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Slide 1 - ESD 113 Teaching and Learning

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Slide 1 - ESD 113 Teaching and Learning Powered By Docstoc
					            presents

How to effectively assess and
  improve your accident
   prevention program
                  AGENDA
I.   Introduction of Attendees – What do you
     want to get out of this workshop?
II. Background on Safety Management
III. The Eight Elements of an Effective
     Safety Management Program
       •   Management Commitment
       •   Accountability
       •   Employee Involvement
       •   Hazard Identification and Control
       •   Incident/Accident Investigation
       •   Training
       •   Safety Committees
       •   Plan Evaluation

IV. Putting the Plan Together – Where do you
    go from here?
              Welcome
              The ability to identify, analyze and evaluate your district's Safety and Health Program
              is extremely important to the long-term success of your school or facility. This
              workshop will take a look at the program evaluation process.
We’ll overview the evaluation process of identifying and analyzing the symptoms and underlying
causes of “ailing” safety systems, and making judgments about their effectiveness.
During this workshop there will be ample opportunity to participate and share your knowledge and
experience with others. Remember, the more you participate the more you will get out of this
training.




              Workshop Goals

      1. Gain a better understanding of the best practices for safety and health programs.
      2. Learn about a systematic approach to evaluating and improving your district’s safety and
         health program.
                      A tale of two cultures
You’re a safety management consultant that has recently assisted two companies, XYZ Widget and
ABC Wombat, design effective safety management systems. As you can imagine, there are slight
differences in the design of the two systems, but for the most part, the comprehensive written plans
look quite similar on paper.
After a year, you return to XYZ Widget to find their system is producing spectacular results. The
safety committee is well staffed, motivated, and producing impressive results. Injury rates have
dropped dramatically.
However, ABC Wombat is another story. A visit to this company quickly uncovers a system that is a
dismal failure. Although the safety committee does meet once a month, the meeting is poorly
attended and it results in few, if any, improvements. Injury rates have actually increased. Morale has
not improved and is actually down in some departments. Turnover remains high and overall
productivity is down 5%.

If both companies have virtually the same safety plan sitting on a shelf,
why are the outcomes so different?
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________



How does the principle below apply to the scenario?
“Every system is designed perfectly to produce what it’s producing”
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________



                               To learn how a system works, try to change it.
 Every safety and health program is a system with inputs, processes,
 and outputs.
Inputs - Resources from other management systems

            Tools              Equipment           Machinery           Materials
            Facilities         People              Time                Money



     Processes - Using available resources

                    Planning safety into the vision, mission, objectives, strategies, programs, budgets.
                    Designing effective proactive safety and health plans.
                    Leading people by example - commitment, caring, communication
                    Managing programs and controlling safety activities.
                    Educating and training everyone about safety and health.
                    Identifying, measuring, and analyzing behaviors, conditions, results - fact finding.
                    Recognizing and rewarding desired behaviors, activities and results at all levels.
                    Suggesting changes and improvements in workplace safety.
                    Participating in safety committees, teams, surveys, and projects.
                    Correcting hazardous conditions and unsafe practices/behaviors.
                    Evaluating behaviors, activities, performance, results, systems.
                    Improving safety policies, plans, processes, procedures, practices.


                   Outputs - Conditions, Behaviors, Results

                                           Safe/Unsafe conditions       Safe/Unsafe behaviors
                                           Many/Few accidents           High/Low costs/savings
                                           High/Low morale, trust       High/Low productivity



What do we mean by the statement that "system processes are
interdependent"?
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Without proper “nutrition,” systems may get sick
A safety management system must have adequate nutrition in the form of resources or the resulting outputs
may indicate some form of system illness. It’s important to implement an effective system wellness plan to
make sure the “prognosis” for the safety management system remains positive. That’s what evaluation is all
about…maintaining system health.



         Circle the system component that give the most clues about its health.

                   Inputs                 Processes                  Outputs


                What are symptoms of an ailing system?
         _______________________________________________________________
         _______________________________________________________________


                How do we usually treat those symptoms?
         _______________________________________________________________
         _______________________________________________________________


                What are the underlying causes of an ailing system?
         _______________________________________________________________
         ______________________________________________________________

                What is required to bring about a system cure?
         _____________________________________________________________
   Diagnose the underlying cause to determine the cure.

 To improve the safety management system, we must diagnose and eliminate underlying causes.
 We must evaluate the current system against best practices and then implement changes to begin
 the transformation.


• Determine where we are now - analyze!

    What does our safety management system look like now?

    Closely examine the outputs of the safety management system.

____________________________________________________________________


• Determine best policies and practices for your district - visualize!

    What do we want our safety system to look like?

    Research best practices.

____________________________________________________________________


• Evaluate the system for strengths and weaknesses - scrutinize!

    What cultural values are supportive - non-supportive?

    What system components are adequate? inadequate?

    Rate the current system against best practices.
____________________________________________________________________


• Implement proactive changes to improve the system - actualize!

    What forces are promoting or resisting change?

    Develop an action plan to transform the system.

____________________________________________________________________
        Eight Elements of a Safety Management System
             1.      Management Commitment
             2.      Accountability
             3.      Employee Involvement
             4.      Hazard Identification and Control
             5.      Incident/Accident Investigation
             6.      Training
             7.      Plan Evaluation
             8.      Safety Committees

                     Safety Management System Evaluation Audit
Each of the eight safety management system elements analyzed in this workshop contains:
   •   a number of statements to evaluate using a five-point rating system and
   •   other informational helps specific to the element. Use the information below as criteria for
       conducting your evaluation.
        5


                   Audit Ratings - Enter your rating to the left of each statement. Use
                   the following guidelines for your rating.

5 - Fully Met:
   •   Analysis indicates the condition, behavior, or action described in this statement is fully met and
       effectively applied.
   •   There is room for continuous improvement, but workplace conditions and behaviors, indicate
       effective application. (Employees have full knowledge and express positive attitudes.
   •   Employees and managers not only comply, but exceed expectations.
   •   Effective leadership is emphasized and exercised.
   •   Safety policies and standards are clear, concise, fair, informative and directive, communicate
       commitment to everyone.
   •   Results in this area reflect continual improvement is occurring.
   •   This area is fully integrated into line management.
   •   First line management reflect safe attitude and behavior. Safety is first priority.
3 - Mostly Met:
   • Analysis indicates the condition, behavior, or action described in this statement is adequate, but
     there is still room for improvement.
   • Workplace conditions, if applicable, indicate compliance in this area.
   • Employees have adequate knowledge, express generally positive attitudes.
   • Some degree of trust between management and labor exists.
   • Employees and managers comply with standards.
   • Leadership is adequate in this area.
   • Safety policies and standards are in place and are generally clear, concise, fair, informative and
     directive.
   • Results in this area is consistently positive, but may not reflect continual improvement.

1 - Partially Met:
   • Analysis indicates the condition, behavior, or action described in this statement is partially met.
   • Application is most likely too inadequate to be effective.
   • Workplace conditions, if applicable, indicate improvement is needed in this area.
   • Employees lack adequate knowledge, express generally negative attitudes.
   • Mistrust may exist between management and labor.
   • Employees and managers fail to adequately comply or fulfill their accountabilities.
   • Lack of adequate management and leadership in this area.
   • Safety policies and standards are in place and are generally clear, concise, fair, informative and
     directive.
   • Results in this area are inconsistent, negative, and does not reflect continual improvement.


0 - Not Present:
   • Analysis indicates the condition, behavior, or action described in this statement does not exist or
     occur.
           Indicators. To help you arrive at a score for each statement, analyze these indicators
           to more accurately determine the rating for each statement.


1. Standards. Analyze system inputs - policies, plans, programs, budgets, processes, procedures,
   appraisals, job descriptions, rules. Informative/directive, clear, concise, communicated inputs
   indicate probable effectiveness.
   _____________________________________________________________________________
   _____________________________________________________________________________
2. Conditions. Inspect the workplace for hazards. The absence of physical hazards and
   psychosocial hazards indicates effectiveness.
   _____________________________________________________________________________
   _____________________________________________________________________________
3. Behaviors, actions. Observe both employee and manager behaviors. Consistent appropriate
   behavior and adherence to safety and health rules, indicate
   effectiveness.
   _____________________________________________________________________________
   _____________________________________________________________________________
4. Knowledge, attitudes. Analyze what employees are thinking by conducting a survey. Full
   knowledge, positive attitudes, high trust and low fear indicate effectiveness.
   _____________________________________________________________________________
   _____________________________________________________________________________
5. Results. Analyze accident trends, MOD rates, etc. Continually improving results indicate
   effectiveness.
   _____________________________________________________________________________
   _____________________________________________________________________________
                  ELEMENT 1 - MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT
1. ____ A written policy that sets a high priority for safety and health exists.
An effective policy will be both informative and directive. It will express a commitment to safety and the
intent of the company to carry out the policy. A written policy will clarify expectations. The policy will
be accessible to all employees. "Safety First" will be meaningful only if management doesn't reprioritize
safety down when the going gets tough. Prioritizing safety may also have the affect of communicating
the message that either safety or production is the top priority. Safety is considered a district value and is
not prioritized over other issues.
   Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
   Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________


2. ____ A written safety and health goal and supporting objectives exist.
Each of the eight safety program elements will contain certain goals and supporting action steps.
A goal describes an end-state. Objectives should be (1) measurable (2) observable, and (3) completed
within a time frame. For instance, a safety goal might be to, "Increase employee involvement in safety."
A supporting action step would be, "Complete joint supervisor/employee job hazard analyses on all jobs
in Food Serviceby July 30th, 2007."
Written plans containing goals and objectives are better able to communicate purpose and function
clearly. Consequently, duties, responsibilities, criteria, specifications, and expectations will be more
effectively met in a consistent manner throughout the entire school or facility.
   Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
   Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
   _________________________________________________________________________________
3. ____ The workplace safety and health policy is supported by management.
What does that support look like? Support needed for an effective safety and health program must
include a substantial commitment to safety. Top management commitment must go beyond "lip
service." It's more than just moral support...just talking up safety. Management needs to walk the talk
by investing serious time, their own and staff, and money into proactive safety initiatives.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
4. ____ Safety and health goals and objectives are supported by management.
Goals and objectives are created by management and workers. If your primary safety goal is "zero
accidents," management will establish objectives to achieve that goal. One objective to reach this goal
might be, "Train all employees on proper lifting techniques by December 30." Management will then
support this objective by developing an effective training system.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
5. ____ Management supports safety and health rules.
Management best supports safety and health rules by educating all employees on those rules and
insisting that everyone, at all school or facilityal levels, follow those rules. Management must also
provide everyone with the resources necessary for compliance.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
6. ____ Managers personally follow safety and health rules.
Management can not expect employees to follow safety rules if they, themselves, do not. If supervisors
and managers ignore safety rules, they actually "rewrite" those rules.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________


7. ____ Managers personally intervene in the safety behavior of others.
Supervisors and managers, as agents of the district, are responsible to personally intervene when they
see an employee performing unsafe behaviors. They must stop the unsafe behavior, find out why it
occurred, and do whatever it takes to make sure it doesn't happen again.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________


8. ____ Managers set a visible example of safety and health leadership.
Management and leadership are not the same. Leadership is a human relations skill. Leaders establish
positive relationships with their followers. The greater the responsibility, the more opportunity exists to
demonstrate safety leadership. Effective safety programs maximize opportunities for safety leadership.
Setting a good example is accomplished through action.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
9. ____ Managers participate in the safety and health training of employees.
It's smart involving supervisors in the safety training process. A policy of involvement supports the
principle, and communicates to each supervisor that it's their job to manage safety as well as other
activities. Employees will more likely perceive safety as important when supervisors are directly
involved in safety training.
Justification for rating: ___________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Ideas to take back: ______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Your total score for this element ________________
               |--------------------------------------------------------|
               0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

               Action Plan: Element 1. – Management Commitment

         Objective                Action Items                  Persons           Date to be
                                                               Responsible        completed
          Action Plan: Element 1. – Management Commitment

Program       Objective   Action Items     Persons     Date to be
Element                                  Responsible   completed

				
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posted:10/28/2011
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