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					    GRADUATE
     STUDENT
    HANDBOOK

   Department of
   Anthropology
University of Oregon
    (2009-2010)




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ii
                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION
  University Catalog and Schedule of Classes………………………………………………….…….…….…                     1
  Department of Anthropology Graduate Student Policy Documents…………………………….…….……             1
  Student Information………………………………………………………………………………………………                                   1
  Telephones………………………………………………………………………………………………………                                         1

CAMPUS COMPUTING FACILITIES
  Information Services (formerly Computing Center)……………………………………….. ……………… 1
  Campus Computing Labs……………………………………………………………………………………… 1

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY INFORMATION
   Facilities……………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                                      1
       Condon Hall……………………………………………………………………………….…………………                                    1
       Laboratories………………………………………………………………………………..………………                                   3
       University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and
            Oregon State Museum of Anthropology……………………………………………………………                      3
   Current Teaching Faculty……………………………………………………………………..………………                               3
   Organizations………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                                     3
   Association of Anthropology Graduate Students (AAGS)………………………………………………                   3
   The Student-Faculty Senate (SFS)…………………………………………………………….……… ……                           3
   AAGS/Department Colloquium………………………………………………………………………………                                 3

GRADUATE PROGRAMS: GENERAL INFORMATION
   Resource People……………………………………………………………………………………………….                                     4
   Relevant University of Oregon Regulations……………………………………………….…………………                      4
   UO Graduate School Regulations….…………………………………………………………………………                             5
   General Information……………………………………………………………………………………………                                   5
   Research Compliance…………………………………………………………………………………………                                    5
   Continuous Enrollment………………………………………………………………………..………………                                 5
   On-Leave Status……………………………………………………………………………….………………                                     5
   Permission to Reregister………………………………………………………………………………………                                5
   Time Limit…………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                                       6
   Waiver of Regulations…………………………………………………………………………………………                                  6
   Joint-Campus Program…………………………………………………………………………………………                                   6
   Application for a Degree………………………………………………………………………………………                                6
UO Graduate School Regulations: Master's Degree………………………………………………………                        6
   Transfer Credit…………………………………………………………………………………………………                                     6
   Distance Education…………………………………………………………………………….………………                                   6
   Reservation of Graduate Credit: Permission to Register for Graduate Credit………………..…………   7
   Transfer of Reserved Graduate Credit………………………………………………………..………………                        7
   Other University of Oregon Transferred Credit………………………………………………………………                    7
   Credit Requirements…………………………………………………………………………..………………                                  7
   Residency and Enrollment Requirements…………………………………………………….……………                          7
   Examinations…………………………………………………………………………………..………………                                      7
   Thesis…………………………………………………………………………………………..………………                                         7
   Summary of Graduate School Requirements for a Master's Degree………………………….………….            8
   Statement of Completion of Requirements…………………………………………………….…………                         8
   UO Graduate School Regulations: Doctoral Degree………………………………………….…………                     8
   Residency and Credit Requirements………………………………………………………………………                             8
   In Absentia Registration……………………………………………………………………….………………                               8
   Language Requirement………………………………………………………………………..………………                                  9
   Examinations and Advancement to Candidacy………………………………………………...…………                       9
   Dissertation Committee………………………………………………………………………..………………                                9
   Dissertation Registration………………………………………………………………………………………                               9
   Defense of Dissertation………………………………………………………………………..………………                               9
   Completion of Dissertation…………………………………………………………………….………………                              9
   Chronological Summary of Procedures Leading to Doctoral Degrees……………………………………            10


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DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:
   GENERAL INFORMATION
   Overview of Degrees Granted…………………………………………………………………………………                        10
   Course Load……………………………………………………………………………………………………                                 10
   Courses Requiring Faculty Approval………………………………………………………….………………                   11
   The Advisor……………………………………………………………………………………………………                                 11
   Proseminar in Anthropology (ANTH 615)…………………………………………………….. ……………                 11
   Timely (and Satisfactory) Progress…………………………………………………………….……………                   11
   Timing of Degree Completion…………………………………………………………………………………                        11

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:
   THE MASTER’S DEGREE
   General Requirements…………………………………………………………………………………………                            12
   Overview……………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                                 12
   "Core"Courses……………………………………………………………………………………………………                               12
   Master's Paper………………………………………………………………………………….………………                              12
   Master's Paper or Master's Thesis…………………………………………………………………………                     13
   Annual Reviews of Master's and Doctoral Students………………………………………………………             13
   Incompletes as an Impediment to the Degree…………………………………………………..…………               14
   Summary Table of the Master’s Degree Requirements in Anthropology……………………..…………   14
   Other Master's Requirements for Archaeology Students……………………………………..……………         14
       Research Methods…………………………………………………………………………………………                            14
       Basic Statistical Methods Requirement…………………………………………………….……………               14
       Skill Requirement………………………………………………………………………….………………                          15
   Other Master's Requirements for Biological Anthropology Students……………………………………    15
       Research Methods Requirement…………………………………………………………..……………                     15
       Statistical Methods Requirement…………………………………………………………..……………                  16
   Other Master's Requirements for Cultural Anthropology Students………………………………………     16
       Second Core Course in Cultural Anthropology…………………………………………….……………            16
       Core Course in Linguistic Anthropology…………………………………………………..……………              16
       Research Methods Requirement…………………………………………………………..……………                     16
       Language…………………………………………………………………………………..………………                               16

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:
THE DOCTORATE
   General Regulations (Admission, Transition, etc.)……………………………………… …………………          17
   Ph.D. Residency Requirement…………………………………………………………………………………                        17
   Time Limit……………………………………………………………………………………..…………………                               17
   Incompletes as an Impediment to the Degree……………………………………………………………..               17
   Status…………………………………………………………………………………………..………………                                  17
   Obtaining Doctoral Candidacy………………………………………………………………………………                        18
Obtaining Doctoral Candidacy…………………………………………………………………….………………                        18
   Comprehensive Examinations…………………………………………………………………………………                         19
   Dissertation Prospectus………………………………………………………………………..………………                        20
Other Requirements for the Doctorate……………………………………………………………..……………                   20
   Other Requirements for Archaeology Students………………………………………………...…………              20
   Other Requirements for Biological Anthropology Students…………………………………..……………       21
   Other Requirements for Cultural Anthropology Students……………………………………..……………        21
From Doctoral Candidacy to the Ph.D.Field Research…………………………………………………………             22
   Preparation of the Dissertation………………………………………………………………….……………                    23
   Presentation of the Dissertation……………………………………………………………….……………                    23

POLICIES, REGULATIONS ON COURSEWORK COMPLETION
   Grade Policy/GPA……………………………………………………………………………..………………                             23
   Pass/No Pass…………………………………………………………………………………..………………                               23
   Incompletes…………………………………………………………………………………….………………                                23
       Anthropology Department Policy………………………………………………………….……………                    23
       University Regulation……………………………………………………………………..………………                       23
   Transfer Credits………………………………………………………………………………..………………                            23


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GRADUATION CEREMONIES………………………………………………………………..…………………… 23

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY FUNDING
   Graduate Teaching Fellowships (GTFs)………………………………………………………. ……………            23
      Standard GTFs……………………………………………………………………………..………………                       23
          Selection Criteria………………………………………………………………………………………                  24
      The Stern and Barnett (Graduate Teaching) Fellowships……………………………………………   25
          Selection Criteria………………………………………………………………………………………                  25
      Assigning GTFs to Particular Courses…………………………………………………….……………           25
      The Teaching Effectiveness Program (TEP)……………………………………………… …………          25
      GTF Evaluations……………………………………………………………………………………………                       25
      Summer Session/Summer Sandwich……………………………………………………….……………                26
   Other Department Awards
      Cressman Prize…………………………………………………………………………….………………                       26
      The McFee Dissertation Writing Grant…………………………………………………….……………           26
      Department Travel and Research Awards (DTRA)……………………………………….. …………       26
      Juda Fund Student Travel/Research Grants………………………………………………..…………         26
      Research Assistantships…………………………………………………………………………………                   26

NONDEPARTMENTAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
  Graduate School………………………………………………………………………………..………………                        26
  GSRA………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                               26
  Stein Award………………………………………………………………………………………………………                           27
  McBride Lehrman Award………………………………………………………………………………………                       27
  Gary E. Smith Summer Grant…………………………………………………………………………………                    27
  Wasby Dissertation Research Grant…………………………………………………………..……………               27
  OUS-SYLFF Award……………………………………………………………………………………………                           27
  Center for the Study of Women in Society…………………………………………………………………            27
  College of Arts and Sciences………………………………………………………………….………………                 27
  University Club Foundation……………………………………………………………………………………                   27
  CoDaC……………………………………………………………………………………………………………                               28
  Diversity Building Scholarship………………………………………………………………..………………               28

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES
   Federal Agencies………………………………………………………………………………………………                        28
   Private Foundations……………………………………………………………………………………………                      29
   Professional Societies………………………………………………………………………….………………                   30

INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
   International Education and Exchange………………………………………………………………………             31
   SPEAK Test for International Graduate Students……………………………………………..……………      31
   International Cultural Service Program (ICSP)……………………………………………….. ……………     31

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES
   Libraries and Learning Services……………………………………………………………….………………              31
       Knight Library……………………………………………………………………………..…………………                    31
       Science Library…………………………………………………………………………….………………                     32
       Architecture and Allied Arts Library………………………………………………………………………         32
       Academic Learning Services………………………………………………………………………………                32
   Bookstores and Copy Services near Campus…………………………………………………..……………          32
   Housing………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………                           32
   Student Financial Aid/Employment……………………………………………………………………………               32
   ERB Memorial Union (EMU)…………………………………………………………………. ………………                   33
   Health Insurance……………………………………………………………………………….………………                       33
       GTFF Health Plan………………………………………………………………………………………….                     33
       Medical…………………………………………………………………………………….…………………                         33
       Dental………………………………………………………………………………………………………                           33
       Vision…………………………………………………………………………………………………………                          34
       Important Addresses and Phone Numbers………………………………………………………………           34
   Health Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………                        34

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     Medical Emergencies………………………………………………………………………………………                                      34
     Student Health Center……………………………………………………………………………………                                     34
     Hospitals……………………………………………………………………………………………………                                           34
  Counseling Center/Testing Office……………………………………………………………..………………                              34
  Other Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………                                          34
  Non-medical Services………………………………………………………………………….………………                                      35

MISCELLANEOUS
   Student Conduct Code…………………………………………………………………………………………                                      35
   Transportation/Escorts…………………………………………………………………………………………                                    35
       Lane Transit District……………………………………………………………………….………………                                 35
       Bicycling…………………………………………………………………………………..…………………                                       35
       Project Safe-Ride…………………………………………………………………………..………………                                   35
       Safety Escorts………………………………………………………………………………………………                                      35
   Climate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………                                            35
   Banks and Credit Unions………………………………………………………………………………………                                    36
   Child Care……………………………………………………………………………………..…………………                                         36
   Physical Activity and Recreation Services (PARS)………………………………………….. ……………                    36
   Museums…………………………………………………………………………………………………………                                             36
   Music, Theater, and Sports……………………………………………………………………………………                                  36

FIRST YEAR SURVIVAL GUIDE
   Department Protocols………………………………………………………………………….………………                                     37
       Support Staff……………………………………………………………………………….………………                                      37
       Use of Office Equipment…………………………………………………………………..………………                                37
       Attendance…………………………………………………………………………………………………                                         37
       Department Petitions……………………………………………………………………….………………                                  37
       Sample Petition…………………………………………………………………………….………………                                     38
   The Relationship between Graduate Students and Faculty………………………………………………                    39
   Staying Motivated………………………………………………………………………………………………                                       41




              The Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook and Faculty Advising
     Manual was originally compiled by Tiffany Brannon and Lynn Stephen during the summer of 2002.
     It is continually revised and updated by the current DGS and Graduate Secretary including revised
     by Madonna Moss, Tiffany Brannon, and Angela Donaldson during summers 2003 and 2004, by
     Aletta Biersack in 2005, by Larry Sugiyama in 2006 and 2007, and by Madonna Moss and Betina
     Lynn in 2008, and Frances White and Betina Lynn in 2009.




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                                               GENERAL INFORMATION

University Catalog and Schedule of Classes
The University of Oregon 2008-2009 Catalog, the Graduate Admission Supplement to the UO Catalog, and the Schedule
of Classes, contain information on University and department rules and regulations, registration procedures, and student
services. You should become familiar with these references, as they will provide the answers to many questions you have
concerning your academic career at the University of Oregon. The catalog is published annually and may be purchased at
the University of Oregon Bookstore for $5.00 and includes information on classes that can be taught, as well as
information on departments, faculty, programs, and other useful information. It can also be accessed on-line at
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~uopubs/bulletin. The Schedule of Classes lists classes for the current term and future term
during registration and is available online only. A tentative schedule of Anthropology classes for the academic year is
available in the department office.

Department of Anthropology Graduate Student Policy Documents
This is the Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook and Faculty Advising Manual. It is a basic
reference for graduate students in the Anthropology program and should be read and referred to frequently. The General
Duties and Responsibilities Statement, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Teaching Fellowships may be found on line
at: http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=gdrs&id=3&unit=CAS (select College of Arts and Sciences in the first drop down
menu, and Anthropology in the second).

Student Information
The Student, Faculty, and Staff Directory is available online from the University of Oregon homepage under “Find People.”
The Graduate Student Resource Guide is available: http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/pdf/GSRG_2006-07.pdf.

Telephones
On campus telephones, the four-digit telephone numbers listed in this handbook are UO campus extension numbers. If
you’re calling from a campus phone (for example, from an office Condon Hall), simply dial 6, then the four-digit number to
complete your call. When calling from off-campus, the prefix for all campus extension numbers is 346; dial the prefix plus
the four-digit extension to complete your call. The area code for Eugene is 541, Salem is 503, and Portland is 503 and
971.

CAMPUS COMPUTING FACILITIES

Information Services (formerly, the Computing Center)
The Computing Center, located in McKenzie Hall, supports the computing needs of the university through the creation and
maintenance of computing and networking environments. You may also pick up the Fall 2009 Duckware. This CD-ROM
is free to all university members and provides the user with free software, including virus and spyware protection, as well
as a step-by-step guide to setting up your on and off-campus connection. All university members receive free internet
access. To connect to UOnet, see http://it.uoregon.edu/help/getconnected/index.shtml. To set up an email account, see
http://it.uoregon.edu/help/email/index.shtml. Microcomputer Services are fully detailed at:
http://micro.uoregon.edu/services/ The various computing labs on campus can be found at:
http://it.uoregon.edu/campus_labs.shtml.

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY INFORMATION

Condon Hall
Condon Hall Hours. The entrance to Condon Hall is open from 7:30 am to 7:00 pm, Monday–Friday. The main office (308
Condon) is open from 8:00 am to 12 noon and from 1 pm to 5:00 pm weekdays, except holidays. The main office is also
open when classes are not in session.

Condon Hall Keys. All graduate teaching fellows are eligible for a key that unlocks the outer building doors of Condon Hall
after office hours and over the weekend. All graduate students may request a key for the graduate offices main room (366
and 365). If you are not a GTF and feel that you need a key to the building for after-hours access, please see Betina Lynn
in the main office for a keycard. You will need your student ID, issued by Photo ID in the basement of the Erb Memorial
Union (EMU) to get a key for Condon Hall. Once the ID is issued, you need to take it, along with your keycard, to the
Office of Public Safety in Straub Hall (1319 East 15th, 6-5444), across from the Student Recreation Center. A refundable
deposit of $5.00 will be charged for each key checked out. Note: If you need keys to specific faculty laboratories, see the
faculty member to obtain authorization. Have the faculty member notify Betina in the main office. Please remember that
you must return your keys to campus security when you graduate, terminate your studies, or no longer need access to
Condon. You will then receive your deposit.


                                                             1
                                                                                                               rd
Condon Hall Computers. Graduate students may use computers in the Graduate Student Offices on the 3 floor of
Condon Hall for various tasks, although these computers are generally for short-term use. The Cultural Laboratory also
has some computers for graduate student use. The computers in the archaeology laboratories are for laboratory use, i.e.,
cataloguing collections, generating illustrations such as maps, site plans, etc. and are generally not to be used for email or
student internet browsing. These computers were made available when faculty upgraded to new systems; we do not have
a separate budget for Grad Lounge computers. The various computing labs on campus, including those in the Knight
Library, have computers for student use (as specified above): http://it.uoregon.edu/campus_labs.shtml.

Recycling. The Anthropology Department has recycling containers placed outside of the main office (Room 308) and in
the Graduate Student Lounge. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to recycle paper, and to use divided boxes for
this purpose at their desks. Each recycle location typically has four bins—white, color, newspaper and low grade. Some
locations also have a bin for bottles and cans. White is for letterhead, copy machine paper, index cards, and notebook
paper. Color is for pastels, as well as all white products that contain color, including printing in colored ink. Low grade is
for magazines, paper items with labels still attached, paper bags, and all bright and neon colors. Staples may be left in
recyclable items, but paperclips should not. None of these bins are for disposal of facial tissue, food wrappers, paper cups
or paper plates. For more detail regarding the University’s well-established recycling program, check out the following link
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/%7Erecycle/.

Bulletin Boards. There are bulletin boards containing miscellaneous information in the hallway outside the main office and
on other boards down the hall. Check the boards often for information pertaining to graduate education, departmental
colloquia, department news, sales and notices, employment opportunities, calls for papers, and graduate school recruiting
posters and materials. See office personnel if you have a question about bulletin board information or if you would like to
post something on one of the boards.

Mailboxes. The Anthropology Department provides mailboxes for graduate students in the graduate lounge. You will be
sharing your box with other graduate students, so be careful when picking up your mail. Mail for faculty can be left in the
main office. Out-going mailing services are not provided to graduate students.

Office Space, Printing, Supplies. The Department of Anthropology provides office space in Condon Hall (Rooms
365ABCD and 366ABCD, and cubicles in 365 and 366, and other locations as available) for GTFs holding teaching
assignments to hold office hours for the number of hours required by their appointments. A single office with a door
(number?) is available for GTFs to meet privately with undergraduates in their classes if their office or cubicle is not private
or open to undergraduates. GTFs may use the telephone in the Grad Lounge (Room 365) for local calls and for purposes
directly related to their GTFs teaching duties. Upon approval of their supervising course instructor, GTFs may use the
Department office copy machine to copy course materials that have been explicitly approved by the course instructor, up to
a limit of 50 pages per job or 100 pages per week. Larger copy jobs must be sent to the Campus Copy office in advance,
and must be pre-approved by the Graduate Coordinator. GTFs are not permitted to charge copy orders without this
permission. In the interest of both conservation and to reduce costs, all are encouraged to “think before you print” and
avoid unnecessary paper use. Departmental printers may be used when directly related to GTF teaching duties. Printing
out emailed student papers, printing from the internet, etc., should be kept to a minimum. If student papers are submitted
online, they can be reviewed on computer screens and comments made electronically. For those documents that must be
printed, double sided printing is required.

Important: Unfortunately, the Department of Anthropology does not control sufficient space or resources to provide all
graduate students with individual offices and unlimited printing. Therefore office space and printing resources must be
limited to those relating to GTF positions and responsibilities. Sometimes, shared space can be made available in the
cubicles in the Graduate Student Office area or through a student’s advisor. The phones, office space, copy machines,
FAX machine, and printers are not for the personal or unauthorized use by graduate students. Printing articles from the
internet, printing course materials and papers, printing manuscripts, theses or dissertations, etc., are personal expenses
that the Department cannot afford. Printing can be done at the Knight Library, EMU, and other facilities on and off
campus. If a graduate student is working on a faculty grant or their own research grant which provides administrative
support to the Department, then printing can be done under the aegis of the grant. Leah Frazier should be informed of the
incurred costs so she can make the appropriate fund transfers.

Graduate students can use Department stationery and mailing supplies for academic business. The Department provides
office supplies for GTF offices, but not for work at home. The slide projectors, VCR, overhead projector, laptop computer,
computer projector, etc., are for teaching purposes and use must be scheduled in advance. Betina Lynn is knowledgeable
about all sign-out procedures. Films and slides used in teaching must also be signed out. Dissertations and Master’s
papers on file in the Department can be borrowed for short-term use in Condon Hall only, again, by checking out. See
Betina Lynn for any questions.



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Laboratories
The Anthropology Department's laboratories are set up for teaching and research in three areas: archaeology, cultural
anthropology, and biological anthropology. The laboratory facilities are described at:
http://www.uoregon.edu/~anthro/index.php?p=Academics&s=labs

University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon State Museum of Anthropology
The Museum of Natural and Cultural History is located at 1680 East 15th Avenue, just behind the Knight Law Center. It
houses exhibits on the cultural and natural history of Oregon, and is open to the public between 11 am and 5:00 pm
Wednesday through Sunday. For information on current exhibits, visit the Museum’s webpage, http://natural-
history.uoregon.edu/. The Museum's research is carried out through the Oregon State Museum of Anthropology
(OSMA), a self-contained division of the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. This research division is comprised of
two subdivisions: archaeological research and collections. Most of the Research Division staff work in buildings near the
Millrace or on Moss Street, where they conduct CRM work. For more information see
http://oregon.uoregon.edu/%7Eosma/sma.html. The Collections Division staff work to accession and safeguard the
material remains of Oregon’s past and work in the Museum itself. The Condon Fossil Collection has recently been
reincorporated into the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. During fall and spring terms, the Museum sponsors
lecture series. In winter term, it hosts the Margaret Mead Film Festival. Anthropology faculty affiliated with the Museum
include: Jon Erlandson, Director of the Museum, and Sarah McClure, Assistant Director of Public Programs. Museum
Research staff also teach Archaeology of Oregon every few years.
Current Departmental Faculty: Anthropology and associated faculty, their research interests and contact information are
listed on the department website at: http://www.uoregon.edu/~anthro/index.php?p=People&s=Faculty

ORGANIZATIONS

Association of Anthropology Graduate Students (AAGS)
AAGS, the Association of Anthropology Graduate Students, was founded for the purpose of facilitating communication
between graduate students and faculty. AAGS consists of the graduate student body as a whole, elected officers, and as
faculty liaison, the Director of Graduate Studies. This organization was intended to: 1) facilitate communication and
community among the UO Anthropology graduate students, 2) serve as a forum for pursuing graduate student concerns
and interests, 3) facilitate communication between graduate students and faculty, and 4) organize the Department
Colloquium series and social events. AAGS officers are elected yearly and consist of students in the roles of two co-
presidents, a secretary, and two senators. AAGS generally holds its first meeting of the year immediately following the
faculty-graduate student reception. More information can be found at
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/%7Eanthro/graduate/aags03.html

AAGS as an organization is flexible and responsive to student needs and goals on an annual basis. Because the
responsibility for keeping the association going from year to year rests primarily with the graduate students, some student
groups have been more active than others in getting organized for and during each academic year.

The Anthropology Department encourages participation in the Graduate Student Association. Any graduate student
should feel free to play an active part attending meetings and organizing the group.

The Student-Faculty Senate (SFS)
This body is comprised of the entire faculty Graduate Committee, including the Director of Graduate Studies, the president
or co-presidents of AAGS, two SFS senators, chosen by the graduate students, and the Departmental Steward, who is
also chosen by the graduate students and who represents the Graduate Teaching Fellow Federation, the official Graduate
Teaching Fellow union. The body meets at least once a term to discuss matters of common interest to faculty and
students. Frequently discussions opened up in SFS meetings are pursued in AAGS and/or the faculty meetings. The
purpose of the organization is to establish an interface between the faculty and the leadership group of graduate students.
Meetings are conducted with the aim of improving the graduate program in a spirit of mutual concern and respect.

AAGS/Department Colloquium
The Department Colloquium Series is organized by the Faculty Colloquium Committee in concert with the Association of
Anthropology Graduate Students. The series is comprised of talks and lectures offered by visiting and resident faculty and
graduate students. The presentations are typically scheduled on Friday afternoons in 360 Condon, although this schedule
is subject to speaker availability. Because there are so many events on campus, it is important to coordinate the
Department Colloquium Series with speakers jointly sponsored by other units on campus. Please check postings and the
departmental website for the next colloquium event. Light refreshments are organized by AAGS and the office staff.




                                                             3
GRADUATE PROGRAMS: GENERAL INFORMATION

Resource People
Specific questions on the requirements and regulations of the Department and the Graduate School should be addressed
to the Graduate Secretary, Betina Lynn (betina@uoregon.edu , 346-5103), 308 Condon. Your academic advisor is the
best resource regarding course selection, professional development, and planning a multiyear schedule to clear
requirements for the degree or degrees you seek. S/he is also key when it comes to researching and writing your master's
paper and/or dissertation, and is invaluable in conceptualizing and preparing your research proposal, your job applications,
and your job talks. Each graduate student is assigned an advisor prior to his or her arrival at the University. If at any time,
a student feels s/he would be better served by changing advisors, s/he is free to do so, in consultation with the Director of
Graduate Studies or Department Head. The Director of Graduate Studies may also be consulted for other questions about
Department and Graduate School regulations and requirements. S/he offers a 2-credit course every fall that introduces
new students to the Department and its graduate degree programs.

Here is a list of staff people and faculty who should be able to assist you with questions:

    Contact:                                  Extension:            With Questions About:

    Your advisor                              see directory         Specific course content, course load planning, proposed
                                                                    study programs

    Carol Silverman, Department Head          346-5114              Regulations, research opportunities

    Frances White                             346-5278              Graduate program and policies; petitions
    Director of Graduate Studies                                    on ancillary skills and to deviate from
                                                                    Department regulations; GTF selections and
                                                                    assignments; graduate student interface with the faculty

    Brenda Dutton, Office Manager           346-5125                Payroll

    Leah Frazier                            346-5136                Purchasing, travel reimbursement, grant
    Accounting Technician                                           administration

    Betina Lynn                             346-5103                Department and Graduate School regulations
    Graduate Coordinator                                            and requirements, GTF contracts, individualized study
                                                                    preauthorization, keys, room reservation, general
                                                                    questions.

RELEVANT UNIVERSITY OF OREGON REGULATIONS

Grade Requirements
Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.00 grade point average (GPA) in graduate courses taken in the degree
program. Grades of D+ or lower for graduate courses are not acceptable for graduate credit but are computed in the GPA.
Similarly, the grade of N (no pass) is not accepted for graduate credit. A grade of pass (P) must be equal to or better than
a B-.

A GPA below 3.00 at any time during a graduate student's studies or the accumulation of more than 5 credits of N or F
grades-regardless of the GPA-is considered unsatisfactory. The Dean of the Graduate School, after consultation with the
student's home department, may drop the student from the Graduate School, thus terminating the student's degree
program.

I or Incompletes. Graduate students must convert a graduate course incomplete (I) into a passing grade within one
calendar year of the assignment of the incomplete. Students may request more time for the removal of the incomplete by
submitting a petition, stating the course requirements that were not initially completed and signed by the instructor, to the
Dean of the Graduate School for approval. To be granted more time, a student must be enrolled in the term of petitioning,
be within the seven-year time limit, and have only a minimal quantity of work to complete. This policy does not apply to
incompletes assigned to Thesis (503), Research (601), Dissertation (603), and Terminal Project (609). Thesis and
dissertation credits are automatically converted when the thesis or dissertation is completed and accepted by the Graduate
School. Research and terminal project credits are converted after the instructor submits a supplementary grade report to
the Office of the Registrar. Incompletes that remain on the academic record after the degree is completed may not be
removed. Graduate students are not permitted to convert a mark of Y (no basis for a grade) unless the Y was the result of

                                                               4
an administrative error. The petition is available from the Graduate School website
(http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_650a.html).

UO GRADUATE SCHOOL REGULATIONS

General Information
The Graduate School is located in 125 Chapman Hall. The office hours are 8:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm,
Monday through Friday. The phone number is (541) 346-5129. The Graduate School web site is
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~gradsch/gradschool.htm

Research Compliance
University policy requires that students who intend to engage in research that involves human or animal subjects receive
approval of their research procedures before beginning to collect data. Research compliance form and further instructions
are available on the Graduate School website at http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_910-a.html. Students doing research
involving human subjects for anything other than a class paper should contact the Human Subjects Compliance
Coordinator, at 346-3106 to develop a human subjects approval proposal. This proposal also has to be approved by the
human subjects person in the Department. All graduate students, regardless of whether they intend to use human or
animal subjects, must complete the research clearance form:
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/pdf/researchClearanceGS910.pdf

Continuous Enrollment
Unless On-leave or In Absentia status has been approved, graduate students enrolled in an advanced degree or graduate
certificate program are required to be continuously enrolled, excluding summer session, until all requirements have been
completed. “On-leave” status is granted to Master’s students by petition, and “In Absentia” status is granted to Ph.D.
students by petition.

To remain in compliance with the Continuous Enrollment Policy, graduate students must be registered for a minimum of 3
graduate credits each term. This includes students who are taking only comprehensive exams, final examinations or
presenting terminal projects. Also, students not in residence while writing a thesis, dissertation or project, but using faculty
assistance, university services or facilities such as sending chapters to an advisor by mail or email for criticism must
register for a minimum of 3 graduate credits per term. Registration should be for Thesis or Dissertation or Project credits.

For the term in which a degree is granted, graduate students must register for at least 3 graduate credits. If submitting a
master's degree thesis in this final term, registration must include at least 1 of the 3 credits as Thesis (503) (see Masters
policies). If a doctoral dissertation is being completed, registration must include no fewer that 3 credits of Dissertation
(603) in both the term of graduation and the preceding term (see Doctoral policies).

Various on-and off-campus agencies and offices have their own course-load requirements. For example, some agencies
offering student loans set registration requirements. Because the minimum registration requirements for the Graduate
School may not satisfy some agency requirements, it is the student's responsibility to register for the required number of
credits. The Office of the Registrar can certify a student's registration.

On-Leave Status
A graduate student (at the Master’s level) interrupting a study program for one or more terms, excluding summer session,
must register for on-leave status to ensure a place upon return. Only graduate students in good standing are eligible.

The Graduate School must receive the application by the last registration day in that term, as noted in the schedule of
classes. On-leave status is granted for a specific time period that may not exceed three academic terms, excluding
summer session. Students with on-leave status are not required to pay fees. However, students must register and pay
fees if they will be using university facilities or faculty or staff services during that term. The on-leave form is available from
the Graduate School website http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_770-a.html.

Master's degree candidates may apply for a maximum of three academic terms of on-leave status during the course of
study for the degree.

Doctoral candidates may apply for a maximum of three academic terms prior to advancement to candidacy, and they may
apply for a maximum of three academic terms of registration in absentia after advancement to candidacy.

Permission to Re-register
A graduate student who fails to maintain continuous enrollment or obtain on-leave status is required to file a Permission to
Reregister petition in the Graduate School. The student’s home department and the Graduate School review the petition.
This procedure is equivalent to a new admission, and the petitioner may be required to meet departmental admission
                                                                5
policies and degree completion requirements that are in effect on the date of re-enrollment. The Permission to Reregister
form is available on the Graduate School website at http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_710.pdf.

Review of the re-registration form may result in a change of residency status from resident to non-resident.

When re-registration is approved, a master's candidate must register for 3 credits for each term he or she has stopped
out. If the accumulated credits total more than 16, the student may be required to enroll in more than one term of
increased registration. Doctoral candidates must register for a new year of residency-three consecutive terms of at least 9
graduate credits in each term. They must also retake the comprehensive examinations if completed prior to stopping out.

Time Limit
Students must complete all work for the master's degree within seven years, including transferred credits, thesis, the
language requirement for a Master of Arts, and all examinations.

Students must complete all work for the Ph.D. within seven years, including required year of residency spent on the
Eugene campus, the passing of the comprehensive examinations required for advancement to candidacy, and the
completion of the doctoral dissertation. If the seven-year period is exceeded, either a second year of residency or a new
set of comprehensive examinations or both are required. In addition, some departments may require that the dissertation
be completed within a certain number of years after advancement to candidacy (e.g., three years) to ensure currency of
knowledge. Students are responsible for staying informed about individual departmental regulations.

Students needing a one-year extension must file a petition with the Graduate School after securing department approval.
The petition should include a Plan of Completion. Please see http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_610.pdf for the
appropriate form.

Waiver of Regulations
Graduate students may file a petition requesting exemption from any academic requirement. The Graduate School
reviews, upon petition, the educational purpose the regulation in question was designed to serve. Please be aware that
petitions are seldom granted if the only reason given is to save the student from inconvenience or expense. The petition
form is available on the Graduate School website http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_610.pdf.

Joint-Campus Program
Graduate students at the university may, with advisor and departmental approval, take graduate courses at any of the
other institutions in the Oregon University System. A student registers for these courses with the University of Oregon
Registrar, who records each grade on the academic record under Joint-Campus Course (JC 610). The student must be a
matriculated UO graduate student in an advanced degree program and registered for UO courses the same term the JC
610 course is taken. A maximum of 15 credits may be applied toward a graduate degree program. Joint campus course
work counts toward the 24 graded credits required for the master's degree. Forms are available in the Office of the
Registrar.

Application for a Degree
The application for a degree must be filed online to the Graduate School by the second week of classes in the term of
graduation. Please see http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/advanced-degree_app.html. All grade changes, removal of
incompletes, and transfer work necessary to complete degree requirements must be filed with the Graduate School the
term prior to the term of graduation. Corrections to an academic record can be made only during the 30 days following the
granting of a degree. Deadline for degree completion is available on the Graduate School website
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/deadlines.html.

UO GRADUATE SCHOOL REGULATIONS: MASTER’S DEGREE

Transfer Credit
Graduate credit earned while a graduate student in another accredited graduate school may be counted toward the
master's degree under the following conditions:
    1. Total transfer credits may not exceed 15 credits in a 45-credit master's degree program.
    2. The courses must be relevant to the degree program as a whole.
    3. The student's home department and the Graduate School must approve the transfer.
    4. The grades earned must be A+, A, A-, B+, B, or P.
    5. The courses may not have been used to satisfy the requirements for another degree.
Transferred credit may not be used to meet the requirement of 24 credits in University of Oregon graded graduate
courses, nor are they used in computing the UO cumulative grade point average. The Transfer of Graduate Credit form is
available on the Graduate School website http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_820.pdf.

                                                             6
Distance Education
Credit earned in distance education study is considered transferred credit and no more than 15 graduate credits may be
applied to a student's degree program without prior written approval of the dean of the Graduate School. A policy
statement on distance education and graduate degrees is available at the Graduate School.

Reservation of Graduate Credit: Permission to Register for Graduate Credit
Since fall term 1991, a University of Oregon senior undergraduate must request permission to register for a graduate-level
course. The student must file a form with the Graduate School prior to the beginning of the term of registration. He or she
may choose one of the two options:
    Option 1: Include the course in requirements for the bachelor's degree (500-level course only).
    Option 2: Reserve the course as graduate credit for consideration by a department after admission as a graduate
              student.
Registration in a graduate-level course is available only to senior-level students with at least a 3.00 GPA in the last three
terms of work. A student may take a maximum of 9 graduate credits while classified as an undergraduate.

Credits in Research (601); Supervised Teaching (602); Internship (604); Reading and Conference (605); Field Studies or
Special Problems (606); Workshop, Special Topics, or Colloquium (508 or 608); and Practicum, Terminal Project, or
Supervised Tutoring (609) do not qualify. The Permission to Register for Graduate Credit form is available on the
Graduate School website http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_690a.html.

Transfer of Reserved Graduate Credit
Undergraduates who have passed graduate-level courses that have been approved in Option 2 of the Reservation of
Graduate Credit process may apply up to 9 credits toward a master's degree (within the overall 15-credit maximum for
transfer credit). Work in courses taken for letter grades (mid-B or better and P/N courses), if accompanied by the
instructor's statement that the passing grade was equal to a mid-B or better, is eligible for consideration. If approved,
these courses can be used to satisfy relevant university master's degree program requirements. A Transfer of Graduate
Credit form http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_820.pdf must be filed within two terms of acceptance into a master's
degree program and within two years of earning the bachelor's degree.

Other University of Oregon Transferred Credit
A maximum of 15 graduate credits earned at the University of Oregon while classified as a graduate post-baccalaureate
student, a non-admitted graduate student enrolled in the community education program or in summer session, or a
graduate-certification student may later be counted toward the master's degree, pending school or department
endorsement and Graduate School approval. This is within the overall 15-credit maximum transfer credit to a 45-credit
master's degree program. Grades earned must be A+, A, A-, B+, B, or P. The Transfer of Graduate Credit form is
available on the Graduate School website. See http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_820.pdf.

Credit Requirements
Students working toward a 45-credit master's degree with thesis must register for a minimum of 36 credits of course work
and 9 credits of Thesis (503). Credit for thesis is given pass/no pass.

Residency and Enrollment Requirements
For a master's degree, the Graduate School requires that a minimum of 30 credits (applicable to degree requirements) be
taken on the Eugene campus during at least two terms of study. A second master's degree also requires a minimum of
two terms of full-time study on the Eugene campus. Individual schools or departments may have additional residence
requirements.

In addition, students enrolled in an advanced degree program must attend the university continuously, except for
summers, until program requirements have been completed, unless On-Leave status (maximum of three academic terms)
has been approved. In the term the degree is received, the graduate student must register for at least 3 graduate credits.

Examinations
The student's major school or department may require qualifying, comprehensive, or final examinations or any
combination of these. The content and methods of conducting such examinations are the responsibility of the school or
department.

Thesis
In some fields, master's degree candidates must submit a thesis; in others the thesis is optional. Please note that most
graduate students in the Department of Anthropology write a Master’s paper, not a thesis. The following guidelines show
the Graduate School’s requirements for a thesis.
A student who writes a thesis must complete the following procedures:

                                                              7
    1. Review the Checklist for Writers of Masters Thesis at http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/forms/gs_760a.pdf. Also
    review The Required Clearance for Master's Thesis Project or Doctoral Dissertation
    http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_910-a.html.
    2. Obtain a current copy of the University of Oregon Style and Policy Manual for Theses and Dissertations
    http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=styleManualContents. Only theses meeting the standards of style and form
    discussed in that manual are accepted.
    3. Find out at the Graduate School the exact number of copies of the thesis to submit
    http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=styleManual#ch4.
    4. Submit three copies of an abstract (150-word maximum) to the Graduate School.
    5. Look at Manuscript Review of Theses and Dissertations
    http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=manuscriptReviewThesesDissertations.
    6. Time Limit. Students must complete all work for the master's degree within seven years, including transferred
    credits, thesis, the language requirement for a Master's of Arts and all examinations. Students needing a one-year
    extension must file a petition http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=forms with the Graduate School after securing
    department approval. The petition should include a Plan of Completion.
    7. A student writing a thesis must register for at least 9 credits of Thesis (ANTH 503).

Summary of Graduate School Requirements for a Master's Degree
The following outline lists minimum Graduate School requirements for master's degrees. Specific department
requirements must also be met before the student is awarded an advanced degree. Credit requirements listed below must
be met with graduate credits.
         Language requirement.                           M.A. only (M.S. students in ANTH do a “skill”)
         Minimum GPA                                     3.00
         Minimum thesis credits                          9 credits (required only if writing a thesis)
         Time limit for program completion               7 years
         Total credit minimum                            45 credits
         Registration minimum per term                   3 credits
         Minimum graded credits taken in residence       24 credits
         Minimum 600-level credits in residence 9 credits
         Minimum credits in major                        30 credits
         Minimum credits in residence                    30 credits

Statement of Completion of Requirements
The department submits to the Graduate School a Statement of Completion of Requirements by the deadline
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=deadlines specified by the Graduate School verifying that the student has met all
department requirements for a master's degree.

UO GRADUATE SCHOOL REGULATIONS: DOCTORAL DEGREE

Residency and Credit Requirements
For the Ph.D. degree the student must complete at least three years of full-time graduate-level academic work beyond the
bachelor's degree. At least one academic year--the residency year--must be spent in residence on the Eugene campus
after the student has been classified as a conditionally or an unconditionally admitted student in a doctoral program.
During this residency year the student is expected to make progress toward the degree by completing course credits and
satisfying doctoral degree requirements. The residency year consists of three consecutive terms of full-time study, with a
minimum of 9 completed graduate credits a term. Research (ANTH 601) may be a part of the 9 credits.

A doctoral candidate may fulfill the residency requirement during the period in which he or she works toward a master's
degree on the university campus as long as the student has been officially awarded the master's degree, the doctoral
degree program immediately follows the master's degree program, and both the master's degree and the doctoral degree
are in the same discipline.

Students working toward a Ph.D. or professional doctorate must register for a minimum of 18 credits in Dissertation
(ANTH 603). Credit for Dissertation is recorded P/N (pass/no pass).

In Absentia Registration
Following advancement to candidacy, only a single academic year of registration in absentia is allowed. When registering
in absentia the doctoral candidate acknowledges that he or she is neither doing any work toward the degree nor using any
university or faculty services (e.g., no examinations are being taken, no committee changes are being processed, and no
dissertation chapters are being submitted for review). This in absentia registration maintains the student's status as a
degree candidate and reserves a place for dissertation supervision and other academic affairs upon the student's return to

                                                            8
active enrollment within the seven-year time period. The In Absentia form is available on the Graduate School website
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/gs_770-a.html.

Doctoral candidates must register the term prior to the term of defense to ensure sufficient time for evaluation of the
dissertation by every committee member. Students who do not register the term prior to the defense may be required to
register retroactively and could incur late fines and petition fees.

Language Requirement
Individual schools or departments may require knowledge of a second language or of other specialized disciplines, such
as computer science or statistics, as part of a Ph.D. program.

Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree at the University of Oregon are expected to have proficiency in at least one
language in addition to English if a substantial, relevant body of literature in one or more second languages exists in the
candidate's specialized field of dissertation research. It is the responsibility of the candidate's advisor or doctoral
committee to determine which languages the candidate is expected to know before beginning dissertation research. The
candidate’s home department establishes guidelines for language proficiency.

Examinations and Advancement to Candidacy
Every student must pass a group of comprehensive examinations (oral, written, or both) that cover the primary areas of
the student's program and, if applicable, any supporting area required by the department. The student is responsible for
material directly covered in completed graduate courses and for additional independent study in his or her field.

Within two weeks of the student passing these examinations, the home department and the student must submit an on-
line request through GradWeb http://gradweb.uoregon.edu/ to the Dean of the Graduate School recommending
advancement to candidacy. (In Anthropology, graduate students must also complete the prospectus before advancing, so
this requirement means that within two weeks of the student passing comprehensive exams and completing the
prospectus, the student and the Department must submit an on-line request recommending advancement.)

Dissertation Committee
Following advancement to candidacy, the candidate's department proposes the membership for the dissertation
committee to the Dean of the Graduate School on-line through GradWeb http://gradweb.uoregon.edu, who appoints the
committee after approving it. The committee includes at least four instructional faculty members with the rank of assistant
professor or higher. Three of the members are from the department awarding the degree and one is from outside the
department. When appropriate, some of the home department committee members may be from another department,
with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School and the home department. The committee should be proposed to
the dean within one month after advancement to candidacy, but in no case later than six months before completion of the
dissertation.

Dissertation Registration
The dissertation committee cannot be appointed formally, nor can Dissertation (603) credits be earned until the candidate
is advanced to candidacy.

Defense of Dissertation
Formal, public defense must take place on campus at a date set by the committee chair and approved by the Graduate
School. Tentative approval of the dissertation by the committee is recommended prior to formal defense. This evaluation
is based on copies of the final manuscript, which the candidate provides for the dissertation committee at least three
weeks before the formal defense.

The doctoral candidate needs to submit two forms, along with the abstract, to the Graduate School; Application for Final
Oral Defense for Doctoral Degree AND Confirmation of Agreement to Attend the Final Oral Defense for Doctoral Degree.
Both forms are available on the Graduate School Website (http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/oral_defense.html ). Four copies
of the dissertation abstract (350-word maximum) must also be filed with the Graduate School at this time.

The time and place of the defense must be publicly noted. The dissertation committee must be present at the defense,
and the chair of the committee must certify to the Graduate School within two weeks following the defense that the
defense was held as scheduled.

Completion of Dissertation
Within two weeks following the defense of the dissertation, but before the dissertation is submitted in duplicate to the
Graduate School, each member of the dissertation committee must confirm in writing either approval or disapproval of the
final version. Approval requires a unanimous vote. In the event of a split vote, the Dean of the Graduate School
determines the review procedure after consultation with the student, the Department Head, and the committee.
                                                             9
Following final approval of the dissertation, two copies must be submitted to the Graduate School. Committee members
should sign approval of the dissertation only if they have seen and approved what is substantially a final draft and if they
are willing to delegate the overseeing of remaining minor revisions to the chair. If this is not the case, they should not sign
the final oral form. If the Graduate School receives no signed approval form within two weeks following the scheduled oral
examination, another oral examination must be scheduled for defense of the dissertation.

Chronological Summary of Procedures Leading to Doctoral Degrees
   1. Admission (Note that Anthropology has its own protocol for admitting Master’s students in our program into our
     Ph.D. program.)
   2. Continuous enrollment. Students enrolled in advanced degree programs must attend the university continuously
     (except for summers) until all program requirements are completed, unless In Absentia status has been approved.
     Enrollment minimum is 3 graduate credits a term.
   3. Course work and residence. Student's advisory committee, appointment by the department, determines the
     program, which must include three years of accredited, full-time graduate work beyond the bachelor's degree, of
     which at least one academic year (three consecutive terms of full-time study and a minimum of 9 completed
     graduate credits a term) must be spent on the Eugene campus.
   4. Second languages or other specialized knowledge. Regulations are set by the department, school, or college.
   5. Comprehensive examination(s), covering the major discipline, advances the student to candidacy for the degree.
     The examinations are taken after the majority of required course work has been completed and after most of the
     requirements for the degree, except completion and defense of the dissertation, have been satisfied.
   6. Appointment of dissertation committee, registration for Dissertation (603), and completion of dissertation. The
     committee is appointed following advancement to candidacy, and at least six months before completion of the
     dissertation. Typically, the committee consists of at least three members of the graduate faculty of the candidate's
     home department, school or college as well as a Graduate School representative who is a graduate faculty member
     from outside the candidate's department school, or college. A minimum of 18 credits of Dissertation (603) are
     required after advancement.
   7. In Absentia. Post-advancement doctoral students are allowed only a single academic year of registration In
     Absentia following advancement to candidacy.
   8. Application for degree made to the Graduate School. Deadlines are available from the Graduate School.
   9. Defense of dissertation. Application for oral defense, confirmation of agreement to attend, and four copies of final
     abstract must be filed with the Graduate School no fewer than three weeks before the date of defense.
   10. Dissertation publication arranged through the Graduate School.
   11. Granting of degree at end of term in which all degree requirements are satisfied.
   12. Diploma, with commencement date, issued by Registrar.

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:
GENERAL INFORMATION

Overview of Degrees Granted
Three advanced degrees are offered in Anthropology: Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy.
Generally speaking, a Master’s degree is appropriate for employment in various positions in government, community
colleges, the private sector, and museum administration. The Ph.D. is required to teach in four-year colleges and
universities.

A realistic timetable for a Master’s degree is two years, with a course load of 12 credits per term. For students wishing to
pursue a Ph.D., another four or five years would be reasonable.

The student is expected to make satisfactory academic progress. Full-time students who have not completed all
requirements for the Master’s degree within three years from the time of admittance will be dropped from the graduate
program. On the other hand, a student entering at the pre-Master’s level with graduate credits from other institutions, or
with an exceptionally broad undergraduate program, may plan an accelerated program with his or her advisor.

The anthropology faculty regularly reviews student performance at the end of each academic year for all students who
have not been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. In addition, students who have advanced but are not making adequate
progress may also be reviewed. Students are provided with a copy of their performance evaluation. In addition, students
who are regularly enrolled in the anthropology graduate program and who receive two grades of C or lower in courses
taken for graduate credit will receive a special review. A determination will be made as to whether the student will be
permitted to continue or be dropped from the program.




                                                              10
Course Load
Nine to sixteen credit hours is considered the full-time course load for graduate students. Graduate teaching fellows are
required to register for and complete a minimum of 9 graduate credits each term to maintain their GTF status at the
University or Oregon. The same is true for International students here on an F-1 (student) visa to maintain their
immigration status. A fixed tuition rate is assessed for 9-16 graduate credits per term. The bare minimum required to
remain in the program is 3 hours, but the appropriateness of this should be discussed with one's advisor and the Director
of Graduate Studies.

Courses Requiring Faculty Approval
Open-ended courses and Individualized Study Plans include Thesis (ANTH 503), Research (ANTH 601), Supervised
College Teaching (ANTH 602), Dissertation (ANTH 603), Reading (ANTH 605), Special Problems (ANTH 606), and
Practicum (ANTH 609). In order to be pre-authorized for an open-ended course or study plan with a faculty member, a
graduate student must fill out a "Permission to Register for Individualized Study" form, which outlines the specifics and is
signed by the instructor. The student will then submit the form to the main office, and office staff will pre-authorize the
graduate student to register. The student will still need to register via DuckWeb. If you wish to identify a reading or
project course and have a specific title appear on your transcript, you should be sure to include this on the form.

The Advisor
Each entering student is assigned a departmental advisor. It is the student’s responsibility to confer with this advisor, who
will assist in planning a course of study consistent with the student’s interests, competence based on prior performance,
and the departmental requirements. The design of a course of study remains primarily the responsibility of the student,
drawing upon the counsel of the advisor. Students are assigned as an advisor the person whose interests and expertise
are most compatible with those of the student. If at any time a student feels s/he would be better served by changing the
advisor, s/he should consult with the Director of Graduate Studies and Department Head. The student should, of course,
clear the change with the potential new advisor. After approval by the Director of Graduate Studies and Department Head,
the student should notify the Graduate Secretary who will formalize the change.

If your advisor takes a leave of absence or sabbatical, you should work out with him or her well in advance of the leave
what your mentoring needs will be during the period of leave and how they will be met. Whatever arrangements you make
with your advisor should be mutually agreeable and helpful to you.

Proseminar in Anthropology (ANTH 615)
All newly admitted graduate students are required to register for the Proseminar (ANTH 615; 2 credits) in Fall term. The
proseminar provides a forum for reviewing departmental structure and requirements, introducing important extra-
departmental links for research and funding, and permits a structured environment in which new students may become
better acquainted with the anthropology faculty and pursue intellectual issues and practical aspects of anthropology. The
Director of Graduate Studies co-ordinates the Proseminar and meets with new graduate students during their first term in
residence.

Timely (and Satisfactory) Progress
The graduate student is evaluated in part in terms of timely progress through the Master's and/or doctoral degrees. Timely
progress constitutes:
    1. Two years to complete the M.A. or M.S. degree
    2. Formation of a dissertation committee, passing comprehensive exams, and writing and successfully defending a
      research prospectus should ideally be completed within four terms, but no longer than two years after entry into the
      doctoral program. Those cultural anthropology students who have taken their theory comprehensive exam prior to
      entering the doctoral program, should ideally complete their second exam within four terms, but no longer than two
      years after entering the doctoral program.
    3. Doctoral research may begin as early as the second year, but no later than the third year in the doctoral program. It
      should be completed no later than the fourth year in the doctoral program. In other words, students are expected to
      spend one to two years actively conducting field and/or laboratory research for the dissertation.
    4. The dissertation should take about 9-18 months to write, with another 6 months devoted to revision (under
      dissertation committee guidance). In other words, students should spend one to two years writing the dissertation.
      Ideally during the period of dissertation preparation, the doctoral candidate will also be giving professional papers
      and publishing.

Timing of Degree Completion
The Department of Anthropology policy is that no Ph.D. defenses are scheduled during the summer, defined for this
purpose as between June 15 and the beginning of fall term in September. Summer defenses put a special burden on
faculty who are not paid during the summer and who typically use summer to pursue their own research. Summer
defenses have been scheduled under special circumstances when all faculty members, including the “outside” members
from other departments, and the DGS agree. Nevertheless, the Department strongly discourages summer defenses.
                                                             11
Simply failing to submit a defensible manuscript in time to meet Spring deadlines does not constitute a special
circumstance warranting approval of a summer defense. Completion of Master’s degrees during the summer is also
discouraged, but in special situations is at the discretion of the advisor, second faculty reader, and DGS.

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: THE MASTER'S DEGREE

General Requirements - Overview
The M.A. and M.S. degrees each require a minimum of 45 credit hours, 32 of which must be in anthropology. Students
who fulfill their requirements by demonstrating proficiency in a foreign language will obtain a Master's of Arts. All other
students will receive a Master's of Science degree.

The Master’s degree program requirements vary depending on whether the student focuses on archaeology, biological
anthropology, or cultural anthropology. To obtain the Master’s degree, ALL students must complete the following
requirements:
    1. Proseminar, ANTH 615: Graduate Studies in Anthropology
    2. "Core" courses in 1) Archaeology, 2) Biological Anthropology, and 3) one of two core courses in Cultural
      Anthropology
    3. Master’s paper or Master’s Thesis
For each of the three subfields, additional requirements are described in subsequent sections for archaeology, biological
anthropology and cultural anthropology.

Core Courses
All Master’s students, and Ph.D. students without a Master’s in anthropology, are required to complete the archaeology,
biological anthropology, and one of the cultural anthropology core courses during their first and second years in residence.
The three core courses required of all students are:
ANTH 680 Basic Graduate Physical Anthropology
ANTH 681 Archaeology and Anthropology
ANTH 688 Social Theory I, or ANTH 689 Social Theory II
These courses offer an advanced introduction to biological anthropology, archaeology, and cultural anthropology. Each
class is five credit hours and requires a concomitant amount of work. There are no formal prerequisites for these core
courses. Core courses must be passed with a grade of B- or better. In the event of failure, only one retake of any single
core course or reexamination will be permitted. In the case of a second failure, the student will be dropped from the
graduate program in anthropology.

The core course program is designed to give Master’s students an overview of three of the four sub-fields of anthropology,
and to prepare them for introductory-level instruction in higher education. More immediately, the core courses prepare
Master’s students to lead anthropology discussion and laboratory sections as a Graduate Teaching Fellow (GTF). Core
course exams become part of the student’s permanent academic file.

                               Core Course Offerings for Fall 2009 through Winter 2010
CORE                         WINTER 09      SPRING 09           FALL 09     WINTER 10
Archaeology
Biological                                                         ANTH 680
Anthropology
Social Theory             ANTH 688 (I)        ANTH 689 (II)
Linguistics                                                                        ANTH 683

Students who believe they already have scholarly background equivalent to one or more of the core courses may petition
the Graduate Committee to have the background accepted in place of one or more of the core courses.

Master’s Paper
A Master’s paper is normally submitted by the end of the student’s second year in residence. Planning of the paper should
begin by the end of the first year of the program. The process of working on a Master’s paper provides the student with
experience in conceptualizing (spring term), implementing (fall and winter terms), and writing up (spring term) a major
piece of research, in preparation for the demands of professional research and writing. The paper should set out a
problem and clearly follow the theme or themes involved. It should attend to the relevant literature and show an ability to
synthesize material in a way that brings it to bear on the chosen problem. The length should be about that of an average
journal article, to be decided in consultation with an advisor but normally limited to 50 double-spaced pages. It must be
presented in a finished and polished format and of sufficiently high caliber that it is ready to submit to a professional
journal. The topic should be selected in consultation with the advisor. Students writing Master’s papers register for ANTH
606, Special Problems, for at least 4 credits during the final term of working on the paper. Most students take additional
ANTH 606 credits to plan and conduct their Master’s research.
                                                              12
The Master’s paper is read and approved by the student’s advisor and a second faculty reader. A copy of the Master’s
paper bearing the advisor’s and second reader’s signatures will be placed in department files. The application for the
Master’s degree must be filed in the Graduate School by the second week of classes in the term of graduation. Once all
requirements for the Master’s (including the paper) have been completed, the advisor will notify the Graduate Secretary,
who will then notify the Graduate School to clear the student for graduation.

Master’s Paper or Master’s Thesis?
Either a Master’s Paper or a Master’s Thesis is required for completing the Master’s degree in Anthropology. The Master’s
paper also serves as an excellent basis for a publication. In either case, the product is read and approved by the student’s
advisor and a second faculty reader. There are stylistic, although not necessarily substantive, differences between the
paper and thesis. For logistical reasons (see below) many students choose the paper rather than the thesis option,
although this decision should be made in consultation with the student’s advisor.

A student planning to write a Master’s Thesis should consult the University of Oregon Style and Policy Manual for Theses
and Dissertations early in the process. (See http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=styleManualContents). See office
staff, 308 Condon, if you wish to peruse samples of previous master’s theses. A student must register for at least 9 credits
of ANTH 503 over the course of time spent working on the thesis. Once the student starts, the Graduate School expects
the student to register for ANTH 503 every term until the thesis is completed. Students who are completing a thesis in
their final term must register for a minimum of 3 credits of ANTH 503, Thesis. Please also check with the Graduate
School regarding submission deadlines.

The main advantage of writing a Master’s Thesis over a Master’s Paper, is that the thesis is more easily available to
colleagues at other institutions. In general, Master’s Theses tend to be longer than Master’s Papers. When the thesis is
filed, the student can choose to make the thesis available through ProQuest (formerly University Microfilms International).
Any person can easily purchase your thesis when it is published by ProQuest (UMI). Individuals can also request that their
libraries purchase your thesis for their collections. This means that your work has a greater potential impact by being
made available to other professionals. The disadvantage of writing a Master’s Thesis is that is must not only be approved
by your advisor and a second faculty reader, but it must also be approved by the UO Graduate School. The Graduate
School does not comment on content, quality of research, or grammar (this is the job of the advisor). Yet theses require
stringent conformance to Graduate School Style and Policy Manual format requirements that take precedence over format
rules found in other style manuals. Format includes definition of the parts of the thesis and the order in which they are
presented, the style of preliminary pages, type font, margins, spacing, order of page numbers, placement of page
numbers, information to be included in the Table of Contents, List of Tables and List of Figures, and the requirement for
permission to reproduce copyrighted material. Your thesis must be approved by the UO Graduate School Thesis and
Dissertation Editor and there are additional requirements regarding the type of paper to be used, when abstracts must be
filed, number of copies, etc. Writing a Master’s Thesis is excellent preparation for the Ph.D. dissertation. Nonetheless,
the Graduate School deadlines are strict and the requirements can seem onerous. As the thesis is due to the Graduate
School well before the graduation date, careful planning of a schedule of completion is critical.

The main advantage of writing a Master’s Paper over a Master’s Thesis is the elimination of Graduate School approval of
the document itself. Ideally, the Master’s Paper can be written in the style of a long journal article and then can be
submitted to a journal for publication. When Master’s Papers appear in well-respected journals, they become easily
accessible to colleagues at other institutions. Unfortunately, not all students pursue the additional work required in getting
their Master Papers published. If the Master’s Paper is not published, it is still accessible to colleagues who write to you
directly or request a copy from the Department of Anthropology, but generally, your work will not have as much potential
impact on the profession if it is only available in these ways.

Copies of all Master’s Papers and Master’s Theses are maintained in the permanent files of the Department of
Anthropology. Over the next few years, we will be working to make the most frequently requested of these Master’s
papers (that have not been published as journal articles) available through the UO Library webpage via Scholars Bank.

Annual Reviews of Master’s and Doctoral Students
At the end of the academic year, typically in the second half of May and/or the beginning of June, during the last one or two
faculty meetings, the progress of all Master's students and students who have not yet achieved doctoral candidacy is
reviewed by the entire faculty. Students who have achieved doctoral candidacy but do not appear to be making adequate
progress toward completion may also be reviewed. Each student fills out a form indicating when the student has cleared
the various requirements for the master's degree and for obtaining doctoral candidacy and gives this form to his or her
advisor. On the basis of this information and any other information the advisor may have, the advisor then prepares a
summary review of the student's efforts and progress during the academic year. The advisor's summary should specify the
progress toward the degree during the past year, and expectations and planned work for the next year or more. This
summary is presented at the faculty meeting or meetings devoted to reviewing graduate students who are not yet doctoral
candidates. The faculty meeting review provides a forum for sharing information about individual graduate students with
                                                              13
the intention of identifying student strengths and weaknesses and offering guidance for future years. The advisor's
summary, together with the two-page form the student has prepared, serve as the basis of the letter written by the Director
of Graduate Studies that is sent to the student. This letter becomes part of the student's Department file. Once a student
is advanced to doctoral candidacy, s/he is no longer annually reviewed except as noted above.

Incompletes as an Impediment to the Degree
A graduate student otherwise qualified to be awarded the Master’s degree must remove any grades of “incomplete” for
courses given by the Department before being certified for the degree. Graduate students have a maximum of one year in
which to remove an incomplete.

Summary Table of the Master’s Degree Requirements in Anthropology
Master’s Program      Archaeology          Biological                            Cultural
Proseminar            ANTH 615: Proseminar in Anthropology, Fall term, first year, 2 credits
Core classes          3 core courses: (archaeology [ANTH 681], biological anthropology [ANTH 680] are required;
                      everyone takes at least one cultural anthropology core course [ANTH 688 or ANTH 689]; note
                      that cultural students must take both ANTH 688 and ANTH 689
Research              ANTH 549: CRM
                                         1   One approved class:                 Choose one:
methods                                      ANTH 692: Dental morph/evolution ANTH 524: Feminist Methods
                                             ANTH 560: Nutritional Anth          ANTH 611: Ethnographic
                                             ANTH 507 BioAnth Methods            Research SOC 612: Overview
                                             ANTH 606 Research Methods           Soc. Methods SOC 613: Adv.
                                                                                 Soc. Methods
                                                                                 J 641: Qualitative Research.
                                                                                 Methods
                                                                                 J 642: Quantitative Res Methods
                                                                                 J 660: Advanced Res. Methods
                                                                      st
Other                 1 term statistics      1 year of statistics as 1 skill,    Second cultural core course
requirements                                 including Anth 570 Statistics for   ANTH 683: Linguistics
                      Skill (3 classes       Biological Anthropologists.
                      auxiliary skill                                            Language
                      outside Anth)


Recommended           Professional Writing (ANTH 685)
                                                                       st                                            nd
Master’s paper        completed in second year (plan during spring of 1 year; research during fall and winter of 2
                                                               nd
                      year, write during winter and spring of 2 year)
                                                              nd
Master’s degree       Plan to complete during spring term of 2 year.

Other Master's Requirements for Archaeology Students
To obtain the Master’s degree, archaeology students must complete the following requirements:
    1. Research Methods (one course)
    2. Statistics (one course)
    3. Skill (three courses taken outside the Department of Anthropology)

Research Methods
Completion of ANTH 549, Cultural Resource Management, fulfills the research methods requirement for archaeology
students. This course should help prepare students for research in contemporary archaeology. The course is generally
offered once every two years. A graduate course in Historic Preservation, offered in the School of Architecture and Allied
Arts, may be substituted by petition.

Basic Statistical Methods Requirement
All archaeology Master’s students, or those with a Master’s in another field, are required to complete a basic statistics
course during the first year of study. Normally any basic upper-division or graduate-level statistics course offered in the
University or its equivalent will be accepted, as long as the student has passed the course with a C or higher, for an
undergraduate course, or a B- or higher for a graduate course. Traditionally this requirement is completed by Anth 570
Statistics for Biological Anthropologists or courses offered in other departments including Math (MTH 525 or 526), Political

1
    …or other course as agreed upon by archaeology faculty.
                                                              14
Science (PS 445/545: Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis I), Psychology (PSY 302 Statistical Methods in Psychology)
or Sociology (SOC 312: Quantitative Methods in Sociology), for example.

Skill Requirement
Archaeology students choose a skill in consultation with the advisor during the first year of graduate study. Language
skills, statistic skills, and a variety of “ancillary skills” may be used to fulfill this requirement. All classes used to satisfy the
skill requirement must be taken on a graded basis.

Possible skill packages include:

Computer science skills: A three-term sequence of courses that provides an advanced introduction to computer science
will be accepted in fulfillment of the skill requirement. One of these courses must include programming in a language that
facilitates numeric programming. The student’s advisor must approve the courses selected.

Statistics skills: Students may define, in consultation with their advisors, a two-term advanced statistics course work
package to be taken as a follow-up to the one term of introductory statistics required of all graduate students. The two
terms of advanced statistics may be selected from among any appropriate offering available in any department of the
university. If desired, one of the two advanced courses may be taken as a tutorial within the department of anthropology
by enrolling with a faculty member for at least four credits of ANTH 606 Special Problems to work on a statistical problem
of specific relevance and professional interest to the student. Students should take the initiative in setting up such
arrangements.

Language skills: Any foreign language may be submitted by the student, with the advisor’s approval. Competence in a
foreign language is normally demonstrated by successful completion of the last term of the second year of college-level
                                                                                                                  th
course work or by passing the GSFLT or other appropriate examination with a score equivalent to that of the 50
percentile. International students may claim their English language competence in fulfillment of the skill requirement
provided that their language of instruction for their high school or college education was other than English.

Ancillary skills: Competence in a variety of professional and scientific research skills may be developed through
completing a set of three or more interrelated courses that include both practical and theoretical components. An ancillary
skills package is designed in consultation with the advisor and should complement the student’s areas of expertise in
anthropology. The package of ancillary skill courses should be individually tailored to a student’s research interests and
are typically not in anthropology, but from allied fields (art history, biology, folklore, geography, geology, public policy and
planning, for example).

In archaeology, students frequently include an integrated set of three or more courses in cartography, advanced
cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), geomorphology, hydrology, marine biology, paleopedology,
Quaternary environments. For example:
    Landforms & Environments Skill                                 Mapping & GIS Skill
    GEOG 522: Advanced Geomorphology                               GEOG 511: Advanced Cartography
    GEOG 527: Fluvial Geomorphology                                GEOG 516: Intro to GIS
    GEOG 530: Quaternary Environments                              GEOG 572: Advanced GIS

Ancillary skill satisfying course packages: a) are from allied fields (not from anthropology course offerings), b) comprise a
minimum of three interrelated courses, c) develop practical expertise in data collection, manipulation, or analysis, and d)
involve learning experiences in laboratory or field settings. Students are encouraged to carefully plan their skill package
with their advisor taking their professional and career goals and their research interests into account. A one page
description of the ancillary skill package, how it relates to the student’s academic program and research, and the courses
that will fulfill the skill requirement should be approved by the advisor and submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies for
approval by the Graduate Committee.

Other Master's Requirements for Biological Anthropology Students
To obtain the Master’s degree, biological anthropology students must complete the following requirements:
    1. Research Methods (one course, approved by advisor)
    2. Statistics (three courses)

Research Methods Requirement
This requirement prepares students for research in biological anthropology. Students should complete this requirement
during their first year in the program in order to commence research for the Master’s paper in the second year. Taking the
course no later than fall term of the second year is strongly advised. The research methods requirement can be met with
one of the following courses:
    Nutritional Anthropology (ANTH 560)
                                                                  15
    Dental Morphology and Human Evolution (ANTH 692)
    BioAnthropology Methods (ANTH 507)
    Research Methods (ANTH 606)
Additional courses may be added to this list as approved by the Graduate Committee. Courses from another institution that
are demonstrably similar in content to any of those on the list may be accepted upon approval of a petition.

Statistical Methods Requirement
All biological anthropology Master’s students, or those with a Master’s in another field, are required to complete a basic
statistics course during the first year of study. Normally any basic upper-division or graduate-level statistics course offered
in the University or its equivalent will be accepted, as long as the student has passed the course with a C or higher, for an
undergraduate course, or a B- or higher for a graduate course. Traditionally this requirement is completed by courses
offered in other departments including Math (MTH 525 or 526), Political Science (PS 445/545: Methods for Politics and
Policy Analysis I), Psychology (PSY 302 Statistical Methods in Psychology) or Sociology (SOC 312: Quantitative Methods
in Sociology), for example.

Biological anthropology students go on to define, in consultation with their advisors, a two-term advanced statistics course
work package to be taken as a follow-up to the one term of introductory statistics. The two terms of advanced statistics
may be selected from among any appropriate offering available in any department of the university. ANTH 570 (Statistics
of Biological Anthropology) is designed to fulfill one term of this requirement and Biological Anthropology students are
strongly encouraged to take this class which is typically taught every other year. If desired, one of the two advanced
courses may be taken as a tutorial within the department of anthropology by enrolling with a faculty member for at least
four credits of ANTH 606 Special Problems to work on a statistical problem of specific relevance and professional interest
to the student. Students should take the initiative in setting up such arrangements.

Other Master's Requirements for Cultural Anthropology Students
2nd Core Course in Cultural Anthropology (one course)
Core Course in Linguistic Anthropology (ANTH 683)
Research Methods (one course)
Language

Second Core Course in Cultural Anthropology
All graduate students of cultural anthropology are required to take both core classes in social theory, ANTH 688, Social
Theory I, and ANTH 689, Social Theory II. Despite the numbering of these courses, one is not a prerequisite for the other
and the courses do not have to be taken sequentially. These courses are established around select keywords and their
utility in social theory. Cultural students should take these two courses as soon as possible when they are offered. These
courses should provide students with a solid foundation in contemporary social theory.

Core Course in Linguistic Anthropology
All cultural anthropology graduate students are required to take ANTH 683 Anthropological Linguistics. Students without
previous formal course work in linguistics should enroll in an appropriate linguistics course prior to taking ANTH 683.

Research Methods Requirement
This requirement prepares students for research in cultural anthropology. Students should complete this requirement
during their first year in the program in order to commence research for the Master’s paper in the second year. Taking the
course no later than fall term of the second year is strongly advised. The research methods requirement can be met with
any of the following courses:
     Feminist Methods (ANTH 524)
     Ethnographic Research: Epistemology, Methods, Ethics (ANTH 611)
     Overview of Sociological Methods (SOC 612)
     Advanced Sociological Methods (SOC 613)
     Qualitative Research Methods (Journalism 641)
     Quantitative Research Methods (Journalism 642)
     Advanced Research Methods (Journalism 660)
Additional courses may be added to this list as approved by the Graduate Committee. Courses from another institution
that are demonstrably similar in content to any of those on the list may be accepted upon approval of a petition.

Language
Any foreign language may be submitted by the student, with the advisor’s approval. Competence in a foreign language is
normally demonstrated by successful completion of the last term of the second year of college-level course work or by
passing the GSFLT or other appropriate examination with a score equivalent to that of the 50th percentile. International
students may claim their English language competence in fulfillment of the language requirement provided that their
language of instruction for their high school or college education was other than English.
                                                              16
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: THE DOCTORATE

General (Admission, Transition, etc.)
Students who have received, or who are about to receive, a Master’s degree from the Department of Anthropology and
who wish to be considered for the doctoral program should provide the Graduate Secretary with the following materials:
    1. Completed Transition to Doctoral Program form signed by advisor and two committee members. The form is
      available on the departmental website.
    2. Statement of purpose: This should be~1000 word statement describing the dissertation topic and indicating how,
      where, and when it will be pursued. The statement should also summarize the scope of the two comprehensive
      exam areas. (Note that cultural students describe only one comprehensive exam area, as they will have already
      taken their first comprehensive exam.) The applicant should write this document thoughtfully and with care, since it
      will reveal whether the applicant is suitable for the doctoral program.
    3. Current curriculum vitae.
    4. Current academic transcript.
    5. Three “Report on Graduate Applicant” forms (http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=forms, scroll down for
      appropriate form), one of which must be from the committee chair, who should briefly describe the applicant’s
      readiness to enter the doctoral program.
Students who apply externally for admission to the doctoral program and who have a Master’s degree in anthropology from
a peer institution will be admitted directly into the doctoral program. Students whose Master’s degree is in another field will
be conditionally admitted into the doctoral program, admission being finalized once the provisional admittee has completed
the core course requirements for the Department's Master's degree, as determined by the admittee's subfield, and, in
archaeology and biological anthropology, the statistics requirement (see the Department's requirements for the master's
degree).

Admission to the doctoral program is competitive and will be decided in the spring by the Graduate Committee.

Ph.D. Residency Requirement
For the Ph.D. degree, the student must complete at least three years of full-time academic work beyond the baccalaureate
degree. This may include work done at another institution, but must also include at least one academic year (three
consecutive terms of full-time study, with a minimum of 9 completed graduate credit hours per term) in residence on the
Eugene campus. This year of residency must be completed after the student has been conditionally or regularly enrolled
in a doctoral program. For the purpose of this requirement, spring and fall are considered consecutive terms.

Students entering the doctoral program with a Master’s degree in anthropology are automatically placed in D (doctoral)
status and begin accumulating credits toward the Ph.D. residency requirement. Students entering with a Master’s in
another discipline are normally placed in Y (conditional doctoral) status. They begin accumulating credit toward the Ph.D.
residency requirement, and are normally admitted to D status after successful completion of the core course requirement.

Time Limit
Graduate School requirements state that the “required year of residency to be spent on the Eugene campus, the passing
of the comprehensive examinations required for advancement to candidacy, and the completion of the doctoral
dissertation must all be accomplished within a seven-year period. If this period is exceeded, either a second year of
residency or a new set of comprehensive exams or both will be required.” It should also be noted that a doctoral candidate
may fulfill the residency requirement during the period in which he or she works toward a Master’s degree on the university
campus as long as the student has been officially awarded the Master’s degree, the doctoral degree immediately follows
the Master’s degree program, and both the Master’s degree and the doctoral degree are in the same discipline.

Incompletes as an Impediment to the Degree
A graduate student otherwise qualified to be awarded the doctoral degree must remove any grades of “incomplete” (I) for
courses given by the Department before being certified for the degree. Graduate students have a maximum of one year in
which to remove an incomplete from their record.

Status
All Ph.D. students are admitted with a conditional (Y) status. After successful completion of the required coursework, the
status will be changed to "Doctoral" (D). Master’s students hoping to continue in the Ph.D. program will have their status
changed from “M” to “Y” after the successful completion of the core requirements. Nevertheless, acceptance into the
Ph.D. program requires formal application.




                                                              17
SUMMARY OF PH.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS IN ANTHROPOLGY

Transition to PhD         See procedures outlined at the beginning of description of ANTH doctoral program.
program
PhD Program               Archaeology               Biological                        Cultural
comprehensive exam 1      Arch Method &             Area selected by student          Social Theory (Core 1 and
                          Theory (tailored by                                         Core 2 bibliographies)
                          student)
comprehensive exam 2      Area selected by          Area selected by student          Topic or geog area selected
                          student                                                     by student
dissertation prospectus   The passing of comprehensive examinations and               As for Arch and Bio students,
                          dissertation prospectus should ideally be completed in 4    except that the first Social
                          terms, but no later than two years after entry into the     Theory comprehensive exam
                          Ph.D. program. The schedule for the two exams and           may be taken prior to
                          prospectus will be determined by the student in             transition to the doctoral
                                                                      2
                          consultation with his/her exam committee.                   program.
                            nd                       nd
other course              2 skill, published        2 skill, published paper, major   Language, 3 courses in
requirements              paper, major              research proposal, or language    cognate field(s) outside
                          research proposal,                                          ANTH, published paper, or
                          or language                                                 major funding proposal
Advancement               Advisor presents results of exams and prospectus defense to faculty. The Director of
                          Graduate Studies will notify the Graduate Secretary, who will notify the Graduate School
Dissertation Research     research and writing of dissertation
Committee                 Grad School formally appoints dissertation committee/ schedule defense
Ph.D.                     defense of dissertation

Obtaining Doctoral Candidacy
Those admitted into the doctoral program (provisionally or actually) are doctoral students (or students in the doctoral
program). But they are not yet doctoral candidates. To become a doctoral candidate, a student must: pass two
comprehensive examinations (details to come), satisfactorily complete and defend a dissertation prospectus, form a
dissertation committee (typically, this involves adding an external member to the examination/prospectus committee), and
clear all of the coursework requirements for the doctorate (see details below).

The committee that writes and evaluates the comprehensive examinations and evaluates the dissertation prospectus is
the examination/prospectus committee. A doctoral advisor must be selected by the student prior to admission into the
Ph.D. program. With this advisor, the student selects two additional members, one of whom may be a member of another
academic department or program, secures their consent to serve, and submits the list to the Graduate Secretary, who
submits it to the Graduate School. The faculty at large votes on the student's advancement to candidacy (in light of the
advisor's report on the quality of the two comprehensive examinations and the dissertation prospectus), and the Graduate
Secretary informs the Graduate School of the student's change in status, should the vote be favorable.

Although format may vary, the dissertation prospectus should embody the academic rigor and detail of a National Science
Foundation (NSF) proposal. Ideally, the prospectus is completed in time to use it as the basis for students to apply for
research funding. Such proposals grow out of the dissertation prospectus, which functions doubly to prepare a student to
write a competitive research proposal as well as to conduct doctoral research. Although some students may need no
external funding for their research, most will. The submission of external funding proposals is an important component of
professional development. For students whose work will require external funding, we advise submitting proposals to
multiple agencies (e.g., NSF, Wenner-Gren Foundation, NIH, Fulbright), to increase the chances of funding success.
Because the time-lag between proposal submission, notification regarding proposal acceptance (or rejection), and the time
at which the funds are made available may be 9 months or more, ideally proposals should be submitted to the earliest
possible deadline or deadlines once the student has entered the doctoral program. This presupposes that the student has

2
 The advantage of doing the prospectus first is that grant proposals can be submitted while the student is preparing for
comprehensive exams. This works well if the student has a good command of the literature and if the dissertation topic is
an outgrowth of the Master’s research. In other cases, it may be more advantageous to take exams first, especially if the
student’s research represents a new research focus.
                                                             18
identified likely sources, learned their deadlines, and organized his or her schedule in such a way as to accommodate the
targeted deadlines. Failure to submit in a timely way will postpone research and cause students to lose significant time.
The "Graduate Studies" site of the Department's web site links to on- and off-campus sites containing information on
funding, for the student's convenience.

Comprehensive Examinations
The comprehensive examinations are ideally taken no later than the end of the fourth term of doctoral study.

Students of archaeology and biological anthropology develop bibliographies of readings for two exam areas which can
be topical, theoretical, or geographic in focus. Students choose their exam foci, develop synthetic statements about the
scope of exam areas, conceptualize questions to direct their readings, and develop the bibliographies in consultation with
their advisors and examination/prospectus committees. The 2 to 3 page-long synthetic statement (~2000 words) defines
each of the comprehensive exam areas, justifies or explains the focus or scope of each, and specifies the relationship of
the exam areas to the dissertation prospectus. The bibliographies developed for the comprehensive exams should be
broader than the specialized research pursued in the dissertation as designed in the prospectus. The comprehensive
exam process prepares the student not only for his or her dissertation research but for the job market. The
comprehensive exam areas represent distinctive areas of expertise in anthropology that the student may eventually
represent in job applications as academic strengths in which s/he would be prepared to teach. The broader the pre-
dissertation preparation, the better able the student is to develop a suite of course offerings for his or her first teaching
position.

Students of cultural anthropology develop a bibliography of readings for one exam area (typically topical and/or
geographic in focus). In consultation with their examination/prospectus committee, the student develops a synthetic
statement about the scope of the exam area and a bibliography. The bibliography developed by the student for this one
comprehensive exam may overlap with but should also be significantly distinct from the references cited in the prospectus
(see below). The second comprehensive exam is a theory exam. Preparation for the exam requires taking the two "core"
courses in cultural theory and reading beyond the syllabi for these two courses with the aid of a bibliography and study
questions that the instructors of these two courses will supply the students preparing for the comprehensive examination.
Most cultural anthropology students will have taken their first comprehensive exam prior to entering the doctoral program.

When the comprehensive exam bibliographies are in near-final form, the archaeology, biological anthropology or
cultural anthropology student calls a meeting of the exam committee for final discussion and approval of the
bibliographies and to schedule the dates and times of the exams. Through the process of writing the synthetic statement
and meeting with the committee, the student has an opportunity to describe the boundaries and content of the particular
comprehensive exam areas and explain their relationship to each other and to the dissertation research topic in a coherent
way. At the committee meeting, the student orally summarizes the synthetic statement and the exam committee as a
whole approves the final version of the exam bibliographies on which the exams will be based. The synthetic statement
and exam bibliographies are included in the student’s official departmental file. A student preparing for the comprehensive
examinations is typically invited to submit questions for the exam. This procedure serves the purpose of providing the
examination committee with a concrete indication of the student's understanding of the exam as intellectual terrain. Where
it is inadequate, this can be corrected by the examination/ prospectus committee. If the questions are good, they will
inform the writing of the exam.

Archaeology and biological anthropology students take two four-hour sit-down comprehensive examinations. After both
exams have been written, they are read by the examination committee. The committee confers as to whether or not the
student has passed. Cultural anthropology students will take one four-hour sit-down comprehensive examination, as well
as a theory comprehensive exam, which will be administered as a take-home exam. The process of preparing for the four-
hour sit-down exam for cultural anthropology students is the same as the process that archaeology and biological
anthropology students go through in preparing for both of their exams (see above), and the student’s exam/prospectus
committee will grade this exam. Preparation and grading for the social theory exam is different, however. To help students
prepare for the theory comprehensive exam, the teachers of the two Social Theory courses the student has taken will
prepare a bibliography as well as some study questions. Moreover, these two instructors (and not the exam/prospectus
committee) will grade the exam. If the student's performance is deemed outstanding, the committee will pass the student
with distinction. In a case where questions arise, an oral exam may follow.

Students should make sure their answers clearly respond to the questions, and present coherently developed arguments
and detailed treatments of the texts chosen to discuss as evidence. Students may introduce texts that do not appear on
the comprehensive exam bibliographies, but the questions will give the student ample opportunity to discuss the works on
the official bibliography for the exam. Quality of writing is a factor in the evaluation of exams, but the exam committee will
not penalize students for superficial blunders that sometimes occur.



                                                              19
If the committee is dissatisfied with the student’s performance on the examinations, the student fails, and will be given one
chance for a retake of one or both exams.

Dissertation Prospectus
The student will write a dissertation prospectus and formally present it before a special meeting of the examination
committee. The prospectus should include: a) definition of the research problem, b) a literature review placing the
research problem in broader context, c) a statement of the significance of research, d) a detailed description of methods to
be used in data collection and analysis, and e) a list of references cited. Although specific format may vary as required by
the advisor and committee, as a guideline, the prospectus should at least be of the academic rigor and detail expected of
an NSF proposal. The prospectus bibliography should be extensive and similar in magnitude to the comprehensive exam
bibliographies. As indicated above, the references cited in the prospectus may overlap to a degree, but should also be
significantly distinct from either of the comprehensive exam areas. The oral presentation should not be scheduled until the
dissertation prospectus is acceptable to the examination/prospectus committee. The purpose of the oral presentation is to
allow the committee as a whole to collectively discuss the student’s research prospectus with a view toward facilitating
implementation of the research project.

The comprehensive examinations and dissertation prospectus should be completed in four terms, but no later than two
years after entering the doctoral program. The examination committee will consist of the three members of the student’s
examination/prospectus committee. A student who fails one or both of the two written examinations, or who is judged to
have performed unsatisfactorily in the oral presentation of the dissertation prospectus, will be permitted one retake, to
occur within one year of taking the first exam or defending his/her prospectus (whichever occurred first).

Course and other Requirements for the Doctorate
The following course and additional requirements for the Ph.D. must be completed before advancement to candidacy.

Course and Other Requirements for Archaeology Students
As described in an earlier section, in order to complete the Master’s degree, an archaeology student must complete a skill
requirement. To complete the doctoral degree, an archaeology student must complete an additional (second) “skill.”
Alternatively, a high level of competence in a single foreign language will fulfill both skills required at the doctoral level.
Students should choose a skill in consultation with the advisor no later than the first year of the doctoral program. The
student preparing for the doctorate must complete both skill requirements before the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations
may be taken. All classes used to satisfy the skill requirement must be taken on a graded basis.

There are several ways to complete the skill requirement for the Ph.D.:
   • Ancillary skill (as described under Skill Requirement for the Master’s degree).
   • Language. A second language (as described under Skill Requirement for Master’s degree), or demonstration of
       greater proficiency in a single foreign language, or demonstration of greater proficiency in English and proficiency
       in a field language.
   • Major Research Proposal or a Paper accepted for publication

Skill
Students who desire to satisfy both skills by demonstrating high proficiency in a single language must pass the Modern
Language Association (MLA) examinations in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, with an average
                                                                     th
percentile score of 55 or better and no individual score below the 45 percentile. In the case of languages for which no
MLA exam is available, students may demonstrate their ability by another appropriate examination procedure.

International students who desire to meet both skills by demonstrating high proficiency in English may do so by
documenting their graduation from a degree program at an institution where English is the language of instruction.
Alternatively, such students may undergo an English proficiency evaluation by their doctoral committee, based on the
written Ph.D. examinations and oral defense of the dissertation prospectus.

Language:
In cases where a student wishes to develop as a skill a field language not taught on campus, the student, with the support
of his/her advisor, may petition the Graduate Committee for the acceptance of a package of three appropriate courses in
Linguistics, chosen to prepare the student for language learning in the field. Alternatively, if an examiner is available, an
examination procedure will be permitted. The examination procedure must first be cleared by the Graduate Committee.
Major Research Proposal or a Paper accepted for publication:
Ph.D. students may submit--in consultation with their faculty advisor and Ph.D. committee--a substantive and significant
research paper for peer-reviewed publication, or a grant application to a major funding source (NSF, Wenner-Gren, SSRC,
NIH, or comparable funding source). Publications or grant proposals must be submitted while in residence at the
University of Oregon. If graduate students choose to submit a paper for peer-reviewed publication, they are encouraged to
present the paper or poster session at a national, international, or regional conference before the paper comes out,
                                                              20
although this is not required. For papers submitted for publication, the graduate student must be the first author and the
student’s advisor and committee should be satisfied that the work is primarily the intellectual product of the student. The
paper must be formally accepted by the journal to meet this requirement. The publication or grant proposal option is
strongly recommended for Ph.D. students who hope to pursue careers in academia, but may also be extremely helpful for
those pursuing applied or CRM careers.

Course and Other Requirements for Biological Anthropology Students
Students of Biological Anthropology choose a skill in consultation with the advisor no later than the first year of the doctoral
program. Language skills and a variety of ancillary skills may be used to fulfill this requirement. All classes used to satisfy
the skill requirement must be taken on a graded basis.

Ancillary skill. Competence in a variety of professional and scientific research skills may be developed through completing
a set of three or more interrelated courses that include both practical and theoretical components. An ancillary skills
package is designed in consultation with the advisor and should complement the student’s areas of expertise in
anthropology. The package of ancillary skill courses should be individually tailored to a student’s research interests and
are typically not in anthropology, but from allied fields (biology, computer science, geography, geology, psychology, public
policy and planning, for example).

For example: a skill in Computer Science would involve a three-term sequence of courses that provides an advanced
introduction to computer science will be accepted in fulfillment of the skill requirement. At least one of these courses must
include programming in a language that facilitates numeric programming. The student’s advisor must approve the courses
selected.

In biological anthropology, skills packages may include courses in biomechanics, GIS/GPS, advanced statistical methods,
quantitative population ecology, microanalytical methods (histology, electron microscopy, digital image analysis), etc; for
example:

    Soils & Environments Skill                                  Ecological Methods Skill
    GEOL 522: Neotectonics & Quaternary Geology                 BIOL 571: Population Ecology
    GEOG 530: Quaternary Environments                           BIOL 572: Community Ecology
    GEOL 535: Paleopedology                                     BIOL 573: Quantitative Ecology

Ancillary skill satisfying course packages: a) are from allied fields (NOT from anthropology course offerings), b) comprise a
minimum of three interrelated courses, c) develop practical expertise in data collection, manipulation, or analysis, and d)
involve learning experiences in laboratory or field settings. Students are encouraged to plan their skill package carefully
with their advisor taking their professional and career goals and their more immediate dissertation research into account.
A one-page description of the ancillary skill package, how it relates to the student’s academic program and dissertation
research, and the courses that will fulfill the skill requirement should be approved by the advisor and submitted to the
Director of Graduate Studies for approval by the Graduate Committee.

Language. Any foreign language may be submitted by the student, with the advisor’s approval. Please see the description
on the Language requirement for archaeology students above.

Major Research Proposal or a Paper accepted for publication. Please see the description for “Major Research Proposal or
a Paper accepted for publication” for archaeology students above.

Course and Other Requirements for Cultural Anthropology Students
In cultural anthropology, students can demonstrate competence in a foreign language other than the one completed for the
Master’s degree, demonstrate high proficiency in a single language, take three courses in a cognate field, submit a high-
quality paper for publication, or develop a major funding proposal (e.g., NSF, Wenner-Gren). All classes used to satisfy
this requirement must be taken on a graded basis.

Language. Students can demonstrate competence in a foreign language other than the one completed for the Master’s by
following the same requirements as specified under Language Requirement for Master’s degree.

Students who desire to satisfy both Master’s and Ph.D. requirements with a single language, must demonstrate high
proficiency by passing the Modern Language Association (MLA) examinations in listening comprehension, speaking,
                                                                                                           th
reading, and writing, with an average percentile score of 55 or better and no individual score below the 45 percentile. In
the case of languages for which no MLA exam is available, students may demonstrate their ability by another appropriate
examination procedure.



                                                              21
International students who desire to meet the language requirement by demonstrating high proficiency in English may do
so by documenting their graduation from a degree program at an institution where English is the language of instruction.
Alternatively, such students may undergo an English proficiency evaluation by their doctoral committee, based on the
written Ph.D. examinations and oral defense of the dissertation prospectus.

In cases where a student wishes to develop knowledge of a field language not taught on campus, the student, with the
support of his/her advisor, may petition the Graduate Committee for the acceptance of a package of three appropriate
courses in Linguistics, chosen to prepare the student for language learning in the field. Alternatively, if an examiner is
available, an examination procedure will be permitted. The examination procedure must first be cleared by the Graduate
Committee.

Cognate Field. Competence in a variety of professional and scientific research skills may be developed through
completing a set of three or more interrelated courses that include both practical and theoretical components. A cognate
field package is designed in consultation with the advisor and should complement the student’s areas of expertise in
anthropology. The package of cognate courses should be tailored to a student’s research interests and offered not in
anthropology but in allied fields (art history, biology, comparative literature, folklore, geography, geology, psychology, public
policy and planning, sociology, for example).

Major Research Proposal or Paper accepted for publication. Please see the description for “Major Research Proposal or a
Paper accepted for publication” for archaeology students above.

FROM DOCTORAL CANDIDACY TO THE PH.D.
With the completion of coursework, passage of the comprehensive examinations, and acceptance of the dissertation
proposal, the student is advanced to candidacy. Then the doctoral candidate will propose a doctoral committee, in
consultation with the advisor. This usually (although not always) consists of the examination/prospectus committee plus a
fourth member. Typically the fourth member is from another department, but if the examination/prospectus committee
already included someone from another department, the doctoral committee will consist of a third anthropologist (plus two
others and someone from another department). The student's advisor will inform the Graduate Secretary of the proposed
committee, and s/he will inform the Graduate School, which authorizes the formation of the committee. The remainder of
the candidate’s program will be devoted to the research upon which the dissertation is to be based, to the preparation of
the final manuscript, and to its defense. Students who aspire to obtaining a position in academia should also work on
publications during this time.

Field Research
Normally a student undertakes dissertation research in the year following advancement to candidacy. Much of the basic
planning, however, should be done beforehand. If research funds are required, applications to funding agencies should
have been submitted while the student was taking courses and preparing for exams. All required permits must be
obtained prior to the beginning of the research. If research involves human subjects, on-campus research clearance must
be obtained through the Human Subjects Compliance office in the Office of Research Services and Administration, before
research begins. If research involves animals, on-campus clearance must be obtained through the Institutional Animal
Care and Use Committee, Office of Veterinary Services.

Preparation of the Dissertation
While in the field, students will maintain contact with their dissertation advisor and continue to be enrolled in absentia at the
University. Preparation of the dissertation will be done in close consultation with the advisor.

Presentation of the Dissertation
All members of the dissertation committee read the dissertation before it enters final draft in order that the student may
make revisions before undertaking the final typing. The student should make drafts of the dissertation available to the
committee in a timely fashion according to an agreed upon schedule, and the committee should provide feedback to the
student in a timely manner. A complete revised draft of the dissertation must be distributed to all committee members at
least three weeks before the candidate can take action to schedule the oral defense. The chair of the student’s committee
will confer with the committee to decide whether the defense should be scheduled. After the committee has agreed that
the dissertation is defensible, the student must orally present and defend the dissertation before the committee and such
faculty, advanced graduate students, and others as desire to attend. Dissertation defenses are open to the public.

The decision upon the dissertation is made by the dissertation committee alone. Upon its positive recommendation to the
Dean of the Graduate School, and with the fulfillment of all other requirements, the candidate is awarded the Ph.D. degree.

No candidate will be recommended for the degree until the minimum Graduate School requirements for credits, residence,
study, and the skills requirements set forth by the Department have been satisfied. The student’s progress is determined
by performance in the Master’s core courses and their related examinations, in the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations, in
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course work, in research papers, in a formal Master’s paper, and finally in the doctoral dissertation. The dissertation itself
should be based upon original research, typically involving field or laboratory work. It must be written in fully professional
and publishable style, appropriate to the sub-field of specialization and adhering to the Graduate School’s Style and Policy
Manual for Theses and Dissertations.

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS ON COURSWORK COMPLETION

Grade Policy/GPA
Each graduate student should be familiar with both department and Graduate School regulations for maintaining graduate
status and for graduation. These regulations are listed in the 2008-2009 UO Catalog. All 15 core credits must be taken
for a letter grade and passed with grades of B– or better. A B- is expected for all other courses as well. Students who fail
to maintain a cumulative 3.00 GPA in two successive terms may be dropped from the program.

Pass/No Pass
Please note that P indicates satisfactory performance, which is defined by the university as a grade of B– or better for
graduate students.

I or Incompletes - Anthropology Department Policy
An “I’’ is appropriate only in an extraordinary circumstance, such as serious illness or injury, which precludes completion of
the course before the end of the term, and then only if the completed coursework is satisfactory (B– or higher). In
particular, “I’’ may not be used to forestall a failing or otherwise undesirable grade. If the conditions for the removal of the
incomplete grade are not fulfilled within one year, the incomplete will remain on the student’s transcript permanently.

I or Incompletes - University Regulation
An incomplete may be issued when the quality of work is satisfactory but some minor requirement has not been completed
for reasons acceptable to the instructor. To remove an incomplete, a graduate student must convert a graduate course
incomplete into a passing grade within one calendar year of the assignment of the incomplete. Students may request
additional time for the removal of the incomplete by submitting a petition stating the course requirements that were not
initially completed, signed by the instructor, to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. This policy does not apply to
incompletes assigned to Thesis (503), or Dissertation (603). Thesis and dissertation credits are automatically converted
to “Pass” when the thesis is completed and accepted by the Graduate School. Students who are graduating and planning
to remove an incomplete must have it completed and recorded with the Registrar within 30 days after graduation.
Otherwise it will remain as a permanent "I" on the transcript.

Transfer Credits
Courses required for the Ph.D. degree may be waived if taken at another university, regardless of whether they have been
officially transferred. The Graduate Committee should be petitioned to waive the course, after an advisor agrees that
equivalent coursework has been met.

GRADUATION CEREMONIES
The main University of Oregon graduation ceremonies take place in June, when students who have completed their
degrees in fall, winter, and spring terms graduate. The University of Oregon also has a small graduation ceremony in
August for those who have completed their degrees in the summer, although Ph.D. defenses are not scheduled during the
summer (see above). There are two Spring (or June) Commencement ceremonies. The University-wide graduation
typically takes place in McArthur Court, while the Department of Anthropology ceremony takes place outdoors on the east
side of Condon Hall. The Department of Anthropology policy is that all requirements for graduation must be completed for
a student to walk in the Department’s graduation ceremony.


DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY FUNDING

Graduate Teaching Fellowships (GTFs)
Every year the Department supports the majority of its graduate students in residence through GTFs. Presently, however,
there is no guarantee of any level of support. Students typically receive funding in their first or second year in our program,
however. The Department is working toward offering multiple years of funding, assuming academic merit and timely
progress through the program.

Standard GTFs
GTF positions are generally teaching assistant positions, although they sometimes involve research or lab work. GTFs
and potential GTFs must read the GENERAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES STATEMENT (GDRS) posted on the
Graduate Program Blackboard site. Usually, GTFs will lead 50-minute discussion sections of a large lecture class.
Typically, GTFs are offered beginning at .2 FTE (Full Time Equivalent), and may increase to .49 FTE (the maximum for
                                                              23
graduate students allowed by the university). GTFs teaching 2 sections are at .25 FTE, those teaching 3 sections are at
.38 FTE, and those teaching 4 sections are at .48 FTE. This funding formula is subject to change due to budgetary
limitations. Readerships are appointed at .2, .3, and .4 FTE, depending upon course enrollment. The baseline formula for
hours worked is that a student appointed at a .2 FTE works no more than 88 hours per term according to the collective
bargaining agreement between the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation and the university. A student with a .25 FTE
works 110 hours a term, one with a .38 FTE works 167 hours a term, and one with a .48 FTE works 211 hours a term.

Readerships are GTF positions in which the graduate student assists the instructor in grading and logistics of a moderate-
sized lecture class, but does not run her or his own weekly sections. Readers are assigned to courses based on
enrollment, following this formula:
                 0.2 FTE if enrollment is greater than or equal to 50, but less than 75,
                 0.3 FTE if enrollment is greater than or equal to 75, but less than 100,
                 0.4 FTE if enrollment is greater than or equal to 100, but less than 125.
Classes with enrollments of 125 or more generally tend to have weekly sections run by GTFs.

In ANTH 366, Human Osteology, sections run for 80 minutes, hence GTFs receive .38 FTE for teaching two sections and
.48 FTE for teaching three sections.

The pay structure is determined by the university and is broken down into three different pay rates. Students without a
master’s are designated “level 1,” those with a master’s, but not yet advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. are “level 2,” and
those who have advanced to candidacy are “level 3.”

To be considered for a GTF position, students must submit a complete application by the announced deadline. Late or
incomplete applications cannot be considered. A complete application includes a current CV, a current transcript, two
“Reports on Graduate Applicant,” (also known as “letters of recommendation” or “letters of reference”), a cover letter
indicating prior teaching experience and teaching philosophy, and the courses for which the applicant is most suited. The
applicant should use this letter to make the strongest case for his or her appointment and to explain any tardiness in
making timely progress through degree programs. Of the two “Reports on Graduate Applicant,” one should be from the
advisor. The other “Report on Graduate Applicant” should be from a faculty member who is familiar with the student’s
work and progress. If the student has already served as a GTF, at least one of these letters must be from a faculty
member for whom the student served as a GTF. International students who are non-native speakers of English are
required to take the "Speak Test." More information about this test can be found at
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=intlGTFLangRequirement.

Students must meet the deadline for the GTF competition, usually at the end of winter term. Everyone is invited to apply
for a GTF for their second year in the program. Even if a student thinks s/he may not be on campus for the subsequent
year or that s/he may have alternate funding, completing an application is the prudent course to take. Although the
majority of GTF appointments are made in April for the following academic year, there are occasional openings during
mid-year. Interested students should, therefore, periodically inform the Director of Graduate Studies of their continued
interest. Additionally, students have the opportunity to apply for GTFs in other departments. In the past, anthropology
students have held GTFs in Biology, Ethnic Studies, Humanities, International Studies, Religious Studies, Women’s
Studies, General Science, Dance, Physical Education, the English Department’s Writing Program, and other departments
through campus. The Museum of Natural and Cultural History, and on occasion, the Oregon State Museum of
Anthropology also advertise GTF positions.

GTF Selections
GTF selections are made by the Graduate Committee, which includes a representative (either standing or ex officio) of all
subfields. Regular GTFs are awarded to students who have not accumulated 3.6 FTE+ in prior GTF appointments in the
Department of Anthropology and according to merit, as gauged by timely progress through the program, grades, faculty
references, reports and evaluations (see Annual Reviews of Master’s and Doctoral Students above), and quality of
past teaching. Other criteria include: publications, grants and proposal development, and conference presentations
appropriate to the student’s level. Graduate students who have accumulated 3.6 FTE or more in prior GTF appointments
should apply, but, priority will go to qualified students who have not yet received 3.6 FTE in prior appointments. An eligible
student who has accumulated 3.6 FTE or more will receive alternate status and will receive GTF assignments as the need
to make further GTF appointments arises. There is no single formula applied to all applicants. The decision-making is not
cut-and-dried but depends upon the Graduate Committee’s overall evaluation of relative merit, given these criteria and the
overall quality of the applicant pool. To the extent that a course requires the GTF to have specific skills and background,
this requirement may loom large in the committee’s choice of GTF for that course.

For practical reasons, the fit between the Department’s needs and a student’s background and preparation are
considered. For example, we generally have a greater need for biological anthropology GTFs than for cultural or
archaeology GTFs. The Biological core class (ANTH 680) or comparable experience is a prerequisite for receiving a GTF
                                                             24
for biological anthropology courses, and students that are interested in being a GTF for Biological Anthropology classes
are encouraged to talk with the appropriate faculty to receive advising on training. It is conceivable that the pedagogical
requirements of particular courses will overshadow other criteria and that appointment will be made out of specific staffing
needs. As described above, receiving GTFs from other campus units will not adversely affect the ability of a person to
receive a GTF in Anthropology.

The Stern and Barnett (Graduate Teaching) Fellowships
Each year the Graduate Committee chooses Stern and Barnett (Graduate Teaching) Fellows at the same time it chooses
regular GTFs. Applicants must be advanced to candidacy no later than the spring term of the year they are applying for
one of these fellowships. Graduate students propose to teach a class and submit a letter of interest, letters of
recommendation, CV, and syllabus for the proposed class. These fellowships offer a year long GTF with a level of
appointment ("FTE") of .4 for the terms in which the student does not teach his or her own course and .49 for the term in
which s/he does teach his or her own course. Generally, two students are selected each year, one as the Stern Fellow
and the other as the Barnett Fellow in honor of distinguished University of Oregon Department of Anthropology faculty
Theodore Stern and Homer Barnett.

Stern and Barnett Fellowship Selection
The Stern and Barnett Fellows are chosen by Graduate Committee and endorsed by the faculty. The graduate student is
evaluated in part in terms of timely progress through the Master's and/or doctoral degrees; only those who are advanced to
candidacy or will achieve candidacy in the spring prior to the fellowship year may apply. The Stern and Barnett
Fellowships are awarded primarily for academic merit. Winners tend to have sterling records in terms of grants,
publications, and faculty support, and the course they propose teaching is a well designed and significant contribution to
our course offerings for the year in which they will hold the fellowship.

Assigning GTFs to Particular Courses
The Director of Graduate Studies attempts to make the regular GTF assignments for the entire year at the end of spring
term of the previous year. GTFs and the faculty teaching the courses requiring GTFs are asked to identify their
preferences and e-mail these to the DGS. Although the DGS tries to honor both student and faculty requests, students
must be willing to accept the GTF assignment that they are given. The DGS reserves the right to make these decisions as
s/he sees fit to meet curricular, enrollment, and departmental needs. Because students’ schedules change (for example,
when they receive grants supporting field research off-campus), adjustments have to be made prior to the beginning of
each term. The DGS and Graduate Secretary greatly appreciate students’ flexibility and cooperation during this process.

The Teaching Effectiveness Program (TEP)
The Teaching Effectiveness Program (TEP) is available to all teaching staff at the University of Oregon. Throughout the
year they offer free workshops on a variety of teaching issues. Most helpful to GTFs is the new GTF training. Please see
their website http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~tep/ or contact Georgeanne Cooper at gcooper@uoregon.edu or 346-2177 for
more information. The Center for Educational Technology (CET) http://libweb.uoregon.edu/cet/ also provides training in
the use of instructional technology and multimedia (e.g., using Blackboard course websites). GTFs teaching in the
Department of Anthropology are encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities to improve their teaching skills.

If you are concerned about your teaching now, you might want to plan on doing a midterm evaluation of teaching by TEP.
Georgeanne Cooper is the person to contact; she can arrange for a classroom interview or compile email comments. If
you identify problems from this kind of feedback during week 5, you have time to make improvements by the end of the
term.

GTF Evaluations
GTF Evaluations in the Department of Anthropology consist of:
   1) Course Evaluations filled out online by students. Your students will assess your preparation, course content,
   fairness of grading, willingness to engage in dialogue, and availability outside of class (i.e., office hours). These
   surveys are compiled and summary statistics (z-scores) are provided to you for each category. A z-score measures
   how well you are doing compared to the Department average of other ANTH GTFs. A positive z-score (+1) is great; it
   means that you are above average. A negative z-score (-0.5, -1, etc.) means you are below average. Someone has
   to be "average" and the quality of our GTFs is usually good, so please don't worry too much about this at this stage in
   your career. Your students are also invited to write narrative comments about your teaching. These are typically
   short, and often can be quite helpful in learning to improve your teaching. A typical one might read, "She was really
   well-organized, but had a tendency to call on the same students week after week." Sometimes you will receive
   unmitigated praise, sometimes not. Copies of both the summary statistics and narrative comments become part of
   your Departmental file.
   2) Letters written by your supervising instructor about your performance as a GTF.
   3) Feedback from faculty during the Annual Reviews of Master’s and Doctoral Students (see above).

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Summer Session/Summer Sandwich
The summer term (typically mid-June to mid-August) is a little different from fall, winter, and spring terms. GTFs who are
employed during the spring term and have a GTF appointment the following fall, but do not have a position for the summer
quarter, are entitled to a "Summer Sandwich." With this, they may take courses at a reduced fee (typically the same fee
paid by GTFs who are employed during the summer). In order to get a Summer Sandwich, a qualified student needs to
complete forms available on the Graduate School website http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=summerSandwich.

Occasionally, employment during summer is available as a GTF. Advanced graduate students sometimes have the
opportunity to teach their own courses in the summer. Interested students should inform the faculty person in charge of
summer session that they are interested in a position as soon as possible. Decisions about the summer teaching
schedule are usually made during the first half of fall term.

OTHER DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS
Cressman Prize
The Cressman Prize (named after Luther Cressman, founder of the UO Department of Anthropology) is an annual
competition in which students submit research papers. The award consists of $250.00 plus one-term tuition waiver, the
student being able to decide when he uses the tuition waiver in the year of the award. The winner presents his or her
paper at a Department Colloquium the following academic year. A special selections committee of faculty is formed in the
beginning of every academic year to choose the winner of this prize.

The McFee Dissertation Writing Grant
The McFee Dissertation Writing Grant is occasionally offered to an exceptionally promising graduate student to support
their final term of dissertation writing. It has been awarded once or twice in the past decade, and consists of a 0.2 FTE
and tuition waiver.

Department Travel and Research Awards (DTRA)
The Department of Anthropology allocates a small sum to support student travel and/or research most years. Students
must compete for these funds by providing a one-page description and budget of the proposed activity. Note that if the
proposed activity costs more than the award limit, the applicant should indicate how s/he will supplement the Department's
award. Instructions for the complete application and application deadlines are announced in the fall.

Juda Fund Student Travel/Research Grants
The Department of Anthropology awards small travel and research grants through the Pauline Wollenberg Juda Memorial
Endowment Fund. The awards assist undergraduate and graduate students in the anthropological study of nutrition.
Travel awards are to be used for attendance at professional meetings or transportation in connection with research related
activities. Research awards may be used for expenses, including the purchase of equipment, undertaken in the
examination of nutritional topics, including sociocultural, biological, and archaeological efforts. Students may apply for
both the travel and research awards. The deadline for the 2008-2009 academic year is October 15, 2008. Graduate
students may be awarded up to $350 in travel support and up to $1,000 in research support. Applicants should submit a
completed application form, two-page long description of the activity for which you seek support, budget, and a letter of
recommendation from their faculty advisor. Awards must be used within one year of the date of the award.

Research Assistantships
Faculty members sometimes have grant-supported positions similar to GTFs for students. In some cases these positions
are structured like GTFs with tuition waivers, and in other cases, a position may simply provide an hourly wage. More
information about such positions is available from individual faculty.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON (beyond the Department of Anthropology)
Graduate School
In recent years the Graduate School has awarded the Department of Anthropology three $500 awards to give to graduate
students proposing to carry out research or creative projects, present a paper or engage in other aspects of professional
development, acquire special training, or process data related to research. The Department announces the Graduate
School Research Awards (GSRA) in fall term; the Graduate Committee decides who receives these awards on the basis
of the student's application, which includes a cover letter, an itemized budget, a current CV, and his or her advisor's
"Report on Graduate Applicants" (http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=forms and click on gs_620. pdf).

Every year, the University of Oregon awards one or more Doctoral Fellowships to outstanding graduate students. To be
considered for this award, a student must be nominated by the Department. The nomination packet includes a research
prospectus for the dissertation of not more than 20 double-spaced pages; a current CV; a copy of the nominee's transcript;
three letters of recommendation from faculty familiar with the candidate's research, academic background, and potential
as a developing scholar; and a letter of nomination from the Department's chair. The award carries a cash stipend of
$18,000, and each fellow receives a University tuition waiver. Fellowships are tenable for up to 12 months.
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The Donald and Darel Stein Graduate Student Teaching Award recognizes experienced Graduate Teaching Fellows
who have demonstrated a commitment to developing their instructional skills, while at the same time excelling in their
academic degree program. Each chosen GTF receives an award of $1,000.00. To be considered for the award, it is
necessary to be nominated by the Department. The deadline for the Department's nominee to apply is mid-April. His or
her application must include a one-page teaching statement, a list of courses he or she has taught, and a statement
describing teacher training and/or professional development activities the GTF has participated in.

The Graduate School offers the Margaret McBride Lehrman Fellowship, which includes a full-year tuition waiver and a
stipend of $ 10,000. The award is intended "to provide support for graduate students with financial need who are pursuing
studies that emphasize communication, especially writing skills." Applications are available from the Graduate School and
the deadline is early March. This award is not offered every year.

The Graduate School offers a few Gary E. Smith Summer Grants, which are $3000 awards to provide support during
summer term to make significant progress toward the degree. Examples of summer activities that may be funded are
travel and expenses to attend a summer conference or specialized training, a summer colloquium, off-site research, and
course preparation workshop. The application deadline is in May.

The Graduate School offers several Stephen L. Wasby Dissertation Research Grants, which are $1000 awards to
doctoral students who are at the beginning stages of their dissertation research. Application deadline is in March.

The OUS-SYLFF Graduate Fellowships for International Research are awarded for one year of full-time graduate work
involving research and scholarly endeavors in programs and projects with an international dimension. The focus is on
masters and doctoral degree-seeking students within OUS who have high potential for leadership in international affairs, in
public life, or in private endeavor. Outstanding students in the social/behavioral sciences, arts and humanities, and directly
related professional fields will be considered through nomination by their department. The nomination packet includes a
letter of nomination prepared by the Department chair or DGS, the nominee's application, a three-page statement
prepared by the nominee and describing the proposed work while an OUS-SYLFF fellow, three letters of recommendation,
official graduate and undergraduate transcripts, and GRE scores. The application deadline is mid-April. See
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/OUS_SYLFF_Fellowship.html

Center for the Study of Women in Society
The Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS) offers CSWS travel and research grants to students working on
topics about gender, feminist theory, or any aspect of women's experience. CSWS Graduate Student Travel Grants
(from $100 to $400) have application deadlines in fall and spring, and support travel for research and to attend
conferences. CSWS Graduate Student Research Support Grants, which range from $100 to $2000, also have
deadlines in fall and spring. The CSWS Laurel Research Award offers $2500 to graduate students of under-represented
groups; the CSWS International Laurel Research Award offers $2500 to international students. Applications for the
Laurel awards are due in April. CSWS also offers the Jane Grant Dissertation Fellowship, a $10,000 award, to a
graduate student working on topics of gender, feminist theory, or any aspect of women’s lives; its deadline for applications
is in early May. See http://csws.uoregon.edu/grants/index.shtml

College of Arts and Sciences
The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) offers several awards each year, most of which range from $500 to $1000. The
Mary Chambers Brockelbank Endowed Assistance Fund Awards of $500-$1000 will be made to outstanding students
of limited means, teaching assistants, instructors, or support staff who are students. Students are nominated by the
department. The Risa Palm Graduate Fellowship provides an annual source of income to supplement support for one
or more graduate students (M.A., M.S., Ph.D. degree candidates) in any of the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS)
departments or programs. Candidates shall show exceptional promise for achievement in their chosen academic field as
evidenced by GPA, originality of research, publication, teaching evaluations or other applicable criteria. Typically, awards
will be made for one year, but may be repeated for not more than two consecutive years. At present, the annual award is
$1,000. The John L. and Naomi Luvaas Graduate Fellowship award criteria are the same as those for the Risa Palm
Fellowship described above. The deadlines for applications and nominations are usually in mid-February, and the awards
are announced in March or April. See the CAS website,
http://cas.uoregon.edu/uogetpage.php?page=http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/%7Efinaid/index.htm.

The University Club Foundation Fellowship also awards a yearly scholarship of $5,000. These scholarships, which can
go to students at any stage of their graduate work, are based on an initial selection process held by the Graduate School,
which sends the names of finalists on to the Club each year. The deadline for nominations from the department to the
Graduate School is mid-April. See: www.uclubpdx.com



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The University of Oregon Center on Diversity and Community, CoDaC, and the Graduate School provide 10 $1,000
summer stipends for outstanding UO graduate student research projects on issues relating directly to the Center's
mission. Applications may be for a portion of research projects already underway (such as theses or dissertations), or to
launch a new project. See http://www.uoregon.edu/~codac

The University of Oregon Diversity-Building Scholarship recognizes undergraduate and graduate students who
enhance the educational experience of all students by sharing diverse cultural experiences. These scholarships are an
integral part of the university's effort to meet the educational-diversity needs of its students, and they complement other
programs in the UO campus diversity plan. The Diversity-Building Scholarship is a tuition-remission scholarship with
awards ranging from partial to full tuition and fee waivers. The amount of each award is determined by the UO Diversity-
Building Scholarship Committee. Scholarships are renewable. The duration of each award depends on the recipient's
class standing at the time of initial award. Recipients must meet specific scholarship-renewal requirements to retain their
scholarships. See http://financialaid.uoregon.edu/SCG-dbsinfo.htm.

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES
National Science Graduate Fellowships offer recognition and three years of support for advanced study to
approximately 900 outstanding graduate students (nation-wide) in the mathematical, physical, biological, engineering, and
behavioral and social sciences, including the history of science and the philosophy of science, and to research-based PhD
degrees in science education. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or nationals who are at or near the beginning of their
graduate study. Awards that were made in March 2003 carry a stipend for each fellow of $27,500 for a 12-month tenure
(prorated monthly at $2,291 for lesser periods) and an annual cost-of-education allowance of $10,500, paid to the Fellow's
institution in lieu of tuition and fees. See http://www.fastlane.nsf.gov.

NSF also offers Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants in Physical Anthropology, Archaeology and Cultural
Anthropology. Awards of up to $12,000 to meet expenses associated with doctoral dissertation research. Items normally
requested include per diem for time spent away from the home institution, travel funds, supplies and equipment, costs
associated with field research and analysis fees. Salary for research at one’s home institution is not permitted. Recent
panel advice to applicants in cultural anthropology notes that “projects which advance our theoretical understanding are
more scientifically meritorious than descriptive projects which add a case study of some (albeit fascinating and topical)
situation. Outstanding proposals specify how the knowledge to be created advances our theoretical understanding of the
study situation, so that people interested in similar situations in different contexts will learn from the project's outcome.
The key is to be explicit in showing how the general theory explains the local situation, and in showing how the new
knowledge from the local situation will advance the theory.” This advice is relevant to applicants in all subfields.

Fulbright Fellowships for Graduate Study and Research Abroad: These awards provide travel and maintenance, and
specific book or research allowances for study or research projects in over 100 nations. Level of required language
training depends on the project or study plan and the country in question. The UO interviews applicants and forwards
applications in a single institutional packet. For application materials see Kathy Poole, OIP, 346-1212. The campus
deadline is in late September or early October.

Preservation Technology and Training Grants (PTTGrants) Program: The PTT Grants program supports research,
training, meetings and conferences, and publications that advance the application of technology to the preservation of
cultural resources. Preservation technology refers broadly to any equipment, method, or technique that can be applied to
the discovery, analysis, interpretation, conservation, protection, and management of historic objects, sites, structures or
landscapes. Research priorities include protecting cultural resources against vandalism, looting and terrorism, studying
environmental effects of pollution on cultural resources, and documenting and preserving threatened cultural landscapes.
The proposal deadline is usually in December. More information can be found at www.ncptt.nps.gov.

National Institute of Mental Health: The National Institute of Mental Health is the lead Federal agency for research on
mental and behavioral disorders. NIMH does support some doctoral research, please see
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/nimhhome/index.cfm and discuss with your advisor.

Student Career Experience Program (SCEP)
The Student Career Experience Program is a strong recruitment source for Federal agencies that need to attract diverse
and talented students with skills which will be critical to the future workforce needs of the Federal Government. For
example, both the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management use this program to train and recruit archaeologists
and heritage specialists. The program provides for work-study partnerships between the students, the university, and a
Federal agency. The SCEP provides an opportunity to gain work experience directly related to an academic field of study,
and allows for a flexible work schedule. See http://www.usajobs.gov/EI14.asp, and the appropriate federal agency
website.


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Canadian Embassy - Canadian Studies Graduate Student Fellowships
The purpose of the fellowship is to offer graduate students an opportunity to conduct part of their doctoral research in
Canada. The fellowships will support research in the social and human sciences, journalism, business, trade,
environment, and law with a view to contributing to a better knowledge and understanding of Canada and its relationship
with the U.S. and/or other countries of the world. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. and
should have completed all doctoral requirements except their dissertations at the time of application. All dissertations
must be related in substantial part to the study of Canada, Canada/U.S. or Canada/North America. The fellowships are
available for up to nine months, with a maximum stipend of up to $850 per month. See http://geo.international.gc.ca/can-
am/washington/studies/graduate-en.asp.

Please note: the Canadian Embassy is just one example of an international funding opportunity.

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS
American Association of University Women: One of the world's largest sources of funding exclusively for graduate
women, the AAUW Educational Foundation supports aspiring scholars around the globe, teachers and activists in local
communities, women at critical stages of their careers, and those pursuing professions where women are
underrepresented. See http://www.aauw.org/fga/index.cfm.

Ford Foundation Predoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships for Minorities: Open to U.S. citizens who are members of
one or more groups: Alaskan Natives, Native American Indians, Black/African Americans, Mexican Americans/Chicanos,
Native Pacific Islanders, and Puerto Ricans. The awards are made for study in research-based doctoral programs that will
lead to careers in teaching or research at the university or college level in the behavioral and social sciences, humanities,
engineering, mathematics, physical sciences, and life sciences. Predoctoral Fellowships are for students with fewer
than two years of graduate study completed. The awards include a stipend of $16,000 plus and $7,500 institutional
allowance toward tuition. Dissertation Fellowships are for candidates who have finished all degree requirements except
for the writing and defense of the dissertation and who expected to complete the dissertation during the fellowship year.
The award provides a one-year stipend of $21,000 and expenses paid to attend three Conferences of Ford Fellows. See
http://www7.nationalacademies.org/fellowships/index.html.

Jacob K. Javits Fellowships provides financial assistance to students who have demonstrated: (1) superior academic
ability and achievement; (2) exceptional promise; and (3) financial need to undertake graduate study leading to a doctoral
degree or a master's degree in which the master's degree is the terminal (highest) degree in the selected field of study.
The Department of Education awards fellowships in selected fields of study in the arts, humanities and social sciences.
Fellowships can be offered to individuals who at the time of application have not yet completed their first full year of a
doctoral or master's degree program (whichever is the terminal degree for the field of study) or are entering graduate
school for the first time in the next academic year. http://www.ed.gov/programs/jacobjavits/index.html

The Newberry Library offers the Frances C. Allen Fellowship for Women of American Indian Heritage. This fellowship is
for women of American Indian heritage working on a project appropriate to the collections of the Newberry Library.
Applicants may be working in any graduate or pre-professional field. Financial support varies according to their need and
may include travel expenses. Allen Fellows are expected to spend a significant part of their tenure (one month to one
year) in residence at Newberry's D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History. Applicants must submit a budget of
travel and research expenses. Awards will vary from $1,200 to $8,000 of approved expenses. See
http://www.newberry.org/research/felshp/fellapp.html.

School of American Research is a nonprofit center for advanced studies, contributes to the understanding of the human
condition by supporting the study and practice of anthropology and Southwest Indian arts. Two Weatherhead
Fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or
scientific in nature. The Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship is available for a Native American scholar, either pre- or post-
doctoral, working in either the humanities or the sciences. See http://www.sarweb.org/scholars/scholars.htm.

Social Sciences Research Council: International Dissertation Field Research Fellowships are available to provide 9-12
months of dissertation field research abroad in social science and humanities disciplines, especially comparative, cross-
regional, and/or cross-cultural projects that build knowledge about some part(s) of the world other than the U.S. Upon
completion of the field research, fellows will participate in multi-disciplinary workshops. Applicants may be citizens of any
country, but must have completed all Ph.D. requirements except the research component by the time the fellowship
begins. Support includes maintenance funds plus travel, normally under $15,000 per award. See www.ssrc.org.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research: The Wenner-Gren Foundation seeks to further the discipline
of anthropology. Dissertation Fieldwork Grants are awarded to individuals to aid doctoral dissertation or thesis research.
Applicants must be enrolled for a doctoral degree. Application must be made jointly with a thesis advisor or other scholar

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who will undertake responsibility for supervising the project. Awards are contingent upon the applicant's successful
completion of all requirements for the degree other than the dissertation/thesis. Applications may be submitted before
such requirements have been met; however, should an award be approved, the foundation will at that time request
evidence of that the applicant is "all-but-dissertation/ advanced-to-candidacy." Qualified students of all nationalities are
eligible. See www.wennergren.org

Woodrow Wilson Foundation: Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation is an
independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to the encouragement of excellence in education through the identification
of critical needs and the development of effective national programs to address them. Graduate student funding
opportunities can be found at <http://www.woodrow.org/students_graduate.html>.

American Indian Graduate Center: Founded in 1969 to assist American Indian college graduates who want to pursue
graduate degrees, AIGC fellowships are made to enrolled members of U.S. federally recognized Indian tribes and of
Alaska Native groups in need of financial aid. See www.aigc.com for more information.

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES
Students are encouraged to join professional societies such as the American Anthropological Association and other
organizations tailored to regional and topical interests. Most of these societies provide students with reduced membership
fees and offer scholarship opportunities to student members.

The American Anthropological Association (AAA), the primary professional society of anthropologists in the United
States since its founding in 1902, is the world's largest professional organization of individuals interested in anthropology.
The AAA provides numerous online resources for graduate students, and an extensive list of funding opportunities.
Please see <http://www.aaanet.org/students.htm>.

The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) is an international organization dedicated to the research, interpretation,
and protection of the archaeological heritage of the Americas. With more than 6,600 members, the society represents
professional, student, and vocational archaeologists working in a variety of settings including government agencies,
colleges and universities, museums, and the private sector. See www.saa.org. The SAA presents the Arthur C. Parker
Scholarship and National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships for Archaeological Training for Native Americans and
Native Hawaiians. See the SAA website for application deadlines. The Dienje Kenyon Fellowship is presented in
support of research by women students in the early stages of their archaeological training. It is presented in honor of
Dienje Kenyon and was awarded for the first time in 2000. The Student Paper Award is designed to recognize the best
student research paper presented at the Annual Meeting. All student members of SAA are eligible to participate.

The American Association of Physical Anthropologists is the world’s leading professional organization for physical
anthropologists. Formed by 83 charter members in 1930, the AAPA now has an international membership of over 1,700.
The Association’s annual meetings draw more than a thousand scientists and students from all over the world. Their
webpage provides links to several funding sources that support biological anthropology including the Leakey Foundation,
National Geographic Society, National Institutes of Health, Decade of Behavior, and Ellis R. Kerley Forensic Sciences
Foundation. The AAPA also awards several student prizes to graduate students. See http://www.pysanth.org/.

Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society - Founded in 1886, Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society is a non-profit
membership society of more than 70,000 scientists and engineers who were elected to the Society because of their
research achievements or potential. Sigma Xi has more than 500 chapters at universities and colleges, government
laboratories and industry research centers. In addition to publishing American Scientist, Sigma Xi awards grants annually
to promising young researchers. See http://www.sigmaxi.org/ for more information.

Examples of regional societies include:
The Oregon Archaeological Society offers the Roy F. Jones Memorial Scholarship. This $1500 award is made to a
student enrolled in a college or university in Oregon or Washington, to assist in funding a worthy archaeological project.
This scholarship was established in 1973 to honor the memory of a man who was an enthusiastic supporter of
archaeology. The deadline is usually in February. See http://www.oregonarchaeological.org for more information.

The Association for Oregon Archaeologists accepts proposals for funding archaeological research in Oregon. Grants
will provide funds for technical analyses necessary for ongoing research in the state. The total amount of this award is
$500. Proposals may target all or part of this amount. The application deadline is usually in February, and announcement
of the winner usually takes place at the Northwest Anthropological Conference in March.

While this list is not comprehensive, it does provide a good sampling of the types of professional organizations that support
graduate students in anthropology.

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INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Students who require tutoring or additional coursework in written or oral English skills may wish to contact the American
English Institute (107 Pacific, 6-3945), the English Department at the UO (118 PLC, 6-3911), or Lane Community College
Downtown Center (1059 Willamette Street, 747-4501).

International Education and Exchange
The Office of International Education and Exchange, located in 330 Oregon Hall (6-3206), offers a variety of services to
new and returning students. The office provides information about admissions, housing, U.S. immigration regulations,
employment opportunities, and scholarships. International Education and Exchange also offers academic and personal
counseling, helps students adjust to life in the U.S., and coordinates the Friendship Family program that introduces foreign
students to local families. The Office of International Education and Exchange produces a publication, Resource Guide for
Foreign Students and Families full of valuable information for foreign students. Contact their office if you have not yet
received a copy. Please see http://oip.uoregon.edu/iss/index.php for information from the Office of International Programs.

SPEAK Test for International Students
Nonnative speakers of English who accept graduate teaching fellowships for teaching-related positions must submit a
score for the Test of Spoken English (TSE) or the SPEAK test to the Graduate School. Individuals scoring below 50 on
either of these tests will be required to attend language support classes (at no additional charge to the student) and may
be subject to limitations on the kinds of activities they may carry out as GTFs. The TSE is available at many TOEFL
testing sites. If a TSE score is not submitted to the Graduate School in advance of arrival on campus, the student must
take the SPEAK test at the University of Oregon prior to the first term of appointment. The cost of the SPEAK test is
$35.00. This cost is refunded to students who have GTF appointments during the term they take the SPEAK Test. More
information about this test can be found at http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/?page=intlGTFLangRequirement. The results of
this test will be considered in the student’s application, if the exam is taken before a GTF decision is made.

International Cultural Service Program (ICSP)
International students demonstrating financial need and exceptional merit are encouraged to apply to participate in the
University of Oregon’s International Cultural Service Program (ICSP). Students selected to participate in ICSP receive a
partial tuition waiver of $6,000-$18,000 per academic year (prorated per term). In very exceptional cases, supplemental
awards may be given which cover the full cost of non-resident tuition. Fees are not covered by ICSP include non-
instructional, departmental, and resource fees. As a participant in the program, ICSP students agree to complete 80 hours
per year of cultural service. This service takes the form of speaking about your country, culture and traditions, to school
classes and community groups.

The $6,000 scholarship assistance offered by this program is a partial scholarship. You are responsible for covering the
remaining tuition, fees and living expenses with funds from other sources. Scholarships from ICSP reduce tuition, but
cannot be converted to assist with living expenses. ICSP scholarships are for the completion of one degree objective
only.

Selection for ICSP awards is extremely competitive. The ICSP Selection Committee annually reviews around 100
applications. Demonstrated financial need is an important criterion for the program. Applicants should provide as much
information as possible about their financial status. Financial statements submitted to the Office of Admissions will be
compared with the information provided in this application. Please explain any changes in your financial circumstances
that may have occurred since applying for admission to the University of Oregon.

Applications must be received on or before February 15, 2008. Students selected will begin the program the following fall
term.

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES
Libraries and Learning Services

Knight Library
The Knight Library, considered the main branch of the University of Oregon Library System, has a collection of
anthropology journals and books, including books and publications that professors may place on reserve in the Reserve
Book Room. The UO library catalog system, known as “JANUS” is on line, and can be accessed from any terminal on
campus. To browse the library system on the Internet, the address is http://libweb.uoregon.edu/. Janus is used to find
books, periodicals, etc., owned by the UO Library. If a publication is unavailable in the UO Library, check to see if it is in
one of the Summit-Cascade (formerly Orbis) libraries. Books available in Summit libraries can be sent to the University of
Oregon quickly and are available for short-term loans. If not available through Summit, the interlibrary loan service can
help to locate it through other libraries. An exceedingly helpful online research tool is Anthropological Literature, an index
available through the index menu on the Janus homepage. This can be used to search for journal articles by author, title,

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keyword, etc. We will meet with the Anthropology Subject Specialist of the Knight Library early in the term to help you find
library resources you will need in your coursework and research.

Science Library
The Science Library forms another branch and is located in the Science Complex. This library contains science reference
manuals, books, and periodicals. Archaeology and biological anthropology students will find themselves using both the
Knight and Science libraries.

Architecture and Allied Arts Library
This is another library branch, but located in Lawrence Hall. It contains 80,000 books and other materials on architecture,
interior architecture, landscape architecture, arts and administration, art history, fine and applied arts, historic preservation,
and urban planning. The Visual Resource Collection, also in Lawrence Hall, is a part of the AAA Library. The VRC has an
extensive collection of art and architecture-related slides and mounted illustrations used on campus for instructional
purposes.

A note regarding "Waiving Confidentiality" -- Waiving this right means that if someone requests a particular book you
have checked out, that person may contact you to determine when the book will be available. In many cases, the person
who contacts you will be a colleague. Waiving your right to confidentiality will help you and your peers trace materials
currently on loan from the library.

Academic Learning Services (ALS)
The ALS Center is located in Room 64 PLC, x63226. ALS provides assistance to students in a variety of ways: academic
courses (Introduction to University Studies and College Reading Skills), research skills, speed-reading, writing and math
workshops, and general study skills.

Bookstores and Copy Services near Campus

University Bookstore –“The Duck Store” The bookstore is located at the corner of 13th Avenue and Kincaid Street.
Textbooks may be purchased on the second floor. Besides textbooks, the Bookstore offers a large collection of novels,
paperbacks, and children’s books. The Bookstore offers a discount of 10% on all books to staff and students. Take your
student ID. On the ground floor, the Bookstore sells stationery, greeting cards, UO souvenirs, magazines, snack foods,
and electronic equipment. A wide selection of school and art supplies are sold in the basement of the Bookstore.

Smith Family Bookstore – Located on the corner of 13th Ave. and Hilyard, this bookstore offers a wide range of new and
                                                                                            th
used books, including large quantities of used textbooks. The Copy Shop, also located on 13 Ave, provides inexpensive
                                           th
copying services. Kinko’s is located at 13 Ave. and Willamette Street.

HOUSING

University Housing--Information on University Housing, both residence halls and family housing, is available from The
Housing Department, Walton Hall, 6-4277. See http://housing.uoregon.edu/.

Off-Campus Housing -- The EMU maintains a free rent referral service and paralegal counseling for landlord-tenant
problems. Information on rentals and “roommates wanted’’ notices are posted on bulletin boards outside Suite 3 of the
EMU.

Student Financial Aid/Employment

Contact the Financial Aid Office (260 Oregon Hall, 6-3221) for information on scholarships, grants, short-term and long-
term loans, and employment. Financial aid counselors are available on a drop-in basis and by appointment. Current
information is also available at http://financialaid.uoregon.edu/.

Information on employment opportunities (on and off campus) is available through the Career Center in Hendricks Hall.
See the receptionist first in room 220, call 6-3235 or visit their site on line at http://uocareer.uoregon.edu/. You may go
directly to any department to find out if there are openings. However, some only hire exclusively through the Career
Center and for those that hire walk-ins on occasion, stopping by just prior to any given term is recommended.

For archaeologists, the Oregon State Museum of Anthropology sometimes has part-time positions for field and lab
workers during the school year, and full-time temporary work in the summer. OSMA is a separate and self-supporting
section of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and conducts archaeological research under
contract with state agencies and a few large corporations, in compliance with federal and state cultural resource protection
laws, as well as through grants and other awards. The museum presently handles work for the Oregon Department of
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Transportation highway projects, and other large development projects. A huge amount of research on Oregon prehistory
is represented by these endeavors. ANTH 549 (Cultural Resource Management) provides excellent background for
working at OSMA.

ERB Memorial Union (EMU)
The EMU provides services and facilities to enhance the extracurricular life of UO students. The EMU provides meeting
rooms, a recreation center, lounges, and food services. Located in the EMU are the Oregon Daily Emerald (campus
newspaper), Photo I.D., the Campus Copy Center, a ticket outlet, University lost and found, and a microcomputer
laboratory. You may pay Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) and Northwest Natural Gas bills at the Ticket Office.
Information on bus service (Lane Transit District) is available at the Transportation Resource Center at the North entrance
of the EMU and is also easily available by calling 687-5555.

Also housed in the EMU are:

    1. Child Care Center (346-4384)

    2. Club Sports and Recreation Center (346-3733) The Club Sports Program has teams in soccer, rugby, lacrosse,
    karate, fencing, water polo, table tennis, volleyball, skiing, crew, badminton, sailing, bicycling, bowling, equestrian
    riding, baseball, archery, sky diving, and ultimate Frisbee. The Recreation Center facilities provide billiards, video, and
    table games.

    3. The Craft Center (6-4361) has facilities for work in jewelry, woodworking, ceramics, graphics, fiber crafts and
    photography, as well as other crafts.

    4. The Cultural Forum (6-4373) provides campus-wide entertainment such as films, concerts, arts exhibits, and
    lectures.

    5. The Outdoor Program (6-4365) offers activities such as camping, hiking, mountaineering, ski touring, kayaking, river
    rafting, and bicycle touring.

    6. The A.S.U.O. or Associated Students of the University of Oregon (6-3724) is the recognized representative
    organization of students at the university. Its network of agencies, activities, and programs serves student needs and
    interests. The ASUO gives students the opportunity to plan and direct their own programs, to become involved in
    every aspect of student life, and to influence the decisions that affect the quality of education and student life at the
    university. Students who pay incidental fees are members of the ASUO.

Health Insurance
All students are encouraged to purchase health insurance coverage. Student health insurance is available through the
Student Health Center (see next section). International students are automatically billed for this insurance, unless they
have submitted a waiver verifying adequate coverage of their own. Students awarded a GTF obtain insurance through
their union. The office for the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation is off campus (but close by) at 870 East 13th
Avenue, and their number is 344-0832.

GTFF Health Plan
Regardless of whether you choose to be a full member of the GTFF union or not, when you are awarded a GTF, you are
eligible for health benefits through the GTFF health plan. In order to receive your benefits you'll need to go into the
                                                               th
Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation office at 870 East 13 Street and fill out some basic paperwork. If you need
additional information about the GTFF, visit them at gtff.net. If you have any questions regarding GTF benefits, please
contact Lisa Hamilton, GTFF benefits coordinator, 344-0832, gtffben@efn.org.

Medical
You have a $200 deductible on this plan for medical services. This means you pay the first $200 of all prescriptions and
medical services before your benefits begin. After you have met the $200 deductible, ODS will cover your medical
expenses at 90% if you use Preferred Providers and at 70% if you use non-Preferred Providers (for a book of medical
Preferred Providers please stop by the GTFF office). Women are entitled to one gynecological exam each year exempt
from the deductible, with a $15 co-payment. Prescriptions will be reimbursed at 70%. However, for prescriptions, you
are required to pay up-front and submit reimbursement forms (also available at the GTFF office) to receive your 70% for all
prescriptions.

Dental
You have a $25 deductible on this plan for dental services. After that, you will be covered at 80% for most minor dental
needs. There is no major dental coverage on this plan. You are entitled to one free cleaning and one free oral exam
                                                              33
every six months. Be sure that your dentist accepts ODS before receiving services, as there is no Preferred Provider list
for dentists (99% of dentists in our area accept this insurance). If you are outside of Oregon you will receive full benefits
by using a Delta Dental Provider. There is a $1,000 yearly maximum for dental benefits.

Vision
There is no deductible for vision benefits. You are entitled to one free vision exam each year, and 40% towards frames
and lenses, or the equivalent towards contacts up to a $200 maximum. In order to receive the free exam you must use a
provider from the OSO list available at the GTFF office. Your glasses, frames, or contacts can be purchased from any
licensed ophthalmologist, optician or optometrist.

Important Addresses and Phone Numbers

        ODS Health Plans (For reimbursements)
        P.O. Box 40384
        Portland, OR 97204
        1-800-852-5195

        Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation
                 th
        870 E. 13 Ave
        Eugene, OR 97401
        541-342-0832
        Lisa Hamilton

        GTFF Benefits Coordinator
        541-344-0832
        gtffben@efn.org

Health Services

Medical Emergencies
In the case of an on-campus emergency, call 6-6666 for help. Ambulance is 911. Be sure to state your actual location on
campus; a street address is best.

Student Health Center
The Student Health Center (6-4441) is located on the corner of 13th and Agate Streets (across from Oregon Hall). All
currently registered University of Oregon students are eligible to use the Student Health Center, whether they have
insurance or not. There is a $6.00 fee for visits to Health Center staff physicians, the dentist, nurse practitioners, and
mental health care workers.

Hospitals
The hospitals in the Eugene/Springfield area are:
   Sacred Heart Medical Center at River Bend, 3333 RiverBend Drive, Springfield                      222-7300
   Sacred Heart Medical Center University District, 1255 Hilyard, Eugene                             686-7300
   McKenzie-Willamette Hospital, 1460 G St., Springfield                                             726-4400

Counseling Center/Testing Office
Located on the second floor of the Student Health Center, the Counseling Center provides trained counselors to assist
students with personal problems. The Testing Office, housed also on the second floor, coordinates most of the national
testing programs such as the School Aptitude Test (SAT), the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL), and the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).

Other Services
Additional services available at low cost to students, for which you can be billed, are:
   Women’s clinic services
   X-rays
   Medical laboratory testing
   Allergy consultation
   Sports medicine
   Physical therapy
   Nutritional counseling
   Pharmacy (prescription and over-the-counter drugs)
   Dental services
                                                              34
    Alcohol and drug dependency counseling

NON-MEDICAL SERVICES

Academic Advising and Student Services (164 Oregon Hall, 346-3211)

Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (474 Oregon Hall, 346-4215)

The Crisis Hotline (346-4488) is a 24-hour telephone emergency service for personal and emotional problems. Crisis
Center staff provides emergency counseling at times when other University facilities are unavailable.

The Office of Public Safety (1319 East 15th, 346-5444) handles emergencies regarding security (including keys/locks),
safety and environmental health.

Student Conduct Code
The University operates under a student conduct program designed to protect the health, safety, and well being of
everyone within the University community and, at the same time, to protect the educational objectives of the university. All
university students are expected to abide by the UO Code of Student Conduct.

A summary of the Code of Student Conduct appears in the Schedule of Classes. More information regarding it can be
found at http://studentlife.uoregon.edu/judicial/conduct/code.htm.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Every student should read these helpful web pages which provide clear and explicit
definitions and examples of what is and is not plagiarism: Plagiarism Guide for Students
http://libweb.uoregon.edu/guides/plagiarism/students/
Plagiarism Guide for Instructors http://libweb.uoregon.edu/guides/plagiarism/faculty/

TRANSPORTATION/ESCORTS

Lane Transit District
Because parking spaces near the UO are often difficult to find, many students choose to ride the bus or bicycle to campus.
Bus schedules, are available from the Transportation Resource Center in the EMU, the UO Bookstore Customer Service
Desk (first floor, rear), and the Downtown Lane Transit District Information Center (687-5555). Note: Your UO student ID
is a bus pass, and it allows you to ride LTD anytime, anywhere for free. Your fare for the term is included in your student
incidental fees. This service is provided in cooperation with the ASUO.

Bicycling
If you decide to ride a bike, you will need raingear for the winter months, bicycle fenders, and a lock. You may also be able
to rent one of the bike lockers located between Oregon Hall and Deschutes Hall (though availability is typically limited).
Contact the Office of Public Safety (6-5444) for other bike storage options. All bicycles on campus must be registered with
the Office of Public Safety (Straub Hall). Bicycle registration permits are free of charge. The Office of Public Safety has a
web site at http://safetyweb.uoregon.edu/.

Project Safe Ride
Project Safe Ride is a sexual-assault prevention shuttle service provided by the ASUO Women's Center free of charge to
women and men on campus and surrounding areas. It is a safe alternative to walking alone at night and risking assault.
Safe Ride operates 7 days a week, when school is in session. For hours of operation and shuttle boundaries visit Safe
Ride’s website http://gladstone.uoregon.edu/~saferide/ or call 6-0653.

Safety Escorts
If a member of the University community (either man or woman) feels threatened or unsafe walking to his or her dorm
room or office, the Office of Public Safety offers on-campus escorts during the evening hours. This service is provided
based on the availability of on-duty Public Safety personnel and if alternatives are unavailable for the campus member.

Climate
Eugene has a mild climate with frequent rainfall. Normal annual rainfall is 42.56 inches. Small amounts of occasional
snow may be expected between November and February. In the summer, Eugene experiences many sunny days with
cool nights. Precipitation is usually infrequent and humidity is low to moderate. Temperature extremes for the area range
from -10o F to 109o F. Students should plan to bring warm clothing and raingear for the winter months.



                                                             35
BANKS AND CREDIT UNIONS

Banks located near campus include:

   1. U.S. Bank, Campus Branch, 810 E. 13th, 465-4281
    2. Oregon Community Credit Union is located at the corner of 11th and Ferry Streets (687-2347) (among other
    branches, including one in The Duck Store). Membership is open to all students and alumni of the UO residing in
    Lane County (students currently enrolled and past students of the University), UO employees, Oregon state
    employees, SAIF, The Duck Store employees, and family members of all those listed above. U-Lane-O offers a
    variety of services, including a draft share account which earns monthly interest, free traveler’s checks, 24-hour
    automatic teller machines, check guarantee cards, safety deposit boxes and automobile buying services.

Child Care
For University-affiliated childcare information, go to the U.O. Work and Family Services Web Site at
http://housing.uoregon.edu/apartments/childcare.php. Once there you may link to the various center sites. If you have
trouble linking to the EMU Child Care and Development Centers you may open their site directly at
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~ccdc. Phone numbers for the respective programs are as follows:

      EMU Child Care and Development Centers (children 15 months to 6 yrs), 346-4384
      Co-op Family Center/Spencer View (children 8 wks to 10 yrs), 346-7400
      Vivian Olum Child Development Center (children 6 wks to 11 yrs), 346-6586
      U.O. Parent and Baby Co-op (children 6 wks to 1 yr), 346-2962

Physical Activity and Recreation Services (PARS)
The three divisions of PARS are Physical Education, Recreational Sports, and Facilities Services. To find out more about
program specifics go to the web site at http://perec.uoregon.edu/or visit the Recreation and Fitness Center main desk at
15th and University. Their phone number is 346-4183.

Museums
    University of Oregon Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art adjacent to UO Library, 6-3027)
    University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History (1680 East 15th Avenue, 346-3024
    Lane County Historical Museum (740 West 13th Avenue, 682-4239)
    The Science Factory is located at 2300 Leo Harris Pkwy, 682-7888. See http://www.sciencefactory.org/.
    Lane Education Service District Planetarium (Oregon Museum Park, 2300 Leo Harris Pkwy, 461-8227 or 687-
             7827)

Music, Theater, and Sports
Below is a list of local theaters, performance groups and ticket outlets. For information on scheduled events, call the
number listed in parentheses. Be sure to ask if a student discount on tickets is available.
     Beall Concert Hall -- U.O. (6-5678)
     Casanova Athletic Center (6-4461)
     EMU Ticket Office (6-4363)
     Eugene Ballet (485-3992)
     Eugene Opera (485-3985)
     Eugene Symphony (687-9487)
     Hult Center for the Performing Arts (682-5000)
     John D. Shedd Institute for the Arts (687-6526)
     Mainstage Theatre Co. (683-4368)
     Oregon Festival of American Music (see http://www.ofam.net/)
     Oregon Mozart Players (345-6648)
     University Theater (346-4191)
     Very Little Theater (344-7751)

The following outlets handle ticket sales for area concerts and events: GI Joe’s (1030 Green Acres Road, 343-1669) and
FASTIXX at Fred Meyer in Eugene, 1-800-992-8499. Eugene Weekly, a guide to local arts, entertainment, and events, is
published weekly (new issues are available every Thursday) and provides details on local amusements and activities.
Free copies are available in stands around campus, outside the UO Bookstore, at the EMU, and at local businesses.

FIRST YEAR SURVIVAL GUIDE

Department Protocols
                                                             36
Support Staff. Our Anthropology Department Support Staff, Brenda Dutton, Leah Frazier, Betina Lynn, and various work
study students are valued employees with a tremendous amount of knowledge and expertise. Be kind and courteous to
them at all times, and respect their work spaces. Their desktops and desk drawers are private spaces; they are not
“open to the public.” Good advice comes from Robert L Peter’s 1992 book, Getting What You Came For: the Smart
Student’s Guide to Earning Master’s or a Ph.D. (Noonday Press, NY): “One of the most common mistakes of both grad
student and professors is to treat secretaries and support staff with condescension. Considerations of human decency
aside, this is really stupid because these people can either make life easy for you or not. If they choose to make your life
hell, the chances are you won’t even know it.” While none of our support staff will “make your life hell,” they are both
knowledgeable and powerful, and it is in your best interest to show them respect and courtesy at all times.

Use of Office Space, Equipment, Supplies. The Department of Anthropology provides office space in Condon Hall
(Rooms 365ABCD and 366ABCD and other rooms as available) for GTFs holding teaching assignments to hold office
hours for the number of hours required by their appointments. GTFs may use the telephone in the Grad Lounge (Room
365) for local calls and for purposes directly related to their GTFs teaching duties. Upon approval of their supervising
course instructor, GTFs may use the Department office copy machine to copy course materials that have been explicitly
approved by the course instructor, up to a limit of 50 pages per job or 100 pages per week. Larger copy jobs must be sent
to the Campus Copy office in advance, and must be pre-approved by the office manager. GTFs are not permitted to
charge copy orders without this permission. Departmental printers may be used when directly related to GTF teaching
duties. Printing out emailed student papers, printing from the internet, etc., should be kept to a minimum. If student
papers are submitted online, they can be reviewed on computer screens and comments made electronically. For those
documents that must be printed, double sided printing is required.

Unfortunately, the Department of Anthropology does not control sufficient space or resources to provide all graduate
students with individual offices and unlimited printing. Therefore office space and printing resources must be limited to
those relating to GTF positions and responsibilities. Sometimes, shared space can be made available through a student’s
advisor. The phones, office space, copy machines, FAX machine, and printers are not for the personal or unauthorized
use by graduate students. Printing articles from the internet, printing course materials and papers, printing manuscripts,
theses or dissertations, etc., are personal expenses that the Department cannot afford. Printing can be done at the Knight
Library, EMU, and other facilities on and off campus.

If a graduate student is working on a faculty grant or their own research grant which provides administrative support to the
Department, then printing can be done under the aegis of the grant. Leah Frazier should be informed of the incurred costs
so she can make the appropriate fund transfers.

Graduate students can use Department stationery and mailing supplies for academic business. Out-going mailing
services, however, are not provided to graduate students. The Department provides office supplies for GTF offices, but
not for work at home. The slide projector, VCR, overhead projector, laptop computer, computer projector, etc., are for
teaching purposes and use must be scheduled in advance. Betina Lynn is knowledgeable about all sign-out procedures.
Films and slides used in teaching must also be signed out. Dissertations and Master’s papers on file in the Department
can be borrowed for short-term use in Condon Hall only, again, by checking out. See Betina Lynn for any questions.

Attendance. This hopefully will seem like common sense to all of you: it is expected that graduate students attend each
and every class of each course in which they are enrolled. GTFs attend each and every class of the course for which they
teach. If a class must be missed due to a communicable illness or other serious matter, inform your instructor as soon as
possible prior to the beginning of class. Students should expect to make up missed class time in some way as negotiated
with their instructor.

Departmental Petitions. A number of requirements are fulfilled by graduate students designing course packages that
must be approved by the Graduate Committee. For example, graduate students of archaeology are required to complete
one skill at the Master’s level and another for the Ph.D., both of which must be approved by petition. Students of biological
anthropology have to complete statistics at the Master’s level (for which no petition is needed), but must complete a
second skill at the Ph.D. level, for which a petition is needed. Students of cultural anthropology at the Ph.D. level must
fulfill a language requirement (for which no petition is needed) or a cognate field requirement, for which a petition is
required. A petition is a memo addressed to the Graduate Committee that describes the package of courses being used
to fulfill the requirement and justifies how these are suited to meet the student’s training needs. This memo is written by
the student, but its contents are discussed in detail with the student’s advisor beforehand. The advisor must endorse the
plan by signing the student’s memo, or supporting it with a memo of his/her own. A sample petition follows on the next
page:




                                                             37
Sample Petition


                     UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
                     Department of Anthropology



                                                                                                                   June 6, 2008

To: Dr. Larry Sugiyama, Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Committee
From: Heather Ulrich, Masters Student in Anthropology
Subject: Petition for Ancillary Skill

         I am submitting this petition for my ancillary skill set. I chose my ancillary skill within the Department of Geography
that includes courses in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The courses I propose include:

        GEOG 516: Intro to GIS, completed Fall 2007
        GEOG 511: Advanced Cartography, completed Winter 2008
        GEOG 601: Research (Advanced GIS as independent study), proposed Fall 2008)

         As a student archaeologist with a Student Career Experience Program (SCEP) position within the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM), my studies in archaeology are partially based in Cultural Resource Management (CRM). Skills in GIS
are necessary to be successful in my future career as an archaeologist within a government agency. There are numerous
aspects of my position with the BLM that will necessitate the use of GIS. The districts site forms and survey reports that I
work with are in dire need of updating into a database. The BLM has a statewide database that maintains all of the site
information and survey report information in a GIS format. During the Summer of 2008 I will receive training in the use of
this database. I have made arrangements with Nick Kohler in the Geography Department to do an independent study
course under his supervision during Fall 2008. I will be entering all of the digital site and survey data into the GIS database
along with all of the accompanying metadata.
         I believe that the GEOG 601 Research course will be more valuable than the standard Advanced GIS course as it
allows me to take the course when my class schedule allows, as well as I will be working on a project that will directly
benefit my skill set needed for my future career as an archaeologist with the BLM.
         I hope that these proposed courses will meet the Anthropology Department’s requirements for an ancillary skill set.
I ask for the graduate committee’s approval of this petition. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.




                                                               38
The Relationship between Graduate Students and Faculty

The following guidelines are excerpted from the Graduate School’s Guidelines For Good Practice
In Graduate Education. Please see http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/guidelines.html - Footnote1
http://gradschool.uoregon.edu/guidelines.html for the full text of these guidelines.

A main purpose of graduate education at the University of Oregon is to instill in each student an understanding of and
capacity for scholarship, independent judgment, academic rigor, and intellectual honesty. It is essential that graduate
students:

    ○ take primary responsibility to inform themselves of regulations and policies governing their graduate studies.

    ○ conduct themselves in a mature, professional, and civil manner in all interactions with faculty and staff.

    ○ recognize that the faculty advisor provides the intellectual and instructional environment in which the student
      conducts research, and may, through access to teaching and research funds, also provide the student with financial
      support.

    ○ recognize that faculty have broad discretion to allocate their own time and other resources in ways which are
      academically productive.

    ○ recognize that the faculty advisor is responsible for monitoring the accuracy, validity, and integrity of the student's
      research. Careful, well-conceived research reflects favorably on the student, the faculty advisor, and the University.

    ○ exercise the highest integrity in taking examinations and in collecting, analyzing, and presenting research data.

    ○ acknowledge the contributions of the faculty advisor and other members of the research team to the student's work
    in all publications and conference presentations.

    ○ maintain the confidentiality of the faculty advisor's professional activities and research prior to presentation or
      publication, in accordance with existing practices and policies of the discipline.

It is also imperative that faculty:

    ○ familiarize themselves with policies that affect their graduate students.

    ○ interact with students in a professional and civil manner in accordance with University policies governing
      nondiscrimination and sexual harassment.

    ○ impartially evaluate student performance regardless of religion, race, gender, sexual orientation, or national origin of
      the graduate student candidate.

    ○ prevent personal rivalries with colleagues from interfering with their duties as graduate advisors, committee
      members, or colleagues.

    ○ excuse themselves from serving on graduate committees when there is an amorous, familial, or other relationship
      between the faculty member and the student that could result in a conflict of interest. See University Policy on
      Sexual Harassment – Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual or Romantic Relationships with
      Students in Appendix.

    ○ acknowledge student contributions to research presented at conferences, in professional publications, or in
      applications for copyrights and patents.

    ○ not impede a graduate student's progress toward the degree in order to benefit from the student's proficiency as a
      teaching or research assistant.

    ○ create in the classroom, lab, or studio supervisory relations with students that stimulate and encourage students to
      learn creatively and independently.

    ○ have a clear understanding with graduate students about their specific research responsibilities, including time lines
      for completion of research and the thesis or dissertation.

                                                               39
    ○ provide verbal or written comments and evaluation of student's work in a timely manner.

    ○ discuss laboratory, studio, or departmental authorship policy with graduate students in advance of entering into
      collaborative projects.

    ○ refrain from requesting students to do personal work without appropriate compensation.
Graduate education is structured around the transmission of knowledge at the highest level. In many cases, graduate
students depend on faculty advisors to assist them in identifying and gaining access to financial and/or intellectual
resources which support their graduate programs. It is important that graduate students:

    ○ devote an appropriate amount of time and energy toward achieving academic excellence and earning the advanced
      degree.

    ○ be aware of time constraints and other demands imposed on faculty members and program staff.

    ○ take the initiative in asking questions that promote understanding of the academic subjects and advance the field.

    ○ communicate regularly with faculty advisors, especially in matters related to research and progress within the
      graduate program.

In turn, faculty advisors should:

    ○ provide clear maps of the requirement each student must meet.

    ○ evaluate student progress and performance in regular and informative ways.

    ○ help students develop interpretive, writing, verbal, and quantitative skills, when appropriate, in accordance with the
      expectations of the discipline.

    ○ assist graduate students to develop grant writing skills, where appropriate.

    ○ when appropriate, encourage graduate students to participate in professional meetings or perform or display their
      work in public settings.

    ○ stimulate in each graduate student an appreciation of teaching.

    ○ create an ethos of collegiality so that learning takes place within a community of scholars.

    ○ prepare students to be competitive for employment which includes portraying a realistic view of the field and the
      market at any given time and making use of professional contacts for the benefit of their students, as appropriate.

On a day-to-day basis, these guidelines should help you get the most out of your relationship with your advisor:

    ○ Meet regularly.

    ○ Prepare for each meeting with your advisor with a list of topics to discuss and idea of what you want to get out of the
      meeting. If your advisor gives you things to do, DO THEM by a mutually agreed upon deadline.

    ○ Some advisors like you to send them an email that provides a brief summary after every meeting. This might
      include a “To Do List” for yourself, a “To Do List” for your advisor, a statement about what you agreed upon, or a
      reconsideration of advice you might NOT follow. Ask your advisor if they would like to receive these kinds of emails.
      This practice can minimize misunderstandings and can help you build a good record of your progress.

    ○ If you need a letter of reference from your advisor (or another faculty member), provide them 2-3 weeks warning and
      make sure that they have all the background materials they need to write you a strong letter. Do not, however,
      assume that a faculty member can write a letter for you (see “Asking for Reference Letters” in the Professional
      Development section of this handbook). Letters of reference take much more time than you might think; please be
      appreciative of the faculty member’s effort.

    ○ Share the results of your research with your advisor to get feedback as soon as possible.



                                                             40
    ○ Communicate clearly. If you disagree with your advisor, state your concerns clearly and calmly. If you feel
      something about your relationship is not working well, discuss it with him or her. Avoid complaining about your
      advisor to everyone BUT the advisor him/herself.

    ○ Take the Initiative. You don’t need to discuss every activity with your advisor. S/he has a tremendous amount of
      work to do. Be responsible for your own research ideas and progress.

    ○ Respect your advisor’s time and other commitments. Faculty members are under enormous time pressure. Do not
      take advantage of your advisor’s good will by wasting his or her time.

Finally, do not become overly dependent on your advisor. Master’s students will need a faculty member, in addition to their
advisor, to read and review their master’s papers. If you intend to work on a Ph.D., remember that you will generally need
three faculty members on your committee. In fact, to transition to the Ph.D. program, you will need to submit a formal
application with signatures from at least three Anthropology faculty members who are willing to serve on your committee.
Take courses from as many faculty in your subfield and outside your subfield as possible. Get to know the talents and
strengths of various faculty members. Generally, faculty members will not agree to serve on your committee if they
haven’t had you as a student in one of their courses and if they don’t know you. Through your classroom performance
(both as a student and as a GTF) demonstrate the merit of your ideas and your work ethic to faculty. When it becomes
time for you to transition to the Ph.D. program, you will then know who among the faculty has research interests most
congruent with your own; who will be willing to serve on your Ph.D. committee. You will need faculty advocates for every
position or grant you apply for. Cultivate the good will of faculty by working hard, communicating effectively, and treating
everyone collegially.

Staying Motivated
(adapted from Marie des Jardins) (http://www.cs.indiana.edu/how.2b/how.2b.html)
At times, it can be very hard to maintain a positive attitude and stay motivated. Many graduate students suffer from
insecurity, anxiety, and even boredom. First of all, realize that these are normal feelings. Try to find a sympathetic ear --
another graduate student, your advisor, or a friend outside of school. Next, try to identify why you're having trouble and
identify concrete steps that you can take to improve the situation. To stay focused and motivated, it often helps to have
organized activities to force you to manage your time well. Setting up regular meetings with your advisor, attending
seminars, or even extracurricular activities such as sports or music can help you to maintain a regular schedule.

Be realistic about what you can accomplish, and try to concentrate on giving yourself positive feedback for tasks you do
complete, instead of negative feedback for those you don't. Setting daily, weekly, and monthly goals is a good idea, and
works even better if you use a ``buddy system'' where you and another student meet at regular intervals to review your
progress. Try to find people to work with: doing research is much easier if you have someone to bounce ideas off of and to
give you feedback.

Breaking down any project into smaller pieces is always a good tactic when things seem unmanageable. Establish good
working relationships with your advisor and fellow students.

The divide-and-conquer strategy works on a day-to-day level as well. Instead of writing an entire Master’s paper or thesis,
focus on the goal of writing a chapter, section, or outline. Instead of implementing a large system, break off pieces and
implement one module at a time. Identify tasks that you can do in an hour or less; then you can come up with a realistic
daily schedule. If you have doubts, don't let them stop you from accomplishing something -- take it one day at a time.
Remember, every task you complete gets you closer to finishing.

Finding a balance between work, play, and other activities isn't easy. Different people will give you very different advice.
Some people say you should be spending eighty or ninety percent of your waking hours working on your research. Others
think that this is unrealistic and unhealthy, and that it's important for your mental and physical health to have other active
interests.

If you have a family, you will have to balance your priorities even more carefully. Graduate school isn't worth risking your
personal relationships over; be sure that you save time and energy to focus on the people who matter to you.

One of the keys to balancing your life is to develop a schedule that's more or less consistent. Many graduate students hit
the doldrums around the end of the second year, when they're finishing up their coursework and trying to finish their
Master’s paper. This process will inevitably take more time than you think. Try to find useful, enjoyable activities that can
take your mind off of your project, at least for a little while.




                                                              41
In the final push to finish your Master’s paper or dissertation, though, you will have less time for social activities than you
used to. Your friends may start to make you feel guilty, whether they intend to or not. Warn them in advance that you
expect to turn down invitations, and it's nothing personal -- but you need to focus on your work.

Professional Development

Letters of Recommendation, by Aletta Biersack

    1. Cultivate endorsements

    2. Choose carefully. Make sure that the recommender can vouch credibly for what you need to have vouched for.
      Choose in light of particular applications.

    3. Some excellent advice from The Academic Job Search Handbook by Mary Morris Heiberger and Julia Miller Vick:

Ask for letters as much in advance as possible. Faculty members receive many requests for them. Phrase your request in
such a way that if someone does not feel comfortable writing for you, he or she can gracefully decline. A tactful approach
might be, “I’d appreciate a recommendation from you if you feel you know my work well enough to recommend me.” If
there is someone who must serve as a recommender, such as an advisor, about whose opinion of your work you are in
doubt, you may want to ask that person to discuss with you frankly the types of institutions for which be or she can
enthusiastically support your candidacy. Discuss your plans with those who agree to write for you. Recommendations are
most effective when they describe you as well-suited to a particular goal. If appropriate, remind the person who will
recommend you of your work and experience. Provide him or her with your vita, a copy of a paper you wrote, a dissertation
chapter, a statement of your research goals, or anything else that would be helpful.

Of this checklist, the vita is the most important. DEFINITELY, IF YOU ARE RESPONDING TO AN AD OF ANY TYPE,
PROVIDE THE RECOMMENDER WITH THE AD, so that s/he can write the recommendation with the job specifications in
mind. You may want to give the recommender a copy of your cover letter as well.

Letters of Reference
Madonna Moss, with thanks to Professors Kristen Luker and Margaret Conkey for these guidelines.

Letters of reference are one of the most important parts of job applications, research proposals, and grant applications.
They can highlight your strengths, explain your weaknesses, and give a sense of you as a living, breathing human being.
In order to get the most from a letter of reference, experience has shown the following hints to be useful.

First, choose faculty whom you know, and who know you. Unless I know a student well, I urge her/him to find someone
else to write a letter. If I haven’t had you in class, it's hard to write anything other than a lukewarm letter. If I suggest that
you find someone else, please do not take this personally. It is my attempt to help you get the kind of strong letter which
will get you the job or grant for which you are applying.

Second, give all faculty the tools we need to write a strong letter. Include:
     a) your vita or resumé
     b) your personal statement tailored to the award, job ad, etc.
     c) any and all forms we need to complete

Make sure your packet of information is readable, neatly typed, and well organized. Professors like me who write you
letters care about the outcome of your application; let us know the outcome of your application. Writing a letter takes a
significant block of time, and show appreciation to the faculty member who supports you in this way.

The Curriculum Vitae, by Aletta Biersack

This means “course of life.” It is a basic document, something that you can circulate when applying for a job, submitting a
book proposal to a publisher, applying for funding of any kind, or simply introducing yourself to someone who does not
know you but who wants to know all about you as a professional. The kind of vita that would cover all of these occasions
includes information on:

      Education appointments
      Work experience (usually refers to nonacademic experience; you may find it useful to indicate what your job
       description was)
      Publications
      Works in progress
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      Grants and honors
      Professional papers
      Courses given
      Courses you are prepared to teach but have not yet taught
      Research interests
      Special skills (languages, computers, etc., anything that bears upon your competence as a researcher)

It should begin with your address and telephone number, minimally. You may want to give more personal particulars such
as age, place of birth, whether you are married, whether you have children, your “race,” etc.

Vitas are not fixed documents. They grow (lengthen) as you grow or age. They should be dated.

They are also highly mobile entities. You can change your vita to emphasize teaching over research or research over
teaching, for example. In some contexts non-academic work becomes important while in others it isn’t, and you would
want to write your vita accordingly, emphasizing or de-emphasizing it as the case may be. It will take you awhile to figure
out what your true assets are and to organize your vita to accent them effectively. You should therefore spend some time
drafting your vita. Give your draft to your advisor to look over and get feedback from him/her. Play with the categories that
you group the various lines under, and always keep yourself flexible about categories, changing them to suit the occasion.

The vita should be well ordered and pleasing to the eye. Presentation values are more important here than in the cover
letter, where writing style and quality of thinking counts a great deal.

Finally, make sure that you read other people’s vitas to get ideas about your own. Example graduate student c.v. are on
the Graduate Program Blackboard site. Both the Graduate School and the Career Center give workshops on writing a c.v.
We may decide to include a couple of sample curriculum vitae in the Graduate Student Anthropology Blackboard site.
Check back at a late date if you interested in seeing this come to fruition. Also, please do not hesitate to let us know if
there are specific types of materials or resources you might like to see on Blackboard for your reference.




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