Docstoc

Summer Workshop 2010 - Web

Document Sample
Summer Workshop 2010 - Web Powered By Docstoc
					                                        General Information

Location                                                                      Meetings Held at the Adjoining:
Sheraton Hotel                                                                Sioux Falls Convention Center
1211 N West Avenue                                                            1101 N West Avenue
Sioux Falls, SD 57104                                                         I-29, Exit 81


Reservation Deadline
A block of rooms has been reserved at a special rate at the Sheraton Hotel.

Single/Double - $99.00            Triple/Quad - $99.00
You must reserve your room(s) by May 17, 2010, to guarantee the rate and availability. Please mention
the SDHCA room block to receive the special rate. Call 605-367-9690 or 888-627-8088 to reserve your room.


How To Register
Register for the Summer Workshop online at www.sdhca.org. Register early and save money! If you
register by May 7th, you can save the most money. If you register later, you will pay a higher fee!

Registration Categories:                                         Early Bird         Late
                                                                 Registration       Registration
                                                                 (By May 7)         (After May 7)
Per Nursing Facility – SDHCA Members (Up to 5 attendees)         $385.00            $405.00
Per Assisted Living Facility – SDALA Members                     $315.00            $335.00
(Up to 3 attendees)
SDHCA Corporate Members (Up to 4 attendees)                      $335.00            $355.00
SDHCA Associate Member                                           $315.00            $335.00
Per Individual – Nonmembers                                      $385.00            $405.00
Per Additional Attendee (Must register facility.)                $35.00             $45.00
Facilities may not combine onto one registration.
Each licensed facility must register separately.

Send Payment to:                         SDHCA
                                         804 N Western Avenue
                                         Sioux Falls, SD 57104


Cancellation Policy
Registration cancellations must be made in writing by fax, mail or email to the SDHCA office by May 7, 2010.
Any cancellations received between May 8, 2010, and June 4, 2010, will be refunded minus a $100.00 fee.
Refunds will NOT be issued to participants who did not attend the workshop and did not cancel their
registration by June 4, 2010.


Continuing Education Credit
CEU Form will be in your packet when you register. The sessions are pre-approved for nursing home
administrators and social workers. Hours have been requested from the Dietary Manager Association and
Dietetic Association. A total of 10.5 clock hours are available.

This program has been approved by SDHCA, which is an approved provider of continuing education for the
SD Board of Examiners for Nursing Facility Administrators. Provider #: NFA2009.01 (Please note sessions
that are approved for administrators.) This organization (SDHCA) is approved as a provider for continuing
education by the SD Board of Social Work Examiners. Provider #: 1000
Name Badges
All attendees must wear a name badge to attend the educational sessions. Your name badge is also your
proof of attendance along with the CEU Form. You must receive a name badge from the Registration Desk.


Attire
The attire for the workshop is casual attire. Please dress in layers to accommodate the air conditioning in the
meeting rooms.


Cell Phones
Cell phones must be turned off or on vibrate during the educational sessions.


Breaks
Snacks will be provided during the breaks. The attendees are on their own for lunch breaks.
                                   Breakout Sessions

Tuesday, June 15
8:30 – 10:00 am
“DICE: Diabetes Initiative Clinical Education Program” (Part 1 of 4)
Speaker: Dr. Chuck Gokoo, MD, CWS, FACCWS, Chief Medical Officer
Pamela Scarborough, PT, MS, CDE, CWS, FACCWS, Director of Public Relations & Education
Room: Room 13 & 14
Disciplines: NRSG, DTRY & ADM
1.5 Hours

This session is designed to provide the attendees with an understanding of current diabetes related issues
including diabetes management strategies, diabetes effects on wound healing, nutritional aspects and to
improve communication and care concerning diabetic foot ulcer prevention and management. This
educational session is a day event consisting of the following topic areas: Diabetes in Long Term Care,
Diabetes in Wound Care, and Managing the Diabetic Foot.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Describe the pathophysiology of type 1 and 2 diabetes;
 Review current diabetes management strategies;
 List the effects of hyperglycemia on wound healing in the patient/resident with diabetes;
 Discuss nutritional needs of the diabetic resident;
 Identify risk factors associated with the diabetic foot; and
 Describe the assessment and management processes of the diabetic foot including vascular testing.

“Understanding Wandering in People With Dementia”
Speaker: Jane Aspaas, RN, State Director
Room: Room 11 & 12
Disciplines: AC & SS
1.5 Hours

This presentation provides important information about the role of wandering in people with dementia. This
session will offer strategies for promoting safe wandering and provides a model for responding to wandering
incidents. At the end of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Identify situations that may lead to wandering;
 Explain the difference between safe and unsafe wandering;
 Identify residents at risk for unsafe wandering; and
 Apply strategies that promote safe wandering.


10:15 – 11:30 am
“DICE: Diabetes Initiative Clinical Education Program” (Part 2 of 4)
Speaker: Dr. Chuck Gokoo, MD, CWS, FACCWS, Chief Medical Officer
Pamela Scarborough, PT, MS, CDE, CWS, FACCWS, Director of Public Relations & Education
Room: Room 13 & 14
Disciplines: NRSG, DTRY & ADM
1.25 Hours

Continued Session (Not a repeat) – See Previous Program Description
“Relocation: Its Effects on the Resident and Family Members”
Speaker: Novella Perrin, Ph.D., Consultant/Educator
Room: Room 11 & 12
Disciplines: AC, SS & ADM
1.25 Hours

The purpose of this session is to identify the characteristics of the individual, the institution, and the process of
relocation a person may experience who moves into a long-term care facility. The session will also present
the role of the family during the resident’s relocation process. Interventions for successful relocation also will
be presented.

At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:
 Identify characteristics of the person, institution, and process that effect the individual’s relocation;
 Identify the role of the family on the individual’s relocation; and
 Identify interventions for successful relocation.


Tuesday, June 15
12:30 – 2:00 pm
“DICE: Diabetes Initiative Clinical Education Program” (Part 3 of 4)
Speaker: Dr. Chuck Gokoo, MD, CWS, FACCWS, Chief Medical Officer
Pamela Scarborough, PT, MS, CDE, CWS, FACCWS, Director of Public Relations & Education
Room: Room 13 & 14
Disciplines: NRSG, DTRY & ADM
1.5 Hours

Continued Session (Not a repeat) – See Previous Program Description

“Psycho-Social Aspects of Aging”
Speaker: Novella Perrin, Ph.D., Consultant/Educator
Room: Room 11 & 12
Disciplines: AC, SS & ADM
1.5 Hours

The purpose of this session is the explore the psycho-social needs of older adults including their basic
personality types and how they develop as well as how they respond if their needs are not met. Activities and
social services are directly involved in this process.

At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:
 Identify the basic personality types of older adults;
 Explain how personality develops in older adults; and
 Identify common responses of older adults when their needs are not met.


2:15 – 3:30 pm
“DICE: Diabetes Initiative Clinical Education Program” (Part 4 of 4)
Speaker: Dr. Chuck Gokoo, MD, CWS, FACCWS, Chief Medical Officer
Pamela Scarborough, PT, MS, CDE, CWS, FACCWS, Director of Public Relations & Education
Room: Room 13 & 14
Disciplines: NRSG, DTRY & ADM
1.25 Hours

Continued Session (Not a repeat) – See Previous Program Description
“The Baby Boomers – Past, Present and Future”
Speaker: Novella Perrin, Ph.D., Consultant/Educator
Room: Room 11 & 12
Disciplines: AC, SS & ADM
1.25 Hours

The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of the so-called “baby boom” generation, their
demographic profile, comparisons with other generational cohorts, and effects this generation has had on
social institutions such as the family and the economy. The session also will focus on the needs of this
generation as they become “older adults” and the impact they will have on the future of the health care
industry.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Identify the demographic profile of the “baby boomer” population and compare them with other cohorts;
 Discuss the effects of this generation on the family and the economy; and
 Identify the impact of the “baby boom” generation on the future of the health care industry.


Wednesday, June 16
8:15 am – 9:45 am
“Cognitive Assessment Forms: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”
Speaker: Dr. David Brechtelsbauer, Director of Geriatric Training
Room: Room 13 & 14
Disciplines: NRSG, SS & ADM
1.5 Hours

The Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) in many ways remains the gold standard as a screening and monitoring
tool for cognitive dysfunction. The emergence of “mild cognitive impairment” as a diagnostic category, and the
fact the MMSE is now under copy rite creates the need for alternative tools. This session will focus on the
strengths and weaknesses of alternatives to the MMSE.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will:
 Understand why the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) achieved “gold standard” status;
 Review how acceptance of the concept of “Mild Cognitive Impairment” and the copyrighting of the MMSE
    have decreased the MMSE’s utility; and
 Review alternative tools to assess cognitive status, assessing: ease of use, ease of interpretation, and
    clinical situations where a particular tool might more or less be useful.


“Dementia: Will Be The Number One Diagnosis in Your Facility in 2011”
Speaker: Camy Richie, BS, ADC, International Speaker/Consultant
Room: Room 11
Disciplines: AC
1.5 Hours

We see it now, but the major first wave of baby boomers will be in the year 2011. Dementia will be the
number one diagnosis in your facility. The Oscar Report for last year shows a dramatic increase in dementia
population in your facilities. Most facilities currently have 60 to 80% dementia. Yet, we are not training our
staff. We typically see activity staff trying to manage 45 to 60 residents by themselves. Nursing Assistants
have to be assigned to help the activity staff as they cannot run programs by themselves. How can activity
staff be expected to run programs and deal with difficult behaviors by themselves? State surveyors who have
strongly put the word out that “all staff diversional activities are designed to divert attention from self by
focusing on projects that result in a finished product and foster feelings of achievement.” Specific diversional
task activities should be utilized to minimize behavior, divert or prevent the behavior from occurring. If any
activity causes or contributes to a behavior, it should be something to avoid for that resident.
At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:
 Identify the factors in nursing home residents with dementia, recognizing that they are especially
    susceptible to boredom unless special programs are provided to meet the residents’ needs and interests.
    Boredom triggered agitated behavior more than 50% of the time. Unoccupied time is when the most
    problematic behavior occurs;
 Demonstrate these examples of diversional activities such as clipping, folding, cracking, sorting, washing,
    sweeping, and many other examples of successful diversional interventions;
 Describe proven diversional strategies that will help with wandering, anxiety, weeping/crying, calling out,
    yelling, physically disruptive, and aggressive behavior;
 Recall simple, familiar activities based on the person’s previous hobbies, employment or lifestyle and
    simplifying the activity further and gaining the feeling of success;
 Explain activities that draw on the person’s remaining abilities and knowledge and are compatible with his
    level of comprehension and awareness; and
 Discuss repetitive activities that even quite impaired residents can perform.


“Navigating the Dining Culture Change Journey, Moving From Traditional to Transitional”
Speaker: Donna Manring, DTR, Senior Consultant and Speaker, Maun-Lemke, Inc.
Room: Room 12
Disciplines: DTRY
1.5 Hours

 Finding it difficult to keep up with the fast pace in food service?
 Feel like you can’t serve attractive and nutritious meals within your food budget?
 Overwhelmed with the pressures of enhanced dining, maintaining a budget and keeping employees
  motivated?

Enhanced dining food service remains a major focus for Supervisors, providers and, most importantly,
customers. This session will address current “hot buttons” in food service dining trends and menu planning on
a budget. As professionals in the dining industry, culture change necessitates that we be concerned with
providing the highest quality dining service for our residents, offer residents more freedom in daily meal
decisions, and ensure that residents enjoy a warm, home-like atmosphere. Your facility can decrease the cost
of supplementation just by addressing 3 main issues: the resident’s ability to eat, the dining experience or
environment, and the impact staffing have on consumption and dining satisfaction.

Learn proven techniques to keep your employees excited, resulting in a team that works together to produce
quality outcomes. Enhanced food service has a great impact on providing the best care for your residents.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Develop enticing menus and enhanced dining programs that meet and exceed current dining trends while
    complying with facility budgets;
 Learn techniques to enhance menus to meet your dining culture change goals; and
 Develop learned leadership skills to create a team atmosphere, encourage positive attitudes and personal
    accountability,


10:00 am – 11:15 am
“Infection Control – Meeting the Requirements of F-Tag 441”
Speaker: Sharon Rockman, RN, BA, CIC, Coordinator of Infection Prevention & Control
Room: Room 14
Disciplines: NRSG & ADM
1.25 Hours

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has made changes to the surveyor guidance for
determining compliance with infection prevention and control strategies for long term care. The guidance
became effective September 30, 2009, with additions in December 2009. This presenter will review the
guidance surveyors are given for determining compliance and provide the evidence that led to the
requirements. This session will cover hand hygiene; standard & transmission based precautions; identifying
and surveillance for infections; reporting of infections; safe equipment, supply and linen handling; separation
of clean and dirty/sanitation; environmental cleaning; and multi-drug resistant organism specific prevention
strategies.

At the end of this session, the participants will understand:
 The surveyor instructions for verifying compliance with “Interpretive Guidelines for Long Term Care
    Facilities – F-Tag 441; and
 The specific aspects of the infection control program that when observed and monitored demonstrates
    compliance with F-Tag 441.


“Activity Care Plans – Everything You Wanted to Know – Your Road Map To Success”
Speaker: Camy Richie, BS, ADC, International Speaker/Consultant
Room: Room 11
Disciplines: AC
1.25 Hours

Care Planning is an essential part of healthcare, but it is often misunderstood or regarded as a waste of time.
Without a specific document delineating the plan of care, important issues are likely to be neglected. Care
planning provides a “road map” of sorts to guide all who are involved with a resident’s care. The
interdisciplinary team as the task of interweaving the care plan to individualize each resident’s plan so it
maximizes the care the resident receives. To be effective and comprehensive, the care planning process
must involve all disciplines which includes activities.

The “problem” list may actually include resident strengths as well as family/relationship problems which are
affecting the resident’s overall well-being. You look at each problem and ask the question, “Will this problem
get better?” If the answer is yes, then your goal will be for the problem to resolve or show signs of
improvement within the review period. The goal should be measurable and attainable and the approaches (or
interventions) should also be measurable and documented in the record.

At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:
 Define the resident: Who am I?;
 Problems or Strengths? What’s the difference and how to determine which to choose?;
 What is the requirement – is the activity department responsible for a separate care plan?;
 How to write individualized care plans;
 Approaches – tips on approaching each resident;
 Care planning examples, real case studies and successful outcomes;
 What to update and when;
 How to write measurable goals; and
 What is a RAP and what is the correct way to write it?


“Pre-Admission Screening & Resident Review (PASRR)”
Speaker: Elizabeth Twamley, RN, RAC-CT, Program Manager, DSS
Room: Room 13
Disciplines: SS
1.25 Hours

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 mandated that all individuals regardless of funding source
who apply for admission to a Medicaid certified nursing facility or swing bed must be screened to determine if
they have mental illness, mental retardation or developmental disabilities. The purpose of the pre-admission
screening & resident review process is to ensure that swing bed and nursing facility applicants and residents
with serious mental illness or mental retardation are identified, placed appropriately (least restrictively),
evaluated and admitted, or allowed to remain in a nursing facility or swing bed only if they can be appropriately
served in a nursing facility or swing bed and they are provided with the mental illness/mental
retardation services they need, including specialized services. This presentation will cover the South Dakota
Discharge Planning PASRR Process and requirements.
At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Understand the history of PASRR;
 Understand the purpose of PASRR;
 Understand how to complete the PASRR pre-screening tool;
 Understand when to request a Level I screening;
 Understand what your responsibilities are when a resident has a Level II determination; and
 Understand survey requirements for PASRR compliance.


“Gluten-Free Diets: Are You Prepared?”
Speaker: Donna Manring, DTR, Senior Consultant and Speaker, Maun-Lemke, Inc.
Room: Room 12
Disciplines: DTRY
1.25 Hours

Facilities are expected to manage complex patients and often do not receive warning when a gluten-free diet
is needed. Are you prepared to handle these cases? Your kitchen already manages food allergies and diet
restrictions. The key to success is to understand what gluten free is and be prepared for the diet when you
have a gluten free diet order admission. In addition to celiac disease, non-celiac gluten intolerance is now
being recognized and some people are choosing a wheat-free diet as a lifestyle choice. The growing
prevalence of celiac disease has increased the need for all facilities to be able to competently manage
residents who require this special diet. Managing gluten-free diets, like other food allergies, depends on
facility-wide awareness. Ingredient labels must be scrutinized, dishes must be prepared and plated separately
to avoid cross-contamination, and patients must be assured that the meals being served to them are safe.
Participants will receive resource information on foods that contain gluten and you will receive helpful
educational handouts for training your teams.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Learn what food and possible medications contain gluten;
 Learn techniques in preventing cross contamination while preparing meals;
 Learn symptoms and signs of gluten intolerance; and
 Develop and implement facility policy and procedures on gluten free diets.


Wednesday, June 16
12:15 – 1:15 pm
“Infection Prevention & Control – It’s Everybody’s Business”
Speaker: Diana Weiland, RN, Health Facility Surveyor, DOH
Room: Room 14
Disciplines: NRSG & ADM
1.0 Hour

Infection Prevention & Control IS everybody’s business. This session will provide the participants an
opportunity to accompany a state surveyor on an initial tour in a long term care facility. This will give the
participants a better understanding of the “outsiders” perspective in identifying concerns and potential infection
prevention and control issues in the long term care facility as well as discuss a team approach.

At the end of the session, the participants will be able to:
 Better understand and respond to F-Tag 441 and/or ARSD 44:04 regulations;
 Utilize the “outsiders” perspective to identify concerns and potential infection prevention and control
    problems in their homes; and
 Recognize team approach strengths.
“Activity Specific Care Plans - Networking”
Speaker: Camy Richie, BS, ADC, International Speaker/Consultant
Room: Room 11
Disciplines: AC
1.0 Hours

Creating and implementing individualized care plans for residents is a very important responsibility of activity
personnel. The activity assessment determines the content of the care plan. Not all residents will have an
“activity care plan,” but most care plans should have “activity-related interventions” found in the
comprehensive care plan. Care plans may be written regardless if a resident triggers on the MDS.
Information from the individualized assessment is used to develop the activities components of the
comprehensive care plan. Objectives should be measurable and should focus on the resident’s desired
outcomes.

At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:
 Identify individualized care plans;
 Focus on inventive ways to create care plans;
 Gain assistance in writing care plans; and
 Consider accommodations in schedules, supplies, and timing to optimize participation in care plans.


“Pre-Admission Screening & Resident Review (PASRR)”
Speaker: Elizabeth Twamley, RN, RAC-CT, Program Manager, DSS
Room: Room 13
Disciplines: SS
1.0 Hours

Con’t – See Previous Program Description - This session will provide an opportunity to discuss case scenarios
that your facility may have encountered.


“Breaking Barriers by Building Bridges: Celebrating Your Success In Dining”
Speaker: Donna Manring, DTR, Senior Consultant and Speaker, Maun-Lemke, Inc.
Room: Room 12
Disciplines: DTRY
1.0 Hour

Are you tired of hearing about the challenges of culture change in dining? Are you frustrated hearing ideas
that you don’t think will work for your facility? Do you wish you could have positive discussion with your peers
about what has successfully worked for them? This session will focus on success stories along with facilitated
discussion on making culture change work for you. Come prepared to share your stories! You will be able to
glean ideas from other facilities and leave motivated to implement new and fresh ideas. Renew your
enthusiasm for culture change and celebrate the impact you make on your residents. Network with your peers
and have facilitated conversation that will answer your dining questions.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Learn fresh ideas on culture change that can be immediately implemented at your facility;
 Participate in facilitated discussion that will answer questions on culture change that will increase resident
    and employee satisfaction; and
 Implement techniques and systems that fit into an action plan for facilities of all sizes.
                                        Closing Session
1:30 – 2:45 pm
“Communication Conquers Chaos”
Speaker: Donna Manring, DTR, Senior Consultant and Speaker, Maun-Lemke, Inc.
Room: Room 12, 13 & 14
Disciplines: ALL
1.25 Hours

In today’s world, everyone is busy. The in-basket is never empty and the “to do” list is never short. We
nurture families, friends, co-workers and residents with care, support, sometimes a gentle touch. Then we
turn around and demand from ourselves perfection, tremendous effort, pushing ourselves to do more, learn
more, make more. And we wonder why we’re tired.

It’s time to make our journey great by taking time for ourselves, being as kind to ourselves as we are to our
closest friends, so we can still be there for those we love and celebrate the journey every day.

This session inspires individuals to take the journey of nurturing themselves first – by filling their own
emotional reservoirs – to strengthen themselves for service, leadership, and life. The speaker guides the
audience to give themselves five gifts: self-love, a positive, can-do attitude, focus, courage, and the legacy of
our past – the values that strengthen us. This speaker shares the journey from a prairie lake to the ocean,
and her own decisions to create a “high tide” in life, regardless of what the journey brings.

At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be able to:
 Immediately incorporate effective communication skills in daily situations;
 Communicate information and convey ideas effectively thru a means of mutual understanding;
 Utilize a variety of skills to communicate with different personality types; and
 Speak with purpose thru effective communication.
                                                 Faculty

Dr. Chuck Gokoo, MD, CWS, FACCWS
Dr. Chuck Gokoo is the Chief Medical Officer for American Medical Technologies. During his 29 year career,
his continued role in global wound management strategies has helped many clinicians meet today’s wound
care challenges. He is most noted for his role in developing prevention guidelines and outcome analysis for
venous disease and venous ulcer prevention management. Dr. Gokoo is the past president of the American
Academy of Wound Management, a founding member and a Fellow of the American College of Certified
Wound Specialists and has been an invited speaker at both national and international wound society
meetings.

Pamela Scarborough, PT, MS, CDE, CWS, FACCWS, Director of Public Relations & Education
Pamela Scarborough is the Director of Public Relations and Education for American Medical Technologies.
Ms. Scarborough has an extensive clinical background in a variety of practice care settings including acute
care, long term care facilities, outpatient physical therapy and home health care. She received a BS in
Physical Therapy and a Masters in Health and Wellness. She received her board certification as a Diabetes
Educator (CDE) in 1992 and her board certification as a wound care specialist (CWS) in 2000. She teaches
and lectures nationally on the topics of wound care, diabetes management and other subjects in her related
fields of practice and interest.

Jane Aspaas, RN, State Executive Director
Jane Aspaas is the State Executive Director for the South Dakota Office of the Alzheimer’s Association. For
the past 7 ½ years, she has provided professional and family education, care consultation, and information
and referral on support services, advocacy and research for people dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and
related disorders throughout the state of South Dakota. Jane is a registered nurse and graduate of Dakota
Wesleyan University. She began working in behavioral health with emotionally disturbed adolescents in
residential treatment. Since then, she has worked in direct care with abused and neglected children, case
management for adults with disabilities, residential long term care consulting and case management of
Alzheimer’s residents. She has participated in developing and teaching programs in Alzheimer’s and
dementia care as well as other nursing care processes.

Novella Perrin, Ph.D., Consultant/Educator
Novella Perrin recently retired as the Assistant Provost for Research and Dean of the Graduate School at the
University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg, MO. She was also a professor of sociology and the Director of
the UCM Gerontology Institute. She earned her doctorate in sociology from the University of Kansas. She is
consultant and author of numerous books and articles. Her most current research focuses on behavioral
management of Alzheimer’s Disease.

David Brechtelsbauer, MD, Director of Geriatric Training
David Brechtelsbauer, MD, CMD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the
University of South Dakota School of Medicine and an Associate Director at the Sioux Falls Family Medicine
Residency. Also, he is the Director of Geriatric Training at the Center for Family Medicine in Sioux Falls. He
holds a certificate of Added Qualifications in Geriatric Medicine. He was the South Dakota Family Doctor of
the Year in 2004 and was awarded the James Pattee Excellence in Education Award in 2005. He is the past
president of the American Medical Directors Association.

Camy Richie, ADC
Camy Richie is certified nationally as an activity director with NCCAP. Her formal education is from Northern
Kentucky University in Human Services/Mental Health. She has experience in health care for over twenty-five
years in activities, social services, admissions, community awareness, and volunteer coordination. She has
been consulting long term care facilities for the past twelve years. She speaks nationally on a variety of topics
mainly concentrating in activity programming.
Donna Manring, DTR
Donna Manring is a Senior Consultant and Speaker for Maun-Lemke, Inc. in Omaha, NE. She is a Registered
Dietetic Technician. She has extensive experience in health care, long term care and assisted living in the
dietary department, business management, and people skills. She is registered with the American Dietetic
Association and is a member of the National Speakers Association. Donna was awarded Dietetic Technician
of the year for the state of Wisconsin. She is an Instructor at the Madison Area Technical College in Madison,
WI.

Sharon Rockman, RN, BA, CIC, Coordinator of Infection Prevention and Control
Sharon Rockman received her degree in nursing from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, SD. She began her
infection control career in 1987 at Avera McKennan Hospital. In 1988, she completed the Epidemiology
Training Course through the University of Iowa. In 1991, she joined the Infection Control staff of Sanford USD
Medical Center. Since 1991, she has maintained certification by the Certification Board of Infection Control
(CIC). She is a member of the South Dakota Infection Control Council (SDICC) and the National Association
for Professionals in Infection Control (APIC). In 2007, she became the Coordinator of Infection Prevention
and Control at Sanford USD Medical Center. She has provided education and consultation to many health
care facilities around the state.

Elizabeth Twamley, RN, RAC-CT, Program Manager
Elizabeth Twamley is the Program Manager for the Nurse Consultants for the Division of Adult Services and
Aging through the Department of Social Services in Chamberlain. She has the oversight and monitoring of the
State’s specialty long term care programs, case mix and pre-admission screening resident review programs.
She has twenty-seven years of professional nursing practice with a background in diversified health care
fields. She has experience on state and national work groups designed to improve care and services for
South Dakota residents.

Diana Weiland, RN, Health Facility Surveyor
Diana Weiland is a Registered Nurse with a BA in Psychology and Sociology. She has over 25 years of
experience in the nursing field with clinical experience in a variety of work settings and a comfortable familiarity
with multiple regulatory bodies. Work settings included health education of preschool through collegiate level,
healthcare and medical staff education, critical care, emergency nursing, correctional health in both
adolescent and adult population, and currently Health Facility Surveyor.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:10/28/2011
language:English
pages:12