Hackett Orchard) to Ann Hackett
       (Reginald B.) Gerhardt, 628-000713 (7 July 1981).
8
       Northampton County Tax Records, www.unpub.org.
9
       Deed, John Penn the Younger and John Penn the Elder to John Wagener, G2 378 (4 Apr. 1793);
       A.D. Chidsey, Jr., The Penn Patents in the Forks of the Delaware Plan of Easton, Map 2 (Vol. II of
       Publications of the Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society 1937).
                                                 5



10
     Deed, John (Margaret) Wagener to Samuel Sitgreaves, G2 379 (9 June 1802). The entire Lot had
     a 60’ front on Third Street, and extended 230’ on Spring Garden Street.
     For a brief biography of Samuel Sitgreaves, see generally separate www.WalkingEaston.com
     entry for Sitgreaves Folly (East): Montague Building at 237-39 Northampton Street, and the
     Former Y.M.C.A. Headquarters at 109 North Third Street.
11
     Deed, Samuel (Mary) Sitgreaves to George Dingler, D3 200 (1 Apr. 1807)(Lot #40, dimensions
     60’ X 230’, described as a “Messuage tenement and Lot of Ground”, sold for $1,000).
12
     Deed, John Ludwig, Administrator of Estate of George Dingler, to Martha Moore, A6 134 (10
     Feb. 1831)(described as a “Messuage Tenement and Lot”, part of Lot No. 40, sale price $900).
13
     Deed, Martha Moore to Euphemia Wall, A6 134 (26 Jan. 1835)(sale price $900).
14
     Deed, Euphemia Dawes (formerly Euphemia Wall) to Sarah Milligan, A12 170 (26 June
     1866)(sale price $3,500, “Brick Messuage of Tenement and lot of land”).
15
     See Deed, Euphenia Dawes Estate to Beates R. Swift, B14 417 (7 Apr. 1873), recited in Deed,
     Francis B. Swift, et al. (heirs of Beates R. Swift) to W. Clayton Hackett, F47 534 (3 June 1920).
16
     Deed, Euphemia Dawes (formerly Euphemia Wall) to Sarah Milligan, A12 170 (26 June
     1866)(sale price $3,500, “Brick Messuage of Tenement and lot of land”).
17
     C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 46 (Cole & Eichman’s
     Office, 1855). The location of the house is inferred because prior to the inauguration of the
     modern street numbering system in 1874, No. 41 Spring Garden Street was the Henry Fulmer
     Mansion, which was located at the NW corner. See www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the
     Parking Lot at 201 Spring Garden Street, and sources cited therein. No. 39 was, accordingly, the
     next property to the East -- probably the NE corner property.
18
     Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 – Present, “RANDOLPH, James Fitz”,
     bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=R000044 (accessed 24 Apr. 2008); see also
     1840 Census, Roll 256, p.62, entry for “Jas. F. Randolph” in North Brunswick, Middlesex County,
     New Jersey.
19
     See 1850 Census, Series M432, Roll 802, p.157(Transportation); C[harles] Kitchen, A General
     Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 46 (Cole & Eichman’s Office, 1855)(coal dealer); 1860
     Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.249 (Coal Agent); 1870 Census, Series M593, Roll 1382,
     p.10A(Merchant). For a more complete history, see separate entry for 109 Northampton Street.
20
     See, e.g., Richard F. Hope, Easton PA: A History 76-79 (AuthorHouse 2006)(and sources cited
     therein).
21
     Wikipedia, “Theodore Fitz Randolph”, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodore_Fitz_Randolph (accessed
     24 Apr. 2008).
22
     Wikipedia, “Theodore Fitz Randolph”, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodore_Fitz_Randolph (accessed
     24 Apr. 2008).
23
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for 109-13 Northampton Street, and sources cited
     therein.
24
     William H. Boyd, Boyd’s Directory of Reading, Easton, [Etc.} 123 (William H. Boyd 1860)(at 43
     North Second Street).
     No.43 – prior to the inauguration of the modern street numbering scheme in 1874 – is probably the
     house now numbered as 75 North Third Street, located just South of the SE corner with Spring
     Garden Street. This is because 41 North Second Street (presumably next door to No.43) was,
     prior the 1874 street renumbering, the William Memmert House, which was replaced by the Frank
     Lawall Mansion (next door at 73 North Second Street under the modern numbering scheme).
     Compare Jeremiah H. Lant, The Northampton County Directory for 1873 96 (1873)(alphabetical
                                                 6



     listing) with D.G. Beers, Atlas of Northampton County Pennsylvania, Plan of Easton (A.
     Pomeroy & Co. 1874)(Wm Memmert); see also www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Frank
     Lawall Mansion at 73 North Second Street.
25
     Research being done by Carole Hefley, to be published in the near future.
26
     William H. Boyd, Boyd’s Directory of Reading, Easton, [Etc.] 118 (William H. Boyd 1860). See
     generally 1860 Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.234 (Isbon Benedict, grocer, with wife Eliza
     and 8 children). The 1860 Census did not specify street addresses; however, the Benedict
     dwelling house is number 111, while Joseph and Euphemia Dawes were number 107 listed on the
     same page.
27
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Benjamin Ihrie Building at 100 South 3rd
     Street.
28
     Email, Andria Zaia (Curator, Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society) to Richard
     F. Hope (21 Dec. 2009)(forwarding inquiry from house owner Jennifer Thornton).
29
     He was born no 20 February 1850. Works Progress Administration (copier and ed.), Record of
     Births – Baptisms – Marriage of First Methodist Episcopal Church (Easton Area Public Library
     Code Letter “D”) 31 (1937). That record shows that Isbon and Eliza Benedict had six children all
     baptized in the Methodist Church on 3 March 1859, which would also be a reasonable
     approximation for the time of Charles Benedict’s inscription. Perhaps he was making his own
     data record at the time of his baptism!
     Isbon Benedict in fact had 8 children in total (including Charles) as of 1860. See 1860 Census,
     Series M653, Roll 1147, p.234 (listing Charles as age 10 in that year). See also 1850 Census,
     Series M432, Roll 802, p.103B (“John” Benedict, grocer, age 32, in Lehigh Ward, Easton, family
     including a son Charles age 6 months at the time the survey was taken in August 1850; an older
     son’s name is listed as “Isbon”).
30
     The grafitto was probably not written in 1850. For one thing, Charles Benedict was then less than
     1 year old (see above). For another, Isbon Benedict was not in residence in 1855 – as noted above,
     James Randolph was the tenant at that time. Accordingly, it is fairly clear that the 1850
     inscription must refer to young Charles’s birth year, rather than the year when it was written. See,
     e.g., C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 14 (Cole & Eichman’s
     Office, 1855)(Isbon Benedict, grocer, house at 66 Bushkill Street); see also 1850 Census, Series
     M432, Roll 802, p.103B (“John” Benedict was a resident of the Lehigh Ward of Easton, not the
     Bushkill Ward, at that time).
31
     Deed, Euphemia Dawes (formerly Euphemia Wall) to Sarah Milligan, A12 170 (26 June
     1866)(sale price $3,500, “Brick Messuage of Tenement and lot of land”).
32
     Fitzgerald & Dillon, Easton Directory for 1870-71 81 (Ringwalt & Brown 1870)(Beates R. Swift,
     lawyer, house at the corner of Second and Spring Garden Streets, office at 13 North 3 rd Street).
33
     Article, “Chief Executives of Easton Since 1789”, EASTON EXPRESS, Sun., 12 June 1937, Jubilee
     Section A, p.5, cols. 1-2.
34
     Deed, Euphenia Dawes Estate to Beates R. Swift, B14 417 (7 Apr. 1873), recited in Deed, Francis
     B. Swift, et al. (heirs of Beates R. Swift) to W. Clayton Hackett, F47 534 (3 June 1920).
     Euphemia Wall Dawes died on 2 July 1872 at age 80, the “relict” of Joseph Dawes. Henry F.
     Marx (compiler), II Marriages and Deaths Northampton County 1871 – 1884 342 (Easton Area
     Public Library 1935).
     She had lived with her husband, Joseph Dawes, at what became 52 North 3 rd Street. That property
     later became the Seville / Boyd Theatre, and today is incorporated into a parking lot at 56 North
     3rd Street. See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for 56 North 3 rd Street.
                                                 7



35
     Ned D. Heindel (ed.), The 1863 Diary of Beates R. Swift – A Year in the Llife of an Easton Youth
     during the Civil War 14, 35-36, 38, 65 (Easton: The Northampton County Historical &
     Genealogical Society 2004). See generally separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Dr.
     Swift Residence at 46 North 2nd Street.
36
     Ned D. Heindel (ed.), The 1863 Diary of Beates R. Swift – A Year in the Llife of an Easton Youth
     during the Civil War 34 (Easton: The Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society
     2004); see Easton Heritage Alliance, House Tour 2003: Historic Easton Homes and Gardens 19
     (17 May 2003)(“Correspondence relating to Swift . . . as well as early newspapers, was discovered
     in the crawlspace over what is now the kitchen when the current owner installed recessed
     lighting.”); C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA (Cole &
     Eichman’s Office, 1855)(alphabetical listing for John Swift, “cotton manufacturer”); see also
     1870 Census, Series M593, Roll 1382, p.15B (John Swift, age 62, “agent in cotton mill”, and his
     wife Jane Swift, age 61); Fitzgerald & Dillon, Easton Directory for 1870-71 81 (Ringwalt &
     Brown 1870)(John Swift house at 26 North 2 nd Street, under the numbering scheme in effect at
     that time). See generally separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the John Swift Residence at
     42 North 2nd Street.
37
     Ned D. Heindel (ed.), The 1863 Diary of Beates R. Swift – A Year in the Llife of an Easton Youth
     during the Civil War passim, especially at 31, 38 (Easton: The Northampton County Historical &
     Genealogical Society 2004).
38
     II List of Pensioners on the Roll 738 (Washington: Government Printing Office 1 Jan. 1883).
39
     Heindel (ed.), The 1863 Diary of Beates R. Swift, supra at 4-5, 22, 34, 36.
40
     Jeremiah H. Lant, The Northampton County Directory for 1873 122 (1873).
41
     Article, “The New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Sat., 28 Nov. 1873, p.3, col.4;
42
     Ned. D. Heindel (ed.), The 1863 Diary of Beates R. Swift A Year in the Life of an Easton Youth
     during the Civil War 25 (Easton: The Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society
     2004).
43
     J.H. Lant & Son, Easton [Etc.] Directory 1881-2 (1881)(alphabetical listing); 1900 Census, Series
     T623, Roll 1447, p.57B; 1910 Census, Series T624, Roll 1381, p.17A(age 70, retired and living
     on his own income).
44
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry regarding the Porter Mansion, now a Parking Lot at
     53 North Third Street; Article, “Interesting Reminiscence, North Third Street a Third of a Century
     Ago”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Thursday, 20 Aug. 1885, p.3 (two daughters of James M.
     Porter reside in 1885); 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.383A (Elizabeth Porter listed at 47
     N. Third St.); George W. West, West’s Guide to Easton, etc. 32 (West & Everett, Job Printers
     1883)(alphabetical listing for Miss E.P. Porter); Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The History of Easton,
     Penn’a 475 (George W. West 1885 / 1889); 1870 Census, Series M593, Roll 1382, p.20A (E.P.
     Porter, with Harriett and Mary A. Porter); Webb’s Easton and Phillipsburg Directory 1875-6 96
     (Webb Bros. & Co.1875)(Elizabeth P. and Harriet Porter at 53 N. Third St.); Jeremiah H. Lant,
     The Northampton County Directory for 1873 105 (1873)(alphabetical listing for Miss E.P. Porter);
     D.G. Beers, Atlas of Northampton County Pennsylvania, Plan of Easton (A. Pomeroy & Co.
     1874)(Miss Porter).
45
     Compare Deed, Beates R. Swift to Elizabeth P. Porter, E17 563 (11 July 1883), recited in Deed,
     James Madison Porter, et al. (heirs of Elizabeth P. Porter) to W. Clayton Hackett, F47 533 (6 July
     1920) with Deed, Francis B. Swift, et al. (heirs of Beates R. Swift) to W. Clayton Hackett, F47
     534 (3 June 1920)(reciting that the property had been sold by Beates Swift to Elizabeth Porter and
     given back to the Swift children).
                                                 8



46
     Deed, Sarah Milligan to Henry Dr. Lachenour (Physician), A14 386 (1 Apr. 1873). There was
     thus a single week after Milligan’s sale of the corner house, and Swift’s purchase of the former
     Euphemia Wall Dawes residence.
     In 1873, No.151 was listed as the residence of Abram Fangboner, and no listings were given for
     either Nos.157 or 165. See Article, “The New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 5
     Dec. 1873, p.3. Early in 1873, Mr. Fangboner appears to have lived on North Fourth Street. See
     Jeremiah H. Lant, The Northampton County Directory for 1873 69 (1873)(A.F. Fangboner, coal
     oil, residence at 25 North Fourth Street, under numbering scheme then in effect).
47
     Deed, Henry D. (Laura) Lachenour M.D. to Nathan H. Heft, D18 249 (27 Mar. 1885)(“brick
     messuage tenement”).
48
     See Historic Easton, Inc., Annual House Tour Site #2 (18 May 1985); Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 21 (3 May 2008); separate
     www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Col. Thomas McKeen Mansion at 241 Spring Garden
     Street.
     See also 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.379B(Dr. H.D. Lachenour, with wife Laura and two
     daughters including the youngest (age 1) named Laura, no street number on Spring Garden Street
     listed). This is consistent with the 1910 Census entry showing the McKeen Mansion occupant as
     Laura S. Lanchenour (apparently the Doctor’s widow), and daughter Laura S. Ormsby (age 30).
     1910 Census, Series T624, Roll 1381, p.28B.
49
     The Dr. H.D. Lachenour shown in Easton in the 1880 Census at 44 Spring Garden Street is almost
     certainly the same person that purchased the McKeen Mansion in 1885. The 1880 Census shows
     that Dr. Lachenour had a wife Laura and two daughters, the youngest (age 1) named Laura. In
     1910, the McKeen Mansion was occupied by Laura S. Lanchenour (apparently the Doctor’s
     widow), and his daughter Laura S. Ormsby (age 30). Compare 1910 Census, Series T624, Roll
     1381, p.28B with 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.379B.
50
     Article, “The New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 5 Dec. 1873, p.3. Early in
     1873, Mr. Fangboner appears to have lived on North Fourth Street. See Jeremiah H. Lant, The
     Northampton County Directory for 1873 69 (1873)(A.F. Fangboner, coal oil, residence at 25
     North Fourth Street, under numbering scheme then in effect).
51
     Deed, Charles M. Hapgood to Robert L. Ahles, C35 252 (27 Dec. 1905)(with brick dwelling, sale
     price $12.500); Deed, Dr. F.B. Johnson, Executor of the Will of Nellie [H] Johnson (formerly
     Nellie H. Lesher), to Charles Hapgood, D30 42 (9 Nov. 1900)(sale price $6,000); Deed, John A.
     Nightingale to Nellie H. Lesher, D24 551 (1 Apr. 1893)(with brick dwelling house, sale price
     $10,000); Deed, Nathan H. (Frances) Heft to John A. Nightengale, B22 113 (8 Jan. 1891)(sale
     price $4,000); Deed, Henry D. (Laura) Lachenour M.D. to Nathan H. Heft, D18 249 (27 Mar.
     1885)(“brick messuage tenement”; sale price $7,500).
52
     Deed, Robert L. (Helen K.) Ahles to W. Clayton Hackett, G36 258 (14 March 1907).
53
     Deed, John A. Nightingale to Nellie H. Lesher, D24 551 (1 Apr. 1893)(with brick dwelling house,
     sale price $10,000); Deed, Nathan H. (Frances) Heft to John A. Nightengale, B22 113 (8 Jan.
     1891)(sale price $4,000).
54
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Bixler-Nightengale Building at 315-21
     Northampton Street
55
     Obituary, “NIGHTINGALE”, EASTON EXPRESS, 29 Oct. 1894, p.2, col.3.
56
     Deed, Charles M. Hapgood to Robert L. Ahles, C35 252 (27 Dec. 1905)(with brick dwelling, sale
     price $12.500); Deed, Dr. F.B. Johnson, Executor of the Will of Nellie [H] Johnson (formerly
     Nellie H. Lesher), to Charles Hapgood, D30 42 (9 Nov. 1900)(sale price $6,000).
                                                9



57
     American Journal of Progress, “Greater Easton of To-day” 9 (written c.1902 during Mayor B.
     Rush Field’s second 3-year term, reprinted courtesy of W-Graphics); see separate
     www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Hay Building at 339-41 Northampton Street.
58
     C.M. Sitgreaves (compiler), Resources and Industries of Easton, PA, South Easton, and
     Phillipsburg, N.J., at The Forks of the Delaware! 55 (Geo. W. West 1889); Richard F. Hope,
     Easton PA: A History 106, 108 (AuthorHouse 2006)(includes picture).
59
     1900 Census, Series T623, Roll 1447, p.56A.
60
     Williams T. Blair, The Michael Schoemaker Book 867, 868 (International Textbook Press
     1924)(available at Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society 1924).
61
     1910 Census, Series T624, Roll 1381, p.454B (John Rice & wife Caroline D., with daughter
     Virginia (age 10) and son (age 6) John Jr.).
62
     J.H. Lant & Son, Easton etc. Directory 1881-2 (1881)(alphabetical listing); 1900 Census, Series
     T623, Roll 1447, p.57B; 1910 Census, Series T624, Roll 1381, p.17A(age 70, retired and living
     on his own income).
63
     Deed, Francis B. Swift, et al. (heirs of Beates R. Swift) to W. Clayton Hackett, F47 534 (3 June
     1920); Deed, James Madison Porter, et al. (heirs of Elizabeth P. Porter) to W. Clayton Hackett,
     F47 533 (6 July 1920)(Mrs. Porter had also acquired her property from Beates R. Swift in a Deed
     recorded at E17 563 dated 11 July 1883). A small concrete strip at the northern end of the
     property is not included. See Northampton County Tax Records map, www.ncpub.org.
64
     See Deed, Ann Hackett Orchard to Ann Hackett (William) Orchard, 236 556 (23 Feb.
     1965)(Senator Hackett died no 10 Dec. 1930; his will left the property to his wife, Bessie C.
     Hackett, for life, and then to his daughter Ann Hackett, who married William Orchard); Deed,
     Ann Hackett Gerhardt (formerly Ann Hackett Orchard) to Ann Hackett (Reginald B.) Gerhardt,
     628 713 (7 July 1981)(William Orchard died 18 Sept. 1975; Ann married Reginald B. Gerhardt,
     Jr. on 3 May 1980).
65
     Deed, Jane G. Trevett, Executrix of the Will of Reginald B. Gerhardt, Jr., to Chris A. Thonrton,
     2009-1-024059 (6 Feb. 2009)(sale price $262,500); see Email, Chris Thornton to Richard F.
     Hope (23 Nov. 2010)(correcting entry to indicate that Reginald Gerhardt was the third husband of
     Ann Hackett).

				
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