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2011-2012 MSW Field Education Handbook - CSU_ Chico

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2011-2012 MSW Field Education Handbook - CSU_ Chico Powered By Docstoc
					           2011-2012




         School of Social Work
          Butte Hall, Room 511
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences
    California State University, Chico
         Chico, CA 95929-0550
                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

2011-2012 MSW Field Instructor Calendars                                      1


School of Social Work Administration, Faculty and Staff                       3


Letter from the Director of Field Education                                   5


School Mission, Goals and Objectives, and Overview of the MSW Program         6


Glossary of Terms                                                             8


Frequently Asked Questions                                                    10


Professional Foundation Year and Concentration Year Practicum                 14


2011-2012 Student Field Calendars                                             19


SWRK 631/632 Foundation Field Practicum Seminar Syllabus                      22


SWRK 631/632 Advanced Field Practicum Seminar Syllabus                        30


SWRK 648/658 Advanced Field Practicum Seminar Syllabus – Three Year Program   38


Field Journal Assignment                                                      46


Formal Agreements and Selection of Practicum Sites                            47
        Policy on Employment-Based Placements                                 50


Roles and Responsibilities                                                    52
        Director of Field Education                                           52
        Field Liaison                                                         52
        Agency                                                                52
        Agency Field Instructor                                               53
        Agency Task Supervisor                                                53
        School of Social Work                                                 54
        Student                                                               54


Student Placement Process                                                     55
Writing the Learning Contract                                                      57


MSW Learning Contract Template                                                     59


Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program                                          62


Examples of Title IV-E Learning Activities                                         63


Title IV-E Addendum to the MSW Foundation Child Welfare Learning Contract          67


Title IV-E Addendum to the MSW Advanced Child Welfare Learning Contract            75


Resolution of Problems in Field Education                                          81


Performance Contract – Field Practicum Work                                        87


Forms                                                                              89
        Field Instructor Forms                                                     90
                Foundation Year Field Education Student Evaluation                 90
                Concentration Year Field Education Student Evaluation              97
                Evaluation of Field Education Program by Agency Field Instructor   105
        Student Forms                                                              107
                MSW Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance               107
                Ethical Guidelines and Consent                                     108
                Proposal for Agency of Employment as Field Practicum Site          110
                Employment Based Practicum Release of Information                  112
        Field Liaison Forms                                                        113
                Field Liaison Evaluation of Agency & Practicum Site                113


Appendix                                                                           115
        Process Recording Guidelines & Formats                                     116
        Safety Guidelines                                                          117
        NASW Code of Ethics                                                        119
        Course Descriptions for MSW Program                                        131
        Strike Policy for Students in Field Placement                              135
        California State University, Chico University Policies                     136
        CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards                        139
                2011-2012 MSW FIELD INSTRUCTOR CALENDAR
This calendar provides dates for Field Instructors to follow with their students in completing field
practicum hours and student evaluation due dates.


Fall Classes Begin                                     August 22
 Fall Practicum Hours                                  September 6 - December 9, 2011
 Thanksgiving Break (No Practicum Hours)               November 21-25
 Semester Break (No Practicum Hours)                   December 19, 2011 – January 1, 2012

Spring Classes Begin                                   January 23
 Spring Practicum Hours                                January 2 – May 11, 2012
 Spring Break (No Practicum Hours)                     March 19-23
                   **Practicum hours must be completed by May 11, 2012**


                                                       Foundation           Concentration
Assignment                                             (SWRK 631/632)       (SWRK 648/658)


MSW Learning Contract                                  October 10           October 6

Midterm Progress Report                                November 7           November 3

Final Fall Student Evaluation                          December 12          December 1

Midterm Progress Report                                March 12             March 8

Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance       April 23             April 26

Final Spring Student Evaluation                        May 7                May 10
AFI Evaluation of Field Education Program
Student Evaluation of Practicum Experience
                2011-2012 MSW FIELD INSTRUCTOR CALENDAR
                              Three Year Program
This calendar provides dates for Field Instructors to follow with their students in completing field
practicum hours and student evaluation due dates.

Fall Classes Begin                                     August 22, 2011
 Fall Practicum Hours                                  August 22- December 9, 2011
 Thanksgiving Break (No Practicum Hours)               November 21-25
 Finals Week (No Practicum Hours)                      December 12-16
 Semester Break (No Practicum Hours)                   December 19, 2011 – January 1, 2012
Spring Classes Begin                                   January 23, 2012
 Spring Practicum Hours                                January 2 – May 11, 2012
 Spring Break (No Practicum Hours)                     March 19-23
 Finals Week (No Practicum Hours)                      May 14-18

                   **Practicum hours must be completed by May 11, 2012**


                                                       Concentration
Assignment                                             (SWRK 648/658)

Student/Field Instructor Orientation                   August 23

MSW Learning Contract                                  October 7

Title IV-E Learning Contract and Addendum              October 7

Midterm Progress Report                                November 4

Final Student Evaluation                               December 16

Midterm Progress Report                                March 9

Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance       April 13
Final Student Evaluation                               April 27
Field Instructor Evaluation of Field Education
Program
Student Evaluation of Practicum Experience
            SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY
Administration
Dean, College of BSS                       Gayle Hutchinson            Butte 701    898-6171
Director, School of Social Work            Celeste A. Jones            Butte 511B   898-6204
Director, BA Program and
        Undergraduate Advisor              Kathy Cox                   Butte 531    898-3060
Director, MSW Program and Mental
        Health Coordinator                 Jean Schuldberg             Butte 519    898-4187
Director, Field Education Program          Patty Hunter                Butte 529    898-5875
MSW Title IV-E Child Welfare
        Training Coordinator               Valerie Peck                Butte 543A   898-4261
BSW Title IV-E/DE Pathways
        Coordinator                        Meka Klungtvet-Morano       Butte 504    898-6874
BSW Title IV-E/DE Pathways
        Administrative Support             Nica Digmon                 Butte 511    898-6204
School Administration                      Angela Corral               Butte 511C   898-6204
MSW / BSW Program Support                  Jenny Funk                  Butte 511    898-6204
Field Education/Mental Health Support      Nicole Davis                Butte 511    898-6204
MSW Title IV-E Administrative Support      Teresa James                Butte 543    898-4261
BSW Field Assistant                        Andrea Rioux                Butte 543    898-5875
                                     Full-time Faulty
J. David Bassett, PhD                             Kathy Cox, PhD
Butte 521                                         Butte 531
898-5597                                          898-3060
jbassett2@csuchico.edu                            kfcox@csuchico.edu

Patty Hunter, MSW, LCSW                         Pam Johansen, EdD
Butte 529                                       Butte 515
898-5875                                        898-5217
phunter@csuchico.edu                            pjohansen@csuchico.edu

Celeste A. Jones, PhD                           Patrick Mace, DSW
Butte 511B                                      Tehama 231
898-6204                                        898-5273
cajones@csuchico.edu                            jpmace@csuchico.edu

Vincent Ornelas, PhD                            Valerie Peck, MSW, LCSW
Tehama 229                                      Butte 543A
898-5445                                        898-6754
vornelas@csuchico.edu                           vpeck@csuchico.edu

Jean Schuldberg, EdD                            Seema Sehrawat, PhD
Butte 519                                       Butte 513
898-4187                                        898-3113
jschuldberg@csuchico.edu                        ssehrawat@csuchico.edu

Kui-Hee Song, PhD                               Sue Steiner, PhD
Butte 537                                       Butte 543B
898-5590                                        898-3066
ksong@csuchico.edu                              sjsteiner@csuchico.edu
                                       Adjunct Faculty

Rayna Bertolucci, MSW, LCSW        Gary Bess, PhD                   Patrick Borel, MSW
898-6204                           898-6204                         898-6204
rbertolucci@csuchico.edu           gbess@csuchico.edu               pborel@csuchico.edu
Lori Cavanaugh, MSW                Phil Coppock, MA                 Chelsea Cornell, MSW
898-5680                           898-5680                         898-6204
lcavanaugh@csuchico.edu            pcoppock@csuchico.edu            ccornell1@csuchico.edu
Lena Correa, MSW                   Ken Crandall, MSW                Betsy Gowan, LMFT
898-6204                           898-6204                         898-6204
                                                                    egowan@csuchico.edu
Molly Heck, MSW                    Meka Klungtvet-Morano, MSW       Dilia Loe, MA
898-3602                           898-3602                         898-3602
mheck@csuchico.edu                 mklungtvet-morano@csuchico.edu   dloe@csuchico.edu
Gina Muse, MSW                     Ann Petersen, MSW, LCSW          Andrea Rioux, MSW
898-6204                           898-6204                         898-3602
rmuse@csuchico.edu                 acpetersen@csuchico.edu          alrioux@csuchico.edu
Natalia Salinas, MSW, LCSW         Kathy Wendt, MSW
898-6204                           893-3783 or 520-3783
nsalinas2@csuchico.edu             kiwendt@csuchico.edu

Administrative Support Staff - School Office – Butte 511
Tel: 530-898-6204 Fax: 530-898-5574
School Webpage: http://www.csuchico.edu/swrk

Angela Corral, Administrative Coordinator
Office Manager
acorral@csuchico.edu

Nicole Davis, Administrative Assistant
Field Education/Mental Health Support
nmdavis@csuchico.edu

Jenny Funk, Administrative Assistant
MSW / BSW Program Support
jcfunk@csuchico.edu

Title IV-E Office – Butte 543
Tel: 530-898-4261    Fax: 530-898-4269

Teresa James, Administrative Assistant
MSW Title IV-E Stipend Program Support
tjames2@csuchico.edu
                          Letter from the Director of Field Education


To All Agency Field Instructors, MSW Students, and Field Liaison Faculty:

The purpose of the Field Education Program is to prepare students for the world of professional social
work practice by placing them in actual settings where, under the guidance of social work
practitioners, they will develop essential competencies in applying social work knowledge, values and
skills. Field practicum is often referred to as the “heart of social work education.” It provides students
with an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to real life situations. The field experience is to be
educationally focused and challenge each student to develop a professional identity reflective of the
values, knowledge and skills of the social work profession.

The School of Social Work at California State University, Chico wishes to take this opportunity to
thank the agencies and professionals within those agencies who choose to take on the role of teaching
and mentoring students in their quest to become professional social workers. We recognize the time,
energy and resources that such a commitment takes, and we appreciate the opportunity to work with
each of you in the education and training of competent professional social workers.

This manual is intended to provide you with the information and forms you will need during your field
education practicum. It is our goal to provide a quality field education experience to each student and
agency field instructor, so please contact your Field Liaison or the Director of Field Education with
any questions or concerns you may have.

Good luck! We hope your field experience will be both challenging and rewarding!


Patty Hunter
Patty Hunter, Director
Field Education Program
School of Social Work
CSU, Chico
phunter@csuchico.edu
(530) 898-5875




                  The following Schools of Social Work are to be credited for material in this Handbook:
University of Alaska, Anchorage; CSU Fresno; CSU Long Beach; CSU Stanislaus; CSU Sacramento; University of Denver
        SCHOOL MISSION AND GRADUATE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Mission of the School of Social Work at CSU, Chico
The mission of the School of Social Work is to provide high quality social work education for
generalist social work practice at the baccalaureate level, advanced practice and leadership at the
master's level, and high quality general education courses. Our intent is to educate social work
practitioners at both levels who are ethical, knowledgeable, and versatile in serving rural and urban
areas throughout the region and state. Through collaborative efforts with community service agencies,
social work professionals and organizations, the program educates social workers to become lifelong
learners and culturally competent practitioners who work to promote social and economic justice in an
increasingly complex, diverse, and, interconnected world.

Goals of the MSW Program
To fulfill its mission, the MSW Program will work toward the following goals:
1. Prepare social workers who will enhance the well-being of the peoples in the urban and rural
   communities of Northern California and the State through efforts to alleviate poverty and promote
   social and economic justice;
2. Prepare social workers who will provide leadership for social service agencies and communities in
   Northern California and the profession;
3. Prepare social workers who will practice as culturally competent practitioners for empowerment,
   strengths-based, collaborative social work practice and advocacy at multiple system levels;
4. Prepare social workers who will engage in continuing professional education and life-long learning
   to enhance their social work knowledge and skills.

Objectives of the MSW Program
1. Prepare advanced social work practitioners who have the knowledge, skills and values to intervene
    with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities, and who are committed to
    maintaining their professional growth through lifelong learning and continuing education;
2. Prepare advanced social work practitioners who have the knowledge, understanding and respect for
    people from diverse backgrounds and who can provide culturally competent social work practice at
    multiple system levels, and promote culturally sensitive services for diverse client systems;
3. Prepare advanced social work practitioners who can identify vulnerable populations and those
    factors that place them at risk, and implement strategies at multiple system levels that work to
    promote social and economic justice through alleviation of discrimination, oppression, and
    economic deprivation;
4. Prepare advanced social work practitioners who are knowledgeable about selected theories of all
    systems levels, and apply those theories specifically relevant for practice at multiple system levels;
 5. Educate advanced social work practitioners who are knowledgeable about and can analyze social
    policies and services relevant to practice, and provide leadership in policy practice to influence,
    formulate and advocate for policies consistent with social work values;
6. Provide knowledge to graduates that enable them to provide advanced practice with multiple
    systems at the advanced level in the fields of mental health, and families, youth and children;
 I. Prepare graduates who will engage in quantitative and qualitative research for effective practice
    and program evaluation to improve one‟s own practice, as well as services and policies;
8. Prepare advanced social workers who will provide leadership for and act as catalysts in promoting
    collaborative endeavors in social service agencies in the community;
9. Prepare advanced social work practitioners who can work effectively in a broad range of social
    services and functions in rural and urban environments.
Statement of Unqualified Respect for Human Diversity and Nondiscrimination
As stated in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics, specified within the
Educational Policy and Accreditation Statement of the Council on Social Work Education, and
consistent with the California State University, Chico's Policy on Nondiscrimination and Affirmative
Action in Employment and Education, we the faculty, staff, and students of the School of Social Work:

      advocate the elimination of any form of discrimination on the basis of age, class,
       socioeconomic status, color, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status,
       national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation and other physical, psychological or
       social characteristics;
      are committed to teach, encourage, and promote an appreciation, respect, and understanding of
       human diversity in the School of Social Work, California State University, Chico, our
       professions, and our communities;
      affirm the value of soliciting, incorporating, and respecting human diversity into all aspects of
       our educational experiences, our profession, and our personal lives as ways to enrich our total
       life experience individually and collectively as members of a diverse world community.

Statement Regarding Students with Disabilities
Any student who, because of a disability, may need special arrangements or accommodations to meet
the requirements of the MSW Program should consult with the MSW Director as soon as possible. The
office of Disability Services provides an array of services to meet the needs of students with
disabilities, according to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990. See information and guidelines provided in California State University
Student Handbook and Policy Guide and the California State University Nondiscrimination Policy
Regarding Individuals with Disabilities in the Appendices.
                                Glossary of Terms
Advanced Standing – The advanced standing program option is available only to incoming students
who have obtained a baccalaureate degree in social work (BSW) from a college or university whose
social work program is accredited by or in accreditation candidacy with the Council on Social Work
Education at the time the degree is conferred. A student with advanced standing completes two
summer bridge courses and the final two semesters of the MSW program.

Foundation Year – This is the first year of the two-year MSW program.

Concentration Year – This is the second year of the two-year MSW program.

Field Director—The Field Director works directly with students and agencies in the internship
placement process.

Field Instruction/Supervision – This is the supervision meeting time between the student and the
Field Instructor. Supervision occurs weekly for at least one hour per week. During supervision the
MSW Field Instructor incorporates classroom learning into the context of the field internship and
answers the student‟s questions about topics including clients, the agency, policies and social work
interventions.

Field Instructor – The Field Instructor is typically an agency staff member who provides the
equivalent of weekly supervision to the student intern. The field instructor must have both an MSW
degree and a minimum of two years post-graduate professional social work experience.

Field Liaison – The Field Liaison provides a link between the School of Social Work, the student and
the internship agency. Field Liaisons meet jointly with the student and field supervisor at least once per
semester to discuss progress made toward completing internship assignments. Field Liaisons are also
available to the student and the agency for problem resolution. Field Liaisons are experienced MSWs
from the community and/or faculty members.

Field Placement/Internship – This is the agency or organization in which the student learns and
practices social work skills. A field internship differs from paid employment in that the focus of the
internship is on learning and applying classroom knowledge.

Student Learning Contract– The learning contract is the student‟s learning plan. It reflects the
student‟s individualized goals in a field internship and outlines areas where development and growth
are expected. Specific objectives, learning activities, methods of measurement and evaluation are
identified.

Off-Site MSW Field Instructor – This is a person with an MSW degree who is partnered with the
agency that provides field instruction for the student. A student with an off-site MSW Field Instructor
also has an on-site Task Supervisor.
Task Supervisor – This is an on-site supervisor who is involved with the student‟s day-to-day tasks
and provides supervision in addition to that provided by the MSW field instructor. Every intern with an
off-site MSW field instructor also has an on-site task supervisor. A task supervisor must have an
advanced degree or a level of experience in the field that allows for supervision of a masters level
student.

Employment Based Internship – An employment based internship is an internship in a student‟s
place of employment. Students must be assigned new duties that are educationally focused and
provide an opportunity for students to develop new skills and expand their knowledge base.
                      Frequently Asked Questions
General Questions about Field Education
What is the difference between Foundation and Concentration year internships?
Foundation year internships are generalist in nature and focus on core social work competencies.
Foundation year students work with a variety of client systems. Concentration year internships focus
on competencies required for more advanced social work practice. Advanced Standing students enter
directly into a concentration year internship after completing two summer bridge courses.

When are students in field?
Foundation year students are in field 16 hours per week Wednesday, Thursday or Friday.
Concentration year students (including advanced standing students) are at their internships 24 hours
per week on Monday through Wednesday. Students attend classes on the days they are not in field.

How many total hours are required for an internship?
Foundation year students spend 480 hours in an internship over two academic semesters, or 16 hours
per week for 30 weeks. Concentration year students (including advanced standing students) spend 720
hours in internship over two academic semesters, or 24 hours per week for 30 weeks.

Do students change internship sites each semester?
It is the expectation that students spend their entire academic year at one internship site.

Can students receive field credit for past work experience?
No, students cannot receive field credit for past experience. The accreditation standards of the
Council on Social Work Education state that academic credit for life experience and previous work
experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of the field internship or courses in the
professional foundation areas.

Where can I find student forms online?
Many field-related forms and resources are available for students online and can be accessed at
www.csuchico.edu/swrk. If you need any help finding or completing forms, contact the field support
at 530-898-6204.


Selecting an Internship

How do I obtain an internship?
MSW students work closely with the Director of Field Education to determine agencies with whom to
interview. Students and agencies interview each other. When a match is made then agencies contact
the student to offer them an internship. Students either accept or decline the offer. If a match is not
made students continue to interview.

MSW students attend the Field Fair which is held in the spring. The Field Fair provides an opportunity
for students to meet with agency representatives to learn more about potential agency sites.
Advanced Standing students work closely with the Director of Field Education to determine approved
agencies with whom to interview. Students are also instructed on accessing the field agency data base
to identify potential agencies of interest. Students and agencies interview each other. When a match is
made then agencies contact the student to offer them an internship. Students either accept or decline
the offer. If a match is not made students continue to interview.

Do I have to be living in, or visiting, Chico to find an internship?
Students need to interview with potential agencies. While students who are in Chico conduct these
interviews in person, telephone interviews can sometimes be arranged for students who are out of
town. However, it is to the student's advantage to arrange a time to interview in person if at all
possible.

Can I complete my internship in my place of employment?
Students interested in an employment based internship must submit a „Proposal for Employment Based
Internship‟ form to the Director of Field Education. Submitting the required form does not guarantee
approval of the request. The internship must provide the student with experiences that are distinctly
different from the student‟s regular job responsibilities.

Can students create their own internships?
The field education program is always interested in identifying new internship agencies and welcomes
suggestions from students. All internship sites must meet the requirements for learning opportunities
and supervision and must be approved by the field education program prior to a student beginning the
internship. To begin the approval process, prospective agencies must first submit an Agency Profile to
the Director of Field Education. The Agency Profile can be downloaded at www.csuchico.edu/swrk.

How does an agency become an approved internship site?
Agencies become approved internship sites through a written agreement with the field education
program. This agreement can be initiated by an agency, a student or the School of Social Work.
Agencies complete the „Agency Profile‟ online at www.csuchico.edu/swrk. This generates a site visit
from the Field Director during which learning opportunities, supervision requirements, non
discrimination policies and other matters are discussed.

What if an agency does not have an MSW on site?
Agencies without an on-site MSW can provide internships only if the agency identifies an off-site
individual with an MSW to provide the field instruction. It is optimal for the off-site MSW to be
familiar with the agency‟s mission and work.

What determines a student's tasks and learning opportunities in an internship?
Each student, in conjunction with the field instructor, completes a Student Learning Contract. The
learning contract addresses all of the tasks, learning objectives and competencies for the internship.
The learning contract template can be downloaded from www.csuchico.edu/swrk.

When and why should students contact their assigned Field Liaison?
Field Liaisons contact students and Field Instructors during the first three weeks of the internship to set
up a schedule for site visits. Throughout the year, students should contact their Field Liaison if they
have questions or concerns about work load, field instruction/supervision, learning contract, field
evaluations or the integration of classroom assignments and the field internship.
When and why should Field Instructors contact their assigned Field Liaison?
Throughout the year, field instructors should contact their field liaison if they have questions or
concerns about their students, learning contract, field evaluations, or the integration of classroom
assignments and the field internship.

What is the difference between a Field Instructor and Field Liaison?
A Field Instructor is an agency staff member who provides weekly supervision to the student intern.
The Field Instructor must have an MSW degree and a minimum of two years post-graduate
professional social work experience.

A Field Liaison provides a link between the School of Social Work, the student and the internship
agency. Field Liaisons meet jointly with the student and Field Instructor at least once per semester to
discuss progress made toward completing internship assignments. Field Liaisons are also available to
the student and the agency for problem resolution. Field Liaisons are experienced MSWs from the
community and/or faculty members.

What are supervision requirements for an internship?
All students must be supervised by an MSW who has at least 2 years of post-graduate professional
social work experience. MSW students receive at least 1 hour of supervision per week. A small
number of students receive weekly supervision from an on-site task supervisor and weekly supervision
from an off-site MSW supervisor.

What happens if problems arise during an internship?
Problems that arise during an internship are first addressed between the field instructor and the student.
The field liaison is available for problem resolution as needed. If problems cannot be resolved between
the student, the field liaison and the field instructor, a performance contract should be developed to
identify areas of concern and a method to address the concern. A time frame to complete the
performance contract should also be determined. Detailed information to address problems during an
internship may be found in the Field Problems & Resolutions section of the field manual.

Can students request to change internships during the year?
Any decisions about changing internships must be made by the field liaison, the field instructor, and
the student. Detailed information may also be found in the Field Problems and Resolutions section of
the field manual.

Are students required to have background checks prior to beginning their internships?
Background checks are required by some agencies before a student is accepted for, and/or allowed to
begin an internship. If an agency requires any type of background check and/or medical testing, the
agency should notify the intern of these requirements during the interview process. Conducting
background checks is the responsibility of the agency. If an agency is not able to pay for these
additional requirements, payment is the responsibility of the student.
Scheduling

Can an internship take place during evening and weekend hours?
Students need to be at their internship during normal agency business hours and during times when
their field supervisor is available. These conditions do not usually allow students to do their entire
internship during evening or weekend hours although it might be possible to complete some hours
during these times.

Can students work while attending the MSW program?
Many students work while attending the MSW program. It is recommended that full-time MSW
students work no more than 20 hours per week.

What are the policies regarding University holidays, sick days and vacation days during an
internship?
The University does not require students to be at their internships during holidays officially observed
by the University. Students needing to take additional time off during their internships, or wishing to
make up time missed for illness or vacation, must discuss their requests with their Field Instructor.


Transportation

Does a student need a car for an internship?
Many internships require that students have cars to carry out assignments such as home visits, outreach
and community work. In addition, many internships are located in rural areas that are underserved by
public transportation. Therefore, students without cars may need to choose internships that are close to
their homes, are available by public transportation or that do not require the use of a car to carry out
assigned tasks.

Can students drive clients?
According to the University policy, interns shall not transport clients in vehicles unless specific
provision for this to occur is included in the written agreement between the University and the
internship agency. Therefore, it is up to the agency to specify whether or not interns shall drive as a
part of their essential duties within their internship. At that time, interns may be required to submit to
a motor vehicles records check, notify their insurance carrier of their use of their own vehicle to
transport clients, and follow all driving-related policies of the agency. The University does not cover
the cost of automobile insurance for any of its interns. To initiate an agency contract that includes
driving of clients, students or agency representatives should contact the Director of Field Education at
phunter@csuchico.edu.

As a matter of record and additional areas of liability, any accidents involving a CSUC student who is
driving during the course of an internship must be reported to local law enforcement, the agency, and
the School of Social Work Field Director.
                                  Requirements for MSW Degree
                              Overview of the MSW Program Curriculum

The MSW program prepares students for Advanced Generalist practice that consists of a broad-based set of
knowledge, values and skills necessary for advanced social work practice with multi-level systems. The major
emphases of the concentration are direct services to individuals, families and groups; community and
organizational practice; policy analysis and practice; and research for practice. Within the Advanced Generalist
concentration, students may choose a focus area in mental health services, or in families, children and youth
services, for additional advanced direct practice and policy practice preparation. The electives and
comprehensive examination, thesis or project augment the students‟ advanced practice expertise.

Course Requirements for MSW Degree: 36-61 units
Continuous enrollment is required. A maximum of 9 units of transfer credit may be applied toward the degree.
Thirty-six units are required for students who have a baccalaureate from social work programs accredited by the
Council on Social Work Education and who meet the criteria listed below for admission to the one-year
program. Sixty-one units are required for students who meet the criteria listed below for admission to the two-
year program.

Field Education Requirement
The Master of Social Work program requires a total of 480 hours of practicum during the Professional Foundation
year, and 720 hours of practicum during the Concentration year. Employment-based practicum positions are
considered on an individual basis when agencies are able to provide the student with a position that is
educationally focused and involves tasks other than normal work duties. Please see the Policy on Employment-
Based Placements for details.

Advanced Generalist Practice with focus in Mental Health Services or in Families, Children and
Youth Services
The Advanced Generalist concentration in the second year of the MSW program prepares students with a broad-
based set of knowledge, skills, and values necessary for multiple levels of advanced social work practice with
individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The major emphases for the concentration are:
direct services to individuals, families and groups; community and organizational practice; policy analysis and
practice; and research as practice. Within this concentration, MSW students choose Mental Health Services or
Families, Children and Youth Services as focus areas for additional practice preparation. The thesis, project and
electives augment students‟ expertise in the focus areas.

A. Mental Health Services
The focus in Mental Health Services is aimed at preparing the student for a career of service to persons with
mental disorders. Graduates may be employed in community mental health centers, mental hospitals, regional
centers, alcohol and substance abuse programs, and a variety of other social service agencies.

B. Families, Children, and Youth Services
The focus in Families, Children, and Youth Services is aimed at preparing the student for a career of service to
at-risk families and children. Graduates may be employed in a variety of settings including family service
agencies, public child welfare agencies, probation departments, foster care agencies, adoption agencies, child
guidance centers, schools, and a variety of other social service agencies.
Requirements for MSW Degree
For the MSW degree to be conferred, students must meet the following criteria:
    1. Completion of all requirements as established by the School of Social Work MSW Program Committee
        and the Graduate School;
    2. Completion of a culminating activity as specified in "Master‟s Degree Requirements" in The University
        Catalog and as approved by the MSW Program Committee. Two-Year program students should submit
        their Program Plan stating their culminating activity before spring semester finals of their Foundation year.
        One-Year program students should submit their Program Plan by beginning of fall semester of their
        Concentration year. Three-Year Weekend program students should submit their Program Plan during fall
        semester, 2008. Options for this activity may be one of the following: Master‟s Thesis, Master‟s Project or
        Comprehensive Examination. Additional information is provided under “Culminating Activity” in this
        handbook.
    3. Approval by the School‟s MSW Program Committee and the Graduate Coordinators on behalf of the
        faculty of the University.

Requirements for the One-Year MSW Program
Students who have obtained a social work baccalaureate accredited by the Council on Social Work Education
(CSWE) within five years of entering into the program, and who meet other School of Social Work criteria for
entry into the One-Year Program must complete 36 units of 600-level social work courses, including a minimum
of 720 hours of field education practicum. The One-Year Program includes the 30 units of Concentration
courses listed above plus two additional courses (six units) that must be completed during the summer session
prior to entering the Concentration year of study.
Summer Session
        SWRK 635                                 Foundations of SWRK Practice              3.0
        SWRK 636                                 Foundations of SWRK Research              3.0

Requirements for the Two-Year MSW Program
Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree other than in social work, as well as students who do have
a baccalaureate in social work and chose the Two-Year Program, must complete 31 units of 600-level social
work Professional Foundation courses prior to the 30 units of 600-level social work Concentration courses.
Twelve hundred hours of field education practicum are required. The social work Professional Foundation
courses must be taken in the following sequence:

Professional Foundation Year Courses (First Year)
Fall Semester
SWRK 601        Human Behavior & Social Environment                                        3.0
SWRK 605        Social Welfare Policy & Services                                           3.0
SWRK 608        Gen SWRK Theory & Practice I                                               3.0
SWRK 617        Research I Methods for SWRK Knowledge & Practice                           3.0
SWRK 631        Foundation Practicum I                                                     3.0
Spring Semester
SWRK 612        SWRK Practice in Multicultural Contexts                                    3.0
SWRK 609        General SWRK Theory & Practice II                                          3.0
SWRK 610        General SWRK Theory & Practice III                                         3.0
SWRK 644        Human Behavior and Social Environment II                                   3.0
SWRK 632        Foundation Practicum II                                                    3.0
Concentration Year Courses (Second Year)
In the Concentration year of the program, students have an option of focusing in Mental Health Services or in
Families, Children and Youth Services. Concentration courses must be taken in the following sequence:
Fall Semester
SWRK 641        Advanced Practice in Mental Health Services                               3.0
        OR
SWRK 642        Advanced Practice in Families, Children & Youth Services                  3.0
SWRK 643        Assessment of Individuals and Families                                    3.0
SWRK 653        Research II: Program Evaluation                                           3.0
SWRK 648        Advanced Practicum I                                                      4.0
Thesis/project/elective (2-3 units)
Spring Semester
SWRK 652        Supervision, Program Development and Administration                       3.0
SWRK 654        Social Policy in Mental Health Services                                   3.0
        OR
SWRK 655        Social Policy in Families, Children & Youth Services                      3.0
SWRK 681        Advanced Family & Child Treatment                                         3.0
        OR
SWRK 656        Advanced SWRK Macro Practice                                              3.0
SWRK 658        Advanced Practicum II                                                     4.0
Thesis/project/elective (2-3 units)

Electives (not all electives are offered each semester)
SWRK 671        SWRK Health Care Policy & Practice                                        3.0
SWRK 673        Trauma and Loss                                                           3.0
SWRK 674        Policies & Practice with Older Americans & Families                       3.0
SWRK 677        Substance Abuse: Foundations for SWRK Practice                            3.0
SWRK 678        Mental Recovery and Wellness                                              3.0
SWRK 685        Developmental Theory and Interpersonal Processes                          3.0
SWRK 687        Advanced Child Welfare (Required for Title IV-E)                          3.0
SWRK 688        SWRK Practice in Schools                                                  3.0
SWRK 699P       Master‟s Project                                                          2.0
SWRK 699T       Master‟s Thesis                                                           2.0

Requirements for the Three-Year Weekend Program
The Three-Year Weekend Program provides the same MSW curriculum as the Two-Year Program except that
it meets twice a month for four hours on Friday and eight hours on Saturday for the course of a calendar year.
This program admits students once every three years. The next cohort begins fall 2012. As in the Two-Year
Program, the Three-Year Weekend program requires a total of 59-61 units of course work. The units vary
depending on the student‟s choice to enroll in electives, or complete a thesis or project. Additionally, students
complete 1200 hours of field education practicum experience.
                                 Other Approved Graduate Courses
Political Science
POLS 660A       Seminar: Public Management                                                   3.0
POLS 660B       Seminar: Public Personnel Administration                                     3.0
POLS 660C       Seminar: Public Financial Resources                                          3.0
POLS 663        Seminar: Health/Human Services Management                                    3.0
Psychology
PSY 648         Career Counseling & Development                                              3.0


            Professional Foundation Year and Concentration Year Practicum
Purpose
The purpose of the Field Education Program is to prepare students for the world of professional social work
practice by placing them in actual settings where, under the guidance of social work practitioners, they will
develop essential competencies in applying social work knowledge, values, and skills. In addition to their
classroom experience, students will gain knowledge, skills, and professional identity through practice in these
settings and through the instruction and modeling provided by their mentors. In addition to time at the field site,
the student attends a Field Seminar designed to help integrate classroom learning and the field experience. During
the Professional Foundation Year, students attend SWRK 608 (Theory & Practice I), a course that addresses
professionalism, ethics, and values of social work, as well as the models, methods and theories related to actual
practice. During the Concentration Year, students attend either SWRK 641 (Advanced Practice in Mental Health
Services) or SWRK 642 (Advanced Practice in Families, Children & Youth Services). These courses, along
with the field seminars, help to integrate classroom learning with the field experience. Only students enrolled in
the MSW program may participate in field education practicum.
Via the practicum, students learn through experience reinforced by the integrative courses (SWRK 608, 609, 641,
642 and 652) about issues related to the use of self in facilitating change, including professional boundaries,
organizational culture, communicating with other professionals, and the challenges posed by practice with
diverse populations. The integrative courses are the vehicle for students to generalize experiences from
individual placements to practice with the diversity of social work roles, services, populations, settings,
approaches, and levels of practice. Students must take the practice courses concurrently with the Field
Practicum.

Professional Foundation Year Practicum
The purpose of the Professional Foundation Year is to learn basic knowledge, skills, and values for client-centered
problem-solving in generalist social work practice. During the Professional Foundation Year, students should
learn to:
   1. engage in interpersonal helping;
   2. utilize a problem solving process;
   3. analyze and function within an Agency delivery system;
   4. perform a variety of direct and indirect practice roles with primary focus on direct roles;
   5. find and use formal and natural resource systems; and
   6. critically reflect on their own practice.
It is during the Professional Foundation Year that students begin developing a professional identity, particularly in
gaining a working knowledge of the ethics, values, and roles of social workers. A working knowledge of the
NASW Code of Ethics and its application to practice is a major focus. Practice courses support the student‟s
learning in the agency and community, and encourage a fuller understanding of the array of social service systems.
Practice courses also address professionalism, ethical and value conflicts related to practice, professional
boundaries, organizational cultures, and challenges posed by practice with diverse populations. Integrative social
work courses help students generalize experiences from individual placements to practice across the broad
spectrum of organizations, interacting with the diverse populations and practice levels students encounter
professionally.
Concentration Year Practicum
During the Concentration Year, students continue developing their professional identity. It is assumed that
students have acquired the basic knowledge, skills and values from their Professional Foundation Year practicum
in preparation for the Concentration Year practicum. The emphasis of the concentration field work and practice
courses is on preparing students for advanced generalist practice and leadership roles in human service agencies in
Northern California. Emphasis also is placed on using advanced intervention methods and problem solving
methodologies with complex systems of all sizes. The Concentration Year practicum develops particular
professional competence as a generalist with a focus in Mental Health Services or in Families, Children and
Youth Services. It is during this Concentration Year practicum that students are able to apply the concepts, skills
and values learned in the Professional Foundation Year to the selected focus area of advanced generalist practice.

The Concentration Year practicum further prepares students as social work practitioners in their focus area by
expanding understanding and use of the ecological systems perspective. Students gain a more comprehensive
understanding of theories, concepts, and practice models for assessment and intervention with different size
systems at multiple levels in small town and rural settings. The student‟s practice should be guided by values
which build upon the strengths of consumer systems at multiple levels, consistent with the values of individual
and cultural diversity, self-determination, human dignity and worth, and social justice. At this level, students
should also be able to engage and maintain complex professional relationships with staff, colleagues,
community members and policy makers consistent with social work ethics and values. While the Professional
Foundation Year practicum introduces supervision and critical reflection, it is during the Concentration Year
practicum that students become skilled in critical self-reflection and the ability to constructively utilize
consultation and supervision for understanding their own limits, ethical scrutiny, professional growth and
wellness.
                        2011-2012 STUDENT FIELD CALENDAR
                Social Work Concentration Year Practicum (SWRK 648/658)

Fall Classes Begin                                                August 22

  Fall Practicum Hours                                            September 6 - December 9, 2011
                     **312 Field Practicum Hours must be completed by December 9, 2011
                          in order to continue in the field practicum for the Spring **

Spring Classes                                                    January 23
  Spring Practicum Hours                                          January 2 – May 11, 2012
                       **720 Field Practicum Hours must be completed by May 11, 2012**

                        No Field Practicum During the Following Dates:
        Thanksgiving Break (November 21 - 25)       Spring Break (March 19 - 23)
        Fall Finals Week (December 12 - 16)         Spring Finals Week (May14 – 18)
        Semester Break (Dec. 19 – January 1)

Fall Field Seminar Meetings                                       Spring Field Seminar Meetings
August 25                                                         January 26
September 8                                                       February 9
September 22                                                      February 23
October 6*                                                        March 8*
October 20                                                        March 29
November 3*                                                       April 12
November 17                                                       April 26*
December 1*                                                       May 10
*Assignments due
Seminar dates may be subject to change due to individual instructor or program schedule conflicts.


Assignments                                                       Due Date

MSW Learning Contract                                             October 6
Midterm Progress Report                                           November 3
Final Fall Student Evaluation                                     December 1
Midterm Progress Report                                           March 8
Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance                  April 26
Final Spring Student Evaluation                                   May 10
AFI Evaluation of Field Education Program
Student Evaluation of Practicum Experience
                         2011-2012 STUDENT FIELD CALENDAR
                  Social Work Foundation Year Practicum (SWRK 631/632)

Fall Classes Begin                                                August 22

  Fall Practicum Hours                                            September 6 - December 9, 2011
                     **208 Field Practicum Hours must be completed by December 9, 2011
                          in order to continue in the field practicum for the Spring **

Spring Classes Begin                                              January 23
  Spring Practicum Hours                                          January 2 – May 11, 2012
                       **480 Field Practicum Hours must be completed by May 11, 2012**

                        No Field Practicum During the Following Dates:
        Thanksgiving Break (November 21 - 25)       Spring Break (March 19 - 23)
        Fall Finals Week (December 12 - 16)         Spring Finals Week (May14 – 18)
        Semester Break (Dec. 19 – January 1)

Fall Field Seminar Meetings                                       Spring Field Seminar Meetings
August 29                                                         January 30
September 12                                                      February 13
September 26                                                      February 27
October 10*                                                       March 12*
October 23                                                        March 26
November 7*                                                       April 9
November 28                                                       April 23*
December 12*                                                      May 7*
*Assignments due
Seminar dates may be subject to change due to individual instructor or program schedule conflicts.


Assignments                                                       Due Date

MSW Learning Contract                                             October 10
Midterm Progress Report                                           November 7
Final Student Evaluation                                          December 12
Midterm Progress Report                                           March 12
Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance                  April 23
Final Student Evaluation                                          May 7
Evaluation of Field Education Program
Student Evaluation of Practicum Experience
               2011-2012 STUDENT FIELD CALENDAR
Social Work Concentration Year Practicum (3 Year Program) (SWRK 648/658)

Fall Classes Begin                                 August 22, 2011

 Fall Practicum Hours                              August 22– December 9, 2011
 Students need to complete 360 field hours prior to beginning the spring semester 1/23/12
Spring Classes Begin                               January 23, 2012
 Spring Practicum Hours                          January 2 – May 11, 2012
            **720 Field Practicum Hours must be completed by May 11, 2012**

                      No Field Practicum During the Following Dates:
      Thanksgiving Break (November 21-25)         Spring Break (March 19-23)
      Fall Finals Week (December 12-16)           Spring Finals Week (May 14-18)
      Semester Break (Dec.19 – January 1)

Fall Field Seminar Meetings                        Spring Field Seminar Meetings
August 26                                          January on line
September 9                                        February on line
September 23                                       February on line
October 7                                          March on line
October 21                                         March on line
November 4                                         April on line
December 2
                                                   April 13 face to face meeting
December 16
                                                   April 27 face to face meeting

      Assignments                                         Due Date

      MSW Learning Contract                               October 7

      Midterm Progress Report                             November 4

      Final Student Evaluation                            December 16

      Midterm Progress Report                             March 9

      Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance    April 13

      Final Student Evaluation                            April 27
      Field Instructor & Student Evaluation of Program
                                    California State University, Chico
                                          School of Social Work
                                    Master of Social Work Program

                             SWRK 631/632: Foundation Field Practicum
                                   (3.0 UNITS, credit/no credit)
                                    FALL 2011/SPRING 2012

Section:          01                                     Section:      02
Instructor: Molly Heck                                   Instructor: Ann Petersen
Time: Monday 4-5:50pm FA; 4-5:50pm SP                    Time: Monday 4-5:50pm FA; 4-
                                                         5:50pmSP
Classroom: Butte 209 FA; Butte 323 SPG                   Classroom: Butte 323 FA; Butte
                                                         209 SPG
Office Location: Butte 518                               Office Location: Butte 518
Office Telephone: 898-                                   Office Telephone: 530-570-2921
Email: mheck@csuchico.edu                                Email: acpetersen@csuchico.edu
Office Hours:                                            Office Hours:


Contents

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION
Prerequisites: CSU, Chico Graduate acceptance, admission to the MSW program and
 concurrent enrollment in SWRK 601, 605, 608 and 617 for the fall semester and concurrent
enrollment in SWRK 612, 609, 610 and 644 for the spring semester. The field education practicum
provides 240 hours per semester of directed field learning for students in the foundation year of the
MSW program. The hours are to be completed over the course of 15 weeks during each semester. If
students are accumulating more than 16 hours per week arrangements should be made to flex their
hours so that the practicum is not completed prior to the end of each semester.

II. PURPOSE OF THE COURSE
A field practicum in a public or private agency provides the opportunity for students to apply the
knowledge, skills and values learned in liberal arts, social work practice, social welfare policy and
services, human behavior in the social environment and social research courses in an educationally
supervised setting. Students are expected to learn basic social work skills applicable to working with
individuals, families, groups, and communities in a wide variety of practice settings. The seminar
provides students with a forum to process the learning experiences they are having in the agency
settings and integrate those experiences with the knowledge and skills they are learning in the
classroom setting.

III. MAJOR COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
Students will be placed in field practicum settings for 16 hours per week and attend a bi-weekly
seminar.

IV. MSW Program Objectives
    Refer to Page 9 of the MSW Student Handbook.
V.      COURSE OBJECTIVES
        Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate:
Course Objectives                                               Program      Assignments
                                                                Objectives
1. a commitment to social work practice in a professional       1            Weekly
social work environment by working within a social service                   Journal
agency in a professionally responsible manner

2. knowledge of systems framework to assess, plan, and             4       Weekly
evaluate social work intervention with multi-level client                  Journal
systems                                                                    Case
                                                                           Presentation
3. research knowledge to understand the social work                7       Weekly
processes of problem definition, data collection, assessment,              Journal
goal setting, intervention planning, contracting, carrying out
intervention, evaluation of practice outcomes, referral (when
appropriate), and termination

4.sensitivity, understanding, and skill in responding to the       2       Weekly
special needs of diverse populations including women, ethnic               Journal
groups, gay men and lesbians, older adults, people with
mental and physical limitations, and other populations at risk
who have experienced discrimination and oppression

5. ability to perform the social work roles of advocate,           1       Weekly
linkage broker, enable, teacher, mediator, nurturer, and                   Journal
collaborator in social work interventions                                  Student Self
                                                                           Assessment
6. an understanding of the structure, policy, and procedures       5       Weekly
of the agency                                                              Journal
                                                                           Case
                                                                           Presentation
7. ability to use a range of resources that complement agency      8       Weekly
services                                                                   Journal

8. use of self purposefully as a professional helper, and use      8       Weekly
available resources (e.g. supervision and other agency                     Journal
learning opportunities) to support professional development                Student Self
                                                                           Assessment
9. ability to work as a team member with other social              9       Weekly
workers and related professionals within the placement                     Journal
agency, and developing collaborative working relationships
within and between social systems to enhance services in
both rural and urban settings

10. knowledge of what constitutes social justice within the        3,5     Weekly
context of institutional policies and practices, and the ability           Journal
to identify and work toward changing those policies and
practices that foster discrimination or oppression
11. understanding of how attitudes and practices toward        2            Weekly
disadvantaged populations can be changed                                    Journal

12. commitment to the values and ethics of the profession      1            Weekly
through appropriate attitudes and behavior including                        Journal
demonstrating professional self awareness and the
development of professional boundaries



VI.     INTEGRATION WITH OTHER COURSES
The field education courses provide students opportunities to apply and integrate knowledge gained in
their undergraduate liberal arts education and foundation social work courses with their practicum
experiences. The practicum seminar is used for agency multi-level case analyses to assess the
applicability and effectiveness of various theories and approaches, evaluate social policies and their
effects on service delivery, identify and evaluate agencies‟ use of research findings on service
implementation, and evaluate their interventions.

VII.   COURSE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

       See 2011-12 MSW Student Handbook

       A. Students with Disabilities or Physical Limitations
       MSW Student Handbook, p. 37

       B. Attendance
       MSW Student Handbook, pp. 35 & 37-38

       C. Academic Honor and Honesty
       MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

       D. Writing Standards
       MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

       E. Evaluation
       MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

       F. Incomplete Grades
       MSW Student Handbook, pp. 26-27 & 39

       G. Professional Behavior
       MSW Student Handbook pp. 36 & 40-50

       H. Confidentiality
       MSW Student Handbook, p. 40
VIII. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Required Reading
          MSW Field Education Handbook
   A.     Assigned Reading
             Individual course instructors may assign reading during the semester according to the topics and
                                       issues being discussed in individual seminars.


   B.       Assessment of Student Learning and Grades

(CR) Credit
A CR indicates satisfactory achievement of course objectives: equated with a B and is not calculated in
student‟s GPA.

(NC) No Credit
A NC indicates unsatisfactory achievement of course objectives: equated with an F and is not
calculated in the student‟s GPA.

(IC) Incomplete Charged
Incompletes (I) will be assigned only in cases where instructors conclude that a clearly identifiable
pattern of course requirements cannot be met for unforeseen reasons. An Incomplete shall not be
assigned when it is necessary for the student to attend a major portion of the class when it is next
offered. An Incomplete is also prohibited where the normal practice requires extension of course
requirements beyond the close of a term, e.g., thesis or project type courses. In such cases, use of
the "RP" symbol is required. The conditions for removal of the Incomplete, including the time
period allowed for the removal, shall be provided in writing by the instructor and given to the
student with a copy placed in file with the appropriate campus officer until the Incomplete is
removed or the time limit for removal has passed.
A student may not re-enroll in a course for which he or she has received an "I" until that "I" has
been converted to a grade other than "I"; e.g., A-F, IC.
An Incomplete must be made up within one calendar year after it is assigned whether or not the student
is enrolled or it will be changed to IC in a letter grade situation or to NC in a CR/NC situation. An
extension of the one-year time limit may be granted by petition for contingencies such as intervening
military service and serious health or personal problems. A faculty member may submit a letter grade
to be assigned in the event the Incomplete is not made up within one year. If the Incomplete is not
converted to a credit-bearing grade within the prescribed time limit, or any extension thereof, it shall
be counted as a failing grade in calculating grade point average and progress points unless the faculty
member has assigned another grade. See University Catalog p. 143. Students may not proceed in their
field practicum courses if they have received an incomplete or no credit for any previous field
practicum course taken in a previous semester.

(RP) Report in Progress:
The "RP" symbol is used in connection with courses that extend beyond one academic term. It
indicates that work is in progress but that assignment of a final grade must await completion of
additional work. Work is to be completed within one year except for graduate degree theses. It is
employed in connection with Independent Study (698), Master's Study (699), and similar courses (e.g.,
designated Special Topics/598 courses approved for this grading option) where assigned work
frequently extends beyond a single academic term and possibly requires enrollment in more than one
term. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted may not exceed the total number applicable to your
educational objective. Work must be completed within one year of initial enrollment for 698 courses
and within the seven years allowed for the completion of the master's degree for 699 courses. See
University Catalog p. 143-4.

Grades
MSW Grades are determined by each student‟s point totals applied to the following percentages:

         A = 94 - 100        B+ = 87 – 89          C+ = 77 - 79         F = ≤ 69
         A- = 90 - 93        B = 84 - 86           C = 74 – 76
                             B- = 80 - 83          C- = 70 - 73




Performance in field practicum site –                                  50% of total grade
Seminar Participation – (includes case presentation)                   25% of total grade
Journals and self-assessment - (20 points each)                        25% of total grade

Students must complete all assignments and field hours in order to proceed in the MSW
program. Students must receive credit for all field education practicum courses in order to
proceed in the MSW program.


C.      Course Assignments

Each student is required to complete the following:
     4. Field Placement: The student will complete 480 hours in a field placement in a public or
        private human service organization per academic year. The student will complete a written
        learning contract in collaboration with the field instructor by the date specified in the field
        seminar syllabus.
     5. Field Seminar: Students are expected to attend all seminar meetings and assume an active role
        in class discussions. A pattern of lateness or absences in the field seminar will impact the
        student‟s grade for the field practicum negatively. Students are expected to be both
        physically and mentally present during seminar. Specifically cell phones and lap top
        computers will be turned off and there will be no texting, or any other form of electronic
        communication occurring during seminar time. More than two absences from field seminar
        may result in the student failing the course.
     6. Writing Assessment: Documentation is a very important skill in social work practice. Students
        are asked to complete various forms of agency documentation in their field placements.
        Faculty field liaisons will be evaluating student writing in student journals, as well as inquiring
        about student writing skills in their agency placements and may make a recommendation for a
        student to enroll in the social work writing course when appropriate.
     7. Confidentiality: Information shared in class about human service organizations and
        clients/consumers is covered by the NASW Code of Ethics. Such information is considered
        shared in a classroom setting for supervisory purposes. Given the nature of the field seminar
        and the fact that it will focus on concerns and issues faced by students working with actual
        clients, it is critical that client confidentiality be maintained. Under no circumstances will a
       student reveal the name of a client or provide descriptive information that might identify the
       client, even when names are not mentioned. Discussions outside of class with members of the
       class or with individuals outside of the seminar regarding information shared in class about
       clients, field instructors, or agencies are considered a breach of confidentiality.
   8. Communication and conflict resolution: One of the most important aspects of becoming a
      professional is developing an understanding of the use of supervision. Effective use of
      supervision requires understanding the process for communicating concerns. Students are
      expected to use identified channels for resolving concerns within the field placement and the
      field seminar. These channels include going directly to their field instructor and/or their
      seminar instructor.
   9. Journals: Students are expected to complete ten journal entries during the course of the field
      placement. Faculty field liaisons will assign the dates that these journal entries will be turned
      in. The length of each entry is not as important as the quality of content. All Field Instructors
      have been informed about this assignment, and it is expected that the student may do some
      journal writing during their field practicum time. Journal entries should address integration of
      field work to classroom curriculum and self awareness/ exploration.
   10. Student Presentations: Over the course of the academic year each student will give an in-class
       case presentation. Students will sign up for a presentation date during the field seminar. The
       date may be in the fall or spring semester, as the presentations will start late in the fall semester
       and continue during the spring semester. Individual seminar instructors will provide students
       with a format for the case presentation that incorporates concepts introduced in the foundation
       practice course.
   11. Student Self Assessment: During the spring semester students will complete a narrative
       summarizing their practicum learning experiences and progress toward attaining their learning
       goals and objectives and continued professional development. The strength of the evaluation
       directly reflects the time and consideration the student contributes to this process. A format for
       this self assessment is provided in the Field Education Manual.


IX. Bibliography
Anderson, A.,G. (2000). Coping strategies and burnout among veteran child protection workers. Child
      Abuse and Neglect, 24 (6), 839-848.
Babcock, M.D., Burpee, J.M., & Stewart, R.G. (2002). Sources of stress and coping strategies of full
      time MSW students. Arete, 25(2), 87-95.
Bacallao, M. L., & Smokowski, P. R. (2007). The costs of getting ahead: Mexican family system
        changes after immigration. Family Relations, 56 (1), 52-66.
Behn, J.D., Dana, R.H., Gonwa, T. (1992). A checklist for the examination of cultural    competence
in social service agencies. Research on Social Work Practice, 2.
Berg-Weyer, M. & Birkenmeyer, J. (2004). The practicum companion for social work: Integrating
      class and field work. Boston, Allyn & Bacon.
Bradley, V. J. (2000). Changes in services and supports for people with developmental disabilities:
        New challenges to established practices. Health and Social Work, 25 (3), 191-200.
Burke, A. C., & Clapp, J. D. (1997). Ideology and social work practice in substance abuse settings.
        Social Work, 42 (6), 552-564.
Cearley, Sarah, (2004). The power of supervision in child welfare services. Child &      Youth Care
Forum, 33 (5), 313-327.
Clemans, S. (2004). Recognizing vicarious traumatization: A single session group model for trauma
      workers. Social Work with Groups, 27(2/3), 55-74.
Corey, M., & Corey, G., (1989). Becoming a helper. Pacific Grove, CA; Brooks/Cole Publishing Co.
Coyle, E., D., Hannigan, B., Fothergill, A. & Burnard, P. (2005) A systematic review of stress among
      mental health social workers. International Social work, 48(2), 201-211.
Cunningham,M.,(2004). Teaching social workers about trauma: Reducing the risks of
     vacarious traumatization in the classroom. Journal of Social Work Education, 40(2),
     305-317.
Cunningham, M. (1999). The impact of sexual abuse treatment on the social work clinician. Child and
        Adolescent Social Work Journal, 16 (4), 227-290.
Davidson, J.C. (2005). Professional relationship boundaries: A social work teaching module.
        Social Work Education, 24(5), 511-533.
DiGiulio, J.F. (2002). Back to basics: Confidentiality in the field practicum. Arete, 25 (2), 71-77.
Garcia, J. A., & Floyd, C. E. (1999). Using single-subject design for student self-assessment: A
        method for enhancing practice and integrating curriculum. Journal of Social Work Education,
        35 (3), 451-462.
Grobman, Linda (2005). Days in the lives of social workers: 54 professionals tell real life stories from
      social work practice. 3rd Ed. White Hat Communications.
Guttman, D., (2006). Ethics in social work: A context of caring. Haworth Press.
Hodge, D. R. (2001). Spirtual genograms: A generational approach to assessing spirituality. Families
        in Society, 82 (1), 35-48.
Kaye, L.W., (2005). Perspectives on productive aging: Social work and the new aged. Washington,
      DC. NASW Press.
Keogh, E. Bond, F.W., & Flaxman, R.E. (2006). Improving academic performance and mental health
      through a stress management intervention: Outcomes and mediators of change. Behaviour
      Research and Therapy. 44(3), 339-357.
Knight, C. (2006). Groups for individual with traumatic histories: Practice considerations for social
        workers. Social Work, 51(1), 20-30.
Kosberg, J. I. (1988). Preventing elder abuse: Identification of high risk factors prior to placement
        decisions. The Gerontologist, 28 (1), 43-50.
Labisi, O. (2006). Suicide risk assessment in the depressed elderly patient with cancer. Journal of
        Gerontological Social Work, 47 (½), 17-25.
Lam, C., Wong, H.& Leung, T. (2007). An unfinished reflexive journey: Social work student‟s
        reflection on their placement experiences. British Journal of Social Work Volume, 37 (1), 91-
        105.
Lowerey, C. T. (1998). American Indian perspectives in addiction and recovery. Health and Social
        Work, 23 (12), 127-135.
Lukas, Susan (1993). Where to start and what to ask. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
Mattison, M. (2000). Ethical decision-making: The person in the process. Social Work, 45 (3), 201-
        212.
Miller, P. J. (1994). Dual relationships in rural practice: A dilemma of ethics and culture. Human
        Services in Rural Environments, 18 (2), 4-7.
Newhill, C., (2003). Client violence in social work practice: Prevention, intervention and research.
        Guildford Press.
Otto, J. M. (2000). The role of adult protective services in addressing abuse. Generations, 24 (2), 33-
        38.
Palmer, S. E., Brown, R. A., Rae-Grant, N. I., & Loughlin, M. J. (2001). Survivors of childhood abuse:
        Their reported experiences with professional help. Social Work, 46 (2), 136-146.
Peterson, Marilyn. (1992). At personal risk: Boundary violations in professional client
      relationships. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
Raines, J.C. (2004). To tell or not to tell: Ethical issues regarding confidentiality. School Social Work,
      28(2), 61-78.
Reamer, F. (2005). Documentation in social work: Evolving ethical and risk management
     standards. Social Work, 50 (4), 325-334.
Reamer, F. G. Ethical standards in social work: The NASW code of ethics. In Encyclopedia of Social
       Work (19th ed., suppl. Pp. 113-131). New York: National Association of Social Workers.
Regehr, C., & Antle, B. (1997). Coercive influences: Informed consent in court-mandated social work
       practice. Social Work, 42 (3), 300-306.
Scalera, N.R. (1995). The critical need for specialized health and safety measures for child welfare
     workers. Child Welfare, 74(2), 337-350.
Smith, M., (2006). Too little fear can kill you: Staying alive as a social worker. Journal
       of Social Work Practice, 20 (1), 69-81.
Sowers, K., & Thyer, B. (2005). Getting your MSW: How to survive and thrive in a social work
       program. Chicago, IL: Lyceum.
Strom-Gottfried, K. (1999). Professional boundaries: An analysis of violations by social workers.
       Families in Society, 80 (5), 439-449.
Thurston, L. P. (1996). Support systems for rural families: Rationale, strategies, and examples. Human
       Services in Rural Environments, 20 (1), 19-26.
                                 California State University, Chico
                                       School of Social Work
                                 Master of Social Work Program

                             SWRK 648-658 Advanced Field Practicum
                                (3.0 UNITS, Credit/No Credit))
                                     Fall 2011/Spring 2012

Section:      01
Instructor: Andrea Rioux, ASW
Time:         Thurs. 3pm-4:50pm FA; 3-4:50pm SP
Classroom: Butte 327FA; Butte 327 SP
Office Location: Butte 529
Office Telephone: 898-5875
Email: alrioux@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: TBA

Section:      02
Instructor: Lena Correa, LCSW
Time:         Thurs 3pm4:50pmFA; 3pm-4:50pm SP
Classroom: THA 308 FA; LANG 104 SP
Office Location: Butte 518
Office Telephone:
Email: lcorrea@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: TBA

Section:      03
Instructor: Kathy Wendt, LCSW
Time:         Thurs 3pm-4:50pm FA; 33pm-4:50pm SP
Classroom: Butte 7103 FA; OCNL 237 SP
Office Location: Butte 518
Office Telephone: 898-4774
Email: kiwendt@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: TBA


COURSE DESCRIPTION
Prerequisites: MSW Concentration Year standing, advancement to degree candidacy,
and concurrent enrollment in SWRK 641 or 642, 643, 653 and a thesis or elective
course in the fall semester and concurrent enrollment in SWRK 652, 681 or 656, 654 or
655 and a thesis or elective course for the spring semester. The field education
practicum provides 360 hours per semester of directed field learning for students in the
concentration year of the MSW program. The hours are to be completed over the
course of 15 weeks during each semester. If students are accumulating more than 24
hours per week arrangements should be made to flex their hours so that the practicum
is not completed prior to the end of each semester.
      I.      PURPOSE OF THE COURSE
      The Advanced Practicum provides the opportunity for students to apply and expand the knowledge, values
      and skills taught in the concentration year courses. In addition, students are expected to become skilled in
      critical self-reflection and the ability to constructively utilize consultation and supervision for understanding
      their limits, ethical scrutiny, professional growth and wellness.

      II. MAJOR COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
      Students will be placed in field practicum settings for 24 hours per week. In addition they will
      attend a biweekly field seminar.


IV.        MSW PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
           Refer to Page 9 of the MSW Student Handbook.

V.         COURSE OBJECTIVES
           Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate:

Course Objectives                                               Program                 Assignments
                                                                Objectives
1. knowledge of the laws and policies relevant to               9                       Weekly
social work practice in rural and urban settings                                        Journal

2. knowledge of various theoretical frameworks used 4                                   Weekly
in multi-level practice with families, children, youth                                  Journal
and older adults across the lifespan                                                    Case
                                                                                        Presentation

3. ability to assess, plan, and intervene while       2                                 Weekly
practicing with individuals, families and groups from                                   Journal
diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds in need

4. ability to use the diagnostic and statistical manual         6                       Weekly
of mental disorders and other approaches for                                            Journal Case
assessment                                                                              Presentation

5. ability to develop intervention plans based on the 7                                 Weekly
                                                                                        Journal
results of evaluation and/or research for evidence
                                                                                        Case
based practice;
                                                                                        Presentation
6. ability to take a leadership role in identifying             5                       Weekly
unresolved issues or needs in various practice                                          Journal
settings

7.ability to promote collaborative efforts to advocate          5                       Weekly
for and implement policy and/or procedural changes                                      Journal
to promote social and economic justice

8. ability to use instruction and supervision for               6                       Weekly
professional growth, self reflection and development                                    Journal
of professional boundaries                                                  Case
                                                                            Presentation
                                                                            Student Self
                                                                            Assessment
9. ability to practice ethically, based on the values of   1                Weekly
the social work profession, and to resolve ethical                          Journal
dilemmas appropriately


10. understanding of the need for lifelong professional 1                   Weekly
development through continuing education                                    Journal
                                                                            Student Self
                                                                            Assessment
11. ability to evaluate practice interventions at micro,   6                Weekly
mezzo, and macro levels                                                     Journal
                                                                            Case
                                                                            Presentation
12. knowledge of administrative functions in human         5                Weekly
service organizations                                                       Journal

13. ability to utilize results of evaluation and/or        7                Weekly
research to improve their practice effectiveness, and                       Journal
the overall effectiveness of the agency in achieving its
mission



VI.    INTEGRATION WITH OTHER COURSES
The advanced field education practicum provides student opportunities to apply and integrate
knowledge, skills and values gained during the foundation year to strengthen their ability to practice
autonomously as advanced generalist practitioners. The Advanced Practicum Seminar is used for
agency multi-level case analyses to assess the applicability and effectiveness of various theories and
approaches, analyze policies and promote those that have positive effects on service delivery, use
research finding in their social work practice with multiple systems, and evaluate their interventions.
Additionally, students apply supervisory and administrative skills and knowledge gained during the
concentration year to move from case advocacy to cause advocacy.

VII.      COURSE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
See 2011-12 MSW Student Handbook

A. Students with Disabilities or Physical Limitations
MSW Student Handbook, p. 37

B. Attendance
MSW Student Handbook, pp. 35 & 37-38

C. Academic Honor and Honesty
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38
D. Writing Standards
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

E. Evaluation
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

F. Incomplete Grades
MSW Student Handbook, pp. 26-27 & 39

G. Professional Behavior
MSW Student Handbook pp. 36 & 40-50

H. Confidentiality
MSW Student Handbook, p. 40

VIII. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS
   A.   Required Reading
        MSW Field Manual
   B.    Assigned Reading
        Individual course instructors may assign reading during the semester according to the topics
        and issues being discussed in individual seminars.


   C.       Assessment of Student Learning and Grades

        Superior work: A level of achievement so outstanding that it is normally attained by relatively
        few students
        Adequate work: A level of achievement indicating adequate competence in the subject
        matter/skill. This level will usually be met by a majority of students in the class.
        Minimally acceptable work: A level of achievement which meets the minimum requirements
        of the course
        Unacceptable work: A level of achievement, which fails to meet the minimum requirements of
        the course. Not passing. Because a C is the minimum acceptable grade for a 600-level course, a
        D grade is not allowed.


Grades
The following grading rubric will be used in determining credit for the field practicum course:

   Performance in field practicum site –                            50% of total grade
   Seminar Participation – (includes case presentation)             25 % of total grade
   Journals and self-assessment - (20 points each)                  25% of total grade

Students must complete all assignments and field hours in order to proceed in the MSW
program. Students must receive credit for all field education practicum courses in order to
proceed in the MSW program.
         A = 88 - 100     B+ = 74 –79              C+ = 54 - 59       F = ≤ 39
         A- = 80 - 87     B = 68 - 73              C = 48 –53
                          B- = 60 - 67             C- = 40- 47
C.      Course Assignments

Course Requirements
Each student is required to complete the following:
     1. Field Placement: The student will complete 720 hours in a field placement in a public or
        private human service organization per academic year. The student will complete a written
        learning contract in collaboration with the field instructor by the date specified in the field
        seminar syllabus.

     2. Field Seminar: Students are expected to attend all seminar meetings and assume an active role
        in class discussions. Students are expected to both physically and mentally be present
        during seminar. Specifically cell phones and lap top computers will be turned off and
        there will be no texting, or any other form of electronic communication occurring during
        seminar time. A pattern of lateness or absences in the field seminar will impact the student‟s
        grade for the field practicum negatively. More than two absences from field seminar may
        result in the student failing the course.


     3. Writing Assessment: Documentation is a very important skill in social work practice. Students
        are asked to complete various forms of agency documentation in their field placements. .
        Faculty field liaisons will be evaluating student writing in student journals, as well as inquiring
        about student writing skills in their agency placements and may make a recommendation for a
        student to enroll in the social work writing course when appropriate.


     4. Confidentiality: Information shared in class about human service organizations and
        clients/consumers is covered by the NASW Code of Ethics. Such information is considered
        shared in a classroom setting for supervisory purposes. Given the nature of the field seminar
        and the fact that it will focus on concerns and issues faced by students working with actual
        clients, it is critical that client confidentiality be maintained. Under no circumstances will a
        student reveal the name of a client or provide descriptive information that might identify the
        client, even when names are not mentioned. Discussions outside of class with members of the
        class or with individuals outside of the seminar regarding information shared in class about
        clients, field instructors, or agencies are considered a breach of confidentiality.



     5. Communication and conflict resolution: One of the most important aspects of becoming a
        professional is developing an understanding of the use of supervision. Effective use of
        supervision requires understanding the process for communicating concerns. Students are
        expected to use identified channels for resolving concerns within the field placement and the
        field seminar. These channels include going directly to their field instructor and/or their
        seminar instructor.
   6. Journals: Students are expected to complete ten journal entries during the course of the field
      placement. Faculty field liaisons will assign the dates that these journal entries will be turned
      in. The length of each entry is not as important as the quality of content. All Field Instructors
      have been informed about this assignment, and it is expected that the student will do journal
      writing during their field practicum time. Journal entries should track observations,
      emotions, skills used, challenges faced in field, ethical dilemmas experienced and self
      awareness/ exploration.


   7. Student Presentations: Over the course of the academic year each student will give an in-class
      case presentation. Students will sign up for a presentation date during the field seminar. The
      date may be in the fall or spring semester, as the presentations will start late in the fall semester
      and continue during the spring semester. . Individual seminar instructors will provide students
      with a format for the case presentation that incorporates concepts introduced in the advanced
      practice course. Students will explore theoretical models practiced in their field agencies
      and incorporate that model into their case presentation.


   8. Student Self Assessment: During the spring semester students will complete a narrative
      summarizing their practicum learning experiences and progress toward attaining their learning
      goals and objectives and continues professional development. The strength of the evaluation
      directly reflects the time and consideration the student contributes to this process. A format for
      this self assessment is provided in the Field Education Manual.


IX. Bibliography
Anderson, A.,G. (2000). Coping strategies and burnout among veteran child protection workers. Child
      Abuse and Neglect, 24 (6), 839-848.
Babcock, M.D., Burpee, J.M., & Stewart, R.G. (2002). Sources of stress and coping strategies of full
      time MSW students. Arete, 25(2), 87-95.
Bacallao, M. L., & Smokowski, P. R. (2007). The costs of getting ahead: Mexican family system
        changes after immigration. Family Relations, 56 (1), 52-66.
Behn, J.D., Dana, R.H., Gonwa, T. (1992). A checklist for the examination of cultural     competence
in social service agencies. Research on Social Work Practice, 2.
Berg-Weyer, M. & Birkenmeyer, J. (2004). The practicum companion for social work: Integrating
      class and field work. Boston, Allyn & Bacon.
Berlin E.A., Fowkes WC., (1983). Teaching framework for cross-cultural care:
        Application in family practice. West J Med, 139(6), 934-938.
Bradley, V. J. (2000). Changes in services and supports for people with developmental disabilities:
        New challenges to established practices. Health and Social Work, 25 (3), 191-200.
Burke, A. C., & Clapp, J. D. (1997). Ideology and social work practice in substance abuse settings.
        Social Work, 42 (6), 552-564.
Cearley, Sarah, (2004). The power of supervision in child welfare services. Child & Youth Care
        Forum, 33 (5), 313-327.
Clemans, S. (2004). Recognizing vicarious traumatization: A single session group model for trauma
      workers. Social Work with Groups, 27(2/3), 55-74.
Corey, M., & Corey, G., (1989). Becoming a helper. Pacific Grove, CA; Brooks/Cole Publishing Co.
Coyle, E., D., Hannigan, B., Fothergill, A. & Burnard, P. (2005) A systematic review of stress among
      mental health social workers. International Social work, 48(2), 201-211.
Cunningham,M.,(2004). Teaching social workers about trauma: Reducing the risks of
     vacarious traumatization in the classroom. Journal of Social Work Education, 40(2),
     305-317.
Cunningham, M. (1999). The impact of sexual abuse treatment on the social work clinician. Child and
        Adolescent Social Work Journal, 16 (4), 227-290.
Detlaff, A.J. (2005). The influence of personality type on the supervisory relationship in
        field education. Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work, 11 (1), 71-86.
DiGiulio, J.F. (2002). Back to basics: Confidentiality in the field practicum. Arete, 25 (2), 71-77.
Ganzer, C. & Ornstein, E., (2004). Regression, self-disclosure, and the teach or treat
        dilemma: Implications for a relational approach to social work supervision.
        Clinical Social Work Journal, 32 (4), 431-449.
Garcia, J. A., & Floyd, C. E. (1999). Using single-subject design for student self-assessment: A
        method for enhancing practice and integrating curriculum. Journal of Social Work Education,
        35 (3), 451-462.
Grobman, Linda (2005). Days in the lives of social workers: 54 professionals tell real life stories from
      social work practice. 3rd Ed. White Hat Communications.
Guttman, D., (2006). Ethics in social work: A context of caring. Haworth Press.
Herman, J., (1997). Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books.
Hodge, D. R. (2001). Spirtual genograms: A generational approach to assessing spirituality. Families
        in Society, 82 (1), 35-48.
Howard, J. (2002). Workplace violence in organizations: An explanatory study of organizational
prevention techniques. Employee Responsibilities and Rights          Journal, 13 (2), 57-75.
Kaye, L.W., (2005). Perspectives on productive aging: Social work and the new aged. Washington,
      DC. NASW Press.
Keogh, E. Bond, F.W., & Flaxman, R.E. (2006) Improving academic performance and mental health
      through a stress management intervetion: Outcomes and mediators of change. Behaviour
      Research and Therapy. 44(3), 339-357.
Knight, C. (2006). Groups for individual with traumatic histories: Practice considerations for social
        workers. Social Work, 51(1), 20-30.
Korinek, A. & Kimball, T., (2003). Managing and resolving conflict in the supervisory
        System. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal. 25 (3),
        295-310.
Kosberg, J. I. (1988). Preventing elder abuse: Identification of high risk factors prior to placement
        decisions. The Gerontologist, 28 (1), 43-50.
Labisi, O. (2006). Suicide risk assessment in the depressed elderly patient with cancer. Journal of
        Gerontological Social Work, 47 (½), 17-25.
Lam, C., Wong, H.& Leung, T. (2007). An unfinished reflexive journey: Social work student‟s
        reflection on their placement experiences. British Journal of Social Work Volume, 37 (1), 91-
        105.
Lowerey, C. T. (1998). American Indian perspectives in addiction and recovery. Health and Social
        Work, 23 (12), 127-135.
Lukas, Susan (1993). Where to start and what to ask. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
Mattison, M. (2000). Ethical decision-making: The person in the process. Social Work, 45 (3), 201-
        212.
McAlpine, C., Marshall, C. C., & Doran, N. H. (2001). Combining child welfare and substance
        abuse services: A blended model of intervention. Child Welfare, 90 (2), 129-150.
Miller, P. J. (1994). Dual relationships in rural practice: A dilemma of ethics and culture. Human
        Services in Rural Environments, 18 (2), 4-7.
Miller, P. J., & Hedlund, S. C. (2005). "We just happen to live here": Two social workers share their
        stories about Oregon's death with dignity law. Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life &
        Palliative Care, 1 (1), 71-86.
Newhill, C., (2003). Client violence in social work practice: Prevention, intervention and research.
        Guildford Press.
Otto, J. M. (2000). The role of adult protective services in addressing abuse. Generations, 24 (2), 33-
        38.
Palmer, S. E., Brown, R. A., Rae-Grant, N. I., & Loughlin, M. J. (2001). Survivors of childhood abuse:
        Their reported experiences with professional help. Social Work, 46 (2), 136-146.
Peterson, Marilyn. (1992). At personal risk: Boundary violations in professional client
      relationships. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
Raines, J.C. (2004). To tell or not to tell: Ethical issues regarding confidentiality. School Social Work,
      28(2), 61-78.
Reamer, F. (2005). Documentation in social work: Evolving ethical and risk management
      standards. Social Work, 50 (4), 325-334.
Reamer, F. G. Ethical standards in social work: The NASW code of ethics. In Encyclopedia of Social
        Work (19th ed., suppl. Pp. 113-131). New York: National Association of Social Workers.
Reamer, F. G. (2000). The social work ethics audit: A risk-management strategy. Social Work, 45 (5),
        355-366.
Regehr, C., & Antle, B. (1997). Coercive influences: Informed consent in court-mandated social work
        practice. Social Work, 42 (3), 300-306.
Ringstad, R., (2005). Conflict in the workplace: Social workers as victims and perpetrators. Social
      Work, 50 (4), 305-313.
Scalera, N.R. (1995). The critical need for specialized health and safety measures for child welfare
      workers. Child Welfare, 74(2), 337-350.
Smith, M., (2006). Too little fear can kill you: Staying alive as a social worker. Journal
        of Social Work Practice, 20 (1), 69-81.
Sowers, K., & Thyer, B. (2005). Getting your MSW: How to survive and thrive in a social work
        program. Chicago, IL: Lyceum.
Spencer, P., & Munch, S., (2003). Client violence toward social workers: The role of management in
        community mental health programs. Social Work, 48 (4), 532-544.
Strom-Gottfried, K. (1999). Professional boundaries: An analysis of violations by social workers.
        Families in Society, 80 (5), 439-449.
Strom-Gottfried, K., & Corcoran, K. (1998). Confronting ethical dilemmas in managed care:
        Guidelines for students and faculty. Journal of Social Work Education, 34 (1), 109-120.
Toscone, C. (1998). Countertransference and clinical social work supervision: Contributions and
        considerations. The Clinical Supervisor, 16 (2), 17-32.
Thurston, L. P. (1996). Support systems for rural families: Rationale, strategies, and examples. Human
        Services in Rural Environments, 20 (1), 19-26.
Weaver, D. (2001). Organizational technology as institutionalized ideology: Case management
      practices in welfare-to-work programs. Administration in Social Work, 24(1), 1-20.
Young, R. (2004). Cross cultural supervision. Clinical Social Work Journal, 32 (1),
        39-49.
                                 California State University, Chico
                                       School of Social Work
                                 Master of Social Work Program

                             SWRK 648-658 Advanced Field Practicum
                                (3.0 UNITS, Credit/No Credit))
                                     Fall 2011/Spring 2012
                                 THREE YEAR PROGRAM

Section:      80
Instructor: Rayna Bertolucci, LCSW
Time:         Fri. 7pm-9pm FA; 7pm-9pm SP
Classroom: 8104 FA; Spring ON LINE
Office Location: Shasta Center
Office Telephone:
Email: rbertolucci@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: By appointment

Section:      81
Instructor: Ken Crandall, LCSW
Time:         Fri. 7pm-9pmFA; 7pm-9pm SP
Classroom: 8109 FA; Spring ON LINE
Office Location: Shasta Center
Office Telephone:
Email: kcrandall@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: By appointment

Section:      82
Instructor: Natalia Salinas, LCSW
Time:         Fri. 7pm-9pm FA; 7pm-9pm SP
Classroom: 8111 FA; Spring ON LINE
Office Location: Shasta Center
Office Telephone:
Email: nsalinas2@csuchico.edu
Office Hours: By appointment

    III.    COURSE DESCRIPTION
Prerequisites: MSW Concentration Year standing, advancement to degree candidacy,
and concurrent enrollment in SWRK 641 or 642, 643, 653 and a thesis or elective
course in the fall semester and concurrent enrollment in SWRK 652, 681 or 656, 654 or
655 and a thesis or elective course for the spring semester. The field education
practicum provides 360 hours per semester of directed field learning for students in the
concentration year of the MSW program. The hours are to be completed over the
course of 15 weeks during each semester. If students are accumulating more than 24
hours per week arrangements should be made to flex their hours so that the practicum
is not completed prior to the end of each semester.
      IV.      PURPOSE OF THE COURSE
      The Advanced Practicum provides the opportunity for students to apply and expand the knowledge, values
      and skills taught in the concentration year courses. In addition, students are expected to become skilled in
      critical self-reflection and the ability to constructively utilize consultation and supervision for understanding
      their limits, ethical scrutiny, professional growth and wellness.

      V. MAJOR COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
      Students will be placed in field practicum settings for 24 hours per week. In addition they will
      attend a biweekly field seminar.


IV.         MSW PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
            Refer to Page 9 of the MSW Student Handbook.


V.          COURSE OBJECTIVES
            Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate:

Course Objectives                                               Program                 Assignments
                                                                Objectives
1. knowledge of the laws and policies relevant to               9                       Weekly
social work practice in rural and urban settings                                        Journal

2. knowledge of various theoretical frameworks used 4                                   Weekly
in multi-level practice with families, children, youth                                  Journal
and older adults across the lifespan                                                    Case
                                                                                        Presentation

3. ability to assess, plan, and intervene while       2                                 Weekly
practicing with individuals, families and groups from                                   Journal
diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds in need

4. ability to use the diagnostic and statistical manual         6                       Weekly
of mental disorders and other approaches for                                            Journal Case
assessment                                                                              Presentation

5. ability to develop intervention plans based on the 7                                 Weekly
                                                                                        Journal
results of evaluation and/or research for evidence
                                                                                        Case
based practice;
                                                                                        Presentation
6. ability to take a leadership role in identifying             5                       Weekly
unresolved issues or needs in various practice                                          Journal
settings

7.ability to promote collaborative efforts to advocate          5                       Weekly
for and implement policy and/or procedural changes                                      Journal
to promote social and economic justice

8. ability to use instruction and supervision for               6                       Weekly
professional growth, self reflection and development                        Journal
of professional boundaries                                                  Case
                                                                            Presentation
                                                                            Student Self
                                                                            Assessment
9. ability to practice ethically, based on the values of   1                Weekly
the social work profession, and to resolve ethical                          Journal
dilemmas appropriately


10. understanding of the need for lifelong professional 1                   Weekly
development through continuing education                                    Journal
                                                                            Student Self
                                                                            Assessment
11. ability to evaluate practice interventions at micro,   6                Weekly
mezzo, and macro levels                                                     Journal
                                                                            Case
                                                                            Presentation
12. knowledge of administrative functions in human         5                Weekly
service organizations                                                       Journal

13. ability to utilize results of evaluation and/or        7                Weekly
research to improve their practice effectiveness, and                       Journal
the overall effectiveness of the agency in achieving its
mission



VI.    INTEGRATION WITH OTHER COURSES
The advanced field education practicum provides student opportunities to apply and integrate
knowledge, skills and values gained during the foundation year to strengthen their ability to practice
autonomously as advanced generalist practitioners. The Advanced Practicum Seminar is used for
agency multi-level case analyses to assess the applicability and effectiveness of various theories and
approaches, analyze policies and promote those that have positive effects on service delivery, use
research finding in their social work practice with multiple systems, and evaluate their interventions.
Additionally, students apply supervisory and administrative skills and knowledge gained during the
concentration year to move from case advocacy to cause advocacy.


VII.      COURSE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
See 2011-12 MSW Student Handbook

A. Students with Disabilities or Physical Limitations
MSW Student Handbook, p. 37

B. Attendance
MSW Student Handbook, pp. 35 & 37-38

C. Academic Honor and Honesty
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

D. Writing Standards
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

E. Evaluation
MSW Student Handbook, p. 38

F. Incomplete Grades
MSW Student Handbook, pp. 26-27 & 39

G. Professional Behavior
MSW Student Handbook pp. 36 & 40-50

H. Confidentiality
MSW Student Handbook, p. 40


VIII. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS
   D.   Required Reading
        MSW Field Manual
   E.    Assigned Reading
        Individual course instructors may assign reading during the semester according to the topics
        and issues being discussed in individual seminars.
   F.    Assessment of Student Learning and Grades

       Superior work: A level of achievement so outstanding that it is normally attained by relatively
       few students
       Adequate work: A level of achievement indicating adequate competence in the subject
       matter/skill. This level will usually be met by a majority of students in the class.
       Minimally acceptable work: A level of achievement which meets the minimum requirements
       of the course
       Unacceptable work: A level of achievement, which fails to meet the minimum requirements of
       the course. Not passing. Because a C is the minimum acceptable grade for a 600-level course, a
       D grade is not allowed.


Grades
The following grading rubric will be used in determining credit for the field practicum course:

   Performance in field practicum site –                            50% of total grade
   Seminar Participation – (includes case presentation)             25 % of total grade
   Journals and self-assessment - (20 points each)                  25% of total grade

Students must complete all assignments and field hours in order to proceed in the MSW
program. Students must receive credit for all field education practicum courses in order to
proceed in the MSW program.
         A = 88 - 100     B+ = 74 –79              C+ = 54 - 59        F = ≤ 39
         A- = 80 - 87     B = 68 - 73              C = 48 –53
                          B- = 60 - 67             C- = 40- 47
C.      Course Assignments

Course Requirements
Each student is required to complete the following:
     9. Field Placement: The student will complete 720 hours in a field placement in a public or
        private human service organization per academic year. The student will complete a written
        learning contract in collaboration with the field instructor by the date specified in the field
        seminar syllabus.

     10. Field Seminar: Students are expected to attend all seminar meetings and assume an active role
         in class discussions. Students are expected to both physically and mentally be present
         during seminar. Specifically cell phones and lap top computers will be turned off and
         there will be no texting, or any other form of electronic communication occurring during
         seminar time. A pattern of lateness or absences in the field seminar will impact the student‟s
         grade for the field practicum negatively. More than two absences from field seminar may
         result in the student failing the course. The spring semester seminar meetings will be offered
         using an on line format. The fall seminar meetings will be: Aug. 26,. Sept. 9 & 23, Oct. 7 &
         21, Nov. 4 and Dec. 2 & 16. The spring seminar will have five on line modules and two
         meetings on Apr. 13 and 27, 2012.

     11. Writing Assessment: Documentation is a very important skill in social work practice. Students
         are asked to complete various forms of agency documentation in their field placements. .
         Faculty field liaisons will be evaluating student writing in student journals, as well as inquiring
         about student writing skills in their agency placements and may make a recommendation for a
         student to enroll in the social work writing course when appropriate.
     12. Confidentiality: Information shared in class about human service organizations and
         clients/consumers is covered by the NASW Code of Ethics. Such information is considered
         shared in a classroom setting for supervisory purposes. Given the nature of the field seminar
         and the fact that it will focus on concerns and issues faced by students working with actual
         clients, it is critical that client confidentiality be maintained. Under no circumstances will a
         student reveal the name of a client or provide descriptive information that might identify the
         client, even when names are not mentioned. Discussions outside of class with members of the
         class or with individuals outside of the seminar regarding information shared in class about
         clients, field instructors, or agencies are considered a breach of confidentiality.

     13. Communication and conflict resolution: One of the most important aspects of becoming a
         professional is developing an understanding of the use of supervision. Effective use of
         supervision requires understanding the process for communicating concerns. Students are
         expected to use identified channels for resolving concerns within the field placement and the
         field seminar. These channels include going directly to their field instructor and/or their
         seminar instructor.

     14. Journals: Students are expected to complete ten journal entries during the course of the field
         placement. Faculty field liaisons will assign the dates that these journal entries will be turned
       in. The length of each entry is not as important as the quality of content. All Field Instructors
       have been informed about this assignment, and it is expected that the student will do journal
       writing during their field practicum time. Journal entries should track observations,
       emotions, skills used, challenges faced in field, ethical dilemmas experienced and self
       awareness/ exploration.

   15. Student Presentations: Over the course of the academic year each student will give an in-class
       case presentation. Students will sign up for a presentation date during the field seminar. The
       date may be in the fall or spring semester, as the presentations will start late in the fall semester
       and continue during the spring semester. . Individual seminar instructors will provide students
       with a format for the case presentation that incorporates concepts introduced in the advanced
       practice course. Students will explore theoretical models practiced in their field agencies
       and incorporate that model into their case presentation.
   16. Student Self Assessment: During the spring semester students will complete a narrative
       summarizing their practicum learning experiences and progress toward attaining their learning
       goals and objectives and continues professional development. The strength of the evaluation
       directly reflects the time and consideration the student contributes to this process. A format for
       this self assessment is provided in the Field Education Manual.

IX. Bibliography
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                                 Field Journal Assignment

Students will complete ten journal entries during the course of the field placement. The length of each
entry is not as important as the quality of content. All Field Instructors have been informed that
students are to complete journal entries for each week and that they may be completed during field
practicum hours. Be aware of confidentiality issues – do not write a client‟s real name or any details
that would reveal his or her identity. Focus more on your experience with the client/client system.

The format for the journal should begin with a description of an interaction with a client, client system
or another professional. After describing the interaction identify the social work skills that were used
in the interaction, including skills that might have been helpful, and social work knowledge and values
that guided your interaction. Below is a list of essential social work knowledge, values and skills that
students are working on developing during their social work education. Use it as a reference for what
areas you might address in your journal. A critical component of social work education is developing
a professional use of self. The journal entry is designed to help students identify the professional
social work skills, knowledge and values that guide their practice.

Social Work Knowledge                                    Social Work Values
Diversity                                                Service
Populations at Risk & Social/Economic Justice            Social Justice
Human Behavior & the Social Environment                  Dignity & Worth of the Person
Social Welfare and Policy Services                       Importance of Human Relationships
Social Work Practice & Interventions                     Integrity
Research                                                 Competence

Social Work Skills
Attending Skills                                         Focusing
Minimal Encouragers                                      Verbal Following
Building Rapport                                         Empathic Communication
Clarifying                                               Confrontation
Paraphrasing                                             Establishing Goals
Reflecting Feelings                                      Identifying Tasks
Summarizing                                              Contracting
Starting Where the Client Is                             Educating
Probing                                                  Reframing
Partializing                                             Reviewing & Evaluating
Seeking Concreteness                                     Terminating Skills

Students should be mindful of how curriculum introduced in the classroom setting is applicable to
situations they are encountering in the field practicum setting and integrate this information as well. A
sense of self-awareness should also be reflected in journal entries, exploring both their strengths and
vulnerabilities with clients and co-workers.
                Formal Agreements and Selection of Practicum Sites
Terms

Field Instructor:       Agency Field Instructor (AFI) is the social worker in the Agency who provides learning
                        experiences and weekly supervision for students, as well as facilitating and writing
                        formal evaluation of the student‟s performance.

Task Supervisor:        In agencies where the MSW Field Instructor is located off site, students will be
                        assigned a Task Supervisor. Task Supervisors are members of the agency service
                        delivery team. The Task Supervisor is provided with information about the curriculum
                        objectives for students, the specific learning objectives that he/she will be providing to
                        the student, and a clear understanding of their participation in the evaluation process.
                        The Task Supervisor will be responsible for assigning day-to-day tasks which students
                        will be involved in to meet specific learning objectives. The designated off-site MSW
                        Field Instructor maintains overall responsibility for the student‟s placement experience
                        and is accountable for the required evaluations, meetings with the liaisons, etc.

Liaison:                Field Liaison is the faculty member who works with the agency Field Instructor in
                        providing a professional learning experience for students. The Field Liaison provides
                        agencies with consultation and linkage between the MSW Program and the agency.

Director:               Director of Field Education is responsible for the planning, coordination and
                        implementation of the Field Education program, which includes placing students in
                        agencies for their MSW practicum.

School:                 School of Social Work

Agency:                 Agency where students are placed for their learning experience

Student:                MSW student placed in an agency

Formal Agreements
We consider agencies as our partners in educating students. This partnership exists both on paper and in practice
(See “Forms”). To become a practicum placement site, the University requires a contractual relationship with
an agency. The University‟s Contracting Services Division provides a “Service Learning Agreement” that spells
out the conditions of practicum placements. This is a five-year contract between the director of the agency and
CSU, Chico, signed by the Director of the School of Social Work, the Dean of the College of Behavioral and
Social Sciences, and the Provost. The second formal agreement is the “Learning Contract” that describes the
student‟s objectives and learning activities for the practicum, which is developed and signed by the student, AFI,
and Liaison. A third formal agreement is the Employment-Based Internship Proposal which is signed by the
director, the Director of Field Education, agency director, AFI, Liaison and the student. This agreement is
required when students apply to use their employment as a practicum site.

The field education program requires that agencies be able to provide certain learning assignments in order for
students to meet educational goals and objectives. Because the program is designed to prepare students for
advanced generalist practice, an agency must offer learning assignments that include opportunities for students
to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities (e.g., collaboratives, systems of
care). To support the student, the agency, and the AFI, a faculty member (Liaison) is assigned to every student
in placement.
Selection of Agency
The field education program places students in a variety of social service agencies located in the University‟s
twelve-county service region. Priority is given to student placements with public and non-profit agencies
providing services to children, youth and families, and in the field of mental health services. Several placements
are in community behavioral health settings, public child welfare, health related services, residential care and
shelters, and school social work.

Agencies are selected for their ability to provide quality instruction, commitment to collaborative participation
in professional education, and commitment to client and community service. Priority is given to agencies
involved in formal collaborative relationships with other human service systems and agencies providing
integrated services to diverse populations.

Agency administrative support is a valued and necessary component of the practicum. Agency administrators
demonstrate their commitment to professional education by signing the Service Learning Agreement and
ensuring that the placement meets MSW program standards. The AFI‟s job responsibilities are adjusted to make
time available for student instruction and supervision. Necessary resources, such as space, clerical support and
field transportation, are also provided.

In determining the suitability of an agency for field placement, the Director of Field Education assesses an
agency‟s interest and long-term commitment to the field education program. During preliminary discussions
with the agency, the following areas are considered: auspices, target population served, nature and scope of
services provided, size of social work staff, extent of community involvement, linkages with other agencies,
standards of practice, availability of qualified staff for field instruction, facilities for students (e.g. space,
telephone, etc.), and the willingness of the agency‟s administration to support the field education program so
that practicum meets the purpose and course objectives for all practicum courses.

The Director visits a potential agency and meets with the agency contact person and potential agency field
instructors. The purpose of the agency visit is to determine whether the agency meets the criteria (see below).
The agency contact person is asked to complete a placement site information form and forward it to the School
of Social Work. This form is used to determine agency compliance with standards. Once it is determined that
an agency is satisfactory, the University sends a Service Learning Agreement for signature. The agreement is
valid for five years, and must be reviewed and renewed at its expiration.

Criteria used in evaluating an agency‟s suitability for use as field education settings are as follows. The agency:
   is able to provide a comprehensive range of learning experiences involving all size systems of intervention,
    particularly collaborative multi-agency systems of care;
   has a philosophy of service and practice compatible with the educational objectives of social work;
   practices are consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics;
   is able to provide students exposure to diverse client populations with particular emphasis on cultural and
    ethnic diversity and under-served oppressed groups;
   is in compliance with Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; and in the delivery of services, no person
    shall be excluded from participation or denied benefits, or is otherwise subjected to discrimination under
    any program or activity of that agency or center on the basis of race, color, or national origin;
   maintains a working and learning environment free from discrimination and harassment of students and
    employees (see “University Policies” in Appendix);
   has a respected standing by the professional community;
   is committed to the philosophy and mission of the School of Social Work and the MSW program, including
    the purpose and objectives of SWRK 648 and 658;
   maintains sufficient staff to support the service mission of the agency without reliance on students;
   has sufficient staffing resources to provide a qualified field instructor or agrees to other supervision
    arrangements as required;
   agrees to sign a Service Learning Agreement with the University.

Agencies may require students to maintain malpractice insurance during their practicum. To ensure proper risk
management protocol, the School of Social Work suggests all agencies consider (if such a procedure is not all
ready in place) requiring a criminal background check of students. As an educational institution, we are unable
to initiate criminal background checks; students enrolled in the Title IV-E Child Welfare Stipend Project are an
exception.

Selection of Field Instructor
As the student‟s teacher and supervisor in the placement site, the AFI instructs, supervises, provides ongoing
feedback, and assesses student acquisition of knowledge, skills, and values. Field instructors are selected for the
quality of their field instruction and commitment to educational standards of the MSW program. The MSW
program looks for the following qualifications when selecting a field instructor:
     MSW from an accredited program;
     two years post-MSW experience in social services;
     commitment to be available for the full term of the practicum;
     knowledge and practice competence related to integrative practice and the student‟s concentration.

All potential field instructors complete a vitae form, which provides information on the person‟s academic
background and work experience. The Director reviews this information to ensure that all field instructors meet
the requirements listed above. Field instructors should complete the three-hour Field Instruction
Orientation before supervising a student. Eight hours of field instruction training should be completed every
two years.

The Director provides orientation for new field instructors prior to placing students in agencies. The orientation
introduces the field instructor to the MSW curriculum and the University‟s academic policies. It also prepares
them to carry out educational assessments, determine student‟s learning styles, prepare educational contracts,
supervise students, use classroom assessment techniques, evaluate the progress of learning, and write student
evaluations.

Policy on Off-Site Field Instructors
Under certain circumstances the field education program may permit the use of a faculty member or other off-
site MSW to provide field instruction for a student placed in an agency with no MSW on staff. In addition to
meeting the requirements for being an AFI, off-site field instructors must have:
      one year of work experience in an agency or service setting similar to the placement site;
      completed a field instructor orientation offered by the MSW program prior to assuming off-site
       supervision;
      field instruction responsibilities.

Off-Site Field Instructors will be expected to carry out the following responsibilities:
     availability to meet with the student at the placement site a minimum of every other week;
     availability to meet with the student every week for a minimum of one hour of supervision;
     availability to meet with the student and the on-site task supervisor at least once a month;
     take primary responsibility for ensuring the learning plan and required evaluations are completed.

Policy on Paid Field Placements
Paid field placements are appreciated by the Social Work department and the students. A paid placement may
be offered to a student in an agency where the student is not already an employee. The student‟s assignments
and supervision must be educationally focused, rather than centered on agency services.
Policy on Employment-Based Placements
School of Social Work policy requires that all practicum placements maintain a primary focus on the education
and development of the student as a social worker. To ensure this, students should experience and be exposed to
a broad variety of social work practice experiences in the MSW program. Therefore, using a student‟s place of
employment as a practicum site is not encouraged. Students may, however, use their place of employment as a
practicum site under certain circumstances which may include, but are not limited to:
    1. economic hardship for the student;
    2. lack of other available placements in the area where the student resides;
    3. agency hardship;
    4. loss of a social work position in a rural community should the student relinquish their employment.
The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) standards requires that we maintain the educational focus of
the field experience and differentiate between job and practicum activities. The option of using the student‟s
place of employment as the practicum site is considered on an individual basis by the Director to insure that
students receive a variety of field experiences and supervision during their practicum.

General Guidelines for Student Placement in Employing Agency
    The student‟s AFI would not be the administrative supervisor for the student in their job.
    Learning experiences for the student would be available in a unit of the agency which is different from
       the area where the student functions as an employee. Fieldwork assignments must be clearly delineated
       and separate from employment responsibilities so that they consist of different tasks and are located in a
       different program or division. It is also recommended that the clients served are different than those
       served in the student‟s job assignments.
    The agency must be an approved Field Instruction site (see “Selection of Agency”).
    The proposed AFI must meet the criteria established for all other field instructors (see “Selection of
       Agency Field Instructors”).
    The fieldwork assignments must be specifically related to the field instruction course objectives.
    Field instruction assignments and supervision must be educationally focused rather than centered on
       agency services. The Learning Contract must have substance that reflects learning opportunities that go
       beyond the student‟s present work scope.
    The student must have release time for field supervision.
    In such a placement setting, the agency and the student must complete a “Proposal for Agency as
       Employment as Field Practice Site” and the student must sign an Employment Waiver indicating the
       student grants permission to the placement agency to notify CSU, Chico School of Social Work when
       she/he has been terminated from their employment and field placement and the reasons for that
       termination. The agency must agree that on the days of practicum, the expectations for the student will
       be guided by the Field Education Handbook, not routing agency standards.

Any plan for such a placement is implemented well in advance. It is necessary that such placement requests
be discussed with the Director of Field Education before the student applies for a placement site.

To request such a placement, the student first completes an application for a placement and discusses the
appropriateness of the placement with the Director. If the preliminary discussion suggests that a placement at
the student‟s place of employment may be appropriate and feasible, the student then provides the Director with:
     A proposal for employment-based placement, describing how the practicum assignments will be
        separate and distinct from work assignments, including the identification of the days and hours of the
        practicum. These hours must be scheduled at a minimum of 4 hours at a time, although 8-hour blocks
        are preferred, to provide the best educational experience. This plan will be included later in the
        Learning Contract between the student and the agency field instructor.
     Students will also be required to sign an employee waiver indicating that if the student is terminated
        from their employment and subsequently their field placement, the agency will notify the School of
       Social Work of the termination and provide the circumstances for which the employee/student was
       terminated.

If the proposal is approved by the Director, she will discuss the proposal with the AFI to assure there is
agreement on the conditions of the paid practicum. If the proposal is not approved, the Director of Field
Education will work with the student to find another placement.
                                    ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Director of Field Education
The Director is a full-time faculty member who is responsible for the following activities:
       1. Overall orientation, coordination and integration of the field education program.
       2. Develop, participate in, and implement a continuous comprehensive field education program
           evaluation.
       3. Recruit qualified placement agencies for student practicum.
       4. Maintain files on field education internship agreements and letters of understanding.
       5. Participate, when necessary, in the resolution of problems occurring in the placement.
       6. Prepare and maintain the practicum directory and field database containing current agency
           information.
       7. Plan and implement training seminars for agency field instructors.
       8. Plan and facilitate the meetings with Field Liaisons.
       9. Facilitate the Field Education Advisory Committee meetings each semester.
       10. Attend Social Work Advisory Board meetings.

Field Liaison
The Field Liaison (Liaison) is a member of the social work faculty who schedules ongoing contacts with
students and AFIs for assessment of practicum performance and provision of supportive services and resources.
These contacts will include at least one visit to the agency per semester (more if needed) and regular phone
contact. The Liaison will serve as a link to the AFI and student in terms of regular contacts and as a first-line of
contact if problems arise. The Liaison also works with the student and AFI in facilitating the Learning Contract
and evaluating the student. The Liaison will also participate in program development and evaluation, including
regular meetings with the Director of Field Education. The following are the overall responsibilities of the field
liaison:
     1. Serve as a major link among the agency, the AFI, the student, and the Social Work program.
     2. Provide ongoing consultation and support for the AFI in order to enhance the practicum experience and
         integration of classroom learning with practicum experiences.
     3. Participate in the development of and regularly review the Learning Contract.
     4. Meet with the AFI and the student in the agency at least once per semester in order to review the
         Learning Contract, explore learning opportunities and assess the student‟s performance.
     5. Make regular telephone contact to effectively monitor the placement and provide support to the AFI.
     6. Keep regular office hours.
     7. Submit the grade for the practicum, based on the AFI‟s evaluations and participation in the Field
         Seminar.
     8. Keep appropriate professional boundaries.
     9. Promote and maintain respectful, professional and culturally sensitive relationships with the students.
     10. Collaborate with the Director in overall evaluation of the field education program, including planning
         field education training seminars for AFIs.
     11. Participate in the meetings and training sessions scheduled by the Director of Field Education.

Agency
The placement agency shall:
   1. Maintain agency facilities used for field placements in such a manner that they shall be available to the
        student and AFI when needed.
   2. Assure that staff is adequate in number and quality to provide field instruction and to ensure continuous
        management of the student program in cooperation with the Director.
    3. Provide the resources necessary for an educationally-focused field practicum in accordance with
        policies and procedures of the School of Social Work.
    4. Provide office space, telephone access, supplies, and other materials to enable a student to function
        effectively in their placement.
    5. Designate qualified AFIs.
    6. Modify the schedule of the designated AFIs to allow adequate time for student supervision, field
        instructor meetings, training and orientation.
    7. Adhere to policies and practices reflecting nondiscrimination applied to clients, staff, and students.
    8. Orient and introduce agency staff to MSW students, and to the role of the student in the agency.
    9. Notify the Director and the AFI in advance of any change in the agency‟s personnel appointments,
        which may affect the student field education program.
    10. The agency agrees to provide the student with safety training to insure the student is well informed of all
        safety issues & agency procedures.

Agency Field Instructor
Agency Field Instructors shall:
   1. Provide an educationally-focused field work experience in accordance with policies and procedures of
       the School of Social Work, including the use of the learning contracts, educationally-based recordings,
       appropriate supervision, and assignment of appropriate learning experiences.
   2. Provide an agency orientation to the student at the beginning of the placement period.
   3. Develop and assist the student in preparing a Learning Contract during the first four weeks of
       placement.
   4. Provide educationally-focused experiences and opportunities for student learning, based on the learning
       agreement objectives and action plans.
   5. Complete and submit a written evaluation at the middle and end of each semester outlining the student‟s
       progress and further learning goals and needs.
   6. Meet with Liaison during the placement period to assess student progress and coordinate learning
       experiences.
   7. Provide regular supervision for the student and be available for spontaneous consultation and/or
       supervision as needed.
   8. Be available in the agency during the field work hours when the student is present and arrange for back-
       up supervision when necessary.
   9. Maintain communication with the assigned Liaison or coordinator regarding student performance,
       potential difficulties or areas of concern, or changes in the agency which impact field work or the
       student.
   10. Participate in agency field instructor orientation and training seminars, and other field-related activities.
   11. Provide feedback about the field education program by completing the Evaluation of Field Education
       Program at the end of each academic year.

Agency Task Supervisor
Task Supervisor shall:
   1. Provide an educationally-focused field work experience in accordance with policies and procedures of
       the School of Social Work, including the use of the learning contract and assignment of appropriate
       learning experiences.
   2. Meet with the off-site MSW Field Instructor during the placement period to assess student progress and
       coordinate learning experiences.
   3. Be available for spontaneous consultation and/or supervision as needed.
   4. Be available in the agency during the field work hours when the student is present and provide back up
       supervision when necessary.
    5. Maintain communication with the off site MSW Field Instructor regarding student performance,
       potential difficulties or areas of concern, or changes in the agency which impact field work or the
       student.

School of Social Work
The School of Social work shall:
   1. Conduct a field education program in the field of social work in conformity with all applicable statutes
       and regulations of the State of California and the United States, and in keeping with the NASW Code of
       Ethics for the social work profession.
   2. Establish practicum placement sites and coordinate the process of placing students accepted into field
       education courses.
   3. Insure that the agency is provided adequate opportunity to interview and determine the appropriateness
       of interested students before any student is assigned to the agency.
   4. Orient practicum students, personnel who serve in the capacity of agency field instructors, and agency
       representatives to field education requirements, policies and procedures.
   5. Expect social work students and agency field instructors to abide by the NASW Code of Ethics.
   6. Designate a member of the School of Social Work to serve as a Liaison between the University and
       agency.
   7. Monitor and facilitate the student‟s learning in the practicum by the use of a learning contract; by
       providing a regularly scheduled process, such as a seminar, to promote integration of academic learning
       and agency-based practice experience by the student; and by offering technical assistance and problem
       solving as needed or at the request of the student or agency.

Student
The primary responsibility is to the student‟s own learning and professional development through the learning
opportunities provided in the field setting and in accordance with the Code of Ethics. The field practicum
experience comprises the learning activities agreed to by the AFI and student and documented in the Learning
Contract. The following are also responsibilities of the student:
   1. Adhere to assigned agency‟s personnel practices, policies, and procedures, which includes adhering to
        the agency‟s workday hours and dress code.
   2. Absences from regularly scheduled field work days must be approved by the student‟s AFI. If a student
        is absent for any reason, including sickness or time off for a religious observance or professional
        conference, arrangements must be made to make up those hours. If an agency has approved a
        professional training and requests the student to attend, those hours may count towards the practicum
        requirement.
   3. Develop a schedule which requires them to be at the placement agency 16 hours per week (Foundation
        Year) and 24 hours per week (Concentration Year) for the entire 30 weeks, covering two semesters. Any
        deviation from this should be discussed with the Liaison.
   4. Identify themselves as student trainees to clients/consumers either verbally or through the use of name
        tags, except in emergency situations where it is clinically contraindicated as determined by student and
        AFI.
   5. Student placement and performance in an agency is neither private nor confidential, even if the student
        is in an employment-based practicum setting. AFIs are considered adjunct faculty and thereby entitled
        to receive and share with the social work faculty information pertinent to the student‟s educational
        experience.
   6. Work collaboratively with AFI to develop the learning contract and submit it to their Liaison by week
        three of the practicum.
   7. Complete the Student Self Assessment of Performance prior to their Liaison‟s last visit to the
        placement.
   8. Complete the Student Evaluation of the Practicum Experience prior to the end of the placement.
    9. Abide by the NASW Code of Ethics and CSU Student Code of Conduct.

Student Placement Process
Placements are made by the Director after considering student preferences, educational needs, and agency capacity.
Placements begin in the fall semester and continue through the spring semester. The student remains at the same agency
for both semesters. The procedure for securing a field practicum is as follows:
     1. The student fills out a Field Practicum Application.
     2. The Director assists the student in identifying relevant agencies for potential interviews, based on student
         preferences and educational needs. The Director contacts the identified agencies and confirms that they will be
         accepting students for the following academic year.
     3. The student contacts the agency to set up an interview and prepares a 1-page resume to present at interview.
     4. The agency reports back to the Director as to whether or not a student will be accepted at a particular agency for
         placement. The student also reports back to the Director and indicates what agency they would like to be placed
         with for the practicum. When there is an agreement between all three parties the student and the agency will
         receive a letter confirming the placement for the following academic year.

The following placement policies pertain to all social work students:
   1. Unsuccessful Placement Interview(s): The School of Social Work attempts to place all students in accordance
         with its placement procedures; it does not guarantee that all students will be successful in the placement interview.
         Students who are denied a placement by three different agencies, or who refuse to accept three different agencies,
         or a combination thereof, will meet with the Director and the MSW Program Director. The possible outcomes of
         such a meeting are as follows:
              a. Student will be advised to sit out the year due to personal life complications that seemingly interfere with
                   the student‟s ability to present well in interviews or perform the work of a social worker, and referred to
                   appropriate community resources.
              b. Student will be advised that social work is not an appropriate profession for him/her and will be afforded
                   career counseling through the University Career Center, and/or referred to Student Psychological
                   Services for personal counseling.
              c. Student will be advised to extend her/his academic program another full year and pursue a placement the
                   following academic year. In the interim a student may be advised to volunteer at a human service agency
                   to gain more experience and understanding of the social work profession.
   2. Students must successfully complete foundation year practicum prior to interviewing for the concentration year
         placement.
    3. If a student repeats a field practicum course and is unsuccessful in the second attempt to complete the placement
       no further action will be taken to place this student. The Director will refer this student to the Student Affairs
       Committee and recommend immediate dismissal from the social work program.

    4. Educational Leaves: The field status of students who have requested an educational leave will be
       assessed on an individual basis. Students need to be aware the field education program may not be able
       to accommodate one semester field placements and consequently students may be required to complete
       a year long field placement even when their leave may only have been for one semester.

    5. Conflict of Interest: No student may be placed in an agency wherein she/he or an immediate family
       member was, or is, a client or AFI. The School of Social Work does not ascertain client information
       from agencies or students, thus it is the responsibility of the student to decline (or not select) a
       placement based on conflict of interest. Students who are found attempting to secure or who secure a
       placement in an agency where they or a member of their family, are or were a client of an AFI will be
       administratively dropped from the social work program.

    6. Felony Convictions: The School of Social Work expects students with prior felony convictions to inform the
       BSW Program and Field Education director of such convictions prior to placement. A question regarding all
    felony and misdemeanor convictions is on the Professional Sequence Questionnaire, and the student must provide
    complete answers. Given the laws governing work with children and other issues of moral turpitude, persons with
    felony convictions are prohibited from certain agencies or situations. Thus, if a student fails to inform program
    directors of a felony conviction(s) and it becomes known to the department and/or agency, the student in question
    will be administratively dropped from the social work program. Students interested in having their criminal
    records expunged should contact Starting over Strong, an Associated Students organization dedicated to helping
    students alleviate barriers to their professional development - www.startingoverstrong.com.

7. Background Checks: Background checks are required by some agencies before a student is accepted
   for, and/or allowed to begin an internship. If an agency requires any type of background check and/or
   medical testing, the agency should notify the intern of these requirements during the placement
   interview process. Conducting background checks is the responsibility of the agency. If an agency is
   not able to pay for these additional requirements, payment is the responsibility of the student.

8. Driving Clients in Personal Vehicles: Due to general concerns related to financial, emotional,
   institutional, and legal liability, transporting clients in student private/personal vehicles is strongly
   discouraged. There may be situations where all workers in the agency are expected to transport clients
   on rare occasions and, as a regular participant in the agency/program a student might be put in a position
   where it would seem to be necessary. If that is the case the student should provide the agency with a
   copy of his/her personal auto insurance policy and DMV driving record. The university does not cover
   the cost of automobile insurance for students. Any accidents involving a student who is driving during
   the course of an internship must be reported to local law enforcement when appropriate, the agency field
   instructor, faculty field liaison and the Director of Field Education. If a student incurs a non emergency
   injury during an accident that occurs during their internship they should immediately be evaluated at the
   CSUC Student Health Center, where a determination for further treatment can be made.
                                       Writing the Learning Contract

Purpose
The Learning Contract is intended to create an educationally focused practicum. The learning contract is an
agreement between AFI, the agency, the student, and the School of Social Work. Adult education theory
emphasizes the importance of the teacher and student sharing responsibility for quality and content of the
learning experience. It is, therefore, recommended the Learning Contract be developed collaboratively by the
student, AFI, and Liaison, as it defines the work they will be doing together over the course of the semester.
The contract is to be completed within the first two weeks of the semester, and it should be based on learning
objectives of the course (i.e. SWRK 631/632 and 648/658). The contract must include what experiences and
responsibilities the student will have related to social work with individuals, families, groups, organizations and
communities.

We recognize that agencies and programs may not be able to accommodate practice opportunities in all areas of
advanced generalist social work. For example, some students will have an abundance of opportunities to
facilitate groups, develop an agency newsletter, attend regular staff meetings, conduct home visits, lobby for a
proposed bill, and so on. Other agencies may not be able to offer these experiences but are rich in opportunities
to perform crisis work, outreach, residential or milieu therapy. Therefore, the agency setting and mission will
influence each student‟s learning contract. If it is not possible to provide a complete generalist social work
practice experience through placement in one agency, the AFI should arrange for the student to spend some
hours in a second program or agency to obtain the appropriate learning experiences. It is essential the student
have a combined advanced direct and indirect social work experience. The Liaison can offer resources to help
fulfill this requirement.

The learning contract is to be used as a guide, including timelines for initiating and exposing the student to
specific learning experiences. It may need to be modified as the placement progresses and the student‟s needs
or agency‟s opportunities change. Any changes to the learning contract should be noted in writing on the
evaluations (mid-term and final).

Learning Activities are specific activities which help the student achieve the program objective. Frequently
these activities identify readings, observations, practice situations or consultations the student should seek out in
order to accomplish their objective. It is important be mindful of the student‟s learning style and choose
activities which utilize their strengths as well as challenge them. Again, using the above example, learning
activities might include reading a specific article on theories of addiction pertaining to women, attending a
training on substance abuse treatment for women, planning and facilitating a recovery treatment group for
women, carrying three individual cases of women with substance abuse issues, providing case management
services for two women with substance abuse issues and their families, etc. All of these activities should have
timelines defining when the activity would occur.

The following areas should be considered when identifying learning activities for the learning contract:

       Agency Orientation                              Social Work Practice Skills
       Social Work Values & Ethics                     Professional Use of Self
       Professional Work Ethics                        Generalist Practice - Micro, Mezzo, Macro Opportunities
       Social Work Knowledge

Questions and Considerations when Beginning to Write the Learning Contract
Development of a Learning Contract involves comparing learning needs, goals, and interests with educational
opportunities available in the practicum placement. The contract itself is focused on outcomes (including core
competencies) the student is striving to achieve during their practicum. Before beginning to write, it is essential
that students are familiar with practicum requirements and the agency‟s expectations. The student will want to
carefully review the practicum syllabus and performance standards for SWRK 631/632 or for SWRK 648/658.
As a starting point, begin by forming a list of essential “building blocks” to provide structure for learning
contract goals, objectives and outcomes. The following questions and considerations will facilitate this process:
   What SKILLS will I need to build on? Identify 5 - 10 social work skills, choosing 3 - 5 to build into the objectives.
   Is there a THEORY central to the practicum work that I need to learn? Discuss theories and methodologies
    applied in the agency with the AFI.
   What SERVICES will be offered to individual clients? families? the community? (assessments, social
    summaries, group work, family therapy, home visits, advocacy, writing a policy manual, convening an advisory
    board, facilitating a focus group, etc…)
   What Social Worker ROLES will this setting engage in? What will I learn? (Refer to field evaluation tools for
    ideas of social worker practice roles.)
   How can my SUPERVISION time best be used? What areas can be built on? What structure or tools will
    facilitate this: agenda? progress recording? studio taping? What has the AFI suggested?
   How will CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION be addressed in this setting? What will I learn or be
    reflecting on during the practicum experience? What areas do I need to develop as a knowledge base in order to
    work effectively with this population?
   What ETHICAL and POLICY issues may arise in this field placement? What ethical issues emerge for social
    workers practicing in this agency? Are there policy considerations or constraints the agency faces? How will the
    next legislative session impact the agency? clients? community? What opportunities exist for systems change?
    advocacy?
   What TOOLS are available to maximize my learning experience? Many learning tools and resources are
    available, such as process recording, case studies, literature reviews, audio/video taping, clinical assessment tools
    and measures. You may even want to design your own clinical or outcome measure to evaluate progress and
    learning during the placement. An example of a journal writing format and process recording are included in the
    appendix.
                                       TEMPLATE
                                 MSW LEARNING CONTRACT


  Student Name:                                                       Academic Year:


  Foundation Year Practicum                       Concentration Year Practicum


  Placement Agency Name:


  Agency Field Instructor:                                            Phone:


  Field Liaison:                                                      Phone:

  Weekly Schedule for Practicum Hours:


Total Hours: This practicum involves a total of __________ hours to be completed between
_______________ and _______________ (specify dates). Practicum hours must be scheduled
relatively evenly each week throughout the academic term. No time should be scheduled during
university holidays or semester breaks unless approved in advance by the Field Liaison and/or Director
of Field Education.

Supervisory Meetings: A weekly supervisory meeting between the student and the agency field
instructor will be scheduled on _______________ (day) at __________ (specify time).

Terms and Conditions:
   1. The Learning Contract must be completed by the assigned due date in the course syllabus- no
      exceptions.
   2. This Learning Contract may be revised with the consent of all parties. Revisions must be in
      writing and signed by the Agency Field Instructor, Field Liaison, and student. The Learning
      Contract should be periodically reviewed during the practicum to determine whether revisions
      are necessary. Copies of the contract are to be distributed as specified below.
   3. The parties agree to adhere to the established policies and procedures of the MSW Field
      Education Program. These are described in the MSW Field Education Handbook. The
      Director of Field Education may be contacted for updates and to address any questions that
      arise pertaining to policies and procedures related to the MSW practicum.
   4. The student shall not be employed by the agency during the term of this contract unless
      standards have been met to qualify the practicum as an employment based field practicum (see
      Policy on Paid Placements).
   5. The Learning Contract will include 2-3 learning activities for each student competency on the
      student evaluation. The activities will provide students with opportunities at the micro, mezzo
      and macro practice levels.

The following are meant to serve as examples only, students and field instructors will need to
identify learning activities that are specific to the placement agency.
The following competencies have been established by the Council on Social Work Education and
will serve as learning objectives. Please list three to five learning activities under each
competency that will facilitate the student‟s professional development in each of these areas.

  1. Student identifies as a professional social worker and conducts himself/herself
     accordingly.
     Learning Activities:
     1. Ex. Demonstrates professional dress
     2.
     3.
     4.
     5.

  2. Student applies social work ethical principles to guide his or her professional practice.
     Learning Activities:
     1. Ex. Identifies ethical dilemmas in assigned cases
     2.
     3.
     4.
     5.

  3. Student applies critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
     Learning Activities:
     1. Ex: Develop three client psychosocial-spiritual assessments
     2.
     3.
     4.
     5.

  4. Student engages diversity and difference in practice.
     Learning Activities:
     1. Ex: Identify three diverse client characteristics to research and discuss with
     field instructor appropriate practice interventions
     2.
     3.
     4.
     5.

  5. Student advances human rights and social and economic justice.
     Learning Activities:
     1. Ex.: Identify three opportunities to advocate for a change in practice or policy
     2.
     3.
     4.
     5.

  6. Student engages in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.
     Learning Activities:
     1.
       2.
       3.
       4.
       5.


   7. Student applies knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.
      Learning Activities:
      1.
      2.
      3.
      4.
      5.

   8. Student engages in activities that advance social and economic well being and to deliver
      effective social work services.
      Learning Activities:
      1.
      2.
      3.
      4.
      5.

   9. Student adapts to organizational, community and societal changes as needed.
      Learning Activities:
      1.
      2.
      3.
      4.
      5.

    10. Student engages, assesses, intervenes and evaluates with individuals, families, groups,
         organizations and communities.
         Learning Activities:
         1.
         2.
         3.
         4.
         5.
Signatures: The parties acknowledge their understanding and consent to this Learning Contract with
their signatures below.

______________________________________                                  ______________________
Student                                                                 Date

______________________________________                                  ______________________
Agency Field Instructor                                                 Date

______________________________________                                  ______________________
Field Liaison                                                           Date
                              Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program

Students who are participating in the Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program may utilize the MSW Learning
Contract. Template examples of Title IV-E Learning Activities are provided to assist in creating an
individualized learning contract and experience for the students who are interns at a child protective service
agency.

The Title IV-E program utilizes a set of child welfare principles and curriculum competencies, the competencies
were designed not to recapitulate the full MSW generalist social work curriculum but to provide the foundation
for a competency-based curriculum for graduate students in the public child welfare specialization. When
developing the Learning Contract, please include appropriate curriculum competencies that are found in the
learning contract.

Title IV-E students are required to complete an addendum to the Learning Contract, provided in the
field manual or by going online, http://www.csuchico.edu/swrk/ive/forms.shtml. This will assist the
Title VI-E program in monitoring the curriculum competencies for public child welfare attained in
field practice.
                    EXAMPLES OF TITLE IV-E LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Students who are participating in the Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program may utilize the MSW
  Learning Contract. Examples of Title IV-E Learning Activities are provided to assist in creating an
 individualized Learning Contract and experience for the students who are interns at a child protective
                                             service agency.

Introduction to the Agency

 Learning Activity Examples:
  1. Read the Title IV-E Competencies and review them and discuss how to incorporate in the
     Learning Contract with your field instructor.
  2. Student completes the Title IV-E Addendum to Learning Contract.
  3. Read agency Policy and Procedures manual which describes mission and history of agency.
  4. Interview agency director to discuss agency‟s policies and procedures.
  5. Learn where the Division 31 Child Welfare Services Manuals are kept in your agency, and
     review with your supervisor.
  6. Find out what the agency policy is regarding worker safety. For example:
           Before leaving the office
           ____ Cell phone provided
           ____ Agency vehicle provided
           ____ Dogs
           ____ Observing the neighborhood surroundings
           ____ Entering and exiting residence
           ____ Drug labs
           ____ Guns
           ____ Pest infestation
           ____ Assessing a physical threat
           ____ Discuss with your supervisor any concerns you may have about your personal safety
                on the job and how to ameliorate your anxieties.
           ____ Discuss with your supervisor work related stress factors including secondary
                traumatic stress and self-care and other strategies to reduce their effects.
           ____ Identify at least one strategy for self-care that you will use.
  7. Meet with individual program managers, or staff analysts to gather information about each
     service and policies that may be offered in the agency such as:
               safe measures
               emergency response
               court
               family reunification
               permanency planning
               adoption
               team decision making
               ILP (Independent Living Programs)
               ICWA (Indian Child Welfare Act)
               Structured Decision Making
               MEPA (Multi Ethnic Placement Act)
Legal and Court Issues

 Learning Activity Examples:
  1. Review a minimum of five court reports developed by different social workers; i.e., detention,
     jurisdictional, dispositional, status review, and “26”.

   2. Identify and discuss the components of a court report and/or assessment with field instructor
       during supervision.

      Suggested other activities:
               Print out a blank CWS/CMS court report outline. Go over each section with your
              supervisor to understand what information you will need to report.

   3. Review agency guidelines regarding documentation standards and discuss with field instructor
      and do the following activities:
            Accompany an experienced worker on a home visit. Complete a written narrative of
               this visit, covering all required information written in the format the agency uses.
               Transfer this to CWS/CMS.

   4. Write a sample or mock court report on an existing client to discuss with field instructor during
      supervision.

   5. Write up three court reports on individual clients by and discuss each one with field instructor.
            Students can do mock assessments and court reports if agencies are unable to provide
               actual agency clients.
            See Legal and Court Issues.

Emergency Response

 Learning Activity Examples:
  1. Accompany an experienced worker on an initial interview of an emergency response
     investigation. Following the interview:
           Discuss your observations of the interview(s) with the work and/or your supervisor.
                    Share your perceptions of how the various family members might have been
               feeling during the interview.
           Share your personal feelings and reactions, and how they could potentially affect your
               perceptions and decisions.
           Fill out your own (mock) forms the agency uses when assessing risk; go over them
               with the worker, and/or supervisor.

Sexual Abuse

 Learning Activity Examples:
  1. Discuss with your supervisor or a co-worker how case of sexual abuse are handled in this
     county. Find out what special measures, if any, are taken during the sexual abuse investigation,
     such as forensic interviewing, special sex abuse unit, etc.
      2. Shadow an experienced worker on a child sexual abuse investigation, accompany a worker in
          the sex abuse unit, discuss a sexual abuse case with your supervisor, or read a case of child
          sexual abuse if there is no case to investigate. During and after this experience:
(1) Write down your reactions to the case.
               (2) Select some personal feelings and reactions to share with your supervisor.
               (3) Discuss your observations of the interview(s) with the worker and/or your supervisor.
               (4) Share your perceptions of how the various family members might have been feeling
                    during the initial interview.
               (5) Fill out the forms the agency uses when assessing risk; go over them with the worker
                    and/or supervisor.
               (6) Discuss with your supervisor the ethical considerations in this case.
               (7) Discuss with your supervisor the cultural considerations in this case.
               (8) Observe a court proceeding.
               (9) Observe half a day of shelter care, dependency or review proceedings.
               (10) Choose one Dependency case and make a list of people who are “parties to the
                    action”, entitled to notification of hearing.
               (11) Interview an experienced social worker and document how they meet documentation
                    requirements for court.
               (12) Develop a field sheet checklist for the steps to identifying an Indian child as required
                    by the Indian Child Welfare Act.
               (13) Review a case file for compliance with county policy and clear writing. Look for
                    indications of neutrality and lack of bias or opinion.

       3. Engage in a discussion with the worker or your supervisor regarding the effects of sexual abuse
          on a child‟s growth and development.

    Domestic Violence

      Learning Activity Examples:
       1. Discuss with your supervisor or a co-worker how cases involving domestic violence are handled
          in this agency. Go over the laws that pertain to domestic violence and child welfare
          interventions.

       2. Find out what special measures, if any, are taken during a domestic violence investigation, such
          as cooperation with law enforcement.

       3. Ask your supervisor for a case dealing with domestic violence for you to review. Or if
          possible, accompany a worker on a visit.

                Afterwards discuss the following:
(1) What were the reasons for the original referral?
(2) What factors in this case constituted child maltreatment?
              (3) What current laws regarding domestic violence and child protective services
                    intervention apply to this case.
              (4) What behaviors did the child exhibit that indicated that the child was maltreated?
              (5) How does this case present the effects of domestic violence on children? Engage in a
                    discussion regarding the effects of exposure to domestic violence on a child‟s growth
                    and development.
              (6) How was each parent‟s behavior abusive or neglectful?
              (7) What family or other support did the family have?
           (8) What interventions were used?
           (9) What strengths did the family possess that could be cultivated?
           (10) What role did culture play in this case?

   4. Make a list of at least three specific strategies for interviewing a victim of domestic violence.

Substance Abuse

 Examples of Learning Activities:
  1. Talk to an experienced worker about his/her work with substance abusing clients. Have a
     discussion with the worker about what clues he/she uses to determine whether a client is under
     the influence of a substance.

   2. Accompany a worker on a home visit for a substance abuse case, or ask your supervisor for a
      case dealing with substance abuse that you can review. Write down your responses to the
      following, and/or discuss them with your supervisor:
            1. What screening tools did the worker use to evaluate the current use of substances by
               members of this family?
            2. Identify the specific effects on this child‟s development that the use of substances by
               this parent may have had.
            3. What services were the parent(s) referred to and which (if any) were used?

Macro Practice

 Examples of Learning Activities:
  1. The student could interview a supervisor and/or program manager regarding the System
     Improvement Plan (SIP) the county has developed. The student in the Concentration Year may
     research the topic and provide a critical analysis of the promising practice by completion of the fall
     semester and for the Advanced Child Welfare Course SWRK 687.

Research

 Examples of Learning Activities:

   1. Student will familiarize themselves with various websites and attempt to utilize information
       gathered to assist in informing their practice.

      Suggested Sites:
       CWS-CMS reports http://cssr.berkeley.edu/ucb%5Fchildwelfare/
       The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare
         http://www.cachildwelfareclearinghouse.org/
       Northern California Training Academy http://humanservices.ucdavis.edu/academy
            California State University, Chico - School of Social Work
    Title IV-E ADDENDUM to the MSW Foundation Child Welfare Learning
                                    Contract
  (To be completed by the student, reviewed by the field instructor, and turned in with the Learning Contract)


             Student ______________________________                Academic Year___________________

Field Placement Agency ____________________________________________________


Throughout the Master of Social Work Program (i.e. field placement, coursework and seminars), students will
be exposed to the ten core competencies covered by the Educational Policy and Accreditation Statement
(EPAS). This Addendum to the MSW Foundation Learning Contract assists the Title IV-E Program in
monitoring the CalSWEC Integrated Foundation Competencies for Public Child Welfare attained in field practice
and the classroom. Please read over the competencies listed and indicate with a check mark the task/activity
that will facilitate the attainment of that competency. If the student will not have the opportunity to address
a particular competency during the course of his/her placement with your agency, check the box marked
‘N/A’.

EPAS CORE COMPETENCIES

2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.
      IV-E COMPETENCY                   FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY          CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate beginning capacity to            Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
advocate for client services by utilizing    Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
a policy practice framework and              Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
negotiating for community based and          Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
culturally sensitive programs and            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
services.                                    Other:                             Other:
                                            ____________________________        ____________________________
                                             N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate self-awareness of                Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
personal knowledge limitations and           Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
biases, and practice self-correction and     Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
reflection in action while pursuing          Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
ongoing professional development.            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                             Other:                             Other:
                                            ____________________________        ____________________________
                                             N/A                                N/A
In intervention planning, demonstrate        Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
consistently the understanding and           Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
recognition of how personal beliefs,         Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
values, norms, and world view can            Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
influence case dynamics and                  Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
outcomes.                                    Other:                             Other:
                                            ____________________________        ____________________________
                                             N/A                                N/A
Present self in a manner consistent         Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
with respectful professional conduct,       Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
and adapt methods of communication,         Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
including written client materials, to      Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
consumer, colleague, and community          Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
language and cultural needs.                Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Support the purpose and values of the       Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
profession through consistent pursuit       Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
of learning, and recognize the              Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
relationship between career long            Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
learning and contributing to practice       Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
effectiveness.                              Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
                                            Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
Utilize supervision/consultation
                                            Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
effectively, including the need to
                                            Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
augment knowledge, or to mediate
                                            Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
conflict arising from personal values
                                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
and emotions related to practice and
                                            Other:                             Other:
professional contexts.
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A

2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
      IV-E COMPETENCY                  FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY             CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate capacity to perceive the       Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
diverse viewpoints of clients,             Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
community members, and others in           Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
cases of value conflict and the ability    Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
to resolve such conflicts by applying      Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
professional practice principles.          Other:                              Other:
                                          ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A
Demonstrate knowledge of ethical           Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
decision making methods and the            Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
capacity to apply these in practice,       Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
policy, advocacy and research.             Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
                                           Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
                                           Other:                              Other:
                                          ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A

2.1.3 Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
      IV-E COMPETENCY                  FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY         CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate the ability critically to      Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
appraise, integrate and apply              Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
evidence-based knowledge and               Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
practice principles, as well as client     Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
and other knowledge, in conducting         Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
and communicating ethnically               Other:                              Other:
competent assessments and                 ____________________________         ____________________________
interventions.                             N/A                                 N/A
Demonstrate the capacity to monitor       Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
and analyze the gathering,                Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
assessment and evaluation of              Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
information to inform practice model      Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
design and use, including                 Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
assessment, intervention and              Other:                              Other:
evaluation.                              ____________________________         ____________________________
                                          N/A                                 N/A
Understand and apply the principle        Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
that all oral and written                 Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
communication must conform to             Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
audience needs and adhere to              Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
professional standards.                   Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
                                          Other:                              Other:
                                         ____________________________         ____________________________
                                          N/A                                 N/A

2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice.

        IV-E COMPETENCY                         FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY             CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate knowledge of historical,       Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
legal, socioeconomic, and                  Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
psychological forms of oppression and      Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
the ability to develop culturally          Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
sensitive interventions within that        Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
understanding.                             Other:                             Other:
                                          ____________________________        ____________________________
                                           N/A                                N/A
Recognize how institutional racism         Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
and power dynamics affect workplace        Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
culture and climate in practice.           Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
                                           Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                           Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                           Other:                             Other:
                                          ____________________________        ____________________________
                                           N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate self-awareness of bias,        Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
including knowledge of and capacity to     Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
manage power differences, when             Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
assessing and working with diverse         Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
populations.                               Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                           Other:                             Other:
                                          ____________________________        ____________________________
                                           N/A                                N/A
Student demonstrates ability to            Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
understand and communicate the             Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
effects of individual variation in the     Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
human developmental process and its        Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
importance to the shaping of life          Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
experiences within diverse groups.         Other:                             Other:
                                          ____________________________        ____________________________
                                           N/A                                N/A
Student demonstrates capacity to            Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
learn from and consult/collaborate          Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
with others and to engage                   Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
constituents/consumers within the           Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
helping process.                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A

2.1.5 Advance human rights and social and economic justice.
      IV-E COMPETENCY              FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY                          CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate, through assessment,           Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
intervention and evaluation                Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
practices, a working understanding         Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
of the role and function of historical,    Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
social, political, and economic factors    Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
as the underlying causes and               Other:                              Other:
mechanisms of oppression and              ____________________________         ____________________________
discrimination.                            N/A                                 N/A
Student demonstrates a functional          Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
knowledge of advocacy theory, skills,      Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
and techniques and consistently            Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
engages in activities/tasks designed       Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
to promote social and economic             Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
justice in working with all client         Other:                              Other:
populations.                              ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A
Student develops case planning             Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
strategies to address discrimination,      Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
barriers, gaps, and fragmentation          Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
that impede client access,                 Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
functioning, and optimum use of            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
resources and opportunities.               Other:                              Other:
                                          ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A

2.1.6 Engage in research informed practice and practice informed research.

       IV-E COMPETENCY                          FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY             CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate a beginning capacity           Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
and skills to gather and synthesize        Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
practice evaluation findings,              Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
including client feedback, to support      Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
and increase the professional              Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
knowledge base.                            Other:                              Other:
                                          ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A
Demonstrate knowledge of how to            Case Carrying Activities            Course _____________
consult and utilize research evidence      Individual Supervision              Guest Speakers
to inform ongoing practice and policy      Training/Workshop Manuals           Lecture
at all levels.                             Shadow Other Workers Meetings       Course Assignments
                                           Collaboration w/ Other Agencies     Readings
                                           Other:                              Other:
                                          ____________________________         ____________________________
                                           N/A                                 N/A
2.1.7 Apply knowledge of human behavior to the social environment.

       IV-E COMPETENCY                         FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate beginning ability to          Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
apply conceptual behavioral               Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
frameworks to social environments         Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
involved in assessment, intervention      Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
and evaluation.                           Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                          Other:                             Other:
                                         ____________________________        ____________________________
                                          N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate beginning ability to          Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
gather and interpret behavioral           Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
knowledge in perceiving person and        Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
environment.                              Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                          Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                          Other:                             Other:
                                         ____________________________        ____________________________
                                          N/A                                N/A

2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic wellbeing and to deliver effective
      social services.

       IV-E COMPETENCY                         FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Begin systematically to collect and       Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
analyze knowledge and experiences         Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
to identify, formulate, and advocate      Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
for policies that advance social and      Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
economic well-being.                      Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                          Other:                             Other:
                                         ____________________________        ____________________________
                                          N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate ability to identify and       Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
to engage stakeholders to                 Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
collaborate for effective policy          Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
formulation and action.                   Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                          Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                          Other:                             Other:
                                         ____________________________        ____________________________
                                          N/A                                N/A

2.1.9 Respond to contexts that shape practice.

       IV-E COMPETENCY                         FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate beginning capacity to         Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
comprehend changing local and             Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
social contexts and scientific            Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
advances that affect practice, with an    Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
emerging ability to identify and          Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
provide relevant services.                Other:                             Other:
                                         ____________________________        ____________________________
                                          N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate a beginning capacity to     Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
discern and promote sustainable         Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
practice and service delivery change    Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
to improve service quality.             Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                        Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A

2.1.10(a)     Engagement

       IV-E COMPETENCY                       FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate the knowledge base          Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
and affective readiness to intervene    Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
constructively with individuals and     Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
groups.                                 Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                        Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate the capacity to exercise    Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
empathy and use of self in              Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
engagement and service delivery.        Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
                                        Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                        Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate the ability to work with    Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
individuals, families and groups to     Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
identify and work towards               Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
accomplishment of shared goals.         Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                        Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A

2.1.10(b)    Assessment
      IV-E COMPETENCY                        FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate ability to effectively      Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
engage with diverse individuals to      Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
gather, analyze, and interpret          Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
consumer/client information in a        Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
coherent, objective manner.             Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate capacity to conduct a       Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
comprehensive, collaborative,           Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
unbiased assessment that follows        Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
legal and ethical guidelines and        Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
identifies strengths and needs.         Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                        Other:                             Other:
                                       ____________________________        ____________________________
                                        N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate ability to involve              Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
individuals, family members, and            Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
community service providers to              Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
develop coordinated intervention            Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
plans.                                      Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate ability to critically           Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
determine the most appropriate              Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
intervention strategies to implement        Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
a plan.                                     Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A

2.1.10(c)         Intervention

        IV-E COMPETENCY                          FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate beginning ability to            Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
initiate efforts consistent with service    Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
and organizational goals.                   Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
                                            Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate capacity to identify and        Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
utilize prevention measures that            Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
enhance individual clients’ strengths       Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
and protective factors.                     Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate capacity to identify and        Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
prioritize challenges and to foster         Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
solutions that call on                      Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
clients’/consumers’ existing                Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
strengths.                                  Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Demonstrate capacity and skills to          Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
undertake the role of client advocate       Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
in negotiating for needed policies,         Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
resources and services.                     Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
                                            Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                            Other:                             Other:
                                           ____________________________        ____________________________
                                            N/A                                N/A
Recognize the importance of           Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
understanding the transition &        Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
termination processes and             Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
demonstrate the capacity to           Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
sensitively terminate work.           Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                      Other:                             Other:
                                     ____________________________        ____________________________
                                      N/A                                N/A

2.1.10(d)        Evaluation

       IV-E COMPETENCY                     FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY            CLASSROOM TASK/ACTIVITY
Demonstrate a beginning ability to    Case Carrying Activities           Course _____________
systemically monitor, analyze and     Individual Supervision             Guest Speakers
evaluate interventions, applying a    Training/Workshop Manuals          Lecture
knowledge- for-action approach to     Shadow Other Workers Meetings      Course Assignments
determine future action.              Collaboration w/ Other Agencies    Readings
                                      Other:                             Other:
                                     ____________________________        ____________________________
                                      N/A                                N/A



Student ____________________________________________________________                       ___________
                Signature                                                           Date

Agency
Field Instructor _____________________________________________________________________________
                   Signature                                                Date

Faculty
Field Liaison ____________________________________________________________                 ___________
                  Signature                                                Date
            California State University, Chico - School of Social Work
     Title IV-E ADDENDUM to the MSW Advanced Child Welfare Learning
                                    Contract
  (To be completed by the student, reviewed by the field instructor, and turned in with the Learning Contract)


   Student                                                                Academic Year


Field Placement Agency



Throughout the Master of Social Work Program (i.e. field placement, coursework and seminars), students will
be exposed to the ten core competencies covered by the Educational Policy and Accreditation Statement
(EPAS). This Addendum to the MSW Advanced Learning Contract assists the Title IV-E Program in monitoring
the CalSWEC Integrated Foundation Competencies for Public Child Welfare attained in field practice and the
classroom. Please read over the competencies listed and indicate with a check mark the task/activity that will
facilitate the attainment of that competency. If the student will not have the opportunity to address a
particular competency during the course of his/her placement with your agency, check the box marked
‘N/A’.

EPAS CORE COMPETENCIES

2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

 IV-E COMPETENCY               ADVANCED                FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY                 CLASSROOM
                                PRACTICE                                                  TASK/ACTIVITY
                               INDICATOR
Able to articulate the    1. Interact positively      Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
roles of a professional   with clients, colleagues    Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
child welfare social      and supervisors and         Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
worker and consistently   demonstrate skill in        Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
demonstrate effective     seeking out suitable       Meetings                       Readings
self -management,         client services and         Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
interpersonal             ensuring client access     Agencies                      _______________________
interaction, service      to those services.          Other:                       N/A
advocacy, and             2. Maintain                _______________________
continuing professional   professional demeanor       N/A
development within        and boundaries in
those roles.              practice situations,
                          demonstrate skill in
                          articulating
                          professional knowledge
                          and effective use of
                          self, and utilize
                          appropriate resources
                          to ensure professional
                          growth.
2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
 IV-E COMPETENCY         ADVANCED              FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY                            CLASSROOM
                          PRACTICE                                                           TASK/ACTIVITY
                         INDICATOR
Demonstrate capacity to      1. Skillfully identify and    Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
perceive the diverse         apply ethical principles      Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
viewpoints of clients,       in making child welfare       Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
community members,           practice decisions and        Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
and others in cases of       articulate their             Meetings                       Readings
value conflict and the       application in routine        Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
ability to resolve such      and challenging ethical      Agencies                      ________________________
conflicts by applying        contexts.                     Other:                       N/A
professional practice                                     ________________________
principles.                                                N/A

2.1.3 Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
 IV-E COMPETENCY           ADVANCED            FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY           CLASSROOM
                            PRACTICE                                        TASK/ACTIVITY
                           INDICATOR
Apply critical thinking      1. Routinely exercise         Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
skills using logic,          critical, higher-order        Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
scientific inquiry, and      thinking in evaluating        Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
reasoned discernment to      child welfare data and        Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
synthesize information,      proactively seek             Meetings                       Readings
to practice effectively in   additional data as            Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
child welfare and to         required to make             Agencies                      _______________________
communicate                  reasoned professional         Other:                       N/A
professional judgments.      decisions.                   _______________________
                             2. Consistently               N/A
                             communicate
                             information, including
                             professional knowledge
                             and judgments, clearly,
                             promptly, effectively
                             and in a manner
                             appropriate to diverse
                             recipients.

2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice.
 IV-E COMPETENCY         ADVANCED              FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY                            CLASSROOM
                          PRACTICE                                                           TASK/ACTIVITY
                         INDICATOR
In providing effective       1. In child welfare           Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
child welfare practice,      practice, demonstrate         Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
consistently                 both an acute                 Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
demonstrate and              awareness of historical       Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
articulate both accurate     and societal variables       Meetings                       Readings
awareness of self and        influencing interaction       Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
knowledge of societal        at the micro, mezzo,         Agencies                      _______________________
variables contributing to    and macro levels and          Other:                       N/A
power imbalances and         the consistent ability to    _______________________
interpersonal and            work effectively with         N/A
intercultural conflict       diverse individuals,
among individuals,           families, and
families, groups,          communities.
organizations and          2. Consistently
communities.               demonstrate the skill of
                           learning from client
                           systems and from
                           diverse cultures, being
                           informed by such
                           differences, and
                           applying the knowledge
                           to child welfare
                           practice.

2.1.5 Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

IV-E COMPETENCY                  ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                  PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                 INDICATOR
Utilize knowledge of       1. Engage in policy                                         Course _____________
                                                         Case Carrying Activities
human behavior,            practice to improve social                                  Guest Speakers
                                                         Individual Supervision
variables that             and economic justice in                                     Lecture
                                                         Training/Workshop
contribute to injustice,   child welfare.                                              Course Assignments
                                                        Manuals
and advocacy theory to                                                                 Readings
                                                         Shadow Other Workers
provide leadership in                                                                  Other:
                                                        Meetings
applying social work                                                                  _______________________
                                                         Collaboration w/ Other
skills to promote social                                                               N/A
                                                        Agencies
and economic justice at
                                                         Other:
the micro, mezzo and
                                                        _______________________
macro levels in child
                                                         N/A
welfare.

2.1.6 Engage in research informed practice and practice informed research.

 IV-E COMPETENCY                 ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                  PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                 INDICATOR
Regularly assess and use   1. Demonstrate skill in       Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
research to guide child    conducting child welfare      Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
welfare practice, to       literature reviews, in        Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
evaluate child welfare     applying findings to          Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
practice, and to           practice, in program         Meetings                       Readings
disseminate findings to    evaluation, and in            Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
improve child welfare      knowledge                    Agencies                      _______________________
practice.                  dissemination.                Other:                       N/A
                                                        _______________________
                                                         N/A
2.1.7 Apply knowledge of human behavior to the social environment.

 IV-E COMPETENCY                 ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                  PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                 INDICATOR
Integrates knowledge        1. In evaluation of child    Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
and theory of human         welfare practice             Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
behavior and the social     (engagement,                 Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
environment from            assessment, planning,        Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
diverse perspectives to     intervention, and           Meetings                       Readings
conduct reliable and        evaluation),                 Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
valid assessments,          demonstrate the ability     Agencies                      _______________________
comprehensive service       knowledgably to apply        Other:                       N/A
plans, effective            information about           _______________________
interventions, and          human behavior and           N/A
meaningful evaluations      the social environment
in child welfare.           from diverse
                            perspectives.


2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic wellbeing and to deliver effective
social services.

 IV-E COMPETENCY                 ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                  PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                 INDICATOR
Articulates knowledge of    1. Demonstrate               Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
current agency, state,      through policy practice      Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
and federal child welfare   interventions the            Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
policies and engages in     knowledge of social          Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
effective development       work values, child          Meetings                       Readings
and implementation of       welfare relevant             Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
ethical and effective       policies (including those   Agencies                      _______________________
child welfare practices     specific to cultural         Other:                       N/A
and policies.               groups), and                _______________________
                            assessment of service        N/A
                            effectiveness.

2.1.9 Respond to contexts that shape practice.

 IV-E COMPETENCY                 ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                  PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                 INDICATOR
Identify trends among       1. Readily identify          Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
micro, mezzo, and           changing factors that        Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
macro variables that        affect child welfare         Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
affect child welfare        services and initiate        Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
practice and provide        culturally competent        Meetings                       Readings
leadership to respond to    action to promote            Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
those trends in effective   responsive, sustainable     Agencies                      _______________________
and culturally              services.                    Other:                       N/A
competent ways.                                         _______________________
                                                         N/A
2.1.10(a)     Engagement

 IV-E COMPETENCY                  ADVANCED                  FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY              CLASSROOM
                                   PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                  INDICATOR
Demonstrate the ability      1. Skillfully and            Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
to develop relationships     respectfully establish       Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
and manage power             working relationships        Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
differentials in routine     with clients and             Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
and challenging client       community partners in       Meetings                       Readings
and partner situations, in   accord with social work      Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
a manner that reflects       values, and utilize those   Agencies                      ______________________
core social work values      relationships in forging     Other:                       N/A
in child welfare practice.   goals and positive          _______________________
                             outcomes.                    N/A

2.1.10(b)         Assessment

 IV-E COMPETENCY                  ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                   PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                  INDICATOR
Consistently gather          1. Create service plans      Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
qualitative and              that demonstrate data        Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
quantitative data from a     collection and               Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
variety of sources, form     assessment methods           Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
coherent meaning from        reflecting goal             Meetings                       Readings
the data, and use the        mutuality and respect        Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
resulting information to     for clients from diverse    Agencies                      _______________________
make recommendations         backgrounds.                 Other:                       N/A
and to plan interventions                                _______________________
that meet standards for                                   N/A
child welfare social work
practice.

2.1.10(c)         Intervention

 IV-E COMPETENCY                  ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY               CLASSROOM
                                   PRACTICE                                                 TASK/ACTIVITY
                                  INDICATOR
Comfortably move             1. Shape child welfare       Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
among the roles of a         interventions that           Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
social worker in child       demonstrate effective        Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
welfare and intervene        balance of multiple          Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
effectively in those         social worker roles and     Meetings                       Readings
roles, including             phases of service that       Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
enhancing client             recognize client            Agencies                      _______________________
strengths, acting as a       strengths and self-          Other:                       N/A
client advocate, and         determination.              _______________________
skillfully handling                                       N/A
transitions and
terminations.
2.1.10(d)        Evaluation

 IV-E COMPETENCY                ADVANCED                 FIELD TASK/ACTIVITY              CLASSROOM
                                 PRACTICE                                                TASK/ACTIVITY
                                INDICATOR
Consistently employ        1. Regularly engage in      Case Carrying Activities     Course _____________
reliable and valid         practice evaluation         Individual Supervision       Guest Speakers
methods for monitoring     using reliable and valid    Training/Workshop Manuals    Lecture
and evaluating practice    methods, and apply the      Shadow Other Workers         Course Assignments
interventions and use      results to benefit child   Meetings                       Readings
the results to improve     welfare clients.            Collaboration w/ Other       Other:
child welfare policy and                              Agencies                      _______________________
practice.                                              Other:                       N/A
                                                      ________________________
                                                       N/A


Student          ____________________________________________________________                    ___________
                  Signature                                                 Date

Agency
Field Instructor ____________________________________________________________                    ___________
                  Signature                                                 Date

Faculty
Field Liaison     _____________________________________________________________________________
                   Signature                                                 Date
                                 Resolution of Problems in Field Education

The School of Social Work Field Education Program is committed to helping students maximize their learning
opportunities. Performance issues, personal and educational, occasionally surface in the field placement. The
field education program encourages early identification of any difficulties so that a resolution and/or corrective
action can be taken as soon as possible.

Early intervention is essential to protect the student, the agency and the client‟s interests. Problems in field
education can generally be categorized as one or more of the following:

       Situational: transportation difficulties, illness, personal crisis, unreliable child care, etc.
       Environmental: lack of adequate opportunity provided by the agency to accomplish learning objectives,
        little or unsatisfactory field instruction, a personality conflict between the student and the agency field
        instructor, etc.
       Academic/Professional Behavior: ethical violations (NASW Code of Ethics), poor professional
        behavior, unsuccessful completion of projects or tasks assigned, lack of ability or motivation to learn
        social work skills, disrespect for clients and/or other professionals, unable to utilize feedback
        effectively, threatening or criminal behavior, etc.

Situational Issues
If there is an issue that arises during the practicum in which the student is having difficulty fulfilling his/her
responsibilities due to transportation, illness, personal crisis, unreliable childcare, etc. a resolution must be
settled upon by joint agreement between the student and field instructor. Strategies should be identified to
resolve the issue in writing by the student and a copy of a remediation plan provided to the field instructor, field
liaison and Director of Field Education. The field liaison will monitor the situation to ensure that progress is
being made and the student is fulfilling his/her responsibilities.

In the event that the situational issue is not ameliorated and the student is unable to fulfill his/her responsibilities
to the practicum, the placement may be terminated by either the student or the field instructor. Termination of a
placement requires that the field liaison and Director of Field Education be notified immediately and a plan for
adequate termination/closure with clients and agency personnel submitted to the field liaison and field
instructor. The plan for termination should reflect the date the student will leave the placement, timing and
method for terminating contacts with individuals and groups, and how and when the student will fulfill other
termination responsibilities; i.e. transfer or closing of cases, completion of necessary paperwork, returning keys
or identification cards etc. Termination from a field placement will result in the student being terminated from
the MSW Program. The student may grieve this decision to the Student Review Committee. Please see the
grievance table on Page 83.

Environmental Issues
Occasionally problems in fieldwork are related the agency‟s or the agency field instructor‟s ability to provide
appropriate learning experiences. The following steps are to be taken in this circumstance:

    1) The student will address his/her concerns with the agency field instructor first, clarifying the problem
       area or issue and identifying possible strategies for improving the situation. Either the student or the
       field instructor may request the Field Liaison to be present for this discussion. At the very least, the
       Field Liaison should be informed of the concerns and made aware of the plan to resolve these concerns
       and the time frame in which the concerns will be addressed. Students will provide the field liaison with
       a written remediation plan, signed by both the student and field instructor.

    2) If the concerns are resolved in the designated time frame the student will remain in the placement. If the
       concerns are not resolved the student will request a meeting with the field instructor and field liaison to
       determine whether or not a change in placement needs to occur. The program highly discourages
       changes in placements and every effort should be made to resolve the issue. The field liaison will make
       a recommendation to the Director of Field Education in writing at the conclusion of this meeting as to
        whether or not the student should be moved or remain in the placement, and the reasons for this
        recommendation. If the recommendation is to keep the student in the placement a revised remediation
        plan will be submitted with the recommendation and strategies identified to resolve the issue. The field
        liaison will notify the student and the field instructor of the recommendation and the plan. If either the
        student or the field instructor disagrees with the liaison‟s recommendation they may submit a written
        appeal to the Director of Field Education who will make the final decision.

    3) If either the student or the field instructor chooses to appeal a decision made by the Director of Field
       they may request a meeting with the Field Committee to review the decision. The field committee will
       make a recommendation to support the decision of the Director of Field Education or submit a new
       remediation plan.

    4) If the student or field instructor rejects the plan submitted by the field committee he/she can appeal the
       decision to the Chair of the School of Social Work.

    5) If the student or field instructor rejects the decision of the Chair they can appeal the decision to the Dean
       of Behavioral and Social Sciences. At any point in the process a student may contact Student Judicial
       Affairs for assistance. It is required that above steps be taken to resolve any placement issue in addition
       to any steps taken by Student Judicial Affairs.

Academic/Professional Behavior Issues
Evaluation of the student‟s academic and professional behavior in the placement is viewed as a process jointly
undertaken by the student, the agency field instructor, and the Field Liaison. The purpose of evaluation is to
provide ongoing feedback and to determine if the student has met the course learning objectives and adhered to
the agency‟s personnel practices, policies and procedures, as well as the profession‟s code of ethics. If a student
breaches the professional code of ethics the Field Review Committee can make an immediate referral to the
Student Review Committee and recommend immediate dismissal from the MSW program. If a student is not
meeting the minimum expectations for professional behavior, a contract should be developed to help the student
improve their performance. The following steps should be taken to resolve an academic/professional problem in
the field placement:

    1) The field instructor will address his/her concerns with the student first, clarifying the problem area or
       issue and identifying possible strategies for improving the situation. Either the student or the field
       instructor may request the Field Liaison to be present for this discussion. The Field Liaison will be
       informed of the concerns by the field instructor and made aware of the plan to resolve these concerns
       and the time frame in which the concerns will be addressed. It is recommended that this initial time
       frame be no longer than two weeks. The student will provide the field liaison with a written
       remediation plan, signed by both the student and field instructor.

    2) If the concerns are resolved in the designated time frame the student will remain in the placement. If the
       concerns are not resolved the field instructor will request a meeting with the student and field liaison to
       develop a formal Performance Contract (see appendix for form). The Performance Contract will
       include a clear statement of the problem area(s), remediation steps, expectations for change, a clearly
       defined evaluation process, and a time frame for remediation. The Performance Contract will be
       signed by all three parties and a copy provided to the student, field instructor, Field Liaison and the
       Director of Field Education. The field liaison will closely monitor the student‟s progress.

    3) If the time frame for the Performance Contract expires but the student has followed through with the
       remediation plan and is making satisfactory progress the field instructor in conjunction with the student
       and faculty liaison can agree to extend the time frame of the contract. An extension of the contract may
       also warrant the student completing additional hours in fieldwork to fulfill the terms of the contract. If
       the extension of the contract requires the student to complete field hours beyond the grading period the
       student will receive a grade of “Report in Progress (RP)” until the contract is complete. Any and all
        extensions should be noted in writing on the Performance Contract and initialed by all three parties.
        The Director of Field Education will also be notified about any extensions.

    4) If a student does not show satisfactory remediation progress under the contract or does not follow the
       contract time frame, the student will be terminated from the placement and a grade of "No Credit (NC)”
       will be assigned for fieldwork. A grade of NC in fieldwork will result in the student being terminated
       from the MSW program. If a student wishes to grieve the decision he/she will notify the Student
       Review Committee (see table below).

Termination from Field Practicum
Step 1 – Student Review Committee
If a student is terminated from their field practicum      The Director of Field Education will provide the chair
placement the Director of Field Education will notify      of the Student Review Committee a summary of the
the student that they are also terminated from the         issues that contributed to the student‟s termination
MSW program and advise the student that they may           from field practicum within five instructional days
contact the Student Review Committee within five (5)
instructional days to grieve this action                   The Student will notify the Chair of the Student
                                                           Review Committee within five days of their intent to
                                                           grieve their dismissal from the MSW program

Step 1 a Student Review Committee Initial                  The Chair of the Student Review Committee forwards
Notification                                               the request and supporting materials to the committee
                                                           members, informing them that the committee will
                                                           meet within one week to review the request.

                                                           If the committee determines the request is legitimate,
                                                           the student must be given written notification five
                                                           instructional days before the review date.

 The Student Review Committee is a standing committee of three Faculty Members appointed by the Director of
the School with the committee chair elected from its membership. Its purpose is to review students experiencing
performance concerns that interfere with their ability to function successfully in the program. The Student
Review Committee is the primary mechanism for resolution of the matter.

Some examples of concerns warranting a recommendation for dismissal from the program based on a student‟s
performance in the field include:
    a. Student engages in behavior that is disrespectful of other students, instructors, practicum personnel and
       that disrupts the classroom, office or practicum, alienates self from others related to the program, results
       in repeated complaints and requires undue time from faculty, staff or practicum personnel.
    b. Student displays attitudinal or unethical behaviors that question the student's fitness for the profession of
       social work.
    c. Student displays attitudes or behaviors inconsistent with the values and ethics of the social work
       profession.
    d. Student acts out unresolved personal issues that affect classroom behavior and/or relationships with
       colleagues, faculty, staff or professionals in the field setting.
    e. Student engages in behavior in or outside the classroom that is illegal, indicates a substance abuse
       problem, or interferes with the student‟s ability to function in the program or with colleagues.
    f. Student fails to meet the terms of a performance contract in their field practicum and the placement
       agency terminates the student from their field practicum.
    g. Lack of acceptance by three or more field agencies if, in the judgment of faculty and field staff, the
       placements can provide appropriate field experiences without undue inconvenience to the student.
                                                  The student, student‟s Advisor, MSW Program
                                                  Director, Director of the School, and representative
                                                  from CSU, Chico Student Judicial Affairs are notified
                                                  in writing of the date, time and place of the review,
                                                  and the alleged nature of the deficiencies in
                                                  performance or conduct under review.

                                                  Note: The CSU, Chico email is the official form of
                                                  communication and notification.
Step 1c – Attendees and Participants at Student   At the discretion of the committee, the Director of
Review Committee                                  Field may be present during the Student Review
                                                  Committee review.

                                                  The student has the right to present material on her/his
                                                  behalf that challenges the allegations, including asking
                                                  others to address the Student Review Committee on
                                                  her/his behalf. The advocate may be a student or any
                                                  other advocate save a licensed attorney.

Step 1d – Questioning Process                     The student has the right to question anyone
                                                  participating in the proceedings.
Step 1e – Student Review Committee Procedure      Call to order.

                                                  Designation of a committee member to record the
                                                  minutes of the meeting.

                                                  Recording of attendees and their role in the proceeding
                                                  (committee member, student, other faculty, and
                                                  student‟s invitees).

                                                  Identification of the matter for discussion.

                                                  Description of the known facts regarding the issue by a
                                                  designated committee member.

                                                  Student‟s comments, explanations, challenges,
                                                  evidence (if applicable).

                                                  Comments of other attendees.

                                                  Discussion with the goal of reaching concurrence on
                                                  the nature of the difficulty and possible solutions
                                                  including, possibly, dismissal from the School of
                                                  Social Work.

                                                  Informing student of the recommendation to be made
                                                  to the Director of MSW Program. Recommendation
                                                  may be further deliberations or a decision.

                                                  Notification to student of date and location for
                                                  securing a copy of the minutes
                                                  as well as a written explanation that amendments to
                                                  the minutes must be made within six weeks.
                                                    Adjournment.

                                                    Note: The designated Student Review Committee
                                                    member records the proceedings and arranges for
                                                    faculty attendees to receive copies.

                                                    It is the student‟s responsibility to obtain a copy, if
                                                    desired, per above instructions.

                                                    In addition, the secretary provides a copy of the
                                                    committee‟s recommendation to the MSW Program
                                                    Director.

                                                    A copy of the report is kept in the student‟s file within
                                                    the School of Social Work.

Step 1f – Determination of Action                   The MSW Program Director makes a determination of
                                                    the action to be taken, if any, and notifies the student
                                                    by registered letter. Any action will be carried out by
                                                    the MSW Program Director and, possibly, other
                                                    interested parties in accordance with the terms of the
                                                    decision.

                                                    If the student agrees with this determination of action,
                                                    the MSW Program Director‟s recommendation is
                                                    followed.

                                                    If the student would like to appeal this decision, a
                                                    rebuttal is sent to the Director of the School of Social
                                                    Work within 5 instructional days.

                                                    The Director of the School of Social Work will review
                                                    all the documents and will make a determination of
                                                    action, and notify the student by registered mail within
                                                    five (5) instructional days.

Student Judicial Affairs
If the issue remains unresolved, the student may    Students wanting assistance in responding to a
request advice and guidance from Student Judicial   negative evaluation of their performance, dismissal, or
Affairs.                                            believe the School of Social Work faculty, staff, or
                                                    administration have violated their rights, may enlist
                                                    assistance from the Office of Student Judicial Affairs
                                                    at any point in the process.

                                                    The formal grievance process with Judicial Affairs
                                                    may be initiated only after all informal attempts to
                                                    resolve the problem have been made and found
                                                    unsatisfactory in reaching a solution (see CSU, Chico
                                                    Student Judicial Affairs).

                                                    The student must file a request for a formal hearing
                                                    with the Coordinator of Judicial Affairs within 30
                                                    instructional days after the problem has come to the
                                                    student‟s attention. See EM 94-22. The Student
                                                          Grievance Procedures.


                                                          Note: Students who violate EM 96-38, the Code of
                                                          Student Rights and Responsibilities, or the NASW
                                                          Code of Ethics, may be referred to Student Judicial
                                                          Affairs.


A student may be removed from a practicum placement for the following reasons:
           1. Failure to maintain confidentiality
           2. Failure to abide by the NASW Code of Ethics
           3. An attempt to harm someone else
           4. An attempt to harm oneself
           5. Repeated tardiness at the agency and/or tardiness without notification
           6. Repeated absences from the agency and/or absence without notification
           7. Repeated change in scheduled field hours without approval
           8. In appropriate or illegal behavior during or outside of the practicum
           9. Below average performance as documented in formal written evaluation
           10. Failure to perform and complete assigned tasks in a timely manner

Closure
Regardless of the reasons for early termination, it is expected that the student with direction from the agency
field instructor, will carry out adequate closure with clients, co- workers, and the agency. Any plans for closure
should include: the exact date of termination, the timing and method used to terminate planned contact with
individuals and/or groups; the way in which the student will fulfill other agency obligations (completion of
summaries needed for case transfer or closing, for example); and completion of necessary separation procedures
(sign forms, returning keys and/or ID, etc.). It is expected that the closure process will be done in a way that
continues to support the student‟s learning and the best interests of the client‟s served.

Repeating Field Practicum Courses
Any student who does not receive credit for the field practicum and is given the opportunity to repeat the course
may be required to also repeat other course(s) the Student Review Committee deems necessary to increase the
student‟s knowledge, values and skills needed to successfully pass the practicum.
                                         California State University, Chico
                                               School of Social Work

                             Performance Contract – Field Practicum Work

Student:

Agency Field Instructor:

Agency:

Field Liaison:

MSW ______ 1st Year _____ 2nd Year _____

Performance Contract Initiated:
                                  Date
Timeframe in which contract is to be completed:                    -
                                                          From            To


Student Signature                                                 Date


Agency Field Instructor Signature                                 Date


Field Liaison                                             Date



Contract Performance Reviewed:
                                           Date

Contract successfully completed:
                                           Date

Contracted extended to:
                                  Date

Contract not met referred to Field Review Committee:
                                                                  Date



Student Signature                                  Date


Field Instructor Signature                         Date
                                 PERFORMANCE CONTRACT (Cont.)

Student:                                          Field Liaison:
Agency Field Instructor:
Agency:


Performance Contract Initiated (Date):

Timeframe in which contract is to be completed:              -
                                                   From            To
Student Strengths:




Specific Areas Needing Improvement:




Expected Level of Performance:




Learning Activities Assigned to Improve Performance:




Method(s) of Evaluation:




Student Signature                                                  Date


Agency Field Instructor Signature                                  Date


Field Liaison                                                      Date
FORMS
         MSW 631/632 – FOUNDATION FIELD EDUCATION STUDENT EVALUATION


This evaluation is to be completed by both the Agency Field Instructor and student. The field
instructor will score the student‟s performance under the field instructor column and the student will
rate their performance under the student column. Both parties should discuss the evaluation when
completed. The evaluation will be submitted by the Agency Field Instructor and student by the date
noted on the Field Education Calendar.


Student: _______________________________________________________________________
Agency Field Instructor: __________________________________________________________
Agency: _______________________________________________________________________
Faculty Field Liaison: ____________________________________________________________
Please provide a brief description of your Agency:



                                                                 ______________________________

Please provide a brief description of current learning activities in which the student is participating:




                                                                                                  ______

The field instrument consists of ten student competencies that relate to the overall BSW/MSW
Program Objectives. Each section includes articulated field learning objectives, all of which are to be
evaluated. If there is an area that the field instructor has not been able to evaluate the student‟s
performance in please use the NA category. When reviewing the evaluation together please note that
areas that were rated NA by the field instructor should also be rated NA by the student. Please use the
following key in evaluating your students.

                                           EVALUATION KEY

 NA -     No opportunity to develop this skill in this setting as of yet/or the field instructor does
          not have evidence needed to make a judgment.

 1   -    Unacceptable: Student shows little evidence of understanding the concept and/or demonstration
          of skill development.

 2   -    Beginning Skill Development: Student shows some understanding of the concept and is
          beginning to recognize in hindsight how it might have been applied in practice situations.
 3    -   Progressing in Demonstration: Student understands the concept and demonstrates the skill but
          performance is uneven. Needs time and practice to be more consistent.

 4    -   Consistent Demonstration of High Level of Skill Development: Understands the concept and
          demonstrates the skill with consistency.

 5    -   Exceptional Demonstration of Skill Development. The skill is an integrated part of the student‟s
          stance and style. Student exhibits independence, creativity and flexibility in use of the skills.
          This category is to be used with great discretion

NARRATIVE SECTION

Please use narrative section to individualize your student's evaluation. The narrative is an important and
necessary part of the evaluation. Your comments personalize and clarify for your students the essence of
your evaluation of their work. It is important to comment on areas that need work, as well as areas in
which the student excels. It is essential for the student and the School to have this section completed.


                                 MSW Foundation Year Expectations

First Semester (Mid-Year Evaluation):

The expected levels of performance for a first semester student are levels 2, 3, and 4. The liaison should
be contacted under the following circumstances:

     - if a student is performing at level 1 on any specific behavioral measure;
     - If a student is performing at level 2 on more than 50% of the behavioral measures in any one of
        the core areas.

Second Semester (Final Evaluation):

The expected levels of performance for a second semester student are levels 3 and 4. The liaison must be
contacted under the following circumstances:

     - if a student is performing at level 1 on any specific behavioral measure;
     - If a student is performing at level 2 on more than 25% of the behavioral measures in any one of
       the core areas.
      MSW 631/632 – FOUNDATION FIELD EDUCATION STUDENT EVALUATION



1. Student identifies as a professional social worker                   Fall                 Spring
   and conducts himself/herself accordingly.
                                                              Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Attends well to professional roles and boundaries
Demonstrates professional demeanor in appearance
Demonstrates professional demeanor in communication
Uses supervision and consultation effectively
Practices personal reflection and self correction to assure
continual professional development
Has a commitment to conducting himself/herself as a
professional social worker
Demonstrates ability to assume responsibility for own
learning and seeks out opportunities/activities to foster
professional growth
Plans, prioritizes and manages work assignments
effectively

2. Student applies social work ethical principles to his                Fall                 Spring
   or her professional practice
                                                              Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Recognizes and manages personal values in a way that
allows professional values to guide practice
Abides by the ethical standards of the profession
Abides by laws relevant to social work practice

Tolerates ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts
Applies strategies of ethical reasoning to arrive at
principled decisions




3. Student applies critical thinking to inform and                      Fall                 Spring
   communicate professional judgments
                                                              Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Uses critical thinking to address client concerns
Demonstrates good assessment skills
Demonstrates good problem solving skills
Demonstrates good data gathering skills
Analyzes complex material well
Integrates multiple sources of knowledge, including
research based knowledge and practice wisdom in problem
solving.
Demonstrates effective oral communication in working
with individuals, families, groups organizations,
communities and colleagues
Demonstrates effective written communication in working
with individuals, families, groups, organizations,
communicates, and colleagues

4. Student understands diversity and difference and                       Fall                 Spring
   understands the influence of these factors on the
   human experience.                                            Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Demonstrates the ability to work comfortably with persons
who are different from self
Demonstrates an awareness of socio-political and
   economic issues affecting clients who differ by such
   factors as age, class, color, culture, disability,
   ethnicity, gender identity and expression, immigration
   status, political ideology, race, religion, sex and sexual
   orientation
Demonstrates self awareness to eliminate the influence of
   personal biases and values in working with diverse
   groups
Recognizes the extent to which a culture‟s structures and
   values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, create or
   enhance privilege and power
Seeks to understand the clients‟ culture and identity
    through questioning and observation
Identifies intervention strategies that are congruent with
    the culture and identity of the client




5. Student advances human rights and social and                           Fall                 Spring
   economic justice.
                                                                Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
   Demonstrates understanding of the forms and mechanisms
   of oppression and discrimination
Advocates for human rights and social and economic
justice
Analyzes the effects of policies on clients and on the
delivery of service
   Identifies public policies that provide the mandate, funding,
   and boundaries for agency services as well as policies that
   govern service delivery




6. Student engages in research informed practice and                         Fall                 Spring
   practice informed research
                                                                   Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Uses practice experience to inform research
Applies research finding to practice and, under
supervision, evaluates practice interventions
Uses research findings to improve practice, policy, and
social service delivery
Is aware of and adheres to the values and ethical practices
which govern research
Demonstrates basic skills to evaluate their own practice




7. Student applies knowledge of human behavior and                           Fall                 Spring
   the social environment
                                                                   Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
Demonstrates knowledge of human behavior across the
lifespan
Demonstrates skill in completing bio psycho social
spiritual assessments of the client or client system
Demonstrates knowledge of social systems that promote or
deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well
being



8. Student engages in policy practice to advance social                      Fall                 Spring
   and economic well being and to deliver effective social
   work services.                                                  Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor

Demonstrates an understanding of the role of policy in
service delivery, social work practice and attainment of
individual and social well-being
Collaborates with colleagues and clients to implement
effective policy change
Understands the influence practice can have on policy
development
 9. Student understands the dynamic nature of social                      Fall                 Spring
    work practice and adapts practice approaches
    accordingly.                                                Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates ability to identify and use community
 resources
 Transfers knowledge and skill from one situation to
 another
 Learns from a variety of sources (peers, other agency staff,
 field instructor, preceptors and consultants)
 Accepts and utilizes constructive criticism
 Responds to evolving organizational, community, and
 societal contexts as all levels of practice



 10. Student engages, assesses, intervenes and evaluates                  Fall                 Spring
   individuals, families, groups, organizations, and
   communities.                                                 Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates use of empathy and other personal skills in
 with client groups
 Develops mutually agreed upon focus of work and desired
 outcomes with client groups
 Effectively prepares for work with client groups
 Collects, organizes and interprets client data
 Assess client strengths and limitations
 Develop mutually agreed on intervention goals and
 objectives with client groups
 Selects appropriate intervention strategies
 Initiates actions to achieve organizational goals
 Implements prevention interventions that enhance client
 capacities
 Help clients resolve identified concerns
 Negotiates, mediates and advocates for clients
 Facilitates transitions and endings with client groups
 Critically analyzes, monitors and evaluates interventions
 with client groups

Please indicate if the above skills were     demonstrated with one or more of the following client
groups:                Individuals             _____
                      Families                 _____
                      Groups                  _____
                      Organizations           _____
                      Communities             _____
NARRATIVE
Please use the narrative section to individualize your student's evaluation. The narrative is an important
and necessary part of the evaluation. Your comments personalize and clarify for your students the essence
of your evaluation of their work. It is important to comment on areas that need work, as well as areas in
which the student excels. It is essential for the student and the School to have this section completed.

NARRATIVE (Fall)
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________


NARRATIVE (Spring)
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________

Student has completed at total of ____________________ hours.


Student Signature:                                                   Date:
                                                                             Fall


Field Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date: __________
                                                                   Fall


Student Signature: ______________________________________ Date: ___________
                                                                 Spring


Field Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date: __________
                                                                    Spring



This form was adapted from an evaluation form developed by Charles Zastrow, PhD.
     MSW 648/658 – ADVANCED YEAR FIELD EDUCATION STUDENT EVALUATION

This evaluation is to be completed by both the Agency Field Instructor and student. The field
instructor will score the student‟s performance under the field instructor column and the student will
rate their performance under the student column. Advanced practice incorporates all of the core
competencies augmented by knowledge and practice behaviors specific to an area of focus. Please
indicate after each set of practice behaviors what population the student mastered these competencies
with. Both parties should discuss the evaluation when completed. The evaluation will be submitted
by the Agency Field Instructor and student by the date noted on the Field Education Calendar.


Student________________________________________________________________________
Agency Field Instructor: __________________________________________________________
Agency: _______________________________________________________________________
Faculty Field Liaison: ____________________________________________________________
Please provide a brief description of your Agency:




Please provide a brief description of current learning activities in which the student is participating:




The field instrument consists of ten student competencies that relate to the overall MSW Program
Objectives. Each section includes articulated field learning objectives, all of which are to be evaluated.
Areas the field instructor has not been able to evaluate the student‟s performance should indicate NA.
When reviewing the evaluation together please note that areas that were rated NA by the field instructor
should also be rated NA by the student. Please use the following key in evaluating your students:
                                           EVALUATION KEY

 NA -     No opportunity to develop this skill in this setting as of yet/or the field instructor does
          not have evidence needed to make a judgment.

 1    -   Unacceptable: Student shows little evidence of understanding the concept and/or demonstration
          of skill development.

 2    -   Beginning Skill Development: Student shows some understanding of the concept and is
          beginning to recognize in hindsight how it might have been applied in practice situations.

 3    -   Progressing in Demonstration: Student understands the concept and demonstrates the skill but
          performance is uneven. Needs time and practice to be more consistent.

 4    -   Consistent Demonstration of High Level of Skill Development: Understands the concept and
          demonstrates the skill with consistency.

 5    -   Exceptional Demonstration of Skill Development. The skill is an integrated part of the student‟s
          stance and style. Student exhibits independence, creativity and flexibility in use of the skills.
          This category is to be used with great discretion

NARRATIVE SECTION

Please use narrative section to individualize your student's evaluation. The narrative is an important and
necessary part of the evaluation. Your comments personalize and clarify for your students the essence of
your evaluation of their work. It is important to comment on areas that need work, as well as areas in
which the student excels. It is essential for the student and the School to have this section completed.


                                       Advanced Year Expectations

First Semester (Mid-Year Evaluation):

The expected levels of performance for a first semester student are levels 3 and 4. The liaison should be
contacted under the following circumstances:

     - If a student is performing at level 1 on any specific behavioral measure;
     - If a student is performing at level 2 on more than 25% of the behavioral measures in any one of
        the core areas.

Second Semester (Final Evaluation):

The expected levels of performance for a second semester student are levels 3, 4 and 5. The liaison must
be contacted under the following circumstances:

     - If a student is performing at level 1 or 2 any specific behavioral measure
     SWRK 648-658 ADVANCED YEAR STUDENT FIELD EDUCATION EVALUATION



 1. Student identifies as a professional social worker                   Fall                 Spring
    and conducts himself/herself accordingly.
                                                               Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Attends well to professional roles and boundaries
 Demonstrates professional demeanor in appearance
 Demonstrates professional demeanor in communication
 Uses supervision and consultation effectively
 Practices personal reflection and self correction to assure
 continual professional development
 Has a commitment to conducting himself/herself as a
 professional social worker
 Demonstrates ability to assume responsibility for own
 learning and seeks out opportunities/activities to foster
 professional growth
 Plans, prioritizes and manages work assignments
 effectively
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
                Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                   _____
                       People with mental illness _____


 2. Student applies social work ethical principles to his                Fall                 Spring
    or her professional practice
                                                               Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Recognizes and manages personal values in a way that
 allows professional values to guide practice
 Abides by the ethical standards of the profession
 Abides by laws relevant to social work practice

 Tolerates ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts
 Applies strategies of ethical reasoning to arrive at
 principled decisions
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____
 3. Student applies critical thinking to inform and                        Fall                 Spring
    communicate professional judgments
                                                                 Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Uses critical thinking to address client concerns
 Demonstrates good assessment skills
 Demonstrates good problem solving skills
 Demonstrates good data gathering skills
 Analyzes complex material well
 Integrates multiple sources of knowledge, including
 research based knowledge and practice wisdom in problem
 solving.
 Demonstrates effective oral communication in working
 with individuals, families, groups organizations,
 communities and colleagues
 Demonstrates effective written communication in working
 with individuals, families, groups, organizations,
 communicates, and colleagues
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____


 4. Student understands diversity and difference and                       Fall                 Spring
    understands the influence of these factors on the
    human experience.                                            Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates the ability to work comfortably with persons
 who are different from self
 Demonstrates an awareness of socio-political and
    economic issues affecting clients who differ by such
    factors as age, class, color, culture, disability,
    ethnicity, gender identity and expression, immigration
    status, political ideology, race, religion, sex and sexual
    orientation
 Demonstrates self awareness to eliminate the influence of
    personal biases and values in working with diverse
    groups
 Recognizes the extent to which a culture‟s structures and
    values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, create or
    enhance privilege and power
 Seeks to understand the clients‟ culture and identity
     through questioning and observation
 Identifies intervention strategies that are congruent with
     the culture and identity of the client
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____




 5. Student advances human rights and social and                         Fall                 Spring
    economic justice.
                                                               Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
     Demonstrates understanding of the forms and
     mechanisms of oppression and discrimination
 Advocates for human rights and social and economic
 justice
 Analyzes the effects of policies on clients and on the
 delivery of service
     Identifies public policies that provide the mandate,
     funding, and boundaries for agency services as
     well as policies that govern service delivery
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families             _____
                       Older Adults                   _____
                       People with mental illness _____




 6. Student engages in research informed practice and                    Fall                 Spring
    practice informed research
                                                               Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Uses practice experience to inform research
 Applies research finding to practice and, under
 supervision, evaluates practice interventions
 Uses research findings to improve practice, policy, and
 social service delivery
 Is aware of and adheres to the values and ethical practices
 which govern research
 Demonstrates basic skills to evaluate their own practice
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____
 7. Student applies knowledge of human behavior and                       Fall                 Spring
    the social environment
                                                                Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates knowledge of human behavior across the
 lifespan
 Demonstrates skill in completing bio psycho social
 spiritual assessments of the client or client system
 Demonstrates knowledge of social systems that promote or
 deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well
 being
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
                Children & Families             _____
                       Older Adults                   _____
                       People with mental illness _____



 8. Student engages in policy practice to advance social                  Fall                 Spring
    and economic well being and to deliver effective social
    work services.                                              Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor

 Demonstrates an understanding of the role of policy in
 service delivery, social work practice and attainment of
 individual and social well-being
 Collaborates with colleagues and clients to implement
 effective policy change
 Understands the influence practice can have on policy
 development
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____



 9. Student understands the dynamic nature of social                      Fall                 Spring
    work practice and adapts practice approaches
    accordingly.                                                Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates ability to identify and use community
 resources
 Transfers knowledge and skill from one situation to
 another
 Learns from a variety of sources (peers, other agency staff,
 field instructor, preceptors and consultants)
 Accepts and utilizes constructive criticism
 Responds to evolving organizational, community, and
 societal contexts as all levels of practice
Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____


 10. Student engages, assesses, intervenes and evaluates                  Fall                 Spring
   individuals, families, groups, organizations, and
   communities.                                                 Student     Instructor   Student   Instructor
 Demonstrates use of empathy and other personal skills in
 with client groups
 Develops mutually agreed upon focus of work and desired
 outcomes with client groups
 Effectively prepares for work with client groups
 Collects, organizes and interprets client data
 Assess client strengths and limitations
 Develop mutually agreed on intervention goals and
 objectives with client groups
 Selects appropriate intervention strategies
 Initiates actions to achieve organizational goals
 Implements prevention interventions that enhance client
 capacities
 Help clients resolve identified concerns
 Negotiates, mediates and advocates for clients
 Facilitates transitions and endings with client groups
 Critically analyzes, monitors and evaluates interventions
 with client groups


Please indicate if the above skills were       demonstrated with one or more of the following client
groups:                Individuals               _____
                      Families                   _____
                      Groups                    _____
                      Organizations             _____
                      Communities               _____

Please note the level (1-5) at which the student mastered this skill set with the following populations:
               Children & Families            _____
                       Older Adults                 _____
                       People with mental illness _____
NARRATIVE
Please use the narrative section to individualize your student's evaluation. The narrative is an important
and necessary part of the evaluation. Your comments personalize and clarify for your students the essence
of your evaluation of their work. It is important to comment on areas that need work, as well as areas in
which the student excels. It is essential for the student and the School to have this section completed.



NARRATIVE (Fall)
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
NARRATIVE (Spring)
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________



Student has completed a total of __________________ hours.



Student Signature:                                                   Date:
                                                                             Fall


Field Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date: __________
                                                                   Fall


Student Signature: ______________________________________ Date: ___________
                                                                 Spring


Field Instructor Signature: ________________________________ Date: __________
                                                                    Spring


This form was adapted from an evaluation form developed by Charles Zastrow, PhD.
                            California State University, Chico - School of Social Work
                  Evaluation of Field Education Program by Agency Field Instructor

Agency Field Instructors and Agency Representatives: This evaluation is intended to obtain your
constructive feedback about the Field Education Program as a means of improving its quality.
Please return this form to: School of Social Work, CSU, Chico, CA 95929-0550 or by fax to: 530/898-5574.

Name:                                                                           Date:


Agency:


Agency Field Instructor            On-Site          Off-Site   Agency Representative 


Please rate the quality of your working relationship with the Field Liaison:
Excellent         Very Good          Satisfactory          Fair         Unsatisfactory 
Please rate the effectiveness of the Field Liaison in communicating and clarifying the University and the
Social Work Program's policies, procedures and expectations for field education:
Excellent          Very Good           Satisfactory        Fair        Unsatisfactory 
Please rate the overall quality and benefit of the Field Education Orientation & Training:
Excellent          Very Good         Satisfactory           Fair        Unsatisfactory 
Have you read the Field Education Handbook?
Yes        No 
Please rate the overall quality, clarity and usefulness of the Field Education Handbook:
Excellent          Very Good           Satisfactory           Fair       Unsatisfactory 
Please rate the effectiveness of the Field Liaison in establishing and maintaining a relationship with you to
facilitate the placement process and the student's learning experience:
Excellent          Very Good           Satisfactory           Fair       Unsatisfactory 
Please rate the effectiveness of the Field Liaison and/or the Director of Field Education in assisting you to
address and resolve any challenges or difficulties during the field placement:
Excellent          Very Good           Satisfactory          Fair         Unsatisfactory 
Did the Field Liaison schedule a minimum of one site visit with you each semester?
Yes          No       Comments:


Was the Field Liaison accessible to you at times other than the scheduled site visits?
Yes         Most of the Time         On Occasion           Rarely
Did this experience contribute positively to your service commitment to the profession?
Yes          No       Comments:


(please turn page and complete last question on reverse side)
Overall, how do you rate the quality of California State University, Chico--School of Social Work, Field
Education Program?
Excellent        Very Good          Satisfactory          Fair        Unsatisfactory 

Additional Comments:
                        California State University, Chico - School of Social Work
                       MSW Student Self-Assessment of Practicum Performance

Student:                                                                            Date:
Placement Site:

Instructions: : This is a self assessment completed by the student summarizing their practicum learning
experiences and progress toward attaining their learning goals and objectives. The strength of the evaluation
directly reflects the time and consideration the student contributes to this process. Students are encouraged to
address each area of this form, writing a brief statement and providing concrete examples whenever possible.
The self assessment will be turned in to the Faculty Field Liaison. The Field Liaison will place the original in
the student‟s permanent file in the CSU, Chico, School of Social Work Office. Students are encouraged to
share a copy of this self assessment with the Agency Field Instructor as well.
1. Provide an overview of your practicum learning experiences and a narrative describing the learning gains
   you made this semester. Include in your response a detailed list of activities, clients served or other
   outcomes summarizing your direct and indirect practice experience.
2. Identify any barriers or challenges you faced in striving toward your goals and objectives.
3. Describe the knowledge, skills and values you learned in your practicum, providing examples illustrating
   the progress you made in your development as a social worker.
4. Discuss 3 - 5 learning goals you plan to address in your next field placement. (Applicable only to
   Foundation Year MSW students.)
5. Comment on the nature and quality of your interactions with your Agency Field Instructor, agency staff, as
   well as your collaboration with other agencies and community members.
6. From your supervision experience this semester, discuss 3-5 insights you‟ve gained regarding your strengths
   and areas for growth as a social worker.
7. Additional comments:



Reviewed by:



Student‟s Signature                                                                  Date



Field Liaison Signature                                                              Date
                         California State University, Chico - School of Social Work
                                          ETHICAL GUIDELINES AND CONSENT

Students taking part in field education opportunities are expected to adhere to certain guidelines for ethical, responsible
conduct. This is necessary for the benefit and protection of the students themselves, as well as for the clients, placement
agencies, agency field instructor, faculty field liaison, and the University. Certain basic guidelines are described below, but
these are not exhaustive. Students are also expected to learn and adhere to the broader ethical guidelines dictated by
NASW, as well as the guidelines specific to their placement agency. If, at any time, students have questions about ethics or
responsible conduct, they should contact their agency field instructor or the faculty field liaison. At a minimum, students
agree to adhere to the following principles:

Please sign your initials on each line as you complete training in these areas. AFI = Agency Field Instructor, S = Student

        Confidentiality. The identity of clients, or information that would reveal the identity of clients, cannot be revealed
         without the specific permission of the client. The only exceptions to this are cases in which the client may be
         dangerous to themselves or others and in cases of child or elder abuse. In such situations, there may be legal
         requirements that responsible agencies be informed. There are also certain legal proceedings in which case notes
         and other records can be ordered to be released by the courts. Students must familiarize themselves with, and
         adhere to, confidentiality procedures of their placements and the laws of the state. Case material discussed in class
         must be prepared in such a way that confidentiality is maintained.
         AFI __________              S __________
         If HIPAA regulations apply, please initial here when you have trained the student as to agency regulations.
         AFI __________              S __________

        Recognition of Qualifications and Limitations. Students must recognize the limitations to their training and
         abilities and must not exceed these in work with clients. It is incumbent upon students that they recognize when
         situations are beyond their knowledge or ability. When such situations arise, students will seek assistance from
         their agency field instructor and faculty field liaison.
         AFI __________              S __________

        Identification as Interns. Students will explicitly identify themselves as students to their clients, in reports, and in
         other professional activities. They will not misrepresent their training, qualifications, or status. Students who will
         be at a placement for a limited time will inform clients of that limitation at the outset and will consider it in their
         work with clients.
         AFI __________              S __________

        Record Keeping. Students will accurately and reliably maintain written and other records as required by their
         placement agency.
         AFI __________           S __________

        Dual Relationships. Students will refrain from establishing social work relationships with persons with whom the
         student is already involved in other types of relationships. Such "dual relationships" may inhibit the effectiveness
         of the student's practice and may jeopardize both the client and the student trainee. For example, it would not be
         ethical for a student trainee to take as a client someone who was a fellow student in class. Similarly, co-workers
         and friends should not be seen as clients.
         AFI __________               S __________

        Prohibition Regarding Sexual Conduct or Harassment. Under no circumstances shall students become involved
         in sexual or romantic relationships of any sort with clients of their placement agency. Students will also refrain
         from sexual harassment and will respect the sensitivity of others regarding sexual matters.
         AFI __________              S __________

        Self-Awareness and Monitoring. Students will monitor their own emotional and physical status and should be
         aware of any conditions that might adversely impact their ability to serve their clients or placement agencies. If
         such conditions arise, students should inform their agency field instructor and the faculty field liaison.
         AFI __________              S __________

        Ethics Discussion with Field Instructor. Each student must discuss the ethical standards of their placement with
         their agency field instructor before performing any social work or client contact. Space is provided at the bottom
         of this form to indicate that such discussions have taken place and the student has been informed of ethical
         expectations.
         AFI __________               S __________

By signing below, the student agrees to adhere to the guidelines sited above as well as those of the professional discipline
and the specific placement agency.
Student Name (please print):

Student Signature                                                                          Date

Agency Field Instructor                                                                    Date

Faculty Field Liaison                                                                      Date
                                   School of Social Work
                           CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, CHICO

                      Proposal for Agency of Employment as Field Practicum Site

Agencies providing a field practicum site for student employees are agreeing to release the student
from their regular job responsibilities in order to learn new skills in another capacity within the agency.
The following conditions must be met:
1. The student must be employed by the agency.
2. Fieldwork assignments must be clearly delineated and separate from employment responsibilities
   and educationally focused to meet the requirements of the course objectives.
3. There must be an MSW (with post two years graduate experience) available to supervise the
   student who is not the student‟s employment supervisor.
4. A Service Learning Agreement must be in place between the agency and the School of Social
   Work.

The following proposal is to be submitted in addition to the field application submitted by all
students.

Student Name__________________________________ Phone___________________________

Foundation Year_____           Concentration Year_____        BSW_____

Address_______________________________________________________________________

Email____________________________________________

Agency of Employment____________________________________ Phone_________________

Address of Agency______________________________________________________________

#years employed at agency__________________ Full time_____________ Part time_________

Name of current work supervisor______________________________ Phone_______________

Email_____________________________________

Please list the student‟s current work assignments:
    1. ________________________________________________________________________
    2. ________________________________________________________________________
    3. ________________________________________________________________________
    4. ________________________________________________________________________
    5. ________________________________________________________________________
Name of proposed Field Instructor_____________________________ Phone_______________

Email____________________________________________________

Please list the student‟s proposed Fieldwork assignments/responsibilities:

1.____________________________________________________________________________
2.____________________________________________________________________________
3.____________________________________________________________________________
4.____________________________________________________________________________
5.____________________________________________________________________________

Describe the proposed schedule for fieldwork hours and employment hours:

Fieldwork days/times                                Employment days/times




The proposal should be submitted six weeks prior to beginning the field placement.


______________________________          _______________
Student signature                        Date

______________________________          _______________
Employment Supervisor signature          Date

______________________________          _______________
Proposed Field Instructor signature      Date
Reviewed and Approved By:

______________________________          _______________
Director of Field Education              Date
                               California State University, Chico
                                     School of Social Work

                 Employment Based Practicum Release of Information



I, ____________________________________________ being currently considered for placement by

California State University, Chico to the position of Student Intern with:



(Placement Agency)

and desiring the University to be informed as to my performance during this employment do hereby

authorize this employer/agency and any appropriate persons affiliated with this employer/agency to

release to the School of Social Work any and all information regarding my employment upon request.

I understand that should my employment be terminated during the course of my field practicum the

cause for my termination will be disclosed to the School of Social Work. The School of Social Work

may consider this information in rendering a decision about my continued participation in the field

practicum course.

I do hereby agree to hold such employers/agencies, references, persons, etc., harmless from liability for

releasing said information.


                                                                                   _____
Signature of Student                                                            Date

____________________________________                                         ___________
Signature of Agency Field Director                                              Date

____________________________________                                         ___________
Signature of Agency Director                                                    Date
                            California State University, Chico - School of Social Work

                     Field Liaison Evaluation of Agency & Practicum Site
Instructions: This form is intended to obtain feedback about your experience working with each of the placement
agencies in which you were assigned students. This information is very helpful in determining the suitability of
agencies in meeting the needs of our students. Please fill out an evaluation for each agency you visited. Upon
completion please return this form to the Director of Field Education. Thank you.

Agency                                                                Academic Year
Agency Field Instructor                                               On Site: _____Yes        _____ No
Field Liaison

To what degree does the agency culture support social work student training:




Does the agency field instructor receive administrative support to fulfill their responsibilities as an AFI:




To what extent does the agency offers assignments and experiences that allow students to practice and apply
concepts, principles and techniques at the micro, mezzo and macro level of practice:

Micro:


Mezzo:


Macro:



Please describe the opportunities to work with clients of diverse racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds:




What do you feel are the strengths of this placement:




Identify areas for growth or opportunities that you would like to see the agency develop for students:
Describe the quality of the working relationship with the Agency Field Instructor:




Recommendations:
APPENDIX
                               State University, Chico – School of Social Work

                          Process Recording Guidelines & Formats
Purpose:       To enhance the student‟s ability to recall the details of their interactive work with
               clients; to write clearly and coherently about the complex thoughts, reactions and
               feelings that arise in work with clients; to integrate theoretical concepts, skills and
               values into the learning experience and the insight being gained.

Format:        Several formats are available that can be modified by the Agency Field Instructor to
               address the agency‟s services and the student‟s learning needs. Each format begins with
               a description of Identifying Information, Purpose and Observations. This information
               defines the context of the intervention while allowing the student to demonstrate their
               understanding of the bio-psycho-social realities and unique aspects of the clients and
               their situations. This may include the purpose and dynamics of the group session, or
               pre-meeting activity, goals and perceptions. This is followed by a section on
               Assessment, Analysis and Planning.

*Example:

Field Instructor’s Content-Dialogue                  Initial Reactions            Student Analysis/
Comments           of Interaction                    Feelings/Responses,          Assessments
The Field Instructor     The student uses this       The student records here     The student analyzes
can make comments        space to record their       how they were feeling as     their interventions, the
and offer feedback       interaction with the        the dialogue, activity or    skills they used, and
right opposite the       client word-for-word.       interaction was taking       critically assesses
content-dialogue and     This is to include the      place. Being as open and     their own work. There
the feelings/reactions   verbal and non-verbal       honest as possible, this     may also be
that the student         communications such         allows the student to        comments for care
records.                 as interruptions, and       explore their own initial    planning and the next
                         responses, including        reactions and feelings and   intervention.
                         interactions that may       the values upon which
                         not have been part of       these reactions are based.
                         the planned
                         intervention.




                  * Source: Susanna J. Wilson, Recording: Guidelines for Social Workers
                          California State University, Chico – School of Social Work

                                          Safety Guidelines
The following guidelines are offered as basic safety tips for students in field practicum settings:

   Review the Agency‟s written policies and procedures regarding home visits, as well as other safely
    related issues. Ask a staff member familiar with the community to personally orient you.

   Be familiar with your environment: entrances, exits, places to avoid, as well as safe places. Project
    an image of knowing where you are going and what you are doing, even if you don‟t. The last
    thing you want to do is look preoccupied, distracted or lost.

   Observe how clients are dressed and their body language. Are they wearing coats, jackets or other
    clothing that may conceal a weapon?

   Always be sure you have enough gas in the vehicle you are driving, and carry with you either a cell
    phone or change to place several calls at all times. Also carry agency contact numbers in case of a
    vehicle breakdown. Know the procedure for getting emergency assistance from your agency.

   Visit at times of high activity, such as 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., when
    children in the home or neighborhood are going to school or are getting out of school.

   Select a time when people who are known to be violent are out of the home.

   Be mindful that your own clothing and jewelry not misrepresent you or put you at risk for being a
    target for a crime, such as wearing expensive jewelry or clothing that could be interpreted as
    provocative or reflective of gang membership.

   If is seems appropriate in the community and the client or family agrees, walk around the
    neighborhood, visit the park together or sit on the porch with the family from time to time, so
    others can see that you are there with the client‟s permission.

   While protecting the client‟s confidentiality, be prepared to answer questions simply and directly
    pertaining to who you are, what you are doing and why you are with the client. This may be
    important in demonstrating to neighbors that you are not a salesperson, missionary, police officer
    or even a new drug dealer in the neighborhood.

   ALWAYS let the staff at the Agency know where you are going and when you will return.

   Call clients ahead of your visit to let them know to expect you at a certain time. Ask them to
    contact the Agency if you are late.

   At the door, listen before you knock. If you hear sounds that convey a threatening situation is going
    on, leave immediately.

   Stand to one side of the door when you knock, not directly in front. Do not accept invitations such
    as, “Is that you? Just come in”. Identify yourself and ask the occupant to come to the door to let
    you in.
   Once inside, be alert and observant of your environment. Are there any weapons around? Are
    drugs being used in the home? Is someone intoxicated and physically acting out? In such cases,
    inform your primary client that you cannot remain and try to reschedule the visit. Regardless, get
    out.

   If a client or family member‟s language or behavior begins to escalate, do not get physical.

   If you are in a situation that is escalating:

       DIVERT          Refocus the attention to another subject. Change seats. Ask for a cup of water.

       DIFFUSE         Using a clear, confident tone of voice, convey you agree with the person and
                       how they feel they have been treated. Assure them they are safe.

       DELAY           Ask to postpone your discussion, or “practice strength in numbers” by calling
                       for back up assistance if the situation requires you remain in the home, - OR-

       LEAVE

While none of us like to think of the possibility that any of the aforementioned will happen to us,
taking safety precautions and paying attention to the environment we are working in is a critical aspect
of home-based work and being effective as a social worker in the community.

Many agencies offer safety training related to home visits as well as training in de-escalating
potentially violent clients. You are encouraged to participate in these trainings when they are offered.

If you have questions or need further guidance, contact your Agency Field Instructor, your Field
Liaison, or the Director of Field Education.




         (These sections were adapted from Tulane University, the University of Alaska, Anchorage,
                                 and Virginia Commonwealth University.)
                                               NASW Code of Ethics
Professional ethics are at the core of social work. The profession has an obligation to articulate its basic values, ethical
principles, and ethical standards. The NASW Code of Ethics sets forth these values, principles, and standards to guide
social workers' conduct. The Code is relevant to all social workers and social work students, regardless of their
professional functions, the settings in which they work, or the populations they serve.

The NASW Code of Ethics serves six purposes:

  1.   The Code identifies core values on which social work's mission is based.
  2.   The Code summarizes broad ethical principles that reflect the profession's core values and establishes a set of
       specific ethical standards that should be used to guide social work practice.
  3.   The Code is designed to help social workers identify relevant considerations when professional obligations conflict
       or ethical uncertainties arise.
  4.   The Code provides ethical standards to which the general public can hold the social work profession accountable.
  5.   The Code socializes practitioners new to the field to social work's mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical
       standards.
  6.   The Code articulates standards that the social work profession itself can use to assess whether social workers have
       engaged in unethical conduct. NASW has formal procedures to adjudicate ethics complaints filed against its
       members. In subscribing to this Code, social workers are required to cooperate in its implementation, participate in
       NASW adjudication proceedings, and abide by any NASW disciplinary rulings or sanctions based on it.

The Code offers a set of values, principles, and standards to guide decision making and conduct when ethical issues arise.
It does not provide a set of rules that prescribe how social workers should act in all situations. Specific applications of the
Code must take into account the context in which it is being considered and the possibility of conflicts among the Code's
values, principles, and standards. Ethical responsibilities flow from all human relationships, from the personal and familial
to the social and professional.

Further, the NASW Code of Ethics does not specify which values, principles, and standards are most important, and which
outweigh others in instances of conflict. Reasonable differences of opinion can, and do, exist among social workers when
ranking the order of values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. Ethical decision-making in a given situation must
include the informed judgment of the individual social worker, and should also consider how the issues would be judged in
a peer review process where the ethical standards of the profession would be applied.

Ethical decision making is a process. There are many instances in social work where simple answers are not available to
resolve complex ethical issues. Social workers should take into consideration all the values, principles, and standards in
this Code that are relevant to any situation in which ethical judgment is warranted. Social workers' decisions and actions
should be consistent with the spirit, as well as the letter, of this Code.

In addition to the NASW Code, there are many other sources of information about ethical thinking that may be useful.
Social workers should consider ethical theory and principles generally, social work theory and research, laws, regulations,
agency policies, and other relevant codes of ethics, recognizing that among codes of ethics, social workers should consider
the NASW Code of Ethics as their primary source. Social workers also should be aware of the impact on ethical decision
making of their clients' and their own personal values, as well as cultural and religious beliefs and practices. They should
be aware of any conflicts between personal and professional values, and deal with those conflicts responsibly. For
additional guidance, social workers should consult the relevant literature on professional ethics and ethical decision-
making and seek appropriate consultation when faced with ethical dilemmas. This may involve consultation with an
agency-based or social work organization's ethics committee, a regulatory body, knowledgeable colleagues, supervisors, or
legal counsel.

Instances may arise when social workers' ethical obligations conflict with agency policies, or relevant laws or regulations.
When such conflicts occur, social workers must make a responsible effort to resolve the conflict in a manner that is
consistent with the values, principles, and standards expressed in this Code. If a reasonable resolution of the conflict does
not appear possible, social workers should seek proper consultation before making a decision.

The NASW Code of Ethics is to be used by NASW and by individuals, agencies, organizations, and bodies (such as
licensing and regulatory boards, professional liability insurance providers, courts of law, agency boards of directors,
government agencies, and other professional groups) that choose to adopt it or use it as a frame of reference. Violation of
standards in this Code does not automatically imply legal liability or violation of the law. Such determination can only be
made in the context of legal and judicial proceedings. Alleged violations of the Code would be subject to a peer review
process. Such processes are generally separate from legal or administrative procedures and insulated from legal review or
proceedings to allow the profession to counsel and discipline its own members.

A code of ethics cannot guarantee ethical behavior. Moreover, a code of ethics cannot resolve all ethical issues or disputes,
or capture the richness and complexity involved in striving to make responsible choices within a moral community. Rather,
a code of ethics sets forth values, ethical principles, and ethical standards to which professionals aspire and by which their
actions can be judged. Social workers' ethical behavior should result from their personal commitment to engage in ethical
practice. The NASW Code of Ethics reflects the commitment of all social workers to uphold the profession's values and to
act ethically. Principles and standards must be applied by individuals of good character who discern moral questions and,
in good faith, seek to make reliable ethical judgments.

                                                   Ethical Principles
The following broad ethical principles are based on social work's core values of service, social justice, dignity and worth
of the person importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. These principles set forth ideals to which all
social workers should aspire.

Value: Service
Ethical Principle: Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.
Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their knowledge, values, and skills to
help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their
professional skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service).

Value: Social Justice
Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.
Social workers pursue social change, particularly with, and on behalf of, vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups
of people. Social workers' social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination,
and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression, and
cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; an
equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision-making for all people.

Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person
Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.
Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic
diversity. Social workers promote clients' socially responsible self-determination. Social workers seek to enhance clients'
capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social workers are cognizant of their dual
responsibility to clients and to the broader society. They seek to resolve conflicts between clients' interests and the broader
society's interests in a socially responsible manner consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the
profession.

Value: Importance of Human Relationships
Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.
Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change. Social
workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in
a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being of individuals, families, social groups,
organizations and communities.

Value: Integrity
Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.
Social workers are continually aware of the profession's mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards; and
practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers act honestly and responsibly, and promote ethical practices on
the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

Value: Competence
Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional
expertise.
Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice. Social
workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession.
                                                    Ethical Standards
The following ethical standards are relevant to the professional activities of all social workers. These standards concern (1)
social workers' ethical responsibilities to clients, (2) social workers' ethical responsibilities to colleagues, (3) social workers'
ethical responsibilities in practice settings, (4) social workers' ethical responsibilities as professionals, (5) social workers'
ethical responsibilities to the social work profession, and (6) social workers' ethical responsibilities to the broader society.

Many of the standards that follow are enforceable guidelines for professional conduct. The extent to which each standard is
enforceable is a matter of professional judgment to be exercised by those responsible for reviewing alleged violations of
ethical standards.

1.   SOCIAL WORKERS' ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO CLIENTS
1.01 Commitment to Clients
Social workers' primary responsibility is to promote the well-being of clients. In general, clients' interests are primary.
However, social workers' responsibility to the larger society or specific legal obligations may, on limited occasions,
supersede the loyalty owed clients, and clients should be so advised. (Examples include when a social worker is required by
law to report that a client has abused a child or has threatened to harm self or others.)

1.02 Self-Determination
Social workers respect and promote the right of clients to self-determination and assist clients in their efforts to identify and
clarify their goals. Social workers may limit clients' right to self-determination when, in the social workers' professional
judgment, clients' actions or potential actions pose a serious, foreseeable, and imminent risk to themselves or others.

1.03 Informed Consent
(a) Social workers should provide services to clients only in the context of a professional relationship based, when
    appropriate, on valid informed consent. Social workers should use clear and understandable language to inform clients
    of the purpose of the services, risks related to the services, limits to services because of the requirements of a third-
    party payer, relevant costs, reasonable alternatives, clients' right to refuse or withdraw consent, and the time frame
    covered by the consent. Social workers should provide clients with an opportunity to ask questions.
(b) In instances when clients are not literate or have difficulty understanding the primary language used in the practice
    setting, social workers should take steps to ensure clients' comprehension. This may include providing clients with a
    detailed verbal explanation or arranging for a qualified interpreter or translator whenever possible.
(c) In instances when clients lack the capacity to provide informed consent, social workers should protect clients' interests
    by seeking permission from an appropriate third party, informing clients consistent with the clients' level of
    understanding. In such instances social workers should seek to ensure that the third party acts in a manner consistent
    with clients' wishes and interests. Social workers should take reasonable steps to enhance such clients' ability to give
    informed consent.
(d) In instances when clients are receiving services involuntarily, social workers should provide information about the
    nature and extent of services and about the extent of clients' right to refuse service.
(e) Social workers who provide services via electronic media (such as computer, telephone, radio, and television) should
    inform recipients of the limitations and risks associated with such services.
(f) Social workers should obtain clients' informed consent before audio taping or videotaping clients or permitting
    observation of services to clients by a third party.

1.04 Competence
 (a) Social workers should provide services and represent themselves as competent only within the boundaries of their
     education, training, license, certification, consultation received, supervised experience, or other relevant professional
     experience.
(b) Social workers should provide services in substantive areas or use intervention techniques or approaches that are new
     to them only after engaging in appropriate study, training, consultation, and supervision from people who are
     competent in those interventions or techniques.
(c) When generally recognized standards do not exist with respect to an emerging area of practice, social workers should
     exercise careful judgment and take responsible steps (including appropriate education, research, training, consultation,
     and supervision) to ensure the competence of their work and to protect clients from harm.

1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity
(a) Social workers should understand culture and its function in human behavior and society, recognizing the strengths that
    exist in all cultures.
(b) Social workers should have a knowledge base of their clients' cultures, and be able to demonstrate competence in the
    provision of services that are sensitive to clients' cultures and to differences among people and cultural groups.
(c) Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with
    respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, and
    mental or physical disability.

1.06 Conflicts of Interest
(a) Social workers should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest that interfere with the exercise of professional
    discretion and impartial judgment. Social workers should inform clients when a real or potential conflict of interest
    arises and take reasonable steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes the clients' interests primary and protects
    clients' interests to the greatest extent possible. In some cases, protecting clients' interests may require termination of
    the professional relationship with proper referral of the client.
(b) Social workers should not take unfair advantage of any professional relationship or exploit others to further their per-
    sonal, religious, political, or business interests.
(c) Social workers should not engage in dual or multiple relationships with clients or former clients in which there is a risk
    of exploitation or potential harm to the client. In instances when dual or multiple relationships are unavoidable, social
    workers should take steps to protect clients, and they are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally
    sensitive boundaries. (Dual or multiple relationships occur when social workers relate to clients in more than one
    relationship, whether professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or
    consecutively.)
(d) When social workers provide services to two or more people who have a relationship with each other (for example,
    couples, family members), social workers should clarify with all parties which individuals will be considered the client,
    and the nature of the social worker‟s professional obligations to the various individuals who are receiving services.
    Social workers who anticipate a conflict of interest among the individuals receiving services or who anticipate having
    to perform in potentially conflicting roles (for example, when a social worker is asked to testify in a child custody
    dispute or divorce proceedings involving clients), should clarify their role with the parties involved and take
    appropriate action to minimize any conflict of interest.

1.07 Privacy and Confidentiality
(a) Social workers should respect clients' right to privacy. Social workers should not solicit private information from
    clients unless it is essential to providing services or conducting social work evaluation or research. Once private
    information is shared, standards of confidentiality apply.
(b) Social workers may disclose confidential information when appropriate with valid consent from a client or a person
    legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client.
(c) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of all information obtained in the course of professional service,
    except for compelling professional reasons. The general expectation that social workers will keep information
    confidential does not apply when disclosure is necessary to prevent serious, foreseeable, and imminent harm to a client
    or other identifiable person or when laws or regulations require disclosure without a client's consent. In all instances,
    social workers should disclose the least amount of confidential information necessary to achieve the desired purpose;
    revealing only information that is directly relevant to the purpose for which the disclosure is made.
(d) Social workers should inform clients, to the extent possible, about the disclosure of confidential information and, when
    feasible, the potential consequences, before the disclosure is made. This applies whether social workers disclose
    confidential information on the basis of a legal requirement or with client consent.
(e) Social workers should discuss with clients and other interested parties the nature of confidentiality and limitations of
    the client‟s right to confidentiality. Social workers should review with clients circumstances where confidential
    information may be requested, and where disclosure of confidential information may be legally required. This
    discussion should occur as soon as possible in the social worker-client relationship, and as needed throughout the
    course of the relationship.
(f) When social workers provide counseling services to families, couples, or groups, social workers should seek agreement
    among the parties involved concerning each individual's right to confidentiality and obligation to preserve the
    confidentiality of information shared by others. Social workers should inform participants in family, couples, or group
    counseling that social workers cannot guarantee that all participants will honor such agreements.
(g) Social workers should inform clients involved in family, couples, marital, or group counseling of the social worker's,
    employer's, and agency's policy concerning the social worker's disclosure of confidential information among the parties
    involved in the counseling.
(h) Social workers should not disclose confidential information to third-party payers unless clients have authorized such
    disclosure.
(i) Social workers should not discuss confidential information in any setting unless privacy can be ensured. Social workers
     should not discuss confidential information in public or semi-public areas such as hallways, waiting rooms, elevators,
     and restaurants.
(j) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients during legal proceedings to the extent permitted by law.
     When a court of law or other legally authorized body orders social workers to disclose confidential or privileged
     information without a client's consent and such disclosure could cause harm to the client, social workers should request
     that the court withdraw the order, limit the order as narrowly as possible, or maintain the records under seal,
     unavailable for public inspection.
(k) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients when responding to requests from members of the media.
(1) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients' written and electronic records and other sensitive
     information. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that clients' records are stored in a secure location
     and that clients' records are not available to others who are not authorized to have access.
(m) Social workers should take precautions to ensure and maintain the confidentiality of information transmitted to other
     parties through the use of computers, electronic mail, facsimile machines, telephones and telephone answering
     machines, and other electronic or computer technology. Disclosure of identifying information should be avoided
     whenever possible.
(n) Social workers should transfer or dispose of clients‟ records in a manner that protects clients‟ confidentiality, and is
     consistent with state statutes governing records and social work licensure.
(o) Social workers should take reasonable precautions to protect client confidentiality in the event of the social worker's
     termination of practice, incapacitation, or death.
(p) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients for teaching or training purposes
     unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information.
(q) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients with consultants unless the client
     has consented to disclosure of confidential information, or there is a compelling need for such disclosure.
(r) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of deceased clients consistent with the preceding standards.

1.08 Access to Records
(a) Social workers should provide clients with reasonable access to records concerning the that client. Social workers who
     are concerned that clients' access to their records could cause serious misunderstanding or harm to the client, should
     provide assistance in interpreting the records and consultation with the client regarding the records. Social workers
     should limit clients' access to their records, or portions of their records, only in exceptional circumstances when there is
     compelling evidence that such access would cause serious harm to the client. Both clients' requests and the rationale
     for withholding some or all of the record should be documented in the client‟s files.
(b) When providing clients with access to their records, social workers should take steps to protect the confidentiality of
     other individuals identified or discussed in such records.

1.09 Sexual Relationships
(a) Social workers should under no circumstances engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with current clients,
     whether such contact is consensual or forced.
(b) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with clients' relatives or other individuals with
     whom clients maintain a close personal relationship when there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client.
     Sexual activity or sexual contact with clients' relatives, or other individuals with whom clients maintain a personal
     relationship, has the potential to be harmful to the client and may make it difficult for the social worker and client to
     maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Social workers-not their clients, their clients' relatives, or other
     individuals with whom the client maintains a personal relationship-assume the full burden for setting clear, appropriate,
     and culturally sensitive boundaries.
(c) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with former clients because of the potential for
     harm to the client. If social workers engage in conduct contrary to this prohibition or claim that an exception to this
     prohibition is warranted because of extraordinary circumstances, it is social workers, not their clients, who assume the
     full burden of demonstrating that the former client has not been exploited, coerced, or manipulated, intentionally or
     unintentionally.
(d) Social workers should not provide clinical services to individuals with whom they have had a prior sexual relationship.
     Providing clinical services to a former sexual partner has the potential to be harmful to the individual, and is likely to
     make it difficult for the social worker and individual to maintain appropriate professional boundaries.

1.10 Physical Contact
Social workers should not engage in physical contact with clients when there is a possibility of psychological harm to the
client as a result of the contact (such as cradling or caressing clients). Social workers who engage in appropriate physical
contact with clients are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such
physical contact.

1.11 Sexual Harassment
Social workers should not sexually harass clients. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests
for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

1.12 Derogatory Language
Social workers should not use derogatory language in their written or verbal communications to or about clients. Social
workers should use accurate and respectful language in all communications to and about clients.

1.13 Payment for Services
(a) When setting fees, social workers should ensure that the fees are fair, reasonable, and commensurate with the services
    performed. Consideration should be given to the client‟s ability to pay.
(b) Social workers should avoid accepting goods or services from clients as payment for professional services. Bartering
    arrangements, particularly involving services, create the potential for conflicts of interest, exploitation, and
    inappropriate boundaries in social workers' relationships with clients. Social workers should explore, and may
    participate in, bartering only in very limited circumstances when it can be demonstrated that such arrangements are an
    accepted practice among professionals in the local community, considered to be essential for the provision of services,
    negotiated without coercion, and entered into at the client's initiative and with the client's informed consent. Social
    workers who accept goods or services from clients as payment for professional services assume the full burden of
    demonstrating that this arrangement will not be detrimental to the client or the professional relationship.
(c) Social workers should not solicit a private fee or other remuneration for providing services to clients who are entitled
    to such available services through the social workers' employer or agency.

1.14 Clients Who Lack Decision-Making Capacity
When social workers act on behalf of clients who lack the capacity to make informed decisions, social workers should take
reasonable steps to safeguard the interests and rights of those clients.

1.15 Interruption of Services
Social workers should make reasonable efforts to ensure continuity of services in the event that services are interrupted by
factors such as unavailability, relocation, illness, disability, or death.

1.16 Termination of Services
(a) Social workers should terminate services and the professional relationship with clients when such services and
    relationships are no longer required or no longer serve the client‟s needs or interests.
(b) Social workers should take reasonable steps to avoid abandoning clients who are still in need of services. Social
    workers should withdraw services precipitously only under unusual circumstances, giving careful consideration to all
    factors in the situation, and taking care to minimize possible adverse effects. Social workers should assist in making
    appropriate arrangements for continuation of services when necessary.
(c) Social workers in fee-for-service settings may terminate services to clients who are not paying an overdue balance if
    the financial contractual arrangements have been made clear to the client, if the client does not pose an imminent
    danger to self or others, and if the clinical and other consequences of the current nonpayment have been addressed and
    discussed with the client.
(d) Social workers should not terminate services to pursue a social, financial, or sexual relationship with a client.
(e) Social workers who anticipate the termination or interruption of services to clients should notify clients promptly and
    seek the transfer, referral, or continuation of services in relation to the client‟s needs and preferences.
(f) Social workers who are leaving an employment setting should inform clients of appropriate options for the
    continuation of services, as well as the benefits and risks of the options.

2.   SOCIAL WORKERS' ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO COLLEAGUE

2.01 Respect
(a) Social workers should treat colleagues with respect and should represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views,
    and obligations of colleagues.
(b) Social workers should avoid unwarranted negative criticism of colleagues in communications with clients or with other
    professionals. Unwarranted negative criticism may include demeaning comments that refer to a colleague‟s level of
    competence or to an individual‟s attributes, such as race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age,
    marital status, political belief, religion, and mental or physical disability.
(c) Social workers should cooperate with social work colleagues and with colleagues of other professions when such
    cooperation serves the well-being of clients.

2.02 Confidentiality
Social workers should respect confidential information shared by colleagues in the course of their professional relationships
and transactions. Social workers should ensure that such colleagues understand the social worker‟s obligation to respect
confidentiality and any exceptions related to it.

2.03 Interdisciplinary Collaboration
(a) Social workers who are members of an interdisciplinary team should participate in and contribute to decisions that
    affect the well-being of clients by drawing on the perspectives, values, and experiences of the social work profession.
    Professional and ethical obligations of the interdisciplinary team as a whole, and of its individual members, should be
    clearly established.
(b) Social workers for whom a team decision raises ethical concerns should attempt to resolve the disagreement through
    appropriate channels. If the disagreement cannot be resolved, social workers should pursue other avenues to address
    their concerns consistent with client well-being.

2.04 Disputes Involving Colleagues
(a) Social workers should not take advantage of a dispute between a colleague and an employer to obtain a position or
    otherwise advance the social worker‟s own interests.
(b) Social workers should not exploit clients in disputes with colleagues or engage clients in any inappropriate discussion
    of conflicts between social workers and their colleagues.

2.05 Consultation
(a) Social workers should seek the advice and counsel of colleagues whenever such consultation is in the best interests of
    clients.
(b) Social workers should keep themselves informed about their colleagues' areas of expertise and competencies. Social
    workers should seek consultation only from colleagues who have demonstrated knowledge, expertise, and competence
    related to the subject of the consultation.
(c) When consulting with colleagues about a client, social workers should disclose the least amount of information
    necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation.

2.06 Referral for Services
(a) Social workers should refer a client to another professional when the other professional‟s specialized knowledge or
    expertise is needed to fully serve the client, or when a social worker believes that they are not being effective or
    making reasonable progress with a client and that additional service is required.
(b) Social workers who refer a client to another professional should take appropriate steps to facilitate an orderly transfer
    of responsibility. Social workers who refer a client to another professional should disclose, with the client‟s consent,
    all pertinent information to the new service provider.
(c) Social workers are prohibited from giving or receiving payment for a referral when no professional service is provided
    by the referring social worker.

2.07 Sexual Relationships
(a) Social workers who function as supervisors or educators should not engage in sexual activities or contact with
    supervisees, students, trainees, or other colleagues over whom they exercise professional authority.
(b) Social workers should avoid engaging in sexual relationships with colleagues when there is potential for a conflict of
    interest. Social workers who become involved in, or anticipate becoming involved in, a sexual relationship with a
    colleague, have a duty to transfer professional responsibilities, when necessary, to avoid a conflict of interest.

2.08 Sexual Harassment
Social workers should not sexually harass supervisees, students, trainees, or colleagues. Sexual harassment includes sexual
advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.
2.09 Impairment of Colleagues
(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague's impairment that is due to personal problems,
    psychosocial distress, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties that interferes with practice effectiveness, should
    consult with that colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in taking remedial action.
(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague's impairment interferes with practice effectiveness, and that
    the colleague has not taken adequate steps to address the impairment, should take action through appropriate channels
    established by employers, agencies, NASW, licensing and regulatory bodies, and other professional organizations.

2.10 Incompetence of Colleagues
(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague's incompetence should consult with that
    colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in taking remedial action.
(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague is incompetent and has not taken adequate steps to address the
    incompetence, should take action through appropriate channels established by employers, agencies, NASW, licensing
    and regulatory bodies, and other professional organizations.

2.11 Unethical Conduct of Colleagues
(a) Social workers should take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, expose, and correct the unethical conduct of
    colleagues.
(b) Social workers should be knowledgeable about established policies and procedures for handling concerns about a
    colleague‟s unethical behavior. Social workers should be familiar with national, state, and local procedures for
    handling ethics complaints. These procedures include policies and procedures created by NASW, licensing and
    regulatory bodies, employers, agencies, and other professional organizations.
(c) Social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should seek resolution by discussing their concerns
    with the colleague, when feasible, at a time when such discussion is likely to be productive.
(d) When necessary, social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should take action through
    appropriate formal channels (such as contacting a state licensing board or regulatory body, an NASW committee on
    inquiry, or other professional ethics committees).
(e) Social workers should defend and assist colleagues who are unjustly charged with unethical conduct.


3.   SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES IN PRACTICE SETTINGS

3.01 Supervision and Consultation
(a) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation should have the necessary knowledge and skill to supervise or
    consult appropriately and should do so only within their areas of knowledge and competence.
(b) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally
    sensitive boundaries.
(c) Social workers should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with supervisees in which there is a risk of
    exploitation of, or potential harm to, the supervisees.
(d) Social workers who provide supervision should evaluate a supervisee‟s performance in a manner that is fair and
    respectful.

3.02 Education and Training
(a) Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should provide instruction only
    within their areas of knowledge and competence, and should provide instruction based on the most current information
    and knowledge available in the profession.
(b) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should evaluate a student‟s performance in a
    manner that is fair and respectful.
(c) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should take reasonable steps to ensure that
    clients are routinely informed when services are being provided by students.
(d) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should not engage in any dual or multiple
    relationships with students in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the student. Social work
    educators and field instructors are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.
3.03 Performance Evaluation
Social workers who have responsibility for evaluating the performance of others should fulfill such responsibility in a fair
and considerate manner and on the basis of clearly stated criteria.

3.04 Client Records
(a) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that documentation in records is accurate and reflects the
    services provided.
(b) Social workers should include sufficient and timely documentation in records to facilitate the delivery of services and
    to ensure continuity of services provided to clients in the future.
(c) Social workers' documentation should protect clients' privacy to the extent that is possible and appropriate and should
    include only information that is directly relevant to the delivery of services.
(d) Social workers should store records following the termination of services to ensure reasonable future access. Records
    should be maintained for the number of years required by state statutes or relevant contracts.

3.05 Billing
Social workers should establish and maintain billing practices that accurately reflect the nature and extent of services
provided and that identify who provided the service in the practice setting.

3.06 Client Transfer
(a) When an individual who is receiving services from another agency or colleague contacts a social worker for services,
    the social worker should carefully consider the client's needs before agreeing to provide services. To minimize
    possible confusion and conflict, social workers should discuss with potential clients the nature of the clients' current
    relationship with other service providers and the implications, including possible benefits or risks, of entering into a
    relationship with a new service provider.
(b) If a new client has been served by another agency or colleague, social workers should discuss with the client whether
    consultation with the previous service provider is in the client's best interest.

3.07 Administration
(a) Social work administrators should advocate within and outside their agencies for adequate resources to meet clients'
    needs.
(b) Social workers should advocate for resource allocation procedures that are open and fair. When not all clients' needs
    can be met, an allocation procedure should be developed that is nondiscriminatory and based on appropriate and
    consistently applied principles.
(c) Social workers who are administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that adequate agency or organizational
    resources are available to provide appropriate staff supervision.
(d) Social work administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that the working environment for which they are
    responsible is consistent with, and encourages compliance with, the NASW Code of Ethics. Social work administrators
    should take reasonable steps to eliminate any conditions in their organizations that violate, interfere with, or discourage
    compliance with the Code.

3.08 Continuing Education and Staff Development
Social work administrators and supervisors should take reasonable steps to provide or arrange for continuing education and
staff development for all staff for whom they are responsible. Continuing education and staff development should address
current knowledge and emerging developments related to social work practice and ethics.

3.09 Commitments to Employers
(a) Social workers generally should adhere to commitments made to employers and employing organizations.
(b) Social workers should work to improve employing agency‟s policies and procedures and the efficiency and
    effectiveness of their services.
(c) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that employers are aware of a social worker‟s ethical obligations
    as set forth in the NASW Code of Ethics and of the implications of those obligations for social work practice.
(d) Social workers should not allow an employing organization's policies, procedures, regulations, or administrative orders
    to interfere with their ethical practice of social work. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that their
    employing organization‟s practices are consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics.
(e) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate discrimination in the employing organization's work assignments
    and in its employment policies and practices.
(f) Social workers should accept employment or arrange student field placements only in organizations that exercise fair
    personnel practices.
(g) Social workers should be diligent stewards of the resources of their employing organizations, wisely conserving funds
    where appropriate and never misappropriating funds or using them for unintended purposes.

3.10 Labor-Management Disputes
(a) Social workers may engage in organized action, including the formation of and participation in labor unions, to
    improve services to clients and working conditions.
(b) The actions of social workers who are involved in labor-management disputes, job actions, or labor strikes should be
    guided by the profession's values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. Reasonable differences of opinion exist
    among social workers concerning their primary obligation as professionals during an actual or threatened labor strike or
    job action. Social workers should carefully examine relevant issues and their possible impact on clients before deciding
    on a course of action.

4.   SOCIAL WORKERS' ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES AS PROFESSIONALS

4.01 Competence
(a) Social workers should accept responsibility or employment only on the basis of existing competence or the intention to
    acquire the necessary competence.
(b) Social workers should strive to become and remain proficient in professional practice and the performance of
    professional functions. Social workers should critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant
    to social work. Social workers should routinely review the professional literature and participate in continuing
    education relevant to social work practice and social work ethics.
(c) Social workers should base their practice on recognized knowledge, including empirically based knowledge relevant to
    social work and social work ethics.

4.02 Discrimination
Social workers should not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination on the basis of race,
ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, or mental or physical
disability.

4.03 Private Conduct
Social workers should not permit their private conduct to interfere with their ability to fulfill their professional
responsibilities.

4.04 Dishonesty, Fraud, and Deception
Social workers should not participate in, condone, or be associated with dishonesty, fraud, or deception.

4.05 Impairment
(a) Social workers should not allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse,
    or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance, or to jeopardize the best
    interests of clients for whom they have a professional responsibility.
(b) Social workers whose personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health
    difficulties interfere with their professional judgment and performance, should immediately seek consultation and take
    appropriate remedial action by seeking professional help, making adjustments in their workload, terminate their
    practice, or taking any other steps necessary to protect clients and others.

4.06 Misrepresentation
(a) Social workers should make clear distinctions between statements made and actions engaged in as a private individual
    and as a representative of the social work profession, a professional social work organization, or the social worker's
    employing agency.
(b) Social workers who speak on behalf of professional social work organizations should accurately represent the official
    and authorized positions of the organizations.
(c) Social workers should ensure that their representations to clients, agencies or the public, of their professional
    qualifications, credentials, education, competence, affiliations, services provided, or results to be achieved are accurate.
    Social workers should claim only those relevant professional credentials they actually possess and take steps to correct
    any inaccuracies or misrepresentations of their credentials by others.
4.07 Solicitations
(a) Social workers should not engage in uninvited solicitation of potential clients who, because of their circumstances, are
    vulnerable to undue influence, manipulation, or coercion.
(b) Social workers should not engage in solicitation of testimonial endorsements (including solicitation of consent to use a
    client's prior statement as a testimonial endorsement) from current clients or from other people who, because of their
    particular circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence.

4.08 Acknowledging Credit
(a) Social workers should take responsibility and credit, including authorship credit, only for work they have actually
    performed and to which they have contributed.
(b) Social workers should honestly acknowledge the work of and the contributions made by others.

5.   SOCIAL WORKERS' ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION

5.01 Integrity of the Profession
(a) Social workers should work toward the maintenance and promotion of high standards of practice.
(b) Social workers should uphold and advance the values, ethics, knowledge, and mission of the profession. Social
    workers should protect, enhance, and improve the integrity of the profession through appropriate study and research,
    active discussion, and responsible criticism of the profession.
(c) Social workers should contribute time and professional expertise to activities that promote respect for the value,
    integrity, and competence of the social work profession. These activities may include teaching, research, consultation,
    service, legislative testimony, presentations in the community, and participation in their professional organizations.
(d) Social workers should contribute to the knowledge base of social work and share with colleagues their knowledge
    related to practice, research, and ethics. Social workers should seek to contribute to the profession's literature and to
    share their knowledge at professional meetings and conferences.
(e) Social workers should act to prevent the unauthorized and unqualified practice of social work.

5.02 Evaluation and Research
(a) Social workers should monitor and evaluate policies, the implementation of programs, and practice interventions.
(b) Social workers should promote and facilitate evaluation and research to contribute to the development of knowledge.
(c) Social workers should critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to social work and fully
     use evaluation and research evidence in their professional practice.
(d) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should carefully consider possible consequences and should follow
     guidelines developed for the protection of evaluation and research participants. Appropriate institutional review boards
     should be consulted.
(e) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should obtain voluntary and written informed consent from
     participants, when appropriate, without any implied or actual deprivation or penalty for refusal to participate; without
     undue inducement to participate; and with due regard for participants' well-being, privacy, and dignity. Informed
     consent should include information about the nature, extent, and duration of the participation requested and disclosure
     of the risks and benefits of participation in the research.
(f) When evaluation or research participants are incapable of giving informed consent, social workers should provide an
     appropriate explanation to the participants, obtain the participants' assent to the extent they are able, and obtain written
     consent from an appropriate proxy.
(g) Social workers should never design or conduct evaluation or research that does not use consent procedures, such as
     certain forms of naturalistic observation and archival research, unless rigorous and responsible review of the research
     has found it to be justified because of its prospective scientific, educational, or applied value and unless equally
     effective alternative procedures that do not involve waiver of consent are not feasible.
(h) Social workers should inform participants of their right to withdraw from evaluation and research at any time without
     penalty.
(i) Social workers should take appropriate steps to ensure that participants in evaluation and research have access to
     appropriate supportive services.
(j) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should protect participants from unwarranted physical or mental dis-
     tress, harm, danger, or deprivation.
(k) Social workers engaged in the evaluation of services should discuss collected information only for professional
     purposes and only with people professionally concerned with this information.
(1) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should ensure the anonymity or confidentiality of participants and of
     the data obtained from them. Social workers should inform participants of any limits of confidentiality, the measures
     that will be taken to ensure confidentiality, and when any records containing research data will be destroyed.
(m) Social workers who report evaluation and research results should protect participants' confidentiality by omitting
     identifying information unless proper consent has been obtained authorizing disclosure.
(n) Social workers should report evaluation and research findings accurately. They should not fabricate or falsify results
     and should take steps to correct any errors later found in published data using standard publication methods.
(o) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest and dual relationships
     with participants, should inform participants when a real or potential conflict of interest arises, and should take steps to
     resolve the issue in a manner that makes participants' interests primary.
(p) Social workers should educate themselves, their students, and their colleagues about responsible research practices.

6.   SOCIAL WORKERS' ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE BROADER SOCIETY

6.01 Social Welfare
Social workers should promote the general welfare of society, from local to global levels, and the development of people,
their communities, and their environments. Social workers should advocate for living conditions conducive to the
fulfillment of basic human needs and should promote social, economic, political, and cultural values and institutions that
are compatible with the realization of social justice.

6.02 Public Participation
Social workers should facilitate informed participation by the public in shaping social policies and institutions.

6.03 Public Emergencies
Social workers should provide appropriate professional services in public emergencies to the greatest extent possible.

6.04 Social and Political Action
(a) Social workers should engage in social and political action that seeks to ensure that all people have equal access to the
    resources, employment, services, and opportunities they require to meet their basic human needs and to develop fully.
    Social workers should be aware of the impact of the political arena on practice and should advocate for changes in
    policy and legislation to improve social conditions in order to meet basic human needs and promote social justice.
(b) Social workers should act to expand choice and opportunity for all people, with special regard for vulnerable,
    disadvantaged, oppressed, and exploited people and groups.
(c) Social workers should promote conditions that encourage respect for cultural and social diversity within the United States
    and globally. Social workers should promote policies and practices that demonstrate respect for difference, support the
    expansion of cultural knowledge and resources, advocate for programs and institutions that demonstrate cultural
    competence, and promote policies that safeguard the rights of and confirm equity and social justice for all people.
(d) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate domination of, exploitation of, and discrimination against any person,
    group, or class on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political
    belief, religion, or mental or physical disability.
                                 Course Descriptions for MSW Program
Foundation Year Courses (First Year of Two-Year Program)
SWRK 601           Human Behavior and the Social Environment                                                   3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:     Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This course provides understanding of human behavior and social environment from an eco-systemic and value-based
perspective as applicable in social work practice. Content includes theories and knowledge of human, bio-psycho-social
development, and the range of social systems (families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities) in which
individuals live. This course looks at the larger view of the interaction of human behavior and the social environment across
the life span from the human ancestor and family genetic inheritance to birth, childhood, youth, adult life, old age, and
death.
SWRK 605           Social Welfare Policy and Services                                                           3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:     Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This course examines economic, historical, political, intellectual, sociocultural, leadership, values and ideologies and other
factors which shape social welfare and economic policy, programs and services. It addresses various frameworks for
studying social welfare policy, programs and services, and examines the roles of policy-makers, processes of social change,
and the roles of social workers as facilitators of positive social change. Special emphasis is placed on effects of social and
economic policy decisions on impoverished and oppressed people.
SWRK 608          Generalist Social Work Theory & Practice I                                                  3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:    Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This is an introductory course in generalist social work practice methods and skills of social work intervention with
individuals. Attention is given to the historic development of social work practice, the nature and application of social work
values and ethical principles, the theoretical framework of helping methods and the helping process of assessment,
planning, intervention, termination and evaluation. Emphasis is on a generalist approach to helping within an ecosystem
approach for understanding the person-in-situation. A minimum of one hour per week will be devoted to skills development
laboratory.
SWRK 609          Generalist Social Work Theory & Practice II                                              3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:    Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This course is designed to provide a framework for systematic study of the components and issues involved in the practice
of social work with groups and families. This course prepares the student to become familiar with the processes involved
in group and family formation as well as ongoing processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation. A minimum of
one hour per week will be devoted to skills development laboratory.
SWRK 610          Generalist Social Work Theory & Practice III                                                 3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:    Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This course is designed to help students understand organizations, institutions and communities, and to provide the
knowledge bases of social work generalist practice for interventions at this level. It provides an opportunity to explore
selected macro models of practice, and learn about human service organizations that often serve as an immediate context
for community practice. A minimum of one hour per week will be devoted to skills development laboratory.
SWRK 612          Social Work Practice in Multicultural Contexts                                                3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:    Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation Year.
This course is designed to assist graduate social work students in understanding and interacting in a culturally competent
manner with the multitude of groups that are identified by race, culture, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, age, sexual
orientation, mental or physical disability, and regional and national origins that compose the diverse cultural mosaic of the
U.S. The course will also cover issues relating to international social work practice and the increasingly interconnected
global economy.
SWRK 617            Research I: Methods for Social Work Knowledge and Practice                                4.0 Fall
Prerequisites:      Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
This course provides an overview of social science research methods useful for social work practice. It provides the
foundation knowledge and skills that enable students to be intelligent consumers of information, to conduct social research,
and to critically evaluate social work practice. The application of social research methods to social work practice in various
size systems is a primary emphasis.
SWRK 630: Writing for Social Work Profession                                                                   1.0 Fall/Spring
This course engages students in the technical writing and critical thinking skills frequently required for professional social
workers. Through in-class assignments, peer feedback sessions, weekly dialogues on writing, and critical analysis of
writing examples, students learn techniques for analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating writing. Students use written Social
Work course assignments to gain experience in evaluating pattern errors, develop thesis statements/arguments, and learn
writing, editing and revision skills for the academic and professional genre. Students will be exposed to a citation and
writing style of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. This one unit course is not counted
toward the MSW degree.
SWRK 631           Foundation Practicum I                                                                     3.0 Fall
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW Program.
Foundation field education is an educationally supervised agency experience designed for students to apply the knowledge,
skills, and values learned in their previous liberal arts and concurrent social work courses. Students complete a minimum of
240 hours of supervised practice and participate in a bi-weekly integrating seminar throughout the semester. In consultation
with students, the Field Education Director makes agency assignments.
SWRK 632           Foundation Practicum II                                                                    3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:     Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation year.
Foundation field education is an educationally supervised agency experience designed for students to apply the knowledge,
skills, and values learned in their previous liberal arts and concurrent social work courses. Students complete a minimum of
240 hours of supervised practice and participate in a bi-weekly integrating seminar throughout the semester. In consultation
with students, the Field Education Director makes agency assignments.

Summer Bridge Courses (One-Year Program ONLY)
SWRK 635          Foundations of Social Work Practice                                                        3.0 Summer
Prerequisites:    Graduate standing and admission to the One-Year MSW Program.
This course is designed for students in the One-Year Program (see admission requirements for BSW degree holders and
holders of social work degrees not earned in the United States). The course helps students prepare for entry into the
advanced practice year of the MSW program and aids in their adjustment to the rigors of graduate-level academic study.
SWRK 636           Foundations of Social Work Research                                                       3.0 Summer
Prerequisites:     Graduate standing and admission to the One-Year MSW program.
This course is designed to examine various scientific methods for social work research, with special attention to research
design and statistical analysis (correlations, T-test, Chi Square and analysis of variance).

Concentration Year Courses (Second Year of Two-Year Program AND One-Year Program)
SWRK 641            Advanced Practice in Mental Health Settings                                                  3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:      Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course prepares students for differential assessment and intervention with individuals and families with problems
representative of the mental health focus area. Students develop knowledge and skills in the psychosocial approach to
advanced ethnic-sensitive practice, crisis intervention and other selected treatment approaches. Focus is on influences of
culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability, spirituality, and generation in all phases of practice.
SWRK 642           Advanced Practice in Families, Children & Youth Services                                        3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:     Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course prepares students for differential assessment and intervention with individuals and families with problems
representative of the families, children and youth focus area. Students develop knowledge and skills in the psychosocial
approach to advanced ethnic-sensitive practice, crisis intervention, and other selected treatment approaches. Focus is on
influences of culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability, spirituality, and generation in all phases of practice.
SWRK 643:         Assessment of Individuals and Families                                                   3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:    Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course provides content on assessment of families and individuals experiencing problems-in-living, including
biopsychosocial considerations. Includes assessment methods and diagnostic techniques, including mental status, person-in-
environment (PIE), psychosocial, risk, and safety assessments, and use of current DSM. The legal, social, cultural, and
ethnic factors impacting assessment and intervention are explored.
SWRK 644         Human Behavior and the Social Environment II                                                 3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:   Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course examines theories and research regarding work groups, organizations, and communities as contexts for social
work practice and preparation for practice with larger systems. Includes the role of community power structures in the
governance of systems, the change process, and their effects on the provision of services, including interactions between
these systems and diverse individuals and families.
SWRK 648           Advanced Practicum I                                                                     4.0 Fall
Prerequisites:     Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Advanced practicum under the supervision and instruction of an MSW field instructor. This course provides students with
opportunities to apply and expand knowledge, values, and skills gained from previous and concurrent course work with
individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The Director of Field Education makes field assignments
after consultation with the student and agency. Students complete 360 hours during the fall semester.
SWRK 652         Supervision, Program Development, and Administration                                        3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:   Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course provides an introduction and overview of methodologies for supervision, consultation, management,
administration and planning within social services settings. Leadership, decision making, conflict resolution, fiscal
management, fundraising, legal issues, program and staff development, and work with boards are covered.
SWRK 653            Research II: Program Evaluation                                                            3.0 Fall
Prerequisites:      Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course prepares students to interpret evaluative studies of social work interventions within the practice context.
Emphasis is on the development of evaluative research methods relevant to practice and program evaluation, and evaluation
of direct practice.
SWRK 654           Social Policy in Mental Health Services                                                   3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:     Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course prepares students to analyze mental health policies and services and their impact on client systems. Students
examine factors underlying development of current mental health system as basis for interventions and for developing
strategies for policy change, as well as planning and implementing improved policies and services.
SWRK 655          Social Policy in Family, Children & Youth Services                                            3.0 Spring
Prerequisites:    Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
This course prepares students to analyze social policies, including funding policies, and their impact on families, children
and youth. Students examine the historic and current forces underlying development of current policies and services.
Includes an analysis of alternative policy choices and their effect as a basis for intervention and service provisions at multi-
system levels.
SWRK 656          Advanced Social Work Macro Practice                                                          3.0 Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year or instructor permission.
This advanced course continues students‟ understanding of organizations, institutions and communities, and the knowledge
bases of social work generalist practice for interventions at this level. It provides an overview of personnel management,
organizational functioning, planning, and community practice processes for advanced year students. Themes include macro
models of practice, management, financing and governance of human service organizations.
SWRK 658:        Advanced Practicum II                                                                    4.0 Spring
Prerequisites:   Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Continuation and culmination of supervised advanced practice experience with individuals, families, groups, organizations
and communities. Students complete 360 hours during the spring semester.
SWRK 681          Advanced Family and Child Treatment                                                      3.0 Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course builds on SWRK 341 and SWRK 342 to provide advanced knowledge and skills for students wishing to pursue
advanced clinical treatment of families and children. Emphasis is on contemporary research, theories, and models for
intervention with families and children.

MSW Electives (not all electives are offered each semester)
SWRK 671          SWRK Health Care Policy/Practice                                                           3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course focuses on the analysis of health care policies, programs, and approaches to social work practice in health care
settings. Emphasis is given to evaluation of practice, and to the empowerment of oppressed groups and populations-at-risk
in accessing health care resources. Selected contemporary ethical and research issues and their implications for policies and
social work practice in health care settings are explored.
SWRK 673          Trauma and Loss                                                                           3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course examines issues of trauma and working with people who have experienced trauma or loss or who are facing
death. Several theoretical approaches are examined, with emphasis on expanding knowledge of trauma concepts,
intervention models, specific populations-at-risk, and from trauma and deal with losses or imminent death. Focus is on
planned interventions with individuals and families in stressful situations through the use of primarily cognitive or problem-
solving approaches.
SWRK 674           Policies & Practice with Older Americans and Their Families                                   3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course is designed to provide students with the specialized knowledge base necessary for policy analysis and advanced
social work practice with older adults and their families. Students learn a variety of practice concepts, skills, models, and
theories from a strengths perspective to facilitate their gerontological social work practice. Focus is on social work practice
with older ethnic and minority group members, women, and people who belong to other special population groups.
SWRK 677          Substance Abuse: Foundations for Social Work Practice                                    3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course examines the incidence and etiology of chemical dependence and its impact on individuals, families and
society. The course also addresses pharmacological properties and physiological, sociological, psychosocial, and cultural
aspects of psychoactive substance abuse, assessment and classification of substance abuse disorders, and models of
interventions and treatment.
SWRK 685            Developmental Theory & Interpersonal Processes                                                  3.0
Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course provides an overview of the theories of normative individual development that have been most influential in the
development of interpersonal practice methods in social work. In addition, it reviews varied theoretical conceptualizations
on the life experiences that may result in psychological dysfunctions and practice interventions that alleviate impediments
to realization of individual potentials despite their areas of strength. Finally, it ties these concepts to specific mental
illnesses and assessment of risk, prognosis, and optimal facilitation of clients‟ improvement of interpersonal function.
SWRK 687          Advanced Child Welfare                                                                     3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year or acceptance into the concentration year. Title IV-E
requirement.
This course covers core knowledge and skills for the practice of social work with an emphasis on child welfare practice.
Content includes interviewing, assessment, and interventions, with special attention to problems and concerns related to
child protection and family preservation. Students learn to apply a strengths perspective in an environmental context and to
work collaboratively. Students learn to evaluate child and family information and to take appropriate steps toward
permanency planning. In addition the course covers the professional use of self within the values and ethics of social work
practice.
SWRK 688           Social Work Practice in Schools                                                            3.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course examines the traditional roles of school social workers, including screening, prevention and early intervention
with children and their families. This course includes an introduction to a conceptual framework for providing school social
work services, and learning collaborative approaches for serving children and families. Additionally, an overview of the
history of school social work, educational policies affecting school social work, and the current issues facing public schools
are reviewed. This course serves as a partial fulfillment for the requirements of the Pupil Personnel Services Credential.
SWRK 697           Independent Study                                                                        1.0-3.0
Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Instructor and MSW Director permission.
This course is a graduate level independent study offered as 398A-C for 1.0-3.0 units respectively. Students must register
directly with a supervising faculty member and approval of the MSW Director. You may take this course more than once
for a maximum of 3.0 units.
SWRK 699P         Master’s Project                                                                             2.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Advancement to candidacy.
This course is a master‟s study offered as a Master‟s Project. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty
member and have approval of the MSW Director.
SWRK 699T         Master’s Thesis                                                                             2.0 Fall/Spring
Prerequisites: Advancement to candidacy.
This course is a master‟s study offered as a Master‟s Thesis. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty
member and have approval of the MSW Director.
                           Strike Policy for Students in Field Placement
                                        CSU, Chico School of Social Work

Strike Policy
The Field Education Program‟s policy regarding student field placements and strikes/work actions is based on
principles of educational integrity, and focuses on how educational expectations, goals, and objectives can be
met and maintained. The interest of the students‟ educational experience rather than the merits of any given
strike or work action are of primary consideration. It is the Program‟s belief that a strike bound agency is not
able to provide a climate conducive to a sound educational experience.
If an agency is in a bona fide strike situation prior to the beginning of the field work placement period, no
students will be placed for field work in that agency for that academic year. If the agency reaches resolution of
the strike situation at some point during the academic year, the agency may be used for a mid-year placement
depending on re-assessment of the agency and its ability to meet the learning and educational expectations of the
department. This assessment will be completed by one of the field faculty.
If a strike or work action situation occurs in an agency where students are in placement during the course of the
academic year, these options may be considered:
    1. The student may request not to remain in the placement agency during the period of strike or work
       action. The student will be supported in this decision by the department, and will suffer no academic
       consequences. The field hours missed during the strike period will need to be made up by the student
       during the regular semester, break periods, or in an extended placement through May/June of the
       academic year. A plan for missed hours make-up will be developed by the student‟s field faculty liaison
       in consultation with the Director of Field Education, the student, and field instructor.
    2. The student may request to remain in the placement setting during the period of strike or work action.
       This option will be available only when the Director can be sure that the educational integrity of the
       field work can be maintained. This means that the supervisory requirements, caseload requirements,
       and other expectations of field work can be consistently met by the agency during the strike or work
       action period and that there is no danger to the student. Students wishing to remain in the agency must
       discuss this plan with the field faculty liaison who will verify the agency‟s ability to provided
       appropriate supervision and educational experiences. The student will be supported in this decision, and
       will suffer no academic consequences.
        If a strike or work action continues beyond a three-week period, a reassessment of the ability of the
        agency to provide the appropriate supervision and educational experiences will be made by the Field
        Faculty Liaison. If the agency is found not able to meet the educational requirements of the field
        department, the student may be relocated to another agency site until the strike or work action has been
        resolved and/or until the agency is able to provide the appropriate educational activities.
It is expected that field seminars will devote time and attention to issues around strikes, work actions, and the
subsequent professional dilemmas surrounding these situations. In all cases, it is the responsibility of the
Director to meet with students who are confronted with a potential or actual strike situation in order to assist the
student in developing a clear understanding of the relevant issues in regard to the strike and an understanding of
the implications of the strike for the student‟s field education experience. Issues around responsibility to clients
during strike situations will also be discussed in field seminars or in special departmental meetings with
students.


                     Adapted from University of Southern California School of Social Work
                                            California State University, Chico
                                                  University Policies
The following University policies apply to all university courses including the Social Work internships. If you have any
questions regarding their application, consult with the FFI, Director of Field Education, or the Director of the Social Work
Program. They may also be found on the CSU, Chico Web Site at:
                     http://www.csuchico.edu/catalog/cat05/8EndMaterials/02UniversityPolicies.html
California State University, Chico wants you to be aware of the following policies and issues, which affect you and
the quality of life in our community. Please take the time to read and consider carefully the full implication and
intent of these policies. You are expected to abide by them and contribute to your own well-being and that of this
university by careful attention to them.
California State University, Chico has a moral responsibility to maintain an environment that is nurturing, encourages
intellectual growth, and fosters mutual respect among cultures and individuals resident on our campus.
Information on complaint and/or grievance procedures regarding the nondiscrimination policy and affirmative action policy
or law is available from the Coodinator for Student Judicial Affairs (KNDL 110, 530-898-6897) or the Employee Relations
Manager (KNDL 118, 530-898-4666).
Policy on Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action in Employment and Education
California State University, Chico establishes this policy in recognition of its educational mission, its social concerns, its
responsibility for the personal development of individuals, and its concern for the rights of individuals.
CSU, Chico will comply with federal and state regulations relating to affirmative action and nondiscrimination obligations.
The university will provide equal opportunity in education and employment for all qualified persons; prohibit illegal
discrimination based on age, race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, marital or veteran status, and
disability; and promote the full realization of equal education and employment opportunities through a positive and
continuing program of affirmative action for the university as a whole and for each constituent unit.
This policy governs all university educational and employment practices and procedures including, but not limited to,
recruitment, employment, enrollment, rate of pay or other compensation, advancement, reclassification, promotion,
financial aid, demotion, renewal, non-renewal, termination, dismissal, transfer, layoff, leave, training, employee benefits,
grading and program access.
It will be a violation of this policy to dismiss, discharge, expel, penalize, discipline, harass, adversely alter academic grades
or otherwise discriminate against any student, faculty, or staff member because he/she has opposed any discriminatory
practice, filed an internal or external complaint of discrimination, or testified or assisted in any proceeding in accordance
with this policy.
Responsibility and authority for the dissemination and implementation of this policy lies ultimately with the president of
the university with the support of university administrators, faculty, and staff and with assistance from the Vice Provost for
Human Resources. Practically, the responsibility and authority to act affirmatively to provide equality of opportunity in
education and employment lies with all who are in decision-making positions within the university. Support for the
university's affirmative action policy will be considered in the annual evaluation of administrators and supervisors. The
university will commit appropriate resources and create a supportive atmosphere for the implementation of this policy.
(Reference: EM 99-24, June 24, 1999)
Nondiscrimination Policy Regarding Individuals with Disabilities
California State University, Chico is committed to the full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in all educational and
operational aspects of campus life. In accordance with Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, CSU, Chico adopts this policy of nondiscrimination to ensure that any person
with a disability will not, on the basis of that disability, be denied access to or participation in any program, service, or
opportunity provided by the campus. [Excerpts from the policy follow, see EM 99-21 for the full text.]
Employees: Through its administrative representatives, CSU, Chico will recruit, hire, train, advance, and promote
individuals in all job classifications without regard to physical or psychological disability.
Students: As an institution of higher education, the university will provide reasonable accommodations to students with
disabilities in campus-sponsored academic programs, activities, and services unless such provisions would cause a
fundamental alteration of the course, program, activity, or service.
General Public: At university-sponsored events, CSU, Chico will provide reasonable accommodations to members of the
general public with disabilities unless doing so would cause a fundamental alteration of the program, activity, or service.
It will be a violation of this policy to dismiss, discharge, expel, penalize, discipline, harass, adversely alter academic grades,
or otherwise discriminate against any student, faculty, or staff member because he/she has opposed any discriminatory
practice, filed an internal or external complaint of discrimination, or testified or assisted in any proceeding in accordance
with this policy.
Policy Implementation: The authority and responsibility for assuring compliance with this policy rests with the university
president. General oversight has been delegated to the Director of EEO Compliance and Disability Programs. Questions or
concerns regarding this policy or accommodations for faculty and staff may be referred to the Director of EEO Compliance
and Disability Programs (KNDL 120, 530-898-5436). Detailed information and assistance regarding accommodations for
students may be obtained from the Office of Disablity Support Services. Information regarding accommodations for public
individuals may be obtained from the Office of Public Events.
Student Rights & Responsibilities
Students' rights and responsibilities are discussed in the Speech and Advocacy Guidelines and the Code of Student Rights
and Responsibilities, which delineate standards and policies of mutual respect and behavior.
Inappropriate conduct by students or applicants for admission is subject to discipline as provided in sections 41301 through
41304 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations. A complete reading of these sections can be found under "CSU
Campuses and Policies" in The University Catalog. In addition, the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities describes
informal and formal opportunities for due process in the case of student discipline.
For these documents and more information, call the Coordinator for Student Judicial Affairs (KNDL 110, x6897).
Academic Honesty
Faculty expect students to maintain a high standard of academic integrity. If you are unclear about a specific situation, ask
your instructors. They will explain what is and is not acceptable in their classes.
If a student is thought to be cheating and charges are brought, the process can result in severe consequences, ranging from
failure in an individual course to long-term suspension from the university and denial of a degree.
Academic dishonesty, generally, is taking credit for work which is not your own or attempting to receive credit or improve
a grade through fraudulent or deceptive means. Examples include taking information from or providing information to
another student, plagiarism, or altering a grade or record.
Consult the guide on Ethical Standards and Disciplinary Procedures for complete definitions. Copies of the Code of
Student Rights and Responsibilities and answers to questions about academic honesty may be obtained in the Office of the
Coordinator of Student Judicial Affairs (KNDL 110, x6897).
Student Grievance Procedures
Students who believe they are victims of unfair policies or practices at California State University, Chico can bring their
concerns to the coordinator for Student Judicial Affairs (KNDL 110, x6897). The office is available to provide students the
opportunity to resolve problems arising from actions taken on behalf of California State University, Chico in a fair,
uniform, and orderly manner. Most student complaints can be resolved on an informal basis by the Coordinator. Should the
situation be unresolvable through informal means, the student may invoke formal grievance proceedings. Formal Student
Grievance Procedures are provided in EM 94-22. You may get a copy of this memorandum from the Coordinator for
Student Judicial Affairs.
Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records
The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations adopted thereunder (34
C.F.R. 99) set out requirements designed to protect students' privacy in their records maintained by the campus. The statute
and regulations govern access to student records maintained by the campus and the release of such records. The law
provides that the campus must give students access to records directly related to the student, and must also provide
opportunity for a hearing to challenge such if the student claims they are inaccurate, records on the grounds that they are
inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappropriate. The right to a hearing under this law does not include any right to
challenge the appropriateness of a grade determined by the instructor. The law generally requires the institution to receive a
student's written consent before releasing personally identifiable data about the student. The institution has adopted a set of
policies and procedures governing implementation of the statute and the regulations. Copies of these policies and
procedures may be obtained by going to the Student Records & Registration Office or by logging onto
http://www.ed.gov/policy.
The campus is authorized under the Act to release "directory information" concerning students. "Directory information"
may include the student's name, address, telephone listing, electronic mail address, date and place of birth, major field of
study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, part-
time/full-time status, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or
institution attended by the student. The above designated information is subject to release by the campus at any time unless
the campus has received prior written objection from the student specifying information the student requests not be
released. Written objections should be sent to the Office of
The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees who have legitimate
educational interests in such access. These persons have responsibilities in the campus's academic, administrative or service
functions and who have reason for using student records associated with their campus or other related academic
responsibilities. Student records may also be disclosed to other persons or organizations under certain conditions (e.g., as
part of the accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order or subpoena; in connection with financial aid;
to other
Faculty and Student Relations
Faculty and students are strongly discouraged from entering into mutually consenting romantic or sexual relationships
while the faculty member is in a position of evaluation or supervision of the student or in the likelihood that such an
academic connection will exist in the foreseeable future. No faculty member, teaching assistant, research assistant,
department chair, dean, or other administrative officer should vote, make recommendations, or in any other way participate
in the decision of any matter which may directly affect the academic status, evaluation, employment, or promotion of a
student with whom he or she has or has had a sexual or romantic relationship. (Reference: FPPP 2.1.2)
Policy on Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is prohibited at California State University, Chico. Violations of this policy by administrators, faculty,
staff, and students will be regarded as unprofessional and uncivil conduct, and violators may be subject to appropriate
disciplinary action ranging from written or oral reprimand to dismissal or expulsion. Nothing in this policy is meant to
preempt or foreclose the pursuit of remedies available to persons alleging sexual harassment under applicable state and
federal statutes and regulations.
The goal of this policy is to create and preserve a learning and working environment conducive to growth in mind, spirit,
and human community. Sexual harassment subverts the mission of the university by interfering with academic or work
performance; by creating an atmosphere of intimidation and hostility; and by undermining respect for the university, the
individuals who constitute its community, and its degrees and scholarship. [Excerpts from the policy follow, see EM 99-20
for the full text.]
Responsibility and authority for the dissemination and implementation of this policy lies ultimately with the president of
the university with the support of university administrators, faculty, and staff and with assistance from the Vice Provost for
Human Resources. The Vice Provost for Human Resources is responsible for providing information and for monitoring
campus compliance relating to sexual harassment issues. . . . Questions or concerns regarding sexual harassment issues,
complaint procedures, or sexual harassment- related issues may be directed to the Employee Relations Manager (KNDL
118, 530-898-4666).
Sexual Assault Policy
California State University, Chico endeavors to provide an environment conducive to growth in mind, spirit, and human
community and preclusive to exploitation of students or employees.
Sexual assault is any sexual act in which a person is threatened, coerced, or forced to comply against her/his will regardless
of whether the person knows the assailant(s) casually, intimately, or not at all. Any form of rape or sexual assault is an act
of aggression that may be investigated for possible disciplinary and legal action regardless of whether the incident occurs
on or off campus.
Students wanting more information about the sexual assault policy or wishing to discuss a particular situation about sexual
assault should consult with the Coordinator for Student Judicial Affairs (KNDL 110, x6897). An actual sexual assault
should be reported immediately to the University Police Department (YUBA Hall, x5372). All conversations are strictly
confidential.
Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards


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