Consonant Minilessons

Document Sample
Consonant Minilessons Powered By Docstoc
					Consonant Minilessons
       Author: Dr. Diane Nettles
        PPT Designed by: Dr.
          Christine Peterson
Minilesson Features

 This presentation is designed as a
 self-study. Each slide will guide
 you through the process to learn
 about specific phonetic elements.

 If you see an arrow button        click
 on it to return to the previous slide
 or       to advance to the next slide
 in the presentation.
Consonants
Mini-Lesson #1: Consonants
• Consonants are letters. In the
  English alphabet, there are twenty-
  one consonants, and they are: “b,”
  “c,” “d,” “f,” “g,” “h,” “j,” “k,” “l,” “m,”
  “n,” “p,” “q,” “r,” “s,” “t,” “v,” “w,” “x,”
  “y,” and “z.” You will see later that
  the “w” and the “y” can also function
  as vowels.
    Predictable Single Consonant
               Sounds
• Letter “b”: represents the phoneme /b/ as in “bear.”
• Letter “c”:
     – represents the phoneme /k/ as in “cat.”
     – represents the phoneme /s/ as in “city.”
• Letter “d”: represents the phoneme /d/ as in “dog.”
• Letter “f”: represents the phoneme /f/ as in “fox.”
• Letter “g”:
     – represents the phoneme /g/ as in “go.”
     – represents the phoneme /j/ as in “geography.”
•   Letter “h”: represents the phoneme /h/ as in “hat.”
•   Letter “j”: represents the phoneme /j/ as in “jam.”
•   Letter “k”: represents the phoneme /k/ as in “kitchen.”
•   Letter “l”: represents the phoneme /l/ as in “lion.
•   Letter “m”: represents the phoneme /m/ as in “man.
•   Letter “n”: represents the phoneme /n/ as in “nice.
•   Letter “p”: represents the phoneme /p/ as in “pickle.”
   Predictable Single Consonant
              Sounds
• Letter “q”: The letter “q,” when paired with the letter “u”,
  represents a blend of the phonemes /k/ and /w/, as in
  “queen.”
• Letter “r”: the phoneme /r/ as in “run.”
• Letter “s”: represents the phoneme /s/ as in “sun.”
• Letter “t”: represents the phoneme /t/ as in “turtle.”
• Letter “v”: represents the phoneme /v/ as in “violin.”
• Letter “w”: represents the phoneme /w/ as in “well.”
• Letter “x”: when it is at the end of a word or syllable,
  represents the phonemes /k/ and /s/ blended together, as
  in “fox.”
• Letter “y”: when it is at the beginning of a word or
  syllable, represents the phoneme /y/ as in “yellow.”
• Letter “z”: represents the phoneme /z/ as in “zoo.”
Consonant Combinations #1

Study the list of words below. Each word
  is in the book, Spot’s First Picnic, by Eric
  Hill (1987).
Pronounce the words to yourself.
Mini-lesson #1: List #1
  Spot         sticky          crash
  trouble      cloudy          splash
  stepping      stream         branch
  slippery      Steve          crossed
  stones        grass          dry
  climbed       started        tricks
  dry           friends        small
  tree
Consonant Blends

Eldredge (1999) lists the consonant
  blends that occur most often at the
  beginning of words. Twenty-four of
  these are shown on the next few
  slides.
Common Consonant Blends
• “bl” as in “black” and   • “fr” as in “fry” and
  “blue”                     “frozen”
• “br” as in “brush”       • “gl” as in “glisten”
  and “brittle”              and “glad”
• “cl” as in “clear” and   • “gr” as in “green”
  “clink”                    and “grab”
• “cr” as in “crinkle”     • “pl” as in “please”
  and “crush”                and “plank”
• “dr” as in “drive” and   • “pr” as in “prey” and
  “dribble”                  “pretty”
• “fl” as in “flipper”     • “sl” as in “slow” and
  and “flaunt”               “sliver”
Common Consonant Blends
• “sc” as in “scar” and   • “spl” as in “split” and
  “scale”                   “splatter”“
• “scr” as in “screech”   • “spr” as in “spring”
  and “scruples”            and “spray”
• “sk” as in “skate”      • “st” as in “sticky”
  and “skunk”               and “stare”
• “sl” as in “slip” and   • “str” as in “street”
  “slumber”                 and “strange”
• “sm” as in “smitten”    • “sw” as in “swat”
  and “smug”                and “swim”
• “sn” as in “snatch”     • “tr” as in “tree” and
  and “snowman”             “tricky”
   Consonant Combination #2

   There is another type of consonant combination
that is different from a blend or cluster.
   Look at another list of words to find out more
about it. Notice the appearance of the words.
Then pronounce them and think about the first
sound in each.
Mini-lesson #1: List #2
  they         then       shouted        charge
   there       where       third          that
   while       when        shower        shake
   whoops what            chuckled       thanks
Consonant Digraphs
• “ch”: usually represent the phoneme
  /ch/ as in “chicken.”
• “th”: represent the phoneme /th/, as in
  “thick,” and /th/ as in “that.”
• “sh”: usually represent the phoneme
  /sh/ as in “shoe.”
• “wh”: usually represent the phoneme
  /hw/ as in “white.”
• “ph”: usually represent the phoneme /f/
  as in “phonics.”
Consonant Combination #3

Look at the words in List #3 and draw
  a conclusion about them.
Mini-lesson #1: List #3
knock     write      knit      wren
Self-Quiz for Minilesson #1
Test yourself. In each of the following, which one does not
belong? Click on the link to check your guess.
1.                                2.
flutter                           spin
thing                             sherry
spangle                           chocolate
Self-Quiz for Minilesson #1
Test yourself. In each of the following, which one does not
belong? Click on the link to check your guess.
3.                                4.
wet                               strap
write                             slim
whale                             shot
Self-Quiz for Minilesson #1
Test yourself. In each of the following, which one does not
belong?
5.                                6.
knee                              shrug
this                              that
wren                              drill
Review of Minilesson #1
You learned:
1. A consonant blend or cluster is a combination of two
   or three consonants in the same syllable, in which
   both of the phonemes represented by the
   consonants are heard.
2. A consonant digraph is a combination of two
   consonants in the same syllable, which represent a
   single, unique consonant phoneme.
3. Some consonant combinations, such as “wr” and
   “kn” contain a letter that represents no sound, which
   is often called a “silent letter.” They are also
   sometimes called a consonant digraph, because of
   the fact that the two letters represent one sound.
4. A consonant combination of three letters, such as
   “shr” in “shrug,” is actually a blend of two
   phonemes: the digraph phoneme and the single
   consonant phoneme.
The minilessons were prepared
using the following reference:

Nettles, D. (2005). Literacy instruction in
today’s classrooms: Balancing the whole, the
parts, and the heart. Boston, MA: Allyn &
Bacon.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:27
posted:10/31/2011
language:English
pages:17