Docstoc

Etch Systems Operation _amp; Maintenance Volume I Etch Systems

Document Sample
Etch Systems Operation _amp; Maintenance Volume I Etch Systems Powered By Docstoc
					6500               6500               6500                      6500
Etch Systems       Etch Systems       Etch Systems              Etch Systems

Operation &        Operation &        Operation &               Operation &
Maintenance        Maintenance        Maintenance               Maintenance
Volume I           Volume I           Volume I                  Volume I
Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide          Operators' Guide




MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002              MS6500-10002
Rev C              Rev C              Rev C                     Rev C




6500               6500               6500                      6500
Etch Systems       Etch Systems       Etch Systems              Etch Systems

Operation &        Operation &        Operation &               Operation &
Maintenance        Maintenance        Maintenance               Maintenance

Volume I           Volume I           Volume I                  Volume I
Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide          Operators' Guide




MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002              MS6500-10002
Rev C              Rev C              Rev C                     Rev C




6500               6500               6500                       6500
Etch Systems       Etch Systems       Etch Systems               Etch Systems

Operation &        Operation &        Operation &                Operation &
Maintenance        Maintenance        Maintenance                Maintenance

Volume I           Volume I           Volume I                   Volume I
Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide   Operators' Guide           Operators' Guide




MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002       MS6500-10002               MS6500-10002
Rev C              Rev C              Rev C                      Rev C

                                                                     88-294-001 Rev D
                                            Volume I - Operators’ Guide Vol #1
                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




Volume I - Operators’ Guide Vol #1
Manual Receipt - 6500 Series
                                                                                     88-321-002
                                                                                     Rev A

                           Check Volume(s) Received
                   O .................... Full Manual Set ...................................MS6500-05
                   O .................... Install Guide ...................... MI6500-02, MI6500s-01
                   O .................... PDF.....................................................MS6500-90
                   O .................... Volume I     ............................................MS6500-10002

                   O .................... Volume II    ...........................................MS6500-20002

                   O .................... Volume III    ..........................................MS6500-30002

                   O .................... volume IV ...........................................MS6500-40002

                   Name:____________________________________
                   Company__________________________________
                   Address___________________________________
                   City, State, Zip______________________________
                   Country, Date:______________________________
                   Signature__________________________________
                   Please Return to Tegal to be registered for Manual updates.


                                                       Tegal Corporation
                                           Attn: Technical Support Department
                                                 2201 South McDowell Blvd
                                                          P.O. Box 6020
                                             Petaluma, California 95955-6020
                                                                USA



88-321-002 Rev A                                                                          MS6500-05 Vol #1        iii
Manual Receipt - 6500 Series




                        THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




iv   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                        88-321-002 Rev A
                                                 Safety

                                            Introduction

             6500
                            Operator Push buttons
      MS6500-05
Etch Systems
                                     Operators’ Guide
Volume I
Operators’ Guide
                             Operation Procedures


                            Functional Descriptions
Volume I - MS6500-10002
Operators’ Guide
Volume II - MS6500-20002
Maintenance Guide
Volume III - MS6500-30002
Troubleshooting
Volume IV - MS6500-40002
Illustrated Parts

PDF - MS6500-90




                               88-294-101
                               Rev A
                    THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




ii   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                    88-294-101 Rev A
                                     Table Of Contents
                      Volume I - Operators’ Guide
Manual Receipt - 6500 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Document Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
    MS6500-05 Operation & Maintenance Manual Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
                                                    Section 1
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      DANGER: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      WARNING: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      CAUTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Emergency off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Safety Interlocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Possible Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Electrical Shock Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Radiation Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Process Gas Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
    Process By-Product Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
    Oxygen Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
    Mechanical Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
    Magnetic Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Ultraviolet Light (UV) Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Thermal Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Decibel Levels (dBA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
      Suggested safety and protective equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
      Lockout/Tagout Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
      Environmental Regulations 6500 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
      Recommended Abatement Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                                                    Section 2
Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE Etch Systems . . . . . . . . . . 1
Abbreviations and Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
                                                    Section 3
Operator Push buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      EMO Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


                                                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #1         i
          Footswitch Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
          Load/Unload Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
          Machine On/Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
          Machine Off Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
        Abort Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
        Clear Wafers Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
          History Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
        Event Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
        Recovery Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
        Silence Button (alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
        En/Disable Button (alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
          Start Options Button (Unicassette) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
                                                         Section 4
System Diagrams Operators’ Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Operators’ Guide (v5.3x) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
        Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
           Basic Definitions, Operator Input, and Screen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
        Tegal’s standard color code: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
        Operator Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
        Screen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
     Software Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
        Banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
        File Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
        Color Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
        Cassette Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
        Cassette Module Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
        Process Folders for PM1 & PM2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
        Process Menus for PM3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
        Process Menus for PM4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
        Transport Menus for TM1 & TM2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Logon and Logoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
           Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
           Logging Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Fault Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
        Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
        Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
        Abort Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23



ii     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #1
    Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
    Silence Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
    History Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
    Configure Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
    Monitor Status of CM1 & CM2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
    To load wafer cassettes: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
      Running a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing . . . . . . . . . 33
Sequence Creation and Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Uni-Cassette Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Diode Array Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                                     Section 5
Operation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Emergency Machine Off (EMO) Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Etch Rate & Uniformity Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
MFC Calibration Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Particle Count Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
PM Chamber Leak Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Power On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
                                                     Section 6
Functional Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       AC Module (ACM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       Atmospheric Cassette Platform (ACP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
       Chamber Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       Chuck & Chuck Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3



                                                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #1         iii
        DC Module (Lambda) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
        Endpoint Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
        HRe- Process Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
        Mass Flow Controller (MFC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
        Monitor & Touchscreen(CRT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
        Penning Ion Gauge (PIG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
        PM1/2 kHz Matching Network & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
        PM1/2 MHz Matching Network & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
        PM1/2 RF Combiner (Triode 2 HRe- Chambers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
        PM1/2/3 Process Pressure Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
        Rinser Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
        Roughing Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
        System Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
        Temperature Control Unit (TCU) — Neslab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
        TM Turbomolecular Pump & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
        Vacuum Cassette Elevator (VCE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
        VME Card Cage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
        Wafer Aligner (PM5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24




iv   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #1
Document Ordering Information
                                                                            88-320-801
                                                                            Rev A

                   MS6500-05 Operation & Maintenance Manual
                   Set
                   Volumes           (I through IV)                              MS6500-05

                   CDROM –           PDF                                         MS6500-90

                   Volume I –        Operators’ Guide                            MS6500-10002

                   Volume II –       Maintenance Guide                           MS6500-20002

                   Volume III –      Troubleshooting                             MS6500-30002

                   Volume IV –       Illustrated Parts                           MS6500-40002

                   Site Preparation & Installation                      MI6500-02, MI6500s-01




                         COPYRIGHT DECLARATION
                   The information contained herein is supplied without representation or war-
                   ranty of any kind. Tegal Corporation assumes no responsibility and shall have
                   no liability, consequential or otherwise, of any kind arising form the use of this
                   information or any part thereof. No part of this document may be reproduced
                   in any form without the express written permission of Tegal Corporation.




88-320-801 Rev A                                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1    v
Document Ordering Information




                        THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




vi   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                        88-320-801 Rev A
                                     Table Of Contents
                                                       Safety
                                                   Section 1
                                                                       88-269-001
                                                                       Rev E
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      DANGER: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      WARNING: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      CAUTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Emergency off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Safety Interlocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Possible Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Electrical Shock Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Radiation Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Process Gas Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
    Process By-Product Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
    Oxygen Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
    Mechanical Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
    Megnetic Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Ultraviolet Light (UV) Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Thermal Hazards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Decibel Levels (dBA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
      Suggested safety and protective equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
      Lockout/Tagout Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
      Environmental Regulations 6500 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
      Recommended Abatement Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13




88-269-001 Rev E                                                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1       i
               THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




ii   MS6500-05 Vol #1                               88-269-001 Rev E
Safety
                                                                             88-269-001
                                                                             Rev E
                   This Safety section provides information intended to help prevent injury to
                   operations and maintenance personnel or damage to the Tegal etch system.
                   Not all hazards are covered — only the most common and serious. Tegal has
                   made every effort to make this equipment as safe as possible, but your full
                   understanding of its capabilities and limitations is necessary for safe, efficient
                   operation.
                   Only Tegal-trained personnel should attempt to operate or maintain a Tegal
                   etch system.
                   When operating and maintaining a Tegal etch system, all safety procedures
                   and precautions must be followed to avoid certain hazards.
                   DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION messages appear, where appropriate,
                   on etch system modules and in system documentation. Follow all hazard mes-
                   sages. Failure to observe hazard messages may have severe consequences,
                   including, but not limited to, product damage, equipment damage, personal
                   injury, or death.
                   Hazard messages contain three elements: the seriousness of the hazard, the
                   consequences of the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard.
                   Three hazard levels, DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION, indicate the seri-
                   ousness of the hazard.

DANGER:
                   Indicates an imminently hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, will result
                   in death or serious injury

                                        !   DANGER


WARNING:
                   Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, could result
                   in death or serious injury.

                                        !   WARNING




88-269-001 Rev E                                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1        1
Safety
CAUTION
                 Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, may result in
                 minor or moderate injury.

                                     !   CAUTION


                 Emergency off
                 (EMO) is located on the front of the machine and on the rear of TTW systems.
                 Emergency off (EMO) buttons are located on the outside of the system in
                 locations that are optimal for easy access. These location could be on the
                 front or rear of the system, on the facade and even on the power distribution
                 module (PDM). For information about the function of the EMO and their loca-
                 tions, see the Troubleshooting sections of this manual.

                 Safety Interlocks
                 A system of safety interlocks provides additional protection against personal
                 injury and equipment damage. For information about the function of the safety
                 interlocks, see the Troubleshooting section of this manual:
                        • Interlocks, Hardware, PM1, PM295-205-001
                        • Interlock Flowchart, PM1, PM295-206-001
                        • Interlocks, Software, TM, PM, CM95-207-001

                 Possible Hazards
                 TEGAL etch systems present certain hazards if operated or maintained
                 improperly. These fall into the following categories:
                        • “Electrical Shock Hazards,” on page 3
                        • “Radiation Hazards,” on page 3
                        • “Process Gas Hazards,” on page 4
                        • “Process By-Product Hazards,” on page 4
                        • “Oxygen Hazards,” on page 5
                        • “Mechanical Hazards,” on page 6
                        • “Magnetic Hazards,” on page 7
                        • “Ultraviolet Light (UV) Hazards,” on page 7
                        • “Thermal Hazards,” on page 7
                 Although audible sound pressure readings indicate that Tegal systems oper-
                 ate at levels considered nonhazardous, information on decibel levels is
                 provided (“Decibel Levels (dBA),” on page 8).




2   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                               88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                           Safety
                   Electrical Shock Hazards
                   Electrical power is distributed throughout the etch system. Safety interlocks
                   are installed to shut off electrical power to the machine when module covers
                   or modules are removed. Even with the power off, however, there are some
                   hazards from capacitors, which can store energy for long periods of time. Dis-
                   charge capacitors to ground before attempting any maintenance. Only
                   qualified technicians should be permitted to work on an uncovered machine.
                   Use all precautions and safety measures characteristically taken with high
                   energy RF generators and AC and DC circuitry.
                   Electrical shock hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the
                   following:

                                                   !   DANGER

                                                • High voltage.
                                                • Can cause injury or death.
                                                • Turn power off before servicing.



                   Radiation Hazards
                   RF generators provide the RF energy used to generate glow discharge. The
                   generators operate in Continuous Wave (CW) mode during the etch process.
                   RF energy is radiated at frequencies of 13.56 MHz and 450 kHz. Under nor-
                   mal operating conditions the Tegal etch system is properly shielded from RF
                   power to prevent injury to personnel. This shield must not be altered or
                   removed.
                   RF radiation hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the
                   following:

                                                   !   DANGER

                                                 • High voltage.
                                                 • Can cause injury or death.
                                                 • Do not bypass interlock.
                                                 • Turn power off to RF generator.




88-269-001 Rev E                                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1   3
Safety


                                                      !   CAUTION

                                                • Radio Frequency radiation hazard.
                                                • Can cause injury.
                                                • Turn power off before servicing.


                                                  !   WARNING

                                               • Strong magnetic field.
                                               • May affect pacemaker operation.
                                PACEMAKER      • Stay back 2 feet (0,6m).
                                 WARNING




                 Process Gas Hazards
                 Standard processes require complex process gases. Process gases may
                 include, but are not limited to, the following: Ar, BCl3, CF4, C2F6, CHF3, Cl2,
                 HBr, HCl, He, N2, NF3, O2, and SiCl4. Gases CF4, He, N2, and SF6 are inert.
                 Gases BCl3, Cl2, HCl, and SiCl4 are highly toxic, corrosive, and strong irri-
                 tants. O2 provides excellent combustion support.
                 Process gas hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the
                 following:

                                                  !       WARNING
                                              • Hazardous gas located within this
                                                enclosure.
                                              • Can cause serious injury or death.
                                              • Follow approved procedures
                                                before servicing.


                 Process By-Product Hazards
                 The process by-products of the machines are mostly unreacted (i.e., most of
                 the gases going in, come out in the same form). Among the products of
                 plasma reactions involving chlorocarbons, fluorocarbons, and combinations
                 thereof that have been detected in vacuum pump oil and on reactor surfaces
                 are hexachlorobenzene, hexachloroethane, and hexachlorobutadiene in small
                 concentrations. Depending on specific process parameters and choice of pho-
                 toresists, other chlorinated and fluorinated products, plus organic and
                 inorganic acids, may be present in used pump oil.



4   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                                 88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                           Safety
                   Process by-product hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the
                   following:

                                                    !   WARNING
                                                • Gas by-products and
                                                  contaminated part inside.
                                                • Can cause serious injury or death.
                                                • Follow approved procedures
                                                  before opening chamber.

                   Due to the variations in chemistry employed to meet application require-
                   ments, the exact constituents of effluents from the process family cannot be
                   defined. The following general precautions, however, should be observed:
                          • Wear solvent-proof Neoprene gloves when maintaining the reactor
                          surfaces and servicing the vacuum pump and its accessories.
                          • Wear eye protection when handling pump oil, internal components,
                          or accessories. Full face protection is recommended.
                          • Use fully enclosed vacuum pump oil changing equipment whenever
                          possible to eliminate chance contact with contaminated oil. If changing
                          the pump oil is not conducted under controlled conditions, such as
                          when working with closed systems, maintenance should be performed
                          in well-ventilated areas. If any doubt of the effectiveness of the ventila-
                          tion in an area exists, a respirator-type breathing apparatus must be
                          worn.
                          • In the event of skin contact with contaminated pump oil or deposits
                          from within the Reaction Chamber:
                              • ⇒Promptly flush the contact area with cold running water.
                              • ⇒Wash the contact area well with common soap and warm
                              water for 15 minutes.
                              • ⇒Contact first aid or plant safety personnel.

                   Oxygen Hazards
                   In plasma processing systems, reactive sputtering, glow discharge cleaning,
                   or oxide evaporation, it is quite common to use oxygen as a process gas
                   either alone or in conjunction with other gases. When pumping
                   greater-than-atmosphere concentrations of oxygen (approximately 21% by
                   volume), a pump specifically modified for oxygen applications should be uti-
                   lized to prevent possible explosion.




88-269-001 Rev E                                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1    5
Safety
                 Any time a cylinder of oxygen is attached to the system, the possibility exists
                 that 100% O2 may enter the pump and result in an explosion (e.g., via a leaky
                 valve or regulator). Oil-sealed rotary-vane pumps typically use some type of
                 hydrocarbon fluid for lubrication and vacuum sealing. As the gases pass
                 through the pumping stages, considerable heat is generated by compression
                 of the gases and friction from moving parts. Regardless of the inlet pressure, if
                 oxygen happens to be the dominant gas passing through the pump, the poten-
                 tial exists for an explosion due to the high compression ratio.
                 The continuous presence of a hydrocarbon-based fluid, along with a sus-
                 tained flow of oxygen, will support continuing combustion. Hydrocarbon pump
                 fluids are dangerous in most oxygen-service applications and therefore should
                 not be used.
                 Perfluoropolyether-type pump fluids are considered safe for use with oxygen.
                 The semiconductor industry trend is to use Fomblin or Krytox pump fluids for
                 oxygen-service applications. Fomblin and Krytox have good pumping, lubricat-
                 ing, and ultimate vacuum characteristics. They are inert to all but the most
                 reactive chemicals and Lewis acids and can therefore be used in direct con-
                 tact with oxygen, hexafluoride, fluorine, chlorine, boron trifluoride, and many
                 other gases.

                 Mechanical Hazards
                 Mechanical hazards may include moving parts, heavy or awkward parts, parts
                 causing restricted clearance, or parts with sharp edges. Sources of mechani-
                 cal hazards may include slit valves, wafer transport components, areas with
                 restricted clearance, or heavy items such as system modules. Failure to
                 observe mechanical hazard alerts may result in various injuries.
                 Mechanical hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the
                 following:

                                                  !   CAUTION

                                               • Heavy load.
                                               • Possibility of injury.
                                               • Two persons or mechanical
                                                 assist required for removal.



                                                  !   CAUTION

                                              • Low clearance.
                                              • Possibility of injury.
                                              • Use care when accessing this area.




6   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                              88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                          Safety
                   Magnetic Hazards
                   Some Tegal Reactors are equipped with a number of strong magnets in the
                   sidewall. If mishandled, these magnets can pose a hazard to personnel and
                   material. Some precautions are:
                          • The strong magnetic field may affect pacemaker operation. Stay
                          back at least 2 feet (0.6m).
                          • When handling these magnets, be aware of their proximity to other
                          ferrous metal objects. The magnets, when attracted, will move rapidly
                          and can seriously pinch the handler.
                          • Do not allow magnets near magnetic media, i.e., floppy disks, credit
                          cards, magnetic tape, etc., to avoid rendering such media useless.
                          • Do not use magnets to magnetize tools. The tools themselves can
                          become hazardous.
                   Magnetic hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the following:

                                                   !   WARNING

                                                 • Strong magnetic field.
                                                 • May affect pacemaker operation.
                                  PACEMAKER      • Stay back 2 feet (0,6m).
                                   WARNING



                   Ultraviolet Light (UV) Hazards
                   Ultraviolet (UV) light hazards can cause eye damage. UV light is generated as
                   a part of the plasma discharge glow during wafer processing. Each process
                   chamber has a viewport to view the process during etching. Removal of the
                   UV-filtered window cover can result in serious eye damage.
                   UV light hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the following:

                                                   !   CAUTION

                                                 • Ultraviolet light hazard.
                                                 • Can cause eye damage.
                                                 • Do not remove window cover.



                   Thermal Hazards
                   TEGAL etch systems have components that are heated. Touching these
                   heated surfaces before allowing them to cool can cause severe burns.




88-269-001 Rev E                                                               MS6500-05 Vol #1    7
Safety
                 Thermal hazard messages may include, but are not limited to, the following:

                                                 !   CAUTION

                                              • Hot surface.
                                              • Can cause injury.
                                              • Allow to cool to 50°C before
                                                servicing.



                 Decibel Levels (dBA)
                 Audible sound pressure readings, taken 3 feet (0,9 m) from the system, are
                 shown below in a diagram of systems with strip/rinse options. Readings for
                 systems without these options are essentially the same. The background deci-
                 bel level during standby is 70 dB(A).
                 Readings less than 80 dB(A) are considered nonhazardous.

                 Figure 1. Decibel Levels




8   MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                           88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                           Safety
Suggested safety and protective equipment
                   :

                                                   Table 1:
                       Equipment1                         Part Number
                   Neoprene Gloves                        Personal Protection Equip-
                                                          ment Gloves, Neoprene
                                                          (available from Lab Safety
                                                          Supply,
                                                          P/N 8A-17511) or equivalent
                   Respirator, Full Face                  Customer Provided
                   Respirator Filter — Multipur-          Customer Provided
                   pose Organic Vapor, Acid Gas,
                   P-100
                         1) or other vendors’ equivalent products


Lockout/Tagout Procedures
                   Lockout/Tagout procedures are an effective way to minimize exposure to
                   potential hazards. Maintenance procedures on TEGAL etch systems typically
                   involve control of hazardous energies from multiple sources. The same energy
                   sources may require control during several maintenance procedures. Major
                   energy sources include, but are not limited to, the following:
                             • Electricity
                             • Slit valves
                             • Process gases
                             • Stripper heater
                             • RF power
                             • Rinser
                             • Temperature control units
                             • Wafer transport components




88-269-001 Rev E                                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1   9
Safety
                The recommended control procedure for some of these hazardous energy
                sources is described in Table 2.
Table 2. Tegal 6500 Lockout/Tagout (Hazardous Energy Control) Procedures
Component             Shut Down             Isolate &             Dissipate &        Other
                                            Lockout               Verify             Comments
Electricity           Turn off electri-     Lock circuit          Attempt to restart None
                      cal power;            breakers in OFF       electrical power.
                      interrupt circuits    position. Lock        Test with multime-
                      with circuit break-   plug end of           ter where
                      ers. Unplug           cord-and-plug         applicable/possi-
                      components            components.           ble.
                      where applicable.
Process               Turn off process Close two valves           Attempt to flow    Purge gas sup-
Gases                 gas supply using (manual valve at           gases from sys-    ply lines per
                      system software. process cham-              tem software.      procedure
                                       ber and manual             Zero flow should   before begin-
                                       valves for each            appear once        ning work.
                                       gas at rear of             residual flows
                                       tool). Cover and           from line.
                                       lock valves in
                                       OFF position.
RF Power              Turn off RF gen-      Lock circuit          Attempt to run RF None
                      erators using         breaker in OFF        using system soft-
                      circuit breaker on    position at the RF    ware. Zero RF
                      generator.            generator or at       power should be
                                            the remote PDM        indicated.
                                            panel.
Temperature           Turn down Tem-        Turn off the TCU      Attempt to        None
Control Units         perature Control      circuit breaker.      increase TCU set-
(TCU)                 Unit (TCU) set-       Lock circuit          point using
                      point using           breaker in OFF        system software.
                      system software.      position. Alterna-    Verify that tem-
                                            tively,               perature is less
                                            double-block hot      than 50°C on
                                            water lines to tool   CRT monitor and
                                            by locking out        use temperature
                                            two valves.           probe on
                                                                  chamber/elec-
                                                                  trode.
Slit Valves           Open/close slit       Remove and      Attempt to               Opening and
                      valve using sys-      clamp pneumatic open/close slit          closing slit
                      tem software.         line.           valve using sys-         valves per
                                                            tem software. Slit       required
                                                            valve should not         procedure.
                                                            open/close.



10 MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                                    88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                         Safety
Table 2. Tegal 6500 Lockout/Tagout (Hazardous Energy Control) Procedures
Component             Shut Down          Isolate &           Dissipate &         Other
                                         Lockout             Verify              Comments
Stripper              Turn off heater    Lock out breaker Attempt to turn on None
Heater                module breaker.    on AC module.    breaker. Use tem-
                                                          perature probe to
                                                          verify chuck tem-
                                                          perature is less
                                                          than 50°C.
DI Water for          Turn off heater    Lock out breaker Measure temper- None
Rinser                module breaker.    on AC module.    ature of DI water
                                                          in rinser with tem-
                                                          perature probe;
                                                          verify tempera-
                                                          ture is less than
                                                          50°C. Drain DI
                                                          water.

Environmental Regulations 6500 Series
                   Several U.S. Federal regulations control the use and handling of chlorine and
                   hydrogen bromide used in the 6500 Series Etchers. Tegal advises the end
                   user of the following Federal regulations:
                   Chlorine is listed as a hazardous chemical in Title III of SARA Section 313 and
                   Section 6607 of the Pollution Prevention Act of SARA (reference: EPA Emer-
                   gency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313) (40CFR Part
                   372). This regulation requires annual reporting of releases, transfers, and
                   waste management data.
                   Chlorine is listed as an extremely hazardous material in Title III of SARA Sec-
                   tion 302, Extremely Hazardous Substances (reference: EPA Emergency
                   Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 302) (40CFR Part 355).
                   As such, stored quantities of Cl2 in excess of 100 pounds are subject to the
                   emergency planning requirements specified in this code.
                   Chlorine is listed as an extremely hazardous material in Title III of SARA Sec-
                   tion 304, Extremely Hazardous Substances (reference: EPA Emergency
                   Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 304). As such, releases
                   of 10 pounds or more of Cl2 are subject to state and local reporting
                   requirements.
                   Additionally, releases of 10 pounds or more of Cl2 are subject to the reporting
                   requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensa-
                   tion, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Such releases must be reported to
                   the National Response Center.
                   Accident prevention requirements are specified in the Federal Clean Air Act of
                   1990, Section 112(r), if quantities of 2500 pounds or more of Cl2 are stored at
                   a facility.


88-269-001 Rev E                                                              MS6500-05 Vol #1   11
Safety
                Cl2 is considered a hazardous air pollutant by the U.S. EPA and is controlled
                in accordance with the guidelines of the 1990 amendments to the Federal
                Clean Air Act.
                Chlorine is also regulated by NESHAP (National Emission Standard for Haz-
                ardous Air Pollutants) (reference: EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and
                Standards).
                As a hazardous substance, the use of Cl2 is also subject to the provisions of
                CFR 29 1910.1200. This Federal regulation specifies the requirements of the
                Hazard Communication Standard in the workplace through the use of the
                MSDS.
                Potential future Federal regulations include a requirement for a risk manage-
                ment program. This bill as proposed was published in the Federal Register on
                October 20, 1993.
                HBr is not Federally regulated as a hazardous material but is regulated at the
                state and local levels.
                Individual state and local regulations, all of which cannot be enumerated here,
                must also be considered when using and handling Cl2 and HBr. The following
                examples are California statutes:
                       • In California, chlorine and hydrogen bromide are classified as
                       extremely hazardous substances. Title 8 of the California Industrial
                       Relations code number 5189 requires special process management
                       practice when threshold quantities of these chemicals are kept.
                       • California Code of Regulations (CCR) section 66261 specifies that
                       the effluent of a process that employs hazardous substances is
                       assumed to be hazardous and is to be managed according to all State
                       regulations.
                       • Cl2 is considered a toxic air contaminant by the California Air
                       Resources Board and is subject to the controls specified in AB 1807,
                       April 1993.
                       • The locations where Cl2 is used and stored are considered air toxic
                       "hot spots" by the California Air Resources Board and are subject to
                       the regulations specified in AB 2588, June 1993.
                       • Cl2 and HBr are considered inhalation hazard chemicals by the Cali-
                       fornia Department of Transportation, and the transfer of these
                       chemicals is controlled in accordance with the regulations of this code
                       dated March 1993.
                       • In California, Cl2 and HBr are on the extremely hazardous materials
                       list (AKA 'The Directors List') and are subject to the regulations in Title
                       8 of the Industrial Relations dated January 1994. Also, permissible
                       exposure limits for Cl2 and HBr are specified by the California Depart-
                       ment of Industrial Relations (May 1995).




12 MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                                88-269-001 Rev E
                                                                                          Safety
Recommended Abatement Technology
                   Based on the by-products identified in the effluent of the 65XX systems, Table
                   2 below identifies the recommended abatement technology for efficient
                   removal of hazardous process by-products in the Tegal 65XX etch system
                   waste stream:

                                      Table 3:
                   Table 4. Recommended Abatement Technology
                   Etch System                 Abatement
                                               Technology
                   6540 w/ Rinse & Strip Option -          - wet scrubber
                   Pt/PZT                            - hot reactor bed
                                                     (POU1)
                   6520 w/ Rinse & Strip Option - Al - wet scrubber
                                                     - hot reactor bed
                                                     (POU1)
                   6510 - Poly                       - wet scrubber
                                                           - hot reactor bed
                                                           (POU1)
                      1) point-of-use

                   Several methods exist that are capable of removing the process by-products
                   from the effluent stream. Some are reportedly more effective than others in
                   terms of efficiency and neutralization. The oldest abatement technology is to
                   exhaust this effluent into the house wet scrub system, which is normally
                   present in a wafer manufacturing facility. Unfortunately, the presence of water
                   greatly enhances the formation of inorganic solids, which results in clogged
                   exhaust systems and more frequent maintenance. Also, some hazardous
                   compounds, such as organochlorides, will not be treated, and they can be
                   ingrained in the solids, thereby exposing exhaust maintenance workers to
                   extremely hazardous substances.
                   The trend of the industry is to abate the process by-products at the
                   point-of-use (POU), which localizes containment of the process effluent allow-
                   ing ease of handling. Several POU technologies, as described below, are
                   available for controlling these process by-products. Some technologies are not
                   recommended for use with the Tegal 65XX etch systems.
                          • Burners-oxidizers convert the effluent gases into other compounds.
                          This technology is not suitable because it has the potential to convert
                          the chlorine and bromine effluent into measurable quantities of
                          extremely hazardous materials (e.g., furans and dioxins).




88-269-001 Rev E                                                               MS6500-05 Vol #1   13
Safety
                      • Plasma pretreatment technology is applied before the effluent
                      reaches the vacuum pump. In this process the effluent is reacted with
                      other ionized species to create solids that deposit in a collector. This
                      method of abatement is suitable for non-plasma process effluent, such
                      as LPCVD applications. In the 65XX reactor the effluent has already
                      been plasma treated.
                      • POU dry scrubbers are chemi-adsorbent materials that capture the
                      effluent onto adsorbent granules. The granules can be coated with a
                      reactive agent that promotes neutralization of the effluent. In cold dry
                      scrubbers some of the exhaust compounds are not neutralized and
                      simply adsorb onto the granules. Upon exposure to atmosphere, some
                      of the adsorbed species, which should be considered hazardous, may
                      revolatilize, and the cartridges must therefore be handled as hazard-
                      ous waste. Hot reactor beds are essentially hot dry scrubbers and are
                      much more efficient in effluent neutralization. This method is reported
                      to make inert 99% of all process by-products by chemical conversion.
                      The effluent cartridges last about 5 weeks, and no hazardous waste is
                      involved. The benefits of hot reactor beds include cost effectiveness,
                      non-hazardous cartridge disposal, and, if available, recycling.
                More information on abatement technologies may be obtained from Semicon-
                ductor Safety Association (a trade group) at (703) 790-1745.




14 MS6500-05 Vol #1                                                            88-269-001 Rev E
                                                    Section 2

Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE Etch
     Systems
                                                                           88-236-004
                                                                           Rev C
                   The Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE Etch Systems are used by the Semicon-
                   ductor Industry for integrated circuit fabrication. The systems are used in one
                   part of the sequence of manufacturing steps that transfer a pattern formed
                   from a layer of photosensitive material, the photoresist, to a layer that makes
                   up a permanent part of the finished device. The process of defining a pattern
                   with photoresist is known as photolithography, while the process that trans-
                   fers the photoresist pattern to the permanent layer is the actual etch process.
                   The materials used in semiconductor device fabrication may be etched in two
                   ways, either wet or dry. In wet etching, the material to be etched comes into
                   contact with a liquid in which the material dissolves. The action of the liquid
                   solvent removes material that is exposed to the solution. Material that is
                   masked, or covered, by the photoresist remains after etching as a permanent
                   pattern. Dry etching, also termed plasma etching, substitutes a reactive gas
                   mixture for the liquid solvent to accomplish the same result of pattern trans-
                   fer. Dry etching is capable of transferring smaller features into the permanent
                   layer than wet etching, with greater control over the variation in feature size.
                   The current requirements of the Semiconductor Industry necessitate the use
                   of dry etching for most of the pattern transfer steps. As semiconductor
                   devices become denser and faster, the shift to dry etching will continue.
                   Dry etching systems are divided into two broad categories: batch etchers and
                   single-wafer etchers. Batch etching systems etch more than one wafer at a
                   time, while single-wafer systems process just one wafer to completion before
                   proceeding to the next. The Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE Systems are sin-
                   gle-wafer etchers.
                   Wafers in the machine are transported to a wafer aligner and then to one of
                   the two Reaction Chambers. A gas mixture is introduced into the Reaction
                   Chamber, and the gas mixture is made reactive by the application of radio fre-
                   quency (RF) electromagnetic radiation. The reactive mixture, or plasma,
                   etches away material that is not covered by the masking photoresist. The
                   etch process is terminated at an appropriate time, and the wafer is then
                   unloaded from the Reaction Chamber, at which time it may be introduced to
                   the other Reaction Chamber for a subsequent process. The cycle repeats.




88-236-004 Rev C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2     1
Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE Etch Systems

                 The general mechanisms by which etching proceeds in a plasma etching sys-
                 tem are as follows: RF power accelerates free electrons in a low pressure gas
                 mixture. The accelerated electrons undergo collisions with gas molecules,
                 resulting in the generation of several new species. If the gas molecules are
                 broken apart, or dissociated, free radicals are formed. Free radicals are
                 chemically reactive molecule fragments with no net electrical charge. Radi-
                 cals which come into contact with material on the wafer surface may be
                 sufficiently reactive chemically to combine with the surface to form volatile
                 reaction products. The gas molecules may be dissociated and ionized, in
                 which case the molecule fragments have a net electrical charge and respond
                 to electrical fields present in the reactor. Ions accelerated to the wafer sur-
                 face may provide sufficient energy to activate chemical reactions between the
                 surface and gas radicals or the surface and neutral gas species. This results
                 in etching the surface material. Finally, gas molecules may capture energy
                 from the accelerated electrons and then release the captured energy as a
                 photon, or light. This last process accounts for the glow which is characteris-
                 tic of plasmas.
                 The Tegal 6500 Series Plasma/RlE etchers have been configured to take
                 advantage of the characteristics of plasmas for etching various films. Each of
                 the models in the 6500 family has been optimized for specific etches of spe-
                 cific films. All models have the common ability to implement multistep etch
                 recipes using multiple process gases. An optical monitoring system provides
                 a means for determining etch completion so the etch process can be
                 terminated.
                 This volume provides basic information covering the operation and mainte-
                 nance of 6500 series etchers. Careful reading of the information provided as
                 well as adherence to specified procedures will contribute to optimum system
                 performance and minimum maintenance downtime. For any problems not
                 resolvable by on-site maintenance personnel, call the local Tegal
                 representative.




2   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                  88-236-004 Rev C
                                                    Abbreviations and Acronyms

Abbreviations and Acronyms
A
                   • A.........................................Amperes or Actual
                   • A/D .....................................Analog to digital
                   • ABS ....................................Absolute voltage threshold
                   • AC ......................................Alternating current
                   • ACCEL ...............................Accelerate
                   • ACE....................................Atmospheric cassette elevator
                   • ACK....................................Acknowledgment
                   • ACM ...................................AC module
                   • ACP....................................Atmospheric cassette platform
                   • ADC....................................Analog-to-digital converter
                   • ADE....................................(Manufacturer of Tegal's atmospheric
                                                            robot)
                   • ADJ ....................................Adjustment
                   • ADPTR ...............................Adapter
                   • AIM.....................................Active inverted magnetron (gauge)
                   • AKA ....................................Also known as
                   • ALT .....................................Alternate (keyboard command)
                   • AMP ...................................Ampere
                   • ANN....................................Annunciator
                   • ANSI...................................American National Standards Institute
                   • APM ...................................Active penning magnetron (gauge)
                   • ASCII..................................American Standard Code for Information
                                                            Interchange
                   • ASSY..................................Assembly
                   • ATM ....................................Atmosphere, atmospheric
                   • ATTL...................................Transistor-transistor logic level
                   • AUX....................................Auxiliary board (PCB)
                   • AVG ....................................Average
                   • AVME .................................Versa module European (industrial bus
                                                           standard)
                   • AWG...................................American wire gauge (standard)

B
                   • BLK ....................................Black



88-236-004 Rev C                                                          MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   3
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                         • BLU ....................................Blue
                         • BP.......................................Backplane
                         • BRKT..................................Bracket
                         • BRN....................................Brown
                         • BTC ...................................Batch file

C
                         • °C .......................................centigrade (degrees)
                         • CA ......................................Calibrated
                         • CAP ....................................Capacitor or Control alternative plus
                         • CASS..................................Cassette
                         • CB ......................................Circuit breaker
                         • CC ......................................Cubic centimeter or Control computer
                         • CCD....................................Charged coupled device or Cold cath-
                                                                  ode discharge
                         • CCR....................................California Code of Regulations
                         • CCW...................................Counterclockwise
                         • CD ......................................Critical dimension
                         • CDA....................................Clean dry air
                         • CE ......................................Community European
                         • CER....................................Ceramic
                         • CERCLA.............................Comprehensive Environmental
                                                              Response, Compensation, & Liability Act
                                                              (1980)
                         • CF.......................................Conversion factor or Cubic feet
                         • CFG....................................Configuration
                         • CFM....................................Cubic feet per minute
                         • CGA....................................Color graphics adapter
                         • CHI .....................................Cluster human interface
                         • CHK....................................Check
                         • CM......................................Cassette module or Centimeter (cm)
                         • CNV....................................Converter
                         • COAX .................................Coaxial
                         • COMM ................................Communication
                         • CONFIG .............................Configuration
                         • CONN.................................Connector
                         • CONT or CTRL...................Control
                         • CPS ....................................Cycles per second or Characters per
                                                                   second


4   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                               88-236-004 Rev C
                                                     Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • CPU....................................Central processing unit
                   • CRT ....................................Cathode ray tube
                   • CS .....................................Cassette or Cross section
                   • CSL ....................................Console
                   • CTC....................................Cluster tool controller
                   • CTRL or CONT ..................Control
                   • CTRLR ...............................Controller
                   • CTS ....................................Clear to send (a signal)
                   • CVD....................................Chemical vapor deposition
                   • CW .....................................Continuous wave or Clockwise
                   • CWR...................................Cold water return
                   • CWS...................................Cold water supply
                   • CYL ....................................Cylinder

D
                   • D.........................................Display
                   • D/A .....................................Digital to analog
                   • DAC....................................Digital-to-analog converter
                   • DC ......................................Direct current
                   • DCM ...................................DC module
                   • DCV....................................DC voltage
                   • DDC ...................................Direct digital control
                   • DE ......................................Drawing, electrical
                   • DEI .....................................Deionized
                   • DELIV.................................Delivery
                   • DI........................................Dionized (water) or Drawing, illustrated
                   • DIA .....................................Diameter
                   • DIG.....................................Digital
                   • DIN .....................................Deutsche Industrie Normenausschuss
                   • DIR .....................................Directory
                   • DIST ...................................Distribution
                   • DIV .....................................Division
                   • DMM...................................Digital multimeter
                   • DOS ...................................Disk operating system
                   • DRAM.................................Dynamic random access memory (RAM)
                   • DSR....................................Data set ready (signal)
                   • DTE ....................................Data terminal equipment
                   • DTR....................................Data terminal ready (signal)


88-236-004 Rev C                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   5
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                         • DUT ....................................Device under test
                         • DVM ...................................Digital voltmeter
                         • DWG...................................Drawing

E
                         • EA.......................................Each
                         • EE.......................................End effector
                         • EIA......................................Electronic Industries Association
                         • ELEV ..................................Elevator
                         • EMO ...................................Emergency machine off
                         • ENI .....................................Electronics Navigation Inc. (RF genera-
                                                                    tor manufacturer)
                         • EP.......................................Endpoint
                         • EPA ....................................Environmental Protection Agency
                         • ESC ....................................Electrostatic clamp
                         • ESD ....................................Electrostatic discharge
                         • EUR....................................Europe
                         • EVAC..................................Evacuation
                         • EXHST ...............................Exhaust
                         • EXT ....................................External

F
                         • F or °F ................................Fahrenheit (degrees) or Female or
                                                                   Finger
                         • FDDA..................................Floppy disk drive A
                         • FDDB..................................Floppy disk drive B
                         • FE.......................................Field Engineer
                         • FIRQ...................................Fast interrupt request
                         • FLH ....................................Flathead (screw)
                         • FLTR...................................Filter
                         • FNPT ..................................Female National Pipe Thread standard
                         • FRU ....................................Field replaceable unit
                         • FS.......................................Full scale
                         • FW......................................Fault & warning
                         • FWD ...................................Forward
                         • FXNS..................................Functions

G
                         • GC ......................................Gold calibration (ADE robot software)


6   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                              88-236-004 Rev C
                                                      Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • GCA ...................................Compressed Gas Association
                   • GEN ...................................Generator
                   • GHZ....................................Gigahertz (gHz)
                   • GNB ...................................Ground bus
                   • GND ...................................Ground
                   • GPH ...................................Gallons per hour
                   • GPM ...................................Gallons per minute
                   • GRN ...................................Green
                   • GRY....................................Gray
                   • GSC ...................................Gas control switch

H
                   • H.........................................High or Height
                   • HD ......................................Head or Hard disk
                   • HDWR ................................Hardware
                   • HF ......................................High frequency (3 to 30 MHz) or Hydrof-
                                                              luoric acid
                   • HI........................................Human interface (video terminals) or
                                                               High
                   • HRe ....................................High density reflected electron
                   • HSG ...................................Housing
                   • HV ......................................High voltage
                   • HVAC, HIVAC.....................High vacuum
                   • HW .....................................Hardware (range or scale)
                   • HZ ......................................Hertz (Hz)

I
                   • I&W ....................................Installation and warranty
                   • I/F .......................................Interface
                   • I/L .......................................Interlock
                   • I/O ......................................Input/output (devices)
                   • IC........................................Integrated circuit
                   • ID........................................Inside dimension
                   • IDE .....................................Integrated device electronics (hard disk
                                                              drive standard)
                   • IEEE ...................................Institute of Electrical & Electronic
                                                             Engineers
                   • IMS.....................................Intelligent Motion Systems, Inc. (rinser
                                                             motor controller manufacturer)



88-236-004 Rev C                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   7
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                         • IN........................................Inch
                         • IN/HG .................................U.S. inches of mercury
                         • INIT.....................................Initialization
                         • INTLK .................................Interlock
                         • IPA......................................Isopropyl alcohol
                         • IPB......................................Illustrated parts breakdown
                         • IR........................................Infrared
                         • ISA......................................Industry PC bus standard
                         • ISO .....................................International Standards Organization
                         • ISO, ISOL ...........................Isolation

J
                         • J..........................................Jumper
                         • JMP ....................................Jumper
                         • J/P ......................................Jack, plug

K
                         • °K .......................................Kelvin (degrees) absolute (°C + 273)
                         • K .........................................Kilo
                         • KG ......................................Kilogram
                         • KHZ ....................................Kilohertz (1000 hertz) (kHz)
                         • KOHM.................................Kilohm (1000 ohms) (Kohm)
                         • KVA ....................................Kilovolt amperes
                         • KW......................................Kilowatt (kW)

L
                         • LAN ....................................Local area network
                         • LB .......................................Pound
                         • LCD ....................................Liquid crystal display
                         • LE .......................................Lower electrode
                         • LED ....................................Light-emitting diode
                         • LF .......................................Low frequency (30 to 300 kHz)
                         • LKG ....................................Locking
                         • LPCVD ...............................Low pressure chemical vapor deposition
                         • LPG ....................................Liters per gallon
                         • LPH ....................................Liters per hour
                         • LPM ....................................Liters per minute
                         • LPS.....................................Liters per second
                         • LSI ......................................Large scale integration


8   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                                88-236-004 Rev C
                                                      Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • LWR....................................Lower

M
                   • M ........................................Male
                   • M/F .....................................Male/female
                   • mA......................................Milliampere
                   • MA......................................Megampere
                   • MAINT ................................Maintenance
                   • MANO ................................Manometer
                   • MAT NET............................Matching network
                   • MATCH...............................Matching
                   • MAX ...................................Maximum
                   • MB or MBAR ......................Millibar (a pressure measurement) (mB,
                                                      mBar)
                   • MC......................................Main chamber
                   • MDL....................................Model
                   • MFC ...................................Mass flow controller
                   • MHZ ...................................Megahertz (MHz)
                   • µF .......................................Microfarad
                   • µH.......................................Microhenry
                   • MicroP ................................Microprocessor
                   • MILS...................................0.001 inch
                   • MIN.....................................Minimum or Minute
                   • MKS ...................................(Manometer manufacturer)
                   • MM .....................................Millimeter (mm)
                   • MNFD.................................Manifold
                   • MNPT .................................Male National Pipe Thread standard
                   • MPU ...................................Microprocessor unit
                   • MS or MSEC ......................Millisecond
                   • MSDS.................................Material Safety Data Sheets
                   • MT or MTORR....................Millitorr (mT, mTorr)
                   • MV......................................millivolt (mV)
                   • MVME ................................Male VME

N
                   • NA ......................................Not available or Not applicable
                   • NC ......................................Normally closed
                   • NESHAP ............................National Emission Standard for Hazard-
                                                        ous Air Pollutants


88-236-004 Rev C                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   9
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                        • NO ......................................Number or Normally open
                        • NPT ....................................National Pipe Thread (standard)
                        • NS ......................................Not shown
                        • NTWK.................................Network
                        • NU ......................................Nonuniformity
                        • NW .....................................(Fitting measurement)

O
                        • Ø.........................................Phase (pronounced "fee")
                        • OD ......................................Outside dimension
                        • OEM ...................................Operations & Equipment Manual or Origi-
                                                                 nal equipment manufacturer
                        • OES....................................Optical emission spectroscopy
                        • OP ......................................Operation or Operations (procedures)
                        • OP CSL ..............................Operator console
                        • OPCON ..............................Operator console
                        • OPT ....................................Optical
                        • ORN ...................................Orange
                        • OS ......................................Operating system

P
                        • P .........................................Purge
                        • PC ......................................Personal computer or Power conditioner
                        • PCB or PCBD.....................Printed circuit board
                        • PD ......................................Process dependent
                        • PDM ...................................Power distribution module
                        • PECVD ...............................Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor
                                                               deposition
                        • PF.......................................Picofarad (pF)
                        • PG ......................................Pressure gauge or Page
                        • PH ......................................Process head or Phase
                        • PHIF ...................................Process (module) human interface
                        • PI ........................................Proportional & integral
                        • P&ID ...................................Piping & instrumentation drawing
                        • PID .....................................Proportional/integral/derivative
                        • PIG .....................................Penning ion gauge (inverted magnetron
                                                                   gauge, cold cathode ionization gauge)
                        • PIN .....................................Positive intrinsic negative (transistor)
                        • PK-to-PK ............................Peak to peak


10 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                                 88-236-004 Rev C
                                                      Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • PL/SST...............................Plastic/stainless steel
                   • PLAT...................................Platform (cassette platform in vacuum
                                                            cassette elevator)
                   • PLCS..................................Places
                   • PM......................................Planned Maintenance or Process Mod-
                                                             ule or Product Manager
                   • PMC ...................................Process module controller or Planned
                                                            maintenance cycle
                   • PMHI ..................................Process module human interface
                   • PMX ...................................Process module un-designated (= x)
                   • P/N .....................................Part number
                   • PNEU .................................Pneumatic
                   • PNH....................................Pinhead (screw)
                   • POSIT ................................Position
                   • POT....................................Potentiometer
                   • POU ...................................Point-of-use
                   • PP ......................................Pages or Process program
                   • PPM ...................................Parts per minute
                   • PR ......................................Photoresist
                   • PRES .................................Present
                   • PRESS ...............................Pressure
                   • PROC.................................Process
                   • PROM ................................Programmable read-only memory
                   • PS ......................................Pressure sensor
                   • PSI .....................................Pounds per square inch
                   • PSIA ...................................Pounds per square inch, absolute
                   • PSID...................................Pounds per square inch, differential
                   • PSIG...................................Pounds per square inch, gauge
                                                            (graduated)
                   • PT.......................................Point
                   • PV ......................................Process verification
                   • PWR...................................Power
                   • PZT ....................................Platinum zinc

R
                   • R.........................................Radius or Red
                   • RAM ...................................Random access memory
                   • RCASS...............................Receiver cassette
                   • RCP....................................Recipe


88-236-004 Rev C                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   11
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                        • RCV....................................Receiver
                        • RECIRC..............................Recirculator
                        • REF or REFL......................Reflected
                        • REQ....................................Required or Requested
                        • RESEV ...............................Reservoir
                        • RF.......................................Radio frequency
                        • RFG....................................RF generator
                        • RFHF..................................RF high frequency
                        • RFI......................................RF interference
                        • RFL.....................................Reflected (also REF or REFL)
                        • RFLF ..................................RF low frequency
                        • RGB....................................Red, green, blue
                        • RIE .....................................Reactive ion etch
                        • RIM.....................................Remote interface module
                        • RMS ...................................Root-mean-square (multimeter) or Rec-
                                                                 ipe management service
                        • RNSR .................................Rinser
                        • RofR ...................................Rate of rise
                        • ROM ...................................Read-only memory (fixed memory)
                        • RPM ...................................Revolutions per minute
                        • RS ......................................Industry standard communication proto-
                                                                   col (EIA spec #)
                        • RSP ....................................Rotor stop positioner
                        • RST ....................................Reset
                        • RTN ....................................Return
                        • RTS ....................................Request to send (signal)
                        • RW .....................................Read/write or Rework
                        • RX ......................................Receive line in RS-232 communication
                                                                   spec

S
                        • S .........................................Setpoint or Seal (bowl)
                        • SC ......................................System controller or Screw
                        • SCASS ...............................Sender cassette
                        • SCCM.................................Standard cubic centimeters per minute
                        • SCH....................................Schematic
                        • SCI .....................................System cable interface
                        • SCR....................................Screw
                        • SCSI ...................................Small computer system interface


12 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                                 88-236-004 Rev C
                                                      Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • SDR....................................Sender
                   • SEC....................................Second
                   • SECS .................................Semiconductor Equipment Communica-
                                                           tions Standard
                   • SEM ...................................Scanning electronic microscope
                   • SEMI ..................................Semiconductor Equipment & Materials
                                                            International or Semiconductor
                                                            Equipment Manufacturers Institute
                   • SEQ....................................Sequence
                   • SETPT................................Setpoint
                   • SHLDR ...............................Shoulder
                   • SHT ....................................Sheet
                   • SID .....................................(Relay socket)
                   • SLM....................................Standard liters per minute
                   • SMIF...................................Standard mechanical interface
                   • S/N .....................................Serial number
                   • SNSR .................................Sensor
                   • SP ......................................Speed
                   • SPE ....................................Service Product Engineer(ing)
                   • SPEC .................................Specification
                   • SS ......................................Solid state or Stainless steel
                   • SSI .....................................Small scale integration
                   • SSR....................................Solid-state relay
                   • SST ....................................Stainless steel
                   • STD ....................................Standard
                   • STDF..................................Standoff
                   • STEC..................................Manufacturer of pressure measuring
                                                           device (flow calibration tool)
                   • STI......................................Semitool Interface program for rinser
                   • STP ....................................Standard temperature & pressure
                   • SW .....................................Switch
                   • SWL ...................................(Type of fab sensor)

T
                   • T .........................................Theta
                   • TAS.....................................Temperature adjustment switch
                   • TB.......................................Terminal board
                   • TCP ....................................(Aligner LED/Sensor check)
                   • TCU....................................Temperature Control Unit


88-236-004 Rev C                                                        MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   13
Abbreviations and Acronyms

                        • TCWR.................................Temperature Controller water return
                        • TCWS.................................Temperature Controller water supply
                        • TEMP .................................Temperature
                        • THD ....................................Thread
                        • TLV .....................................Threshold limit value
                        • TM ......................................Transport module
                        • TMC....................................Transport module controller
                        • TMHI...................................Transport module human interface
                        • TMP....................................Turbo molecular pump or Temperature
                        • TP.......................................Test point
                        • TRANS ...............................Transition or Transport
                        • TS.......................................Touchscreen or Temperature sensor
                        • TTL .....................................Transistor-transistor logic
                        • TTW....................................Through-the-wall
                        • TV.......................................Throttle valve
                        • TX.......................................Transmit line in RS-232 communication
                                                                   spec

U
                        • UFC ....................................Universal flow controller
                        • UHF ....................................Ultra high frequency
                        • UHV....................................Ultra high vacuum
                        • UPC....................................Unit Instruments pressure controller
                        • UPR....................................Upper
                        • UPS ....................................Uninterrupted power supply
                        • UUT ....................................Unit under test

V
                        • V .........................................Volts or Valve
                        • VA.......................................Valve, air
                        • VAC ....................................Voltage alternating current or Vacuum
                        • VAR ....................................Volt-ampere reactive
                        • VCE ....................................Vacuum cassette elevator
                        • VCR....................................(Type of fitting)
                        • VDC....................................Volts DC
                        • VDCW ................................DC working voltage
                        • VDT ....................................Video display terminal
                        • VERT..................................Vertical



14 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                                                   88-236-004 Rev C
                                                     Abbreviations and Acronyms
                   • VGA....................................Video Graphics Adapter
                   • VHSIC ................................Very high speed integrated circuit
                   • VIO, VIOL...........................Violet
                   • VLF....................................Very low frequency
                   • VLSI ...................................Very large scale integration
                   • VME ...................................Versa module European (industrial bus
                                                            standard)
                   • VOL ....................................Volume
                   • VOM ...................................Volt ohmmeter
                   • VP ......................................Valve, pilot
                   • VS ......................................Valve, solenoid
                   • VT.......................................Valve, throttle

W
                   • W........................................Watts or Width
                   • W/.......................................With
                   • W/OUT ...............................Without
                   • WHT ...................................White
                   • WPH...................................Wafers per hour
                   • WTC ...................................Wafer temperature control
                   • WW ....................................Wire wound

X
                   • XDUCER ............................Transducer
                   • XFER..................................Transfer
                   • XPORT ...............................Transport

Y
                   • YEL ....................................Yellow

Z
                   • ZIF......................................Zero insertion force




88-236-004 Rev C                                                             MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2   15
Abbreviations and Acronyms




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




16 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #2                                        88-236-004 Rev C
                                     Table Of Contents
                             Operator Push Buttons
                                                    Section 3
                                                                       88-280-001
                                                                       Rev C
Operator Push buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      EMO Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
      Footswitch Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
      Load/Unload Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      Machine On/Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      Machine Off Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Abort Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    Clear Wafers Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
      History Button 4
    Event Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
    Recovery Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Silence Button (alarm). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    En/Disable Button (alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
      Start Options Button (Unicassette) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8




88-280-001 Rev C                                                                          MS6500-05 Rev C Vol #1         i
                    THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




ii   MS6500-05 Rev C Vol #1                              88-280-001 Rev C
Operator Push buttons
                                                                           88-280-001
                                                                           Rev C
                   This section provides a description of buttons located on the system, as well
                   as touchscreen buttons.

                   System Buttons                Touchscreen Buttons
                   EMO                          Abort
                   Footswitch                   Clear Wafers
                   Load/Unload                  History
                   Machine On/Reset             Events
                   Machine Off                  Recover
                                                Silence (Alarm)
                                                En/Disable (Alarm)
                                                Touch Calibrate
                                                START Option
                                                (Unicassette)
                                                Endpoint

EMO Buttons
                   There are seven EMO (Emergency Machine Off) buttons on the Tegal 6500.
                   These buttons are tied together in a series circuit. Each EMO is a nor-
                   mally-closed switch that, when pushed, shuts off power to the system.
                   Depending on the configuration of the Power Distribution Module (Extended or
                   Non-Extended), power to the facilities may also be shut off.
                   The seven EMO buttons are located as shown in the table below and in
                   Figure 1.

                   EMO              # of Buttons ID #        Location
                   Facade           2               S13      Upper left- and right-hand
                                                             corners of the facade.
                   PDM              1                        Front panel of PDM.
                   Operator         1               S10      Rear of Console next to
                   Console                                   the OPER/MAINT
                                                             keyswitch.
                   Frame            3                        Around the frame, one
                                                             each on left, right, and rear
                                                             panels of the system.



88-280-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3    1
Operator Push buttons
                 Figure 1. EMO Button Locations




Footswitch Buttons
                 The Footswitch buttons (S12) (Figure 2) are located on the floor beneath each
                 of the cassette modules (CM1 & CM2). When a footswitch for a CM is
                 pressed, the corresponding shield door opens if it is closed and closes if it is
                 open. Load/Unload buttons perform the same function.

Load/Unload Buttons
                 The Load/Unload buttons (S11) (Figure 2) are located above each of the cas-
                 sette modules (CM1 & CM2). These buttons perform the same function as the
                 Footswitch buttons.

Machine On/Reset Button
                 The Machine-On/Reset button (S5) (Figure 2) turns the machine on if it is in
                 an unpowered state or resets the CTC and VME if the machine is already
                 powered on.

Machine Off Button


2   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3                                                   88-280-001 Rev C
                                                              Operator Push buttons
                   The Machine-Off button (S6) (Figure 2) turns the machine off.

                   Figure 2. Load/Unload, Machine On/Off, Foot Pedals




                   Abort Button
                   The ABORT button (Figure 3) in the top banner should be used with caution.
                   Pressing this button will immediately stop all processes, elevators, and aligner
                   and robot motions, possibly leaving these various devices in indeterminate
                   states (such as a robot partially extended into a chamber). See Section IV,
                   “Fault Alarms,” on page 21, of the Operators’ Guide for additional information.

                   Clear Wafers Button
                   The Clear Wafers button (Figure 3) moves wafers that are present in the sys-
                   tem to a cassette. If the ABORT button was pushed during a sequence or
                   cycling, the Clear Wafers button is used to remove the remaining wafers from
                   the modules and return them to the cassette, where they can be removed or
                   reprocessed.




88-280-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3   3
Operator Push buttons
                 Figure 3. Abort & Clear Wafers Buttons




History Button
                 The History button (Figure 4) is used to track previously processed wafers.
                 The Lot History screen (Figure 5), which holds up to 100 lots of data, contains
                 start and stop times, lot identification, user name, and alarm status (Figure 6).

                 Figure 4. History Button




4   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3                                                    88-280-001 Rev C
                                                              Operator Push buttons
                   Figure 5. Lot History Screen




                   Figure 6. Alarm Status Screen




                   Event Button
                   The Events button (Figure 5) allows the user to view the description, date, and
                   time of previous alarms. This alarm information is stored in 100-alarm log his-
                   tory files on the system controller hard drive. Each history file can record 100
                   alarm messages describing when an alarm was posted, recovered from, and
                   cleared (Figure 7).



88-280-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3   5
Operator Push buttons
                 Figure 7. Event History Screen




                 Recovery Button
                 The Recover button (Figure 8) is used to retry the last command made before
                 a fault occurred. Press this button if a process or mechanical condition has
                 caused a fault. Some of these conditions may be temporary; if so, the alarm
                 will signal the system to continue its routines.
                         • Do not recover alarms if you are unsure of the results.
                         • Recovering process alarms may result in wafer damage.
                         • Recovering mechanical alarms may result in system damage.
                         • Always call your Tegal Service Engineer before performing a
                         recovery.

                 Silence Button (alarm)
                 The Silence (Alarm) button (Figure 8) shuts off the audible alarm. If an alarm
                 sounds when this button is not visible, press the Alarm icon to silence.

                 En/Disable Button (alarm)
                 The En/Disable button (Figure 8) allows a user with the appropriate access
                 level to enable or disable any of the system alarms. This feature is intended
                 for use during maintenance and troubleshooting only.




6   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3                                                      88-280-001 Rev C
                                                              Operator Push buttons
                   Figure 8. Alarm Screen




Touch Calibrate Button
                   The Touch Calibrate button (Figure 9) allows a user to reprogram the screen.
                   The screen may seem to be miscalibrated because of the visual angle. Recali-
                   bration will correct this visual angle for each individual operator (Figure 10).

                   Figure 9. Touch Calibrate Button




88-280-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3   7
Operator Push buttons
                 Figure 10. Touchscreen Calibration Screen




Start Options Button (Unicassette)
                 The Start Options, or Unicassette, button (Figure 4 and Figure 11) allows the
                 system to run in one of two modes: In the bicassette mode, the wafers are
                 processed from cassette #1 to a process head, then finished in cassette #2. In
                 the unicassette mode, the wafers are processed from either cassette to a pro-
                 cess head and back to the same cassette. In this mode a sequence can be
                 started from both cassettes.

                 Figure 11. Start Options (Unicassette) Screen




8   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3                                                 88-280-001 Rev C
                                                              Operator Push buttons
Endpoint Button
                   The Endpoint button (Figure 5 and Figure 12) allows the operator to review old
                   endpoint traces. The operator can review the endpoint traces of each wafer
                   from lots previously run and can verify that the endpoints occurred at the time
                   defined by the process engineer.

                   Figure 12. Endpoint Button




88-280-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3   9
Operator Push buttons




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




10 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #3                                        88-280-001 Rev C
                                                        Section 4

System Diagrams Operators’ Guide
                                                                                 88-821-001
                                                                                 Rev D

System Diagrams 6500
                   Figure 1. 6500 SYSTEMS WITHOUT STRIP/RINSE




                        • TM1 ....................................Vacuum Robot
                        • CM1 & CM2........................Vacuum Cassette Elevator (VCE)
                        • PM1 & PM2 ........................Etcher
                        • PM5....................................Aligner




88-821-001 Rev D                                                           MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   11
System Diagrams Operators’ Guide
System Diagrams 6500RS
                 Figure 2. 6500 SYSTEMS WITH STRIP/RINSE




                        • TM1 ....................................Vacuum Robot
                        • TM2 ....................................Atmospheric Robot
                        • CM1....................................Vacuum Cassette Elevator (VCE)
                        • CM2....................................Atmospheric Cassette Platform (ACP)
                        • PM1 & PM2 ........................Etcher
                        • PM3 ....................................Stripper
                        • PM4 ....................................Rinser
                        • PM5 ....................................Aligner




12 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                         88-821-001 Rev D
                                      Table Of Contents
                                       Operators’ Guide
                                                     Section 4
                                                                         88-279-001
                                                                         Rev B
Users’ Guide (v5.3x) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       Basic Definitions, Operator Input, and Screen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
    Tegal’s standard color code: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Operator Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Screen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Software Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
    Banner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
    File Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
    Color Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Cassette Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    Cassette Module Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
    Process Folders for PM1 & PM2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
    Process Menus for PM3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
    Process Menus for PM4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
    Transport Menus for TM1 & TM2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Logon and Logoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       Logging Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Fault Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
    Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
    Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
    Abort Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
    Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
    Silence Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
    History Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
    Configure Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
    Monitor Status of CM1 & CM2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


88-279-001 Rev B                                                                       MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4          i
       To load wafer cassettes: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
         Running a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
     Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing . . . . . . . . . . 33
     Sequence Creation and Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
       Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Uni-Cassette Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Diode Array Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88




ii     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                                          88-279-001 Rev B
Operators’ Guide (v5.3x)
                                                                                  88-279-001
                                                                                  Rev B

                   Introduction
                   This Operators’ Guide provides instruction to machine operators and process
                   engineers in the operation of 65XX, and 65XX-SR (Stripper-Rinser) systems
                   using software version 5.3X.

 Basic Definitions, Operator Input, and Screen Display
                          • BANNER AREA.................The area always present at the top of the
                                                        monitor that allows the user to “navigate”
                                                        to various displays. See Work Area.
                          • CM (Cassette Module .......The module through which wafers enter
                                                       and leave the machine. The 6500 series
                                                       etcher has two CMs:
                              • CM1: Loadlock cassette
                              • CM2: Loadlock Cassette or Atmospheric cassette
                          • ICON ..................................A clearly-defined graphic area on the
                                                                   monitor. The touchscreen uses some
                                                                   icons to represent touch-sensitive fields.
                          • MONITOR ..........................The color screen displaying information
                                                              about system activity and status.
                          • “POP-UP” MENU ..............A window layered over the primary
                                                        screen that displays additional informa-
                                                        tion about the users’ previous selection
                                                        and usually provides additional capability.
                          • PM (Process Module).......An assembly of subsystems for a particu-
                                                      lar process activity. The 65XX-SR series
                                                      etcher has up to five PMs:
                              • PM1: Plasma Etch Module 1
                              • PM2: Plasma Etch Module 2
                              • PM3: Plasma Photoresist Strip Module
                              • PM4: DI Water Wafer Rinse Module
                              • PM5: Wafer Centering & Flat/Notch Aligner Module
                          • RECIPE..............................A listing of all process steps and associ-
                                                                ated parameters designed to accomplish
                                                                a specific result (etch, purge, etc.) in a
                                                                specific PM.

88-279-001 Rev B                                                          MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4           1
Operators’ Guide (v5.3x)

                         • RIM.....................................(Remote Interface Module)A remotely
                                                                   located monitor and touchscreen that is
                                                                   used to control and assist in the mainte-
                                                                   nance of the 6500 system.
                         • SEQUENCE .......................A series of recipes completed in a spe-
                                                           cific order.
                         • SIGNAL TOWER ...............An optional light tower that provides col-
                                                       ored light indication of system status.
                         • TM (Transport Module) ....An assembly of subsystems that pro-
                                                     vides for transport of wafers within the
                                                     system. The 6500 series etcher has up to
                                                     two TMs:
                             • TM1: Vacuum Robot
                             • TM2: Atmospheric Robot
                         • TOUCHSCREEN................A touch-sensitive, transparent device
                                                      mounted in front of the monitor.
                         • WORK AREA.....................The area on the display monitor below
                                                         the Banner Area. The contents of this
                                                         area change based on the users' selec-
                                                         tions and the number of modules
                                                         installed.

                 Tegal’s standard color code:
                         • Blue ....................................System under SECS control
                         • Green (flashing)..................Idle status
                         • Green (solid).......................Process status
                         • Red.....................................Fault/Alarm status
                         • Yellow (flashing) .................Warning status

                 Operator Input
                 The operator inputs information by touching the screen in the appropriate
                 places. Use fingers only. Pointed objects will damage the screen.

                 Screen Display
                 The operator observes system activity and status from a color monitor. A RIM
                 is available for use as a maintenance aid.
                 The screen display is divided into two major areas:
                         • Area....................................Accessing
                         • Banner ...............................System icon to access System Status
                                                                 Screen (Home)
                         • ? ......................................... to help define unknown icons.


2   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                                                         Operators’ Guide (v5.3x)
                   • User Logon/Logoff functionAccessing funtions
                   • Alarm .................................Alarm icon for alarm information
                   • Date and time informationStting the date and time.
                   • Abort icon ......................... Aborts functions
                   • Tegal logo.......................... Software version
                   • Work .................................System Control functions: Process,
                                                           Transport, and Cassette Module




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   3
Software Navigation


    Software Navigation
                 The 6500 Software is organized much like a filing cabinet. The “drawers” con-
                 tain System Control, Process, and Transport “folders.” Each folder contains
                 software functions and may comprise several pages. This section describes
                 how to find and open these software folders.




                        Password
                 Your password is your key to the software “drawers.” It
                 allows access to the “drawers” you need to use.

                        SYSTEM STATUS SCREEN (Home)

                 The System Status Screen is the “Home” screen. From this screen you can
                 easily move to any other screen that your access level allows. Press the Sys-
                 tem icon* to return to the System Status Screen from any other screen.
                 This screen consists of:
                         • Banner Area
                         • File Folders
                         • System Diagram
                         • Cassette Status Indicators




4   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                 88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                 Software Navigation
                   Figure 1. System Status Screen




                   Banner
                   The Banner appears on all screens and provides the following information:




88-279-001 Rev B                                                  MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   5
Software Navigation


                 File Folder
                 File Folders for the System Status Screen provide access to information
                 regarding System Status, Sequence, Maintenance, and Service




                 File Folders for PMs and TMs are similar (see Process and Transport Folders
                 in this section):PMs…Status, Recipe, Maintenance, Service: TMs…Manual,
                 Maintenance, Service

System Diagrams
                 The System Diagram for a 6500-SR shows the relative position of Transport,
                 Process, and Cassette Modules.

                 Figure 2. 65XX-SR System Diagram




6   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                               Software Navigation
                   Color Indicator
                   System Status Screen graphics use color to indicate TM, PM, and CM pres-
                   sure status:

                   Color                                    Meaning
                   Yellow                                  Unknown Status
                   Gray                                    Vacuum
                   Turquoise                               Atmosphere
                   Alternating dark & light                Venting
                   turquoise
                   Alternating dark green & gray           Pumping Down

                   Cassette Status
                   Two cassettes graphically depicted on the System Status Screen indicate the
                   status of wafers according to slot number.
                   The color of the wafer indicates the wafer state:
                           • Color...................................Meaning
                           • Black ..................................Wafer has not been aligned and has not
                                                                     seen process in a chamber.
                           • Light Blue ...........................Wafer has been placed on the aligner.
                           • Pink ....................................Wafer has seen process of some type.
                           • Green .................................Wafer has completed all process with no
                                                                    Faults or Warnings.
                           • Amber.................................Wafer has encountered Warning(s) in the
                                                                   Process Chamber.
                           • Red.....................................Wafer has encountered Fault(s) in the
                                                                     Process Chamber.
                           • Yellow .................................Wafer presence is unknown.
                           • No color..............................No wafer is present.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                               MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4    7
Software Navigation

                 Figure 3. Sample cassettes, each capable of holding 25 wafers:




                 Cassette Module Functions
                 Functions of Cassette Modules 1 and 2 (CM1 & CM2) are displayed on the
                 System Status Screen.




                           CM1 Unload          Cassette present      CM2 Unload
                                               indication




8   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                             88-279-001 Rev B
                                                            Software Navigation
System Control Folders
                   System control folder hierarchy.

                   NOTE: Folder accessibility depends on operator access level.




88-279-001 Rev B                                             MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   9
Software Navigation


                       System Control Folders
                 Press the System icon on the Banner for the System Control Folders.



                                 System Control Folders




        Status               Sequence             Maintenance               Service
        Folder               Folder               Folder                    Folder




10 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                                                            Software Navigation
                   Process Folders for PM1 & PM2
                   PM1 & PM2 control folder hierarchy.

                   NOTE: Folder accessibility depends on operator access level.




88-279-001 Rev B                                              MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   11
Software Navigation


                       Process Maintenance Folder for PM1 & PM2
                 Press the PM1 or PM2 Process Module Folder to access the status buttons.


                                 PM1 & PM2 Control Folders




       Status               Recipe                Maintenance             Service
       Folder               Folder                Folder                  Folder




12 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                                                            Software Navigation
                   Process Menus for PM3
                   PM3 control folder hierarchy.

                   NOTE: Folder accessibility depends on operator access level.

                   .




88-279-001 Rev B                                              MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   13
Software Navigation


                       Process Folder for PM3
                 Press PM3 for the Process Folders for the Stripper (if installed).


                                  PM3 Control Folders




        Status               Recipe                 Maintenance                  Service
        Folder               Folder                 Folder                       Folder




14 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                        88-279-001 Rev B
                                                            Software Navigation
                   Process Menus for PM4
                   PM4 control folder hierarchy.

                   NOTE: Folder accessibility depends on operator access level.




88-279-001 Rev B                                              MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   15
Software Navigation


                       Process Menus for PM4
                 Press PM4 for the Process Folders for the Rinser.




                                 PM4 Control Folders




        Status               Recipe               Maintenance        Service
        Folder               Folder               Folder             Folder




16 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                        88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                       Software Navigation
                   Transport Menus for TM1 & TM2
                   TM1 & TM2 control folder hierarchy.
                   .

                                        TRANSPORT FOLDERS
                                           (press TM1-Vacuum Robot
                                           or TM2-Atmospheric Robot)




      Manual                        Maintenance
                                                                                  Service Folder
      Folder                          Folder


    Manual Wafer
                               Leak               Purge                Direct I/O           Elevator
     Movement
                              Button              Button                Button               Button
      Screen
                                YES to              YES to                TMC_AnalogIO         Configuration
                                 Leak               Purge                 TMC_Valves             "pop-up"
                              ("pop-up")          ("pop-up")              Iso_Valves
                                                                          TM_DigitalIO
                                                                          TM_Robot_Fxns     Vacuum
                               Vent               Pump                    TM2_Robot_Fxns     Button
                              Button              Button                  CM1_Elev_Fxns
                                                                          CM1_WaferMap        Configuration
                                 YES to            YES to                 CM2_Elev_Fxns        "pop-up"
                                  Vent             Pump                   CM2_WaferMap
                               ("pop-up")        ("pop-up")               PM5_AlignFxns
                                                                          Platform_Ctrl

                             Load CM1           Load CM2
                              Button             Button                 Aligner              Analog
                                                                        Button               Button
                                YES to               YES to
                              Pumpdown             Pumpdown
                                                                        Configuration         Configuration
                              ("pop-up")           ("pop-up")
                                                                          "pop-up"              "pop-up"

                             Equalize           Transport
                              Button             Button                 Robot
                                                                        Button
                                YES to             Transport
                                Equal              Plumbing            Configuration &
                              ("pop-up")            Screen               Calibration
                                                                          Screen




88-279-001 Rev B                                                         MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4      17
Software Navigation


                       Process Menus for TM
                 PressTM for the System Folders for the Transport.




                                 TM Control Folders




                            Manual Move           Maintenance        Service
                            Folder                Folder             Folder




18 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                        88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                      Logon and Logoff

Logon and Logoff
                          • Logging on to the system allows you to operate the system and
                          determines your level of access (there are eight access levels).
                          • Logging off from the system provides protection from unauthorized
                          machine operation.
                   The system can be configured to logoff automatically after a specified period
                   of no activity. The default time period is 30 minutes.

                   Figure 1. Logon to the System




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4     19
Logon and Logoff


Password
                 To access the system, enter a pre-installed ID and password

                 Figure 2. Enter Password




                 If you try to access a folder that requires a higher access level, you will be
                 asked to re-login with an password with a higher level.

                 Figure 3. Password Level Access Warning




20 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                      88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                      Logon and Logoff
Logging Off
                   To log off, press the User Logon icon, then the Logoff icon.

                   Figure 4. Logging off




                   Figure 5. Logoff




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   21
Fault Alarms


Fault Alarms
                 Alarms
                 Alarms occur in the following instances:
                        • A system facilities problem has been detected.
                        • A wafer movement problem has been detected.
                        • A process parameter has deviated beyond its Warning value (pro-
                        cess continues).
                        • A process parameter has deviated beyond its Fault value (process
                        does not continue).
                        • A process event time-out has occurred.
                        • A potential problem with a manual command has been detected.
                        • An interlock problem has been detected.

                 Recovery
                 Recovery options vary according to alarm type and access (logon) level.
                 DANGER: If access level allows use of an Override Interlock recovery
                         option, exercise extreme caution. Damage to the system is
                         possible, as well as injury to personnel.




                 Many alarms do not allow recovery, in which case the fault condition must be
                 corrected. If no recovery is allowed, the Recover button will have a black
                 instead of a white border, indicating it is not functional (this is true of all
                 buttons).


22 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                    88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                              Fault Alarms
                   Figure 1. Alarm Recovery




                   If the first recovery option does not restore the machine to normal operation,
                   perform the following steps:

                   Abort Button
                   Press ABORT in the Banner Area and answer YES in the confirmation
                   pop-up. The ABORT button aborts all system operations.
                   After ABORT has been pressed, any wafers in the system must be cleared
                   using the Clear Wafers button in the TM Manual folder.
                   If this does not restore normal operation, proceed to Reset Button.

                   Reset Button
                   Press the Machine ON/RESET button on the Operator Console. The
                   ON/RESET button resets the system controller and the VME controllers.

                   Upon resetting, the following events occur:

                          • PM gate valves shut and PM/TM turbo molecular pumps are
                          disabled.
                          • System controller reboots (ensure there is no floppy disk in the
                          Opcon floppy drive).
                          • VME controllers reboot and establish communications with peripher-
                          als and system controller. (Until communication is established, the
                          PMs, TMs, and CMs will be yellow, indicating Unknown Status.)
                          • Turbo pumps restart (they require approximately 4 minutes to reach
                          ready state).




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   23
Fault Alarms

                        • When turbos become normal, PM gate valves open, completing the
                        reset.
                        • After reset is complete, use the CLEAR WAFERS button in the TM
                        Manual folder to clear all wafer positions in the system.

                 If this does not restore normal operation, call Tegal Technical Support.

                 Silence Button
                 This button silences the audible alarm. If alarm sounds when this button is not
                 visible, press the Alarm icon to silence.

                 History Button
                 This button allows the user to view the description, date, and time of previous
                 alarms. This alarm information is stored in 100 alarm log history files on the
                 system controller hard drive. Each history file can record 100 alarm messages
                 describing when an alarm was posted, recovered from, and cleared.

                 NOTE: When full, the alarm log history files auto roll over. Alarm 1 is
                       replaced by Alarm 101.


                 Configure Button
                 This button allows a user with the appropriate access level to enable or dis-
                 able any of the system alarms. This feature is intended for use during
                 maintenance and troubleshooting only.




24 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                   88-279-001 Rev B
                                    Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading

Wafer Loading, Etching, and
     Unloading
                   NOTE: You must log on to the system and have the proper access level
                         to proceed.


                   Monitor Status of CM1 & CM2
                   While loading, processing, or unloading wafers, monitor the status of the
                   “Load/Unload” and “Cassette” lights on the front panel of the system. These
                   lights indicate the status of Cassette Modules 1 and 2 (CM1 & CM2). The
                   lights on the left side of the facade show the status of CM1, while the lights on
                   the right side show the status of CM2 (see Figure 1).

                        Lights        Off                         On
                       Load/Unload Cassette Module is not         Cassette Module is avail-
                                   available to operator.         able to operator.
                                      Unable to load or unload Ready to load or unload
                                      wafer cassette.          wafer cassette.
                                      Shield Door button and      Shield Door button and foot-
                                      footswitch will not         switch are functional.
                                      function.                   TM Robot(s) will not access
                                      CM is not vented            wafer cassettes.
                       Cassette       Cassette is not present     Cassette is present and
                                      or not properly seated.     properly seated.

                   Figure 1. Top of Facade




88-279-001 Rev B                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   25
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading

                 Figure 2. Bottom of Facade




                 Figure 3. Unload CM1 and CM2

                                  To unload CM1, press        To unload CM2, press
                                  the UNLOAD icon             the UNLOAD icon




                 After pressing CM1/2 UNLOAD, the following events occur:
                 1. The CM1/TM slit valve closes.
                 2. CM1 and CM2 (on a non-Strip/Rinse tool) begins venting.
                 3. The pressure bar graph beneath CM1 and CM2 moves from Vac toward
                    Atm.
                 4. The following pop-up messages appear:

                 Figure 4. CM1




26 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                                   Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading
                   Figure 5. CM2




                   Acknowledge by pressing OK.

                   To load wafer cassettes:
                   1. Wait until the “Load/Unload” lights on the facade are ON, meaning the
                      Cassette Modules are ready to accept wafer cassettes.
                   2. Press the Shield Door open/close button or the footswitch under each
                      cassette module. The CM1 and CM2 loadlock doors open and the safety
                      shield lowers. [On a 6500-SR tool the CM2 shield lowers and the cassette
                      platform tilts backward.]
                   3. Place a loaded wafer cassette into CM1. Check that the “Cassette” light is
                      ON,” meaning the cassette is properly loaded. Reload the cassette if the
                      “Cassette” light is OFF.
                   4. Load an empty wafer cassette into CM2. Check to assure the “Cassette”
                      light is ON. If the “Cassette” light is OFF, reload the cassette.

                   NOTE: The CM2 cassette must be empty. If any wafers are in the
                         cassette, all wafer positions will indicate unknown wafer status.

                   5. Press the Shield Door open/close button or the footswitch under each
                      cassette module. The CM1 and CM2 safety shield rises and the door
                      closes. [On a 65XX-SR tool the CM2 cassette platform tilts forward and
                      the safety shield rises.]




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   27
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading


Running a sequence
                 To run a sequence, select the Sequence input box.

                 Figure 1. Sequence selection




                 A sequence directory will pop-up. Choose the sequence needed and choose
                 where all or just one wafer will be processed.

                 Figure 2. Sequence selection




                          Scroll bar




28 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                             88-279-001 Rev B
                                    Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading
                          • Press Load 1 to process the first available wafer in CM1. “Single
                          Wafer Start” is displayed (see pg 30).
                          • Press Load All to process all wafers in CM1.
                   Press the Start icon to initiate the sequence.

                   Figure 3. Starting the sequence




                   NOTE: If there are wafers in the CM2 cassette when START is pressed,
                         the following prompt appears:


                           Warning: Wafers in output cassette. Unload that
                           cassette now?
                           YES                              NO

                   Select YES to unload the output cassette. Select NO to begin sequence.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   29
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading

                 The Load 1 wafer start is similar to the Load All start. The screen will indi-
                 cate whether a single wafer was selected.

                 Figure 4. Single Wafer Processing




                 NOTE: If there are wafers in the CM2 cassette when START is pressed,
                       the following prompt appears:


                         Warning: Wafers in output cassette. Unload that
                         cassette now?
                         YES                              NO

                 Select YES to unload the output cassette. Select NO to begin sequence.
                 At the end of the sequence, all the wafers will be in CM2, or back into CM1 if
                 uni-cassette is selected. The wafer will not be black.




30 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                    88-279-001 Rev B
                                   Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading
                   Figure 5. End of wafer processing




                   In general, loadlocks are auto-vented when done: if not, press CM1 UNLOAD
                   and CM2 UNLOAD, as shown below.




                   1. Wait until the “Load/Unload” lights on the facade are ON, meaning that the
                      cassette modules are available to unload.
                   2. Press the Shield Door open/close button or the footswitch under each
                      cassette module. The CM1 and CM2 loadlock doors open and the safety
                      shield lowers. [On a 6500-SR tool the CM2 safety shield lowers and the
                      cassette platform tilts backward.]


88-279-001 Rev B                                                  MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   31
Wafer Loading, Etching, and Unloading

                 3. Remove the empty wafer cassette from CM1.
                 4. Remove the loaded wafer cassette from CM2.
                 5. Continue to process wafers by placing a loaded cassette into CM1 and an
                    empty cassette into CM2.




32 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                            Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

   Process Module Recipe Creation
       and Editing
                    This section provides instructions on how to create and edit process module
                    recipes. Users will be guided through a typical recipe for systems with ESC
                    clamping (see below). This recipe can be adapted for systems without ESC
                    clamping by using only steps 1, 2, 4, and 7.

Step #        1            2           3            4         5         6           7
(Type)        (Pump-       (Stabilize) (Clamp)      (Etch)    (Declamp) (Stabilize) (Pump
              down)                                                                 down)
Sequence      PUMP         STABILIZE    ETCH        ETCH      ETCH             STABILIZE     PUMP
              DOWN                                                                           DOWN
Termination   PRESSURE TIME             TIME        OPT/TIME TIME              STABILITY     TIME
Timeout       10           10           2           120       2                300           2
Pressure      3.0          5.0          5.0         5.0       5.0              0.0           0.0
Gas 1                      25.0         25.0        25.0      25.0             25.0
Gas 2                      0.0          0.0         0.0       0.0              0.0
Gas 3                      0.0          0.0         0.0       0.0              0.0
Gas 4                      0.0          0.0         0.0       0.0              0.0
Gas 5                      0.0          0.0         0.0       0.0              0.0
Gas 6                      0.0          0.0         0.0       0.0              0.0
MHz                                     500         500       500
kHz                                     20.o        20        0.0
RF RAMP                                 NO          NO        NO
Backside He   0.0          0.0          0.0         5.0       8.0              8.0           0.0
ESC Clamp     GND          GND          GND         Auto      GND              GND           GND


                    NOTE: You must log on to the system and have the proper
                          authorizations to proceed.


                    NOTE: The OK step is omitted from this procedure. If a selection is
                          made from a selection box or number is entered, the OK button
                          will be used to confirm the input.




 88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4    33
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Before your create the recipe, a process module needs to be chosen. Press
                 the PM1 Icon.

                 Figure 1. PM1 Selection




                 Next, choose the Recipe tab.

                 Figure 2. Recipe tab




34 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   This is the recipe creation page. All the process modules will have the same
                   creation page. The fields and options change per module. Select 1 to start
                   creating the recipe.

                   Figure 3. The machine is now ready for you to create a recipe.




                                       indicates system is ready to start a new recipe. Proceed
                   to next screen.

                   NOTE: If a recipe is already loaded (displayed), the recipe name will
                         appear instead of BLANK. Edit this recipe, if desired (as shown
                         in this document), or log off if no changes are needed. To start a
                         new recipe, load BLANK from Recipe File pop-up (see pg 71 and
                         pg 72) and proceed to next screen.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4    35
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 The options for PM1 and PM2 recipes.

TYPE                   Type of recipe step.

TERMINATION            Event that terminates the recipe step.

TIMEOUT                Step time when TERMINATION is specified as TIME. When another type of termination
                       is specified, the timeout value is the recipe step fault time.
PRESSURE               Process chamber pressure setpoint in mTorr.

GASES 1-6              Process gas flow setpoints in sccm.

MHz                    13.56 MHz RF setpoint in watts.

kHz                    450 kHz RF setpoint in watts.

RF RAMP                RF ramp enable or disable. The ramp rate applies to RF ON as well as RF OFF. Press
                       RAMP button to specify ramp increase and decrease rate in watts per second.
Backside He            Helium pressure, in Torr, applied to the backside of clamped wafer.

ESC Clamp              Electrostatic chuck clamping voltage (if ESC option is installed)

Electorde Deg C        Set point for a temperature controlled wafer.

                 Press the CREATE Icon.

                 Figure 4. Create Step 1




36 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   The Pumpdown step will be the first step in every recipe. The pumpdown ter-
                   mination can occur on either a set time or set pressure.

                   NOTE: Since the system is typically at 0mT, production time is not
                         saved by using Time.


                   Figure 5. Step 1 Pressure




                   We will set the Pumpdown termination time-out to 10 seconds and the pres-
                   sure to 3mT. If the system does not achieve the set pressure at the set time, a
                   pressure alarm will occur.

                   Figure 6. Step 1 Time




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   37
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



TIME                        Terminates the step when the time specified in the TIMEOUT field elapses.
PRESSURE                    Terminates the step when the pressure specified in the PRESSURE field is
                            achieved.


                 NOTE: For a PUMPDOWN sequence, Termination mode should remain
                       at PRESSURE. The Backside Helium and Clamp values should
                       remain at default.

                 Press 2 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the CREATE icon.

                 Figure 7. Step 2




38 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                             88-279-001 Rev B
                            Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Step #2 is always a gas and pressure stabilization step. The pressure and gas
                   can be set advance on either time or stability. If the Termination is set to stabi-
                   lize, a fault will be generated if the process parameters are not stable with-in
                   the set time.

                   Figure 8. Step 2 Stabilization




                   Figure 9. Step 2 Time




88-279-001 Rev B                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   39
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



TIME             Terminates the step when the time specified in the TIMEOUT field elapses.
STABILITY        Terminates the step when the gas flows, process pressure, throttle valve angle, backside helium
                 pressure, helium flow, and ESC voltage are stable (meaning all values are within their specified
                 warning bands).


                 NOTE: The step following a PUMPDOWN defaults to a STABILIZE
                       sequence. For a STABILIZE sequence, the termination mode
                       typically is TIME.

                 The process pressure is set in this step also. The process pressure can be
                 change in any step but typically, it is set to stabilize with the gases.

                 Figure 10. Step #2 Pressure




40 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                                 88-279-001 Rev B
                          Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 11. Pressure Select Parameters




                   NOTE: Pressure parameters are only available when Stability is chosen
                         in the Termination step. When monitoring Stability, the choices
                         to be monitored are Pressure or Angle.




CONTROL                    Process pressure control mode has two options: Pressure & Angle.

PRESSURE OPTION
PRESSURE MODE              Allows the pressure controller to change valve angle to achieve the specified
                           pressure setpoint (in mTorr). Alarms if pressure is not achieved in time limit.
DELAY TIME                 Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the system does not monitor
                           for pressure faults and warnings. *Not accessible on all versions.
WARNINGS                   Upper and lower warning percentage values (typical values = 20%). If displayed
- UPPER                    process pressure deviates from the Pressure Setpoint by more than the specified
- LOWER                    warning percentages, a warning alarm is generated
FAULTS                     Upper and lower fault percentage values (typical values = 50%). If displayed process
- UPPER                    pressure deviates from the Pressure Setpoint by more than the specified fault
- LOWER                    percentages, a fault alarm is generated




88-279-001 Rev B                                                           MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4       41
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



ANGLE OPTION
ANGLE MODE                       Sets the throttle valve angle (in degrees) to the value specified in the Angle
                                 Setpoint field and does not change. Actual process pressure is a result of
                                 angle, flows, and pumping speed.
DELAY TIME                       Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the system does not
                                 monitor for angle faults and warnings.
WARNINGS                         Upper and lower warning percentage values (typical values = 100%). If
- UPPER                          displayed angle value deviates from the Angle Setpoint by more than the
- LOWER                          specified warning percentages, a warning alarm is generated
FAULTS                           Upper and lower fault percentage values (typical values = 100%). If displayed
- UPPER                          angle value deviates from the Angle Setpoint by more than the specified fault
- LOWER                          percentages, a fault alarm is generated


                 NOTE: Angle Warning and Fault bands are initially at 100%, but if
                       desired, the valve angle setpoint can be set to the typical value
                       angle for this recipe, and the Fault and Warning values can be
                       set so if pressure is correct but angle changes, alarms for angle
                       occur.

                 Gas flow is the next setting. Up to 6 gases, limited by their range and the par-
                 tial pressures, can be turned on.

                 Figure 12. Step #2 Gas flow setting




42 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 13. Gas Select Parameters




                   NOTE: Gas Parameters are only available when Stability is selected as
                         the Termination. At this time, the Select Icon becomes active.

                   .

GAS FLOW SETPOINT                  Flow setpoint of process gas in sccm.
DELAY TIME                         Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the system does not
                                   monitor for gas flow faults and warnings.
WARNINGS                           Upper and lower warning percentage values. If displayed gas flow deviates
- UPPER                            from Gas Flow Setpoint by more than the specified warning percentages,
- LOWER                            a warning alarm is generated.
FAULTS                             Upper and lower fault percentage values. If displayed gas flow deviates
- UPPER                            from Gas Flow Setpoint by more than the specified fault percentages, a
- LOWER                            fault alarm is generated.




                   NOTE: In Step 2 the Backside Helium pressure and ESC Clamp voltage
                         should remain at 0.0. After gas parameters have been entered,
                         proceed to Step 3.

                   Press 3 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the CREATE icon.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                           MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4       43
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Figure 14. Step #3, Etch Step




                 Etch should be the next Type that auto pops up. If not, choose ETCH from the
                 menu.

                 Figure 15.




44 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   A plasma strike step is next. This step is typically not an actual etching step
                   but a pre-etch step. This step verifies that there is a plasma in the chamber,
                   the gas and pressure are stable and that the ESC voltage clamping is good.
                   Choose Time-out as the termination. Since endpoint is not being used on this
                   step, no other parameters are needed.

                   Figure 16. Etch Strike Step




                   Set the Termination time to be 2 seconds.

                   Figure 17. Strike Time-out




88-279-001 Rev B                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4     45
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing


                 NOTE: The step following a STABILIZE sequence defaults to an ETCH
                       sequence. This step is used to strike the plasma and clamp the
                       wafer on the ESC. Termination mode remains at TIME.


                 NOTE: In Step 3 Pressure and gases remains the same. Change
                       pressure or gases, if desired.

                 To strike plasma and start the autoclamp, an RF setpoint is needed. The first
                 entry is the RF set point. The second entry is the ramp up. The ramp up will
                 be watts/sec. Typically, the ramp up is the same as the set point.

                 Figure 18. Step #3 RF Set Point




46 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                  88-279-001 Rev B
                          Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 19. RF Select Parameters




                   NOTE: To change the RF parameters, press the SELECT Icon.




FORWARD LIMITS
DELAY (FORWARD POWER)                  Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the system
                                       does not monitor for MHz faults and warnings.
WARNINGS                               Upper and lower warning percentage values. If displayed MHz RF
- UPPER                                power deviates from the MHz Power Setpoint by more than the
- LOWER                                specified warning percentages, a warning alarm is generated.
FAULTS                                 Upper and lower fault percentage values. If displayed MHz RF
- UPPER                                power deviates form the MHz Power Setpoint by more than the
- LOWER                                specified fault percentages, a fault alarm is generated.




REFLECTED LIMITS
REFLECTED LIMITS (WATTS)                 MHz reflected power fault and warning limits.

DELAY                                    Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the
(REFLECTED POWER)                        system does not monitor for MHz reflected power faults and
                                         warnings.
WARNINGS                                 If the reflected power value goes above the value specified in
                                         this field, a warning alarm is generated.
FAULTS                                   If the reflected power value goes above the value specified in
                                         this field, a fault alarm is generated.



88-279-001 Rev B                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4          47
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing


                 NOTE: kHz RF power and Backside Helium remain at 0.0 in Step 3. RF
                       Ramp typically remains at 100% for the strike step throughout
                       the recipe sequence.

                 To clamp the wafer, set the clamping to AUTOCLAMP. Keep pressure set to
                 0.0. If there is a pressure set point, the wafer will wobble on the electrode and
                 prevent clamping.

                 Figure 20. Step #3 ECS Voltage




Wafer Temperature Parameter
Ground                                     Zero voltage is applied to ESC
SetPoint                                   A constant voltage is applied to ESC. This voltage is
                                           displayed in the field.
AutoClamp                                  The ESC voltage is automatically refer-
                                           enced           to the wafer potential, in order to
                                           provide a constant clamping force. (This mode may
                                           require a hardware upgrade kit).
Hold

                 NOTE: In Step 3 the wafer is clamped onto the electrostatic chuck. This
                       clamping is achieved by the autoclamping circuitry and the use
                       of MHz-only plasma.




48 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                     88-279-001 Rev B
                     Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing


                                                                            Voltage        Leak
                                                                                           Current
 VOLTAGE           Voltage setpoint applied to electrostatic chuck.         300V - 6510
                                                                            1000V - 6540
 DELAY TIME        Delay time, measured from start of step, during which    8 sec          8 sec
                   the system does not monitor for the ESC voltage faults
                   and warnings.
 WARNINGS          Upper and lower warning percentage values. If            10% voltage    50 µA
 - UPPER           displayed ESC voltage deviates from the ESC voltage      10% voltage
 - LOWER           setpoint by more than the specified warning              (typically)
                   percentages, a warning alarm is generated.
 FAULTS            Upper and lower fault percentage values. If displayed    20% voltage    100 µA
 - UPPER           ESC voltage deviates from the ESC voltage setpoint       20% voltage
 - LOWER           by more than the specified fault percentages, a fault    (typically)
                   alarm is generated.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                       MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   49
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Press 4 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the CREATE icon.

                 Figure 21. Step #4




                 After the CREATE icon is pressed, the parameters from Step 3 are trans-
                 ferred to Step 4. This makes recipe creation faster.

                 Figure 22. Step #4 Parameter transfer




50 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Since the ETCH Type was transferred over, we can skip choosing ETCH as
                   our TYPE. Our next step will be an Etch/Time step. Select Etch/Time as our
                   Termination step.

                   Figure 23. Step #4 Etch/Time




                   NOTE: Step 4, like Step 3, is an etch step.




TIME                    Terminates step when a specified time elapses.
ENDPOINT                Terminates step when a specified optical event occurs.
ENDPT/TIME              Terminates step when a specified time elapses or an optical event occurs, whichever
                        occurs first.
% OVERETCH              Terminates step based on a percentage of the cumulative etch time of all previous etch
                        steps.
EXTERNAL                Terminates step when an external endpoint detector event is detected (requires physical
                        connection of external endpoint detector to system).
EXT/TIME                Terminates step when an external endpoint detector event is detected or the specified
                        time elapses (requires physical connection of external endpoint detector to system).
IGNITION                (not used)
(press PgDn)

                   After selecting and Endpoint choice. The endpoint parameters need to be set
                   up. The setup is not arbitrary. The parameters depend on the filter type, the
                   intensity, signal slope. Before setting up an endpoint step, contact Tegal Pro-
                   cess support for standard endpoint parameters.



88-279-001 Rev B                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4         51
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing


                 NOTE: A Diode Array style is available on new 6500 and 6550s. See end
                       of recipe setup procedure for details.

                 Select PhotoDiode 1.




                 Since we are only using PhotoDiode 1, we will select A as our formula.




52 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                  88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 24. Formula Selection




TERMINATION                (defined on pg 51)

A SEES DIODE #             Specifies the photodiode used for channel A.
                           The emission wavelength observed is determined by an optical filter.
B SEES DIODE #             Specifies the photodiode used for channel B.
                           The emission wavelength observed is determined by an optical filter.
FORMULA                    Specifies how the A and B channel outputs are used in developing the endpoint
                           signal. Options are: A, A/B, A+B, A-B, and (A-B)/(A+B).
* SCALE                    This value provides a multiplier for the signal developed by the Formula.
+ OFFSET                   This value provides an offset for the signal product of (Formula * Scale).

                   Select Time for the Normalization. All three choices are typical for endpoint
                   processing. The choice depends on the wafer and the signal.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4    53
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Figure 25. Normalization




TIME             Specified when time is required to terminate normalization and establish the 100% signal value.

MINIMUM          Specified when the endpoint signal minimum value is required to terminate normalization and
                 establish the 100% signal value.
MAXIMUM          Specified when the endpoint signal maximum value is required to terminate normalization and
                 establish the 100% signal value.

                 The endpoint is not always stable throughout the process. To eliminate any
                 premature endpoints, we setup a stability time. This time makes corrections to
                 the endpoint value that will eliminate any premature endpoints. The are two
                 typical choices: One is a straight 10 to 20 second time. The second, is to set
                 the time to 80% of the full pre-endpoint time. This eliminates any variables
                 when processing multiple wafer types with one recipe.




54 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 26. Normalize Time




AVG WINDOW            Specifies endpoint signal averaging time value. The endpoint signal is repetitively averaged
                      throughout the duration of the step.
DELAY                 Specifies the normalize delay time when normalize Time mode is selected. When Min or
                      Max Normalize mode is selected, DELAY specifies the delay before minimum or maximum
                      intensity is detected.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                             MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4        55
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 The Trigger also depends on the specific process and endpoint properties.
                 THRESHOLD is the typical setting and is set to 100%.

                 Figure 27. Trigger




Trigger specifies the type of optical event that terminates the step from two options:
THRESHOLD          Threshold method compares the Endpoint Signal against the Normalization
                   value. If the Threshold percentage (in the next field) is below or equal to
                   100%, completion occurs when Endpoint Signal <= Threshold% * Normaliza-
                   tion value. If the Threshold percentage is above 100%, completion occurs
                   when Endpoint Signal >= Threshold% * Normalization value. At completion,
                   the step is considered done.
Thresh+Slope       Slope method is actually “Threshold Method plus Slope Method”. First,
                   Threshold method is applied as described above. Once Threshold detection
                   has completed, further processing is done.
Ceiling            Ceiling method compares the Endpoint Signal to the Threshold value. If the
                   Endpoint Signal exceeds the Threshold value, the step is considered done.
                   This method can be useful in completing a step when a high enough wafer
                   temperature is achieved. See the section on Wafer Temperature Control for
                   more details.
Floor              Ceiling method compares the Endpoint Signal to the Threshold value. If the
                   Endpoint Signal falls below the Threshold value, the step is considered done.
                   This method can be useful in completing a step when a low enough wafer
                   temperature is achieved. See the section on Wafer Temperature Control for
                   more details.
Ave to Thresh      This mode is similar to Threshold method, except instead of comparing the
                   raw Endpoint Signal to the Normalization value, it compares the averaged
                   Endpoint Signal to the Normalization value. The Avg. Window field specifies
                   the time over which the averaged Endpoint Signal is computed.




56 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                  88-279-001 Rev B
                            Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   A minimum time to endpoint needs to be set up. This setting detects a premature
                   endpoint.

                   Figure 28. Min. Time to Endpoint




Alarm if EP before Specifies a time, when if Endpoint occurs before this, an alarm will be
                   posted. The time has no effect on the Endpoint algorithm: the time is
                   used post-endpoint to decide whether a FAULT alarm is necessary.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                       MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   57
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Figure 29. Diode Gain Setting




DIODE GAIN                Specifies which one of four variable hardware gain settings are to be used for each
SELECT                    endpoint diode. These adjustments are located on the endpoint module.


                 The etch time needs to be set up. When using endpoint, this time should be
                 set 20% to 40% over the endpoint time. If this time is too short, an Endpoint
                 Time Out will occur. If this time is set too long, the wafer may be too over
                 etched.

                 Figure 30. Endpoint Termination Time




58 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                   NOTE: Pressure, Gas Flow, and MHz power remain the same.

                   To increase the etchrate and etch properties, we add kHz to the recipe.

                   Figure 31. kHz Set point




                   Figure 32. kHz Select Parameters




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   59
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



POWER SETPOINT                   kHz RF power setpoint in watts.

Ramp Rate                        The KHz RF ramprate specifies the rate of KHz power turn-
                                 ON or OFF. It is in units of Watts / second.

DELAY TIME                       Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the system does not
(Forward Power)                  monitor for kHz faults and warnings.

WARNINGS                         Upper and lower warning percentage values. If displayed kHz RF forward
- UPPER                          power deviates from the kHz Power Setpoint by more than the specified
                                 warning percentages, a warning alarm is generated.
- LOWER
FAULTS                           Upper and lower fault percentage values. If displayed kHz RF power deviates
- UPPER                          form the kHz Power Setpoint by more than the specified fault percentages,
                                 a fault alarm is generated.
- LOWER

                 Since the wafer was clamped in step #3, the helium backside cooling should
                 be turn on. Typical helium pressure is 5 torr when clamped. The setting can
                 change depending on heat issues. Too much helium may unclamp the wafer.

                 Figure 33. Backside Helium setpoint




                 The AutoClamp parameters need to be set up.




60 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                             88-279-001 Rev B
                         Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 34. ESC Parameter setup




BACKSIDE HELIUM              Backside Helium Parameters screen has two parameters: Pres-
                             sure Setpoint & Flow without Blowby.


PRESSURE SETPOINT Backside Helium pressure setpoint inTorr.
TOTAL FLOW                   Helium flow rate at setpoint pressure. This parameter changes
                             depending on whether the wafer is clamped or not.
PRESSURE DELAY               Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the sys-
TIME                         tem does not monitor for helium pressure faults and warnings.

PRESSURE                     Upper and lower warning percentage values (typical values =
WARNINGS:                    5%). If displayed process pressure deviates from the Pressure
- UPPER                      Setpoint by more than the specified warning percentages, a
                             warning alarm is generated.
- LOWER
PRESSURE FAULTS:             Upper and lower fault percentage values (typical values = 10%).
- UPPER                      If displayed process pressure deviates from the Pressure Set-
- LOWER                      point by more than the specified fault percentages, a fault alarm
                             is generated.
FLOW DELAY TIME              Delay time, measured from start of step, during which the sys-
                             tem does not monitor for helium flow faults and warnings.
UPPER FLOW                   Upper and lower warning values. If displayed flow deviates from
WARNING                      the upper or lower flow by more than the specified warning
                             sums, a warning alarm is generated.
UPPER FLOW FAULT             Upper and lower fault values. If displayed flow deviates from the
                             upper or lower flow by more than the specified fault sums, a
                             fault alarm is generated.



88-279-001 Rev B                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   61
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



                    FLOW WITHOUT BLOWBY
                    Flow                   Description                   Settings
                    FLOW W/O              Nominal He “no leak” flow.     Pressure
                    BLOWBY                                               dependent
                    FLOW DELAY TIME       Delay time, measured from      6 seconds
                                          start of step, during which
                                          the system does not moni-
                                          tor for He blowby faults and
                                          warnings.
                    FLOW WARNINGS:        (Used to detect changes in     Upper: 0.5 sccm
                    ADD FOR UPPER         blowby)                        Lower: 0.5 sccm
                    SUB FOR LOWER         Added and subtracted He
                                          flow values. If the He flow
                                          increases or decreases by
                                          these amounts, a warning
                                          alarm is generated.
                    FLOW FAULTS:          (Used to detect changes in     Upper: 1.0 sccm
                    ADD FOR UPPER         blowby)                        Lower: 1.0 sccm
                    SUB FOR LOWER         Added and subtracted He
                                          flow values. If the He flow
                                          increases or decreases by
                                          these amounts, a fault alarm
                                          is generated.


                 NOTE: In etching steps, FLOW W/O BLOWBY should be set to the
                       clamped value.

                 After the etching, the wafer needs to be declamped. This next step is a short
                 declamping step.




62 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                   88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Press 5 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the CREATE icon.

                   Figure 35. Step #5




                   NOTE: Step 5 is typically the de-clamp step. With the kHz power and
                         clamping voltage turned off, the Mhz-only plasma effectively
                         grounds, and then declamps, the wafer.

                           For systems without ESC clamping, proceed to the PUMPDOWN
                           step (Step 7).




88-279-001 Rev B                                                  MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   63
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 The declamp step is a short timed step.

                 Figure 36. Step #5 Time




                 Set the time to 2 seconds

                 Figure 37. Declamp Time




64 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                             88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   The declamp step uses only mHz power to drain the charge off the wafer.
                   Turn off the kHz power.

                   Figure 38. kHz removal




                   When the wafer is clamped, little to no helium blow-by occurs. If the wafer is
                   not clamped, there will be almost 100% blow-by. Set the clamping to Ground
                   and the helium pressure higher to help defuse the static electricity and the
                   blow-by to 100%.

                   Figure 39. Blow-by Setup




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   65
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Step #6 is for declamp verification. Press the double left arrow to add more
                 steps
                 Press 6 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the CREATE icon.

                 Figure 40. Step #6




                 NOTE: Step 6 is used to verify that the wafer is declamped. When the
                       Helium flow to the backside of the wafer exceeds a certain
                       threshold, the wafer is declamped.




66 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                   88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   To verify the wafer is declamped, we verify that gas and helium flow are
                   stable.

                   Figure 41. Declamp Stabilize




                   Set the Termination to Stability and the Time-out to 300. Depending on the
                   wafer type and charge, it could take 2 to 5 seconds to completely discharge.

                   Figure 42. Declamp Time




88-279-001 Rev B                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4    67
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Set the Declamp pressure to 0mT.

                 Figure 43. Declamp Pressure




                 The most important parameter is the helium flow. Verify that the helium flow is
                 set to 100%. When the helium blow-by is at 100%, the system knows that the
                 wafer is declamped. If the wafer doesn’t declamp, the system will alarm and
                 wait an additional 2 minutes for declamping.

                 Figure 44. Declamp Helium Blow-by




68 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                   88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing


 FLOW WITHOUT BLOWBY
 Flow                    Description                                                 Settings
 SETPOINT                Nominal He flow when wafer is declamped.                    Typically 17-25 sccm,
                                                                                     depending on application
 FLOW DELAY TIME         Not used in a STABILIZE step.                               Ø seconds
 FLOW WARNINGS:          (Used to detect changes in blowby)                          Upper: 50 sccm
 ADD FOR UPPER           Added and subtracted He flow values.                        Lower: 0.5 sccm
 SUB FOR LOWER           Helium flow must remain within these limits for
                         4 continuous seconds for the step to complete
                         successfully. The Setpoint minus the Lower warning level
                         essentially acts as the flow threshold that indicates a
                         declamped wafer.
 FLOW FAULTS:            (Used to detect changes in blowby)                          Upper: 50 sccm
 ADD FOR UPPER           Redundant values in a STABILIZE step, identical in use to   Lower: 20 sccm
 SUB FOR LOWER           the WARNING levels. To avoid user confusion, large
                         values should be set.


                   NOTE: It is essential that FLOW W/O BLOWBY be set to the declamped
                         value.


                   Proceed to the final step. Press 7 to continue entering recipe steps. Press the
                   CREATE icon.

                   Figure 45. Step #7 Create




88-279-001 Rev B                                                            MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4         69
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Select Pumpdown as the type.

                 Figure 46. Step #7 Pumpdown




                 NOTE: The last step is always a PUMPDOWN.

                 Set the Termination to Time, the Time-out to 2 seconds and the pressure to 0
                 mT.

                 Figure 47.




70 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                 88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Now the recipe is finished. Save it to the hard drive. Press the File icon.

                   Figure 48. Saving




                   Press the Save icon.

                   Figure 49. Save Icon




88-279-001 Rev B                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   71
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Enter a new nave for the recipe and press the OK icon.

                 Figure 50. Saved Name




                 To create a recipe for PM2, press the PM2 icon from the Home screen.

                 Figure 51. PM2 Recipe Creation




72 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                               88-279-001 Rev B
                           Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Press the Recipe Tab.

                   Figure 52. PM2 Recipe Tab




                   To create a recipe for PM3, press the PM3 icon from the Home screen.

                   Figure 53. PM3 Recipe Creation




88-279-001 Rev B                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   73
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing

                 Press the Recipe Tab.

                 Figure 54. PM3 Recipe Tab




                 To create a recipe for PM4, press the PM4 icon from the Home screen.


SEQUENCE               Type of recipe step.
TERMINATION            Event that terminates the recipe step.
TIMEOUT                Step time when TERMINATION is specified as TIME. When another
                       type of termination is specified, the timeout value is the recipe step fault
                       time.
PRESSURE               Process chamber pressure setpoint in mTorr.
GASES 1-3              Process gas flow setpoints in sccm.
MHz                    13.56 MHz RF setpoint in watts.

                 NOTE: A Stripper recipe is similar to an Etch recipe. A Stripper recipe
                       differs in that it has fewer gases, one RF source, and no
                       Backside Helium. In all other respects, however, the Stripper
                       recipe is the same. It typically has the following steps: Pump,
                       Stabilize, Strip, Pump.




74 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                      88-279-001 Rev B
                          Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing
                   Figure 55. PM4 Recipe Creation




                   Press the Recipe Tab.

                   Figure 56. PM4 Recipe Tab




88-279-001 Rev B                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   75
Process Module Recipe Creation and Editing



SEQUENCE                Type of recipe step: Rinse.
TERMINATION             Event that terminates the recipe step.
TIMEOUT                 Step time when TERMINATION is specified as TIME.
SPIN RATE               Spin rate in RPM.
DI_Water 1              Enable or Disable DI water, bottom jet.
DI_Water 2              Enable or Disable DI water, side jet.
N2                      Enable or Disable N2 in the step.



                                            indicates system is ready to start a new recipe.
                 Proceed to next screen.




76 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                  88-279-001 Rev B
                                                 Sequence Creation and Editing

 Sequence Creation and Editing
                   NOTE: You must log on to the system and have the proper
                         authorizations to proceed.


                   Introduction
                   1. A Sequence establishes the order of execution of PM Recipes.
                   2. Single Step Sequences for either PM1 or PM2 consist of one Sequence
                      step and only one recipe.
                   3. Parallel Sequences consist of one Sequence step and identical recipes
                      specified in the step for each PM. (Identical recipes must first be created
                      and saved in each of the PM recipe folders.) Wafers are processed in
                      either PM, then unloaded. This mode maximizes throughput of the system
                      and allows maintenance to be performed on either PM while processing in
                      the other.
                   4. Serial Sequences consist of two or more Sequence steps and different
                      recipes and PMs specified in each step. Wafers are processed in the PM
                      specified for the first sequence step, then in the PM specified for the next
                      sequence step(s) [cannot be the same PM specified in the first sequence
                      step], and then unloaded. This mode is used for multilayer structures,
                      when using different chemistries, and rinsing and stripping steps.

                   NOTE: In a two-process-head system with strip and rinse modules, a
                         combination of parallel and serial sequences can be used. The
                         etch step can be parallel, and then rinse and strip steps can be
                         serial.


Sequence Creating
                   Creating a sequence is different than creating a recipe. A sequence can be
                   defined as the map or route, a wafer will travels during processing. Wafer
                   routes can be serial or parallel, with a strip/rinse or strip/rinse/strip.
                   With the system set at CM1 to CM2, the starting loadlock is CM1 and the final
                   loadlock will be CM2. Unicassette, or CM1 to CM1 and CM2 to CM2 is just as
                   stated, the start and finish loadlocks are the same. This option will be
                   explained in more detail later.
                   The sequencer can be set up to run different recipes for different wafers. The
                   example sequence will be set up for:
                   Wafers 1 - 4 will get processed in PM1, PM2 and PM3.
                   Wafers 5 - 8 will get processed in PM1 or PM2, PM3 and PM4.
                   To create a sequence, press the Sequence Tab from the Home page.



88-279-001 Rev B                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   77
Sequence Creation and Editing

                 Figure 1. Sequence Tab




                 To create a new sequence, press the File icon and press the New icon.

                 Figure 2. New Sequence




                 Our wafers 1 - 4 need to be etched in PM1 then PM2 and finally in PM3 before
                 they are finished. The next steps show a series sequence being set up.
                 Choose PM1 under Step #1. Choose the needed recipe and press OK.



78 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                88-279-001 Rev B
                                               Sequence Creation and Editing
                   Figure 3. PM1 Etch




                   Since we want the wafer to go into PM2 next, we choose PM2 under Step #2.

                   Figure 4. Step #2 PM2




                   Again, we choose the recipe and press OK.



88-279-001 Rev B                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   79
Sequence Creation and Editing

                 The next step is to strip the wafer. Select PM3 under Step #3.

                 Figure 5. Step #3




                 Choose the recipe and press OK.

                 Figure 6. PM3 Etch




80 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                    88-279-001 Rev B
                                                 Sequence Creation and Editing
                   This is our last step for the wafer. Now the wafer quantity needs to be set. The
                   default Wafers in Sequence is always ALL. Press the Wafers in Sequence,
                   press the 4, since we want the first 4 wafers processed in this sequence, and
                   press NEXT.

                   Figure 7. Wafer Quantity




                   As you see the sequence clears. The sequence is recorded. This indication is
                   located in the lower right hand corner.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   81
Sequence Creation and Editing

                 Figure 8. Sequence #1




                 Our second sequence is ready for editing. This time, wafers 5 - 8 will go
                 through PM1 or PM2, PM3 then PM4.
                 Press PM1 under step #1. Choose the recipe and press OK.

                 Figure 9. Step #1 PM1




                 Now press PM2 under step #1. This sequence is called parallel. The first step
                 of wafer processing will be either PM1 or PM2.




82 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                   88-279-001 Rev B
                                                  Sequence Creation and Editing
                   Figure 10. Step #1 PM2




                   The wafer will be stripped next so press PM3 under Step #2. At this time, PM3
                   becomes the bottle neck. Both PM1 and PM2 need PM3 so which ever PM
                   finishes the process first that wafer will go to PM3 first. The other waters will
                   wait until PM3 is available. This delay is usually only a first wafer affect. While
                   PM3 is processing, another wafer is placed in the available PM and starts
                   processing.
                   Pick a recipe and press OK.

                   Figure 11. PM3




                   The last step is PM4 or the Rinser. Choose PM4 under Step #3, choose a rec-
                   ipe and press OK




88-279-001 Rev B                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   83
Sequence Creation and Editing

                 Figure 12. PM4-Rinser.




                 The parallel sequence is finished. If the last 4 wafers were the only ones left in
                 the cassette, we could leave the Wafers in Sequence to ALL. This would fin-
                 ish the cassette and end the processing. We will set the Wafer in Sequence to
                 4. Press the Wafers in Sequence. If you scroll down, you will see that there is
                 no longer 25 wafers to choose from. The first 4 are used so the only ones
                 remain are the last 21 wafers. Press 4 then OK.

                 Figure 13. Wafer slots left.




                 The sequence is done. Press the File icon then the Save icon.




84 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                     88-279-001 Rev B
                                               Sequence Creation and Editing
                   Figure 14. Save icon




                   Enter a sequence and press OK. The sequence is now ready to run. To run
                   the sequence, proceed to Wafer Loading, Etching and Unloading.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   85
Uni-Cassette Mode


Uni-Cassette Mode
                 Uni-cassette mode is a special mode to allow the start and finish cassette be
                 the same. This setting is usually unavaliable option for non-strip/rinse sys-
                 tems. Uni-cassette is an option on all 6500 but not always practical.
                 Uni-cassette allows the system to be treated almost as a dual system. Both
                 cassette modules can be set up to do independent processing. A typical
                 uni-cassette process would be CM1 to PM1 and back to CM1 and same with
                 CM2. This increases the thru-put of a system that only requires one process
                 head for production.
                 To set up the uni-cassette, from the Home screen, press the Maintenance Tab
                 then the Start icon.

                 Figure 1. Uni-Cassette




86 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                  88-279-001 Rev B
                                                               Uni-Cassette Mode
                   In the Cassette Mode, select CM1 to CM1 or CM2 to CM2. Since sequences
                   are not based on starting cassettes, no changes need to be made to the
                   sequences.

                   NOTE: With a 6500RS system, if uni-cassette mode is selected and the
                         recipe contains a rinse step, the wafer will be transported back
                         to CM1. This will result in lower thru-put.


                   Figure 2. CM1 to CM1




88-279-001 Rev B                                               MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   87
Diode Array Setup


Diode Array Setup
                 New 6500 systems, with the diode array option, have the ability to use addi-
                 tional options for endpointing. This gives the process engineer more options
                 in finding and utilizing the best endpoint method. The diode array can track
                 and use multiple signals.

                 Figure 1. New Endpoint Options




Termination             Termination mode is the same as the step termination described
                        above:
                                 • ENDPOINT:........................ Endpoint Algorithm
                                 • ENDPT/TIME: .................... Optical Algorithm or Elapsed
                                                                    Time
                                 • % OVERETCH:.................. Percentage of previous Etch
                                                                 Time
                                 • EXTERNAL:....................... External Trigger Signal
                                • EXTERN/TIME:.................. External Trigger Signal or
                                                                 Elapsed Time
A=                      This field sets the wavelength identifier for logical channel “A”. Options
                        are Wavelength1, Wavelength2, … , Wavelength6. Each identifier
                        refers to a wavelength in nanometers from the optional Diode Array
                        spectrometer. The corresponding wavelength is specified in a field at
                        the bottom of the pop-up window.



88 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                            88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                 Diode Array Setup


B=                 This field sets the wavelength identifier for logical channel “B”. Options
                   are Wavelength1, Wavelength2, … , Wavelength6. Each identifier
                   refers to a wavelength in nanometers from the optional Diode Array
                   spectrometer. The corresponding wavelength is specified in a field at
                   the bottom of the pop-up window.
Formula            This field sets the formula used to calculate the “Endpoint Signal”.
                   Options are:
                           • Channel A
                           • Channel A / Channel B
                           • Channel A + Channel B
                           • Channel A – Channel B
                           • (Channel A – Channel B) / (Channel A + Channel B)
                   Each logical channel is sampled continuously throughout the Etch
                   Step. The default sample rate is once every 250 milliseconds, for
                   Camera Times less than 200 ms. The sampling time will increase with
                   larger camera times. It will also increase to more than a second if Full
                   spectral data logging is enabled.
                   The samples are used in endpoint computations for Normalization
                   level and for satisfaction of the Trigger criteria.
                   All of the samples are saved to the System’s hard disk in an Endpoint
                   Trace file. There is one of these files saved for each wafer. It can be
                   plotted on the Human Interface or copied to diskette for display in a
                   spreadsheet program. The Endpoint trace files are accessible from the
                   Lot History Sheet.
                   A subset of the Endpoint samples also is displayed in real-time during
                   the Etch step. The Live-Endpoint graph can be seen in the upper right
                   of the PM Status screen. The displayed samples shown here update
                   about once every half-second. Refer to the section on Data Playback
                   screen for more details.
Bandwidth          This field sets the size of the collection window to the left and right col-
                   lect of each Wavelength listed. It is specified in nanometers, and
                   applies to all wavelengths. The total bandwidth collected for a given
                   Wavelength will be approximately twice this value.
                   If the spectral structures around a desired wavelength are broad, then
                   spatial averaging of this sort can be used to improve the sig-
                   nal-to-noise ratio. The maximum value is 15 nanometers, giving a
                   capture range of about 30 nanometers.




88-279-001 Rev B                                               MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4   89
Diode Array Setup



Exposure                This field sets the duration of exposure for the Diode Array. It is speci-
                        fied in milliseconds, and applies to all wavelengths.
                        Increasing the Camera time is the best way to improve signal-to-noise
                        ratio. The maximum value is 250 milliseconds. Setting too large of a
                        camera time, however, may saturate the Diode Array for certain wave-
                        lengths of light. This occurs at a value of 409.6 counts.
                        The engineer should choose the camera time such that the amplitude
                        of the wavelength(s) of choice are in the 200 – 300 count range.
Add Scan                This field sets the number of successive scans to add together. This
                        type of time-based averaging can increase the signal-to-noise ratio by
                        the square root of the number of scans. It can be used only when the
                        spectra are fairly stable over the sample period, which is rarely the
                        case for low-contact area applications.
Wavelength1,2....       This field sets the center value of the corresponding Wavelength iden-
                        tifier. It is specified in nanometers. Up to six different wavelengths can
                        be sampled at the maximum sample rate.
Gain 1,2.....           This field sets the gain factor which is multiplied against the corre-
                        sponding Wavelength identifier.

                 Figure 2. SubSample




90 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                                     88-279-001 Rev B
                                                                  Diode Array Setup


Sampling           This field specifies the format that the Diode Array data is collected in:
                          • 6 Wavelengths ................... In this mode, all six of the speci-
                                                              fied wavelengths are logged to
                                                              disk at the maximum sample
                                                              rate. This is the mode which
                                                              should be used for Production
                                                              wafer processing.
                          • Full Spectrum..................... In this mode, the entire spectrum
                                                               of wavelengths are logged to disk
                                                               at rate of approximately one
                                                               spectra every sec-
                                                               ond-and-a-half. The spectrum
                                                               covers the range of approxi-
                                                               mately 200 – 850 nanometers.
                                                               Resolution is about 0.3 nanome-
                                                               ters per individual sample.

                   NOTE: Full Spectrum Mode cannot be used for Endpointing an
                         Etch step, and is, therefore, not useful for Production. It
                         is, however, useful for process development. The entire
                         spectra can be captured and plotted on the Data Playback
                         screen, or exported to a spreadsheet program.

                          • Every 2nd........................... This mode is similar to Full Spec-
                                                                 trum mode, however, only every
                                                                 2nd pixel is sampled from the
                                                                 Diode Array. This allows for some
                                                                 speed-up in the collection pro-
                                                                 cess, while sacrificing some of
                                                                 the spatial resolution.
                          • Every nth … ....................... Similar to the above mode,
                                                                except every nth pixel is
                                                                sampled.




88-279-001 Rev B                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4        91
Diode Array Setup




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




92 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #4                                        88-279-001 Rev B
                                    Table Of Contents
                               Operation Procedure
                                                  Section 5
                                                                     88-292-001
                                                                     Rev C
Operation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Emergency Machine Off (EMO) Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Etch Rate & Uniformity Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
MFC Calibration Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Particle Count Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
PM Chamber Leak Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Power On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       Lockout/Tagout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16




88-292-001 Rev C                                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5        93
                   THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




94 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                          88-292-001 Rev C
Operation Procedures
                                                                          88-292-001
                                                                          Rev C


                         ATTENTION!
                         SCREEN REFERENCES
                        Software screens are identified by the “path” required to navigate
                        to the screen. The “path” begins at the System Status Screen
                        (Home). Return to the System Status Screen at any time by touch-
                        ing the HOME button on the software banner.
                        Example:
                        To reach the TMC_Valves Screen (TM-Service / Direct I/O /
                        TMC_Valves):
                                • Touch the HOME button on the banner.
                                • Touch the Robot icon (TM).
                                • Touch the Service tab.
                                • Touch the Direct I/O button.
                                • Select TMC-VALVES.

Introduction
                   The documents on the following pages give detailed instructions on how to
                   perform various operation procedures to assure optimum performance of the
                   Tegal 6500. These procedures will assist personnel in accomplishing the
                   day-to-day tasks involved in qualifying the system for process. If problems are
                   encountered, contact your Maintenance Supervisor.
                   The procedures are presented in logical, easy-to-understand paragraphs:
                          • Purpose
                          • Equipment Required
                          • Preliminary Instructions (optional)
                          • Discussion (optional)
                          • Procedure Summary (optional)
                          • Procedure




88-292-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   95
Operation Procedures




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




96 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                        88-292-001 Rev C
Emergency Machine Off (EMO)
    Verification
88-xxx-xxx1




                                                                       76-204-001
                                                                       Rev C


PURPOSE            This procedure describes how to check the operation of the Emergency
                   Machine Off (EMO) circuitry.


EQUIPMENT                 • Digital Voltmeter (DVM)
REQUIRED


PRELIMINARY               • None.
INSTRUCTIONS


DISCUSSION                • There are six EMO buttons on a 6500 series machine. Pressing any
                          EMO button shuts off all power to the machine.
                          • The EMO switches are normally closed.

Lockout/Tagout
                          • None

Procedure
                   1. Press any EMO button. Machine power should shut off.




76-204-001 Rev C                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   1
Emergency Machine Off (EMO) Verification
                 Figure 1.




                 2. Twist the EMO button to re-enable it.
                 3. Press the ON button on the Operator Console (Opcon). Machine power
                    should NOT come on.
                 4. Press the ON button on the Power Distribution Module (PDM) to enable
                    the EMO circuit.
                 5. Press the ON button on the Opcon to restore power to the machine.
                 6. Repeat step 1 through step 5 for each EMO button.

                        End of Procedure




2   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                              76-204-001 Rev C
Etch Rate & Uniformity Check
88-xxx-xxx




                                                                           76-383-001
                                                                           Rev C


PURPOSE            This procedure describes how to check etch rate and uniformity in the Pro-
                   cess Module.


EQUIPMENT                 • Etch rate wafer (obtain from authorized personnel)
REQUIRED


PRELIMINARY               • If an etch rate recipe does not exist, program a recipe in accordance
INSTRUCTIONS              with fab requirements, and program a sequence. (See “Users’ Guide
                          (v5.3x)” for programming instructions.)


DISCUSSION         Since fab requirements vary, this procedure should be considered a general
                   guide on how to monitor etch rate and uniformity.

Lockout/Tagout
                          • None

Procedure
                   1. From the Home screen, press the UNLOAD icon for CM1. CM1 will vent to
                      atmosphere.
                   2. If CM2 has wafers or the wafer status is unknown (as indicated by a
                      yellow-colored slot), press the UNLOAD icon and remove the wafers when
                      CM2 has vented.
                   3. Load an etch rate wafer into slot #1 of CM2.
                   4. From the Home screen, press the SEQUENCE button, then select the
                      Etch Rate sequence and press START.
                   5. When the sequence has completed, from the Home screen press the CM2
                      UNLOAD icon.
                   6. When CM2 is ready, unload the wafer and measure the etch rate and
                      uniformity in accordance with fab requirements.

                        End of Procedure



76-383-001 Rev C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   3
Etch Rate & Uniformity Check




                                  THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




4   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                        76-383-001 Rev C
MFC Calibration Verification
88-xxx-xxx




                                                                         76-350-001
                                                                         Rev D


PURPOSE            This procedure describes how to verify MFC flow repeatability by using the
                   MFC Calibration utility to compare MFC flow to a previously established
                   baseline.


EQUIPMENT                 • Software v2.20, or later
REQUIRED
                          • Flow calibration tool (STEC)


PRELIMINARY               • Perform an MFC calibration using a flow calibration tool (STEC).
INSTRUCTIONS


DISCUSSION         The MFC Calibration utility has two modes:
                          • Learn: Establishes the baseline flow value to be used for verifica-
                          tion. This mode must be run after system installation or MFC
                          maintenance. The Learn mode need only be run if valid baseline data
                          does not exist.
                          • Verification: Compares existing MFC flow with the previously
                          established baseline.

Lockout/Tagout
                          • None

LEARN Recipe Creation
                   When MFC CALIB is specified as the recipe step Sequence type, only the gas
                   setpoint fields are active. The selection for each of the gases is YES or NO.
                   YES includes the gas in the calibration recipe step; NO does not. All gases,
                   or just one, can be included in the same recipe step. If more than one gas is
                   included, the utility runs the gases in sequence.
                   When creating an MFC calibration recipe, step 1 of the recipe should be spec-
                   ified as a Pumpdown step, and step 2 as the MFC CALIB step.




76-350-001 Rev D                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5    5
MFC Calibration Verification
                 While a gas is highlighted, the SELECT button is active. Press this button to
                 bring up the Gas Parameter pop-up window, with the following features:




                 1. Learn Enabled: On/Off
                         • If ON is selected, the Learn routine is run for that gas. Specify only
                         that gas in the MFC Learn mode recipe.
                         • If OFF is selected, the Verification routine is run for that gas. Spec-
                         ify OFF in the Verification mode recipe.
                 2. Limits
                         • The Upper/Lower Fault and Warning values are used to monitor flow
                         readback of the MFC (the same as in the standard flow recipe step). If
                         flow readback during the recipe step is outside the specified fault/warn-
                         ing values, an alarm occurs. The recipe aborts on a Fault alarm.
                         Typical values are 5% for warnings and 10% for faults.
                 3. Calibration Verification Limits
                         • If the flow calculated by the Verification routine is outside the values
                         specified in the Upper/Lower Fault or Warning fields, an alarm occurs.
                         These values should be set at the what the flow deviation is before
                         process degradation occurs. Default values are 5% for warnings and
                         10% for faults.
                 4. SAVE saves values, while EXIT does not.




6   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                     76-350-001 Rev D
                                                   MFC Calibration Verification
MFC Calibration Learn Procedure
                   1. Perform “Reactor Disassembly, Manual Clean, & Reassembly,”
                      (PM #76-195-002). Use approved dry clean procedure for 6510 systems.

                      NOTE: Running the MFC calibration utility without first cleaning the
                            chamber can result in inaccurate flow measurement due to
                            process by-product outgassing.

                   2. Perform process chamber leak rate check procedure in Learn modes.
                      Verify the chamber leakrate is with-in specs.
                   3. Enter MFC calibration flow setpoint values on the PM\Service\Manifold
                      pop-up window. The maximum value that can be entered is 90 sccm (full
                      scale of the manometer is reached too quickly with flows >90 sccm, and
                      calibration accuracy is greatly reduced. Typical setpoint would be
                      established recipe gas flow or a percentage.).




76-350-001 Rev D                                                 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   7
MFC Calibration Verification
                 4. They system will recognize the change in the setpoints.




                 5. Configure or verify the LEARN recipe MFCs are set for LEARN ENABLE
                    YES.




                 6. Start the sequence LEARN using a clean, bare silicon wafer (if a
                    calibration Learn sequence has not been created, contact Tegal Technical
                    support). The wafer is loaded and the sequence begins.

                     NOTE: Any alarms that occur during the Learn sequence should be
                           examined before saving new calibration baselines.



8   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                               76-350-001 Rev D
                                                      MFC Calibration Verification
                   When the Learn mode sequences completes, a pop-up window appears
                   stating:

                                     MFC Calib learn complete on PMX.
                                     Press YES to update the config file.
                                     YES NO


                   7. Press YES.
                   8. Verify the new Learn data in PMX/Service/Direct I/O/MFCCal_Result.
                   9. Perform MFC calibration verification at established intervals in Verification
                      mode.

                   NOTE: If flows are within calibration verification fault and warning
                         limits, the sequence terminates and the wafer is unloaded. No
                         alarms are generated and the sequence is complete.


MFC Calibration Verification Procedure
                   1. Configure or verify the LEARN recipe MFCs are set for LEARN ENABLE
                      NO.




                   NOTE: DO NOT change any of the setpoints. This will negate all past
                         gas constants.




76-350-001 Rev D                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5      9
MFC Calibration Verification
                 2. Start the sequence LEARN using a clean, bare silicon wafer. The wafer is
                    loaded and the sequence begins.
                 When the sequence is over, the system will prompt that the utility if com-
                 pleted. If all gas flow constants match to learned value, no alarms will occur.
                 If any alarms occur, verify integrity of MFC and repeat the MFC Verification
                 sequence.

                       End of Procedure




10 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                    76-350-001 Rev D
Particle Count Check
88-xxx-xxx




                                                                            76-384-001
                                                                            Rev C


PURPOSE            This procedure describes how to check the number of particles in a Process
                   Module.


EQUIPMENT                 • Particle wafer with an initial count of 50 particles or less (obtain from
REQUIRED                  authorized personnel).


PRELIMINARY               • If a particle recipe does not exist, program a recipe in accordance
INSTRUCTIONS              with fab requirements and program a sequence. (See Users’ Guide
                          (v5.3x) for programming instructions.)


DISCUSSION                • Since fab requirements vary, this procedure should be considered a
                          general guideline on how to make a particle count check.

Lockout/Tagout
                          • None

Procedure
                   1. From the Home screen, press the UNLOAD icon for CM1. CM1 should
                      vent to atmosphere. Remove any wafers in CM1.
                   2. If CM2 has wafers in it or the wafer status is unknown (as indicated by a
                      yellow-colored slot), press the UNLOAD icon and remove the wafers.
                      Wafer status will be shown on the Main screen.
                   3. Load the particle wafer(s) into slots #1 and #2 of CM1, if both PMs are
                      being tested.
                   4. From the Home screen, press the SEQUENCE button, then select the
                      Particle sequence and press START.
                   5. When the sequence is completed, from the Home screen press CM2
                      UNLOAD icon.
                   6. When CM2 is vented, remove the wafer, and then measure the particle
                      count in accordance with fab requirements.

                        End of Procedure


76-384-001 Rev C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5    11
Particle Count Check




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




12 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                        76-384-001 Rev C
PM Chamber Leak Check
88-xxx-xxx




                                                                          76-317-002
                                                                          Rev D


PURPOSE            This procedure describes how to check the Process Module chamber for
                   leaks. Since the method used is software dependent, two versions are
                   provided.


EQUIPMENT                 • Standard Tegal Engineer's Tool Box
REQUIRED


PRELIMINARY               • Software version 4.1 or earlier
INSTRUCTIONS


DISCUSSION                • The Leak Rate utility in the PM recipe directory launches the
                          _Leak.RCP recipe. A default leak rate recipe is provided with the soft-
                          ware, but modifications to meet customer specifications can be made
                          on the recipe page.

Lockout/Tagout
                          • None

Procedure for v4.10 or Greater
                   1. From the Main/PM/Status screen, verify that the chuck is up.
                   2. From Main/PM/Maintenance, press the LEAK button, then YES, to start
                      the PM leak rate recipe. (See Figure 1.)
                             • The PM will pump down for the time specified in the recipe.
                             • When the pumpdown has finished, the gate and throttle valves
                             close, and the leak rate can be calculated.

                   NOTE: An alarm will be posted if the leak rate is greater than the
                         warning or fault levels set on the Main/PM/Service/ Direct_IO
                         page (Analog section).

                   3. When the leak rate check has finished, the gate valve will open and the
                      chamber will pump down again.
                   4. From the Main/PM/Maintenance/Gas Panel page, lower the chuck.


76-317-002 Rev D                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   13
PM Chamber Leak Check
                       End of Procedure

Procedure for Pre v4.10
                 1. From the Main/PM/Maintenance/Gas Panel screen, raise the chuck by
                    pressing the Chuck icon.
                 2. Let the Chamber pump down for 5-10 minutes.
                 3. Press V55 to close the gate valve.
                 4. When the chamber pressure reads 0.1 mT, use a stopwatch to begin
                    timing the leak rate.
                 5. After 5 minutes, record the final chamber pressure and use the formula
                    below to determine the leak rate.
                    Leak Rate =
                                      (Final Chamber Pressure mT) — (0/1mT)
                                                    5 minutes


                 NOTE: Leak rate specification is > 1.5 mT/min. If the leak rate is higher,
                       you may need to be troubleshoot the chamber for leaks.

                 6. Press V55 again to reopen the gate valve.
                 7. Press the Chuck icon to lower the chuck.

                 Figure 1. PM Maintenance Screen




                       End of Procedure

14 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                 76-317-002 Rev D
Power On/Off
88-xxx-xxx1




                                                                        76-354-001
                                                                        Rev C


PURPOSE            These procedures describe how to turn the 6500 System Power ON and OFF
                   depending on various conditions.


EQUIPMENT                 • None
REQUIRED


DISCUSSION         The POWER ON procedures describe how to turn system power ON depend-
                   ing on the conditions present when the system was turned off, as indicated
                   below:
                          • System power was turned off using the Opcon or an EMO button
                          while system was idle, PM1 and PM2 (if present) chucks were down,
                          and the system was at vacuum.
                          • Same as above, except the system was at atmosphere.
                          • System power was turned off using an EMO button while system
                          was not idle, PM1 and/or PM2 chucks were up, and the system was at
                          vacuum.
                   If restoring power to the system, first verify under what conditions the
                   power was turned OFF.
                   For most routine maintenance, it is not necessary to turn off system power.
                   The POWER OFF portion of this document describes how to turn system
                   power OFF when the system is at vacuum and provides a functional descrip-
                   tion of the Emergency Machine Off (EMO) button.
                   This procedures are organized as follows:

                   Proc # Power Conditions
                   1      ON    Opcon or EMO button used while system
                                      is idle, chuck is down, system is at
                                      vacuum
                   2         ON       Opcon or EMO button used while system
                                      is idle, chuck is down, system is at
                                      atmosphere
                   3         ON       EMO button used while system is not idle,
                                      chucks are up, system is at vacuum.
                   4         OFF      Power turned off with EMO button, sys-
                                      tem not idle, chucks up, system at vacuum
                   5         --       Use of EMO button


76-354-001 Rev C                                                  MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   15
Power On/Off
Lockout/Tagout
                        • None

Power On Procedure #1
                 System power was turned off using the Opcon or an EMO button while sys-
                 tem was idle, PM1 and PM2 (if present) chucks were down, and the system
                 was at vacuum.
                 1. Verify that the following facilities are present and meet system
                    specifications:
                    a. House water for RF cart, turbo pumps, PM3 and PM4 (if present)
                    b. CDA
                    c. Nitrogen
                    d. Exhaust
                    e. Verify all EMOs, even the Customer's, are disabled.
                 2. Check Power Distribution Module (PDM) Control Power. If power is OFF,
                    turn the power ON by pressing the Control Power switch on the PDM front
                    panel. The switch will light, indicating the PDM power in ON.

                 NOTE: If the system has the optional extended PDM, peripheral power
                       is not available from the PDM until the PDM Control Power is ON.

                 3. Turn on power to system peripherals (PM & TM rough pumps, PM
                    Temperature Controller).
                 4. Remove any disk from the Opcon floppy drive.
                 5. Turn on the PM1/2 four-way water valves located on the back of the
                    system.
                 6. Press Machine ON button on the front panel of the Opcon. The following
                    events will occur automatically and should be allowed to complete:
                    a. System Controller boots.
                    b. DOS Scandisk executes (if installed).
                    c. Tegal software initializes, and the Tegal logo and home status screen
                       appear.
                    d. Data downloads from the system controller via Ethernet to the VME
                       card cage (approximately 10 minutes). During this download the main
                       status screen module displays are yellow, indicating module status is
                       unknown. When the download completes and communication with the
                       various modules begins, the module display colors change to gray or
                       light blue depending on actual system pressure.




16 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                   76-354-001 Rev C
                                                                             Power On/Off
                      e. The TM1/2 robot(s), PM4 Rinser, and CM1(2) elevators home, and the
                         robot and cassette module graphics appear.
                      f.   After the download completes, the rough pump vacuum valves open
                           and the PM and TM turbo pumps start. As the turbo pumps start,
                           alarms are posted indicating the turbo pumps are not normal. Silence
                           these alarms using the Silence button on the Alarm screen. These
                           alarms automatically clear when the turbo pumps are ready. The TM
                           should begin to pump down.
                   7. Reset the Stripper (PM3) Heater Controller module (if present), by
                      pressing the illuminated Fault Reset switch on the Stripper Heater
                      Controller front panel. [The Controller module is located behind the middle
                      cover on the right.]
                   8. Press the Clear Wafers button on the TM/Manual screen. The system
                      automatically inspects all possible wafer locations and unloads any wafers
                      found. (On a wet system, CM2 cassette may need to be cleared before
                      using the Clear Wafers option.)
                   9. Allow system components to reach operating temperatures. If system
                      power was off for more than a few hours, various system components
                      must warm up prior to etching, as indicated below:
                      a. PM1/2 capacitance manometers: 4-6 hour warm-up required.
                         Setpoint is 100°C.
                      b. PM1/2 lower electrode and sidewall temperature: This warm-up
                         time is a function of the starting time of the water for the temperature
                         controller. Typical setpoint is 80°C.
                      c. Stripper (PM3) chuck heaters (if present): An alarm is posted until
                         the setpoint is reached. Maximum setpoint is 275°C.
                      d. Rinser (PM4) (if present): Deionized water temperature must reach
                         setpoint. This is configured in STI software and is between 60°C and
                         80°C.
                      e. PM1/2 foreline heaters (if present): Upper and lower cuff
                         temperatures must reach 60°C.
                   10. Open gas valves and purge the chamber as follows:
                      a. Open all manual gas valves at the top rear of the PM1/2 gas boxes.
                      b. Open the final manual valve at the PM1/2 chamber gas inlet.
                      c. Press the PM1/2 Purge icon on the PM/Maintenance/Gas Panel
                         screen.
                   11. Allow 4-8 hours for pumpdown.
                   12. Leak-check the PM1/2/3 process chambers, using the Leak utility on the
                       PM1/2/3 Maintenance screen.
                   13. Perform any additional customer-specific pre-etch tests and return system
                       to normal operation.



76-354-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5     17
Power On/Off
                       End of Procedure

Power On Procedure #2
                 System power was turned off using the Opcon or an EMO button while sys-
                 tem was idle, PM1 and PM2 (if present) chucks were down, and the system
                 was vented to atmosphere.
                 1. Verify that the following facilities are present and meet system
                    specifications:
                    a. House water for RF cart, turbo pumps, PM3 and PM4 (if present)
                    b. CDA
                    c. Nitrogen
                    d. Exhaust
                 2. Verify all EMOs, even the Customer's, are disabled.
                 3. Check Power Distribution Module (PDM) Control Power. If power is OFF,
                    turn the power on by pressing the Control Power switch on the PDM front
                    panel. The switch will light, indicating the PDM power in ON.

                 NOTE: If the system has the optional extended PDM, peripheral power
                       is not available from the PDM until the PDM Control Power is ON.

                 4. Turn on power to system peripherals (PM & TM rough pumps, PM
                    Temperature Controller).
                 5. Remove any disk from the Opcon floppy drive.
                 6. Turn on the PM1/2 four-way water located at the back of the system.
                 7. Press Machine ON button on the front panel of the Opcon. The following
                    events will occur automatically and should be allowed to complete:
                    a. System Controller boots.
                    b. DOS Scandisk executes (if installed).
                    c. Tegal software initializes, and the Tegal logo and home status screen
                       appear.
                    d. Data downloads from the system controller via Ethernet to the VME
                       card cage (approximately 15-20 minutes including pumpdown). During
                       this download, the main status screen module displays are yellow,
                       indicating module status is unknown. When the download completes
                       and communication with the various modules begins, the module
                       display colors change to gray or light blue depending on actual system
                       pressure.
                    e. The TM1/2 robot(s), PM4 Rinser, and CM1(2) elevators home, and the
                       robot and cassette module graphics appear.




18 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                   76-354-001 Rev C
                                                                             Power On/Off
                      f.   After the download completes, the rough pump vacuum valves open
                           and the PM and TM turbo pumps start. As the turbo pumps start,
                           alarms are posted indicating the turbo pumps are not normal. Silence
                           these alarms using the Silence button on the Alarm screen. These
                           alarms automatically clear when the turbo pumps are ready. The TM
                           should begin to pump down.
                   8. Reset the Stripper (PM3) Heater Controller module (if present), by
                      pressing the illuminated Fault Reset switch on the Stripper Heater
                      Controller front panel. [The Controller module is located behind the middle
                      cover on the right.]
                   9. Pump down TM1. Silence the Turbo alarm, using TM/Maintenance Pump
                      utility.
                   10. Pump down the PM(s), using the PM/Maintenance Pump utility. Silence
                       the Turbo alarm.
                      a. Allow turbo alarms to clear (the alarms will clear when the turbo
                         reaches normal operating speed).
                   11. Press the Clear Wafers button on the TM/Manual screen. The system
                       automatically inspects all possible wafer locations and unloads any wafers
                       found. (On a wet system, CM2 cassette may need to be cleared before
                       using the Clear Wafers option.)
                   12. Allow system components to reach operating temperatures. If system
                       power was off for more than a few hours, various system components
                       must warm up prior to etching, as indicated below:
                      a. PM1/2 capacitance manometers: 4-6 hour warm-up required.
                         Setpoint is 100°C.
                      b. PM1/2 lower electrode and sidewall temperature: This warm-up
                         time is a function of the starting time of the water for the temperature
                         controller. Typical setpoint is 80°C.
                      c. Stripper (PM3) chuck heaters (if present): An alarm is posted until
                         the setpoint is reached. Maximum setpoint is 275°C.
                      d. Rinser (PM4) (if present): Deionized water temperature must reach
                         setpoint. This is configured in STI software and is between 60°C and
                         80°C.
                      e. PM1/2 foreline heaters (if present): Upper and lower cuff
                         temperatures must reach 60°C.
                   13. Open gas valves and purge the chamber as follows:
                      a. Open all manual gas valves at the top rear of the PM1/2 gas boxes.
                      b. Open the final manual valve at the PM1/2 chamber gas inlet.
                      c. Press the PM1/2 Purge icon on the PM/Maintenance/Gas Panel
                         screen.
                   14. Allow 4-8 hours for pumpdown.



76-354-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5     19
Power On/Off
                 15. Leak-check the PM1/2/3 process chambers, using the Leak utility on the
                     PM1/2/3 Maintenance screen.
                 16. Perform any additional customer-specific pre-etch tests and return system
                     to normal operation.

                       End of Procedure


Power On Procedure #3
                 System power was turned off using an EMO button while system was not idle,
                 PM1 and PM2 chucks were up, and the system was at vacuum and had not
                 vented.
                 1. Verify that the following facilities are present and meet system
                    specifications:
                    a. House water for RF cart, turbo pumps, PM3 and PM4 (if present)
                    b. CDA
                    c. Nitrogen
                    d. Exhaust
                 2. Verify all EMOs, even the Customer's, are disabled.
                 3. Check the Power Distribution Module (PDM) Control Power. If power is
                    OFF, turn the power on by pressing the Control Power switch on the PDM
                    front panel. The switch will light, indicating the PDM power in ON.

                 NOTE: If the system has the optional extended PDM, peripheral power
                       is not available from the PDM until the PDM Control Power is ON.

                 4. Turn on power to system peripherals (PM & TM rough pumps, PM
                    Temperature Controller).
                 5. Remove any disk from the Opcon floppy drive.
                 6. Turn on the PM1/2 four-way water valves located at the back of the
                    system.
                 7. Press Machine ON button on the front panel of the Opcon. The following
                    events will occur automatically and should be allowed to complete:
                    a. System Controller boots.
                    b. DOS Scandisk executes (if installed).
                    c. Tegal software initializes, and the Tegal logo and home status screen
                       appear.




20 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                   76-354-001 Rev C
                                                                             Power On/Off
                      d. Data downloads from the system controller via Ethernet to the VME
                         card cage (approximately 10 minutes). During this download, the main
                         status screen module displays are yellow, indicating module status is
                         unknown. When the download completes and communication with the
                         various modules begins, the module display colors change to gray or
                         light blue depending on actual system pressure.
                      e. The TM1/2 robot(s), PM4 Rinser, and CM1(2) elevators home, and the
                         robot and cassette module graphics appear.
                      f.   After the download completes, the rough pump vacuum valves open
                           and the PM and TM turbo pumps start. As the turbo pumps start,
                           alarms are posted indicating the turbo pumps are not normal. Silence
                           these alarms using the Silence button on the Alarm screen. These
                           alarms automatically clear when the turbo pumps are ready. The TM
                           should begin to pump down.
                   8. Reset the Stripper (PM3) Heater Controller module (if present), by
                      pressing the illuminated Fault Reset switch on the Stripper Heater
                      Controller front panel. [The Controller module is located behind the middle
                      cover on the right.]
                   9. If the chuck is up and the system did not autopump down the chamber,
                      use the PM/Maintenance/Gas Panel screen to do the following:
                      a. Close the throttle valve (0.0°).
                      b. Open V55.
                      c. Open V51.
                      d. Open the throttle valve (10°...30°...60°...and 90° in 1-minute intervals.
                      e. Open the manometer isolation valve V24.
                      f.   Verify that PM chamber pressure reaches < 100 mTorr.
                      g. Enable the PM turbo pump(s) using the
                         PM/Service/Direct_IO/Digital_IO screen.
                      h. Turn ON the PM turbo pump(s), using the PM/Service/
                         Direct_IO/Digital_IO screen.
                      i.   Silence the turbo not normal alarms using the Silence button on the
                           Alarm screen. Allow the turbo alarms to clear. The alarms clear when
                           the turbo reaches normal operating speed.
                   10. Lower the PM chuck(s).
                   11. Allow PMs to reach process state.
                   12. Press the Clear Wafers button on the TM/Manual screen. The system
                       automatically inspects all possible wafer locations and unloads any wafers
                       found. (On a wet system, CM2 cassette may need to be cleared before
                       using the Clear Wafers option.)




76-354-001 Rev C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   21
Power On/Off
                 13. Allow system components to reach operating temperatures. If system
                     power was off for more than a few hours, various system components
                     must warm up prior to etching, as indicated below:
                    a. PM1/2 capacitance manometers: 4-6 hour warm-up required.
                       Setpoint is 100°C.
                    b. PM1/2 lower electrode and sidewall temperature: This warm-up
                       time is a function of the starting time of the water for the temperature
                       controller. Typical setpoint is 80°C.
                    c. Stripper (PM3) chuck heaters (if present): An alarm is posted until
                       the setpoint is reached. Maximum setpoint is 275°C.
                    d. Rinser (PM4) (if present): Deionized water temperature must reach
                       setpoint. This is configured in STI software and is between 60°C and
                       80°C.
                    e. PM1/2 foreline heaters (if present): Upper and lower cuff
                       temperatures must reach 60°C.
                 14. Open gas valves and purge the chamber as follows:
                    a. Open all manual gas valves at the top rear of the PM1/2 gas boxes.
                    b. Open the final manual valve at the PM1/2 chamber gas inlet.
                    c. Press the PM1/2 Purge icon on the PM/Maintenance screen.
                    d. Allow 4-8 hours for pumpdown.
                 15. Using the Leak utility on the PM1/2/3 Maintenance screen, leak-check the
                     PM1/2/3 process chambers.
                 16. Perform any additional customer-specific pre-etch tests and return system
                     to normal operation.

                       End of Procedure

Power Off Procedure #1
                 System at vacuum.
                 1. Idle the system.
                    a. Lower PM1/2 chuck(s).
                    b. Open PM1/2 to TM slit valve(s).
                    c. Open CM to TM slit valves (for PM3, does not matter).
                    d. Remove all wafers from system.
                 2. Raise the PM1/2 chuck(s), using the PM\Maintenance\Gas Panel screen.
                 3. Purge PM1/2 gas line(s) and chamber, using the Purge utility on the
                    PM/Maintenance screen.
                 4. Close manual gas valves:
                    a. Close all manual gas valves at the top rear of the PM1/2 gas boxes.


22 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                                    76-354-001 Rev C
                                                                              Power On/Off
                      b. Close the final manual gas valve at the PM1/2 chamber gas inlet.
                   5. Lower PM chuck(s) and close gate valve V55 using PM/Maintenance/Gas
                      Panel screen.
                   6. PM turbo pump(s) adjustment:
                      a. Disable PM turbo pump enable signal, using the
                         PM/Service/Direct_IO/Digital_IO screen.
                      b. Turn off the start signal for the PM turbo pump, using the
                         PM\Service\Direct_IO\Digital_IO screen.
                   7. Close PM rough pump valve V51, using the PM\Maintenance\Gas Panel
                      screen.
                   8. Allow the PM turbos to spin down for 5 minutes.
                   9. Close TM turbo backing valve V102 and N2 purge valve, using the
                      TM/Service/Direct_IO/Digital_IO screen.
                   10. Turn off the start signal for the TM turbo pump, using the
                       TM/Service/Direct_IO/Digital_IO screen.
                      a. Allow the TM turbo pump to spin down for 5 minutes
                   11. Push the Machine Off switch on the front panel of the Opcon.
                   12. Turn OFF power to peripherals if needed.

                          End of Procedure

Power Off Procedure #2-EMO
                   An emergency requires the use of the Emergency Machine Off (EMO) button.
                   These emergencies include, but are not limited to, the following:
                   1. Press any EMO button when there is an emergency. This will immediately
                      remove power from the system.
                      a. On systems with a standard PDM, pressing an EMO button removes
                         only the system power. Peripheral power remains ON.
                      b. On systems with the optional extended PDM, pressing an EMO
                         removes power from the system and all system peripherals.
                   2. The location of the seven standard EMO buttons is as follows:
                      •   Top left and right of facade (2)
                      •   Rear of Opcon (1)
                      •   Left, right, and rear side of system chassis (3)
                      •   Front panel of PDM (1)
                      Additional remote EMO switches are optional.
                   3. When any EMO button is pressed:



76-354-001 Rev C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5   23
Power On/Off
                    a. The PM and TM turbo pumps are not allowed to spin down slowly,
                       because this could cause premature turbo pump failure.
                    b. The PDM contactors open and the PDM Control Power is disabled.
                    c. The EMO buttons latch in the open position. They can be unlatch by
                       turning the button clockwise.
                    d. The optional Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) system shuts down.

                       End of Procedure




24 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #5                                               76-354-001 Rev C
                                    Table Of Contents
                           Functional Descriptions
                                                   Section 6
                                                                      88-293-001
                                                                      Rev C
Functional Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       AC Module (ACM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
       Atmospheric Cassette Platform (ACP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
       Chamber Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       Chuck & Chuck Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       DC Module (Lambda) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
       Endpoint Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
       HRe- Process Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
       Mass Flow Controller (MFC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
       Monitor & Touchscreen(CRT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
       Penning Ion Gauge (PIG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
       PM1/2 kHz Matching Network & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       PM1/2 MHz Matching Network & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       PM1/2 RF Combiner (Triode 2 HRe- Chambers). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       PM1/2/3 Process Pressure Control System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       Rinser Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       Roughing Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       System Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       Temperature Control Unit (TCU) — Neslab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       TM Turbomolecular Pump & Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
       Vacuum Cassette Elevator (VCE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
       VME Card Cage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
       Wafer Aligner (PM5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24




88-293-001 Rev C                                                                   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6        i
                    THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




ii   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                         88-293-001 Rev C
Functional Descriptions
                                                                       88-293-001
                                                                       C

AC Module (ACM)
               Location
               Bottom of the equipment rack, on the left side of the system chassis.

               Function
               The AC Module receives 208V, 3-phase AC from the PDM, and distributes AC
               voltage to modules within the system chassis that require AC voltage. It pro-
               vides circuit breaker protection and distribution but does not switch power on
               and off to the various loads. The PDM is responsible for main power on/off
               switching.
               On the USA version of the module, 110 VAC is developed using one of the
               three phase lines and neutral. On Japan and Europe versions, 110 VAC is
               developed by a transformer in the module.

               Description
               The front of the module has the following circuit breakers:

               Circuit         Function
               Breaker
               CB1             Main power input to AC module (208 3-phase)
               CB-2            DC power/TM turbo pump (208 1-phase)
               CB-3            Aux out (208 1-phase)
               CB-4            PM1 (208 1-phase) (throttle valve controller,
                               MHz match controller, turbo pump controller)
               CB-5            PM2 (208 1-phase) (throttle valve controller,
                               MHz match controller, turbo pump controller)
               CB-6            Transformer for 110 VAC (not used in USA)
               CB-7            Core robot (110 vac)




88-293-001 C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   1
Functional Descriptions
                  Circuit         Function
                  Breaker
                  CB-8            Enclosure lamp (110 vac)
                  CB-9            Opcon (110 vac)
                  CB10            Service outlets on AC module (110 vac)
                  CB-11           PM1 foreline heater (208 1-phase) (optional)
                  CB-12           PM2 foreline heater (208 1-phase) (optional)
                  CB-13           DI heater (208 1-phase) (PM4)
                  CB-14           ATM robot (208 1-phase)
                  CB-15           Stripper throttle valve (208 1-phase)
                  CB-16           Stripper heater (208 1-phase)

                 Additional front panel items:
                          • Three neon lights on the AC module to indicate which phases of the
                          incoming line voltage are available.
                          • Two 110-volt service outlets for laptops, test equipment, etc.
                 The AC module does not supply line voltage to anything outside the 6500 sys-
                 tem chassis.

Atmospheric Cassette Platform (ACP)
                 Location
                 The ACP is at the right front (CM2 position) of systems equipped with the
                 rinse/strip option. It is housed in a plastic safety enclosure that is accessible to
                 the operator when the CM2 facade safety shield is lowered.

                 Function
                 The primary function of the ACP is to provide a cassette to accept processed
                 wafers after a recipe or sequence has been completed.
                 A secondary function is to hold wafers temporarily, for some recipes and
                 sequences (such as a rinse/strip/rinse sequence), until the rinser or stripper
                 becomes available.

                 Description
                 The ACP is adjustable for 100, 125, 150, and 200 mm cassettes. The plat-
                 form tilts back to facilitate easy loading and unloading of cassettes. The
                 platform has four sensors: cassette-present microswitch, wafer present, plat-
                 form tilted down, and platform tilted up. The wafer present sensor detects if a
                 wafer is present in a cassette but cannot map the cassette to determine the
                 slot. Hence when CM2 is unloaded or a cassette is placed on the ACP, the
                 cassette must be empty.




2   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                          88-293-001 C
                                                             Functional Descriptions
               The ACP is controlled by the ACP Controller PCB, which is mounted under-
               neath the ACP assembly. The Controller PCB is responsible for:
                      • communicating with the TM VME CPU via RS-232
                      • monitoring ACP sensors
                      • driving the platform tilt cylinder
                      • driving the safety shield up/down cylinder
                      • enabling/disabling the PM3/PM4/TM2 safety interlock. When the
                      safety cover is off or the safety shield is down, all moving parts within
                      the cover area are disabled (robot arm, rinser head, and PM3 atmo-
                      spheric slit valve).

Chamber Lift
               Location
               At the rear of PM 1 and PM.

               Function
               The chamber lift is used to lift and pivot PM 1 and PM 2 reactor and pump
               stack components to facilitate easy access of the reactor interior. The entire
               HRe- chamber assembly, or only the pump stack and valve assembly, can be
               raised. The mechanism consists of:
                      • A self-contained motor drive leadscrew mechanism
                      • Up/down limit sensors
                      • Up/down control pendant
                      • Power relays mounted on the chuck panel
                      • Pivoting chamber lift yoke
               The lift is only enabled when the system is in the maintenance mode, when
               selected by the maintenance/operator switch on the chase side of the Opcon.
               With the lift enabled, pushing the pendant up/down switch moves the lift, but
               the lift will not move past the limit sensors mounted near the bottom of the lift
               mechanism.

Chuck & Chuck Panel
               Location
               The Chuck is located directly underneath the PM1/2 chambers, attached to
               the bottom of the subchambers. The Chuck Panel is next to each Chuck, on
               the left of the chassis for PM1 and on the right for PM2.




88-293-001 C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6       3
Functional Descriptions
                 Function
                 The chuck is a pneumatic cylinder that raises and lowers the lower electrode.
                 When the chuck is down, wafers can be loaded and unloaded from the lower
                 electrode. When the chuck is up, the HRe- process chamber is isolated from
                 the subchamber and transport volumes, and the etch process can be run. The
                 lower electrode is mounted to the top of the chuck bowl, and all elec-
                 trode-related connections are made through the hollow piston of the chuck.
                 Connections made to the electrode are RF, water, pins air, pins position
                 fiber-optics, and backside helium.

                 Description
                 There are three sensors for chuck position:
                 1. Chuck down senses when the chuck is in the down position.
                 2. Chuck close. When the chuck is being raised, this sensor senses that the
                    chuck is close to the full UP position. The chuck-up speed is reduced at
                    that time so that as the chuck reaches the chuck-up position, the wafer is
                    clamped (on systems with a mechanical wafer clamp) while the chuck is
                    moving slowly. This is referred to as a “soft landing” of the chuck.
                 3. Chuck up senses when the chuck is in the up position.
                 In addition to the three sensors, there is a microswitch that is only closed
                 when the chuck is up. This is an interlock for the etch chamber process gas
                 final mix valve, V23. V23 is also interlocked with the associated PM slit valve.
                 If the chuck is not up and the slit valve is not closed, process gas cannot flow
                 into the system. If the chuck is up, or if the PM slit valve is closed, process gas
                 can flow.
                 The chuck utilizes a very reliable stainless steel bellows to provide a vacuum
                 seal that allows vertical motion of the chuck.
                 The Chuck Panel provides interface between the chuck assembly and the sys-
                 tem. Panel functions are:
                         • Chuck CDA pressure regulation (40 psi nominal)
                         • Chuck solenoid valves and chuck speed adjust
                         • Lower electrode wafer lift pin solenoid valves and speed adjust
                         • Lower electrode wafer lift pin up/down sensors (sensed via
                         fiber-optics)
                         • Electrical interface to the VME card cage
                         • Relays for the chamber lift

                 NOTE: The chuck cylinder piston is capable of holding the electrode in
                       the down position, against the force of considerable
                       atmospheric pressure (±1200 lbs). Because the cylinder itself is
                       even more powerful, care should be taken whenever working on
                       the chuck or lower electrode.



4   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                         88-293-001 C
                                                        Functional Descriptions
               Figure 1. Chuck Panel




DC Module (Lambda)
               Location
               Below the VME card cage, on the right of the system chassis.

               Function
               The DC Module supplies DC voltages required by system modules and
               electronics.

               Description
               The DC Module consists of 3 DC power supplies:
               DC1 - Left
               DC2 - Middle
               DC3 - Right
               There are two LEDs on the front panel of the DC supplies (red to indicates
               power failure, and green for DC Okay) as well as test points for V1-5. Trim
               pots for adjusting V1-V5 are located on top of the power supply (extender
               cables required).
               The three DC power supplies on the 6500 system are shown below:

               DC #1 (Left)          DC #2 (Middle)       DC #3 (Right)
               V1           +5V      V1        +24V       V1         +24V
               V2           +12      V2        +15V       V2         +12V
               V3           -12V     V3        -15V       V3         -12V
                                     V4        +5V        V4         +5V

               Although periodic adjustment of the DC supplies used in the 6500 is normally
               not required, adjustments may be necessary in the following situations:



88-293-001 C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   5
Functional Descriptions
                         • DC supply output voltage alteration (±12V to ±15V or ±15V to ±12V).
                         • DC supply adjustment after an upgrade or change to the 6500
                         system.
                         • Identification of loads for each of the supplies (see drawing
                         #95-248-001 in the 6500 Troubleshooting Guide).

Endpoint Module
                 Location
                 The Endpoint modules for PM1 and PM2 are mounted underneath the chas-
                 sis top plate, adjacent to the specific PM chuck. Openings in the top plate
                 allow the fiber-optics from the chambers to connect to the endpoint modules.
                 The Endpoint module for PM3 is mounted on top of the chassis top plate, just
                 to the rear of the PM3 chamber.

                 Function
                 The Endpoint modules provide the hardware used to monitor the optical emis-
                 sions from the plasma generated inside the process chambers. These plasma
                 emissions can be used to identify the exact chemistry of the plasma, and,
                 even more important, can detect changes in plasma chemistry. Each chemi-
                 cal element in a plasma emits light at specific wavelengths, which, once
                 detected, allow the identification of the elements and compounds present
                 within the plasma. This technology, referred to as optical emission spectros-
                 copy, is the basis of Tegal’s endpoint detection systems. Optical interference
                 filters are used to select the specific wavelength to observe, and photodiode
                 detectors convert this wavelength intensity to a current.

                 Description
                 The endpoint system has the following components:
                         • Endpoint module, which contains two photodiode filter assemblies
                         and the electronics to amplify and condition the photodiode outputs.
                         • Reactor optical port, which is a quartz viewing port designed for the
                         best viewing angle of the plasma within the reactor.
                         • Bifurcated fiber-optics, which are used to bring the plasma emis-
                         sions from the reactor optical port to the endpoint module filters and
                         photodiodes.
                         • PM VME analog inputs, which monitor and digitize the output volt-
                         age from the endpoint module. Endpoint detection is done by
                         comparing the voltage at the analog input to the recipe endpoint event
                         selection.
                 Optical endpoint, rather than a timed etch, is required because of variances in
                 film thickness from wafer to wafer. Terminating the etch when the etch
                 by-product (or etchant) species indicate etch completion eliminates under- or
                 over-etching.


6   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                       88-293-001 C
                                                          Functional Descriptions
HRe- Process Chamber
               Location
               PM1/2 is positions at the left and right rear of the system.

               Function
               The Tegal HRe- (High Density Reflected Electron) process chambers are the
               main etch chambers of the 6500 system. The HRe- is ideally suited for the
               requirements of advanced silicide, polysilicon, metal, and emerging film etch
               applications.
               The primary mechanism used to etch the various films in the HRe- chamber is
               the Reactive Ion Etch, or RIE. RIE is ideally suited for etching submicron
               geometries because of its highly directional etch characteristics. Some key
               HRe- chamber design characteristics of the that promote RIE are:
                      • Chamber geometry
                      • Low process pressure operation
                      • Dual frequency RF power
                      • Trielectrode design
                      • The use of magnets in the chamber upper electrode and sidewall

               Description
               The design of the HRe- chamber combines high conductance and high pump-
               ing speed (25 sccm/mTorr) with very low process pressures (3.5 mTorr
               typically). To achieve this, a turbomolecular pump is mounted directly on top
               of the chamber.
               Process gases are delivered to the chamber through a ceramic nozzle at the
               top center of the upper electrode. RF is delivered to the trielectrode chamber
               in two modes: Triode 1 and Triode 2. In Triode 1 mode, 13.56 MHz RF is
               applied to the chamber side electrode to control ion density, and 450 kHz RF
               is applied to the lower electrode (wafer) for independent control of ion energy.
               Triode 1 mode is typically used for silicide, polysilicon, and metal etch applica-
               tions. In Triode 2 mode, the side electrode is grounded, and both the MHz and
               kHz RF frequencies are applied to the lower electrode. Triode 2 mode is typi-
               cally used for PZT, platinum, and other emerging film applications.
               A key design feature of the HRe- chamber is the magnetic field surrounding
               the etch chamber, effectively enclosing the plasma in a magnetic container.
               Free electrons that would normally be lost to the chamber walls are reflected
               by the magnetic field away from the chamber walls back into the plasma,
               thereby greatly increasing ionization efficiency and plasma density. The mag-
               netic field is created by permanent magnets mounted in the chamber sidewall
               and upper electrode. With virtually no magnetic field present at the wafer,
               plasma uniformity at the wafer is excellent.



88-293-001 C                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   7
Functional Descriptions
                 Chamber temperature, typically set to 80ºC, is controlled by circulating DI
                 water from the temperature controller unit through the chamber sidewall and
                 upper electrode water paths.
                 Two optical ports are provided for optical endpoint equipment and service
                 requirements.
                 Materials used within the process chamber are quartz, high purity ceramic,
                 and anodized aluminum.

                 NOTE: Because of the presence of toxic process gas and by-products,
                       RF, and magnetic hazards, only certified personnel should
                       perform maintenance on the HRe- process chamber.


Mass Flow Controller (MFC)
                 Location
                 Mass Flow Controllers are located in the PM1, PM2, and PM3 gas boxes. The
                 PM1 and PM2 gas boxes are at the bottom rear of the system chassis, while
                 the PM3 gas box is just below the PM3 chamber on the right of the system
                 chassis.

                 Function
                 Mass Flow Controllers are responsible for delivering precise flows of process
                 gases to the 6500 plasma process chambers. Typical MFC flows range from 5
                 to 2000 sccm. The MFC flow setpoint is delivered to the MFC as a voltage
                 from a VME analog output, and the flow measured by the MFC is delivered as
                 a voltage to a VME analog input.
                 PM1 and 2 gas boxes can have up to six MFCs per box, and PM3 can have
                 up to three. Each MFC is configured and calibrated for use with a specific type
                 of gas and full-scale flow range. Typical gases used for the various processes
                 in the 6500 product line include:
                         • Nitrogen (N2) ......................•Hydrogen bromide (HBr)
                         • Argon (Ar)...........................•Helium (He)
                         • Boron trichloride (BCl3) ......•Carbon tetrafluoride (CF4)
                         • Chlorine (Cl2)......................•Hydrogen chloride (HCl)
                         • Oxygen (O2)

                 Description
                 A Mass Flow Controller has four basic components: flow sensor, bypass, flow
                 control valve, and electronics, as described below:




8   MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                           88-293-001 C
                                                         Functional Descriptions
                      • Flow Sensor. The flow sensor used in an MFC is a thermal device.
                      The sensor consists of two self-heated resistance coils wound around
                      the outside of a thin-walled capillary sensor tube. These resistance
                      thermometer coils are connected in a balanced bridge circuit and sup-
                      plied with a regulated current. The heat generated by the power
                      dissipated in the coils raises the sensor tube to approximately 70ºC
                      above ambient. When there is no gas flow, heat is symmetrically dis-
                      tributed along the tube, and the temperature of both coils is the same.
                      With gas flowing inside the tube, heat is carried downstream, resulting
                      in a temperature shift that makes the upstream coil cooler than the
                      downstream coil. This temperature difference, and the corresponding
                      resistance difference of the coils, is directly proportional to the mass
                      flow rate through the tube. The balanced bridge output is a direct func-
                      tion of the resistance difference of the coils, and is amplified and
                      linearized by the MFC electronics. The measured flow is expressed as
                      a 0-5 volt output from the electronics, which represents 0-100% flow.
                      • Bypass. The bypass, or flow splitter, is located in the primary flow
                      path of the MFC. Its primary function is to split the flow between the
                      primary flow path and the sensor tube, and to establish the full-scale
                      flow range of the MFC. The ratio of the gas split between the sensor
                      tube and the primary flow path is constant over the full-scale range of
                      the MFC.
                      • Flow Control Valve. The flow control valve is responsible for con-
                      trolling the flow through the MFC. Its basic components are a solenoid,
                      a plunger, and a valve seat. The valve seat has a precision orifice that
                      allows gas flow based on the position of the plunger. To increase or
                      decrease flow, the plunger is moved further from, or closer to, the seat
                      by increasing or decreasing the voltage to the valve solenoid.
                      • Electronics. The MFC electronics are responsible for the following:
                          • Supplying a regulated current to the coil bridge circuit
                          • Amplifying the bridge circuit output that provides the flow output
                          voltage
                          • Comparing the flow setpoint with the measured flow
                          • Adjusting the flow control valve so the measured flow exactly
                          matches the flow setpoint.
               When using an MFC with a gas for which it was not calibrated, it is necessary
               to use conversion factors to determine the actual flow for a given output (see
               the MFC Operations & Equipment Manual).

Monitor & Touchscreen(CRT)
               Location
               Located in the Operator Console (Opcon). On 6500 systems equipped with
               the strip/rinse option, the Opcon is always on the left of the system, whereas
               on systems without strip/rinse, the Opcon can be mounted on the left or right.


88-293-001 C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6     9
Functional Descriptions
                 Function
                 The monitor and touchscreen are the users’ primary interface for operating the
                 6500 system. By touching different areas of the screen, the operator can
                 access various functions and services that control how the machine operates.

                 Description
                 Tegal’s monitor and touchscreen, made by Licon (Model ID-1561), combines
                 a 15" color computer monitor with a resistive-type touchscreen. The monitor,
                 operating at a resolution of 640 x 480 with 16 colors, provides a vivid color
                 graphics/text display. The touchscreen, mounted directly on the front of the
                 monitor CRT, allows the user to “touch” the displayed graphics and text to ini-
                 tiate system response. This interactive display technology is intuitive, fast, and
                 ideal for use in cleanrooms, where keyboards are less desirable because of
                 particle generation.
                 The resistive touchscreen consists of a glass substrate that is covered with a
                 tight-fitting plastic cover sheet. Conductive coatings are applied to the inner
                 facing surfaces of the glass and plastic cover sheet. Separating the glass and
                 cover sheet are separator dots evenly distributed across the touchscreen
                 area. Finger pressure causes internal electrical contact at the exact point of
                 touch. This contact is supplied to the touchscreen controller as an analog volt-
                 age. The controller then digitizes the analog voltage and provides X and Y
                 coordinate pair data to the 6500 system controller serial port. Calibration of
                 the touchscreen to the video display is done using a calibration utility imbed-
                 ded in the Tegal system controller software. This utility allows users to quickly
                 calibrate touchscreen response for their specific viewing angle and touch
                 characteristics.

                 NOTE: The touchscreen is susceptible to scratches from sharp objects
                       and abrasions from rough objects.


                 Figure 2. Opcon




10 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                         88-293-001 C
                                                          Functional Descriptions
Penning Ion Gauge (PIG)
               Location
               The Penning Ion Gauge is mounted underneath the transport module vacuum
               chamber. Additional (optional) PIGs are mounted on the process manometer
               valve assembly of the HRe- PM1 and PM2 process chambers.

               Function
               The PIG is used to measure the 6500 PM and TM vacuum chamber base
               pressures. These measurements verify that (1) the base pressures are at or
               below specification and (2) the PM pressure is low enough to permit zeroing of
               the PM process manometers. The gauge does NOT measure the pressure of
               process gases.
               Ionization gauges measure high and ultra-high vacuum by ionizing gas mole-
               cules within the gauge, then collecting these ions and measuring the resulting
               ion current. The ion current is directly proportional to the number of molecules
               present, and is therefore directly proportional to the pressure within the gauge.
               The formation of ions is a result of either (1) a discharge at high electric field
               strength (commonly called a cold cathode discharge, this is the type used in
               6500 systems) or (2) the impact of electrons emitted from a hot cathode.

               Description
               A cold cathode gauge consists of a ring-shaped anode spaced between two
               grounded cathode plates, with an external magnet surrounding the entire
               assembly. High voltage is applied across the electrodes, causing electrons to
               be emitted from the cathode and then accelerated toward the anode. These
               free electrons collide with gas molecules and form positive ions, which are
               attracted to the cathode, and the resulting ion current, directly related to pres-
               sure, is measured. The magnetic field causes the free electrons to travel in a
               spiral path, increasing the probability of ion-producing collisions, which in turn
               sustain the discharge. The gauge used in the 6500 system is called an Active
               Inverted Magnetron gauge, or Active Penning Magnetron gauge. This gauge,
               which consists of a wire probe surrounded by a cylindrical cathode, is an
               improvement over the basic cold cathode operation in its accuracy and
               repeatability.
               The output from the gauge is a 2-10 volt analog voltage that is related to pres-
               sure. This voltage is displayed on the 6500 monitor PM and TM gas panel
               screens, as well as direct I/O screens. A conversion table allows conversion of
               gauge output voltage to pressure in Torr (see the drawing #95-217-001 in
               Troubleshooting manual). The pressure range of the gauge is 7.5x10-3 Torr to
               7.5x10-9 Torr.




88-293-001 C                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   11
Functional Descriptions
PM1/2 kHz Matching Network & Controller
                 Location
                 The PM1/2 kHz Matching Network Controllers are located on the left side of
                 the system, in the middle of the controller rack. The kHz Tuner unit has two
                 possible locations: (Triode 1 systems) underneath the PM process chamber,
                 just in front of the PM gas box; (Triode 2 systems) top rear of the system
                 chassis, just behind the PM process chamber.

                 Function
                 The PM1/2 kHz Matching Network system consists of the Matching Network
                 Controller and the Tuner unit.
                 The Matching Network Controller provides the interface for the Tuner unit and
                 the VME card cage. Front panel controls include:
                        • Power On/off
                        • Auto/manual tune select
                        • Preset select
                        • L1/L2 manual tune controls
                        • L1/L2 position test points
                        • L1/L2 Min/Max LEDs
                 The Tuner unit contains the impedance matching components, which allow
                 matching of a wide range of process chamber load impedances. Proper
                 impedance matching is required for maximum power transfer from the RF gen-
                 erator to the process chamber. Two motor-controlled variable inductors are
                 used to vary the output impedance. When properly tuned, the input imped-
                 ance of the tuner is the same as the output impedance of the RF generator.
                 The Tuner unit also contains circuitry that develops the phase and magnitude
                 tuning error signals.

                 NOTE: Because of the presence of RF and AC voltage hazards, only
                       certified personnel should perform maintenance on these
                       modules.
                       Safety interlock switches are provided on the Tuner unit input
                       and output RF connectors, as well as on the unit cover. When
                       either RF connector must be disconnected, the connector cover
                       must be removed. Removal of the cover disengages the safety
                       interlock switch, disabling AC power to the specific PM RF
                       generators




12 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                     88-293-001 C
                                                         Functional Descriptions
PM1/2 MHz Matching Network & Controller
               Location
               The PM1/2 MHz Matching Network Controller(s) is located on the left side of
               the system, at the top of the controller rack. The MHz Tuner unit has two pos-
               sible locations: (Triode 1 systems) at the top rear of the system chassis, just
               behind the PM process chamber; (Triode 2 systems) underneath the PM pro-
               cess chamber, just in front of the PM gas box.

               Function
               Tegal’s Matching Network system, the ENI MW-10T, consists of a Matching
               Network Controller and a Tuner unit. This automatic impedance matching net-
               work system is specifically designed to interface ENI 13.56 MHz RF
               generators with the Tegal HRe- plasma etch process chambers.
               The Matching Network Controller provides the interface for the Tuner unit, the
               RF generator, and the VME card cage. Automatic tuning adjustments can be
               made on the rear panel of the controller. Front panel controls include:
                      • Power On/Off
                      • Meter function select (RF power or tuning capacitor position)
                      • Capacitor min/max LEDs.
                      • Manual/autotune select
                      • Preset local/remote select
                      • Manual tune/capacitor preset controls
                      • Analog meters for C1/C2 position or forward and reflected power
                      display.

               Description
               The Tuner unit contains the impedance matching components, which allow
               matching to a wide range of process chamber load impedances. Proper
               impedance matching is required for maximum power transfer from the RF gen-
               erator to the process chamber. Two motor-controlled variable capacitors and a
               fixed inductor are used to vary the input and output impedance. When prop-
               erly tuned, the input impedance of the tuner is the same as the output
               impedance of the RF generator, and the tuner output impedance is the same
               as the input impedance of the process chamber.
               The Tuner unit also contains circuitry that develops the phase and magnitude
               tuning error signals. The Tuner circuitry delivers the error signals to the Con-
               troller, and the Controller in turn drives the capacitor motors to eliminate the
               errors.




88-293-001 C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   13
Functional Descriptions

                 NOTE: Because of RF and AC voltage hazards present, only certified
                       personnel should perform maintenance on the matching network
                       system.
                       Safety interlock switches are provided on the input and output
                       RF connectors. When either RF connector must be
                       disconnected, the connector cover must be removed. Removal
                       of the cover disengages the safety interlock switch and disables
                       AC power to the specific PM RF generators.


PM1/2 RF Combiner (Triode 2 HRe- Chambers)
                 Location

                 Bottom of the MHz Matching Network, on systems with Triode 2 HRe-
                 chambers.

                 Function
                 The RF Combiner combines the 13.56 MHz and 450 kHz RF delivered from
                 their respective matching networks and delivers the combined output to the
                 HRe- lower electrode. The combiner uses filter networks that prevent either
                 frequency from entering the matching network and RF generator of the other
                 frequency.

                 NOTE: Because RF hazards are present, only certified personnel should
                       perform maintenance on the RF Combiner.


PM1/2/3 Process Pressure Control System
                 Location
                        • Pressure Controllers: PM1/2, in the controller rack on the left side
                        of the system chassis. PM3, right side of the system chassis, below the
                        PM 3 chamber.
                        • Throttle Valves: PM1/2, on top of the HRe- process chambers,
                        below the gate valves. PM3, underneath the PM 3 chamber.
                        • MKS Capacitance Manometers: PM1/2, on the inboard side of the
                        HRe- chamber. PM3, right side of the PM3 chamber.

                 Function
                 PM process pressure control is achieved through the use of the Edwards
                 Model 1800 Pressure Controller, the Edwards Model 1850 throttle valve, and
                 the MKS Baratron capacitance manometer.



14 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                      88-293-001 C
                                                          Functional Descriptions
               The MKS Baratron, as the primary PM chamber pressure transducer, pro-
               vides accurate pressure measurement regardless of process gas composition.
               The full-scale range of the PM1/2 transducer is 0-100 mTorr, with a corre-
               sponding output voltage of 0–10 volts (PM3 has a full-scale range of 0-10
               Torr). The pressure signal output is connected to the Pressure Controller. Test
               points for measurement of the transducer output are provided on the PM End-
               point Module. The only user adjustment of the transducer is the zero
               adjustment. This adjustment is made after 8 hours of warm-up time and when
               the PM1/2 base pressure is less than 5x10-6 Torr (for PM3, 5x10-4 Torr).
               The Edwards Model 1800 Pressure Controller is a microprocessor-based,
               self-tuning pressure control system capable of precise pressure control and
               fast response. The controller compares the pressure transducer output with
               the process recipe pressure setpoint and adjusts the position of the throttle
               valve plate so the process pressure exactly matches the pressure setpoint.
               The process pressure setpoint is received via RS-232 serial communications
               from the 6500 VME card cage. Pressure can be controlled to any value within
               the range of the pressure transducer.
               The Edwards Pressure Controller must be configured for the pressure range
               to be used and must be taught the characteristics of the vacuum system
               dynamics. This is done with an independent terminal or computer when the
               controller is first installed or when the system pumping characteristics are
               changed (such as when a different type of turbo pump is installed).
               The Edwards Model 1850 throttle valve varies system conductance, hence
               system pressure, by varying the throttle valve throttle plate angle. The throttle
               plate is positioned using a high speed stepper motor driven by the Pressure
               Controller. A valve angle of 0° to 90° can be achieved in less than 300 msec.
               The throttle valve is not a shut-off valve.

               NOTE: Because process by-products and AC voltage hazards are
                     present, only certified personnel should perform maintenance on
                     these modules.


Rinser Module
               Location
               The Rinser lift/rotate and bowl assembly is located at the front of the system
               chassis, inside the ACP safety cover. The Rinser Controller is mounted at the
               right front bottom of the system chassis.

               Function
               The Rinser mechanism (PM4) is a self-contained wafer rinse process module
               that rinses and dries processed wafers. With the rinser imbedded in the 6500
               system, downstream process steps can be eliminated.




88-293-001 C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   15
Functional Descriptions
                 The primary function of the rinse process step is to passivate wafers that have
                 been etched with use of chlorine chemistries. Passivation prevents corrosion
                 of metals caused by the formation of hydrochloric acid, which is created when
                 the residual chlorine in the wafer photoresist combines with atmospheric water
                 vapor.
                 An additional process function is to remove any residue remaining on the
                 wafer after the PM3 photoresist strip process.

                 Description
                 The Rinser process module has the following components:
                        • Rinser controller. This module contains the CPU, memory, floppy
                        drive, serial communications, pneumatic valving, analog I/O, and digi-
                        tal I/O required for rinser operation. The VME TM CPU communicates
                        with this controller using an RS-232 serial port.
                        • Lift rotate assembly. This assembly consists of motor controllers
                        and motors for up/down motion, head rotate, and rotor spin. The rotor
                        has four stationary pins that support the wafer, and four fingers that
                        open and close to hold or release the wafer. The rotor is spun by a
                        brushless motor, with a tachometer to monitor and control spin rpms
                        (2000 rpms maximum). The rotor stop position is controlled by a pneu-
                        matic cylinder. When the rotor is in the closed position, an inflatable
                        seal is used to seal the rotor to the bowl, preventing water leaks while
                        spraying.
                        • DI water heater tank and heater controller. This subsystem heats
                        the DI water used to spray the wafer to 80°C. The tank has a level sen-
                        sor, overtemp sensor, temperature sensor, and heater element. The
                        controller contains the heater temperature control and heater power
                        circuitry. This controller is located at the left front of the system
                        chassis.
                        • Rinser bowl. The Teflon rinser bowl contains the DI water side jet
                        and bottom jet manifold, the nitrogen jets, DI water drain, and bowl
                        exhaust port.
                        • DI water and nitrogen plumbing.
                 The rinse process starts with the atmospheric robot loading a processed wafer
                 onto the rinse head rotor of the lift rotate assembly. With the wafer held by fin-
                 gers, the rinse head rotates, lowers, and seals against the rinser bowl. The
                 rotor then spins the wafer at the rpm specified in the process recipe. While
                 spinning, heated DI water is sprayed on the wafer and drained from the bowl.
                 After rinsing, the wafer is spun at high rpms while nitrogen jets assist in the
                 removal of all water from the wafer surface. When complete, the rinse head
                 rises and rotates, the fingers release the wafer, and the atmospheric robot
                 removes the wafer. This process dramatically increases the time wafers can
                 remain “on the shelf” prior to the next process step.




16 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                         88-293-001 C
                                             Functional Descriptions
               Figure 3. Rinser




               Figure 4. Rinser Controller




88-293-001 C                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   17
Functional Descriptions
Roughing Pump
                 Location
                 Subfab or pump chase, depending on fab layout.

                 Function
                        • Provide vacuum backing for the turbo pumps. Without this backing,
                        high pressure at the turbo pump outlet would never allow the turbo to
                        reach normal operating speed, with consequent damage to the turbo
                        pump. With process gas flowing, typical rough pump foreline pres-
                        sures are in the 100 mTorr range. The PM1/2 and TM1 turbo pumps
                        can achieve pressures in the 1x10-6 Torr range.
                        • Provide an exhaust for the process gases and by-products pumped
                        out of the turbo.
                        • [Transport rough pump only] Provides backing for the transport
                        turbo, and pumps down the cassette module(s) from atmosphere.
                        • Supply a “pump okay” signal to the 6500 system.

                 Description

                 There is a roughing pump for each HRe- process chamber (PM1/2), the strip-
                 per chamber (PM3), and the transport and cassette modules (TM1 & CM1/2).
                 Roughing pumps can achieve vacuum in the 1x10-3 Torr range. Since this
                 range is adequate for PM3 strip process requirements, a turbo pump is not
                 required for this module. Turbo pumps are needed, however, for HRe- cham-
                 bers (PM1/2) and the transport, both of which require much lower pressure
                 and higher pumping speed.
                 Two types of roughing pump can be used on Tegal 6500 systems:
                 • The rotary vane, oil-sealed, pump works in combination with a roots
                   blower pump. Oil in these pumps can be a source of contamination.
                 • The dry compression pump has pumping chambers that are free of oil,
                   lubricants, and sealants, and are therefore not a source of contamination.
                   Water cooling is required for these pumps.

System Controller
                 Location
                 Inside rear door of the Opcon.




18 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                       88-293-001 C
                                                         Functional Descriptions
               Function
               The System Controller is an industrial IBM-compatible PC dedicated to
               high-level control of the 6500 system. Primary functions include:
                      • Human interface. The color monitors and touchscreens interface
                      directly with the system controller. A keyboard is available for service
                      functions.
                      • Primary system memory. DOS, Tegal software, process recipe and
                      sequence storage, touchscreen software, system configuration files,
                      alarm and history files.
                      • Monitoring and controlling the entire system through an Ether-
                      net local area network. This LAN networks the System Controller with
                      the VME TM and PM CPUs.
                      • Signal tower drive (optional)
                      • SECS communications with a host (optional)

               Description
               The System Controller has the following components:
                      • Passive Backplane Board
                          • Consists of a standard ISA PC bus with slots for the system con-
                          troller PCBs. There are no active components.
                      • Cluster Tool Controller PCB
                          • Handles the signal tower drive and maintenance/operator (clean-
                          room/ chase) switching.
                      • CPU PCB
                          • 486DX 33MHz CPU with 32M RAM. This single-board computer
                          includes IDE drive interface.
                      • Hard Drive (IDE)
                          • Stores DOS, System controller software, system configuration
                          files, sequences and recipes, alarm logs, and lot history logs.
                      • Video PCB (VGA)
                          • Supplies 640 x 480 16-color video to the Opcon monitor and
                          RIM.
                      • Floppy Disc Drives (FDD)
                          • FDD A is located on the front of the Opcon under the video moni-
                          tor, and FDD B is on the System Controller front panel.
                      • Ethernet PCB
                          • Transmits data to, and receives data from, the VME card cage.
                          Data includes:
                          • Initial download of VME resident software from system controller
                          • Machine commands



88-293-001 C                                                     MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6     19
Functional Descriptions
                            • Recipes
                            • Configuration
                            • PM/TM parameter real-time values
                        • SECS Interface PCB (Optional)
                            • Supports the interface to a SECS compliant host computer.
                        • DC Power Supply
                            • Supplies System Controller DC voltage requirements (internal).
                 All interconnect to the System Controller is at the rear panel of the enclosure.
                 A rear panel keyswitch can be used to switch the controller on and off.

Temperature Control Unit (TCU) — Neslab
                 Location

                 Subfab or pump chase, along with the roughing pumps. Each HRe- process
                 module has its own TCU.

                 Function
                 The Neslab TCU is a dual-channel, water-to-water heat exchanger. The chan-
                 nels, which are identical, are designed to circulate high resistivity deionized
                 water at a specific temperature. The temperature ranges from 30° to 90°C,
                 controlled within ±1°C. (Because the Neslab TCU is a heat exchanger, not a
                 chiller, it has no refrigeration system; hence it is impossible to control tempera-
                 tures at or below house water temperature.) On 6500 systems, one channel is
                 dedicated to control of the HRe- lower electrode temperature, while the other
                 is dedicated to control of the HRe- chamber sidewall and upper electrode tem-
                 perature. The typical setpoint for both channels is 80°C.
                 The TCU can be controlled and monitored locally at the TCU front panel or
                 remotely via an RS-232 serial port (the normal mode of operation on 6500
                 systems). The TCU and the PM VME CPUs exchange data on temperature
                 setpoint, resistivity, and water flow.

                 Description
                 Tegal's Temperature Controller is manufactured by Neslab. Each channel has
                 independent particulate and deionization filters. All plumbing within the TCU is
                 stainless steel. The turbine pumps, which are also stainless steel, require
                 bypass valves at the 6500 utility panel. If the TCU is circulating water, block-
                 ing (or dead-heading) the output will damage the pump.




20 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                          88-293-001 C
                                                          Functional Descriptions
TM Turbomolecular Pump & Controller
               Location
               The TM Turbomolecular Pump is underneath the transport chamber, centered
               between the PM1 and PM2 slit valves. The Turbo Pump Controller is on the
               lower left front of the system chassis.

               Function
               The TM Turbomolecular Pump is used to achieve and maintain a continuous
               high vacuum in the 6500 transport chamber. High vacuum ensures that few
               contaminants, such as atmospheric gases, water vapor, etch by-products, or
               process gases, are present in the transport. Typical operating pressures are in
               the 1x10-6 Torr range.

               Description
               The pump consists of a high-frequency motor that drives a turbine fitted with 8
               bladed stages and 3 pumping disc final stages. The turbine rotor is con-
               structed from a single block of aluminum alloy and is supported by high
               precision, permanently lubricated, ceramic ball bearings. In operation, gas
               molecules entering the pump inlet are pumped toward the outlet by impact
               with the rapidly rotating turbine rotor stages, which spin at 56,000 rpm.
               The Turbo Pump Controller is a microprocessor-controlled solid state fre-
               quency converter. It has all the facilities required for automatic operation of the
               turbo pump. An LCD display on the front panel displays pump operating condi-
               tions and parameters. The interface to the 6500 TM VME is via rear panel
               digital signals for remote start/stop and pump status. The front panel start/stop
               controls are not enabled.

Vacuum Cassette Elevator (VCE)
               NOTE: Because of mechanical hazards present, only certified personnel
                     should perform maintenance on the VCE.


               Location
               In systems with rinse/strip options, VCEs are located behind the facade safety
               shields at the left front (CM1) and right front (CM2) of the system. In systems
               without the rinse/strip options, the single VCE is located behind the facade
               safety shield on the left front of the system (CM1).




88-293-001 C                                                      MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   21
Functional Descriptions
                 Function
                 The Vacuum Cassette Elevator provides the vacuum loadlock required for the
                 6500 continuous vacuum wafer transport system. The transport system and
                 etch chambers are continuously maintained at a vacuum in the 10-6 Torr
                 range. Vacuum loadlock of the transport system excludes atmospheric gases
                 (which can inhibit etching and cause corrosion) from the transport and etch
                 chambers. The loadlock also prevents process gases and by-products from
                 entering the ambient environment.
                 The VCE allows placement of an entire cassette in vacuum, thereby eliminat-
                 ing pumpdown and vent for each wafer. Pumpdown and vent of the cassette is
                 accomplished by means of profiled vent and vacuum valves, which reduce tur-
                 bulence and consequently enhance particle reduction. A vertical drive
                 provides precise cassette platform positioning.
                 The VCE Controller provides the interface between the VME card cage, VCE
                 pneumatic solenoids, VCE sensors, cassette platform DC motor/position
                 encoder, and DC power. The VCE communicates with the TM VME by means
                 of an RS-232 serial port. VCE status and commands from the VME are
                 exchanged using this port.
                 VCE pneumatics drive the VCE pneumatic cylinders to perform the following
                 tasks:
                        • Open and close the VCE door.
                        • Latch and unlatch the VCE door.
                        • Rotate the cassette platform to and from both the process position
                        and the operator load position.
                 VCE sensors report on the position of the cylinder-driven components and the
                 cassette platform. The wafer present sensor allows the wafer cassette to be
                 mapped and also detects wafer presence or absence for each cassette slot.
                 The platform motor is operated as a DC servo with an optical encoder used for
                 position control.

VME Card Cage
                 Location
                 Mounted on the right side of the system chassis just above the DC supply
                 module.

                 Function
                 The VME card cage is responsible for real-time control of all transport and
                 process module operations. It carries out commands downloaded from, and
                 uploads system status to, the System Controller via Ethernet. Card cage I/O is
                 comprised of serial data communications, digital I/O, and analog I/O.




22 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                      88-293-001 C
                                                           Functional Descriptions
               Description
               VME stands for Versa Module Eurocard, a computer bus standard [a bus is a
               computer data path] defined by a group of manufacturers who cooperated in
               making the definition. This bus standard is not proprietary, meaning many
               third-party products are available.
               The card cage has the following components:
                      • 21-board capacity VME bus card cage with 3 cooling fans
                      • Backplane board for connections to and from the rear of the card
                      cage (1 ea.)
                      • CPU transition board (1 ea.)
                      • CPU boards with imbedded Ethernet (3 ea.)
                      • Serial communication board (1 ea.)
                      • Analog input boards (3 ea.)
                      • Analog output boards (3 ea.)
                      • Analog transition boards (3 ea.)
                      • Digital input/output boards (3 ea.)
               The boards, all of which are under the supervision of the system controller,
               are grouped by function, as follows:
               TM CPU group
                          • TM Ethernet communications to/from the system controller
                          • TM1 and TM2 robot serial communications
                          • CM1 and CM2 serial communications
                          • [PM3 only] Analog I/O, digital I/O, and serial communications
                          • [PM4 only] Serial communications
                          • Transport analog and digital I/O for TM valves and sensors
                          • TM CPU debug port
               PM1 CPU group
                          • PM1 Ethernet communications to/from the system controller
                          • PM1 analog and digital I/O for PM1 RF control, process gas con-
                          trol, wafer temperature control, valves and sensors
                          • PM1 pressure controller serial communications
                          • PM1 TCU serial communications
                          • PM1 CPU debug port
               PM2 CPU group
                          • PM2 Ethernet communication to/from the system controller
                          • PM2 analog and digital I/O for PM1 RF control, process gas con-
                          trol, wafer temperature control, valves, and sensors
                          • PM2 pressure controller serial communications
                          • PM2 TCU serial communications


88-293-001 C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   23
Functional Descriptions
                            • PM2 CPU debug port

Wafer Aligner (PM5)
                 Location
                 The Wafer Aligner is on the TM core at the port between CM1 and PM1. The
                 Aligner Controller is below the aligner assembly on the system chassis.

                 Function
                 The aligner mechanism takes randomly oriented wafers and (1) centers
                 wafers within the aligner and (2) rotates wafers so the wafer flat, or notch, is
                 positioned at a pre-selected location. Wafers to be processed cannot bypass
                 the aligner prior to transport to a process module.
                 Centering and flat positioning is important in the 6500 system because the
                 HRe- process chambers have wafer clamps. These clamps require that the
                 wafer flat (or notch) be exactly aligned with the flat of the wafer clamp, and
                 that the wafer be exactly centered in the lower electrode pocket. If either
                 requirement is not met, the wafer will not be properly clamped, and helium
                 used by the wafer temperature control system will leak around the improperly
                 positioned wafer, causing poor temperature control and consequent possibil-
                 ity of wafer damage.
                 The aligner uses a non-edge contact mechanism and optical sensing to
                 ensure clean operation. All normal aligner operation takes place at vacuum.
                 The aligner volume is never vented.

                 Description
                 The Aligner has four major elements:
                 1. Rotating Chuck Assembly
                        • Rotates the wafer for characterization. Moves wafer to any angular
                        position. Driven by a stepper motor.
                 2. Translation Fork
                        • Lifts the wafer from, and lowers the wafer onto, the TM1 end effec-
                        tor. Raises and lowers wafers onto the chuck and moves them forward
                        and backward to facilitate centering. Two stepper motors are used for
                        fork motion.
                 3. Charged-coupled Device (CCD) Sensors and Illuminating LEDs
                        • Illuminated by LEDs, the CCD sensors detect wafer edge features by
                        observing the varying percentages of sensor illumination as the chuck
                        rotates the wafer.
                 4. Aligner Controller PCB




24 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                                         88-293-001 C
                                                            Functional Descriptions
                      • Coordinates all mechanical movements as well as optical data gath-
                      ering and analysis. Communicates with the VME card cage via an
                      RS-232 serial interface.

Wafer Temperature Control (WTC)
               Location
               The PM1 and PM2 wafer temperature control systems have components both
               in the PM gas boxes at the rear of the system chassis, and in the HRe- cham-
               ber lower electrode

               Function
               The system 6500 wafer temperature control system uses wafer clamping and
               wafer backside helium pressure to control wafer temperature during the etch
               process. When the wafer is in process position, it is clamped to the lower elec-
               trode by means of either a mechanical or electrostatic clamp. Clamping the
               wafer to the lower electrode provides positive physical contact between the
               wafer and the lower electrode. Lower electrode temperature is controlled by
               recirculating DI water from the TCU. The typical setpoint temperature is 80°C.
               To enhance heat transfer from wafer to electrode, helium is applied to the
               backside of the clamped wafer at a typical pressure of 5.0 Torr. Helium,
               because of its extremely high thermal capacity, greatly improves control of
               wafer temperature. The clamping mechanism ensures minimal helium leak-
               age around the wafer and into the etch process chamber.

               Description
               The WTC system has the following components:
                      • Helium inlet valve
                      • Helium to lower electrode valve
                      • Helium bleed valve
                      • Electrode exhaust valve
                      • Fixed ruby orifice for bleed flow
                      • Pressure controller
                      • 10 Torr manometer
                      • Wafer clamp, either mechanical or electrostatic




88-293-001 C                                                    MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6   25
Functional Descriptions




                                 THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY




26 MS6500-05 Vol #1 Chapter #6                                        88-293-001 C

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:29
posted:10/28/2011
language:English
pages:208