; Writing Formal Scientific Laboratory Report
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Writing Formal Scientific Laboratory Report

VIEWS: 103 PAGES: 3

  • pg 1
									Lexington Science Department                                    Name__________________ 
Formal Lab Report Format 

                  Writing a Formal Scientific Laboratory Report 

Scientific laboratory reports are the means for communicating information to peers and 
society at large in both academic and professional institutions.  It is important that each 
student at Lexington High School be competent at writing a scientific report with the 
proper format and procedure. 

Overall format (5pts.):  All formal scientific lab reports should be typed using a word 
processor.  Tables and graphs should be neatly hand­drawn or done by using a computer­ 
graphing program.  The report should be clear, concise, organized, free of grammatical 
and spelling errors, and using the correct lab report format as outlined below.  Use 
complete sentences.  Scientific reports are usually written in third person, omitting the 
use of personal pronouns.  Note:  not all experiments may require all of the sections 
shown below.  Your teacher can help you decide if you think a section is not needed for 
your report.  Points given for each section may vary. 

Title Page (5pts.):  The title page should include the information below, centered in the 
middle of the page.  The following should be the only information on this first page 
unless otherwise instructed. 
First line­Your name, Second line­ Title of lab report, Third line­ Names of all lab 
partners, Fourth line­ Course title, Fifth line­ Instructor’s name and class period, Sixth 
line­ Date actual lab conducted 

At the bottom of this page, the report should be signed and dated by the author, reflecting 
the date submitted.  This signature is an affirmation that the lab report is the author’s 
unique work and has not been plagiarized in any part or form.  The lab report will not 
be accepted without this signature. 

Title (5 pts.):  The title should clearly state the subject of your report.  The title should 
allow the reader to understand the topic of the report.  Creative or ambiguous titles are 
not appropriate for formal scientific lab reports. 

Introduction/Background information (5 pts.):  The introduction should give the 
background information on the subject.  Include such things as a general history of the 
topic, or information that will help the reader understand the basis for the experiment. 
For example, in a lab report about water quality and the population of aquatic organisms 
the background information would include information about pH and living systems, as 
well as acid rain and its effects on the environment.  You should also explain how the 
acid rain could affect the quality of the water.  If the experiment is conducted outside, a 
brief summary of the location of the experiment may also be appropriate.  You must cite 
your sources.  Your textbook can be used as a source.  “Wikipedia” and search engines 
such as “Google” or “Yahoo” cannot be used as source.  On­line resources ending in 
“.gov” or “.edu” are desired.


                                                                                                 1 
Problem/Purpose (5 pts.):  The problem is the question that you are trying to answer 
and must be appropriate for the experiment.  Remember that a question has a question 
mark for its punctuation. 

Hypothesis (5 pts.):  The hypothesis is a proposed answer to the question (the problem) 
based on prior knowledge or evidence.  The hypothesis should be written as an “if, then” 
statement that is testable.  The hypothesis should state as much of the question in it as 
possible and will be a brief statement outlining specific expected outcomes of the 
experiment.  For example, if the problem that you were trying to answer was:  How does 
water quality affect the growth of aquatic plants?, then your hypothesis might be:  If the 
pH of the water in which aquatic plants live is decreased, then the plant will not grow in 
size. 

Materials (5 pts.):  The materials list should contain a complete description of the items 
that were used in the experiment and the amounts used.  Be sure to include the number 
used of each item and its size if necessary.  The materials list should be formatted as a 
three­column table without gridlines rather than in paragraph form.  You must include 
any safety concerns as separate statements following the table. 

Methods/Procedure (5 pts.):  The methods (or procedure) should include all the steps 
that were used to do the experiment.  Remember to give enough information so that 
someone else could repeat the experiment without difficulty.  You should include details 
in your steps to ensure that others could understand them.  This should be a numbered list 
of directions on how to perform the experiment.  The directions should be detailed and 
specific.  Do not “tell a story” with comments like “First we found the …” or “Next, 
we…”.  Once again, include all safety concerns for each respective step.  For instance, 
consider potential dangers of flammable, corrosives sharps, heat, cold, etc.  Goggles are 
always required for experiments involving chemicals, heat, dissections, or projectiles. 

Results 
The results of the experiment should contain all the observations and data collected 
during the experiment.  It is broken down into several main areas. 

       Presentation of Data (20 pts.): All of the data collected during the experiment 
       should be included in the lab report and presented as a table or chart.  All data 
       should relate to the hypothesis.  Each quantitative measurement should include a 
       number and a unit. All data presented must be neat and well organized and 
       include an appropriate title that describes the data.  All columns and/or axis must 
       be labeled and include units.  If a key is needed to clarify data, then it must be 
       included. 
       Graph data appropriately with above criteria (title, labels, units, appropriate 
       increments). 
       Calculations (5 pts.): This section includes the numbers that are found through 
       math calculations.  Give an example of each type of calculation no matter how 
       trivial and label each.  Use data from the experiment for your example.  Each 
       calculation should include a number and a unit.  Show the work.  This section


                                                                                          2 
       could be presented as a table.  This section could also include all of the 
       calculations made for the experiment as a separate table from the raw data table 
       described above for the Presentation of Data section. 

       Analysis (10 pts.): This section will explain relationships found within the data, 
       and will include significant data and trends found.  This section is written in 
       paragraph form.  Summarize the data.  State the ranges of the data and include 
       significant data.  Discuss patterns and trends in the data as indicated in the graphs. 
       State only the facts, do not draw conclusions in the section. 

       Conclusion (10 pts.):  The conclusion is the section where it is stated whether or 
       not the hypothesis was supported by the results of the experiment and answers the 
       problem question.  The hypothesis should be restated here.  You should provide a 
       good explanation how the results support or do not support the hypothesis, using a 
       numerical figure or other data/observation from the experiment to support your 
       explanation.  Be specific.  Compare the experimental values with theoretical 
       values if applicable.  Discuss the variables that influenced the results and explain 
       how they affected the experiment.  Discuss constants (if applicable) ­factors that 
       you kept the same throughout the experiment in order to improve the accuracy of 
       the results. 

       Further Studies (5 pts.): The analysis of your data should lead you to other 
       questions that need to be answered or situations that the experiment did not fully 
       explain due to experimental design.  In other words, what related questions didn’t 
       your experiment answer, and what would be another experiment that you could 
       conduct in order to investigate this question.  You should use this to create a new 
       hypothesis.  State this new hypothesis. 

       Limitations and Sources of Error (5 pts.):  This section explains factors that 
       you could not control or did not think about until after the experiment that may 
       have altered the results or skewed the data.  List 2 or more sources of error.  Be 
       very specific and explain each source and its possible effects on the data or 
       results.  Suggest changes to be made if experiment was to be repeated. 
       Statements such as “human error” or “equipment limitations” are only acceptable 
       if explained thoroughly, indicating what specific error and its effects.  Statements 
       such as “calculation error” or “equipment error” are not acceptable, as those 
       conditions should have been corrected when conducting the experiment or 
       analysis. 

References (5 pts.):  All information that you obtained from other sources should be 
properly documented throughout your paper and listed here in either APA or MLA 
format (APA is required for most college work within the Sciences, Social Sciences, or 
Education fields). 


       Total points possible if all items required:  100 points



                                                                                            3 

								
To top
;