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					5.     GRADUATE PROGRAM AND STUDENTS ........................................................ 1
     5.1    DEGREES .............................................................................................................. 1
     5.2    HISTORICAL NOTE ............................................................................................... 1
     5.3    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS................................................................................. 2
     5.4    ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY...................................................................... 2
     5.5    SPECIALTY AREAS ............................................................................................... 3
     5.6    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER’S..................................................... 3
     5.7    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR PH.D. ............................................................ 4
     5.8    FIVE-YEAR COMBINED B.S.M.S. DEGREE PROGRAMS ......................................... 4
     5.9    FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS ................................................................... 5
     5.10   GRADUATE COURSES ........................................................................................... 5
     5.11   GRADUATE SEMINARS ......................................................................................... 9
     5.12   STUDENT POPULATION ........................................................................................ 9
     5.13   ENROLLMENT AND GRADUATION HISTORY ....................................................... 10
     5.14   AWARDS RECEIVED BY GRADUATE STUDENTS .................................................. 17
     5.15   ABOUT MASTER’S ALUMNI ............................................................................... 18
ii
           5.     GRADUATE PROGRAM AND STUDENTS

5.1      Degrees
The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers three Master's degrees and a Ph.D.
The specific degree awarded depends on the emphasis chosen by the student as well as
the undergraduate degree received and academic background of the student. The degree
options are:
      Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.). Students who are
      graduates of ABET accredited programs in mechanical engineering are qualified to
      apply for this degree. GRE exam is required for students from non-accredited US
      mechanical engineering programs and all non-US institutions.
      Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.). Students who are graduates of ABET
      accredited engineering programs, other than mechanical engineering, are qualified to
      apply for this degree. GRE exam is required for students from non-accredited US
      engineering programs and all non-US institutions.
      Master of Science (M.S.). Students who are from non-accredited and/or non-
      engineering programs, including technology, are qualified to apply for this degree
      program if they meet the minimum requirements for undergraduate proficiency in the
      discipline. These requirements are listed in the Master’s program Handbook. GRE
      exam is required for students from non-accredited US programs and all non-US
      institutions. Students who have chosen the MS degree option may follow an
      interdisciplinary plan of study, where courses from other disciplines may be taken,
      depending on the student’s interests.
      Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Offered jointly with the Purdue University School of
      Mechanical Engineering. Students admitted to the program have exceptional
      academic potential and usually a Master’s degree. GRE exam is required for
      admission.
      While the department was delegated the authority to administer the process, the
      students are closely supervised by a joint advisory committee consisting of faculty
      from PUWL and IUPUI.

5.2      Historical Note
The mechanical engineering graduate program was officially initiated in the 1989-90
academic year. Until 1989-90 only M.S. and M.S.E. degree programs, administered
jointly with the Purdue University Continuing Engineering Education (CEE) program,
were available at IUPUI. In 1990, the department was delegated the authority to
administer the M.S.E. and M.S. degrees as well as the newly instituted M.S.M.E. degree
for IUPUI with the approval of the Indiana Higher Education Commission. The program
is coordinated through the Graduate School at Purdue University, West Lafayette. With a
cooperative agreement signed with the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue
University, West Lafayette, the department has launched a joint Ph.D. degree program in
Fall 2004. With this agreement, the students will be admitted to IUPUI and enroll in
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


IUPUI and Purdue courses, and conduct research at IUPUI under the supervision of a
joint advisory committee. Prior to this agreement, Ph.D. students could only conduct
research at IUPUI with special arrangements with the School of Mechanical Engineering
faculty at Purdue.

5.3    Admission Requirements
Students are required to have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0/4.0 for admission to
the graduate program. International students who are graduates of non-US institutions
and whose first language is not English are required to take the TOEFL and the GRE
exams. Ph.D. program applicants, Master’s program applicants who wish to apply for a
fellowship or scholarship, and graduates of non-accredited US programs, and graduates
of all non-US intuitions are required to take GRE. GRE scores are recommended for
other domestic applicants to master’s programs, but are required if the applicant wishes to
apply for a fellowship or scholarship. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required for
paper-based test, or 213 for computer-based test. For the GRE, scores of at least 650 is
preferred on the quantitative section and 600 on the analytical section.

Admission to the Ph.D. program is normally granted to those superior students who have
completed a Master of Science degree in an engineering discipline and have met the
requirements outlined by the department. Exceptional students with only a bachelor’s
degree in an engineering discipline may also be admitted.

5.4    English Language Proficiency
All graduate degree-seeking international students whose English is not their first
language must take the English Placement Test (English language proficiency
examination) administered by the IUPUI English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
before they are permitted to enroll for classes after admission. Students tested with
English language deficiencies are required to take all of the remedial courses determined
by the ESL placements and receive passing grades on those courses. Students must begin
taking the first ESL course in the first semester of enrolment and complete the
requirements in sequence before graduation. Students with incomplete ESL requirements
will not be approved for graduation.             Students placed into English G013
“Reading/Writing for Academic Purposes” may replace G013 with TCM 460
“Engineering Communication in Academic Context,” which is taught by the Technical
Communications Program of our School specifically for engineering students.

Moreover, all non-native speakers of English must be tested for their oral English
proficiency before they are assigned duties that involve direct student contact (teaching
assistant, laboratory assistant, graders, and tutors). Students must take and pass the
SPEAK Test, a nationally standardized test before the students are given an academic
appointment. Students who failed to obtain the required minimum scores will take an
ESL course, G020 “Communication Skills for International Teaching Assistants” (3
credit hours) and take the test again before they can accept their appointments.




                                            2
                             5. Graduate Program and Students


5.5        Specialty Areas
The graduate program leading to the M.S.M.E. and Ph.D. degrees are organized into
following four areas of study:
      1.   Solid Mechanics and Computer-Aided Engineering
      2.   Thermal-Fluid Sciences
      3.   Bioengineering
      4.   Machatronics and Controls

The solid mechanics and computer-aided engineering area is for students interested in the
study of solid materials, stress analysis, kinetics, vibration, structural mechanics, and
computer aided design and manufacturing processes. The thermal and fluid sciences
area is for students interested in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and
computational fluid dynamics. The bioengineering area is for students interested in
broad areas of biomechanics, such as musculoskeletal systems, joint mechanics, dental
mechanics, bio-fluid mechanics, bio-solids mechanics, and medical instrumentation. The
mechatronics and controls area is for students interested in the study of mechanical
systems, electro-mechanical systems, control theory, micro-controllers, sensors, and
actuators.

5.6        Graduation Requirements for Master’s
All students have a Master’s Advisory Committee consisting of at least four ME faculty
members, who are also members of the Purdue Graduate School. The second semester
after admission to the program, students must fill-out a plan of study with the help of the
chair of advisory committee.

The thesis option requires 30 credit hours of course work. Courses are classified under
primary area and related area. Those courses directly related to the area of specialty are
classified as primary and those courses outside the specialty area are classified as related
area. A minimum of 9 credit hours of thesis, 9 credit hours of primary-area courses, 6
credit hours of related-area courses, and 6 credit hours of mathematics are required for
the thesis option. At least 3 credit hours of the math-related courses must be taken from
the math department, the other three credit hours may be a graduate engineering course
with strong math content.

The non-thesis option also requires 30 credit hours of course work: 12 credit hours of
primary-area courses, 12 credit hours of related-area courses, and 6 credit hours of
mathematics. Same as the thesis option, at least 3 credit hours of the math-related
courses must be taken from the math department, the other three credit hours may be a
graduate engineering course with strong math content.

More information is available in the ME Master’s Degrees Program Handbook.




                                             3
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


5.7 Graduation Requirements for Ph.D.
Students admitted to the program may take courses from IUPUI, Purdue University or
Purdue’s Continuing Engineering Education program. They have to pass the same
qualifying exams offered jointly by the faculty of the School of Mechanical Engineering
at West Lafayette and IUPUI.

The student must form his/her Doctoral Advisory Committee before the end of the
second semester of the academic program. For students in the Direct Ph.D. Program, the
Doctoral Advisory Committee must be formed by the end of the third semester following
the admission to the program. This committee consists of at least four faculty members
and is formed upon approval of the Final Plan of Study. The committee is co-chaired by
one ME faculty member from IUPUI and one ME faculty member from WL. These co-
chairs serve as the major professors in guiding the student’s thesis research. Prior to
registering for the third semester in the Ph.D. program, all students must file a
Preliminary Plan of Study signed by four faculty members who have advised the student.
Prior to registering for the fourth semester in the Ph.D. program (sixth semester for
students entering the Ph.D. program with only a bachelor’s degree), the student must file
a final plan of study signed by the co-chairs, who will supervise the thesis research, and
the Ph.D. Advisory Committee.

A Ph.D. student is expected to take 21-30 credit hours of course work beyond the
Master’s degree, in addition to Ph.D. dissertation research credit hours. All Ph.D.
students take a qualifying examination that covers core courses administered trough
Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering. This written examination is part
of the information used for evaluating a student’s potential for completing the Ph.D.
program. All Ph.D. students take a preliminary examination that includes an oral part
and a written thesis proposal. The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine
if the student is adequately prepared to conceive and undertake a suitable research topic.
After the successful completion of the preliminary examination, the thesis research may
be conducted under supervision of a mechanical engineering faculty member at IUPUI in
collaboration with a mechanical engineering faculty at Purdue University West Lafayette.
Ph.D. research must be original and merit publication in the scholarly literature. The
final oral examination is given to determine if the research performed by the Ph.D.
student warrants granting the Ph.D. degree.

More information is available in the Ph.D. Degree Program Handbook.

5.8       Five-year Combined B.S.M.S. Degree Programs
In order to attract more domestic students to graduate programs and groom them for
advanced degrees at earlier age, the department has instituted two five-year combined
B.S.M.S. degree programs in which students can receive both B.S. and M.S. degrees in
five years. These programs are open to qualified undergraduates in mechanical
engineering and physics departments at IUPUI, leading to either:
      1   B.S. and M.S.M.E. degree (BSMSME) for IUPUI Mechanical Engineering



                                            4
                             5. Graduate Program and Students


          Undergraduates started in Fall 2004.
      2   B.S. degree in physics and M.S. degree in mechanical engineering (BPMME) for
          IUPUI physics undergraduates started in Fall 2002.

By taking 12 credit hours of graduate courses in the senior year in place of technical
electives and receiving at least a B grade in each, the students are able to finish both
degrees with 12 credit less course work than those who choose the separate route. These
programs, designed for high achieving students are already attracting students who
otherwise would terminate their formal education with their B.S. degree. Even though
they are fairly new programs, the programs have already attracted 10 candidates in the
ME program and 5 candidates in the Physics program.

5.9       Financial Support for Students
Almost all thesis option graduate students are fully supported as research and teaching
assistants.   They receive stipends, tuition, and other fees from faculty grants
supplemented by campus and school block grants. For the last six years, the department
has been receiving in the order of $35-$40 K from campus and $50 K from the school as
block grants for graduate student support. This amount is distributed to faculty
competitively each year as partial support. In contrast to many institutions, non-resident
research and teaching assistants do not receive a non-resident tuition waiver in the
Indiana University budgeting system, which governs our programs. This introduces a
heavy burden on faculty who want to hire research assistants, as the non-resident tuition
fees are almost three times the resident tuition fees per credit hour. With the recent Ph.D.
program, the school has agreed to pay for the tuition differential of non-resident Ph.D.
students, but not yet for Master’s. As the school financials improve, we expect this to be
extended to Master’s candidates too.

Resident tuition support is provided to teaching assistants (three to four each year)
through the Department’s Melba Schumacher Endowment. This endowment, established
by the Schumacher family, has been used as a good resource for attracting both
undergraduate and graduate students to our programs for the last ten years.

Starting Fall 2005, a new fellowship has been instituted through Cummins Company,
with which a graduate student will be fully funded (up to $20 K per year) to pursue
Master’s degree in mechanical engineering. The recipient of this fellowship will work on
a thesis research pertinent to Cummins’ needs under supervision of a graduate faculty
member. It is expected that continuation of this fellowships program will lead to a
stronger research and development collaboration with Cummins.

5.10 Graduate Courses

5.10.1 Master’s Program Courses
Courses in the Master’s program are classified as primary and related area courses. For
all areas, the thesis option requires a maximum of 9 credit hours of thesis, 9 credit hours



                                             5
                             5. Graduate Program and Students


of primary-area courses, 6 credit hours of related-area courses, and 6 credit hours of
mathematics. The non-thesis option requires 12 credit hours of primary-area courses, 12
credit hours of related-area courses, and 6 credit hours of mathematics. Those courses
directly related to the area of specialty are classified as primary and those courses outside
the specialty area are classified as related area.

Primary Area Courses. In the following the primary area courses that have been offered
regularly in the past are listed for each specialty area below:

   1. Solid Mechanics and Computer-Aided Analysis Area
               ME 546         CAD/CAM – Theory and Applications
               ME 550         Advanced Stress Analysis
               ME 551         Finite Element Analysis
               ME 558         Composite Materials
               ME 563         Mechanical Vibrations
               ME 569         Mechanical Behavior of Materials
               ME 597         Mechanical Engineering Projects I (for non-thesis option)
               Other Solid Mechanics Area courses offered through CEE

   2. Thermal-Fluid Sciences Area
               ME 500         Thermodynamics
            ME 505           Heat and Mass Transfer
            ME 509           Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
            ME 510           Gas Dynamics
            ME 525           Combustion
            ME 551           Finite Element Analysis
            ME 597           Topics: Principles of Turbomachinery
            ME 597           Topics: Introduction to Tribology
            ME 597           Mechanical Engineering Projects I (for non-thesis option)
            ME 614           Computational Fluid Dynamics
            Other Thermal-Fluid Sciences Area Courses offered through CEE

      3. Bioengineering
            ME 597          Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System
              BME 601       Principles of Biomedical Engineering
              BME 602       Principles of Biomedical Engineering
              ME 597        Mechanical Engineering Projects I (for non-thesis option)
              Other Bioengineering Sciences Area courses offered through CEE


                                             6
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


           Combination of Solid Mechanics and Thermal-Fluid Sciences Areas
               courses.

     4. Mechatronics and Controls
           ME 546         CAD/CAM Theory and Applications
             ME 551       Finite Element Analysis
             ME 563       Mechanical Vibrations
             ME 597       Topics: Analysis and Design of Robotic Manipulators
             ME 597       Topics: Automotive Control
             ME 597       Topics: Mechatronics
             ECE 538      Digital Signal Processing I
             ECE 554      Electronic Instrumentation and Control Circuits
             ECE 602      Lumped System Theory
             ECE 629      Introduction to Neural Networks
             ECE 680      Modern Automatic Control
             ECE 685      Introduction to Robust Control
             ME 597       Mechanical Engineering Projects I (for non-thesis option)
             Other Mechatronics Area courses offered through CEE

Related Area Courses.      Any Mechanical Engineering graduate course outside the
primary area can constitute a related-area course. Selected graduate electrical
engineering, physics and computer science courses also comprise related area courses,
with the approval of the graduate advisor.

   5. Other Related Area Courses
              ME 552        Advanced Applications of Finite Element Methods
              ME 597        Topics: Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering
              ME 597        Mechanical Engineering Projects I (for non-thesis option
                             only)
              EE 580        Topics: Optimization Methods for Systems and Control
              EE 595        Topics: Introduction to Computational Intelligence
              EE 595        Topics: Parallel Processing Theory
              EE 595        Topics: Electromechanical         Systems   and      Applied
                             Mechatronics
              EE 600        Random Variables
              EE 608        Computational Models and Systems
              PHYS 510      Physical Mechanics


                                           7
                           5. Graduate Program and Students


             PHYS 522       Coherent Optics and Quantum Electronics
             PHYS 545       Solid State Physics
             PHYS 550       Introduction to Quantum Mechanics
             PHYS 600       Mathematical Methods in Physics
             CSCI 520       Computational Methods in Analysis
             CSCI 549       Intelligent Systems
             CSCI 552       Advanced Graphics and Visualization
             CSCI 580       Algorithm Design and Implementation
             CSCI 614       Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations
             CSCI 615       Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations

Mathematics Courses. Six (6) credit hours of mathematics courses are required in the
plan of study as a related area for both thesis and non-thesis options. This requirement
may be met by taking any of the two acceptable three-credit hour courses from the
mathematics department (see the list below), or one course from the mathematics
department and an equivalent course with a strong math content from another
department, including ME. Some acceptable courses in these categories are in the
following lists.

   6. Recommended Mathematics Courses
             MATH 537       Applied Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers I
             MATH 528       Advanced Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers
             MATH 510       Vector Calculus
             MATH 511       Linear Algebra with Applications
             MATH 523       Introduction to Partial Differential Equations
             MATH 578       Mathematical Modeling of Physical Systems

   7. Courses with Strong Math Content
             ME 551         Finite Element Analysis
             ME 552         Advanced Applications of Finite Element Methods
             ME 597         Topics: Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering
             ME 614         Computational Fluid Dynamics
             EE 580         Optimization Methods for Systems and Control
             EE 600         Random Variables
             PHYS 550       Introduction to Quantum Mechanics
             PHYS 600       Mathematical Methods in Physics

Seminar Course. A seminar course, ME 597, (zero credit) is required for all RAs and


                                           8
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


TAs in each semester of appointment. The course aims to provide students the frontier
knowledge in various areas of mechanical engineering as well as contemporary issues
facing the discipline. Attendance in 75% of the seminars will be a requirement.

5.10.2 Ph.D. Program Courses
As the Ph.D. program has started only recently, we ask the new students to enroll at
Purdue University, West Lafayette, and take the courses offered there with the permission
of the advisory committees until they pass their qualifying exams. We expect to use this
approach until we have adequate faculty to teach such courses. We will also continue
taking advantage of courses offered through CEE. Current faculty and student sizes limit
our ability to offer more advanced courses suitable for Ph.D.

5.11 Graduate Seminars
ME department has been organizing graduate and research seminar series regularly for
the last five years in order to enhance graduate student learning and increase interaction
among researchers. Speakers from industry, academic institutions within and outside
IUPUI are invited to these seminars. Also, the thesis work as well as independent project
work of graduate students have been presented at these seminar series. The schedule is
announced and updated regularly on the web site with abstract and information on the
speakers included, (e.g., see Spring/Summer 2005 Seminars for a recent list) Students and
faculty are invited to attend. Since its formal inception in Fall 2000 about 120 speakers
have given presentations. Shown in Figure 5.1 is the number of seminars since Fall 200.
All Research Assistants (RAs) and Teaching Assistants (TAs) are asked to attend the
seminars. Starting Fall 2005, the attendance will be mandatory with the introduction of a
zero credit seminar course (ME 597 Topics: ME Seminar) in the graduate program for
which all RAs and TAs are required to sign up for. This is expected to enhance the level
of student learning while making the seminars better attended.

5.12 Student Population
Given the urban university nature of IUPUI, the graduate program has been originally
designed for engineers working in local industry. As a result, most of the graduate
courses have been offered in the evening hours. Even though our graduate programs are
preferred by most engineers working in local industry, we are not able to tap into the
entire population, as we still face competition from Purdue’s CEE program, as many
major and medium size company sites have access to this program via distance education
tools, such as videostreaming.

Knowing the need for full-time students to build a research program, and the tendency for
domestic students to choose part-time enrolment, international students, international
students are also accepted to the program to increase the full-time student population and
enhance the faculty research. This favorably affects the quality of learning and research
and makes the program more competitive and internationally recognized. Currently,
about 30% of our graduate students are full time. While 90% of the full time students
choose the thesis option, 90% of the part-time students choose the non-thesis option. All


                                            9
                                              5. Graduate Program and Students


full-time students in thesis option are fully supported as a research or a teaching assistant.
Recognizing the need for diversity and serve central Indiana population better, the
department has instituted the five-year B.S.M.S. degree program to attract our qualified
students to graduate program. While these programs are rather new, we expect to see
their impact within the next few years.


                  Number of Seminars

                                       20

                                       15

                                       10

                                        5

                                        0
                                               Sp 0



                                               Sp 1


                                            r/S 02



                                            r/S 03



                                            r/S 04
                                                     03



                                                     04



                                                     05
                                                      1



                                                      2
                                                   l0



                                                  ll 0
                                                  r0



                                                  r0

                                         Sp all



                                                  ll



                                                  ll
                                               um



                                               um



                                               um
                                          l
                                       Fa



                                               Fa




                                               Fa



                                               Fa
                                               F




                                         Sp



                                         Sp
                                                             Semester



                 Figure 5.1 Number of ME seminars held each semester.




5.13 Enrollment and Graduation History
Shown in Figure 5.2 is the headcount of Master’s students enrolled the program since
1998. Since the Ph.D. program has started in Fall 2004, the current enrollment is at five.
Shown in Figure 5.3 is the graduation history of Master’s graduates (mostly M.S.M.E.),
50% of whom are thesis option students. Currently we have about 150 alumni with
Master’s degree.




                                                            10
                                                              5. Graduate Program and Students



                      45

                      40

                      35
       ME Headcount
                      30

                      25                                                                                                   MS
                      20                                                                                                   PhD
                      15

                      10

                       5

                       0
                                            98           99             00            01          02        03        04
                                                                         Academic Year (Fall)

                       Figure 5.2 Graduate student headcount in mechanical engineering.

                                                 20
                                                 18
                           Number of Graduates




                                                 16
                                                 14
                                                 12
                                                 10
                                                 8
                                                 6
                                                 4
                                                 2
                                                 0
                                                      98/99     99/00        00/01        01/02   02/03   03/04   04/05
                                                                                 AcademicYear



                      Figure 5.3 Number of Master’s graduates in mechanical engineering.



Even though the level of research and percentage of full time students have increased
substantially during the recent years, the graduate student enrollment has not changed.
The ability to attract more part- and full-time students to the graduate program still
remains a challenge, and the lack of resources to recruit full-time students significantly
limits the growth of research, and hence the graduate program. . Shown in Table 5.1 are
the graduate ME courses offered since 1996. Small class sizes show that potential exists
to double the enrolment. However, the fact that we are not able to offer more variety of
courses, makes it difficult for us to attract more students to the program. Increasing
graduate enrollment is one of the present goals of the department. The history of total
enrollment in each semester since Fall 1996 is shown in Figure 5.4, which closely
resembles the head count.



                                                                                     11
                          5. Graduate Program and Students


          Table 5.1 Enrollment in ME Graduate courses since Fall 1996.
     (CEE = offered from Purdue’s Continuing Engineering Education Program)
COURSE   FALL 1996                                       PROFESSOR      STUDENTS
ME 505   Heat & Mass Transfer                            A. Ungan       9
ME 509   Inter Fluid Mechanics                           CEE            4
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D.Afolabi      8
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay      7
ME 597   Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Systems         C. Turner      5
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty     8
                             Fall 1996 Total                            43
COURSE   SPRING 1997                                     PROFESSOR      STUDENTS
ME 552   Advanced Application of Finite Element Method   H.U. Akay      3
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                CEE            8
ME 597   Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow          A.Ungan        7
ME 597   Fundamentals of Cryobiology                     D. Gao         3
ME 614   Computational Fluid Dynamics                    CEE            1
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty     1
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty     7
                           Spring 1997 Total                            30
COURSE   FALL 1997                                       PROFESSOR      STUDENTS
ME 505   Heat and Mass Transfer                          A. Ungan       4
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        Nema           7
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay      10
ME 560   Kinematics                                      CEE            3
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           D. Afolabi     6
ME 581   Numerical Methods of Mechanical Engineering     CEE            4
ME 597   Principles of Biomedical Engineering I          E. Berbari     3
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty     2
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty     4
                             Fall 1997 Total                            43
COURSE   SPRING 1998                                     PROFESSOR      STUDENTS
ME 500   Thermodynamics                                  CEE            5
ME 509   Intermediate Fluid Mechanics                    H.U. Akay      8
ME 561   Optimal Design and Theory                       CEE            2
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           CEE            6
ME 597   Principles of Biomedical Engineering II         C. Turner      2
ME 597   Topics: Mechanics of Composites                 R. Pidaparti   1
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty     1
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty     5
                           Spring 1998 Total                            30
COURSE   FALL 1998                                       PROFESSOR      STUDENTS
ME 525   Combustion                                      R. Nalim       11



                                         12
                          5. Graduate Program and Students


ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay        18
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           CEE              2
ME 570   Machine Design                                  CEE              4
ME 571   Reliability Based Design                        CEE              2
ME 597   Biomechanics and Musculoskeletal Systems        C. Turner        3
ME 597   Principles of Biomedical Engineering I          E. Berbari       3
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                 H. El-Mounayri   6
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty       1
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       6
                             Fall 1998 Total                              56
COURSE   SPRING 1999                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 510   Gas Dynamics                                    CEE              8
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       11
ME 552   Advanced Application of Finite Element Method   H.U. Akay        4
ME 562   Advanced Dynamics                               CEE              11
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                CEE              3
ME 597   Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics    A. Ecer          10
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                 H. El-Mounayri   6
ME 597   Principles of Biomedical Engineering II         C. Turner        3
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty       2
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       8
                           Spring 1999 Total                              64
COURSE   FALL 1999                                       PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 505   Heat and Mass Transfer                          A. Ungan         6
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay        20
ME 560   Kinematics                                      S. Alexander     2
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           D. Afolabi       12
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                R. Pidaparti     19
ME 575   Design of Control Systems                       CEE              3
ME 582   Thermal Stress Analysis                         CEE              2
ME 597   Principles of Biomedical Engineering I          H. Yokota        4
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                 H. El-Mounayri   6
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty       3
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       10
                             Fall 1999 Total                              87
COURSE   SPRING 2000                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 500   Thermodynamics                                  A. Ungan         8
ME 509   Intermediate Fluid mechanics                    M. Garbey        9
ME 525   Combustion                                      CEE              4
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       16
ME 565   Vehicle Dynamics                                CEE              11
ME 597   Composite                                       R. Pidaparti     10



                                         13
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


ME 597    Principles of Biomedical Engineering II          C. Turner        1
ME 697    Mechanical Engineering Projects                  ME Faculty       5
ME 698    Research MS Thesis                               ME Faculty       13
                            Spring 2000 Total                               77
COURSE    FALL 2000                                        PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 505    Heat & Mass Transfer                             A. Ungan         19
ME 513    Engineering Acoustics                            CEE              9
ME 551    Finite Element Analysis                          H.U. Akay        17
ME 563    Mechanical Vibrations                            CEE              2
ME 569    Mechanical Behavior of Materials                 R. Pidaparti     10
ME 570    Machine Design                                   CEE              5
ME 597    Principles of Biomedical Engineering I           H. Yokota        4
ME 597    CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                  H. El-Mounayri   1
ME 597    Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Systems          C. Turner        2
ME 697    Mechanical Engineering Projects                  ME Faculty       2
ME 698    Research MS Thesis                               ME Faculty       10
                             Fall 2000 Total                                81
COURSE    SPRING 2001                                      PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 500    Advanced Thermodynamics                          A. Ungan         2
ME        Combustion                                       R. Nalim         12
525/597
ME 550    Advanced Stress Analysis                         J. Chen          15
ME 563    Mechanical Vibrations                            R. Pidaparti     11
ME 597    CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                  H. El-Mounayri   5
ME 614    Computational Fluid Dynamics                     A. Ecer          11
ME 697    Mechanical Engineering Projects                  ME Faculty       4
ME 698    Research MS Thesis                               ME Faculty       10
                            Spring 2001 Total                               70
COURSE    FALL 2001                                        PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 510    Gas Dynamics                                     R. Nalim         11
ME 551    Finite Element Analysis                          H.U. Akay        12
ME 569    Mechanical Behavior of Materials                 R. Pidaparti     13
ME 597    Nanotechnology                                   A. Hsu           7
ME 597    Biomolecular Engineering                         H. Yokota        5
ME 597    Principles of Biomedical Engineering I           E. Berbari       2
ME 597    Mechatronics                                     S. Lyshevski     2
ME 697    Mechanical Engineering Projects                  ME Faculty       2
ME 698    Research MS Thesis                               ME Faculty       10
                             Fall 2001 Total                                64




                                            14
                          5. Graduate Program and Students



COURSE   SPRING 2002                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       12
ME 558   Composite Materials                             R. Pidaparti     8
ME 597   Principles of Turbomachinery                    A. Hsu           10
ME 597   Mechanical Engineering Projects I               H.U. Akay        1
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory and Applications                 H. El-Mounayri   8
ME 614   Computational Fluid Dynamics                    A. Ecer          12
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty       1
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       19
                           Spring 2002 Total                              72
COURSE   FALL 2002                                       PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 509   Inter Fluid Mechanics                           A. Hsu           22
ME 525   Combustion                                      R. Nalim         9
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay        16
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           J. Chen          4
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                R. Pidaparti     7
ME 572   Analysis & Design of Robotic Manipulators       Y. Chen          2
ME 597   Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Systems         C. Turner        1
ME 597   Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I      H.U. Akay        4
ME 597   Combustion                                      R. Nalim         8
ME 697   Mechanical Engineering Projects                 ME Faculty       3
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       16
                             Fall 2002 Total                              94
COURSE   SPRING 2003                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 505   Heat & Mass Transfer                            S. Krishnan      13
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       18
ME 597   Principles of Turbomachinery                    A. Hsu           5
ME 597   Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I      H.U. Akay        2
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory & Applications                   H. El-Mounayri   13
ME 597   Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I      ME Faculty       4
ME 614   Computational Fluid Dynamics                    A. Ecer          8
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       17
                           Spring 2003 Total                              82
COURSE   FALL 2003                                       PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 509   Intermediate Fluid Mechanics                    A. Hsu           13
ME 510   Gas Dynamics                                    R. Nalim         10
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay        18
ME 557   Design for Manufacturability                    CEE              3
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                R. Pidaparti     11
ME 570   Machine Design                                  CEE              1
ME 572   Analysis & Design – Robotic Manipulation        Y. Chen          1



                                         15
                          5. Graduate Program and Students


ME 582   Thermal Stress Analysis                         CEE              3
ME 597   CAD/CAM Theory & Applications                   H. El-Mounayri   1
ME 597   Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I      ME Faculty       3
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       10
                             Fall 2003 Total                              74
COURSE   SPRING 2004                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 505   Intermediate Heat Transfer                      S.S. Krishnan    6
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       9
ME 558   Composite Materials                             R. Pidaparti     14
ME 565   Vehicle Dynamics                                CEE              5
ME 571   Reliability Based Design                        CEE              4
ME 597   Principles of Turbomachinery                    A. Hsu           4
ME 597   Mechanical Engineering Projects I               H.U. Akay        1
ME 597   Mechatronics                                    CEE              1
ME 597   Vehicle Dynamics                                CEE              5
ME 597   Reliability Based Design                        CEE              2
ME 614   Computational Fluid Dynamics                    A. Ecer          4
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       8
                           Spring 2004 Total                              63
COURSE   FALL 2004                                       PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 509   Inter Fluid Mechanics                           A. Hsu           12
ME 551   Finite Element Analysis                         H.U. Akay        18
ME 560   Kinematics                                      CEE              6
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           CEE              4
ME 575   Design of Control Systems                       CEE              1
ME 581   Numerical Methods of Mechanical Engineering     CEE              10
ME 597   Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I      H.U. Akay        1
ME 597   Robotics                                        S. Anwar         1
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       8
                             Fall 2004 Total                              61
COURSE   SPRING 2005                                     PROFESSOR        STUDENTS
ME 505   Intermediate Heat Transfer                      S. Krishnan      11
ME 510   Gas Dynamics                                    CEE              2
ME 550   Advanced Stress Analysis                        D. Afolabi       16
ME 553   Product and Process Design                      CEE              8
ME 563   Mechanical Vibrations                           D. Afolabi       12
ME 569   Mechanical Behavior of Materials                CEE              2
ME 597   Principles of Turbomachinery                    A. Hsu           10
ME 614   Computational Fluid Dynamics                    CEE              1
ME 597   Mechanical Engineering Projects I               ME Faculty       2
ME 698   Research MS Thesis                              ME Faculty       8
                           Spring 2005 Total                              74



                                        16
                                            5. Graduate Program and Students




                        100
                         90
   Number of Students

                         80
                         70
                         60
                         50
                         40
                         30
                         20
                         10
                          0
                         Fa 7



                         Fa 8



                         Fa 9



                         Fa 0



                         Fa 1



                         Fa 2



                         Fa 3



                         Fa 4


                                 5
                         Sp 6



                         Sp 7



                         Sp 8



                         Sp 9



                         Sp 0



                         Sp 1



                         Sp 2



                         Sp 3



                         Sp 4
                            r '9



                            r '9



                            r '9



                            r '0



                            r '0



                            r '0



                            r '0



                            r '0



                            r '0
                           ll'9



                           ll'9



                           ll'9



                           ll'9



                           ll'0



                           ll'0



                           ll'0



                           ll'0



                           ll'0
                        Fa




                                                               Semester

 Figure 5.4 Enrollment history in graduate ME courses since Fall 1996 (credit hours are
                       directly proportional to these numbers).


5.14 Awards Received by Graduate Students
Shown in Table 5.2 is a list of our recent Graduate students who have received awards
because of their technical achievements while they were in our program.


                        Table 5.2 Award winning graduate students (reverse chronological order).
Name                            Degree Awarded and     Award Received and Date               Faculty
                                Date                                                         Supervisor
Amit Baddi                      M.S.M.E., Dec 2005     Department’s Outstanding Graduate
                                                       Student Award, April 2005             H. Akay
Jason Abshire                   M.S.M.E., May 2004     Department’s Outstanding Graduate
                                                       Student Award, April 2004             S. Krishnan
Jason Abshire                   M.S.M.E., May 2004     AIAA Region III Student Conference
                                                       – Second Place (Best Presentation),   S. Krishnan
                                                       West Lafayette, IN, April 2004




                                                          17
                            5. Graduate Program and Students


   Table 5.2 (cont’d) Award winning graduate students (reverse chronological order).
Name            Degree Awarded and     Award Received and Date              Faculty
                Date                                                        Supervisor
Jason Abshire   M.S.M.E., May 2004     AIAA Region III Student Conference
                                       – First Place (Best Presentation),   S. Krishnan
                                       Paducah, KY, April 2003
Haiyan Deng     M.S.M.E., May 2003      Department’s Outstanding Graduate   H. El-
                (now a Ph.D. student at Student Award, April 2003           Mounayri
                Georgia Tech)
Berrak          M.S.M.E.,              AIAA Central Regional Conference –
Alparslan       Dec 2002               Second Place Presentation Award,     R. Nalim
                                       April 2002
Berrak          M.S.M.E.,              Department’s Outstanding Graduate
Alparslan       Dec 2002               Student Award, April 2002            R. Nalim
Mingson Cao     M.S.M.E., May 2002     Department’s Outstanding Graduate
                                       Student Award, April 2002            J. Chen
Subramaniam     M.S.M.E., Aug 2001     Department’s Outstanding Graduate    R. Pidaparti
Jayanti         (Now a Ph.D. student   Student Award, April 2001
                at Purdue)
Nandhini        M.S.M.E., May 2003     School’s Distinguished Engineering   R. Pidaparti
Dhanaraj        (Now a Ph.D. Student   Student Award
                at Carnegie Mellon)




5.15 About Master’s Alumni

5.15.1 Alumni Who Completed Thesis Option
Given in Table 5.3 is a list of Master’s graduates who completed a thesis since 1990.
Many of these currently hold prominent positions in various organizations or pursue
Ph.D. as the next table shows.

5.15.2 Whereabouts of Our Alumni
Table 5.4 lists some of our Master’s alumni and their current job affiliations. Those
graduated before 1990 were through Purdue University Continuing Engineering
Education Program. Those fro whom we have information hold either prominent
positions in major companies as senior technical experts or managerial positions. More
than 15% have pursued Ph.D.




                                           18
                                                 5. Graduate Program and Students




                          Table 5.2 List of Master’s thesis graduates and their thesis titles since 1990.
No.          Name                                              Thesis Title                                  Date     Advisor
1     Ali Beskok             A Parallel Finite Element Algorithm for the Time-Averaged Solution of the       May-   H. Akay
                             Rotor-Stator Interaction Problem                                                 91
2     Batu Balkanli          Numerical Simulation of Refining Bubble Behavior in Glass Melting Furnaces      Dec-   A. Ungan
                                                                                                              92
3     Jeffery Haskett        Stress Fracture Investigation of a Rabbit Tibia Using Finite Element Analysis   May-   N. Paydar
                                                                                                              93
4     William Kemle          Parallel Implementation of a Three-Dimensional Unsteady Potential Finite        May-   H. Akay
                             Element Solver                                                                   93
5     Lianfeng Xu            Finite Element Modeling of the Human Temporomadibular Joint                     May-   J. Chen
                                                                                                              94
6     Anand Chandran         Study of the Osteonal Bone Anisotropy Using Experiment and Composite Models     Aug-   R. Pidaparti
                                                                                                              94
7     Anne L. Vital          Finite Element Studies of Bone Adaptation Models                                Aug-   R. Pidaparti
                                                                                                              94
8     Gangadhar Pontula      Three-Dimensional Fracture Analysis of Rubber Materials                         Aug-   R. Pidaparti
                                                                                                              94
9     Ozan Selcuk            Parallel Solution of Coupled Unsteady Compressible flow and Aeroelasticity      Aug-   H. Akay
                             Equations                                                                        94
10    Alexander Chi-Sun      Strain Variation in the Cement Mantle Around Femoral Hip Stems Due to           Dec-   N. Paydar
      Tsang                  Increased Cement Thickness - An Experimental Investigation Using Fiberglass      94
                             Analog Femora
11    Vamsi Prasad           Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Cord Rubber Composite              Dec-   R. Pidaparti
      Kakarla                Laminates                                                                        94
12    Xu Song                Numerical Modeling of Creep Phenomena in Adhesive Epoxy and Solder Joint        Aug-   H. Akay
                             Assembles of Electric Packages                                                   95
13    Yuehua (Alice)         Parallel Solution of Unsteady Compressible Euler Equations Using the Finite     Aug-   H. Akay
      Chen                   Element Method                                                                   95




                                                                 19
                                                5. Graduate Program and Students




                     Table 5.2 (cont’d) List of Master’s thesis graduates and their thesis titles since 1990.
No.       Name                                                Thesis Title                                      Date     Advisor
14 Altug Bilgic             Fatigue Life Prediction Methods for Thermally Loaded Solder Joints Using the        May-   H. Akay
                            Finite Element Method                                                                96
15   Ahmet Behcet           Parallel Computations of Unsteady Compressible Viscous Flows Using the Finite       May-   H. Akay
     Acikmese               Element Method                                                                       96
16   Geoffrey Louis         Experimental Study of Viscoelastic Properties of a Conductive Adhesive for          May-   H. Akay
     Glogas                 Electronic Packaging                                                                 96
17   Kevin G. Kohrt         A Computational Model of the Auditory Periphery                                     May-   S. Chittajalu
                                                                                                                 96
18   Thomas Henry           The Effect of Electromagnetic Radiation on Ice Crystal Nucleation and Growth in     Aug-   A. Ungan
     Jackson                Aqueous Solutions                                                                    96
19   Yue Liu                Simulation and Analysis of Fatigue Damage of Cortical Bone                          Aug-   R. Pidaparti
                                                                                                                 96
20   Karoly Fekete          A Domain Decomposition Based Parallel Solver for Incompressible Navier-             Aug-   H. Akay
                            Stokes Equations Using the Finite Element Method                                     97
21   Tongyu Wang            The Ultimate Shear Strength and Shear Fatigue of Human Cortical Bone                Aug-   C. Turner
                                                                                                                 97
22   Haihong Qian           Finite Element Stress Analysis of Three-Dimensional Orthodontic Model with          May-   T. Katona
                            Reinforced PDL Elements                                                              98
23   Hongyan Zhang          Combined Heat Transfer and Thermal Stress Analysis of Power Resistor                May-   H. Akay
                            Assembles for Fatigue Life Predictions                                               98
24   Qiong Zhang            Numerical Simulation of Heating of a Containerized Liquid in a Single-Mode          May-   A. Ungan
                            Microwave Cavity                                                                     98
25   Gunasekaran            A Comparative Evaluation of Fatigue Life Prediction Method for Solder Joint         May-   H. Akay
     Kaliappan              Assembles                                                                            99
26   Ali Uzun               Parallel Computations of Unsteady Euler Equations on Dynamically Deforming          Aug-   H. Akay
                            Unstructured Grids                                                                   99
27   Christopher            An Unstructured Grid Partitioning Program for Parallel Computational Fluid          Aug-   H. Akay
     Bronnenberg            Dynamics                                                                             99




                                                               20
                                                5. Graduate Program and Students



                     Table 5.2 (cont’d) List of Master’s thesis graduates and their thesis titles since 1990.
No.      Name                                                 Thesis Title                                      Date     Advisor
28 Jamie Workman            Finite Element of the Compressible Euler Equations Using Tetrahedral Elements       Aug-   H. Akay
                                                                                                                 99
29   Anthony May            Micromechanical Analysis of Cord-Rubber Composites                                  Dec-   R. Pidaparti
                                                                                                                 99
30   John Thomas Guy        Modeling Reflow Ovens for Predicting Reflow Profiles of Printed Wiring              Dec-   H. Akay
                            Assemblies                                                                           99
31   Robert Glen Kiser      Radiation Phenomena in a Natural Gas-fired Furnace                                  Dec-   A. Ungan
                                                                                                                 99
32   Ilker Tarkan           Efficient Algorithms for Parallel Explicit Solvers                                  Aug-   A. Ecer
                                                                                                                 00
33   Lian Peet Loo          Parallel Computing and Dynamic Load Balancing of ADPAC in Heterogeneous             Aug-   A. Ecer
                            Cluster of Unix/RS6K and Windows/ NT Computers                                       00
34   Vipul Tandon           Closing the Gap between CAD/CAM and Optimized CNC End Milling                       Aug-   H. El-
                                                                                                                 00    Mounayri
35   Kok Kee Fong           Parametric Study of a Pulse Detonation Engine                                       Dec-   R. Nalim
                                                                                                                 00
36   Rong Yan               Virtual Evaluation of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance                           Dec-   J. Chen
                                                                                                                 00
37   Zhiqiang Yuan          Electric Variable Transmission Based Powertrain Design and Evaluation               Dec-   Jie Chen
                                                                                                                 00
38   Hui Tan                The Effect of Stop Bend of T-Loop on Measured Force Systems                         May-   J. Chen
                                                                                                                 01
39   Subramaniam            Intelligent Computations for Structural Damage Assessment                           Aug-   R. Pidaparti
     Jayanti                                                                                                     01
40   Yan Liu                Simplifications of Finite Element Models for Thermal Fatigue Life Prediction of     Aug-   H. Akay
                            PBGA Packages                                                                        01
41   Stephen W. Smith       Numerical Modeling of Hybrid Dielectric Heating Within a Multimode                  Dec-   H. Akay
                            Microwave Cavity                                                                     01
42   Jorge Francisco        Modeling and Optimization of Milling Using Computational Intelligence and           May-   H. El-
     Briceno                Design of Experiments                                                                02    Mounayri




                                                                 21
                                               5. Graduate Program and Students



                    Table 5.2 (cont’d) List of Master’s thesis graduates and their thesis titles since 1990.
No.      Name                                                 Thesis Title                                     Date      Advisor
43 Mingsong Cao            Rapid Design Evaluation in an Integrated Product Development System for             Aug-   J. Chen
                           Concurrent Engineering                                                               02
44   Muharrem Barun        Improving the Stability and Accuracy of Explicit Schemes for Convection             Aug-   A. Ecer
                           Diffusion Equations                                                                  02
45   Tao Yang              The Development of a Compressible Lattice Boltzmann Model for Turbomachine          Aug-   A. Hsu
                           Applications                                                                         02
46   Yun Wang              Product Design in an Integrated Product Development System for Concurrent           Aug-   J. Chen
                           Engineering                                                                          02
47   Zhenyin Li            Parallel Computations of 3D Unsteady Compressible Euler Equations with              Aug-   H. Akay
                           Structural Coupling                                                                  02
48   Berrak Alparslan      An Investigation of Detonation Wave Rotor Cycles for Gas Turbine Engine             Dec-   R. Nalim
                           Performance Enhancement                                                              02
49   Nandhini Dhanaraj     Finite Element Simulations of Airway Smooth Muscle Tissue Behavior under            May-   R. Pidaparti
                           Vibratory Loads                                                                      03
50   Zakirhushain Dugla    Prediction of Dimensional Accuracy in CNC Milling using Computation                 May-   H. El-
                           Intelligence Techniques and Experimental Data                                        03    Mounayri
51   Gang Bai              Application of Statistical Methods in Industry for Quality Engineering              Aug-   J. Chen
                                                                                                                03
52   Kemal Arican          Improving the Efficiency of an Explicit Scheme for the Solution of Convection –     Aug-   A. Ecer
                           Diffusion Problem                                                                    03
53   Haiyan Deng           A Generic Approach for Integrated Modeling and Optimization of 21/2-Axis End        Dec-   H. El-
                           Milling Using Solid Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Techniques             03    Mounaryi
54   Sangbae Park          Heat Performance Analysis pf Multi-Fluid Heat Exchangers                            Dec-   S. Krishnan
                                                                                                                03
55   Snehaunshu            Computational Study of High Pressure Fuel Injection and Flow Passage Design         May-   R. Nalim
     Chowdhury             for a Large-Bore Gas Engine                                                          04
56   Tao Geng              Statistical Design of Experiments in the Investigation of the Wave Ejector          May-   R. Nalim
                                                                                                                04
57   Xiaoyin He            Parallel Computations of Solid-Fluid Interactions Using Arbitrary Lagrangian-       May-   H. Akay
                           Eulerian And Relative Coordinate Formulations                                        04




                                                               22
                                                  5. Graduate Program and Students



                       Table 5.2 (cont’d) List of Master’s thesis graduates and their thesis titles since 1990.
No.          Name                                              Thesis Title                                       Date     Advisor
58    Jason M. Abshire        Laminar Diffusion Flame Shapes Under Earth-Gravity and Microgravity                 Aug-   S. Krishnan
                              Conditions                                                                           04
59    Keith E. Bandi          The Development of a CFD Chemistry ODE Solver for Ethylene Fuel                     Aug-   A. Hsu
                                                                                                                   04
60    Chin Wai Lim            The Development of a Three-Dimensional Lattice Boltzmann Model for                  Aug-   A. Hsu
                              Compressible Flows                                                                   04
61    Jie Huang               A Probability Density Function Based Monte Carlo Scheme for Two-Phase Flow          Dec-   A. Hsu
                              Simulation                                                                           04
62    Kittisak Koombua        An Investigation of Mechanical Environment around a Tooth Root Using Finite         Aug-   J. Chen
                              Element Analysis                                                                     05
63    Xiaoyang Sun            Monte Carlo Simulation of Hydrogen Absorption Capacity in Alkali-doped              Aug-   A. Hsu
                              Single-wall and Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes                                          05
64    Xiaofeng Li             A PDM-based Integrated Product Development System for Concurrent                    Aug-   J. Chen
                              Engineering                                                                          05




                                                                 23
                                               5. Graduate Program and Students



                         Table 5.3 Whereabouts of some Master’s alumni (reverse chronological order).
No.   Name                     Graduation    Current Employment                                            Faculty Advisor
                               Date
1     Arnab Banerjee            Aug 2005     Cummins Company, Columbus, IN                                 R. Nalim
2     Daniel Aw                 Aug 2005     PhD Student, IUPUI                                            H. El-Mounayri
3     Amit Baddi                Aug 2005     Cummins Engine Company, Columbus, IN                          H. Akay
4     Emanuel Abebaw            Aug 2005     Remy Inc., Anderson, IN
5     Xiaoyang Sun              Aug 2005     PhD Student, University of Kansas, KS                         A. Hsu
6     Xiaofeng Li               Aug 2005     Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI                              J. Chen
7     Kittisak Koombua          May 2005     PhD Student, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA   J. Chen
8     Dereje Getahun            May 2005     KIPT Inc., Indianapolis, IN                                   H. El-Mounayri
9     Haiyan Deng               May 2003     PhD Student, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA     H. El-Mounayri
10    Jie Huang                 Dec 2004     Cummings Company, Columbus, IN                                A. Hsu
11    Jace McFerran             Aug 2004     Naval Surface Warfare Center, VA                              R. Nalim
12    Jason Abshire             May 2004     NAVAIR, Patuxent River, MD                                    S. Krishnan
13    Sang Park                 Dec 2003                                                                   S. Krishnan
14    Nawfal Issa               Dec 2003                                                                   R. Nalim
15    Nandhini Dhanaraj         May 2003     PhD Student, Carnegie Mellon University, PA                   R. Pidaparti
16    Zakirhushain Dugla        May 2003     DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems, FL                            H. El-Mounayri
17    Berrak Alparslan          Dec 2002     TEI-General Electric, Eskisehir, Turkey                       R. Nalim
18    Minsong Chao              May 2002     PhD Student, Purdue University                                J. Chen
19    Yun Wang                  May 2002     MBA, Wayne State University                                   J. Chen
20    Muharrem Barun            May 2002     Turkish Aerospace Industries, Ankara, Turkey                  A. Ecer
21    Jorge Briceno             May 2002     Allison Transmission Systems, Indianapolis, IN                H. El-Mounayri




                                                               24
                                              5. Graduate Program and Students



                    Table 5.3 (cont’d) Whereabouts of some Master’s alumni (reverse chronological order).
No.    Name                   Graduation       Current Employment                                            Faculty
                              Date                                                                           Advisor
22    Alan Gunter               May 2001      Caltherm, Columbus, IN                                        R. Nalim


23    Jacob Jones               May 2001      PhD Student at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN          R. Pidaparti
24    Brian June                May 2001      Beckman Coulter, Indianapolis, IN                         R. Pidaparti
25    Brien Krieger              Aug 2001     Rolls-Royce Corporation                                   R. Pidaparti
26    Subramaniam Jayanti        Aug 2001     PhD Student, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN            R. Pidaparti
27    Yan Liu                    Aug 2001     Technalysis, Inc., Indianapolis, IN                           H. Akay
28    Hui Tan                   May 2001      Foxlink International Inc, Brea, CA
29    Kevin Farris               Dec 2000     Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis, IN                     H. Akay
30    Kok Fong                   Dec 2000     University Tenaga Nasional, Selangor, Malaysia                R. Nalim
31    Zhiqiang Yuan              Dec 2000    China                                                      J. Chen
32    Rong Yan                   Dec 2000    Ford Motor Company, Detroit, MI                            J. Chen
33    Jeffrey Henkle             Dec 2000     Raytheon Technical Services Co., Indianapolis, IN             R. Pidaparti
34    James Taylor               Dec 2000     Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis, IN                     H. Akay
35    Ilker Tarkan               Aug 2000     Technalysis, Inc., Indianapolis, IN                           A. Ecer
36    Vipul Tandon               Aug 2000     Cummins Company, Columbus, IN                                 H. El-Mounayri
37    Zuhail Izzy                Aug 2000     Delta Faucet, Indianapolis, IN                                R. Nalim
38    Robert Keiser              Dec 1999     Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis, IN                     A. Ungan




                                                               25
                                              5. Graduate Program and Students




                    Table 5.3 (cont’d) Whereabouts of some Master’s alumni (reverse chronological order).
No.   Name                     Graduation     Current Employment                                              Faculty Advisor
                               Date
39    Jamie Workman,             Aug 1999     Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology,       H. Akay
                                              IUPUI
40    Ali Uzun                   Aug 1999     PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Florida State University, Tallahassee, H. Akay
                                              FL
41    Chris Bronnenberg          Aug 1999     Raytheon Corporation, Los Angeles, CA                           H. Akay
42    Troy Pressnal              May 1999     Raytheon Technical Services, Indianapolis, IN                   A. Ungan

43    Guna Kaliappan             May 1999     JLG Industries, Bedford, PA                                     H. Akay

44    Patrick Gee                May 1998     Lecturer, Freshman Engineering Program, IUPUI
45    Karoly Fekete              Aug 1997     Cummins Company, Columbus, IN                                   H. Akay
46    Altug Bilgic               May 1996     Rolls Royce Energy Systems, Mt. Vernon, OH                      H. Akay
47    Ahmet Acikmese             May 1996     PhD., NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA              H. Akay
48    Yuehua (Alice) Chen        Dec 1995     Grumman Aerospace, Los Angeles, CA                              H. Akay
49    Alexander Tsang            May 1995     MD, University of Texas, Medical Branch, Galveston, TX          N. Paydar
50    Ozan Selcuk                May 1994     Leaf Partners, Indianapolis, IN                                 H. Akay
51    Timothy McDonald           May 1994     Visteon, Corp., Dearborn, MI                                    R. Pidaparti
52    Batu Balkanli              May 1992     Microsoft Inc., Istanbul, Turkey                                A. Ungan
53    Ali Beskok                 May 1991     PhD, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, College         H. Akay
                                              Station, TX
54    Evangelos                  May 1990     PhD, Surface Integrity Group, San Jose, CA                      A. Ecer
      Spyropoulos




                                                               26
                                              5. Graduate Program and Students



                    Table 5.3 (cont’d) Whereabouts of some Master’s alumni (reverse chronological order).
No.   Name                     Graduation     Current Employment                                            Faculty Advisor
                               Date
55    Resat Payli                May 1990     CFD Laboratory, IUPUI                                         A. Ecer
56    Michael Gibson             May 1990     Raytheon Technical Services, Indianapolis, IN
57    Nancy Lamm                 May 1989     Director of Freshman Engineering, IUPUI
58    Ralph Najmon               May 1989     Allison Transmission, Indianapolis, IN                        A. Ecer
59    Suleyman Ciray             Aug 1987     Arvin Merritor, Columbus, IN                                  A. Ecer
60    Chuck Lynch                Aug 1986     Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN
61    Vladimir Rubek             May 1985     Technalysis, Inc., Indianapolis, IN                           A. Ecer
62    John Spyropoulos           May 1983     PhD, Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, MD             A. Ecer
63    Ismail Tuncer              May 1983     PhD, Associate Professor, Middle East Technical University,   A. Ecer
                                              Ankara, Turkey
64    Canbek Karaca              May 1982     General Electric, Gebze, Turkey                               A. Ecer
65    Bilal Bhutta               May 1982     PhD, Aero Technologies, Inc., Yorktown, VA                    A. Ecer




                                                               27

				
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