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					                                                                                                     SUSTAINABILITY-RELATED
Undergrad/
                College        Department                             Class Title
  Grad
             Agriculture                         Young and Adult Programs and Adult Leadership (2/
                               Agricultural
    G                          Science (Ag.
                                Education)
             Agriculture    Irrigation Science Advanced Principles of Irrigation (4)
    G                       Subplan

             Agriculture    Irrigation Science   Graduate Independent Study (14)
    G                       Subplan

             Agriculture    Plant Science        Advanced Topics in the Plant and Environmental
                            Subplan              Sciences (3)
    G




    U         Agriculture    Animal Science               The Animal Industries and Society




    U         Agriculture    Animal Science             Animal Science 1: Food Animal Science


                            Food Marketing
    U         Agriculture   and Agribusiness               Politics of Food and Agriculture
                             Management

                            Food Marketing
    U         Agriculture   and Agribusiness                    Water and Civilization
                             Management

                            Food Marketing
    U         Agriculture   and Agribusiness          Agricultural Water Resource Management
                             Management

                            Food Marketing
    U         Agriculture   and Agribusiness                 Agriculture in Development
                             Management
                                Foods and
    U         Agriculture                                         Food and Culture
                                 Nutrition
                                Foods and
    U         Agriculture                                    Community Nutrition (3/1)
                                 Nutrition
                   Foods and             Agriculture, Nutrition, and International
U   Agriculture
                    Nutrition                          Development

                  International
U   Agriculture                                 Global Resources for Food
                   Agriculture

                  International
U   Agriculture                    Agriculture, Nutrition and International Development
                   Agriculture


                  International
U   Agriculture                         Agricultural Water Resource Management
                   Agriculture


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences              Culinary Produce Technology


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences              Pastures and Forage Systems


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences                 Vegetable Crop Systems


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences                    Basic Soil Science



U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences            Irrigation and Water Management




U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences          Pesticide and Hazardous Material Laws



U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences                  Plants and Civilization


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences            Crop Quality and Utilitzation (3/1)


U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences              Urban Pest Management (3/1)



U   Agriculture   Plant Sciences              Weeds and Weed Control (3/1)
U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences              Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (3/1)




U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences              Integrated Pest Management (4)



U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences                Native Plant Materials (2/1)

U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences                       Crop Ecology (4)


U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences                Environmental Toxicology (4)

U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences                    Urban Forestry (3/1)
U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences                    Crop Diseases (3/1)

U    Agriculture    Plant Sciences          Advanced Irrigation Water Management

    College of Business               Seminar in Organizational Behavior (3)
    Business
G   Administrati
    on

    College of     Business           Directed Study in Organizational Behavior (1)
    Business
G
    Administrati
    on
    College of     Business           Organizational Development (4)
    Business
G
    Administrati
    on
    College of     Business           Management Seminar (3)
    Business
G
    Administrati
    on
    College of     Business           Directed Study in Management Seminar (1)
    Business
G
    Administrati
    on
                     Finance, Real
U     Business                             Legal Aspects of International Business (4)
                    Estate, and Law
                   International
U     Business      Business &                   Ethical Issues in Marketing (4)
                     Marketing
                   International
U     Business      Business &                    Organizational Behavior (4)
                     Marketing
                   International
U     Business                              Role of Design Professionals in Society
                 Study in Business

                 Management and
U     Business                                Men, Women, and Management (4)
                 Human Resources


                 Management and
U     Business                             International Comparative Management
                 Human Resources


                 Management and
U     Business                                 Emerging Issues in Management
                 Human Resources
    Collins     Hospitality          Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality          Hotel/Resort Operations (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality          Healthy American Cuisine (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality          Professional Cooking I (2/2)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality          Hotel/Resort Rooms Division Management (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality    Tourism in a Globalizing World (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality    Food and Beverage Operations I (4) Fall, Winter,
    College of  Management     Spring
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality    Food and Beverage Operations II (8) Fall, Winter,
    College of  Management     Spring
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality     Strategic Leadership in the Hospitality Environment
    College of  Management     (4)
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality    International Travel and Tourism (4)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    Collins     Hospitality    Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14)
    College of  Management
    Hospitality
    Management
U
    College of                 Leadership, Policy and Schools in a Democratic
    Education                  Society (3/1)
    and
    Integrative
G   Studies
    College of                 Ethics, Morals, and Values for Educational Leadership
    Education                  (3/1)
    and
    Integrative
G   Studies
      Education
         and
                   Education              Education in a Diverse Society
     Integrative
U      Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                             Introduction to Ethnic Studies
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and      Introduction to the Study of Women and Men in
    Integrative   Women's Studies                      Society (4)
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                            Native American Experience (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                    Interactive Dynamics of Ethnicity and Gender (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                            Community Service Learning (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                                   Ethnic Identity (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                            Women, Ethnicity and Work (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                       African American Contemporary Issues (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
      Studies
U
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                        Chicano/Latino Contemporary Issues (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
U     Studies
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                       Native American Contemporary Issues (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
      Studies
U
     Education
        and         Ethnic and
                                       Asian American Contemporary Issues (4)
    Integrative   Women's Studies
      Studies
U
      Education
         and         Ethnic and
                                                 Gender, Ethnicity, and Class (4)
     Integrative   Women's Studies
U      Studies
      Education
         and         Ethnic and
                                               Gender, Identity and Technology (4)
     Integrative   Women's Studies
       Studies
U
      Education
         and         Ethnic and
                                               Multiethnic Heritage of California (4)
     Integrative   Women's Studies
       Studies
U
      Education
         and         Ethnic and
                                                   Community and Culture (4)
     Integrative   Women's Studies
U      Studies
      Education
                   Interdisciplinary
         and
                       General           Ways of Coexisting: Reform and Revolution (4)
     Integrative
                      Education
U      Studies
      Education
                   Interdisciplinary
         and
                       General         Ways of Doing: Technology and Human Purpose (4)
     Integrative
                      Education
U      Studies
      Education
         and
                    Liberal Studies                 Liberal Studies Seminar (4)
     Integrative
U      Studies
      Education
         and
                    Liberal Studies                     Senior Project I (4)
     Integrative
U      Studies
    College of Civil Engineering Public Transportation (4)
    Engineering


G
    College of Engineering             Advanced Facilities Planning (4)
    Engineering


G
    College of Mechanical             Solar Energy Systems (4)
    Engineering Engineering
G
    College of Mechanical             Direct Energy Conversion (4)
    Engineering Engineering
G
                   Chemical and
    Engineering      Materials                  Stoichiometry I/Laboratory (3/1)
                    Engineering
U

                   Chemical and
    Engineering      Materials                 Stoichiometry II/Laboratory (3/1)
                    Engineering
U
                   Chemical and
                                         Pollution Abatement and Hazardous Materials
    Engineering      Materials
                                                       Management (2)
                    Engineering
U
    Engineering   Civil Engineering           Introduction to Civil Engineering (1)
U


                                       Environmental Resource Management/Laboratory
    Engineering   Civil Engineering
                                                           (3/1)
U


    Engineering   Civil Engineering               Urban Transportation (3/1)

U

    Engineering   Civil Engineering        Water Supply Engineering/Laboratory (3/1)
U


    Engineering   Civil Engineering         Structural DesignTimber/Laboratory (2/1)
U
    Engineering   Civil Engineering                Engineering Hydrology (4)
U
    Engineering   Civil Engineering              Solid Waste Management (3)
U
                   Electrical and
    Engineering      Computer                     Lighting Control/Design (4/1)
U                   Engineering
                                    Ethical Considerations in Technology and Applied
    Engineering    Engineering
                                                       Science (4)
U


    Engineering    Engineering          Role of Design Professionals in Society (4)
U


    Engineering    Engineering             Science and Technology Seminar (4)

U
                  Industrial and
    Engineering   Manufacturing    Manufacturing Systems Processes/Laboratory (3/1)
                   Engineering
U
                  Industrial and
                                   Manufacturing Processes—Materials, Metrology and
    Engineering   Manufacturing
                                             Treatments/Laboratory (2/1)
                   Engineering
U

                   Mechanical
    Engineering                                  Energy Management (4)
                   Engineering
U

                   Mechanical
    Engineering                              Alternative Energy Systems (4)
                   Engineering
U


                   Mechanical
    Engineering                              Solar Thermal Engineering (3/1)
                   Engineering
U
                   Mechanical
    Engineering                                  Nuclear Engineering (4)
                   Engineering
U
                   Mechanical
    Engineering                       Building Energy Calculations/Laboratory (3/1)
                   Engineering
U

                   Mechanical
    Engineering                             Air Conditioning/Laboratory (3/1)
                   Engineering
U
    Environment
                   Architecture         Introduction to Architectural Design (1/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture   Special Study for Lower Division Students (12)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture            Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U

    Environment
                  Architecture            Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture            Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture            Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture            Building Construction (3/1)
      al Design
U

    Environment
                  Architecture            Building Construction (3/1)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture        Topics in Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture        Topics in Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture            Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture        Topics in Architectural Design (3/3)
      al Design
U


    Environment
                  Architecture    Architecture and Historic Preservation (4)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture          Architecture and Urbanism (4)
U     al Design


    Environment
                  Architecture            California Architecture (4)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture        Topics in Southern California Architecture (4)
      al Design
U
    Environment
                  Architecture                 Architectural Practice (3/1)
      al Design
U

    Environment
                  Architecture            Behavioral Factors in Architecture (4)
      al Design
U


    Environment
                  Architecture                Bachelor’s Degree Project (8)
      al Design
U


    Environment   Environmental
                                              Foundations of Design I (2/2)
      al Design       Design
U



    Environment   Environmental
                                     History of Art and Environmental Design (3/1)
      al Design       Design


U
    Environment   Environmental
                                             California Designs for Living (4)
      al Design       Design
U
    Environment   Environmental
                                                 Take Part Workshop (2)
U     al Design       Design
    Environment   Environmental
                                        Community Design and Social Change (4)
      al Design       Design
U


    Environment    Landscape
                                         Introduction to Landscape Design (1/2)
      al Design   Architecture
U
    Environment    Landscape      Introduction to the History of Landscape Architecture
      al Design   Architecture                              (3)
U
    Environment    Landscape
                                   Intermediate Landscape Design (2/3) (2/3) (2/3)
      al Design   Architecture
U


    Environment    Landscape
                                       Landscape Construction (2/2) (2/2) (3/2)
      al Design   Architecture
U

    Environment    Landscape
                                              Planting Design (1/2) (1/2)
      al Design   Architecture
U
    Environment    Landscape
                                         Landscape Architectural Practice (2)
      al Design   Architecture
U
    College of Landscape         Plant Ecology and Design (2/3)
    Environmen Architecture
    tal Design
G
    College of Landscape         Seminar on Theory and Literature (2)
    Environmen Architecture
    tal Design
G
    College of Landscape         Seminar on Landscape Planning (4)
    Environmen Architecture
    tal Design
G
    College of Landscape         Ecosystematic Landscape Design (3/6)
    Environmen Architecture
    tal Design
G
    Environment   Regenerative
                                     Directed Study in Regenerative Practices (24)
U     al Design     Studies

    Environment   Regenerative
                                         Ecological Patterns and processes (4)
      al Design     Studies
U

    Environment   Regenerative
                                      Special Topics in Regenerative Studies (14)
      al Design     Studies
U
    College of Regenerative         Regenerative Concepts and Social Practices (3/2)
    Environmen Studies
    tal Design

G
    College of Regenerative         Master’s Project (4)
    Environmen Studies
    tal Design
G
    College of Regenerative         Master’s Thesis (4)
    Environmen Studies
    tal Design
G

    Environment    Urban and
                                            Process and Theory of Planning (3/1)
      al Design Regional Planning
U

    Environment    Urban and
                                                    Evolution of Cities (4)
      al Design Regional Planning
U


    Environment    Urban and
                                             Research Design for Planning (3/1)
      al Design Regional Planning

U

    Environment    Urban and
                                          Institutional Framework for Planning (4)
      al Design Regional Planning
U

    Environment    Urban and
                                       Intergovernmental Framework for Planning (4)
      al Design Regional Planning
U


    Environment    Urban and
                                             Community Planning Studio I (2/2)
      al Design Regional Planning

U
    Environment    Urban and
                                             Community Planning Studio II (2/2)
      al Design Regional Planning
U
    Environment    Urban and
                                               Urban Growth Management (4)
      al Design Regional Planning
U


    Environment    Urban and
                                                Cities in a Global Economy (4)
      al Design Regional Planning

U

    Environment    Urban and
                                           The Urban Development Process (3/1)
      al Design Regional Planning
U


    Environment    Urban and
                                             Neighborhood Revitalization (3/1)
      al Design Regional Planning
U

    Environment    Urban and
                                             Local Transportation Planning (3/1)
      al Design Regional Planning
U
    College of Urban and            Legal Foundations of Urban and Regional Planning (4)
    Environmen Regional
    tal Design Planning
G
    College of Urban and            Urban Housing and Community Development (4)
    Environmen Regional
    tal Design Planning
G
    College of Urban and            Environmental Policy for Planning (4)
    Environmen Regional
    tal Design Planning
G
    College of Urban and            Social and Political Planning Policy (4)
    Environmen Regional
    tal Design Planning

G
    CLASS   Anthropology   Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   World Cultures via the Internet (4)




U




    CLASS   Anthropology   Special Study for Lower Division Students (12)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Human Nature/Human Affairs: A Biocultural View (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Special Topics for Lower Division Students (14)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Native Peoples of California (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Native Peoples of North America (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   North American Archaeology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   California Archeology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Archaeological Theory and Methods (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Comparative Primatology (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Language and Culture (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Laws, Values, and Culture (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Psychological Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Health Systems Past and Present (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Social Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Demographic Anthropology (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Magic, Shamanism, and Religion (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Visual Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Cultural Areas of the World (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   History of Anthropological Theory (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Methods in Anthropology (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Field Archaeology (2/2)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (2/2)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Special Study for Upper Division Students (14)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   The Anthropology of Gender (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Senior Colloquium (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Forensic Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Anthropology   Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14




U
    CLASS   Geography   World Regional Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Physical Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Image and Map Interpretation (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Computer Basics in Geography and Anthropology (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Special Study for Lower Division Students (12)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Special Topics for Lower Division Students (14)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Climatology (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Advanced Physical Geography I (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Advanced Physical Geography II (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Field Geography (4)




U




    CLASS   Geography   Economic Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Legal and Political Geography (4)




U




    CLASS   Geography   Urban Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Historical Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Business Geographics (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Tourism in a Globalizing World (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   U.S. and Canada Geography (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Geography of California (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Geography of Latin America (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Geography of Asia (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Geography of Africa (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Europe: Land and People (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Special Study for Upper Division Students (14)




U
    CLASS   Geography   GeoDemographics Using GIS (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Advanced Field Techniques (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Photographic Remote Sensing (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Environmental Law (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Digital Image Processing (4)




U




    CLASS   Geography   Computer Cartography (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Multimedia Mapping (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Parks and Protected Areas (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Advanced Geographic Information Systems I (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Advanced Geographic Information Systems II (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Ethnic Geography of the United States (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Environmental Modeling With Geographic Information Systems (3/1)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Internship in Geographic Information Systems (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Senior Colloquium (4)




U
    CLASS   Geography   Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14)




U
    CLASS   History   History of California (4)




U
    CLASS   Sociology   Population and Society (4)




U
    Science   Biological Sciences        Life Science (3) Every quarter




U




    Science   Biological Sciences   Life Science Laboratory (1) Every quarter




U
    Science          Foundations
              Biological Sciences of Biology: Energy and Matter Cycles and Flows (3/2) Fall, Winter




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Careers in Biology (1) Once a year




U
    Science                     Horizons in Biotechnology (1) Once a year: Winter, Spring
              Biological Sciences




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Genetics and Human Issues (4) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Biology of Cancer (4) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Regulatory Affairs and Safety Assessment (4)




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Biophysics (4) Every other year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Field Studies in the Southwest (4) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Field Studies in Baja California (4) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Population Ecology (3) Every other year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Chaparral Biology (3/1) Every other year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Marine Ecology (3/2) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Population Genetics (3/1)




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Tropical Biology (3) Once a year




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   General Botany (3/2) Fall




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Form and Function in Plants (3/2) Fall, Spring




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   General Plant Pathology (2/2) Fall




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Plant Physiology (3/2) Fall, Winter




U
    Science                   Diagnosis and Control of Plant Diseases (2/2) Every other year
              Biological Sciences




U
    Science   Biological Sciences   Methods in Plant Pathology (2/2) Every other year




U
    Science   Chemistry   Fundamentals of Chemistry (3/1) FWSp




U
    Science   Chemistry   Chemistry in Life, Civilization and the World (4) FWSp




U
    Science   Chemistry           The Chemist in Industry (4) Sp




U




    Science   Chemistry   Computational Biochemistry (4) W, even years




U
    Science   Chemistry   Undergraduate Seminar (2) FWSp




U
    Science   Computer Science   Computers and Society (4)




U
    Science                                     Integrated Science I (5)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies




U
    Science                                     Integrated Science II (5)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies




U
    Science                           History Studies
              Institute for Advanced Systems and Philosophy of Systems Science (6)




U

    Science                                Systems Law and Legislation (2/2)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies
U


    Science                                       Multimetrics (2/2)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies
U

    Science                            General Systems
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies Theory I: Processes (3/1)
U
    Science                            General Systems Theory II: Linkages (3/1)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies
U
    Science                    General Systems Theory
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies III: Artificial Systems Research (3/1)
U


    Science                               Comparative
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies Systems Analysis I. (4)
U
    Science                              Comparative
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies Systems Analysis II. (3/1)
U

    Science   Geological Sciences         The Earth Revealed (3/1) FWSp(Su)
U
    Science   Geological Sciences            Earth, Time and Life (3) FW(Su)
U



    Science   Geological SciencesQuantitative Applications in the Earth Sciences (4) Sp


U


    Science   Geological Sciences                 Meteorology (4) W
U




    Science   Geological Sciences               Geomorphology (3/1) F


U


    Science   Geological Sciences       Exploring the Oceans: Oceanography (4)

U

    Science   Geological Sciences                 Coastal Processes (4)
U


    Science   Geological Sciences           Natural Disasters (4) FWSp (Su)

U

    Science   Geological Sciences     Groundwater Geology (3/1) W (even years)
U


    Science   Biological Sciences       Basic Microbiology (3/2) Every quarter

U
    Science   Biological Sciences           Germs and You (4) Once a year
U


    Science   Biological Sciences     Applied Microbiology (3/2) Every other year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences      Food Microbiology (3/1) Every other year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences        General Epidemiology (4) Once a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences   Medical Bacteriology (3/2) Every other quarter
U
    Science   Biological Sciences         Medical Mycology (3/2) Once a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences      General Virology (3/2) Every other quarter
U




    Science   Biological Sciences               Microbial Ecology (2/2)



U




    Science   Biological Sciences           PlantMicrobe Interactions (2/2)




U

    Science   Biological Sciences          Animal Biology (3/2) Twice a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences Introduction to Invertebrate Zoology (3/2) Once a year
U
    Science   Biological Sciences Introduction to Vertebrate Zoology (3/2) Twice a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences       Medical Parasitology (3/2) Twice a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences            Entomology (3/1) Once a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences           Herpetology (3/2) Once a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences            Mammalogy (2/2) Once a year
U

    Science   Biological Sciences            Ornithology (3/1) Once a year
U




    Science   Biological Sciences          Evolutionary Ecomorphology (2/2)



U


    Science   Biological Sciences         Ichthyology (2/2) Every other year
U


    Science                          Project Design
              Interdisciplinary General Education Principles and Applications (2)(2)

U



    Science           Foundations
              Biological Sciences of Biology: Reproduction and Development (3/2) Winter, Spring


U


    Science   Biological Sciences            Biometrics (3/1) Every quarter
U
    Science   Biological Sciences          Human Sexuality (4) Every quarter



U

    Science   Biological Sciences              Genetics (4) Every quarter
U




    Science   Biological Sciences          Biology of the Brain (4) Once a year


U


    Science   Biological Sciences     Cell and Molecular Biology (4) Every quarter

U



    Science                   Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Current Issues (4) Twice a year
              Biological Sciences


U


    Science   Biological Sciences      Developmental Biology (4/1) Once a year
U


    Science   Biological Sciences       Biology of Human Aging (4) Once a year

U


    Science   Biological Sciences                Human Genetics (3/1)
U


    Science   Biological Sciences               Biological Systematics (3)
U
    Science   Biological Sciences           Biology of Ants (3/2) Once a year
U


    Science   Biological Sciences        Principles of Evolution (4) Fall, Winter

U
    Science   Biological Sciences          Advanced Genetics (4) Once a year
U


    Science   Biological Sciences                   Neuroscience (4)

U

    Science   Biological Sciences         Cellular Physiology (3/2) Once a year
U


    Science   Biological Sciences          Radiation Biology (3/1) Once a year
U


    Science                     Molecular Biology of Recombinant DNA (2/2) Once a year
              Biological Sciences

U




    Science   Biological Sciences               Bioinformatics (3/2) Fall



U



    Science                    Interpretation of Science Service Learning (4) Every Quarter
              Biological Sciences


U
    Science   Biological Sciences      Scientific Communication (1) Every quarter
U
    Science   Biological Sciences            Experimental Traditions (2/2)


U

    Science   Biological Sciences                 California Flora (1/2)
U


    Science   Biological Sciences                 Plant Genetics (3/1)
U


    Science   Biological Sciences      Mycology (2/2) Even years (see BOT 426)
U

    Science   Biological Sciences       Mycology (2/2) Odd years (see BOT 425)
U

    Science   Biological Sciences               Evolution of Plants (3/2)
U

    Science   Biological Sciences        Plant Anatomy (2/2) Every other year
U


    Science                   Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14) Every quarter
              Biological Sciences

U




    Science   Chemistry                  General Chemistry (3) (3) (3) FWSpSu




U


    Science   Chemistry             General Chemistry Laboratory (1) (1) (1) FWSpSu

U
    Science   Chemistry       Elements of Organic Chemistry (3) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Chemistry     Special Topics for Lower Division Students (14)
U

    Science   Chemistry      Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (3/1) FSp
U


    Science   Chemistry       Elements of Physical Chemistry (3/1) (3) FW
U



    Science   Chemistry       Physical Chemistry (3) (3) (3) FSu, WSu, SpF


U


    Science   Chemistry           Organic Chemistry (3)(3)(3) FWSpSu

U

    Science   Chemistry        Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Chemistry       Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Chemistry   CHM 319L Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) FWSpSu
U


    Science   Chemistry         Elements of Biochemistry (3/1) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Chemistry                  Biochemistry (3) FW
U
    Science   Chemistry            Biochemistry Laboratory (1) FW
U


    Science   Chemistry                 Biochemistry (3) WSp
U


    Science   Chemistry            Biochemistry Laboratory (1) WSp
U
    Science   Chemistry                  Biochemistry (3) SpSu
U

    Science   Chemistry            Biochemistry Laboratory (1) SpSu
U

    Science   Chemistry             Spectroscopic Methods (2/2) (F)
U

    Science   Chemistry             Separation Methods (2/2) (W)
U

    Science   Chemistry           Electroanalytical Methods (2/2) (Sp)
U
    Science   Chemistry       Theory of Chemical Instrumentation (1/1) Sp
U
    Science   Chemistry          Physical Chemistry/Laboratory (1/2) W
U
    Science   Chemistry           Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) Sp
U


    Science   Chemistry             Inorganic Chemistry (3) (3) FW
U

    Science   Chemistry          Polymer Chemistry (3) Sp, odd years
U

    Science   Chemistry           Methods of Data Acquisition (4) Sp
U

    Science   Chemistry   Introduction to Quantum Chemistry (3) F, even years
U


    Science   Chemistry       Computational Chemistry (4) Sp, odd years
U

    Science   Chemistry                Organic Synthesis (2/2) W
U


    Science   Chemistry                Organic Analysis (2/2) Sp
U
    Science   Chemistry              Biochemical Preparations (1/2) W, even years
U

    Science   Chemistry                  Recombinant DNA Biochemistry (3) Sp
U


    Science   Computer Science      Introduction to Computers for NonCS Majors (4)
U

    Science   Computer Science                    Senior Project (2)(2)
U

    Science   Computer Science                Undergraduate Seminar (2)
U


    Science                                Comparative
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies Science of Origins (4)
U



    Science                                    Integrated Science III (6)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies


U


    Science                          General Systems
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies Modeling and Simulation (4)
U

    Science                          Seminar in Comparative Systems Analysis (14)
              Institute for Advanced Systems Studies
U

    Science   Geological Sciences          Principles of Geology (4) FWSp(Su)
U




    Science   Geological Sciences       Introduction to Astronomy (4) FWSp(Su)



U
    Science   Geological Sciences    Introduction to Oceanography (4) FWSp(Su)
U
    Science   Geological Sciences   Principles of Geology Laboratory (1) FWSp(Su)
U

    Science   Geological Sciences     Earth, Time and Life Laboratory (1) FW(Su)
U

    Science   Geological Sciences                 Mineralogy (3/1) F
U

    Science   Geological Sciences                Field Methods (1/3) F
U



    Science   Geological Sciences      Introduction to Geochemistry (3/1) FW


U

    Science   Geological Sciences   GIS Applications for Earth ScientistsPart I (1/2)
U


    Science   Geological Sciences   GIS Applications for Earth ScientistsPart II(1/2)

U


    Science   Geological Sciences            Engineering Geology I (3/1)

U


    Science   Geological Sciences             Optical Mineralogy (2/2) W
U

    Science   Geological Sciences         Invertebrate Paleontology (3/1) Sp
U

    Science   Geological Sciences             Structural Geology (3/1) F
U

    Science   Geological Sciences           Exploration Geophysics (3/1)
U
    Science   Geological Sciences                Marine Geology (4)
U

    Science   Geological Sciences              Petroleum Geology (3/1)
U




    Science   Geological Sciences            Engineering Geology II (3/1) F



U


    Science   Geological Sciences           Sedimentary Geology (3/2) Sp
U




    Science   Geological Sciences         Ore Deposits (3/1) W (even years)


U




    Science   Geological Sciences Exploration and Mining Geology (3/1) Sp (even years)



U

    Science   Geological Sciences              Micropaleontology (3/1)
U


    Science   Geological Sciences          Geotectonics (3/1) W (odd years)
U


    Science              Introduction to Seismology, Earthquakes and Earth Sturcture (3/1) W
              Geological Sciences

U
    Science   Geological Sciences             Summer Field Geology (8) Su
U



    Science   Geological Sciences              Field Module (2) FWSpSu


U
    Science                    Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14) FWSp(Su)
              Geological Sciences
U


    Science   Mathematics and Statistics Calculus for the Life Sciences (4) FWSp

U


    Science                         Introductory Calculus for Business (4) FWSpSu
              Mathematics and Statistics

U


    Science   Physics                         Fundamentals of Physics (4)
U

    Science   Physics                 Physics of Musical Sound (4) Sp (even years)
U

    Science   Physics                         College Physics (3) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                College Physics Laboratory (1) (1) (1) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Physics                          College Physics (3) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Physics                         College Physics (3) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                         General Physics (3) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                General Physics Laboratory (1) (1) (1) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                         General Physics (3) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Physics                 General Physics (3) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics    Special Study for Lower Division Students (12) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                    General Physics (3) W
U
U   Science   Physics              General Physics Laboratory (1) W
    Science   Physics              Elementary Modern Physics (3) Sp
U
U   Science   Physics         Elementary Modern Physics Laboratory (1) Sp
    Science   Physics    Special Topics for Lower Division Students (14) FWSpSu
U




    Science   Physics              The Universe in Ten Weeks (4) FSp


U


    Science   Physics               Electronics for Scientists (3/1) F
U




    Science   Physics                    History of Physics (4) F


U


    Science   Physics          Introduction to Global Geophysics (3/1) F

U

    Science   Physics         Fundamentals of Mathematical Physics (4) F
U

    Science   Physics         Fundamentals of Mathematical Physics (4) W
U
    Science   Physics   Fundamentals of Mathematical Physics (4) Sp (even years)
U
    Science   Physics   Physics of Electric and Magnetic Phenomena (4) (4) WSp
U


    Science   Physics                   Mechanics (4) (4) WSp
U
    Science   Physics                    Thermal Physics (4) F
U
    Science   Physics                    Applied Optics (4) F
U

    Science   Physics    Special Study for Upper Division Students (12) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                 Quantum Mechanics (4) F
U

    Science   Physics                 Quantum Mechanics (4) W
U
    Science   Physics            Advanced Quantum Mechanics (4) Sp
U

    Science   Physics    Introduction to High Energy Physics (4) W (odd years)
U


    Science   Physics            Solid State Physics (4) W (even years)
U


    Science   Physics            Statistical Physics (4) Sp (odd years)
U


    Science   Physics           Computational Physics (4) F (odd years)

U

    Science   Physics                Biophysics (4) W (odd years)
U

    Science   Physics                        Optics (3) Sp
U
U   Science   Physics                  Optics Laboratory (1) Sp
    Science   Physics                 Acoustics (4) Sp (odd years)
U

    Science   Physics              Plasma Physics (4) F (even years)
U
    Science   Physics                Astrophysics (4) F (odd years)
U

    Science   Physics              Space Physics (4) W (even years)
U


    Science   Physics    Relativity, Gravity and Black Holes (4) Sp (even years)
U
    Science   Physics             Advanced Physics Laboratory (1) F
U
    Science   Physics            Solid State Physics Laboratory (1) W
U
    Science   Physics              Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1) F
U

    Science   Physics              Internship in Physics (2) FWSpSu
U

    Science   Physics                Senior Project (2) (2) FWSpSu
U
    Science   Physics               Undergraduate Seminar (2) Sp
U
    Science   Physics   Special Topics for Upper Division Students (14) FWSpSu
U
G   Science   Physics                   Seminar in Physics (13)
SUSTAINABILITY-RELATED COURSES
  Class Number

 AGS 505/505A




     LIS 512


     LIS 692


    HPS 510




    AVS 311




    AVS 112



    FMA 313




    FMA 350




    FMA 450




    FMA 503


     FN 228


  FN 346/346L
  FN 445


   IA 101


   IA 445



   IA 450


  PLT 222


PLT 223/223L


PLT 226/226L


PLT 231/231L



  PLT 232




  PLT 303



  PLT 311


PLT 321/321L


PLT 324/324L



PLT 331/331L
  PLT 332/332L




     PLT 333



  PLT 337/337L

     PLT 401


     PLT 411

  PLT 420/420L
  PLT 421/421L

  PLT 440/440L

GBA 615




GBA 616




GBA 667




GBA 671




GBA 672




     FRL 426
     IBM 406


    MHR 318


     BUS 445


    MHR 406



    MHR 451



    MHR 452

HRT 101




HRT 203




HRT 255




HRT 281/281L




HRT 304
HRT 345




HRT 382




HRT 383L




HRT 410




HRT 415




HRT 499/499A/499L




EDU 534/534A




EDU 538/538A




     TED 407
EWS 140




EWS 145




EWS 203




EWS 210




EWS 280




EWS 301




EWS 345




EWS 401




EWS 402




EWS 403




EWS 404
     EWS 420




     EWS 425




     EWS 445




     EWS 475




     IGE 221




     IGE 222




         LS 401




         LS 461


CE 586




EGR 574
ME 590



ME 591




  CHE 201/211L




  CHE 202/212L




    CHE 432


     CE 122



    CE 351/L




    CE 428/L




    CE 431/L



    CE 433/L


     CE 451

     CE 457


  ECE 492/492L
     EGR 402




     EGR 445




     EGR 484




    MFE 201/L




    MFE 217/L




     ME 306




     ME 307




    ME 407/L




     ME 408


    ME 417/L



    ME 418/L



ARC 103/103L
ARC 200


ARC 202/202L



ARC 301/301L



ARC 302/302L


ARC 303/303L


ARC 341/341A



ARC 342/342A



ARC 401/401L


ARC 402/402L


ARC 403/403L


ARC 405/405L




ARC 460



ARC 463



ARC 467
ARC 469



ARC 471/471A



ARC 481




ARC 495




ENV 101/101L




ENV 115/115A




ENV 370


ENV 401


ENV 489




LA 102/102L




LA 121
LA 301/301L, 302/302L, 303/303L




LA 331/331L, 332/332L, 333/333L




LA 341/341L, 342/342L



LA 464

LA 540/540L




LA 552




LA 576




LA 606/606L




RS 400


RS 465




RS 499
RS 510/510L




RS 695




RS 696




URP 102/102A




URP 104




URP 331/331L




URP 351




URP 352




URP 431/431L




URP 432/432L
URP 466




URP 475




URP 483/483A




URP 484/484A




URP 488/488L


URP 506




URP 534




URP 537




URP 551
ANT 101
ANT 103
ANT 104
ANT 112




ANT 200
ANT 201
ANT 299/299A/299L
ANT 320
ANT 321
ANT 322
ANT 325
ANT 330
ANT 340/340A
ANT 353
ANT 354
ANT 355
ANT 357
ANT 358
ANT 359/359A
ANT 360
ANT 370
ANT 379
ANT 380
ANT 390/390A
ANT 394/394A
ANT 395/395A
ANT 400
ANT 405
ANT 461
ANT 491
ANT 499/499A/499L
GEO 100
GEO 101
GEO 103
GEO 105
GEO 200
GEO 240/240A
GEO 299/299A/299L
GEO 303
GEO 305
GEO 307
GEO 309




GEO 312
GEO 313




GEO 315
GEO 335
GEO 340/340A
GEO 345
GEO 350
GEO 351
GEO 352
GEO 357
GEO 358
GEO 359
GEO 400
GEO 405/405A
GEO 409
GEO 410
GEO 413
GEO 420




GEO 421/421L
GEO 422/422A
GEO 435
GEO 442/442A
GEO 443/443A
GEO 444
GEO 445/445A
GEO 451
GEO 461
GEO 499
HST 370
SOC 330
BIO 110




BIO 111L
BIO 121/121L
BIO 207
BIO 230
BIO 300
BIO 302
BIO 405
BIO 410
BIO 415L
BIO 416L
BIO 418
BIO 425/425L
BIO 442/442L
BIO 445/445L
BIO 485
BOT 124/124L
BOT 201/201L
BOT 323/323L
BOT 428/428L
BOT 440/440L
BOT 441/441L
CHM 103/103A
CHM 210
CHM 340




CHM 417
CHM 493
CS 375
CSA 250
CSA 251
CSA 300




CSA 340/340A



CSA 350/350A



CSA 411/411A


CSA 412/412A

CSA 413/413A


CSA 450
CSA 451/451L


GSC 101/101A


GSC 112




GSC 225




GSC 304




GSC 323/323L




GSC 335




GSC 338




GSC 350




GSC 360/360L




MIC 201/201L
MIC 301




MIC 310/310L



MIC 320/320L


MIC 330


MIC 410/410L


MIC 425/425L


MIC 430/430L




MIC 435/435L




MIC 436/436L




ZOO 201/201L


ZOO 237/237L
ZOO 238/238L


ZOO 425/425L


ZOO 426/426L


ZOO 429/429L


ZOO 430/430L


ZOO 435/435L




ZOO 439/439L




ZOO 441/441L




AG 481, 482




BIO 122/122L




BIO 211/211L
BIO 301




BIO 303




BIO 309




BIO 310




BIO 311




BIO 320/320L




BIO 328




BIO 403/403L




BIO 406
BIO 407/407L




BIO 413



BIO 421



BIO 424




BIO 428/428L



BIO 431/431L




BIO 455/455L




BIO 459/459L




BIO 488S




BIO 490
BIO 495/495L




BOT 343/343L



BOT 403/403L




BOT 425/425L



BOT 426/426L


BOT 434/434L


BOT 435/435L




BOT 499/499A/499L




CHM 121, 122, 123




CHM 121L, 122L, 123L
CHM 201


CHM 299/299A/299L


CHM 301/301A



CHM 304/304A, 305




CHM 311, 312, 313




CHM 314, 315, 316




CHM 317L


CHM 318L


CHM 321/321L


CHM 321/321L


CHM 327

CHM 327L


CHM 328




CHM 328L
CHM 329


CHM 329L


CHM 342/342L


CHM 343/343L


CHM 344/344L


CHM 347/347L

CHM 352/352L

CHM 353L


CHM 401, 402



CHM 409


CHM 418


CHM 419



CHM 420



CHM 422/422L



CHM 424/424L
CHM 452/452L



CHM 453



CS 101



CS 461, 462


CS 463



CSA 309




CSA 310




CSA 440



CSA 490


GSC 111




GSC 116
GSC 120


GSC 141L


GSC 151L


GSC 215/215L


GSC 255/255L




GSC 300/300L




GSC 310/310L




GSC 311/311L




GSC 321/321L




GSC 325/325L



GSC 331/331L


GSC 333/333L


GSC 334/334L
GSC 340



GSC 351/351L




GSC 415/415L




GSC 423/423L




GSC 433/433L




GSC 440/440L




GSC 441/441L



GSC 444/444L




GSC 450/450L
GSC 490L




GSC 491L




GSC 499/499A/499L



MAT 120




MAT 125




PHY 102



PHY 105/105L


PHY 121


PHY 121L, 122L, 123L


PHY 122

PHY 123


PHY 131


PHY 131L, 132L, 133L


PHY 132
PHY 133



PHY 200


PHY 234

PHY 234L
PHY 235
PHY 235L
PHY 299, 299A, 299L




PHY 303




PHY 304/304L




PHY 306




PHY 307/307L




PHY 308


PHY 309


PHY 310
PHY 314, 315



PHY 321, 322


PHY 333

PHY 344


PHY 400


PHY 401


PHY 402


PHY 403


PHY 404



PHY 406




PHY 407




PHY 409




PHY 410


PHY 417

PHY 417L
PHY 420


PHY 422


PHY 424


PHY 425



PHY 426


PHY 430L

PHY 431L

PHY 432L


PHY 441


PHY 461, 462


PHY 463

PHY 499/499A/499L
PHY 550
ABILITY-RELATED COURSES
                                                              Class Description

           Organization, history, philosophy, administration and procedures in advising of the Future Farmers Association
           (FFA) chapters and conducting classes for outofschool youth and adults. Surveys and plans for development of
           rural and urban adult programs, FFA and Young Farmer programs, techniques and methods. 2 lecture
           discussions; 1 twohour activity. Concurrent enrollment required.
           Advanced studies in methods of estimating evapotranspiration (ET), methods of soil moisture measurement, and
           estimating irrigation efficiency to both landscape and agricultural applications. 4 lecture discussions.
           Prerequisite: graduate standing.
           Independent research and study on an irrigation and water management study chosen by the student with the
           consultation and approval of an advisor. May include research proposal writing to fund the research project.
           Prerequisite: permission of major professor .
           Advanced study of topics related to agronomy, horticulture, soil science and economic entomology. To include
           perspectives on plant biotechnology, trends in public policy related to environmental regulation, and advances in
           plant nutrition and soil management. Recent research in the field will be examined. Reading and reports on
           papers in the literature. 1 threehour seminar. Prerequisite: unconditional graduate standing.

             The course analyzes the application of science in the food animal industry and animal production systems, the
               role and use of food animals and animal products in resolving problems associated with humanity, and the
             influence of animal agriculture on history, civilization and human values. 4 lecture/discussions. Prerequisites:
            one GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, B4. GE Synthesis course for Subarea
                                                                       B5.
            A study of livestock industry and animal management techniques emphasizing the importance of management
                strategies, equipment and facilities, nutrition, selection, breeding principles and disease control to ensure
                                                 scientifically based management decisions
               The political framework affecting the food and agricultural system. Federal and state laws and regulations
              impacting agribusiness. Contemporary development and economic analysis of public programs and policies.
            Current policies and programs as well as alternate policies evaluated. Seminar discussions. Policy case studies. 3
                                                               lecture discussions
             Water and its relationship to civilization from ancient history to modern developments. Survey of global water
               resources and current issues of distribution, relationship to economic development, and the environment.
                  Analysis of state and regional water supplies, water districts. Determination of water requirements for
                                                    agriculture in arid and humid regions
            Water resource management applied to current issues. Water delivery systems in the U.S. and California, survey
            of water rights, water pollution, water conservation, food and agricultural system water use, and efficient water
                                      management. Includes water problems in developing nations

            Survey of food production and marketing systerns as well as issues in agricultural development. Examination of
              attitudes and approaches for rural development practitioners. Understanding of interrelationships among
                         nutrition, agricultural, environmental, economic, political, social, and gender factors
            Interrelationship of food availability, historical developments, socioeconomic institutions, political, religious, and
                               other influences on food patterns. Indepth study of a selected culture group.
             Goals and trends in community nutrition. Dietary methodology. National nutrition status surveys. Role of public
                and private agencies in community nutrition programs. Analytical tools. Grantsmanship, public policy and
                                                                   legislation
     Issues in technology, food policy, nutrition, political economy, and social welfare in developing societies.
  Integrates concerns about food and nutrient distribution and availability, malnutrition, scientific principles of
     nutrient utilization and metabolism, and human productivity and reproduction. Implications for a just and
                                          sustainable economic development.
 Resource base for agricultural production on various continents. Potential for increasing food supplies. Role of
                                        agriculture in economic development.
     Issues in technology, food policy, nutrition, political economy, and social welfare in developing societies.
  Integrates concerns about food and nutrient distribution and availability, malnutrition, scientific principles of
     nutrient utilization and metabolism, and human productivity and reproduction. Implications for a just and
                                          sustainable economic development.
      Water resource management applied to current issues. Water delivery systems in the United States and
 California, survey of water rights, water pollution, water conservation, food and agricultural system water use,
                  and efficient water management. Includes water problems in developing nations.
    Procurement, identification and quality standards of vegetables, fruits, and herbs utilized in a restaurant or
culinary setting. Integration of seasonality, grading, postharvest handling and environmental impacts. Discussion
                  of major issues facing the grower and end user, organic vs. conventional produce.
     Establishment, management and composition of irrigated and rangeland pastures and major forage crops
adapted to southwestern conditions. Identification, botanical characteristics, culture, and livestock utilization of
                                                    forage species.
Environmental and cultural principles involved in the production of major warm and cool season vegetable crops
   in the southwest. Economics of production, climatic adaptation, harvesting principles, postharvest handling.
                            Current topics involving technologies in vegetable production.
Basic concepts of living and nonliving systems of soils; integrated relationships between soils and climate, plants,
     and animals. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Practical approach to current problems
                                              through basic soil principles
 An introduction to irrigation methods like drip, micro, surface and sprinklers for nursery, landscapes, turfgrass,
   field crops and tree crop applications. Basic soilplantwater relationships. Information needed for planning,
design and scheduling of an irrigation system, irrigation hydraulics, irrigation efficiencies and modern controllers.

  Federal, State and County pest control laws and regulations affecting individuals, corporations, and agencies;
  providing for the public welfare and protecting the environment. Emphasis on hazardous materials, pesticide
        safety, and ground water protection. Function and enforcement practices of regulatory agencies.
critical review of science, technology and environment as related to plant domestication and current world food
   and fiber production. Societal implications associated with the biological and technical innovations in world
                               cropping systems will be discussed. Open to all majors.
Grades, quality factors and processing of major cereal, forage, and fiber crops. Analysis of nutritional values and
    market factors. Identification of optimal harvesting, storage, and quality issues to facilitate utilization and
                                                     marketing.
    Analysis and management of arthropods and vertebrate pests causing damage to structures and plant and
 animal production environments. Evaluation of damage, control measures and important laws and regulations
                                 regarding structural integrated pest management.
   Identification and control of weeds in crops, range lands, ornamentals, turfgrass and noncrop areas. Weed
ecology, competition, reproduction, seed dormancy. Methods of weed control, cultural, biological, chemical, and
          integrated pest management strategies. Classification of herbicides and their modes of action.
    Understanding the influence of soil biological, physical, and chemical properties and their interactions on
   nutrient availability for plants. Identify plant nutrition problems and investigate the relationship of edaphic
 factors on nutrient availability. Formulate a probable corrective action by developing a fertilizer plan based on
        soil and tissue tests. Identify soil and nutrient management practices that maximize productivity.

 Critical evaluation of ecosystembased strategies used in management of pests in agricultural, industrial, urban,
 horticultural and structural environments. Control measures are implemented on target pests after monitoring
          and evaluating damaging populations and following established laws, guidelines and treatment
                                                  recommendations.
      Native California plants suitable for landscape purposes. Their identification, habits of growth, cultural
                                          requirements, and landscape use.
      Group research and writing project integrating environmental, ecological, economic, pest and disease
            management, genetics, and soil and water management in a business management setting.

 Survey and analyses of the effects of civilization on the environment. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of
            agriculture and other forms of commerce on food, water, air and soil, and human health.
   The study of the management of trees in communities, considering political, funding and consumer issues.
                      Diagnosis and control of diseases of horticultural and agronomic crops.
Application of soilwaterplant relations, climactic conditions and best management practices to develop effective
 schedules of irrigation water for residential, commercial, industrial, park and golf course systems. Evaluation of
                  water conservation issues, water policies and codes and other related matters.
Human processes employed in accomplishing work tasks and creating employee satisfaction within the
organization. Group experiences whereby students test their interpersonal skills in the organizational
environment. Group activities; 3 lecture discussions. Concurrent enrollment in GBA 616 required. Prerequisites:
Completion of all MBA prerequisite courses and microcomputer proficiency. Unconditional standing required.

Independent investigation of selected problems in organizational behavior under the direction of a faculty
member. 1 seminar. Concurrent enrollment in GBA 615 required. Unconditional standing required.



Initiation and management of organizational efforts at planned improvement. Reviews quality of work life,
productivity and quality improvement thrusts, behavioral science perspectives on organizational development.
Survey of basic methods; review of domestic and global literature. 4 lectures/problem solving. Prerequisites:
GBA 615 and GBA
The development and evaluation of alternative corporate strategies drawing upon the functional areas within
business and the outside environmental factors which affect business. 3 seminars. Completion of all MBA
prerequisite courses and microcomputer proficiency. Concurrent enrollment with GBA 672 required.
Prerequisites: GBA 561 and all required 500level courses. Unconditional standing required.
Independent investigation of selected problems in management under the direction of a faculty member. 1
seminar. Concurrent enrollment with GBA 671 is required. Unconditional standing required.



  Legal factors affecting organizations involved in international business transactions. Sales, bills of exchange,
  patents, obligations and liabilities of cargo carriers, political risks, and credit insurance. 4 lecture discussions.
                                                Prerequisite: FRL 201.
The morality and immorality of modern marketing practices. Ethical theories as applied to such marketingrelated
 issues as bribery, marketing to countries engaging in morally questionable practices, deceptive advertising, and
                                                  invasion of privacy.
     Introductory experiences in the basics of organizational behavior. Organizational socialization, teamwork
leadership, group dynamics, problemsolving, and ethics as they apply to the manager in a multicultural economic
                                               and political environment.
    The unique role of design professionals in society, and the associated privileges and responsibilities. Social,
  economic, historical, legal, and political aspects of professional practice, as well as ethics, social responsibility,
                  regulatory requirements, professional liability, and the consequences of failures.
  Attitudes regarding male/female roles in management positions discussed in seminar and small group format.
Current literature, popular and scholarly, reviewed and evaluated. Three short papers required on current issues.
                                                      4 seminars
   From a comparative perspective, exploring opportunities and challenges facing multinational companies, the
     role of culture in international management, social responsibility and ethics under international context,
       crossborder strategy development, global coordinating and monitoring systems, and global workforce
                                        management. 4 lecture presentations.
  Exploration of contemporary issues; cases and problems facing management in multicultural and international
    environments. Examination of the environment of business in a global economy with specific emphasis on
            businessgovernment relations, ethics, and managing for the future. 4 lecture presentations.
An overview of the hospitality industry with an emphasis on career opportunities, customer service, and
personal success strategies. Brief history, description and interrelationships of key leisure industry segments
emphasizing the application of technology, ethics, leadership, teams, critical thinking, and service standards for
the restaurant, hotel, and travelrelated businesses. 4 lecture discussions.

An introduction to the operating systems and components of a hotelresort facility, which includes: front office,
housekeeping, food and beverage, sales and marketing, accounting, property maintenance, human resources
management and information systems. 4 lecture discussions.


Healthy and environmentally sound perspectives on culinary customs in America. 4 lecture discussions. Product
fee required. Fulfills GE Area E.




Handson cooking, tasting and evaluating approach used to teach students professional cooking techniques.
Emphasis on understanding how ingredients and cooking techniques affect product outcome. 2 lecture
discussions, 2 threehour laboratories. Product fee required. Prerequisites: HRT 225, HRT 276. Corequisites: HRT
281 and HRT 281L.

Examines the techniques, issues, and problems of rooms division management systems. Incorporates the
examination of the major departments which traditionally report to the Rooms Division including: the front
office, housekeeping, engineering, and security. 4 lecture presentations.
The geography of tourism and recreation in selected regions of the world. Aspects of physical and cultural
geography that directly affect the tourist industry. 4 lecture discussions. (Also listed as GEO 345)




Comprehensive study of restaurant and food service management principles, practices, philosophies, and
systems. Competencybased skills incorporating the practices of The Restaurant at Kellogg Ranch. 4
lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: HRT 281/281L, and HRT 302.


Comprehensive application of food and beverage principles, practices, philosophies, and systems in operating a
casual and fine dining restaurant. Analysis of daily operations with a focus on developing viable solutions to
problems. 3 eighthour laboratories. Prerequisite: HRT 382 the preceding quarter.


Integrated capstone seminar in the principles and skills of effective leadership in a global hospitality
environment, application and development of hospitality policy, and the management of a service business in a
strategic environment. 4 discussion. Prerequisites: senior standing.


Description and analysis of international travel from the perspective of the traveler, the entrepreneur, and the
host community. Strategic analysis of challenges and opportunities associated with travel and tourism
development and investigation of popular international travel destinations. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
Prerequisite: HRT 201.

Group study of a selected topic, the title and prerequisites to be specified in advance. May be repeated up to 8
units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory, or a combination.




The ethics of leadership and policy development are studied in relationship to schools in a democratic society.
Candidates will study concepts to provide effective schools by influencing the larger political, social, economic,
legal and cultural spheres of their school community. Prerequisite: Preliminary Administrative Services
Credential. 1 three hour seminar, 1 twohour activity.

The course examines the philosophy, ethics, and moral values of educational leadership. Candidates reflect upon
the theory and philosophy of educational change, core values, and examine research about ethical and moral
leadership in schools. Prerequisite: Preliminary Administrative Services Credential. 1 threehour seminar, 1
twohour activity.


 Explores the nature of culture as a complex body of knowledge related to the understanding of self, others and
schooling. Explores diversity in relation to educational history, philosophy, sociology and law which forms a basis
                           for equity, ethics and understanding. 4 seminar/ discussions.
    Survey of ethnic American experience. Introduction to fundamental theories of race relations and social
processes producing social and gender stratification. Introduction to concepts and terms such as racism, sexism,
        ethnocentricism, etc. The course includes a survey of the four major ethnic groups in America.

Introduction to fundamental principles explaining reasons for the widely different roles women and men play in
societies throughout the world. Includes introduction to concepts and terms such as sexism, sex vs. gender, and
                              female/male roles in society. 4 lecture discussions.


Survey of Native American heritage in the United States; emphasis on historical, political, educational, economic
                                     and social roles. 4 lecture discussions.


 Survey of multicultural readings by and about Native Americans, African Americans, Chicano/Latinos. Asian
Americans, Women, Lesbians and Gays. The readings serve as the basis for analysis into the discursive practices
                             of diverse communities. 4 lectures/problemsolving.

  Academic studies through innovative, experiential activities and service learning in community agencies and
school sites. Tutorial and mentoring opportunities with elementary and secondary students in conjunction with
               campus organizations. May be repeated for a total of 8 units. 4 lecture discussions.

 Biological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of ethnic identity formation. Influences of family patterns, roles of
educational system, peer group involvement, socioeconomic status, racism, sexism, and discrimination. 4 lecture
                  discussions. May be repeated for credit when different ethnic group offered.

An exploration of the meaning of work and occupational choices, particularly as work and work choices relate to
women’s economic mobility, social prestige and political power. Two 2hour seminars. Prerequisite: EWS 140 or
                                                     145.
   A critical and interdisciplinary analysis of contemporary African American communities. Issues in economic
     status, education, health, justice, politics, race relations, and media representation examined from the
  perspectives of anthropology, history, sociology, ethnic and gender studies. 2 twohour lecture/presentation.
   Open to all majors. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in GE areas A and D (subareas 1, 2, 3). Satisfies GE
                                                  requirement for D4.
   A critical examination of Latinos/Chicanos in the U.S. Selected issues in education, the family, labor, health,
 immigration, and religion examined from social science perspectives. 2 twohour lecture/discussion. Open to all
    majors. Prerequisite: All lower division GE courses in Area A and D. Satisfies GE requirement for Area D4.
    A critical examination of Native American ethnic, cultural, and linguistic groups in the U.S. By synthesizing
     interdisciplinary perspectives from the social sciences and humanities, selected issues in education, law,
   community health issues, religious freedom, cultural expression, sovereignty and selfdetermination will be
examined. 2 twohour lecture/discussion. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in Areas A, C1 and 3, and Area D1,
                                2, and 3. Satisfies GE requirement for Area C4 or D4.
   An interdisciplinary approach to contemporary Asian American issues, including immigration, employment,
   education, family, interethnic and intraAsian conflicts, justice, race relationship and media representations
         examined from perspectives of history, sociology, cultural/ ethnic and gender studies. 2 twohour
 lecture/discussion. Open to all majors. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in GE areas A and D (subareas 1, 2,
                                         3). Satisfies GE requirement for D4.
 Theories and casestudies of the (re)production and intersections of social inequalities. Emphasis on strategies
    such as ranking, boundary maintenance, work ghettoization, stereotyping, discrimination, etc. 4 lecture
                               discussions. Prerequisites: EWS 140 or EWS 145.
Examines the interrelationship between identity, power and technological competency. Using perspectives from
history, history of technology, sociology, gender and cultural studies, and political activists, students will explore
    connections between access and mastery of technology with power and changing societal patterns. Good
 academic standing. Open to all majors. Prerequisites: One GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1,
                     A2, A3, and B1, B2, and D2, D3. Satisfies GE requirement for Area B5 or D4.
Exploration of the multiethnic heritage of California: African, Asian, European, Indigenous, and Latino American.
  Historical, sociological, and comparative analysis of colonization, migration, immigration and their impact on
diversity in California. Exploration of multiethnic contributions to California growth and development. 2 twohour
   lecture/discussion. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in Areas A and D, subareas 1,2, and 3. Satisfies GE
                                               requirement for Area D4.
Key concepts and variables in ethnic community development. The dynamics of power and cultural preservation
   and/or innovation in community formation, relations and settlements. Prerequisite: EWS 140. 2 twohour
                                                 seminars.
Exploration of meanings of “coexistence”; negotiating differences; crossing borders; domination and resistance;
     reform and revolution. Inquiries are historically grounded in both the modern world and the American
   revolutionary and Constitutional periods. 4 Lecture/discussions. Prerequisite: IGE 220. Activity fee may be
                                                     required.
 Explorations of technology and human purpose; constructedness of science as a way of knowing; gender, class,
 and race in science and technology; ethical frameworks. Inquiries are historically grounded in both the modern
    world and the Industrial Age. 4 Lecture/discussions. Prerequisite: IGE 221. Activity fee may be required.


    Analyses of enduring themes and issues in the humanities and social sciences. Frequent written and oral
               presentations. 4 seminars. Some sections may require a fee. Prerequisite: LS 201.



              First of two program capstone experiences. 4 discussion/lectures. Prerequisite: LS 201.


Public transportation can be examined from three perspectives: system characteristics and technology, planning
and operations, and management and finance. This course emphasizes the second aspect. Bus and rail transit are
covered. Planning issues include stop and station location, routing and network design. Operational issues
include scheduling, capacity, speed, dwell times, and others. 4 lecture/discussion. Prerequisite: CE 223.

Planning, analyzing, justifying, controlling, and evaluating physical facilities. Longand shortrange facilities plans,
decision criteria, authorization and control procedures, post completion audits. Resource allocation,
optimization, simulation, and computer techniques. Technical, economic, ecological, safety, and intangible
factors. Case studies. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in engineering economy.
Analysis of advanced, hybrid solar collectors. Advanced solar energy storage. Design of solar energy systems. 4
lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: Upperdivision course on solar energy or equivalent.

Conversion of primary chemical, nuclear, solar and heat energy directly to electrical energy without intermediate
mechanical elements. Fuel cells, solar cells, magnetohydrodynamic generators, and fusion plasma generators. 4
lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: Upperdivision course in thermodynamics.
Material balances for chemical and materials engineering processes. Use of process flow diagrams for plant mass
balance calculations. Solving multicomponent mass balance, simple and multiple mixing or separation problems,
    and chemical reaction problems including recycle and equilibrium. Use of CHE data sources. Plant trip, 3
    lecture/problem solving and 1 threehour computational laboratory. Prerequisites: CHM 122, MAT 115.
Analysis of single and multiple phase systems for chemical and materials engineering systems. Energy balances
for both nonreactive and reactive systems. A plant trip and the use of the computer for energy balance analysis
  of nonreactive, reactive, and transient processes. Application of stoichiometry to environmental systems. 3
    lectures/problem solving and 1 threehour laboratory, Prerequisites: Cor better in CHE 201 and CHE 211L.
   Improve the understanding of natural processes and the fundamentals that govern the concentrations of
  contaminants in water, air, and other media. Topics in air pollution, water pollution, and solid waste. Group
project involving study and preliminary design, including cost analysis. 2 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites:
                                                CHE 302, CHE 311.
Fundamental concepts of civil engineering. The technical, professional, ethical, and social responsibilities of the
                                    civil engineer. 1 lecture/problemsolving.
    Discussion and analysis of basic environmental skills and selected topics for the environmental engineer.
  Elements include population projection, curvefitting, principles of environmental systems, food production,
energy topics and noise and air pollution. Labs emphasize practicing techniques and principles studies in lecture
   and field trips. 3 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: MPT or CE 110/110L.
     Study and design of transportation in the urban environment, primarily transit; includes history, nature of
problems, alternative solutions, costs of modernization, mass transit trends, the subsidy debate, role of the State
     and Federal governments, rideshare planning, ADA services, financial plans, the nature and importance of
   planning and transit planning process. 3 onehour lecturediscussion; 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: CE
                                                        223/223L.
  Water pollutants and unit process treatment, water quality, water uses, aeration, sedimentation, coagulation,
   flocculation, filtration, disinfection, and saline water conversion. 3 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour
                                 laboratory. Prerequisites: CE 332/332L, CHM 121/121L.
   Design load requirements. Seismic analysis. Fire resistant requirements. Design of wood structural elements
  including sawn lumber, gluelaminated timber, and plywood. Connection design. Design of complete structural
 systems for both vertical and lateral loads. 2 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite:
                                                            CE
    Precipitation, weather modification, evaporation, infiltration, hydrographs, probability concepts, river and
         reservoir routing, and storm drain design. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CE 332/332L.
Elements include waste generation, storage, collection, transfer, transport, processing, recovery, and disposal of
           municipal solid waste. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CE 351, MPT or CE 110/110L.
Analysis and design of light control systems, occupancy sensors, and magnetic/electric ballasts. Selected sections
             of both State and Federal regulations covering lighting systems and ANSI specifications. 4
          lectures/problemsolving. 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: ECE 209 or ECE 231 or PHY 123.
     This course is team taught by an engineering instructor and a philosophy instructor. Explores the ethics of
engineers: values, ethical theory and practice, moral reasoning morality in law and codes, professional standards
  and societies. Case studies. Prerequisites: One GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and
                        B2, B3 and C2. Fulfills GE Interdisciplinary Synthesis subareas B4 or C4.
    The unique role of design professionals in society, and the associated privileges and responsibilities. Social,
 economic, historical, legal, and political aspects of professional practice, as well as ethics, social responsibility,
regulatory requirements, professional liability, and the consequences of failures. 4 lecture discussions. Fulfills GE
                 Area D4. Prerequisites: Completion of all GE Area A, D1, D2, and D3 requirements.
Issues to be explored will include, but not be limited to: the impact of science and technology on civilization and
 human values; ecological issues; history of science and technology; scientific method and reasoning; heath and
       diseases; medical technology and its ethical implications; general systems theory and its application.
      Prerequisites: One GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, B4. Fulfills GE
                                                  Synthesis subarea B5.
    Study of basic manufacturing processes with emphasis on terminology, technology, process principles and
   capabilities, material selection and comparative advantages and disadvantages. Processes discussed include
      material removal, joining, assembly and casting. Other topics include NC, measurement and gaging, and
                      statistical methods. 3 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour laboratory.
  First in a threecourse sequence. Provides basic knowledge of engineering materials and the enhancement of
    their mechanical properties; measurement methods and process controls. Statistical process control; heat
    treatment of materials; electronic manufacturing and surface technology. 2 lectures/problemsolving and 1
                                    threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 121/L.
  Energy system modeling; forecasting techniques; analysis of energy requirements; energy audits; net energy
  analysis; conservation strategies; energy, environment and economics interface; role of energy management
         and case studies. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: C– or better in ME 301 or equivalent.
    Analysis and synthesis of energy systems; fossil fuel systems; viable alternative energy sources, solar,
 geothermal, wind, biomass, hydro and ocean resources; conversion, storage, and distribution. Environmental
          impact and economics of alternative systems. Synthesis of energy system components. 4
                       lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: C– or better in ME 301.
Solar radiation distribution and measurement; methods of solar energy collection; thermal analysis of flat plate
   solar collectors; experimental testing and efficiency determination; solar energy storage; solar economics;
transient and longterm system performance; computer modeling for solar space and waterheating applications.
          3 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: C– or better in ME 301.
Nuclear power plant design, operation and safety. Reactor vessel internal and core components. Nuclear physics.
  Neutron reactions, fission and moderation. Reactor physics and reactor kinetics. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
                  Prerequisites: either MAT 216 or MAT 224, PHY 133, C– or better in ME 301.
 Thermodynamic processes in buildings; thermal environmental requirements for human habitation; calculation
of building heating and cooling loads; predicting building energy use. 3 lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour
                         laboratory. Prerequisites: C– or better in ME 302 and ME 311.
     Psychometrics; comfort and health room air distribution; building air distribution systems; principles of
          refrigeration; refrigeration equipment; heating equipment; air conditioning system types. 3
lectures/problemsolving and 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: C– or better in ME 302, ME 312 and ME 415.
  Continuing exploration of the design process and the formal and spatial language of architecture; use of case
studies. One 1hour lecture, three 3hour studios. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC
                                  102/102L. Concurrent enrollment required.
          Individual or group investigation, research, studies or survey of selected problems. Problems to be
 studentinitiated under faculty guidance. Total credit limited to 4 units, with a maximum of 2 units per quarter.
                             Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture major.
A continuation of basic design exercises focusing on simple buildings and their relationship to the site. 3 lectures,
     3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC 201. Concurrent
                                                   enrollment required.
         The design process as it relates to building materials and construction. The interaction of aesthetic,
 technological, and economic determinants. 3 lectures, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate
       standing in architecture major; ARC 203 with a C grade or better; ARC 341, ARC 363, MAT 106, and PHY
                                       121/121L. Concurrent enrollment required.
      Interaction of construction technology, human behavior and site development in the design of housing in
   specific context. 3 lectures, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture
                                 major and ARC 301. Concurrent enrollment required.
   Integration of construction technology, human behavior and site development in the design of institutional
       buildings; building codes. 3 lectures, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in
                             architecture, and ARC 302. Concurrent enrollment required.
  An overview of construction, building components, and systems investigated through case studies. 3 lectures
      and a onehour seminar. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC 202, or graduate
                                                 standing in architecture.
 Techniques of construction, building components, and systems investigated through case studies and taught as
  an integral part of ARC 301, Architectural Design. Selected building materials will be discussed. 3 lectures, and
   onehour seminar. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, ARC 203, and ARC 341, or graduate
                                                 standing in architecture.
Topics in Advanced Architectural Design. See Department Office for list of topics offered. 3 lectures, 3 threehour
     laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, ARC 303, ARC 323, ARC 332, ARC 342.
                                            Concurrent enrollment required.
Topics in Advanced Architectural Design. See Department Office for list of topics offered. 3 lectures, 3 threehour
      laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC 401. Concurrent enrollment
                                                         required.
  An exploration of urban design issues including research and analysis of the topics associated with mixed use
  projects. 3 lectures, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC
                                          402. Concurrent enrollment required.
Topics in Advanced Architectural Design. See Department Office for list of topics offered. 3 lectures, 3 threehour
     laboratories. Prerequisites: undergraduate or graduate standing in architecture, and ARC 403. Concurrent
                                                   enrollment required.
       Survey of the relationship between new design and the preservation of historic buildings, structures and
    landscapes, from antiquity to the present. Among the issues to be discussed are the theories and practices
     associated with the historic preservation movement, the impact that historical values, aesthetics, culture,
politics, and economic factors have in the preservation process. 2 twohour lectures. Prerequisite: Upper division
                                                         standing.
   Examination of theories which form the basis for the design of buildings in the modern urban and suburban
                               settings. 2 twohour lectures. Prerequisites: ARC 363, 464.
   California examined from the vantage of its architectural elements, its houses, workplaces, civic spaces, and
roads, and their history. The influences, events, values, technologies, and processes which interact in the making
of architecture and which result in human patterns upon the landscape of California will be surveyed. Field trips.
2 twohour lectures. Prerequisites: undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC 363, or graduate standing in
                                                       architecture.
  Focus on the career of one or more architects with significant works in Southern California; or on a particular
     period, place, or other special topic in Southern California architecture history. Lectures, readings and
     discussions address issues of theory, practice, and historical and cultural context. 2 twohour lectures.
                   Prerequisites: Upper division standing or graduate student in architecture.
   The administrative, legal, ethical aspects of the architectural profession and the relationship between the
       profession and the construction industry. 3 hours lecture and a onehour discussion. Prerequisites:
          undergraduate standing in architecture, and ARC 203, or graduate standing in architecture.
    Relationship of the concepts of psychology, social anthropology and sociology to the design of the built
 environment. The effects of architecture on its users. The relationship of social patterns and cultural mores to
  urban patterns. 4 hours lecture. Prerequisites: upper division standing or graduate student in architecture.

Comprehensive architectural design project illustrating the individual student’s proficiency in the design process.
   The independent design projects are meant to reveal an understanding of programming, human behavior,
   context, conceptual design, integration of structural and environmental systems, design development, and
  verbal and visual presentation. Prerequisites: upper division standing in architecture, ARC 406, and ARC 494.
 Studio introducing undergraduate ENV majors to design fundamentals, stressing a basic vocabulary of 2and 3D
    design and design process in an atmosphere of discovery and creativity. Projects will focus on perception,
     visualization, representation, and expression as well as an introduction to the examination of aesthetic,
   symbolic, and cultural elements. First studio of a twostudio ENV sequence. 1 twohour lecture; 2 threehour
                                                   laboratories.
 An interdisciplinary introduction course integrating the history of architecture, art, landscape architecture, and
    urban planning. Examples drawn from greater Los Angeles illustrate contemporary applications of historic
  precedent. Examination of the styles, iconography, meaning and cultural context of significant and culturally
 diverse periods and places in world art and design. Emphasis on fundamental knowledge necessary to further
  study in the environmental design disciplines, as well as visual, analytical, and verbal skills. 3 hours of lecture,
             teamtaught by faculty representing the four disciplines, and 1 activity session per week.
   The creative interaction of peoples of California with their natural and built environments. The response of
      culturally unique designs for living to universal human needs and processes. The influence of California
                                              environments on the world.
Instruction and practice in planning participatory workshops; facilitation of the environmental planning process.
                       Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in environmental design program.
Principles and processes integrating spatial and social relations in the organization and expression of community.
    Crosscultural examination of change in "design" of communities; implications for quality of life and role of
                                            designer. 4 lecture discussions.
       Principles of basic design and their application in the development of design concepts; use of creative
  problemsolving techniques in landscape design; sensory exploration and interpretation of factors that shape
 natural, physical, and cultural (manmade) landscapes. The course is siteand siteuserrelated, with an emphasis
   upon contextualism and the determinants of design and form. 1 onehour lecture, 2 threehour laboratories.
                                Prerequisite: ENV 101/L with a grade of “C” or better.
Study of human efforts to create and control the physical environment, emphasizing major historical landscapes
    in their relationships with cities and buildings, and in terms of their cultural, social, political and economic
                 contexts. 3 lectures. May be taken by nonLA majors with permission of instructor.
  Application of design concepts and principles to more difficult problems involving a wide range of conditions in
the physical environment. 2 lectures, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: LA 203, 243, 252, with a grade of C
     or better; ENG 104, 105 or equivalent. A grade of C or better is required to advance within the sequence.
                                           Concurrent enrollment required.
    Landscape construction problems involving the formulation and preparation of plans for grading, drainage,
 staking, reference and lighting, planting, irrigation, construction details, structures, and other working drawings;
 relationship to specifications and contract documents. For LA 331, 332: 2 lectures, 2 threehour laboratories. For
  LA 333: 3 lectures, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: MAT 106; LA 203, PLT 245. A grade of C or better is
                     required to advance within the sequence. Concurrent enrollment required.
   A continuation of LA 241, 242, 243 with greater emphasis given to the organization and composition of plant
    materials towards solving design problems. Instruction includes development of planting plans, details, cost
  estimates, and specifications. 1 lecture, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: LA 203, 241, 242, 243. A grade
            of C or better is required to advance within the sequence. Concurrent enrollment required.
   The practice of landscape architecture, covering professional responsibilities and ethics, client and contractor
relationships. Lecture, 2 hours. Prerequisites: LA 303, LA 333, LA 342, with a grade of C or better, and approval of
                                                        instructor.
Exploration and study of plant associations of southern California and the environmental factors that control
these communities as related to planting design theory and application. Identification of native and adapted
species; introduction to cultural, functional, and aesthetic criteria in the organization of design associations of
plants. 2 lecture discussions, 3 threehour laboratories. Concurrent enrollment required.
Review and analysis of the existing body of literature concerning landscape architecture, relationships between
humans and the natural environment, and humans and the designed environment. 1 twohour seminar.



Investigation and discussion of political, economic, social and institutional influences on planning decisions and
policy formulation with particular concentration on issues related to the natural environment. 1 fourhour
seminar.

Application of the ecosystematic approach to complex largescale problems of landscape design and natural
resource planning. May be repeated. Maximum credit 18 units. 3 lecture discussions, laboratory 18 hours to be
arranged. Concurrent enrollment required. Prerequisite: LA 604/604L or permission of instructor. Unconditional
standing required.
Individual study by the student on a subject agreed upon by student and advisor. Total credit limited to 4 units,
                 with a maximum of 2 units per quarter. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Investigation of principles in the emerging field of landscape ecology, and their relationship to planning, design
 and management decisions upon the land. Course covers landscapescale structure, function and change in the
environment, and the implications for environmental sustainability. 2 twohour lecturediscussions. Prerequisite:
                                   RS 301 or RS 501 or permission of instructor.
   Explorations of topics of current interest related to regenerative practices or technologies or their roles in
 society. May include lectures, seminars and/or laboratories on a schedule to be determined by the instructor.
 Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Regenerative Concepts and Social Practices (3/2): Exploration of the history and theories contributing to
contemporary regenerative approaches. Investigations into the individual and social practices that lead to
successful regenerative human behavior and communities. Three hour lecture, 6 hour lab. Prerequisite:
unconditional standing in Regenerative Studies, or RS 501, or equivalent. Concurrent enrollment in RS 520/520L,
530/530L required.
Project concerning a significant problem in sustainable environments. May be clientoriented. Normally the final
course of culmination research, synthesizing learning from earlier courses. Required for students selecting a
Project option for the MRS Degree. Total credit limited to 4 units. Prerequisite: RS 694.

A formal thesis concerning a significant problem in the field of regenerative studies. Required for students
selecting the Thesis option for the MRS Degree. Open to students who have completed all other required
coursework for the MRS. Prerequisite: RS 694.

Study of urban and metropolitan development, theories of urban change, and the role of planning. Issues include
planning in a pluralistic, multicultural society; the role of planning in government and the private sector; and the
  environmental and ethical responsibilities of planners. 3 lectures, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisites: URP 101.
                                           Concurrent enrollment required.
Historical review of cities from antiquity to modern times. The origins and development of cities in Europe, Asia,
        Africa, and America. Critical examination of social, economic, political, cultural and technological
 interrelationships that have determined city location, form, growth and decline over time. The relationships of
                            those factors to modern urban planning. 2 twohour lectures.
 Research design in the context of investigating planning problems and situations. Focus on empirical ways of
   knowing, introducing qualitative and quantitative methods. Conceptualizing variables, posing appropriate
questions, and articulating hypothesis. Types and sources of basic planning data. Collection and organization of
 data in tables, graphs, and figures. Analysis and interpretation. 3 lecture/discussions; 1 threehour laboratory.
Prerequisites: Cor better in URP 102 and URP 120, GE course fulfilling Area B4. Concurrent enrollment required.
Introduces the institutional framework for planning. Reviews the development of the General Plan, zoning, and
  the legal basis for modern planning. Emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding of the legal process that
planners work within and applicable constitutional rights. 4 lecture discussions. Prerequisites: Cor better in both
                                               URP 101 and URP
Introduces the modern intergovernmental framework for planning. Reviews the development of national, state,
and regional land use policy, environmental controls and intergovernmental financing that provides the basis for
    modern land use planning and growth management. 4 lecturediscussions. Prerequisite: Cor better in URP
Theory, process, design, and method for strategic planning demonstrated by studio problems based on field and
    archival studies. The major focus of the course is on applied research, analysis, and community planning
  procedures. Programming a planning activity and evaluating policy. Using teamwork and communications in
  project design, research design and project implementation. 2 onehour lecture/discussions and 2 threehour
studios. Prerequisites: Completion of all threehundred level planning courses, Cor better in URP 332. Concurrent
                                               enrollment required.
    Analysis and synthesis of planning and community design topics interpreted from problems or subissues
emphasized in URP 431. 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: URP 431 with a minimum grade of Cor
                           permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment required.
     The impact of urban growth on the environment. Preparation of Environmental Impact Reports. Current
   methods, procedures and trends for managing urban growth. 4 lecture discussions. Prerequisite: URP 332 or
                                                  graduate standing.
 Major issues confronting residents, planners and other professionals working in developing nations. Introduces
  theory and practice of development planning. Explores spatial, cultural and economic factors associated with
  major problems and examines policies and programs used to address urban change in a development context.
     Study of alternative approaches for achieving developmental aims. 4 lecture/ discussions. Prerequisites:
graduate standing or one GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3, and D1, D2, D3. This course
                                       fulfills GE Subarea D4, Social Science.
 Introduction to the roles of the many participants in the design and development of urban projects. Procedural
    aspects of development, requests for proposals, methods of finance, project feasibility analysis, program
   evaluation and review, and government incentives. 3 lectures, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisite: URP 332 or
                                graduate standing. Concurrent enrollment required.
 Delimiting the urban neighborhood. Traditional functions and life cycle of urban neighborhoods. Revitalization
       policy options and strategies. Public and private sector involvement in neighborhood revitalization.
 Citizeninitiated revitalization programs. 3 lectures, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisite: URP 434 with a minimum
          grade of Cor permission of instructor or graduate standing. Concurrent enrollment required.
     Supply and demand management approaches to local transportation planning. Land use/transportation
   relationships. Improving local accessibility and transportation options. Finance, politics and equity in local
    transportation planning. 3 lecturediscussions, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: URP 337 or graduate
                                                      standing.
Legal and institutional framework for planning. Emphasis is placed on understanding federal and state
requirements for planning, constitutional rights, and key legislation. 4 lecture discussions.



Housing requirements and prospects; local, state, and federal housing and community development policies;
alternative solutions to housing problems. 4 lecture discussions. Prerequisite URP 505.



Theories, ethics and methods of environmental planning in an intergovernmental context. Analysis of
environmental equity in facility siting and urban design. Review of environmental elements for general plans, risk
analysis, and habitat conservation planning. 4 lecture discussions. Prerequisite: URP 512.

Survey of contemporary urban conditions from a social policy perspective. Basic principles and practices of
contemporary social policy planning. Methods by which urban social trends are analyzed, social indicators
developed and applied to program development and analysis. Established social, economic and political
institutional considerations, centralized and decentralized social policydecision models. 4 lecture discussions.
Prerequisite: URP 512.
  Human biology and behavior. The evolution of the human species as an adaptive biological process. Human
ecology in evolutionary perspective. Human growth, development and diversity. The evolution and behavior of
   nonhuman primates. The course includes a CDROM "virtual lab" component. 4 hours lecture discussion.
Basic methods of archaeological reconstruction and interpretation. Survey of human cultural and technological
development from the first appearance of humans to the beginning of the urban lifeways and the formation of
                            world civilizations. 4 hours lecture/problem solving.
Origins and development of oral and written language; speech anatomy, language, and the brain. Overview of
 the structure of language: phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Variation in language;
   history and classification of the world’s languages. Critical use of language (reading and writing).4 hours
                           lecture/problem solving. Meets GE requirement in Area C3.
 Introduction to anthropology and world cultures. Guided exploration of the peoples of the world through the
medium of the internet. Emphasis on web sites demonstrating key anthropological principles. Cultural diversity,
culture structure and function, cultural relativity, environmental adaptation. 4 hours lecture. Course fulfills GE
                                                    SubArea C2.




  Individual or group investigation, research, studies or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4
              units, with a minimum of 2 units per quarter. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
  Integrated exploration of both cultural and biological factors affecting critical cultural/ethical issues such as
intelligence, aggression and territoriality, sexism, racism, and altruism. Relationship of these issues to individual
and cultural systems from a comparative perspective. 4 hours lecture discussion. Meets GE requirement in Area
                                                          E.
  Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture and activity or laboratory. Prerequisite: permission of
                                  instructor. Corequisites may be required.
  Analysis of social, linguistic, ideological and technological diversity among indigenous peoples of California.
  Emphasis on a broad appreciation of native California lifestyles through a detailed study of representative
    societies, as well as historical transformations caused by European and EuroAmerican contact. 4 hours
lecture/discussion. Prerequisites: All lower division GE courses in Area A and Subareas D1, D2, D3. This course
                                         fulfills GE Subarea D4, Social Science.
  Survey of peoples and societies of North America; indepth analysis of diverse ecological, economic, social,
  political, and ideological adaptations and distinct lifeways of selected Native American societies. Extensive
student presentations and research. 4 hours seminar/ discussion. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or 103, or ANT 112, or
                                            permission of instructor.
 Presents a survey of prehistoric cultural development in North America by synthesizing data recovered through
  excavations with the ethnographic record. Emphasizes interdisciplinary application to archaeological method
and theory. Extensive student presentations and research. 4 hours seminar/discussion. Prerequisites: ANT 102 or
                                   ANT 103 or ANT 112 or consent of instructor.
Prehistoric and early historic cultural developments in California as documented by the archaeological and
 ethnographic record and early historic accounts. Extensive student research and presentations. 4 hours
              seminar/discussion. Prerequisites: ANT 102 or ANT 103 or consent of instructor.
  Introduction to problem formulation and methods of analysis in archaeology, including quantitative and
qualitative approaches. Review of theoretical trends in archaeology, from a current and historic perspective.
Development and implementation of research designs and sampling strategies. 4 hours seminar discussion.
                             Prerequisite: ANT 103 or permission of instructor.
     Multimedia exploration of the Primates. Biosocial traits, distribution, range of variation, ecology, and
evolutionary background of prosimians, new world monkeys, old world monkeys, apes, and humans. Humans in
          a comparative primate perspective. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Prerequisite: ANT 101.
Human communication in its social and historical context, the expressive dimension of culture. Topics include
    nonverbal communication, dialects and social variation in speech communities; pidgins and creoles;
 multilingualism, language planning; language and socialization of children; semantics, social interaction and
 communicative ritual; discourse, writing, and technology. 4 hours seminar. Prerequisites: Completion of GE
    requirements in Area A and Subareas C1D3. This course fulfills GE Subarea C4, Humanities Synthesis.
 Crosscultural comparison of legal systems past and present. Political, economic, and other underpinnings of
various legal concepts. Symbolic and philosophical bases of social control. Examination of formal and informal
 means of conflict resolution, definition and treatment of deviancy and criminality. Interrelationship between
 morality, legality, and normative behavior. 4 hours lecture discussion. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 112 or
                                            permission of instructor.
  Examination of individual behavior and development in comparative sociocultural perspective. "National
character," "normalcy," and "abnormalcy," child rearing, and other personality factors reviewed in a variety of
   global settings and from differing schools of theory. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 112 or permission of
                                     instructor. 4 hours lecture discussion.
Crosscultural survey of health, disease, and medicine. Etiology, epidemiology, nutrition, life cycle problems, and
    health care programs in Western and nonWestern cultures. Emphasis on cultural factors in prevention,
diagnosis, and treatment of health problems. 4 hours lecture/presentation. Prerequisites: ANT 101 or ANT 102
                                     or ANT 112 or permission of instructor.
   A comparative, functional approach to social organization and social structure in various societies; culture,
   society, and personality; family, kinship, and marriage; social role and social rank; law and politics; religious
systems; social change. 4 hours lecture discussion. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 112 or permission of instructor.
   Demographic theory and methods applied to problems in cultural, archaeological, and biological (physical)
anthropology. Human population patterns from prehistoric times to the present. Practice with computer models
 used in anthropological/demographic research. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Prerequisites: ANT 101 or ANT
                            102 or ANT 103 or ANT 112 or permission of instructor.
  Crosscultural comparison of religion through time and in societies of varying complexity. Theories of origin,
  syncretism, and interrelation of religion with other components of culture. Religion as a response to human
intellectual and emotional needs. 4 hours lecture/discussion. Prerequisites: GE Area A and at least two courses
for each area being integrated by this course (two prerequisites from C1C3 and two prerequisites from D1D3).
                  Fulfills Area C (Humanities) or Area D (Social Science) synthesis requirement.
   Visual anthropology is the field that is concerned with the documentation of culture, social institutions, and
   everyday human behavior through film. This course explores the uses of video, audio, world wide web, and
  other media in anthropological research, in the communication of ideas and information to the public, and as
repositories of knowledge. Students will become familiar with ethnographic and other documentary approaches
         in multimedia, and will carry out their own projects with digital media. 4 units lecturediscussion.
Ethnographic and ethnohistorical survey of selected cultural areas depending on available faculty specialization.
  Analysis of contemporary as well as traditional societies through ethnographic documents and firsthand field
data. 4 lecture discussions. May be repeated for a total of 12 units. Prerequisites: All lower division GE courses in
 Area A and Subareas D1 (HST 202), D2 (HST 103, HST 201, IA 101 or PLS 202) and D3 (ANT 102, EWS 140, SOC
                   201, GEO 102, or SSC 101). This course fulfills GE Subarea D4, Social Science.
  Chronological investigation by students of the major schools of thought within anthropology. Evolution of
     analytical theory and research methodology in each of the discipline’s quadrants. Primary figures in
anthropology, their lives and work, their impact on developments in the discipline. 4 hours seminar/discussion.
                                    Prerequisites: junior or senior standing.
  Theory and techniques of ethnographic inquiry. Participant observation, directive and open interviewing,
integration and interpretation of anthropological information. Online ethnographic data retrieval. Interactive
   world wide webbased research. Emphasis on computer methodologies. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity.
          Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 112 and upper division standing, or permission of instructor.
Introduction to the strategy and techniques of archaeological excavation. Site surveying and mapping; sampling
   techniques; recording; photography. Excavation of actual archaeological site. 2 lecture discussions, 4 hours
activity. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 103 or ANT 112 or permission of instructor. Corequisites: ANT 394/394A.
                                        Total credit limited to 12 units.
 Training in archaeological identification and analysis of prehistoric and historic cultural materials, including
  faunal remains, chipped stone, ground stone, ceramics, beads, and charcoal. Methods of analysis include
processing of artifacts, artifact and faunal identification, data entry, and preliminary data processing. 2 hours
            lecture discussion, 4 hours activity. Prerequisite: ANT 103 or permission of instructor.
Individual or group investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8
             units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Student directed crosscultural examination of gender. Includes biological anthropology of men and woman; role
  and status; culture and personality; affective and contractual bonding; future trends in relationships. Student
                 research and presentations. 4 hours seminar. Prerequisite: ANT 102 or ANT 112.
   Guided capstone experience with discussion meetings. Completion and presentation of a capstone project
    summarizing student's learning experiences under faculty supervision. Discussion of problems or issues
graduates may encounter in their chosen fields of employment. Summary portfolio and written report required.
                                       Prerequisites: senior standing.
Theory and techniques of forensic science. Instruction in human anatomy, osteology, and dentition; tools of
 anthropometry, facial reconstruction. Visiting experts in field applications (autopsies, crime scene analysis,
  criminal profiling, mortuary practices). Analysis in paleodemography, epidemiology. 4 lecturediscussions.
Prerequisites: Alll lower division GE courses in Area A and Subareas B1B4. This course fulfills GE Subarea B5,
                                            Science and Technology.
  Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
maximum of 4 units per quarter. Lecture and activity or laboratory. Corequisites may be required. Prerequisite:
                                            permission of instructor
    The worlds major regions and the ways people live in them. Includes the regions’ physical and cultural
characteristics, their similarities and differences, levels of development, geopolitics, and population dynamics.
Emphasis on current major issues and their geographic contexts and impacts. 4 lecture/discussions. Meets GE
                                       requirement in Area D3 for nonmajors.
Basic principles of physical geography. Significance of earthrelated distribution patterns with reference to their
       effect on human activities. 4 lecture discussions. Meets GE requirement in Area B2 for nonmajors.
  Fundamental techniques of airphoto and satellite image interpretation and reading of general reference and
thematic maps as they apply to understanding both physical and cultural features depicted in images and maps.
               Student analysis and presentation of their findings. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
Introduction to computer applications in geography and anthropology. Survey of disciplinespecific software in
        current use within each field. Handson experience with selected applications. 4 hours lecture.
Individual or group investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4
            units, with a maximum of 2 units per quarter. Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Concepts in the framework of geographic information systems. Basic techniques for the computer processing of
        geographical systems analysis and modeling. 3 hours lecture/problemsolving, 2 hours activity.
  Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
maximum of 4 units per quarter. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instruction is by lecture and activity or
                                  laboratory. Corequisites may be required
Introduction to the basic elements in the climatic systems. Determinants of climatic variation through time and
     space. Methods of inquiry, including both qualitative and quantitative methods and computer assisted
      simulation in climatology. Reciprocal impact of climate and society. 4 hours lecture/problem solving.
 Prerequisites: All lower division courses in Area A and Subareas B1, B4, or permission of instructor. This couse
                                  fulfills GE Subarea B5, Science and Technology.
In depth investigation of landscapes and flowing water, emphasizing the formation and geographic distribution
 of mountains, volcanoes, valleys, and deserts, and their shaping by rivers, glaciers, and ocean waves. 4 hours
                  lecture/problem solving. Prerequisite: GEO101 or permission of instructor.
     In depth investigation of the changing physical environment. Emphasizes the changing processes of
oceanatmosphere and its impact on soil systems and terrestrial biomes. The influence of human activity on the
  changing physical environment is also examined. 4 hours lecture/ problem solving. Prerequisite: GEO101 or
                                           permission of instructor.
 Extensive student participation in basic methods of geographic field analysis of small areas, including rural and
urban types, and physical and cultural aspects. Theory and practice in field sampling. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
                                      Prerequisite: permission of instructor.




Introduction to the substance and issues of economic geography. Topics addressed include the distribution and
  control of resources, the diversity of political/economic systems and the international exchange of labor and
                            goods. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: ENG 104.
    Spatial aspects of political systems and units. Territorial configurations and disputes at all levels, on all
                         continents. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: ENG 104.




Student analysis and presentation of the problems in the origin and evolution of cities. Includes size, functions,
distribution patterns, supporting and tributary areas, and roles within the whole political, social and economic
    structure of a region; includes suburbs and problems of metropolitan areas. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
  Introduction to the subdiscipline’s content, issues and methods. Substantive examples of major shifts in the
geography of human beings, their geographic knowledge, and their relations with the natural environment are
 drawn from around the globe and the last five centuries. Prerequisites: GEO 100 or GEO 102 or permission of
                                        instructor. 4 lecture/discussions.
Introduces students to routing, marketing, customer prospecting, servicearea assessment, and retail/service site
   selection analysis using geographic information systems (GIS). Students will learn the key points of location
  theory in the spatial economy and data availability/data quality control. 3 hours lecture discussion, twohour
                                                     activity.
The geography of tourism and recreation in selected regions of the world. Aspects of physical and cultural
         geography that directly affect the tourist industry. 4 seminars. (Also listed as HRT 345)
Student analysis and presentations of topics and problems in the physical, cultural and regional patterns of the
      United States and Canada with emphasis on the economic geography. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
   Location, description, and interplay of California’s human and natural resources. The influence of physical
  features upon the economic activities and sequence of occupation of California. Particular attention to the
 relationship of current social and environmental problems to their geographical roots. 4 lecture discussions.
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Area A and at least two courses from Subareas B1B4 and at least two courses
     from Subareas D1D3. Interdisciplinary Synthesis course for GE Subareas B5 or D4. 4 lecture/dicussion.
Physical, cultural, regional patterns of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the islands of the Caribbean.
                                               4 lecture discussions.
NonSoviet Asia from the Middle East to Japan and southward to Indonesia. Emphasis on environmental, cultural
             and political patterns and their relevance to current problems. 4 lecture discussions.
Physical, cultural, and regional patterns of the nations of Africa. Emphasis within regions on development
                        patterns of the new countries in Africa. 4 lecture discussions.
Student analysis and presentations of issues in the natural environment and the cultural landscape of Europe.
Major current trends in social, cultural, economic and political developments in Western and Eastern Europe;
           relationship between historical and geographical diversity. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
Individual or group investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8
             units, with a maximum of 4units per quarter. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
 Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques for the analysis of spatial and locational
patterns of human population, population characteristics and population change. Housing, migration and
 commuting patterns. Market analysis and site location decision support. Neighborhood segregation and
transitions. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Corequisites: GEO 405/405A. Prerequisite: GEO 240/240A or
                                                  equivalent.
Guidance and critiquing of student work in the analysis an evaluation of the geographical characteristics of the
 natural environment and its human use. Includes field mapping, systematic and random sampling of spatial
   phenomena, and environmental impact reporting. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: GEO 309 or
                                           permission of instructor.
Student interpretation of spatial and spectral information from imagery produced in the photosensitive region of
 the electromagnetic spectrum. Experimentation with multispectral photography of the environment. Radialline
   maps and mosaics from air photos and satellite photos. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: GEO 103 or
                                             permission of instructor.
Assessment and evaluation of the interplay between the American system of law and the natural system of the
environment. Analysis, discussion, and case studies of specific legal issues relating to resources, environmental
quality, policy, and regulation, including air, water, and land pollution laws and their application and practice. 4
                                              hourslecture/discussion.
 Principles and techniques of remote sensing and using remotely sensed data to examine physical and cultural
    geographic scenes. Remote sensing applications in urban planning, agriculture, ecosystem management,
atmosphere and earth sciences, and geographic information systems. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites:
        GEO 410 and completion of GE requirements in area 2A, 2B, and 2C, or permission of instructor.




 Explore the fundamentals of cartographic communication principles, processes, and technology. Obtain basic
   skills in designing and making effective maps with Geographic Information Systems and current computer
    technology, including interactive mapping and web based mapping. 3 hours lecture/problem solving, 1
     threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GEO 240/240A, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: 421/421L.
 Concepts and techniques in presenting geographical and spatial information with multimedia technology.
Including two dimensional mapping and three dimensional visualization with GIS technology. Using current
technology to incorporate animation, sound, and video into mapping and visualization of geographical and
spatial information. 3 hours lectures/problem solving, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisites: GEO 240/240A, or
                               consent of instructor. Corequisites: 422/422A.
The geography of world parks, forests, wildernesses, wildlife preserves, recreation areas and other institutionally
  designated and operated natural spaces. Investigation of the origins, meanings, development, designs, uses,
  impacts, problems, and policies relating to them. Particular emphasis on cultural and environmental factors
  supporting the geographic patterns of past and current natural spaces. 4 lecture/ discussions. Prerequisites:
                       Junior or senior standing, and ENG 104 or consent of instructor.
 First course in a two course projectbased sequence. Technical issues in geographic information, including data
        structures and applied spatial statistics. Progress toward completion of a research project. 3 hours
lecture/problem solving, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisites: GEO 240/240A or consent of instructor. Corequisites:
                                                      442/442A.
     New description: Second course in a two course projectbased sequence. Technical issues in geographic
  information, including data structures and applied spatial statistics. Completion of a research project. 3 hours
lecture/problem solving, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisites: GEO 442/442A, or consent of instructor. Corequisites:
                                                   443/443A.
 Explores geographic issues of race and ethnicity, the regional geographic distributions of ethnic groups and
  origins of those distributions, dynamics of change in ethnic geography at various scales, the sociospatial
dynamics of urban ethnic enclaves, and current issues in ethnic geography. Prerequisite: GEO 102. Four units
                                              lecture/discussion.
Environmental modeling from a geographic information systems perspective. Technical approaches to model
development with GIS. Input data requirements, data sources and processing techniques, interactive results
 presentation, scaling and spatial dimensions issues, crossdisciplinary applications. 3 hours lecture/problem
               solving, 2 hours activity. Prerequisite: GEO 240/240A or consent of instructor.
Onthejob training in cartography and/or image interpretation for at least 10 hours per week or a minimum of
100 hours per academic quarter. Prerequisites: senior standing and the consent of the internship coordinator.
   Guided capstone experience with discussion meetings. Completion and presentation of a capstone project
    summarizing student's learning experiences under faculty supervision. Discussion of problems or issues
graduates may encounter in their chosen fields of employment. Summary portfolio and written report required.
                                       Prerequisites: senior standing.
  Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
maximum of 4 units per quarter. Seminar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Corequisites may be required
 Formation and development of California from its Native American origins to the present with an emphasis on
     the social, economic, political, and artistic contributions of its diverse population. Four hours of lecture,
discussion, and group exercises. 4 lecture discussions. Fulfills GE synthesis subarea C4. Prerequisites: Completion
                                      of GE Area A and Subareas C1, C2, and C3.
 Population trends and problems in modern society. Focus on demographic characteristics of world population,
with special reference to urban concentrations and underdeveloped nations. 4 lecture discussions. Prerequisites:
                                                   SOC 201.
 Basic concepts in the study of living systems, including human beings. Uses the study of biology to illustrate
approaches of science in understanding the universe. The role of science in modern society and the impact of
human civilization on other organisms considered. Designed to satisfy the general education requirements for
                                  life science. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Staff.




 An optional laboratory to accompany BIO 110. A basic understanding of living organisms achieved through
experiments and demonstrations. This course will satisfy the general education requirements for a laboratory
      course, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 110 or concurrent enrollment in BIO 110. Staff.
     Defined by the theme of Energy and Matter: Cycles and Flows, this course will examine the acquisition,
 utilization and flow of energy and matter through various taxa (microbes, plants, animals) and organizational
  levels (cells, organisms, populations, ecosystems) that comprise living systems. Designed as the first of three
  foundation courses required of all majors offered by the Biological Sciences Department. This course may be
used to satisfy GE requirements in natural science Area B3. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories.
                                                     Hartney.
Exploration of over 500 career options for majors in the biological sciences. Preparation for a career, finding the
right career and landing the job are covered. 1 lecture/problemsolving. Prerequisite: BIO 110, or BIO 115/115L,
                          or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L. Staff.
A survey of the various applications of biotechnology in today’s industrial community. Topics include theoretical
   explanations of recent biotechnological developments, discussion of problems encountered in production,
 manufacturing and marketing of new products, and future directions in biotechnological research. The course
           will feature guest lecturers from various biotechnology industries. 1 lecture. Adler, Olson.
     Nontechnical introduction to genetic principles with emphasis on humans. Topics include gene structure,
 function and regulation, hereditary diseases, genetic engineering, human genome, cloning, genetic technologies
in medicine and agriculture, cancer, forensics, genetic fingerprinting, human behavior, ethical and social issues. 4
    lectures/problemsolving. Open to all majors. Not for core or support credit for students with majors in the
  Biological Sciences Department. Prerequisites: one GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3
        and B1, B2, B4 (BIO 110 or BIO 115/115L). GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5. Kageyama, Troncale
 Topics include causes and symptoms of cancer, molecular and cell biology of cancer, lung, skin and other major
"site" cancers, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, present research and psychosocial aspects. Material is presented
   by guest lecturers including specialists and cancer patients. May be used for approved elective credit but not
            upper division core credit by students with majors in the Biological Sciences Department. 4
  lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: one GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1,
        B2, B4 (BIO 110, or BIO 115/115L, or BIO 121,121L). GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5. Troncale.
An examination of governmental laws and regulations governing the safety of biological products, such as foods,
drugs, medical devices and biologics, and basic approaches to assessing the safety of biological products. Use of
    toxicological methods to determine safety of biological products and concepts in risk determination and
assessment. Development and evaluation of a series of in class assignments with class discussion and a capstone
project performed with small student groups culminating as inclass presentations. 4 lecture units. Prerequisites:
              General Introductory Biology Course, BIO 121, BIO 122, BIO 123 or equivalent. Dixon.
 Concepts and mechanisms involved in the interpretation of biological systems. A description of living processes
in physical terms. 4 lectures/ problemsolving. (This course is also listed as PHY 410.) Prerequisite: PHY 123. Staff.
  Ecology and natural history of Southwest habitats; field research projects involving species diversity and
 community organization. oneweek trip to Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona. Students will be responsible for
fieldtrip expenses. Consent of instructor required. Lectures/problem solving, laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO
                               325/325L and consent of instructor. Moriarty.
Oneweek field trip covering the ecology and natural history of Baja California. Field research projects in and near
   Bahia de Los Angeles. Students will be responsible for fieldtrip expenses. Consent of instructor required.
    Lectures/problem solving, laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 325/325L and consent of instructor. George.
Introduction to models describing demographics and species interactions. Factors affecting the abundance and
 distribution of animal populations in their natural environment. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: BIO
                                               325/325L. Moriarty.
Structure, function, and management of the California chaparral. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour
                  laboratory. Some oneday field trips. Prerequisite: BIO 325/325L. Staff.
Structure and function of marine ecosystems with emphasis on littoral environments. 3 lectures/problemsolving,
             2 threehour laboratories, 427 required field trips. Prerequisite: BIO 325/325L. Valdes.
Theory and experimental results in population genetics; the interrelation of population genetics and ecological
  and evolutionary studies. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Possible required field trips.
                                Prerequisites: BIO 211/211L and BIO 303. Staff.
A lecture course designed to introduce the physical and biological characteristics of tropical environments, with
   special emphasis on the ecosystems found in the northern portion of South America. 3 lecture discussions.
Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: BIO 325/325L, advanced senior or graduate standing and consent
                                               of instructor. Staff.
Introduction to the relationship between the structures of plants and their functions. Topics also include plant
   classification, genetics, growth and development, evolution and ecology. Emphasis on flowering plants. 3
                     lectures, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO 115/115L. Carlton.
    The interplay of the physiology of seed plants with their anatomy and morphology. The anatomical and
  physiological bases of development, growth regulation, water relations, reproduction, food production and
transport. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BOT 124/124L or the series of BIO
                                  121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L. Bobich.
Principles of the nature, development, epidemiology, diagnosis, and control of plant diseases caused by bacteria,
   fungi, nematodes, viruses, and environmental factors. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories.
 Prerequisite: the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L; or BOT 124/124L; or BOT 125/125L; or BOT
                                                201/201L. Staff.
      Life processes of plants; water relations; nutrition and metabolism; growth and development. 3
lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and
                                     123/123L; or BOT 124/124L. Bozak.
  Principles and practice in the diagnosis of plant diseases and in the prescription of control measures; cultural
   remedies, disease management, and integrated controls; field practice; and a review of advances in plant
pathology. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Field trips required. Prerequisite: BOT 323/323L.
                                                        Staff.
Laboratory and greenhouse methods for isolation, identification, inoculation, and disease assessment for plant
pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses which are plant pathogens. Emphasis on screening procedures and other
 experimental skills. Discussion of emerging problems, application and progress in plant pathology. 2 lectures/
                 problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BOT 323/323L. Staff.
  Atoms, molecules and physical states of matter. Important classes of chemical compounds and chemical
reactions. Experimentation as the approach to solving problems of natural phenomena. Not open to students
            who have credit for CHM 121. 3 lectures, 1 recitation. Concurrent enrollment required.
 A study of the impact of chemistry on life, civilization, and the world. How applications of chemical knowledge,
science and technology affect the human experience. Chemistry as a central science of technology. Benefits and
  risks of science and technology. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: One course each in GE Areas 2A, B,
                                                        and C.
Survey of roles and expectations for chemists in industry and applications of chemical reactions and principles in
   the petroleum, biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, food, inorganics, polymers, aerospace, coatings and metal
 industries. Interfaces with economics, patents, chemical engineering and communication. Guest speakers and
               plant visits. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: CHM 123/123L and 201 or 314.




  Theoretical underpinnings of computational methods in modern biochemistry and practical training in use of
them. Sequence entry, and editing, sequence alignment, phylogenetic analysis, homology searching, elementary
  protein structure prediction, display and evaluation of 3D molecular structures. 4 lectures/problemssolving.
                                  Prerequisites: CHM 260, 321, 327 or BIO 450.
A study of current developments in chemistry and a discussion of periodical literature at an appropriate level. 2
                   lecture discussions. Prerequisites: All required 300level chemistry courses.
Impact of computers on individuals and on society. Various current uses of computers, how these have evolved,
    and what the future might bring. Benefits and dangers of information technology. How the Internet and
  computers have fundamentally changed the way we work, play, and interact with others. Consequent rise of
 new social and legal issues, making it essential for everyone to acquire a working understanding of the role of
     computers in our daily lives. 4 lecturediscussions. Fulfills GE Synthesis requirement in Area B5 or D4.
                        Prerequisites: Completion of courses in GE areas B1B4 and D1D3.
 Key facts, theories, tools, and techniques of seven sciences integrated by showing how their phenomena are
   examples of the same fundamental systems processes, hierarchies and emergence, flows and networks,
 boundaries and limits. Includes similarities and differences of the scientific method across the sciences, and
similarities between the natural and social sciences. No lectures. Multimedia selfstudy, two 2hour, facetoface
  skilltraining and discussion sessions weekly. One interdisciplinary lab session every 3 weeks. (Also listed as
                                                  SCI/CSA 250)
 Key facts, theories, and techniques of seven sciences integrated by showing their phenomena are examples of
    the same fundamental systems processes, feedback and regulation, cycles and oscillations, stability and
  equilibrium. Includes similarities and differences of the scientific method across the sciences, and similarities
 between the natural and social sciences. No lectures. Multimedia selfstudy, 2 twohour, facetoface skilltraining
and discussion sessions weekly. One interdisciplinary lab session every 3 weeks. Prerequisite: SCI/CSA 250. (Also
                                                  listed as SCI 251)
 History and context of general systems theory from classical philosophy to the present; its tenets, strengths,
weaknesses and relationship to conventional and design disciplines, the relevance of systems science to complex
  human problems. Survey of its literature, investigators, institutions and organizations. 4 lecture discussions.




Law applied to optimizing and correcting systems; survey of legislation and case law dealing with environmental
problems. Emphasis on the special difficulties in writing laws of a multidisciplinary nature. 2 lectures, 2 twohour
                                                    activities.
  Techniques and methods of measurement systems; comparative uses of metrics; design and application of
metrics to human and environmental problems. Emphasis on exploration of the application of metric principles
 to the evaluation of qualitative differences. 3 lectures, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisite: Any statistics course.
 Use of 80 candidate systems processes isomorphic across natural and social systems to describe how they work.
Insights into the similarities and differences between natural and social systems. Impacts on society. 3 lectures, 1
                     twohour activity. A computerized multimedia, distanced learning course.
  Survey of hundreds linkage propositions between systems processes learned in CSA 411. 3 lectures, 1 twohour
                                         activity. Prerequisite: CSA 411/411A.
    Use of systems processes in cyberspace models to study manmade systems malfunctions. Use of systems
        processes to engineer optimal systems. 3 lectures, 1 twohour activity. Prerequisite: CSA 412/412A.
Evolution of systems approach to problem solving; comparative overview of dozens of systems methodologies.
Case studies illustrating successful versus unsuccessful applications of the systems approach to governmental,
          biological, social, economic and technological problems. 4 lectures. Prerequisites: CSA 300.
New approaches to modeling emerging from the sciences of complexity. Case studies illustrating applications of
systems analysis techniques and design of new techniques. 3 lectures, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: CSA
                                                            450.
 A broad ranging nonquantitative examination of basic concepts in the physical earth sciences. Subject areas are
geology, oceanography, the atmosphere and the Earth’s place in the solar system. 3 lectures and 1 recitation per
                                week. Does not satisfy laboratory science requirement.
      Changes in continents and ocean basins, fossil populations during successive geological ages, 3 lectures.
                                    Corequisite: GSC 151L (optional for nonmajors).
 Solving realistic quantitative problems in the Earth Sciences using standard mathematical procedures as well as
    more specialized techniques. Use of symbols, scientific notation and units. Different functional forms of the
    geotherm. Earthquake statistics. Determining angles and distances from maps and crosssections. Analysis of
plate motions. Geological and geophysical data visualization using graphing. Hazard analysis. Calculation of rates
        of geological processes and volumes of geological landforms. 4 hours of lecture and problem solving.
                                  Prerequisites: MAT 115 or consent of the instructor.
Framework topics, such as atmospheric structure, composition, heating, pressure, humidity form the base upon
   which a processoriented semiquantitative, descriptive survey of major weather phenomena, including winds,
clouds, precipitation, and storms is conducted. 4 lecture /discussions. Prerequisites: One GE course from each of
             the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, and B4. GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5.
   Introduction to the modern geologic study of Earth surface processes and landforms. Geomorphic analysis of
   landscape evolution, dynamic equilibrium, and topographic response to tectonic and climatic forcing. Terrain
  analysis utilizing geomorphic field data, remote sensing imagery, and numerical models. Emphasis on practical
  applications to natural hazards and resource problems. Topics may include active tectonics, river systems, hill
slopes, coastlines, glaciers, soils, wind, and climate change. This course includes 3 lecture discussions and 1 field
 laboratory (3 hrs.) per week. Required field trips during lab sessions and on at least one weekend. Prerequisite:
                                         GSC 111 or permission from instructor.
    Fundamental ocean processes emphasizing physical, chemical, and geological oceanography. Topics include
      currents, tides, waves, beaches, chemistry of ocean water, ocean basin evolution and physiography, and
               sedimentation as well as specific, relevant biological processes. Research vessel cruise.
  Lecture/discussion/demonstration. Prerequisites: one course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3
                                  and B1, B2, B4. GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5.
  Geologic development of and the hydrologic and geologic processes acting within beach, deltaic and estuarine
   environments. Field trip required. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 120 or 335. Upper
                             division standing. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
    The scientific study of natural disasters and their impact on humankind. A variety of hazards related to plate
    tectonics and climate are examined from a scientific perspective. Topics may include earthquakes, tsunami,
  volcanic eruptions, landslides, flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, and climate change. Recent events and notable
  case histories are studied through lecture, Internet, video, field trips, and student presentations. GE Synthesis
                                                 course for Subarea B4.
      Groundwater occurrence and movement. Role in hydrologic cycle and geologic processes. Groundwater
      resource evaluation, geotechnical problems and contamination. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour
                                                        laboratory.
  A study of morphology, function, metabolism, and genetics of microorganisms. The roles of microorganisms in
environment and disease processes are discussed. Identification and growth of microorganisms are emphasized
in the laboratory exercises. 3 hours lecture, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO 110, or BIO 115/115L, or
  the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L; CHM 121/121L or CHM 103/103A. BrellesMariño, Dixon,
                                                    Lin, Stathopoulos.
   The world of the microbes and their interactions with human. Emphasis on both the beneficial and harmful
   effects of microbes on human and our daily life. 4 lecture/discussion. The course is offered as a Science and
Technology Synthesis course in Area B4. Not for core or support credit for students with majors in the Biological
                                                 Sciences Department.
         The microbiology of foods, air, water, and sewage, stressing the utilization of microbial activities in
manufacturing processes of foods, types and prevention of food spoilage, aims and methods of water treatment
and sewage disposal. 3 lectures/problemsolving. 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: MIC 201/201L; CHM 201
                             and CHM 250L (or CHM 314, CHM 315, and CHM 317L). Dixon.
    The roles of microorganisms in food spoilage, food borne illness, and fermentation. Factors that influence
  microbial growth and control in foods are discussed. 3 hours lecture, 1 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites:
                                               MIC 20I/201L. Dixon, Lin.
    Fundamental concepts in the study of disease occurrence in human populations. Emphasis on descriptive
 epidemiology, formulation of hypotheses, and analytic epidemiology, and case studies with problem solving. 4
             lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: MIC 201/201L, and STA 120 or BIO 211/211L. Chan.
     Characteristics of diseaseproducing bacteria, their means of transmission, hostparasite interactions, and
     laboratory methods of diagnosis. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: MIC
                                                201/201L. Stathopoulos.
Characteristics, habitats, diseases and laboratory identification of fungi which cause human and animal diseases.
            3 hours lecture/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: MIC 201/201L. Adler.
    Chemical composition and physical structure of viruses; their mechanism of reproduction; relationship to
  humans, animals, and plants. Introduction to diagnostic techniques used in the isolation and identification of
            viruses. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: MIC 201/201L. Pal.
 The course involves the examination of microorganisms in their natural environments including terrestrial and
        aquatic environments, community and biofilm development, microbemicrobe interactions, celltocell
communication mechanisms, and current and traditional methods of microbial analysis in natural environments.
  Roles of microbial populations and communities in biogeochemical cycling, ecosystem functioning, industrial,
  agricultural, and environmental applications will be studied. Laboratory reinforces the principles and provides
       exposure to methods used in microbial ecology with a special emphasis on molecular approaches. The
       laboratory course will include a field trip. Prerequisite: MIC 201l201L required, CHM 321 and BIO 450
                                            recommended. BrellesMarino.
     The course is devoted to study some of the ways in which microorganisms interact with plants, from the
       beneficial viewpoint to the detrimental one. Although plants interact with bacteria, fungi, viruses and
      nematodes, the emphasis will be on bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. Processes such as nitrogen fixation,
mycorrhization, plantgrowth promotion and biological control will be studied. Technological approaches such as
the preparation and application of inoculants and the genetic and ecological consequences of releasing modified
  strains will also be discussed. Laboratory reinforces the principles and provides exposure to methods used in
  both traditional and molecular approaches. The laboratory course will include field sampling and greenhouse
      experiments together with bench work. The course is open to students from the College of Agriculture.
                                      Prerequisite: MIC 201l201L. BrellesMarino.
     Introduction to the biology of animals. Evolution, phylogenetics, food intake, respiration, water balance,
     reproduction, internal communication and coordination, locomotion and other aspects of the biology of
                                           invertebrates and vertebrates. 3
        Introduction to the evolution, phylogenetics, anatomy, physiology and ecology of the major phyla of
      invertebrate animals. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Not open to Biology majors.
         Prerequisites: BIO 115/115L or the series of BIO 121/121L, BIO 122/122L and BIO 123/123L. Leong
       Introduction to the evolution, phylogenetics, anatomy, physiology and natural history of vertebrates. 3
  lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Not open to Biology majors. Prerequisite: BIO 115/115L or
                              the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L. Lappin.
     Study of protozoan and helminth parasites of humans: diagnosis, life cycles, pathology, epidemiology and
   control. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO 115/115L or the series of BIO
                                         121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L. Staff.
     General aspects of insect structure and function, development, behavior and influence on human activity;
includes a survey of the principal insect groups. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite:
                               BIO 211/211L, or ZOO 201/201L, or ZOO 237/237L. Leong.
     Evolution, morphology, classification, distribution, ecology, behavior and conservation of amphibians and
    reptiles; identification, and field study of local species. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories.
                       Prerequisite: ZOO 138/138L, or ZOO 201/201L, or ZOO 238/238L. Lappin.
   Morphology, classification, distribution, ecology, behavior and conservation of mammals; identification, and
 field study of local species. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: ZOO 138/138L, or
                                          ZOO 201/201L, or ZOO 238/238L. Staff.
   The evolution, ecology, anatomy, and physiology of birds with emphasis on species of the Pacific Coast. Two
      halfday field trips (held on weekends) are required for credit in this course. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1
          threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: ZOO 138/138L, or ZOO 201/201L, or ZOO 238/238L. Moriarty.
The course focuses on how the form of animals is shaped by their natural environment and evolutionary history.
  Traditional and current methods in morphometrics, functional morphology, biomechanics, and animal ecology
and behavior will be studied. Systems in terrestrial and aquatic environments, including feeding, locomotion, and
  social interactions, will be examined with respect to abiotic and biotic factors. Laboratory reinforces principles
    and provides practical exposure to laboratory and field methods used in Evolutionary Ecomorphology, with
     special emphasis on animal performance testing. Laboratory includes a quarter project. Prerequisites: BIO
  123/123L; ZOO 201/201L or ZOO 238/238L. BIO 211/211L; PHY 121/121L are recommended. Junior standing is
                                                     required. Lappin.
  The structure, relationships, classification, general biology and zoogeography of fishes. Collection identification
               and field study of local species, and laboratory work with preserved and living material. 2
  lectures/problemsolving and 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: ZOO 138/138L, or ZOO 201/201L, or ZOO
                                                      238/238L. Staff.
  Selection and completion of scientific/technological synthesis application project under faculty supervision.
 Multidisciplinary team project. Projects which graduates solve in discipline of practice. Both formal written and
 oral reports. Minimum time commitment: 120 hours. Prerequisites: One GE course from each of the following
      Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, B4 and upper division standing. GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5.
Reproduction and development are examined at several levels of organization, from molecules, cells and tissues,
     to organisms, populations and communities. Exemplar organisms are chosen to highlight developmental
    strategies among biological systems, as well as strategies that maximize reproductive success. Laboratory
 reinforces biological principles and provides exposure to basic methodology, equipment and data analysis. The
   second of three foundation courses required of all majors offered by the Biological Sciences Department. 3
               lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO 121/121L. Staff.
   Applied statistical analysis of biological data. Understanding, interpreting, and performing data analysis in a
research context. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. It is recommended that students take STA
  120 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisites: BIO 115/115L (or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and
                                             123/123L). Carlton, Moriarty.
  Candid and factual coverage of human sexuality through lectures, films, guest speakers and discussion. Topics
include anatomy and physiology, sexual response, hormones, birth control and ethical implications, fertilization,
pregnancy and childbirth, sexual behavior and human values, diseases and dysfunctions, sex and the law, myths,
misconceptions and recent developments in the study of human sexuality. 4 hours of lecture/week. May be used
  for an approved elective support course, but not for upper division core credit by students with majors in the
Biological Sciences Department. Prerequisite: one GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and
B1, B2, B4 (BIO 110, or BIO 115/115L, or BIO 121,121L). GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5. George, LaMunyon.
  Principles of heredity. Introduction to transmission (Mendelian) genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics and
    population genetics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: BIO 110; or BIO 115/115L; or the series of BIO
                       121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L. Alas, LaMunyon, Kageyama, Troncale.
   The fundamental structural and functional organization of the human brain and how this knowledge underlies
simple to complex behaviors in humans. Concepts will be derived from mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology,
genetics, neuroscience, pharmacology and brain imaging technology, and applied to issues in health, psychology
    and society. 4 hours lecture/ discussion. Open to all majors. May be approved for core course credit only for
students who have not taken BIO 424. Prerequisites: one course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3
    and B1, B2, B4 (BIO 110, or BIO 115/115L, or BIO 121/121L). GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5. Eskandari,
                                                        Kageyama.
       Cellular processes and molecular interactions, including transport, chemical signaling, cellcell adhesion,
          intercellular communication, support and movement, energy conversions, digestion, assembly of
      macromolecules and organelles, gene control in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
Prerequisite: BIO 303, CHM 201/250L (or the series of CHM 314/317L, CHM 315/318L, and CHM 316/319L). Alas,
                                     Buckley, Floriano, LaMunyon, Liu, Sperry, Zhao.
 An overview of the biology of sexually transmitted diseases (STD), including AIDS and the impact these diseases
and current therapies have on society at large. Topics include distribution, transmission, sexual practices, current
      scientific research, effects on immune system, treatments, testing and counseling. Selected topics will be
  presented by guest speakers. Not for core or support credit for students with majors in the Biological Sciences
  Department. Two 2hour lectures/discussions. Open to all majors. Prerequisite: one GE course from each of the
                                                          BIO 309
      Cellular processes and molecular and genetic mechanisms in the embryonic development of multicellular
organisms, cellular differentiation, histogenesis and organogenesis. 4 hours lecture/problemsolving; 1 threehour
  laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 115/115L (or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L, BIO 123/123L), BIO 303, BIO
                                           310, and CHM 123/123L. LaMunyon.
    Recent results of biomedical, physical, and chemical research integrated to explain the aging process. Topics
    include human aging diseases, animal experimental models, and cell, molecular, and genetic mechanisms of
 aging that lead to practical advice on how to mitigate human aging. May be used for approved elective, but not
 for upper division core credit. Prerequisites: One GE course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and
               B1, B2, B4 (BIO 110 or BIO 115, or equivalent). GE Synthesis course for Area B5. Troncale.
  Study of single and multigene human diseases, chromosome aberrations, sex determination, immunogenetics,
     genetic counseling and genomics. Problemsolving, and mastering the concepts of medical and biochemical
genetics. 3 lectures/problemsolving. 1 threehour laboratory. Corequisite enrollment not required. Prerequisites:
                                                 BIO 303 and BIO 310. Alas.
     Interpretation of biological variability; kinds and origins of organismic variation, the species and speciation,
phylogenetic inference, classification and nomenclature. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: BOT 124/124L;
   ZOO 137/137L (or ZOO 237/237L), or ZOO 138/138L (or ZOO 238/238L), or BOT 201/201L, or ZOO 201/201L.
                                                           Staff.
Study of general ant biology, including internal and external morphology, identification, chemical communication
    and behavior, plants and other symbiotic relationships; ecology and the evolution of social behavior and its
     significance in ants. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratory/field problems. Prerequisite: ZOO
                          426/426L, or BIO 325/325L, or PLT 300, or PLT 402/402L. George.
   History of evolutionary thought, origin of life, geological and paleontological history of the earth and findings
 derived from, but not limited to, such disciplines as genetics, ecology, systematics and zoogeography. Focus on
                    mechanisms of evolutionary change at microand macroevolutionary levels. 4
  lectures/problemsolving/discussion. Prerequisite: BIO 115/115L (or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and
                                           123/123L); and BIO 303. Valdes.
 Recent advances in genetics with emphasis on molecular methods of gene mapping, quantitative genetics and
        population and evolutionary genetics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: BIO 303. LaMunyon.
 Structural and functional organization of the nervous system, its evolution, development, and plasticity. Basic
  anatomy and physiology of neurons, sensory processing, learning and memory, neuroanatomical pathways,
brain imaging, and neuropathology. 4 lectures/problemsolving, demonstrations. Prerequisites: BIO 115/115L (or
    the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L); and CHM 201/250L or CHM 314/317L. Kageyama.
Physiological mechanisms at the cellular level. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite:
   BIO 115/115L (or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L); and CHM 201/250L or CHM 314/317L.
                                                 Kageyama, Talmadge.
Introduction to radioisotope tracer techniques, radiometric analysis, effects of ionizing radiation, radiation safety
      and health physics as applied to life sciences and public health. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour
   laboratory. Prerequisite: 12 units of courses in the Biological Sciences, 8 units of Chemistry, 8 units of Physics.
                                                   Eskandari, Siegel.
  Molecular biology of nucleic acids including isolation, purification and analysis of virus, plasmid, prokaryotic and
       eukaryotic DNA; restriction endonuclease analysis, Southern blotting and molecular hybridization with
             radioactive probe; concepts on strategies of gene cloning and usefulness of cloned genes. 2
 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: BIO 303, MIC 201/201L, and CHM 321/321L or
                                                  CHM 327/327L. Pal.
  A survey, comparison, and evaluation of computational techniques and software applications currently used to
   store, organize, manipulate, and explore biological information. Students learn how to retrieve, compare, and
  analyze nucleic acid sequences, amino acid sequences, and protein structures. Some of the topics covered are:
    overview of biological databases and other online resources; sequencebased analysis of genes and proteins;
   sequence alignments; phylogenetic reconstruction; protein 3D structure alignment; structural classification of
  proteins; prediction of protein structure and function. This is a handson course focused on developing practical
      bioinformatics skills. Class meets three times a week for Ihour lecture followed by 2hours computer lab.
                        Prerequisite: BIO 303 or CHM 329 or pemission of instructor. Floriano
 A community servicelearning course covering methods and techniques necessary to develop professional oral
and written interpretive skills in the sciences. This capstone course draws on the student's prior coursework and
knowledge in the sciences as they design and develop formal interpretive exhibits, tours, and presentations that
enhance their audience's understanding of science. The student will utilize these products in interpreting science
                 for community groups at Biological Sciences learning centers at BioTrek. Staff.
     Oral and written presentation of selected topics in biology. Open only to students in senior standing. 1
                          lecture/problemsolving. Prerequisite: senior standing. Staff.
The rich history of the experimental sciences and its impact on modern research efforts will be explored through
    the application of classic and stateoftheart techniques to the solution to contemporary research questions.
   Topics that reflect the expertise and research interests of instructor(s) vary quarterly. Total credit limited to 8
  units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. Two 3hour sessions per week as either laboratory instruction (2
 units) or combined lecture/lab problem solving (4 units). Prerequisites: BIO 123/123L and CHM 123/123L. Other
             background: (specified in advance) may be stipulated at the discretion of instructor(s). Staff.
     Identification of California wildland plants using dichotomous keys. Recognition of common plant families.
    Overview of the geographic distribution of plants in southern California. 1 lecture, 2 threehour laboratories,
 required field trips. Prerequisite: the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L; or BOT 124/124L. Bobich.
   Principles of plant inheritance and reproduction. Discussion of cytogenetics, population genetics, cytoplasmic
inheritance, and gene transfer. Introduction to the methods of plant biotechnology. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1
     threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 303, BOT 124/124L (or the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and
                                                    123/123L). Bozak.
          Morphology, physiology, culture, pathology, taxonomy, ecology and general biology of Acrasiales,
        Labyrinthulales, Myxomycetes, Oomycetes, and Zygomycetes. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour
      laboratories. Prerequisite: the series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L; or BOT 124/124L; or BOT
                                           125/125L; or BOT 201/201L. Staff.
        Morphology, physiology, culture, pathology, taxonomy, ecology, and general biology of Ascomycetes,
   Deuteromycetes, and Basidiomycetes. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: the
   series of BIO 121/121L, 122/122L and 123/123L; or BOT 124/124L; or BOT 125/125L; or BOT 201/201L. Staff.
   Evolution of plants as illustrated by the comparative morphology, reproductive patterns, and fossil record of
 green algae, bryophytes, and vascular plants. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite:
                                 BOT 124/124L, or BOT 201/201L and BIO 413. Bobich.
   Microscopic study of representative common plants dealing with origin, development, and structure of cells,
    tissues and tissue systems in roots, stems, and leaves. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories.
                             Prerequisite: BOT 124/124L or BOT 201/201L. Bobich, Ewers.
    Group study of a selected topic for upperdivision students. Course title and number of units are specified in
     advance. Instruction by lecture, problemsolving activity, laboratory, or a combination of formats. Students
  receive credit for multiple courses with the BOT 499/499A/499L designation if course titles are different. Total
    credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. May be used as upperdivision core elective.
                                                          Staff.
  Atomic theory of structure and bonding, chemical equations, gas laws, oxidationreduction, electrochemistry,
 states of matter, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and reaction kinetics and their applications to
chemistry, physics, and engineering sciences. 3 lectures/problemsolving. To be taken in sequence. Corequisite:
CHM 121L, 122L, 123L, respectively. Students must have taken high school chemistry or CHM 103/103A prior to
registering in CHM 121/121L. Prerequisite to CHM 121: Within the last 3 quarters, a minimum placement score
  on the appropriate MDPT or a minimum grade of C in MAT 12, or MAT 106, or MAT 125, or MAT 191, or STA
120; or within the last 18 months either 550 or higher on the SAT I or II or 23 or higher on the ACT. Prerequisite
   to CHM 122: Minimum grade of Cin CHM 121; Prerequisite to CHM 123: Minimum grade of Cin CHM 122.
    Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry lecture series. Experiments in basic quantitative analysis
techniques, gas measurements, acidbase, pH, and redox titrations, electrochemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics,
   and ionic equilibria and qualitative analysis procedures. 1 threehour laboratory. To be taken in sequence.
  Corequisite: CHM 121, 122, 123, respectively. Prerequisite to CHM 122L: minimum grade of Cin CHM 121L.
                          Prerequisite to CHM 123L: minimum grade of Cin CHM 122L.
 The fundamental concepts of organic chemistry with emphasis on practical applications. For students who are
           required to take one quarter of organic chemistry. Not open for credit to chemistry majors. 3
                   lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CHM 122/122L. Concurrent: CHM 250L.
     Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
               maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory or a combination.
     Thermodynamic properties of chemical species and their application; kinetics, measurements of physical
           properties of molecules. Not open to students whose majors require CHM 304 or CHM 311. 3
                            lectures/problemsolving, 1 recitation. Prerequisite: CHM 123.
A twoquarter sequence of physical chemistry covering properties of gases, chemical thermodynamics, solutions,
        electrochemistry, reaction kinetics, and atomic and molecular structure. To be taken in sequence. 3
 lectures/problemsolving, 1 recitation for 304, 3 lectures/problemsolving for 305. Prerequisite: MAT 116, CHM
                  123, PHY 133, or their equivalents. Concurrent with CHM 305: CHM 352A/352L.
        Properties of gases, kinetic molecular theory, chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, solutions,
       electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, photochemistry, colloids and
     macromolecules. To be taken in sequence. Required for certification by the American Chemical Society. 3
    lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites to CHM 311: MAT 216 or equivalent, CHM 123 and PHY 133/133L;
  Prerequisites to CHM 312: CHM 123, MAT 216, PHY 133/133L; Prerequisites to CHM 313: CHM 311 and CHM
                                                         312.
  Modern concepts of chemical bonding, molecular structure, principles of stereochemistry and conformation,
    reaction mechanisms and synthetic pathways. All common classes and substituents of organic compounds
  treated. Carbohydrates, heterocyclics and other biologically significant compounds may be introduced. To be
  taken in sequence. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite to CHM 314: CHM 123. Prerequisite to CHM 315:
            minimum grade of Cin CHM 314. Prerequisite to CHM 316: minimum grade of Cin CHM 315.
Introduction to general techniques of the organic laboratory for the separation, purification and identification of
  organic substances. Interpretation of IR spectra of organic compounds. 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite:
                                   CHM 123; CHM 314 (or concurrent enrollment).
  Application of reaction mechanisms toward the synthesis of organic molecules. Interpretation of IR and NMR
      spectra of organic molecules. 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 317L; CHM 315 (or concurrent
                                                     enrollment).
     Multistep syntheses. Extensive interpretation of IR and NMR spectra of organic compounds. 1 threehour
                      laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 318L; CHM 316 (or concurrent enrollment).
  The fundamental concepts of biochemistry with emphasis on structurefunction relationships as they relate to
carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Designed for students who are required to take one quarter of
biochemistry. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Concurrent enrollment required. Prerequisite:
                                      CHM 201 and 250L, or CHM 315 and 317L.
Chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes. Enzyme reactions and kinetics; glycolysis and the citric
                  acid cycle metabolism. Prerequisite: CHM 316 and 317L. Corequisite: CHM 327L.
    Laboratory work includes the study of pH and buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzyme kinetics.
   Qualitative and quantitative methods employing instrumental analysis are included. Corequisite: CHM 327.
    Chemistry of vitamins, trace metals and important agents in metabolic control; glyoxalate cycle, pentose
 phosphate pathway, electron transport, cellular control, photosynthesis and nucleic acid structures. Nutritional
chemistry, as it relates to vitamin function, is also covered. Prerequisite: CHM 327, 327L. Corequisite: CHM 328L.
Standard curve for protein analysis as well as spectrophotometric quantitation, isolation and partial purification
of biomolecules using centrifugation, liquid column chromatography, salts, heat treatment and electrophoresis.
Laboratory work includes study of tissue extracts and other instrumental methods in biochemistry. Corequisite:
                                                    CHM 328.
 Metabolism of lipids and nucleic acids, biochemistry of DNA replication, RNA transcription, protein translation
                 and membrane dynamics. Prerequisite: CHM 328, 328L. Corequisite: CHM 329L.
 Purification and analysis of membranes, analysis of protein ligand interactions, extraction and denaturation of
DNA. Laboratory work includes denaturing electrophoresis, spectrophotometry and other instrumental methods
                                      in biochemistry. Corequisite: CHM 329.
  Theory and practice of modern analytical techniques based primarily on optical spectroscopy such as UV, IR,
  AAS, AFS, AES and fluorescence. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Concurrent enrollment
                          required. Prerequisite: minimum grade of D in CHM 221/221L.
Theory and practice of modern analytical separation methods primarily encompassing various chromatographic
techniques. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Concurrent enrollment required. Prerequisite:
                                      minimum grade of D in CHM 221/221L.
     Theory and practice of modern analytical electrochemistry, with particular emphasis on potentiometry,
         voltammetry, amperometry, coulometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic and pulse methods. 2
    lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: minimum grade of D in CHM 221/221L.
   Theory of chemical instrument systems with emphasis on the selection of instrumentation appropriate to a
  measurement or control problem. 1 lecture/problem, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 344/344L.
 Laboratory experiments illustrating principles of physical chemistry. 1 recitation and 2 threehour laboratories.
                  Prerequisite: CHM 221/221L; CHM 304 or 311. Concurrent: CHM 305 or 312.
  Advanced laboratory applications of physical chemistry. Required for certification by the American Chemical
                Society. 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: CHM 352L. Concurrent: CHM 313.
Modern concepts of inorganic chemistry including chemical bonding, acid/base, coordination chemistry, kinetics,
 organometallics and catalysis. To be taken in sequence. Required for certification by the American Chemical
 Society. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite to CHM 401: CHM 313 or CHM 305; to CHM 402: CHM 401.
   Types of polymers and polymerization reactions; properties of polymer solutions and the determination of
molecular weights; elasticity and other bulk properties. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: CHM 316, CHM
                                             305 or 313, and MAT 216.
    Concepts behind collection of experimental data in chemistry. Methods required for the analysis of data.
     Methods and experimental considerations required for implementation of electron/photon counting for
            quantitative analysis. 3 lectures/one recitation. Prerequisites: CHM 352A/352L, MAT 216.
Mathematical preliminaries, postulates of quantum chemistry, wave functions for some simple chemical models,
 the central force problem, the Aufbau principle, hybrid orbitals, approximation methods and Hund’s multiplicity
                     rule. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CHM 305 or 313; MAT 216.
    Applied quantum mechanical studies of molecular geometries, electronic excited states, potential energy
  surfaces and conformational structures spanning from small diatomic species to large biochemical molecules.
Spectroscopic problems emphasized. Molecular graphics used to aid in both ab initio and molecular mechanics. 4
                             lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CHM 313, MAT 216.
     Theoretical and practical study of synthetic strategies in organic chemistry. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2
  threehour laboratories. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of D in CHM 221/221L, and a minimum grade of C in
                           CHM 316 and Din CHM 319L. Concurrent enrollment required.
    Structure determination of organic compounds by elemental and functional group analysis using classical
    methods and modern chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. 2 lectures, 2 threehour laboratories.
    Prerequisites: minimum grade of D in CHM 221/221L, and minimum grade of C in CHM 316 and Din 319L.
                                              Concurrent enrollment.
   Isolation of some eight different materials from plant and animal sources, such as a blood protein fraction, a
   plant nucleic acid, a plant terpene, a hormone preparation, a metabolic intermediate and a urinary excretion
    product. 1 lecture/problem, 2 threehour laboratories. Prerequisite: CHM 329/329L. Concurrent enrollment
                                                         required.
     Fundamental aspects of the biochemistry of Recombinant DNA and its applications to current biochemical
 research and industry. Includes germane aspects of the chemistry, structure and biochemistry of RNA and DNA
          macromolecules. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: CHM 329/329L or taken concurrently.
    Basic concepts of computer hardware and software. Computer literacy. Detailed instruction in the use of a
   microcomputer software package including word processor, spreadsheet and database manager. Computer
applications, impact of computers on society, responsibilities of the user. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Cannot be
                                              used for CS elective credit.
  Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates
must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum of 120 hours
                                                        total time.
    Technical presentations by students on current developments in computer science. Seminar discussions of
        ethical, social and economic impacts of technology. Essays on seminar topics. 2 lecture discussions.
                   Prerequisites: senior standing in computer science and a passing score on GWT.
      Crossdisciplinary survey of the mechanisms of origin of most levels of living and nonliving systems using
synthetic concepts to integrate the scientific evidence. Emergence of subatomic particles to clusters of galaxies,
     from the origins of consciousness to civilization. Impact of scientific findings on centuriesold philosophical
                                   debates and human values. 4 lecture discussions.
   Key facts, theories, tools, and techniques of seven sciences integrated by showing how their phenomena are
 examples of the same fundamental systems processes, symmetry and duality, chaos and origins, development
    and evolution. Includes similarities and differences of the scientific method across science, and similarities
  between the natural and social sciences. No lectures. Multimedia selfstudy, 2 twohour, facetoface skilltraining
and discussion sessions weekly. One interdisciplinary lab session every 3 weeks. Prerequisite: SCI/CSA 251. (Also
                                                    listed as SCI 310)
   Using isomorphies and systemslevel computer simulation tools in modeling complex dynamical systems and
   their problems. Survey, comparison and training in use of STELLA, EXTEND, CAST and GENSYS with testing of
  their use of systems concepts. Evaluating global system models and their effects on decisionmakers 4 lecture
                                                       discussions.
 Special problems in selected areas of comparative systems analysis Each seminar will have a subtitle describing
 its nature and content Seminar, 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 units. Prerequisite: consent
                                                       of instructor.
    An introduction to minerals, rocks and geologic features which comprise the Earth; analysis of internal and
  external processes controlling the features of the planet. 4 lectures per week. Corequisite: GSC 141L (optional
                                                     for nonmajors).
A synthesis of our current knowledge of the cosmos and techniques used in its investigation. Primary emphasis is
 on the composition, history, and dynamics of the solar system (the sun, planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and
  meteors) and theories of its origin and evolution. The second part of the course examines the nature of stars,
      galaxies, and the universe as interpreted from analysis of starlight. Topics include distance, magnitude,
     luminosity, temperature, and composition of stars, stellar evolution, other solar systems, and search for
 extraterrestrial life. Special attention is given to independent stargazing activities, current celestial events, and
             new information revealed by satellite data or unmanned space missions. 4 hours lecture.
  An introduction to the marine sciences. Dealing primarily with the properties of water, ocean currents, waves,
 tides, beaches, marine life, marine resources and the nature and origin of the sea floor. 4 lectures. Field trip fee
                                                         required.
    Classification of minerals and rocks. Reading and interpreting topographic and geologic maps. 1 threehour
             laboratory. Must be taken concurrently with +GSC 111. Laboratory optional for nonmajors.
     Classification of fossil invertebrates, studies of paleogeographic maps and geologic maps and problems in
  structural geology. 1 threehour laboratory. Must be taken concurrently with GSC 112. Optional for nonmajors.
                                       Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
 Identification, occurrence, origin and uses of the common minerals. Quantitative xray diffraction microanalysis,
 physical and chemical properties of minerals and introductory morphologic crystallography. Three lectures, one
                   threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 141L. Field trip fee required.
Techniques of recognizing, mapping, analyzing and interpreting geologic structures and earth features. Surveying
with plane table, alidade, Brunton compass and tape. 1 lecture/problem, 3 threehour laboratories. Prerequisites:
                                  GSC 145L. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
  An examination of the interrelationship of geology and chemistry in the near surface environment. The course
     focuses on low temperature groundwater systems and geothermal fluids. Topics of discussion include the
 chemistry of meteoric and connate waters, application of EhpH and log fugacity of 02 diagrams to the modeling
of aqueous fluids, stable isotopic fractionation in the hydrosphere, chemical reactions at the waterrock interface
      and dynamics of hydrothermal systems. 3 lectures/problems, one 3hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHM
                                                         121/121L.
Practical techniques for converting traditional coordinatebased geoscience data into digital map layers. Digitizing
  methods applied to creation of geologic, hydrologic, meteorologic, and oceanographic maps. One hour lecture
                                           plus two 3hour laboratory sessions.
 Practical GIS methods for geologic map representation and quantitative analysis of realworld coordinatebased
   geoscience data. Manipulation and enhancement of digital data layers in contemporary drafting programs.
Creation and interpretation of contour maps, isopach maps, and slope stability maps. Threedimensional analysis
     of borehole data; construction of cross section images. One hour lecture plus two 3hour laboratories.
         Fundamentals of geology applied to engineering problems. Includes rock types, structure, erosion,
sedimentation, seismic explorations, rock/soil movements, and dam site evaluations. Individual and group study
of selected engineering geology problems. Instruction is carried out in the field and laboratory. Laboratory fee is
      required. 3 hours lecture/discussion, 1 laboratory. Prerequisites: one course from each of the following
                      Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, B4. GE Synthesis course for Subarea B5.
        The chemistry (primarily phase relationships) of the common rockforming minerals. The description,
  composition, texture and origin of the common rockforming minerals according to their optical properties as
        determined with the petrographic microscope. 2 lectures/problemsolving, 2 threehour laboratories.
                                             Prerequisite: GSC 215/215L.
 Morphology and evolution of fossil invertebrates. Includes discussion of ancient environments and changes in
  life forms with time. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite: GSC 112 and GSC 151L.
                                     Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
          Investigation of the deformation of the earth’s lithosphere. Solution of geologic field problems. 3
      lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 141L, GSC 145L, and GSC
                                255/255L. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
  Geophysical techniques. Gravity, magnetic, electrical and seismic methods applied to the solution of geologic
 problems. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 141L, PHY 132 and
                   PHY 132L or PHY 122 and PHY 122L. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
 The physiography, sedimentology, structure, origin and evolution of the ocean basins and continental margins.
Facts, data, speculation derived from a variety of texts, journals, maps. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites:
        GSC 335 or 120, and GSC 111, upper division standing. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
  Origin and occurrence of petroleum and related products. Study of the geologic structure and stratigraphy of
   major oil and gas fields. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 141L and GSC
                                   151L. Field trips required. Field trip fee required.
   Application of geologic and geophysical principles to engineering problems encountered in the geotechnical
  industry. Lecture topics include earthquake faults and seismology of Southern California, earthquakeinduced
  strong ground motion and site effects, seismic instrumentation and shake maps, probabilistic hazard analysis,
      AlquistPriolo/fault trench studies, stability analysis of slopes and dams, and case studies of landslides,
     earthquakes, and dam failures. Laboratory sessions involve 3dimensional analysis of geologic data, field
     measurement and analysis of unstable slopes, and investigation of dam sites. 3 units lecture/discussion
        scheduled for evening. 1 unit laboratory requires field trips to be conducted on selected Saturdays.
                        Prerequisites: Equivalent of GSC 111/GSC 141L or GSC 321/GSC 321L.
 Stratigraphic procedures, correlation, depositional environments, classification and origin of stratigraphic units,
    chemical, mineralogic and textural studies of sedimentary rocks, using petrographic, mechanical and xray
techniques. Theory of the classification and origin of these rocks. Field trips. 3 lectures, 2 threehour laboratories.
                     Prerequisite: GSC 325/325L. Field trips required. Laboratory fee required.
   A systematic study of the deposition of metallic ores. Preparation of comprehensive ore deposit models is
  stressed requiring the integration of mineralogy, petrology and structural geology. Discussions and practical
exercises on wall rock alteration, paragenesis, metal zoning and fluid inclusion geothermometry are important
components of the course. Laboratory examination of polished sections and thin sections from "classic" mining
    districts throughout the world and field trips to important mining districts compliment the lecture. Three
       lectures and one 3 hour lab. Prerequisite: GSC 215/215L. Required field trips. Field trip fee required.

 Planning and implementation of mineral exploration programs, resource extraction and oreprocessing. Course
   topics include mineral economics, exploration planning, exploration techniques, ore deposit valuation and
   mining and processing systems. Special emphasis is placed on the economic theory and practical aspects of
 development of precious metal properties. Laboratory exercises focus on all aspects of exploration from field
   exercises involving claim staking, geochemical/geophysical prospecting and underground mine mapping to
 oncampus work with computer generated ore reserve models and automated data base literature searches. 3
                     lectures, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 215/215L.
  Morphology, classification and evolution of major plant and animal microfossil groups with emphasis on the
     Foraminiferida. Use of microfossils in petroleum exploration and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. 3
     lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisites: GSC 112, GSC 151L and GSC 331/331L.
    Study of the major tectonic elements of the Earth, their geometry, kinematics and dynamics with special
emphasis on the Cordillera of Western North America. All of the tectonic features will be analyzed in the context
of plate tectonics. Prerequisites: GSC 111, GSC 141L. Field trips required. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour
                                                    laboratory.
The study of the generation, propagation and recording of seismic waves and of the sources that produce them.
 Stress and strain. Body waves and ray theory. Surface waves and free oscillations. Seismometry. Interpretation
    of seismograms. Determination of Earth structure. Reflection seismology. Seismic sources. Strong motion
   seismology and earthquake hazard. Earthquake statistics. Seismotectonics. 3 hours of lecture + 3 hours lab.
                                Prerequisite: MAT 115 or consent of the instructor
   A sixweek course in geological field methods. Preparation of geological maps of metamorphic, igneous and
 sedimentary rock areas. Geologic report on areas mapped. Prerequisite: GSC 255/255L. Field trip fee required.
   Advanced geologic mapping in a variety of geologic settings. Field reports, maps and crosssections required.
    Techniques emphasized include surveying, GPS mapping, satellite and aerial photo interpretation, Brunton
compass pace and traverse. Each module requires a minimum of five field days with additional field and lab time
as necessary to complete the assignments. Students are expected to complete four (4) modules to fulfill the GSC
     degree requirement. Each module must be topically distinctive. Modules must be taken from at least two
            different instructors. Total credit limited to 8 units with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.
      Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units with a
               maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory or a combination.
       Study of the calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing, limits, derivatives,
  differentials and integrals of single variable functions listed above. Brief introduction to partial derivatives and
       double integrals of multivariable functions. Special emphasis is given to applications in life sciences. 4
   lecture/problemsolving. Prerequisites: within the last three quarters, must have achieved either a minimum
                        placement score on the appropriate MDPT, or C or better in MAT 105.
       Graphing, differentiation, integration of rational and exponential functions, with special emphasis on
         applications to business. Not open to any student whose major requires the MAT 114 sequence. 4
    lecture/problemsolving. Prerequisite: within the last three quarters, must have achieved either a minimum
 placement score on the appropriate MDPT, or C or better in MAT 12, or MAT 105, or MAT 106, or MAT 191, or
                                                         STA 120.
Various theories of matter and energy and the principles and laws that describe their behavior and applications.
     Some special knowledge of modern science that will function in a socially desirable manner in the lives of
  students. 4 lectures. Prerequisite: A college math course. PHY 102 is not open to students who have credit for
                                    PHY 121 or 131. May be graded on CR/NC basis.
The fundamentals of acoustics and its application to musicvibrations, wave, hearing, pure tones, complex tones,
     resonance, scales, consonance, and the physics of musical instruments. 3 lecture/ problems, 1 threehour
                                                       laboratory.
     A study of vectors, motion, forces, gravity, work and energy, momentum, angular motion and mechanical
       properties of matter. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Not for students majoring in physics or engineering.
                      Prerequisite: MAT 106, or MAT 114, or equivalent. Corequisite: PHY 121L.
 Laboratory to accompany College Physics lecture series. Experiments in mechanics, hydrostatics, wave motion,
thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. 1 threehour laboratory. To
                       be taken in sequence concurrently with PHY 121, 122, 123, respectively.
 Heat, wave motion, sound, light and optical devices. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 121 and PHY
                                              121L. Corequisite: PHY 122L.
              Electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, electronics, atomic and nuclear physics. 3
               lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 122 and PHY 122L. Corequisite: PHY 123L.
  Fundamental principles of mechanics, vectors, statics, uniform motion, accelerated motion, work and energy,
momentum, and rotational motion. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: MAT 114 or MAT 130. Corequisites:
                                         MAT 115 or MAT 131, and PHY 131L.
 Laboratory to accompany General Physics lecture series. Experiments in mechanics, hydrostatics, wave motion,
 thermodynamics, optics, and electricity and magnetism. 1 threehour laboratory. To be taken concurrently with
                                            PHY 131, 132, 133, respectively.
   Fundamental principles of fluid mechanics, harmonic motion, waves, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory. 3
  lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: MAT 115 or MAT 131, Cor better in PHY 131. Corequisites: MAT 116 or
                                                MAT 132, and PHY 132L.
     Fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, Coulomb's law, electric fields, potential, properties of
 dielectrics, capacitance, Ohm's law, magnetism and magnetic fields, measuring instruments, and induced emf. 3
   lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: MAT 115 or MAT 131, Cor better in PHY 131. Corequisites: MAT 116 or
                                                 MAT 132, and PHY 133L.
  Individual or group investigation, research, study or survey of selected problems. Approval of problem must be
 obtained in the Physics Department office prior to enrollment. Total credit limited to 4 units with a maximum of
                                                    2 units per quarter.
    AC circuits, electromagnetic oscillations, Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves, geometric optics,
  physical optics, and special theory of relativity. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 132, 133, with Cor
                                                  better in both courses..
                         Experiments on optics and electromagnetism. 1 threehour laboratory. .
      Origin of the quantum theory; Bohr theory; wave mechanics and atomic structure; introduction to nuclear
                               physics. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 234.
                           Experiments illustrative of modern physics. 1 threehour laboratory
       Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a
                 maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory or a combination
  This course investigates answers to questions such as: What is the nature of the cosmos? How did the universe
      begin? What are the smallest constituents of the universe and what are their properties?, etc., through a
    historicalsociologicalscientific overview of our present understanding of the universe. The emphasis is on the
      modern description of the beginning of the universe, its constitution, and its evolution, as discovered and
interpreted by astronomers and chemists, mathematicians and physicists. 4 lectures. Prerequisite: Completion of
   GE Area A and Subareas B1, B2, and B4, including a physics or astronomy course from B1. GE Synthesis course
                                                      for Subarea B5.
  For students majoring in biological sciences, chemistry, geology and other scientific areas, as well as for physics
 majors. Basic concepts of electrical circuits and solid state devices. Circuit analysis and operation of instruments
  commonly encountered in science laboratory. 3 lectures/problemsolving, 1 threehour laboratory. Prerequisite:
                                                      PHY 123 or 133.
      This course addresses questions such as: How did Physics begin in the ancient Greek world? Why was the
scientific tradition continued and developed in the Islamic world while Western Europe fell into a dark age? Why
     did the Scientific Revolution occur in the time and place that it did? How has the relationship of science and
 religion changed through time? How have the discoveries of modern Physics modified our worldview? What is it
 about Physics that makes it a unique way of learning about the world? 4 lecture/discussions. Open to all majors.
     Prerequisites: one course from each of the following Subareas: A1, A2, A3 and B1, B2, and B4. GE Synthesis
                                                  course for Subarea B5.
     The physics of the solid Earth and its applications. The following topics will be discussed: the theory of plate
  tectonics; magnetics, seismology and gravity; radioactivity and heat; the deep interior of the Earth and physical
     processes of the mantle and core; applications to specific regions on Earth. Throughout the course, special
 attention will be given to new research results and the interpretation of actual data. 3 hours of lecture + 3 hours
                                               lab. Prerequisite: MAT 112.
     Applications of mathematical tools to problems in the study of electromagnetism, mechanics and quantum
 mechanics. Linear algebra, coordinate systems, vector analysis, ordinary differential equations, Fourier series. 4
                            lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: PHY 235, MAT 215, 216.
     Continuation of PHY 308. Applications of gamma, beta and error functions; functions of a complex variable;
 partial differential equations and boundary value problems; series solutions of ordinary differential equations in
                          physics problems. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 308.
    Continuation of PHY 308 and 309. Applications of calculus of variations, tensor analysis, integral transforms,
           probability and statistics to physics problems. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 309.
    Electrostatics, magnetostatics, circuit theory, timevarying fields, Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic
  waves. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Courses must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: PHY 308, PHY 309 (latter
                                       may be taken concurrently with PHY 314).
 Vector algebra, principles of Newtonian mechanics, conservative forces, harmonic motion, centralforce motion,
 the twobody problem, center of mass coordinates, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, accelerated coordinate
   systems, normal coordinates and Lagrange’s equations. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Courses must be taken in
            sequence. Prerequisite: PHY 308, PHY 309 (latter may be taken concurrently with PHY 321).
Fundamental principles of thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite:
                                              PHY 132 and MAT 215, 216.
 Geometrical optics and wave optics with an emphasis on technological applications. 4 lectures/problemsolving.
                                             Prerequisite: PHY 131 or 121.
 Individual or group investigation, research, study or survey of selected problems. Approval of problem must be
 obtained in the Physics Department office prior to enrollment. Total credit limited to 4 units with a maximum of
                                                   2 units per quarter
Introduction to quantum mechanics, including Schroedinger equation, hydrogen atom, degeneracy, perturbation
  theory, multielectron atoms, matrix mechanics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. PHY 401 and 402 must be taken in
                              sequence. Prerequisites: PHY 235 or CHM 313, and PHY 309.
Continuation of PHY 401. Introduction to quantum mechanics, including Schroedinger equation, hydrogen atom,
  degeneracy, perturbation theory, multielectron atoms, matrix mechanics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. PHY 401
               and 402 must be taken in sequence. Prerequisites: PHY 235 or CHM 313, and PHY 309.
Advanced topics in quantum mechanics, including approximation methods, timedependent perturbation theory,
                 relativistic theory and frontiers. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 402.
     History and concepts of high energy and elementary particle physics; fundamental interactions; quantum
     numbers, invariance principles and conservation laws; SU(3) quark model and QCD; particle detectors and
                        accelerators. 4 lectures. Prerequisite: PHY 401. Corequisite: PHY 402.
    Crystallography, crystal imperfections, diffusion. Metals, ionic crystals, covalent crystals, molecular crystals.
         Transport properties and specific heat of metals. Electronic states in solids, physical properties of
  semiconductors, theory of semiconductor devices. Behavior of dielectrics, magnetism and superconductors. 4
                                    lectures/problemsolving. Corequisite: PHY 309.
 Study of the statistical behavior of physical systems composed of large numbers of similar particles. Derivation
and application of the distribution functions for the cases of MaxwellBoltzmann statistics. BoseEinstein statistics
            and FermiDirac statistics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 235 and PHY 333.
  Computational methods, which include numerical integration, the solution of differential and transcendental
equations, and statistical analysis, are applied to problems in mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics
    and nonlinear dynamics. Familiarity with programming techniques such as loops, arrays, and functions in
 expected, at the level of CS 128 or ECE 114. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: PHY 133 and one of MAT
                                             208, MAT 216, or MAT 224.
Concepts and mechanisms involved in the interpretation of biological systems. A description of living processes
 in physical terms. (See also BIO 410) 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 123, or PHY 132 and 133.
  Mirrors, lenses and optical instruments; interference, diffraction, polarization and elements of spectroscopy;
  lasers and holography. 3 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 234. Corequisite for physics majors: PHY
                                                      417L.
                    Laboratory to be taken concurrently with PHY 417. One 3hour laboratory.
The fundamentals of acoustical vibrations, baffle effects, resonance and filters, and transmission phenomena will
 be presented using differential equations and complex variables. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: PHY
                                                  132 and MAT 215, 216.
 Fundamental concepts and ideas in the study of ionized gases, including orbit theory, the “twofluid” equations,
    magnetohydrodynamics and the Vlasov theory. Plasma phenomena, such as waves, diffusion, equilibrium,
                        stability and others. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 133.
 Basic astrophysical data, stellar atmospheres and spectra, stellar structure and evolution, galactic structure and
           interstellar matter, galaxies and cosmology. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 235
  Planetary motions, gravitation, celestial mechanics, interplanetary space missions, techniques of space borne
 planetary observation, planetary physics. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisites: PHY 235, 321 (may be taken
                                                      concurrently).
   Review of special relativity, principle of equivalence, tensors, the metric tensor, general theory of relativity,
   cosmological models, gravitational waves, black holes, Hawking radiation, quantum gravity, connection with
        elementary particle theories. 4 lectures/problemsolving. Prerequisite: PHY 235, 315 (may be taken
                                    concurrently), 322 (may be taken concurrently).
     Topics in advanced experimental physics with emphasis on electromagnetism and mechanics. One 3hour
    laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY 235, 235L, 315, 322. (PHY 430L, 431L and 432L may be taken in any order.)
  Topics in experimental solid state physics. One 3hour laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY 235, 235L, 315, 322. (PHY
                                    430L, 431L and 432L may be taken in any order.)
Topics in experimental nuclear physics. One 3hour laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY 235, 235L, 315, 322. (PHY 430L,
                                       431L, and 432L may be taken in any order.)
Practical, onthejob training and work experience in physics. Approval of Physics Department Chair required prior
to enrollment. Course grade determined by internship coordinator and onjob supervisor. Total credit limited to 6
                                                          units.
  Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates
must solve in their fields of employment. Project results presented in a formal report and brief oral presentation.
                          Approval of Physics department chair required prior to enrollment.
     Study of current developments in physics and discussion of periodicals of an appropriate level. 2 lecture
                                           discussions. Prerequisite: PHY 234.
     Group study of a selected topic, the title to be specified in advance. Total credit limited to 8 units with a
               maximum of 4 units per quarter. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory or a combination.
       Special study in selected areas of physics. Seminar, 1 to 3 hours. Maximum of 6 units may be earned.

				
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