00 Inside Front Cover.indd by yaosaigeng

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									The University of Richmond is committed to developing a diverse workforce and student body, and to modeling
an inclusive campus community which values the expression of differences in ways that promote excellence in
teaching, learning, personal development and institutional success. (http://commonground.richmond.edu/ )
Non-Discrimination Policy
The University of Richmond prohibits discrimination and harassment against applicants, students,
faculty or staff on the basis of race, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, sex, sexual orientation,
disability, status as a veteran or any classification protected by local, state or federal law.
   Copies of the complete “Harassment and Discrimination Policy (including Sexual Harassment)” are
included in student handbooks, faculty handbooks and in the published guidelines for University of
Richmond support staff. Copies are also available at the dean’s office of each college and school and the
Department of Human Resource Services. For further information, students should contact the dean
of their school or residential college; staff should contact the director of Human Resource Services; and
faculty should contact the dean of their school.
   Any inquiries regarding the University’s policies in these areas should be directed to the Office of the
Vice President for Student Development, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173. Telephone: (804)
289-8032.
Disclaimer
The contents of this catalog represent the most current information available at the time of publication.
However, during the period of time covered by this catalog, it is reasonable to expect changes to be made
with respect to this information without prior notice. Thus, the provisions of this catalog are not to
be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the University (or any of its colleges or schools) and the
student.
Undergraduate
       ACADEMIC SCHOOLS
      School of Arts and Sciences
       Robins School of Business
  Jepson School of Leadership Studies

    COORDINATE COLLEGES
       Richmond College
      Westhampton College

University of Richmond, Virginia 23173
           (804) 289-8000
         www.richmond.edu
2 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




                                                         CONTENTS
Academic Calendars .....................................3             Academic Programs: Robins School
University of Richmond ...............................7               of Business ...............................................187

Admission ..................................................11        Curricula ..................................................188

Financial Affairs .........................................15         Academic Programs: Jepson School of
                                                                      Leadership Studies ....................................201
Student Life ...............................................20
                                                                      Curricula ..................................................201
Academic Opportunities and Support .........29
                                                                      Directory ..................................................206
International Education .............................31
                                                                      Board of Trustees .......................................206
Academic Procedures ..................................33
                                                                      Administration .........................................206
General Education Curriculum ..................45
                                                                      Faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences ...207
Summary of Degree Requirements ..............49
                                                                      Faculty of the School of Business ...............218
Academic Programs: School of
Arts and Sciences ........................................51          Faculty of the School of Leadership Studies ...220

Curricula .......................................................55   Campus Map ................... Inside Back Cover
                                                                                           ACADEMIC CALENDARS • 3




ACADEMIC CALENDARS 2006–2008
FALL SEMESTER 2006
Aug. 23, Wed. ..................................... School of Arts and Sciences: New students arrive;
                                                       begin orientation
Aug. 25, Fri. ....................................... Registration/problem resolution for entering students
Aug. 28, Mon. .................................... Classes begin
Sept. 4, Mon. ..................................... Labor Day (classes meet)
Sept. 8, Fri. ........................................ Last day to file for May/August graduation
Oct. 13, Fri. ....................................... Last day of classes prior to fall break
                                                       (Residence halls remain open)
Oct. 18, Wed. .................................... Classes resume
Nov. 21, Tues. .................................... Thanksgiving break begins after classes
Nov. 27, Mon. .................................... Classes resume
Dec. 11-19, Mon.–Tues. .................... Fall term examination period
Dec. 19, Tues. .................................... Fall term ends
SPRING SEMESTER 2007
Jan. 15, Mon. ..................................... Classes begin
Feb. 2, Fri. .......................................... Last day to file for May/August graduation, if not filed earlier
Mar. 2, Fri. ......................................... Spring break begins after classes
Mar. 12, Mon. .................................... Classes resume
Apr. 30–May 5, Mon.–Sat. ................. Spring term examination period
May 5, Sat. ......................................... Spring term ends
May 13, Sun. ...................................... Baccalaureate Service and Spring Commencement
SUMMER SESSION 2007
The Summer School Calendar for 2007 will be announced during the Fall 2006 term.
FALL SEMESTER 2007
Aug. 22, Wed. .................................... School of Arts and Sciences: New students arrive;
                                                       begin orientation
Aug. 24, Fri. ....................................... Registration/problem resolution for entering students
Aug. 27, Mon. .................................... Classes begin
Sept. 3, Mon. ..................................... Labor Day (classes meet)
Sept. 14, Fri. ....................................... Last day to file for May/August graduation
Oct. 12, Fri. ....................................... Last day of classes prior to fall break
                                                       (Residence halls remain open)
Oct. 17, Wed. .................................... Classes resume
Nov. 20, Tues. .................................... Thanksgiving break begins after classes
Nov. 26, Mon. .................................... Classes resume
Dec. 10–18, Mon.–Tues. .................... Fall term examination period
Dec. 18, Tues. .................................... Fall term ends
SPRING SEMESTER 2008
Jan. 14, Mon. ..................................... Classes begin
Feb. 1, Fri. .......................................... Last day to file for May/August graduation, if not filed earlier
Mar. 7, Fri. ......................................... Spring break begins after classes
Mar. 17, Mon. .................................... Classes resume
Apr. 23-May 3, Mon.-Sat. .................. Spring term examination period
May 3, Sat. ......................................... Spring term ends
May 11, Sun. ...................................... Baccalaureate Service and Spring Commencement
4 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Addendum to the University of Richmond Academic Calendars 2006-2008
The list below is intended to familiarize the University community with major religious holidays affecting
many throughout the campus. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the day is a University holiday
but is provided to alert members of the Richmond community to possible scheduling conflicts. See the
Class Attendance and University Holidays section of the catalog for more details.

Christian Holidays       2006-2007                               2007-2008
Christmas                Mon, Dec 25, 2006                       Tues, Dec 25, 2007
Good Friday              Fri, Apr 6, 2007                        Fri, Mar 21, 2008
Easter Sunday            Sun, Apr 8, 2007                        Sun, Mar 23, 2008
Easter Monday            Mon, Apr 9, 2007                        Mon, Mar 24, 2008

Jewish Holidays           2006-2007                               2007-2008
Rosh Hashanah             Sat, Sep 23 – Sun, Sep 24, 2006         Thurs, Sep 13 – Fri, Sep 14, 2007
Yom Kippur                Mon, Oct 2, 2006                        Sat, Sep 22, 2007
Sukkot                    Sat, Oct 7 – Sat, Oct 14, 2006          Thurs, Sep 27 – Thurs, Oct 4, 2007
Shemini Atzeret/
Simchat Torah             Sun, Oct 15, 2006                       Fri, Oct 5, 2007
Hanukkah**                Sat, Dec 16 – Sat, Dec 23, 2006         Wed, Dec 5 – Wed, Dec 12, 2007
Passover                  Tues, Apr 3 – Wed, Apr 4, 2007          Sun, Apr 20 – Mon, Apr 21, 2008
Passover
(concluding days)         Mon, Apr 9 – Tues, Apr 10, 2007         Sat, Apr 26 – Sun, Apr 27, 2008
Shavuot                   Wed, May 23, 2007                       Mon, June 9, 2008
- Jewish holy days, religious festivals and the weekly Sabbath begin at sunset the preceding evening. On
   these days, observant Jews do not engage in daily activities or fulfill routine commitments.
- Many Jews who do not observe all holy days prefer to celebrate at their synagogue or at home on Rosh
   Hashanah, Yom Kippur and the first two evenings of Passover.
**This holiday does not require absence from routine commitments.

Muslim Holidays         2006-2007                               2007-2008
Eid-al-Fitr             Tues, Oct 24, 2006                      Sat, Oct 13, 2007
Eid-al-Adha             Sun, Dec 31, 2006                       Mon, Dec 31, 2007
Muslim New Year         Sat, Jan 20, 2007                       Thurs, Jan 10, 2008
- All Muslim dates begin at sunset the preceding evening.
- The Muslim calendar year is based on the lunar cycle, consisting of 12 months of 29 or 30 days each,
  totaling 353 or 354 days. Each new month begins at the sighting of a new moon. Actual dates may
  differ by a day or two from the above dates. In many places, the moon sighting often is determined
  in advance by astronomical calculations.
                                                                                CONTACT LIST • 5



For information regarding any of the following subjects, please write to the individual named:

Academic Schools                 Admission and Transfer             Information Services
School of Arts and Sciences      School of Arts and Sciences           Kathy Monday, Vice
 Andrew F. Newcomb, Dean            Pamela W. Spence, Dean             President for Information
 Kathy W. Hoke, Director,                                              Services
                                 Robins School of Business
 Graduate School of Arts and        Terry M. Weisenberger,          International Education
 Sciences                           Associate Dean                     Uliana F. Gabara, Dean
Robins School of Business        Jepson School of Leadership        Multicultural Affairs
 Jorge Haddock, Dean             Studies                               Tinina Q. Cade, Director
 Richard S. Coughlan,               Teresa J. Williams, Associate   Psychological Services
 Associate Dean for Graduate        Dean                               Peter O. LeViness,
 and Executive Programs                                                Director
                                 Business Matters
Jepson School of Leadership                                         Records and Transcripts
Studies                          Fees and Payments                  (Academic)
 J. Thomas Wren, Interim            Annemarie Weitzel, Bursar          Susan D. Breeden,
 Dean                            Financial Aid                         University Registrar
T. C. Williams School of Law        Cynthia A. Deffenbaugh,         Recreation and Wellness
  Rodney A. Smolla, Dean            Director                           Thomas Roberts,
School of Continuing Studies     Housing                               Director
  James L. Narduzzi, Dean           Joan D. Lachowski, Director     Religious Life
Coordinate Colleges              Selected Administrative               Daphne L. Burt,
                                 OfÞces                                Chaplain to the
Richmond College, for men                                              University
  Dan Fabian, Interim Dean       Athletics
                                    James D. Miller, Director       Student Activities
Westhampton College,                                                   Max V. Vest, Director
for women                        Career Development Center
  Juliette L. Landphair, Dean       Leslie Stevenson, Director      Student Affairs
                                                                       Steve Bisese, Vice
                                 Health Services                       President for Student
                                    Lynne Pendleton Deane,             Development
                                    M.D., Director
                                                                     UNIVERSITY OF
6 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND
                                                                         THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND • 7




                                           RICHMOND

MISSION STATEMENT                                       ENVIRONMENT AND HISTORY
The mission of the University of Richmond               The University of Richmond campus consists of
is to sustain a collaborative learning and              about 50 major buildings of Collegiate Gothic
research community that supports the personal           architectural style set amid 350 acres of lawns, lake
development of its members and the creation of          and woodlands. The beautiful and harmonious
new knowledge. A Richmond education prepares            setting has been recognized nationally by college
students to live lives of purpose, thoughtful           guides. Richmond’s history began almost two
inquiry, and responsible leadership in a global and     centuries ago with Richmond College, founded
pluralistic society.                                    in 1830 by Virginia Baptists as a college of liberal
                                                        arts and sciences for men. Around this nucleus
ORGANIZATION AND ACCREDITATION                          were established the T.C. Williams School of
Five academic schools and two coordinate colleges       Law (1870); Westhampton College, a college
form the University of Richmond, with authority         of liberal arts and sciences for women (1914);
and responsibility vested legally in the Board of       the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, for
Trustees and the president of the University. The       advanced study in the liberal arts and sciences
several colleges and schools award no degrees           (1921); the E. Claiborne Robins School of
individually, but all degrees for work done in any      Business, for undergraduate and graduate study in
one of them are conferred by the University of          business (1949); University College, now known
Richmond.                                               as the School of Continuing Studies, for evening,
   The University enrolls approximately 2,900 full-     summer and continuing education (1962); and
time undergraduates, 92 percent of whom live on         the Jepson School of Leadership Studies, the first
campus; 600 full-time law and graduate students;        school of leadership studies in the United States
and 1,300 part-time students, largely from              (1992).
Richmond and the surrounding community.                     In 1992, the academic missions of Richmond
   The University of Richmond is fully accredited       College and Westhampton College were combined
by the Commission on Colleges, Southern                 in a separate school, the School of Arts and Sciences.
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866               Richmond College and Westhampton College
Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097,                  are the residential colleges for men and women
telephone 404-679-4500, Web site: www.sacscoc.          respectively, providing special programming and
org) to award associate, baccalaureate, master and      leadership opportunities in student life.
juris doctor degrees. The University also is certified       Richmond benefits from a heritage of ethical
by the Virginia State Board of Education to offer       and religious values, a residential character and
teacher licensure programs. Various departments         a commitment to liberal and general education
and divisions have more specialized accreditation.      through intimate schools and colleges joined into
Included in this category are the music program,        a substantial whole.
accredited by the National Association of Schools
of Music, and the chemistry program, accredited
by the American Chemical Society. In addition,
the Robins School of Business is accredited by
the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools
of Business International at the undergraduate
and graduate levels, and the T.C. Williams
School of Law is accredited by the American Bar
Association.
8 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




INFORMATION SERVICES — LIBRARY                           Boatwright Memorial Library offers a mix of
AND COMPUTING RESOURCES                               study space suitable for individuals working alone
                                                      or in groups, as well as AV viewing/listening
Library Resources                                     carrels and rooms and more than 100 computer
The University’s libraries are the center of          workstations. Laptop computers are loaned for
intellectual activities outside the classroom.        in-building use and connect to the University’s
Boatwright Memorial Library, facing Westhampton       wireless network.
Lake, is the main library. It includes collections       A separate wing of Boatwright Memorial
and services for the humanities, social sciences,     Library houses the Virginia Baptist Historical
sciences and business. Boatwright is also home        Society, a memorial to the Virginia Baptists who
to the Business Information Center, the Media         struggled to secure religious liberty in America.
Resource Center and the Science Information           The library holds thousands of books, church
Center. The Parsons Music Library is in the           records, manuscripts and personal papers related
Modlin Center for the Arts. The Muse Law Library      to Virginia Baptist history and heritage. The
in the Richmond School of Law serves the special      society also manages the University’s archives, a
needs of law students and faculty. The libraries’     large collection of books, photos and memorabilia
collections have been developed to meet the needs     related to the University’s rich history. The
of students and faculty. Those collections consist    University’s libraries are open to the entire campus
of more than 465,000 volumes, access to more          community.
than 43,000 print and online journals, 45,000
electronic books, more than 200 online databases      Computing Facilities
and a wealth of resources in media such as sheet      The University of Richmond is committed
music, DVD, audio CD, microfilm and audio              to preparing students to work successfully
books. Since 1900, the University of Richmond has     in technology- and information-centered
enjoyed status as a depository for U.S. government    environments. The Information Services division
publications. Boatwright Memorial Library holds       supports a teaching and learning environment
more than 500,000 government documents in             that provides rich technology and information
print and microform and provides electronic access    resources for students, faculty and staff. Computer
to thousands more. The Galvin Rare Book Room          labs and classrooms with a total of more than
contains nearly 25,000 rare books, first editions,     750 computers are spread across the campus and
maps, photographs and manuscripts. The online         contain a wide variety of equipment and software.
catalog (http://library.richmond.edu/) provides       These systems can be accessed in Boatwright
access to the collections through the Internet. The   Memorial Library and in general-purpose and
libraries participate in local and state consortia    discipline-specific computing spaces. Some
as well as national networks to obtain access to      residence halls are equipped with public computers
databases and to borrow items not held in the         in study lounges.
University’s collections.                                In addition to the general purpose labs,
   The libraries offer group and individual           many academic departments have computer labs
instruction in using these resources effectively.     designed to meet the special learning and research
Group instruction is offered in the Boatwright        needs of their students. These include art and art
Computer Classroom and other locations. In            history, the business school, chemistry, classical
2003, the faculty instituted a library research       studies, education, journalism, the law school,
graduation requirement. First-year students meet      modern literatures and cultures, music, physics,
this requirement by participating in two 75-          psychology, the School of Leadership Studies
minute hands-on workshops, one each semester.         and theatre and dance. For more information
These workshops, called Library 100 and Library       regarding the discipline-specific computer labs
101, introduce students to basic research tools       and their hours of operation, please refer to the to
and techniques. Individual assistance is available    the Information Services Web page.
in person and online through various means
described at http://library.richmond.edu/help/
ask_lib/index.htm.
                                                                        THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND • 9



    The ground floor of Jepson Hall houses many         University computer account to log into any
computing services. This includes the Computer         lab machine. To help ensure the security of our
Help Desk, a resource that provides assistance with    systems and network, passwords must be changed
computing-related issues for the entire campus. The    each semester in order to maintain an active
facilities in Jepson Hall include a general purpose    account. Please refer to the Policies for Responsible
computer lab with a total of 30 workstations; five      Computing posted on the Information Services
PC classrooms with full multimedia capabilities;       Web page for guidelines regarding the use of
and two computer classrooms running Windows,           University-provided technology resources.
Linux and Unix designated for use by the math
and computer science department. When classes          UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES
are not in session, the Jepson Hall computer           Though Richmond is composed of five general
classrooms are open for student use.                   academic schools as well as two residential
    The normal operating hours for the Jepson          colleges, this catalog provides specific program
Hall computing facilities during the fall and spring   information about only undergraduate study in
semesters are Monday – Thursday, 7:45 a.m. to          the School of Arts and Sciences, Robins School of
1:00 a.m.; Friday 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Saturday     Business and Jepson School of Leadership Studies.
11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; and Sunday 11:00 a.m.         Pertinent information about the residential
to 1:00 a.m. In addition, the Help Desk is open        colleges, Richmond College and Westhampton
from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday – Friday.          College, also is presented in this catalog. Detailed
These schedules change during holidays, exam and       information about each of the other academic
summer sessions. A listing of the current hours        schools is available upon request to the respective
of operation may be found on the Information           dean’s office.
Services Web page.
    The Technology Learning Center (TLC)               ACADEMIC SCHOOLS
is a unique resource located on the third floor
                                                       School of Arts and Sciences
of Boatwright Memorial Library. It is devoted
                                                       All students begin as part of the School of Arts
to servicing the multimedia needs of students,
                                                       and Sciences. Approximately two-thirds of the
faculty and staff. This area offers PC and Mac
                                                       University’s students (2,300) then continue their
workstations equipped with high-end Web
                                                       study in arts and sciences, pursuing Bachelor of
development, multimedia, animation, 3-D
                                                       Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in the more
modeling and audio-video recording and editing
                                                       than 40 disciplines offered by the school. The arts
software. Scanners, high quality printers, large-
                                                       and sciences faculty also provides instruction in
format plotters, digitizers and digital video and
                                                       the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences leading
still cameras also are available. In addition, the
                                                       to a small number of master’s degrees.
TLC contains a photography studio and a small
                                                          The School of Arts and Sciences is a blend of
recording studio. Most importantly, the TLC is
                                                       studies from all areas of life—health, fine arts,
staffed by professionals and well-trained student
                                                       natural and urban environments, government,
assistants. Students not only have access to the
                                                       technology, cultures, emerging scientific studies
hardware and software, but also to experts who
                                                       and literature are a few examples. Though
can help them effectively use the specialized tools.
                                                       the fields of study in the School of Arts and
    The University maintains a robust network
                                                       Sciences are diverse, each discipline pursues the
infrastructure. A wireless network supports
                                                       common goals of challenging students to think
mobile computing in every building on campus,
                                                       critically and independently; to make decisions
and provides coverage in most outdoor locations
                                                       based upon their assessments; to communicate
and public gathering spaces. Information Services
                                                       effectively; to gather and evaluate information
keeps University-owned systems loaded with up-
                                                       and others’ opinions; and to work collaboratively,
to-date versions of the latest software tools and
                                                       expanding their understanding of others to better
anti-virus software. All users must have an active
10 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



comprehend the systems and situations around            Residential Colleges
them. The programs ask rather than tell. Working        Undergraduate students at the University of
together across disciplines, the faculty and students   Richmond are members of an academic school:
explore how things work, ask why they operate as        the School of Arts and Sciences, the Robins School
they do, evaluate what has been successful, and         of Business, or the Jepson School of Leadership
consider possible solutions or advancements.            Studies. Depending on their sex, students also
Faculty collaborate with students to research and       are members of a residential college: Richmond
create data or art, encouraging them to build their     College for men and Westhampton College for
own knowledge and skills and demonstrating how          women. The residential colleges serve as dean
to most effectively communicate and apply what          of students offices and manage academic policy
they learn.                                             matters, thereby providing a holistic approach to
                                                        students. The college deans report to both the vice
Robins School of Business
                                                        president of student development and the dean of
The Robins School of Business enrolls about 650
                                                        Arts and Sciences.
men and women. The school’s principal objective
                                                           Each residential college has its own staff,
is to provide a professional college education that
                                                        residence life program, student government,
will enable students to meet the challenges of a
                                                        activities and traditions. Deans’ staff members
complex and international business world.
                                                        focus on students’ personal development, crisis
    The degree of Bachelor of Science in Business
                                                        management, judicial policies and matters that
Administration (B.S.B.A.) is offered with majors
                                                        involve the University’s honor code. The deans’
in accounting, business administration and
                                                        offices also oversee popular student traditions
economics. The business administration major
                                                        that recognize and celebrate the smaller college
has several areas of concentration that students
                                                        community and heritage, including Westhampton
may pursue. Once a student declares his or her
                                                        College’s Junior Ring Dance and Richmond
major, the Robins School of Business provides
                                                        College’s Investiture. The residence life programs
a number of internal activities that the student
                                                        organize gender-based programming within the
may participate in, including its own student
                                                        residence halls and living/learning initiatives
government. The Robins School also has a chapter
                                                        that make important intellectual and personal
of Beta Gamma Sigma, a national honor society.
                                                        connections between students and faculty
Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest
                                                        members, e.g., the Richmond College Outdoor
national recognition a student can receive in an
                                                        House.
undergraduate or master’s program accredited by
                                                           The      two     student     governments—the
the AACSB-International.
                                                        Westhampton College Government Association
    The School of Business faculty also provides
                                                        (WCGA) and the Richmond College Student
the Master of Business Administration (MBA)
                                                        Government Association (RCSGA)—afford
degree in the Robins School of Business.
                                                        students valuable leadership opportunities
Jepson School of Leadership Studies                     and guarantee that men and women students
The Jepson School of Leadership Studies offers the      participate equally in the governing process.
Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in leadership      Meanwhile, students make connections between
studies. The major is broadly based but highly          their curricular and cocurricular experiences in
integrated with leadership as a unifying theme. In      college-based programs such as Westhampton
an exceptional academic environment, the Jepson         College’s Women Involved in Living Learning
School challenges students to reach their potential     (WILL) program.
and prepares them for future responsibilities              For more information regarding Westhampton
through education for and about leadership.             College see http://oncampus.richmond.edu/
                                                        Student_Affairs/wcollege. For more information
                                                        regarding Richmond College see http://oncampus.
                                                        richmond.edu/Student_Affairs/rcollege.
                                                                                            ADMISSION • 11




SPIRITUAL LIFE                                           Zen meditation on Tuesday evenings, Juma’a
                                                         prayer on Fridays at noon, Shabbat prayer on
The University is committed to the formation
                                                         Friday evenings, Ecumenical Christian worship on
and support of the spiritual needs and growth
                                                         Sundays at 3:16 p.m. and Roman Catholic mass
of all its students, regardless of faith, tradition,
                                                         on Sundays at 5:00 p.m. Many student groups
practice or lack thereof. Religious and spiritual life
                                                         hold prayer and praise meetings as well. The City
activities and programs that invite, challenge and
                                                         of Richmond has over 300 places of worship, each
support the spiritual maturity and understanding
                                                         of which welcomes students to participate in their
of all members of the university community are
                                                         services and practice.
coordinated through the Office of the Chaplaincy,
                                                            The Office of the Chaplaincy also coordinates
which is easily accessible in the E. Carlton Wilton
                                                         service opportunities through the Bonner Scholars
Center for Inter-Religious Campus Ministries.
                                                         and Community Partners offices; connects
    There are numerous organizations for students
                                                         with the greater Richmond interfaith and civic
of various faiths and traditions, including Buddhist,
                                                         community through A More Perfect Union; and
Christian (Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant and
                                                         offers individual support, counseling and care by
Ecumenical), Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh.
                                                         appointment with one of the chaplains.
Events, dinners and programs are open to all so
                                                            Listings of on-campus and local events, houses
that interfaith understanding and cooperation
                                                         of worship and holy days may be found on the
might be fostered. Regular on-campus worship
                                                         Office of the Chaplaincy Web site: www://
services and times for religious practice include
                                                         chaplaincy.richmond.edu


                                             ADMISSION

The University of Richmond seeks to enroll men              The largest number of successful applicants
and women who have demonstrated the potential            will have taken a challenging college preparatory
to succeed in a highly rigorous environment and          program. Successful applicants represent a wide
who and have shown evidence of their capability          variety of backgrounds. The prospective student
to contribute to the University community.               is advised, therefore, to complete the most
Admission to the University is competitive and           challenging college preparatory program that can
selective.                                               be taken at the secondary school that he or she
   Criteria for admission are both objective and         attends. Students admitted must show evidence of
subjective. Such qualities as academic ability and       high school graduation or exemplary completion
achievement combined with personal qualities             on all five achievement tests of the general
of leadership, creativity and independence are           education development (G.E.D.) battery.
sought. For those entering as first-year students,           For students who have attended other
the secondary school experience, the results of          institutions of higher learning and wish to transfer
standardized tests and the particular characteristics    to the University of Richmond, the academic
and personal qualities of each applicant will be         achievement and courses completed at the prior
considered. Because we know that a family’s              institution will be important to the admission
financial situation has no relationship to a student’s    decision. In short, whether first-year or transfer,
preparation, character, potential or intellect, the      those students with the potential to be the most
University is proud to make admission decisions          successful in this educational environment will be
in a need-blind manner. Students who believe             offered admission.
that they would benefit from the University’s
programs but do not have the resources to attend
are encouraged to see the section on Financial Aid
for more information.
12 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Campus Visits                                              First-year applicants must submit the results of
Prospective students are invited to visit the campus,   either the SAT or ACT for consideration. There
participate in the admission conference, take a         is not a preference for either test; instead, the
tour of the campus and confer with professors,          evaluation of those who submit results of both will
coaches, or other persons in their fields of interest.   rely on whichever test is comparatively strongest.
The admission conference consists of a group               Application for admission may be made
presentation and discussion about the University of     using the Common Application and a Common
Richmond and is led by an admission officer. When        Application Supplement including a required
the University is in session, student-conducted         essay. All forms are accessible from the admission
campus tours usually follow each conference. The        Web site. The nonrefundable $50 application fee
campus visit is encouraged because it provides an       must accompany the application for admission.
opportunity for the prospective student to learn
about the University, have questions answered and       ADMISSION PLANS
see the campus.                                         Regular Decision
   Plans to visit the campus may be made by             The application deadline for regular decision
calling the Office of Admission, (804) 289-8640          is January 15; candidates are notified of the
or (800) 700-1662, or by visiting our Web site at       admission decisions around April 1.
www.richmond.edu.
   While individual interviews are not required         Early Decision
for admission, they may be available during your        The early decision plan is designed for well-
campus visit or with a Richmond graduate in your        qualified students who have decided that the
home city. Visit www.richmond.edu for more              University of Richmond is their clear first choice.
information.                                            Two plans are available. Fall early decision has a
   During the candidate evaluation process in           deadline of November 15. Winter early decision
January, February and March, schedules are              has a deadline of January 15. The applicant must
abbreviated and times vary.                             file (prior to the deadline) an application form,
                                                        an official copy of the academic record through
Admission Requirements                                  the junior year, first marking period grades from
Candidates for admission must have completed a          the senior year, and the required standardized
minimum of 16 units of secondary school work.           test scores. Candidates will be notified around
Minimum requirements include four units in              December 15 for fall early decision and February
English, three in college preparatory mathematics       15 for winter early decision.
(including of Algebra I, II, and Geometry), and            Accepted candidates must submit the required
at least two each in history, laboratory science        nonrefundable deposit to confirm their admission
and foreign language (two units of the same             to the University of Richmond. Deferred
language, not including American Sign Language,         candidates’ applications will be reconsidered under
which will not satisfy the requirement for foreign      the regular admission plan. In some cases, early
language). Competitive candidates for admission         decision applicants may be denied admission as
usually have three to four units in science, history    well. Further information may be obtained from
and foreign language.                                   the Office of Admission.
   The applicant must have the secondary
school send an official transcript of work               Early Admission
completed, courses in progress and the school’s         The early admission program provides for the
recommendation. Students who have taken work            admission of exceptional students who have
at or under the auspices of a college or university     completed their secondary school experience in
must provide a statement describing the work, and       three years, prior to their college matriculation.
an official transcript from the college or university    Additionally, appropriate candidates must
must be sent directly to the Office of Admission,        possess unusually strong college preparation, as
University of Richmond.                                 demonstrated through a challenging and rigorous
                                                                                             ADMISSION • 13



course of study, while presenting required                   Credit for all courses is regarded as provisional
standardized test scores of a highly competitive         at the time of the applicant’s admission and is not
nature. The student is required to have an               considered final until the satisfactory completion
interview with an admission officer in person or by       of one semester’s work at the University.
telephone and submit a letter from the secondary
school counselor endorsing the student’s early           INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION
admission application.                                   The University of Richmond encourages
                                                         international students with diverse cultural
TRANSFER ADMISSION                                       heritages and multicultural experiences to apply
A student who wishes to transfer from another college    to the University as both first-year and transfer
or university may apply for transfer admission. A        students.
student must have completed a minimum of at least           First-year applicants must complete an
24 semester hours of transferable credit prior to his    academic secondary program which would prepare
or her enrollment at the University of Richmond.         one for entrance to universities in the country of
The transfer credit must have been earned at an          residence. Secondary study (grades 9, 10, 11 and
institution regionally accredited at the time the work   12) should include at minimum three or four
was completed. Transfer candidates must possess a        years of coursework in the native language (or
minimum grade point average of 2.0 to be eligible for    second language), mathematics, social sciences,
review. Competitive candidates will have well above      laboratory sciences and English language. Refer to
this minimum requirement. Interested students may        the Admission Requirements section above.
wish to visit the campus and talk with an admission         A student may apply as a transfer candidate after
officer; however, a personal interview is not a part of   successfully completing at least one year of full-
the admission decision. In order to receive a degree     time study at a recognized academic university in
from the University of Richmond, a student must          the United States or abroad. Refer to the Transfer
complete at least 60 semester hours at the University,   Admission section above.
including the work of the senior year.                      In addition to test requirements described in
   The deadline to submit a transfer application         Admission Requirements above, all nonnative
for fall enrollment is February 15 (priority) or April   English speakers must submit results for Test of
15; the spring enrollment deadline is November           English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The
1. The applicant must file an application form,           University expects nonnative English speakers to
pay the nonrefundable application fee, and have          possess strong analytical and rhetorical writing
secondary school and college transcripts forwarded       skills and highly developed oral communication
directly to the Office of Admission. Students             proficiency in English. Because the University
must have left their previous institution in good        offers only short-term, advanced English
standing or having been honorably dismissed.             as a Second Language (ESL) study during
   Credit for work completed at another college          summer and the academic year, applicants must
or university will be subject to the following           demonstrate English proficiency prior to enrolling.
conditions:                                              Consideration will be given to candidates with the
   • courses must be a part of the University            following minimum scores on the various versions
         of Richmond curriculum and at the level         of the TOEFL: 550 on the paper TOEFL, 213
         of courses taught at the University of          on the computer-based TOEFL, or 80 on the
         Richmond                                        Internet-based TOEFL.
   • the grade received must be the equivalent
         of C (2.0) or better
   • the decisions of credit transfer and
         application towards degree requirements
         are made by the University Registrar in
         consultation with the appropriate academic
         department
14 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




HOME-SCHOOLED STUDENTS                                THE ROBINS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Students who have been educated in a                  The Robins School of Business provides a
nontraditional secondary school setting are           professional education for students who wish
welcome to apply for admission. In addition to        to prepare for the challenges of a complex and
submitting a complete admission application,          international business world. This personalized
home school students are required to complete or      education is offered primarily during the third and
submit the following items:                           fourth years of college study. After one year in the
1. Standardized testing requirement as defined         School of Arts and Sciences, students may declare
    under Admission Requirements. In addition,        their major in accounting, business administration
    students are strongly urged to submit SAT II      or economics. At the time of declaration, a student
    Subject Tests in the subject areas of history     will be assigned an academic advisor who teaches
    and natural science.                              in the area in which the student intends to major.
2. Participate in an interview conducted by one       In anticipation of the junior and senior years,
    of the University’s admission officers. The        planning should begin in the first year to meet
    interview is required for students who spend      the University’s general education and business
    50 percent or more of their secondary school      prerequisite courses.
    experience in a home-school setting or are
    graduating from a home-school environment.        JEPSON SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP
    These interviews are conducted in person or       STUDIES
    over the phone by appointment.                    The Jepson School of Leadership Studies seeks
3. Submit a narrative description of the home-        to develop in each student a base of knowledge
    school environment, such as parental              that provides the conceptual tools that support
    instruction, community teaching, etc.             the exercise of leadership in a variety of settings.
    Additional items that could be included are       Curriculum goals are achieved through courses that
    syllabi for all courses taken and a list of the   help students understand how to use knowledge
    textbooks used.                                   gained through coursework in the world outside
4. Optional letters of recommendation,                the classroom.
    preferably from individuals who have had             Students interested in the major or minor must
    academic contact with the student, can be         apply and be selected by the Jepson School of
    submitted.                                        Leadership Studies. In this regard, the final decision
                                                      concerning admission to the school rests with
                                                      the Jepson School of Leadership Studies Student
                                                      Affairs Committee. The student must submit
                                                      a formal application in the fall after completing
                                                      the first academic year of study at Richmond or
                                                      another accredited college or university.
                                                                                   FINANCIAL AFFAIRS • 15




                                   FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
Fees: 2006-07 Schedule                                                         Semester          Year
General Fee 12 - 19 semester hours for first- and
second-year students and transfer students                                       $18,275      $36,550
   Over 19, fewer than 12: per hour                                                1,820
General Fee 12 - 19 semester hours for all other undergraduate students           14,595       29,190
   Over 19, fewer than 12: per hour                                                1,460
Housing (per student)
   Single (add $100 per semester for private bath)                                $1,513       $3,026
   Double (add $50 per semester for private bath)                                  1,355        2,710
   Triple, Quad (add $50 per semester for private bath)                            1,342        2,684
   Lora Robins Court                                                               1,405        2,810
   University Forest Apartments                                                    1,528        3,056
   (Local telephone service and basic cable television provided in all residential housing)
Meal Plans
   Spider 240 (15 meals per week with 300 dining dollars per semester)                  $1,931        $3,862
   Spider 270 (17 meals per week with 150 dining dollars per semester)                   1,675         3,350
   Spider 300 (19 meals per week with 325 dining dollars per semester)                   2,040         4,080
   Spider Flex (952 dining dollars per semester in all Dining Operations)                   952        1,904
   Spider Blue (350 dining dollars per semester in all Dining Operations)                   350          700
Special Fees
   Applied Music - per course, nonmajors only, individual instruction                     $425
   ID card replacement: each occurrence                                                      15
   Graduation fee                                                                            30
   Campus vehicle permit (spring semester only: $45)                                                     $90
   Registration, change: per transaction                                                     10
   Registration, late (payable before matriculation)                                         60
   General Fee Payment, late fee will be assessed up to:                                     70
   Non-UR Study Abroad Fee                                                               1,500
Optional Fees
   Student Health Service-medical fee                                                       $85         $170
(Semester fees are based on a single-semester contract; year fees are based on a full-year contract.)
   • Textbooks cost approximately $500 per semester; laundry, supplies, transportation and sundries
       are extra costs.
   • Please consult the next chapter under the headings: Motorized Vehicles, Student Health Center,
       Residence Life, Food and Auxiliary Services, for further information.
   • Regardless of the academic school in which a course is taken, the student pays the tuition and fees
       of the school to which he or she has been admitted and which is considered the school of record.
       Any special fee associated with a particular course, such as a laboratory fee, is charged based on
       registration in the course.
   • The University reserves the right to increase the fees listed herein and the charges for room
       and board if conditions should make such changes necessary or advisable. The changes will be
       announced as far in advance as feasible.
   • The University is not liable for students’ personal property. Students or parents should verify that
       their homeowner’s insurance will cover their personal property on campus.
   • Fees and charges will increase for the 2007-2008 school year and will be announced as soon
       as possible.
16 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




PAYMENTS                                                   Deposits are treated as advance payments and
                                                        are nonrefundable. While a single remittance may
Inquiries concerning payments should be directed
                                                        cover both amounts, the distinction between the
to the Office of the Bursar, phone (804) 289-8147
                                                        two deposits remains quite clear. The General
or toll-free (866) 241-8893, or e-mail bursar@
                                                        Fee deposit signifies an intention to attend or to
richmond.edu.
                                                        continue to attend the University. The housing
   Fees are billed, and are payable in advance, by
                                                        deposit signifies an earnest request for on-campus
the semester. The fall semester payment is due
                                                        housing.
by the first Monday in August, and the spring
                                                           The University always credits the General
semester payment is due by the first Monday in
                                                        Fee deposit first. If only a single deposit amount
December. To avoid incurring a late-payment fee
                                                        is received by the stated deadline, regardless of
and delays in housing, registration and other areas,
                                                        any accompanying instructions, the deposit will
individuals are urged to pay fees when due.
                                                        be placed in the General Fee category and the
   Satisfactory financial arrangements for room
                                                        presumption made that no housing is requested.
and board must be made before occupancy.
   No credit is given for a term’s work nor a degree    Deferred Payments
conferred until all charges have been satisfactorily    In recognition of the substantial interest in deferred
settled. Failure to make satisfactory financial          payments, the University has arranged to make
arrangements can result in delay of graduation,         available the services of Academic Management
denial of registration privileges, removal from         Services. This firm represents one of several sound
classes and/or the withholding of transcripts.          alternatives for financing a student’s education.
   If the University deems it necessary to engage       Information is mailed to students in April.
the services of a collection agency or attorney            Many parents and students may prefer to
to collect or to settle any dispute in connection       arrange financing through their local banks or
with an unpaid balance on a student account, the        other sources; but if there is interest in this plan,
student will be liable for all collection agency and/   further information is available at (800) 635-0120,
or attorney’s fees, reasonable expenses and costs       by e-mail at info@amsweb.com, or by visiting
incurred. Accounts referred to a collection agency      www.amsweb.com.
are reported to a credit bureau.                           Students are urged to complete whatever
   Remittance may be made by check drawn to             arrangements they choose early, so that their
University of Richmond, and addressed to                accounts with the University may be settled in a
Bursar’s Office                                          timely manner.
Box R                                                   Late Payment Fee
University of Richmond, Virginia 23173                  A late payment fee will be assessed on any unpaid
   To pay tuition and fees by MC/VISA/AMEX              balance. Students who fail to make satisfactory
or DISCOVER, call PhoneCharge at (877) 237-             arrangements for their semester fees by the close
9734. There is a convenience fee to use this service    of the business on the first day of the term will be
that is explained in detail during the phone call.      charged a late payment fee of up to $70.
Deposits                                                Late Registration Fee
Upon acceptance for admission at the University         A late registration fee of $60 will be charged to any
of Richmond, a $300 General Fee deposit is              student who fails to complete registration for any
required, and a $300 housing deposit is required        semester by the close of business on the day before
if on-campus housing is requested.                      the first day of the term.
    Students planning to continue in the upcoming
school year are notified around January 15 to remit      Tuition Refund Plan
the appropriate deposits: a General Fee deposit of      A medical withdrawal insurance plan is available
$100, and if on-campus housing is requested, a          through A.W.G. Dewar Inc. Information is
housing deposit of $500. These deposits are payable     available at (617) 774-1555 or visit www.
by the mid-February date specified in the notice.        collegerefund.com.
                                                                                  FINANCIAL AFFAIRS • 17




REFUNDS
Inquiries concerning refunds should be directed to the Office of the Bursar, (804) 289-8147 or toll free
(866) 241-8893.

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND REFUND POLICY
Advance Deposits - Returning and Readmitted Students
       General Fee Deposit - Nonrefundable.
       Housing Deposit - Nonrefundable once a room has been selected or assigned.
Advance Deposits - First-Time Students
       If the accepted applicant fails to matriculate, no refund of advance deposits.
       If the accepted applicant matriculates and therefore becomes a student: General Fee deposit and
       housing deposits are refundable in accordance with the University Refund Policy.
General Fee, Room and Board Refund
       Inquiries concerning refunds should be directed to the Office of the Bursar, (804) 289-8147 or
       toll free (866) 241-8893.
   Students are matriculated by semester. If a student withdraws from classes or is dropped from the
University for whatever cause, a refund of fees for a fall or spring semester shall be made in accordance
with the University’s Refund Policy, based on the schedule below. This schedule is adapted for summer
terms.
   Students who withdraw from the University and who are receiving any financial assistance may be
required to return such assistance per Public Law 668.22 and institutional policy. The University of
Richmond complies with all federal regulations governing recipients of federal Title IV funds. Information
regarding financial aid refund policies is available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Any special fee associated with a particular course is nonrefundable after the first day of class.


                                                       Tuition, fees and        Board refund
                                                       room refund
   Withdrawal on or before the first day of class       100% less deposits       Prorated on a
   Withdrawal during the first week of classes          85%                      daily basis through
   Withdrawal during the second week of classes        70%                      the sixth week of classes.
   Withdrawal during the third week of classes         50%
   Withdrawal during the fourth week of classes        25%
   Withdrawal during the fifth week of classes          25%
   Withdrawal during the sixth week of classes         25%
   Withdrawal after the sixth week of classes          None
18 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




APPEALS PROCESS                                           The deadline for financial aid applications for
                                                      returning students is May 15.
The University of Richmond has an appeals
                                                          Students who are eligible for need-based aid
process for students and parents who believe
                                                      and are enrolled full time are offered a package
individual circumstances warrant exceptions from
                                                      of funding that typically consists of no more than
published policy. All appeals must be in writing
                                                      $4,000 in need-based loans or work-study, with
and directed to Annemarie Weitzel, Bursar, Box
                                                      remaining eligibility met with grant assistance.
R, University of Richmond, VA 23173 or bursar@
                                                      Part-time students may be considered for loans
richmond.edu.
                                                      and the Federal Pell Grant.
FINANCIAL AID                                             There are a number of merit-based scholarship
                                                      programs, some of which pay full tuition, room
The financial aid program at the University of         and board. Students are selected from the pool
Richmond provides need-based grants, loans and        of applicants for admission. Separate merit-based
service and work opportunities, and also awards       scholarship applications may be required. Call
merit scholarships. Applicants for financial aid       of the Office of Admission at (800) 700-1662
must be enrolled or accepted for enrollment in        or (804) 289-8640 or e-mail scholarsoffice@
a degree program at the University and, for most      richmond.edu with questions about merit-based
types of aid, must be working toward their first       scholarships.
bachelor’s or master’s degree. The need-based aid         The Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant is
programs are designed for those families who are      awarded to those students who are residents of
unable to pay the full cost of a college education.   Virginia. In 2005-06 grants were awarded in the
For domestic undergraduate students who apply         amount of $2,500. Applications are sent from the
for and qualify for need-based aid, we will provide   Office of Admission to students who are accepted
a financial aid package that meets 100 percent of      to the University.
a student’s demonstrated eligibility for need-based       Financial aid awards made for an academic year
aid. The merit-based scholarships are provided in     may be used for study abroad if the student enrolls
recognition and support of noteworthy academic        at one of the universities with which the University
achievement. These merit-based scholarships are       of Richmond has a direct exchange agreement.
generally awarded independent of any assessment       Financial aid for enrollment in nonexchange
of need, although it is possible to qualify for a     programs is limited to loans.
combination of need- and merit-based aid.                 To receive assistance from any of the need-based
    Applicants for need-based financial aid            financial aid programs at the University, or from the
must complete both the Free Application for           Direct Loan or Direct PLUS programs, students
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the University        must maintain satisfactory academic progress
of Richmond’s Financial Aid Supplemental              towards the completion of degree requirements.
Application. Prospective students (including          An evaluation of progress is made at the end of
transfers) should submit the completed FAFSA by       each academic year, including an analysis of earned
mid-February to ensure its receipt no later than      credit hours and grade point average. Students
the deadline date of February 25. Generally, to       not making satisfactory academic progress will be
be considered for need-based aid, an applicant        ineligible for further financial assistance until the
must be a U.S. citizen, must be enrolled or           deficit is made up. Waivers of these requirements
accepted for enrollment on at least a half-time       may be granted under special circumstances upon
basis in a degree or certificate program, and must     appeal to the Director of Financial Aid.
demonstrate financial need. Once aid is offered            The standards of academic progress outlined
it is generally renewed in subsequent years if the    here are solely for the purpose of evaluating
family’s financial situation stays the same. A new     eligibility to continue receiving need-based
financial aid application must be filed each year       financial aid. They do not replace or modify
and the student must meet certain standards of        academic standards required for continued
Satisfactory Academic Progress as outlined below.     enrollment at the University of Richmond.
                                                                                   FINANCIAL AFFAIRS • 19



   Undergraduate students must          meet    the    the student. Unearned funds, up to the amount
following minimum standards:                           of total institutional charges (tuition, room and
                                                       board) multiplied by the unearned percentage of
    at the end       credits      grade point          funds, are returned to the Title IV programs by the
    of semester      earned         average            University of Richmond. The student must return
          2             24           1.50              any portion of unearned funds not returned by the
          4             48           1.70              school. Only 50 percent of unearned grant funds
          6             72           1.85              must be returned. Title IV loan funds that must
          8             96           2.00              be returned by the student are repaid per the loan
         10            120           2.00              terms.
                                                           Unearned Title IV funds are returned to the Title
Return of Financial Aid                                IV programs in the following order: Unsubsidized
When A Student Withdraws                               Federal Stafford Loans, Subsidized Federal
A student who withdraws during a semester              Stafford Loans, Unsubsidized Direct Stafford
may be entitled to a refund of certain charges         Loans, Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans, Perkins
as outlined in the Refund Policy (see Financial        Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, Direct PLUS Loans,
Affairs section).                                      Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds
   Withdrawal also may affect a student’s financial     is required, Federal Supplemental Educational
aid eligibility for the semester as outlined in the    Opportunity Grants for which a return of funds
Federal Return of Title IV Program Funds Policy        is required, and LEAP funds for which a return of
and the Return of Non-Title IV Program Funds           funds is required.
Policy.                                                Return of Non-Title IV Program Funds Policy
Return of Title IV Program Funds Policy                Non-Title IV financial aid will be adjusted for a
The 1998 amendments to the Higher Education            withdrawing student based upon the University’s
Act (HEA) of 1965 and subsequent regulations           Refund Policy. Adjustments will be made through
issued by the Department of Education (43              the sixth week of classes. The amount to be
CFR 668.22) establish a policy for the return          returned to the non-Title IV financial aid program
of Title IV grant and loan funds for a student         is the same percentage that will be refunded to
who withdraws. Title IV grant and loan funds           the student for tuition and room charges. After
include the following programs: Federal Direct         the sixth week, the student is considered to have
Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental        earned all of the non-Title IV aid.
Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins            Non-Title IV financial aid funds are
Loan, Federal Work-Study, Federal Stafford Loans       returned in the following order: institutional
and Federal PLUS Loans.                                grants/scholarships, nonfederal loans, agency
   The amount of Title IV funds the student earns,     scholarships.
up to the withdrawal date, is based on a daily            Students who are receiving financial aid and
proration determined by dividing the total number      who are planning to withdraw from the University
of calendar days completed by the total number of      during a semester are strongly encouraged to
calendar days in the semester (excluding breaks of     meet with a financial aid adviser to review the
five or more consecutive days). This calculation        impact that their withdrawal will have on their
must only be done up to the 60 percent point in        institutional charges and on their financial aid for
time for the semester. After the 60 percent point in   the semester.
time, the student is considered to have earned all        For further information about the various
of the Title IV funds awarded for that semester.       financial aid programs, contact the Office of
   Unearned Title IV funds must be returned to         Financial Aid at (804) 289-8438 or e-mail finaid@
the Title IV programs. If the amount earned is         richmond.edu with questions about need-based
greater than the amount that has been disbursed,       aid, or check our Web site at http://oncampus.
the difference is treated as a late disbursement to    richmond.edu/financialaid.
20 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




                                          STUDENT LIFE
The University of Richmond, through the Office            internships, transitions from student to work life,
of Student Development, provides a variety of            and other relevant topics.
cocurricular and extracurricular programs and               The Career Development Center houses a career
student-support services. These are designed to          resource library that contains a variety of print and
enrich the quality of the collegiate experience by       multimedia materials. The Internet enhances the
creating an environment in which the student             CDC’s ability to communicate with and provide
can grow intellectually, emotionally, physically,        services to students. Using resources accessible
socially and spiritually. The ultimate purpose of        through the Center’s Web site, students can
this environment is to help each student fulfill his      access complete graduate and professional school
or her potential.                                        catalogs, full-time job vacancies, and more than
   The deans’ offices for Richmond College and            5,000 internship listings on the award-winning
Westhampton College, the University’s residential        Internship Exchange. eRecruiting software allows
colleges, are focal points in student life matters.      students to sign up for on-campus recruiting
For the University, the offices are centers for closely   events, search for job listings, and to upload their
knit smaller communities within the whole.               résumés for referrals to employers and internship
   On a more personal level, a student may find           sponsors. Students should visit the CDC Web site
the dean or staff member serving as a counselor,         (http://cdc.richmond.edu) to view all available
advisor, mentor or collaborator. If questions            resources and a calendar of upcoming events.
remain after reading the Student Life section of            The Center also sponsors a number of career
this catalog, a dean’s office usually can provide         events throughout the year, including Major
a more complete explanation or indicate where            Questions, Major Answers, the Richmond Career
more information may be found. In all cases,             Fair, the Non-Profit Career Fair, an Externship
the deans’ offices are contact points to provide          Program, The Alumni Networking Weekend, and
assistance. Each student is encouraged to make           Metrolink, an off-campus interviewing event held
full use of these excellent resources.                   in New York City and Washington, DC. The CDC
                                                         also serves as an advisor to the student program
STUDENT LIFE SERVICES                                    The Real World. In addition, more than 100
Career Development Center                                organizations visit campus each year to identify
The Career Development Center (CDC), located             candidates for full-time jobs and internships.
on the ground level of Richmond Hall, exists                Students are encouraged to visit the Career
to empower University of Richmond students               Development Center in their first year to meet
to identify and achieve their career goals. The          with a counselor to plan career development
Center provides comprehensive career services for        strategies. An online introduction to the CDC
students, based on the belief that career decision       is included in first-year students’ orientation
making is a lifelong process, integral to the            activities, and serves to introduce new students to
University’s educational objectives.                     the vast resources available in the Center.
   Staff members, who are assigned as liaisons           Counseling and Psychological Services
to academic departments, provide individualized          The University maintains an office for Counseling
career counseling and help students develop              and Psychological Services (CAPS) in addition to
systematic approaches to internship, job or              the academic advising and religious counseling
graduate school searches. Students have access to        services described herein. The office is staffed
online assessment instruments to assist them in          by counseling and clinical psychologists who are
career decision-making. Programs, which often            prepared to help students meet academic, personal
feature alumni and area employers, are presented         or emotional challenges while they are enrolled
throughout the year on job search strategies,            at the University. The services correspond to
connections between careers and majors,                  students’ needs and include short-term counseling
                                                                                       STUDENT LIFE • 21



and psychotherapy, assessment, crisis intervention,   Student Health Center
psycho-educational presentations, individual          The Student Health Center offers a comprehensive
consultations and referral services. A policy of      program in health education and health
confidentiality is maintained with all services        maintenance, as well as treatment for illness
and is guided by the standards of the American        and injury. The Health Center staff includes
Psychological Association and the licensing laws of   board-certified family practice physicians and
the Commonwealth of Virginia. CAPS is located         registered nurses. Services include acute care for
at 201 Richmond Hall and is open from mid-            illness and injury, general medical care, women’s
August to mid-June, Monday-Friday 8:30-noon           health, men’s health, travel abroad consultations,
and 1-5 p.m. Contact CAPS at (804) 289-8119,          allergy shots and immunizations. The telephone
caps@richmond.edu, or oncampus.richmond.              number is (804) 289-8064 and fax is (804) 287-
edu/caps for more information.                        6466. Students and parents are encouraged to
                                                      visit our Web site for general information and
Disability Accommodations
                                                      timely messages: http://oncampus.richmond.
The University seeks to comply with all applicable
                                                      edu/student_health. Our e-mail is healthcenter@
federal, state and local laws regarding the rights
                                                      richmond.edu.
of individuals with disabilities. To facilitate
                                                          Rather than walking in for an evaluation,
such compliance, the vice president for student
                                                      students are encouraged to call and speak with
development serves as the University’s disability
                                                      a registered nurse about their concerns through
coordinator. The University does not discriminate
                                                      our Dial-A-Nurse system (call 484-1555 for the
on the basis of disability in admission. Therefore,
                                                      Dial-A-Nurse). After evaluating the history and
applicants are not required to provide information
                                                      symptoms of the illness, the nurse will advise the
about their physical condition or disability status
                                                      most appropriate treatment. If indicated after
prior to admission. Individuals with disabilities
                                                      the Dial-A-Nurse evaluation, an appointment
are invited to contact the disability coordinator
                                                      will be made. Appointments are made only
regarding any accommodations they may require
                                                      after evaluation by the nurse except for annual
in visiting the campus or upon matriculation.
                                                      gynecological examinations, doctor-requested
The University provides reasonable adjustments
                                                      follow-up visits, allergy shots, immunizations and
or accommodations in its academic programs as
                                                      PPD tests.
necessary for equal opportunity and participation
                                                          Students living on campus are eligible for the
for qualified students with disabilities.
                                                      services provided by the Student Health Center, as
International Students and Study Abroad               the cost of these services is included in the housing
The Office of International Education, located         fee. Student Health Center privileges are available
Puryear Hall, serves all students: undergraduate      to off-campus students for a per-semester fee.
and graduate, in arts and sciences, business,         The cost of prescription drugs, some laboratory
leadership studies, continuing studies and law.       tests, hospital emergency room treatment,
It offers advising on study abroad opportunities      hospitalization, x-rays, and referral off campus
and procedures, and a wide variety of services for    for consultation with medical specialists are not
international students: orientation, visa, work,      covered by any student fees. These costs will be
health insurance and taxes, as well as cultural and   billed separately by the provider.
social activities.                                        The Student Health Center does not accept
                                                      insurance assignments. This means that we will
Multicultural Affairs
                                                      not bill a patient’s insurance company. Any charges
Working closely with the Office of Admission,
                                                      incurred at the time of visit will be billed through
the Office of Multicultural Affairs is the focus of
                                                      Student Accounts, or may also be paid by check,
the University’s effort to increase and maintain a
                                                      cash or Spider Card. The patient will be provided
diverse student population. To support this effort,
                                                      with a medical encounter form itemizing all
the office develops and implements programs
                                                      charges and containing all necessary information
of specific interest to students of diverse ethnic
                                                      to file for insurance reimbursement.
backgrounds, and assists them in becoming
acclimated to the University’s environment.
22 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



   Information regarding our hours of operation,      students are given information about the Honor
descriptions of services, details of allergy shot     System. Each student is required to pass a test to
procedure, billing and insurance questions,           demonstrate an adequate knowledge of the Honor
medical information, community facilities and         System. The University of Richmond Honor
medical referrals, and helpful links can be found     Councils’ policies and procedures are described
on our Web site.                                      in greater detail in the University’s Undergraduate
   All communications between student and             Student Handbook and online at http://www.
staff are strictly confidential and under no           student.richmond.edu/~urhc/.
circumstances will information be released from
                                                      Standards of Conduct
the Student Health Center without the patient’s
                                                      The University of Richmond considers cultivation
prior approval.
                                                      of self-discipline and resolution of issues through
   Virginia law mandates that each student
                                                      processes of reason to be of primary importance
submit an immunization record prior to
                                                      in the educational process and essential to the
enrollment. In compliance with this requirement,
                                                      development of responsible citizens. All members
the immunization record is included in the health
                                                      of the University community have a responsibility
history form provided to entering students and is
                                                      to comply with local, state and federal laws,
to be returned to the Student Health Center.
                                                      and with all published University policies
POLICIES                                              and regulations. In a community of learning,
                                                      individual or group conduct that is unlawful,
The University of Richmond is governed by policy      that disrupts or interferes with the educational
statements which guide individual members             processes, that causes destruction of property, or
in their actions toward each other and toward         otherwise infringes upon the rights of others or of
the larger community. These policy statements         the University itself, cannot be tolerated.
support the University’s educational mission while       The Trustees of the University of Richmond
seeking to assure that both individual and group      have authorized a Policy Statement on Standards
rights are appropriately observed and maintained.     of Conduct, Penalties and Disciplinary Procedures
University Academic Honor Code Statute                to guide the conduct of students and their guests.
The School of Arts and Sciences, the Jepson School    This statement sets forth those standards of
of Leadership Studies, and the Robins School of       conduct which the University of Richmond deems
Business each operate under the University Honor      essential for fulfilling its educational mission. Any
Code Statute. Breaches of the code are cheating,      person who violates the standards of conduct
plagiarism, lying, academic theft, disclosing honor   and regulations of the University of Richmond
council information, registration irregularity and    shall be subject to disciplinary action and, if
failure to report an Honor Code Statute violation.    need be, legal action. Disciplinary action may
Any person who violates these standards shall         range from reprimand/disciplinary warning up
be subject to disciplinary action ranging from        to and including dismissal or expulsion from the
reprimand up to and including expulsion from the      University. Sanctions will be imposed after proper
University. Determination of guilt or innocence       determination has been made in accordance
and imposition of sanctions, when necessary, will     with established disciplinary procedures of the
be effected according to established procedures,      University, with fair procedures observed and
with procedural fairness observed, and with           with appropriate appeal procedures available, as
appropriate appeal procedures available. The          outlined in the Policy Statement and any approved
University Honor Code Statute is available from       revisions thereof.
any dean’s office.                                        A copy of this policy statement and/or any
                                                      officially approved revisions thereof is readily
University of Richmond Honor Councils                 available in the residential college handbooks
The University of Richmond Honor Councils             for each student who matriculates. All members
provide information about the Honor System to         of the University community should familiarize
new students and instructs them as to its meaning     themselves with this policy statement and
and operation. During new student orientation,        revisions, and with any other official publications,
                                                                                              STUDENT LIFE • 23



handbooks, or announcements issued from time               All crimes that occur on the campus should be
to time by the University of Richmond or by                reported to the University Police in person or by
individual colleges and schools of the University.         calling 911, (804) 289-8911 or (804) 289-8715.
                                                           More information about the police department,
Right to Privacy
                                                           including crime statistics, can be found online at
Student academic and personnel records
                                                           http://oncampus.richmond.edu/administration/
are administered under the procedures and
                                                           police/.
requirements of the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-380), as                  Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security
amended. This act generally prohibits the                  Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act
unauthorized release of confidential information            The University of Richmond is committed to
about individual students; however, directory              assisting all members of the University community
information usually may be released. For more              in providing for their own safety and security. The
information, see Confidentiality at the end of this         annual security compliance document is available
section or contact the Office of the University             on the University of Richmond Web site at http://
Registrar, located in Sarah Brunet Memorial Hall.          www.richmond.edu/administration/police. If you
                                                           would like to receive a copy of the security report
Alcoholic Beverages and Other Drugs
                                                           which contains this information, you can stop
The legal age for the consumption and possession
                                                           by the University Police Department at Special
of beverage alcohol is 21 in the Commonwealth
                                                           Programs Building, #31 UR Drive, University of
of Virginia; the law governs all sites within
                                                           Richmond, VA 23173, or you can request that a
the Commonwealth and all persons including
                                                           copy be mailed to you by calling (804) 289-8722.
temporary visitors from other places. The Univer-
                                                              The Web site and booklet contain information
sity supports the laws of the Commonwealth, and
                                                           regarding campus security and personal safety
has policies to educate and regulate its campus
                                                           including topics such as: crime prevention,
constituencies regarding the consumption of
                                                           University police law enforcement authority,
alcohol. Similarly, there are statutes as well as
                                                           crime reporting polices, disciplinary procedures
University policies prohibiting the possession,
                                                           and other matters of importance related to security
distribution, sale or use of illegal drugs or narcotics,
                                                           on campus. They also contain information about
including marijuana and hallucinogens. Moreover,
                                                           crime statistics for the three previous calendar
each person is responsible for his or her destructive,
                                                           years concerning reported crimes that occurred
obstructive or otherwise inappropriate behavior
                                                           on campus, in certain off-campus buildings or
whether under the influence of any substance or
                                                           property owned or controlled by University of
not. Persons in violation of the law are subject to
                                                           Richmond and on public property within or
prosecution by law enforcement agencies as well as
                                                           immediately adjacent to and accessible from the
disciplinary proceedings by the University.
                                                           campus.
UNIVERSITY POLICE                                             This information is required by law and is
                                                           provided by the University of Richmond Police
The University of Richmond Police Department,              Department.
a nationally accredited police department,
is committed to providing a safe and secure                Parking Services
environment for our students, faculty, staff and           The parking and traffic regulations of the University
visitors. The University of Richmond Police                of Richmond are designed to best maintain an
Department provides 24-hour uniformed                      orderly flow of traffic on campus and to best utilize
response to calls for service, provides routine and        the existing parking facilities. To accomplish these
directed patrol activities, performs vehicular crash       goals it is necessary for all motor vehicles, including
investigation and performs the investigation of            motorcycles, golf carts and mopeds owned or
criminal offenses. Additionally, all police officers        operated by faculty, staff or students to be registered
are Red Cross First Responder/CPR certified.                with Parking Services on an annual basis. All
Uniformed security officers also assist with building       vehicles registered and operated on campus must
security and other calls for service as needed.            be properly licensed and inspected for mechanical
24 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



condition in accordance with the laws of the state      the services provided to students, in conjunction
in which the vehicle is registered for operation. All   with the room reservation procedures. Detailed
persons operating a vehicle on University grounds       information regarding residence life and housing
must possess a valid operator’s license. Rules and      is available in the college handbooks.
regulations and vehicle registration information
can be found at the Parking Services Web site           ACTIVITIES
at     http://richmond.edu/administration/police/       Because cocurricular activities are an important part
parking. Parking lots are lighted and patrolled by      of the campus experience, a broad range of events
the University Police Department.                       and opportunities to challenge student interests
                                                        is provided. The University has opportunities for
HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE                              leadership and community service as well as for
On-campus housing for undergraduate students            cultural, recreational, social and spiritual interests.
may be requested by contacting the Office of             These activities, combined with academic pursuits,
Undergraduate Student Housing. The University           contribute to the formation of the well-rounded
attempts to provide on-campus housing for full-         individual.
time students who wish to be accommodated. No
student is required to live on campus, and some         ARTS AND CULTURAL EVENTS
choose to reside off campus in private homes or         The Modlin Center for the Arts presents more than
apartments. The University does not provide             35 world-class performing arts events as part of
married student housing.                                the Modlin Great Performances Series, four main-
   Residence hall rooms generally house two             stage productions presented by the University
students, but there are rooms available which           Players and Dancers, and another 22 music
house one, three or four persons. Most residence        performances as part of the Department of Music’s
halls have lounges and laundry areas.                   annual free concert series. Located throughout the
   Room reservation procedures are made available       campus, University Museums presents more than
at appropriate times during the school year. In         20 exhibitions of national and international art
general, continuing students request rooms and          and artifacts as well as student work. In addition
roommates according to the procedures established       to arts events, the Jepson School of Leadership
by the Office of Undergraduate Student Housing.          Studies, the WILL program and many academic
Incoming students complete a questionnaire.             departments sponsor lecture series.
Using expressed lifestyle, mutual interests, and
other criteria, rooms and roommates are assigned.       CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BOARD
   General supervision of the residence halls is        Each week, the student-run Campus Activities
provided by professional staff who are assisted by      Board presents a diverse selection of events
specially trained upperclass students. University       planned for students. Such events include, but
policy is the framework under which all campus          are not limited to, bands, movies, comedians,
residences are governed.                                hypnotists and karaoke.
   Numerous educational and social programs are
planned for residents by the residence life staffs of   Organizations
the colleges, the Residence Hall Association and        There are over 200 recognized student
the President’s College Associates. These programs      organizations, groups and clubs. The list of
make the residence halls and apartments living          organizations each year reflects changes in student
and learning environments that promote a sense          interests. Academically oriented groups and
of community and personal growth.                       chapters of national honor societies comprise
                                                        about a quarter of the student organizations.
General Conditions                                      These organizations, such as Phi Beta Kappa for
The Unified Agreement sets forth the specific terms       students in the arts and sciences and Beta Gamma
and conditions applicable to residence hall rentals,    Sigma for business students, recognize exceptional
meal plans, telecom services and data services.         academic achievement. Other organizations
Each student approved for housing receives a            provide opportunities in academic disciplines for
copy of the Unified Agreement, which details             study, research or practice beyond the classroom.
                                                                                        STUDENT LIFE • 25



Each serves to unite students who have a common        Recreation and Wellness
academic interest.                                     The mission of Recreation and Wellness is to
   There are organizations which represent the         provide opportunities and experiences that
University in the community. These include the         foster personal development, enhance academic
student newspaper and literary magazine, theater       productivity, increase physical and psychological
productions, performing arts ensembles, the            health, and encourage social interaction through
student-operated radio station and numerous            involvement in health, wellness and recreational
volunteer organizations.                               activity.
   Religious and spiritual life, coordinated              Students, staff and faculty are eligible to use
through the Office of the Chaplaincy, offer a           the Recreation and Wellness facilities during
variety of opportunities for fellowship, study,        normal hours of operation. The new Weinstein
service, worship, practice and learning in small-      Center for Recreation and Wellness will provide
and large-group settings.                              a comprehensive facility that includes a two-level
   The Greek social system comprises                   fitness and wellness center, three-court gymnasium
approximately 40 percent of the full-time              with an elevated walking and jogging track, two
undergraduate men and 50 percent of the full-          multipurpose rooms, pool, game room, racquetball
time undergraduate women. There are eight              and squash courts, as well as locker room and sauna
organizations for men and eight for women; all         facilities. Participants will experience a full range
are nationally recognized. The men have their own      of cardio and strength equipment, in addition
lodges for social and recreational purposes while      to a wellness resource center and computer lab.
the women use existing campus facilities. However,     Outdoor playing fields and lighted basketball
Greek system members live among other students         courts are available for recreational use. Also
in the campus residence halls and eat in the central   available for recreational use when not scheduled
Heilman Dining Center. In addition to their            for intramurals, intercollegiate athletics or special
social activities, these organizations historically    events are 13 tennis courts, a 400-meter track and
have organized and supported a broad range of          cross country trails.
community service projects.                               Members may participate in a variety of classes
   Special interest organizations are yet another      and programs throughout the year. The Fitness
way for students to gather with others who have        and Wellness program offers group exercise, indoor
similar interests. In this context an individual       cycling and instructional programs throughout the
might want to learn or sharpen skills in, for          day. In addition, special screenings, assessments
example, skiing. If there is no club to meet the       and services are offered to address health and
common interest of several students, there are         wellness topics. Services often include massage
procedures to guide the formation of one.              therapy, personal training, cholesterol screenings,
                                                       blood pressure checks and fitness assessments. The
Intercollegiate Athletics
                                                       intramural sports program offers a wide range
The University of Richmond is a proud member
                                                       of major and minor sports at a variety of skill
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and
                                                       levels. More than 25 sport clubs provide student
the Atlantic 10 Conference. All of the University’s
                                                       leadership opportunities as well as competitive
intercollegiate athletics sports are NCAA Division
                                                       options for students who are not part of the varsity
I, including Division I-AA football. All teams
                                                       athletic program. The Natural High/Outdoor
participate in the Atlantic 10 Conference. The
                                                       Adventure program offers activities and trips
intercollegiate athletics program offers nine
                                                       throughout the year, often including whitewater
sports for men and 10 for women. The men’s
                                                       tubing and rafting, camping, skiing, rock climbing
teams include baseball, basketball, cross country,
                                                       and hiking.
football, golf, soccer, tennis and track (indoor and
                                                          For more information about Recreation and
outdoor). The women’s intercollegiate athletics
                                                       Wellness programs or the Weinstein Center, please
teams compete in basketball, cross country, field
                                                       visit      http://oncampus.richmond.edu/student/
hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis
                                                       affairs/recwell/index.html.
and track (indoor and outdoor).
26 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Student Government                                      the Spider Flex and off campus plan are available
To as great an extent as possible, the University       on the Dining Services Web site at http://dining.
places the governance of students in the hands of       richmond.edu/.
students. The residential colleges, and the schools
                                                        Meal Plan Selections and
of business and leadership studies each have their
                                                        Policy of Change Requests
own elected student government association which
                                                        Students are provided the opportunity to make
responds to the needs and interests of its specific
                                                        their meal plan selection via BannerWeb each
students. In addition, student representatives
                                                        fall and spring for the next semester. Deadlines
are chosen to sit and vote on certain faculty
                                                        by which this selection must be made are sent to
committees and committees of the Board of
                                                        students through Spiderbytes and are posted on
Trustees. Each college has its own honor council
                                                        the dining services Web site. Once the selection
and its own judicial council composed entirely of
                                                        is made, only one additional adjustment is
students.
                                                        permitted and must be made prior to the
DINING SERVICES                                         published deadlines. (Typically June 1 for the fall
                                                        semester and November 1 for the spring semester.)
University of Richmond Dining Services is a             To initiate a change, the student must personally
multi-operation department consisting of dining         contact the One-Card Office. After the deadline,
locations, snack shops and retail stores. The newly     a change can be made only with the approval of
renovated E. Bruce Heilman Dining Center is a           the associate director of dining services and will
state-of-the-art facility overlooking Westhampton       incur a $50.00 processing fee. A student may
Lake that serves approximately 3,000 students and       be permitted to move between the appropriate
guests daily. A retail market is located off the main   meal plans, but no refunds will be issued. Any
lobby and the University Club is located on the         decrease in charges will automatically be credited
lower level. The upper level of the facility houses     to a University One-Card account for the student’s
the Department of Food and Auxiliary Services           use on campus. Increased charges will be due at
and the campus Post Office.                              the time of the change or will be billed.
   The centrally located Tyler Haynes Commons
(THC) houses Tyler’s Grill, an eat-in or carry-out      Hours of Operation and Other Services
operation with a dining area that faces the scenic      You can find something to eat somewhere on
Westhampton Lake and gazebo. The campus                 campus whenever classes are in session, from 7:15
smoothie bar, Freshens and the Cellar, a late-night     a.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday,
gathering space, also are located in THC. For-late      Fridays from 7:15 a.m. until 1:00.a.m. and
night studying at Boatwright Library, gourmet           Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 a.m. until 1:00
coffee, hot drinks and snacks are available at Eight    a.m. Dining Services maintains an up-to-date
Fifteen at Boatwright. Sodas, snacks and grocery        schedule of menus and operational hours for all
items also are available at the Dean’s Den, located     campus locations on their Web page. Meal plans
in the Whitehurst building near the Richmond            follow the undergraduate academic calendar and
Dean’s office.                                           service and hours maybe limited during academic
                                                        breaks and holidays.
Meal Plans                                                 A wide variety of additional services,
All students living on campus, except those in          including nutrition counseling and meals-to-
University Forest Apartments, are required to           go, along with catering services are also available
participate in a meal plan. University Forest           through University Dining Services. Additional
residents can waive meal plan participation, choose     information is available upon request or can be
from any of the campus meal plans, or purchase          viewed at http://dining.richmond.edu.
a Spider Flex Plan of dining dollars designed
just for their convenience. An off-campus meal          Special Dietary Needs
plan also is available for commuting students           With a registered dietician as a member of the
or students residing in Honey Tree Apartments.          University Dining Services team, every effort
Details of the various meal plan options, including     is made to support special dietary needs that
                                                                                        STUDENT LIFE • 27



are medically based. Medical documentation is          IDENTIFICATION CARD/ONE-CARD
required and students with dietary restrictions or
                                                       Each degree or certificate-seeking student will be
special needs are asked to make an appointment
                                                       issued a picture identification card (One-Card)
to see our nutrition professional. Students will
                                                       upon request. This card verifies that the holder is
be required to sign an informational release so
                                                       eligible to receive University library and certain
that their situation can be discussed with their
                                                       other campus privileges. A campus ID is required
physician or medical professional as needed. In
                                                       for check cashing and access to athletic facilities
addition, dining services may require that students
                                                       and serves as your meal card if applicable. Neither
consult the University’s physicians regarding their
                                                       the card nor its privileges is transferable.
dietary requests.
                                                           All University students may sign up for the
   The University does not have designated
                                                       University’s Spider Account, a declining balance
facilities to accommodate religion-based dietary
                                                       program which allows students to access previously
needs on a daily basis. However, we do work
                                                       deposited funds via their University One-Card.
closely with the Campus Ministry to provide
                                                       The Spider Account allows students the ability to
Kosher for Passover selections and carryout meals
                                                       make purchases without carrying cash and can be
during Ramadan. Please contact the associate
                                                       used by all students at the bookstore, the Student
director of dining services if you have questions
                                                       Health Center, in campus laundry facilities, at
regarding available services.
                                                       most vending machines and at all campus dining
BOOKSTORE                                              locations. Students will be mailed information
                                                       each semester for One-Card sign up. Complete
The University Bookstore carries textbooks for         information on the One-Card is available at
all courses scheduled for a given term at the          http://oncampus.richmond.edu/student/life/one-
University. A comprehensive selection of reference     card/.
books and general reading materials also is
available. The store offers academically-priced        WRITTEN COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCES
software, computer and office supplies, greeting
                                                       Students who wish to lodge a complaint or grievance
cards, gifts, clothing and health and beauty aids.
                                                       pertaining to University policies, procedures
Services include UPS shipping, faxing and photo
                                                       or conditions may address their complaints in
developing. The bookstore’s Web site is www.
                                                       written form to the appropriate department head
urspidershop.com.
                                                       or official who oversees the area of concern. If in
STUDENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER                          doubt as to whom to direct the complaint, the
                                                       following officials may be contacted:
In an effort to better protect the privacy of
each member of the University of Richmond                 Academically related concerns:
community, the University uses randomly                   School of Arts and Sciences: Dean of Richmond
generated ID numbers of each student, employee,               College (Men) or Dean of Westhampton
faculty member and alumni.                                    College (Women)
   A student will be assigned a University                Robins School of Business: Dean of the Robins
of Richmond ID number as the primary                          School of Business
identification for University records when he/she          Jepson School of Leadership Studies : Dean of the
enters the University. This eight-digit number will           Jepson School of Leadership Studies
be printed on each student’s One-Card (unless             Housing Concerns:
the student requests it not be printed). This ID          Director, Office of Undergraduate Student
number also will be used in conjunction with a               Housing
confidential PIN for students to register for classes      Financial Policy Concerns:
and access their academic records through the             Vice President for Business and Finance
Web using the University of Richmond’s Student
Information System (BannerWeb). A social                  All other concerns:
security number will still be required to be on           Vice President for Student Development
file with the University to fulfill IRS and federal
reporting requirements.
28 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




            CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY RIGHTS/RIGHT TO KNOW
University of Richmond procedures and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) prohibit the
unauthorized release of confidential information about individual students. However, directory information is
not considered to be confidential and may be published or otherwise released. Directory information includes:
name; addresses, including permanent, campus, local (off-campus), e-mail and campus computer network
(IP) address; associated telephone numbers; date and place of birth; school or college; major and/or minor
fields of study; degree sought; expected date of completion of degree requirements and graduation; degrees
conferred; awards and honors (e.g., dean’s list); full- or part-time enrollment status; dates of attendance;
previous institutions attended; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height
of members of athletic team; and photograph. A full list of information considered directory information is
available on the Office of the University Registrar’s Web page at http://oncampus.richmond.edu/academics/
registrar/policy/ferpapolicy.html or by contacting the Office of the University Registrar. Students may opt to
have their directory information withheld. To exercise this option, the appropriate form must be obtained
from the Office of the University Registrar, completed and returned to that office. Once filed, this form
remains in effect until withdrawn by the student in writing to the Office of the University Registrar. For
further information, contact the Office of the University Registrar.
RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO EDUCATION RECORDS                                    on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords               committee, or assisting another school official in performing his
students certain rights with respect to their education records. These      or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest
rights include:                                                             if the official needs to review an education record in order to
1. Access to Education Records: students have the right to inspect          fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
   and review their education records within 45 days of the day the         Upon request, the University discloses records without consent
   University receives a written request for access. Students should        to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends
   submit their request to the Office of the University Registrar and        to enroll.
   specify the record(s) they wish to inspect. Arrangements will be      4. Right to File a Complaint: Students have the right to file a
   made for access and the student notified of the time and place            complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning
   where the records may be inspected.                                      alleged failures by the University of Richmond to comply with
2. Request for Amendment of Education Records: students have                the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office
   the right to request amendment of their education records if             that administers FERPA is:
   they believe the records are inaccurate. They should write the           Family Policy Compliance Office
   University Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record they       U.S. Department of Education
   want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the University        400 Maryland Avenue, SW
   decides not to amend the record as requested by the student,             Washington, DC 20202-4605
   the University will notify the student of the decision and advise        The University’s complete policy statement can be found on the
   the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request       University Registrar’s Web page at: http://oncampus.richmond.
   for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing                  edu/academics/registrar/policy/ferpapolicy.html.
   procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the           Note: Because of the access afforded by a University ID, this
   right to a hearing.                                                      number is not considered directory information and will not be
3. Disclosure of Education Records: students have the right to              released without a student’s consent except in situations as listed
   consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information             above. Students should treat the University ID as confidential--it
   contained in education records, except to the extent that FERPA          should be protected and not carelessly shared with others. It will
   authorizes disclosure without consent.                                   be used for a student’s entire time at the University of Richmond,
   One exception which permits disclosure without consent is                so it should always be treated in a confidential manner.
   disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interest.   RIGHT TO KNOW
   A school official is a person employed by the University in an         In accordance with the Student Right To Know and Campus
   administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support         Security Act, the University of Richmond makes graduation rates
   staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and          available to all current and incoming students. These figures can be
   health staff ); a person or company with whom the University          found on the University Registrar’s Web page at: http://oncampus.
   has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent);   richmond.edu/academics/registrar/policy/studentcon.html.
   a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving
                                                           ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND SUPPORT • 29




               ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND SUPPORT

ACADEMIC ADVISING                                      are available at the Speech Center to assist students
                                                       in the development of their oral presentations.
Every new student is assigned an academic advisor
                                                       Administrators, faculty and staff rely on the Speech
who is either a faculty or staff member. The
                                                       Center as well to prepare for workshops and to tape
advisor serves as a resource for the student in the
                                                       small group discussions for classroom purposes.
development of the student’s academic program
                                                       The student consultant staff assists client peers
and in other academic matters. The student is
                                                       with mock interviews, symposia presentations and
expected to meet with his or her academic advisor
                                                       conference panel practice sessions at the student’s
regularly to plan an academic program and review
                                                       request.
achievement.
                                                          Faculty and trained undergraduate students
   By the end of the second year, in conjunction
                                                       conduct consultations at the Speech Center
with the selection of a major, a different advisor
                                                       weekday afternoons and evenings and weekends by
will be assigned by the departmental chair or
                                                       appointment. To reserve a practice time, students
coordinator who is responsible for the student’s
                                                       may go to the appointment page on the Speech
chosen major subject area.
                                                       Center’s Web site at http://speech.richmond.edu.
   Consistent with the University’s belief that
                                                       Students can reserve the most convenient time
responsibility for one’s actions reside with the
                                                       with student colleagues with whom they may
individual, academic advisors are indeed resource
                                                       be acquainted. The Speech Center is located on
persons. The final decisions and responsibility for
                                                       the fourth floor of Weinstein Hall between the
one’s educational plan remain with the student.
                                                       departments of Rhetoric and Communication
For more information on academic advising, see
                                                       Studies and Journalism.
http://oncampus.richmond.edu/Student_Affairs/
wcollege/Academic_Advising/index.html.                 Writing Center
                                                       The Writing Center offers assistance to students
ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTERS                               writing papers and reports as well as to those
Academic Skills Center                                 making applications to graduate and professional
The Academic Skills Center, located in the             schools and preparing résumés. Beginning about
administrative wing in Boatwright Library,             the third week of each semester, the Writing Center
provides academic skills support to all University     is open on a regular basis and staffed with student
of Richmond students (i.e., undergraduate,             tutors. Students may make an appointment using
graduate, etc.). Operating from a holistic vantage     the Center’s online calendar. The Writing Center
point, the Center incorporates counseling              also offers typing instruction and special tutoring
and study skills techniques which address the          for international students. The Center is located
academic performance of students and their social      in the Boatwright Library’s Administrative Wing,
adjustment to the University environment. The          under the bell tower to the right of the library’s
Center offers free tutoring in a variety of subjects   main entrance. Many of the center’s materials and
to students through its Peer Academic Skills           other information can be found at http://writing.
Tutoring program. Both individual and group            richmond.edu.
tutoring options are available in one-hour sessions.
For information, call (804) 289-8626 or come by
                                                       RICHMOND RESEARCH INSTITUTE
the center to schedule an appointment.                 The Richmond Research Institute was founded
                                                       in 2004 to encourage and facilitate collaborative
Weinstein-Jecklin Speech Center                        research among faculty and students, and to
Practice and preparation can make the difference       help raise the research profile of the University
between a satisfactory speech and a memorable          of Richmond. The Institute has created a
one. Videotaping, review and peer consultation         comprehensive online database of faculty research
30 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



interests and accomplishments. The Web site                All WILL students complete a minor in Women,
features more than 600 books and book chapters          Gender and Sexuality Studies, which serves as the
authored by University of Richmond faculty              cornerstone of the WILL program and provides
members. Hundreds of faculty-authored research          a historical and theoretical framework for the
articles in scholarly journals also are listed on the   examination of gender roles, societal institutions
site. Another of the Institute’s ongoing projects       and the wide range of women’s struggles and
has been the collection and posting of student          achievements. The required WILL internship
research. The students’ research is the culmination     and accompanying seminar afford students the
of an independent study or project mentored by a        opportunity to put theory into practice for a
faculty member at the University. The site features     real-world understanding of classroom concepts.
streaming videos of students talking about their        WILL students combine their minor in Women,
research, abstracts, research papers and posters and    Gender and Sexuality Studies with a wide range
other research products. In addition to focusing        of majors, including business, leadership and the
attention on ongoing faculty and student research,      sciences.
the Institute – under the direction of the provost         As members of the WILL student organization,
– encourages new research through a variety of          WILL women gain valuable leadership experience
initiatives. For more information on the Institute      through student committees, an elected board
and the projects mentioned above, please visit the      and involvement in the community. Students
Richmond Research Institute Web site: http://           have organized successful statewide conferences,
research.richmond.edu.                                  awareness campaigns and social action projects
                                                        benefiting everyone from fellow students to local
WILL PROGRAM (WOMEN INVOLVED IN                         middle school students to hurricane survivors.
LIVING AND LEARNING)                                       Through lectures, performances and other
Established in 1980, Women Involved in Living           events, WILL students hear from prominent
and Learning (WILL) is a national, award-winning        women and men who are deeply involved in a
program that actively develops the intellectual         variety of gender-related issues. WILL students
and leadership skills of women undergraduates           also have the opportunity to interact with the
by enabling them to excel in their chosen fields         invited guests one-on-one. These events and
and realize their full potential. Through courses,      discussions bring coursework, women’s issues and
programs and a student-run organization, WILL           students’ own beliefs and aspirations into much
students explore the influence of women and              sharper focus. And, just as important, they provide
gender across disciplines, cultures and in their own    first-hand knowledge that one person can make a
lives. They also examine how gender intersects          difference in the lives of many.
with other forms of social identity, including race,       Information, including an application, is sent
class and sexuality. Young women leave WILL             to all incoming first-year and transfer women in
with their eyes wide open and ambitions high,           the summer. Applications are accepted during
equipped with the awareness, confidence and              the summer and in the fall of a student’s first year
experience to effectively guide their visions for a     at the University of Richmond. Subject to space
better world.                                           availability, second-year women also may apply.
                                                        For further information, visit WILL’s Web site at
                                                        oncampus.richmond.edu/will and the Women,
                                                        Gender and Sexuality Studies section of this
                                                        catalog.
                                                                           INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION • 31




                             INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
The academic program of the School of Arts and          the world. Students are able to participate in a
Sciences provides opportunities for the study of        variety of international organizations such as the
international subjects within academic fields,           Asian Students Association, Multicultural Student
which have long been associated with such issues,       Union, International Club, Model United
e.g., political science and modern languages and        Nations, Phi Beta Delta, Amnesty International,
literatures. In addition, as a result of focused        and Americans for Informed Democracy.
efforts to internationalize the whole curriculum,       Familiarization with other countries and cultures
there are also a large and growing number of            is enhanced on campus through contacts with a
courses in nearly all other departments, such as        significant and growing number of international
art, English, history, philosophy, religion and         students who are fully integrated into the life of
biology, which include international, often non-        the University.
Western components. Students interested in                 Cross-cultural education and dialogue at
the international field can major in one of the          Richmond take place in residence halls as well as
academic disciplines and in International Studies,      in classes. While the great majority of international
an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural program         students live in general residence halls, the Global
coordinated by Professor Vincent Wang. The              House is home to a community of U.S. and
curricula of the Robins School of Business and          international students. Programs planned and
the Jepson School of Leadership Studies include         executed by students living in the Global House
a number of courses that are international in           are open to the entire University community.
scope. The Robins School of Business offers a              The rapidly growing international student
concentration in international business.                population has recently included representatives
    The University of Richmond places great             from Albania, Argentina, Australia, Austria,
emphasis on internationalizing the education            Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil,
and campus life of all students. To that end,           Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, China, Costa Rica,
the Office of International Education (OIE)              Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt/Greece,
manages and initiates study abroad programs;            Eritrea, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Ghana,
provides international student and scholar              Guatemala, Hong Kong, Iceland, India, Israel,
services; organizes activities and events such as       Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan,
International Week, lectures, concerts, fairs and an    Korea, Lebanon, Lesotho, Lithuania, Mexico,
annual international film series, as well as a faculty   Moldova, Morocco, Netherlands, Netherlands
seminar abroad; and maintains an International          Antilles, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Peru,
Resource Center with travel, work and volunteer         Poland, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia,
information. The office also offers advising and         South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan,
administration of grants and scholarships such          Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, the
as Fulbright. The office, which serves all schools       United Kingdom, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Zambia
of the University, is located on the first floor of       and Zimbabwe.
Puryear Hall.
                                                        Study Abroad
Campus Activities                                       The University of Richmond has linkages with
The University of Richmond provides a wide              70 distinguished universities and study abroad
range of on-campus activities and events in             programs around the world. These study abroad
support of international education. Courses,            opportunities enhance Richmond’s curriculum
lectures and seminars are offered by resident and       by offering students a wide variety of courses and
visiting international scholars, writers and artists.   experiences. Students can go abroad for a semester,
The annual International Film Series, exhibits          year or summer and earn major, minor and elective
and concerts bring to campus arts from around           credits toward graduation. Short programs abroad
32 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



related to specific courses are offered in break         academic and personal interests. Students are
periods during the academic year.                       encouraged to begin exploring the opportunities
    At the University of Richmond, we believe that      for foreign study as early as the first year and
study abroad is most effective when students are        to plan their University of Richmond courses
integrated into the local educational system and        accordingly.
culture. Therefore, most Richmond semester                 When deciding when and for how long to study
programs involve direct enrollment in universities      abroad, a variety of alternatives can be considered.
abroad, with on-site support provided by the host       Richmond students have opportunities to study
university’s international office.                       abroad for a year, a semester or a summer, in the
    Professional staff offer guidance, advising         second, third or even the fourth year. Combining
and support throughout the entire study abroad          summer study after the first year with semester or
process. The office organizes extensive orientation      year study abroad during the third year is among
programs to help prepare students prior to              the best choices.
departure. Upon return from study abroad,                  There are a number of study abroad options.
the OIE organizes activities to help reintegrate        During the academic year there are opportunities
students into the University community and to           to study through the University’s exchanges
identify opportunities for continuing international     and affiliate programs in 30 countries. For
education on campus and in the community.               a current list of programs, see the Office of
    Direct experience of cultures is the best way to    International Education’s study abroad Web site
learn to communicate across barriers of language,       at     http://oncampus.richmond.edu/academics/
customs, politics and geography. An encounter           international/Studyabroad/index.html.
with different values and educational systems, when        During the summer, the University of
supported by good will and serious study, broadens      Richmond sponsors a number of study abroad
students’ understanding of the complexities of          programs directed by Richmond faculty.
our rapidly changing world. Students who study          Programs are offered regularly in Argentina,
abroad find their experiences, both in and out of        China, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Ireland,
the classroom, to be stimulating and rewarding.         Japan, Russia, Spain and the UK. Internships are
They return with a better understanding not only        available in Australia, Ecuador, Germany, Ireland,
of other cultures, but also of their own.               Senegal, Spain and the UK. New programs are
    While study abroad has long been recognized as      always being created. For more information
a significant component of a liberal arts education,     see http://oncampus.richmond.edu/academics/
today students majoring in the sciences, leadership     international/.
studies and in business are actively participating         Students should be aware of the University of
in study abroad in growing numbers. Study               Richmond’s policy on study abroad. The University
abroad is possible and encouraged for all students,     of Richmond invests considerable resources to
regardless of their major and financial situation.       create study abroad programs consistent with
Students who follow required procedures may             the standards and educational objectives of this
transfer up to 16 credits per semester from study       University and the needs of its students. Richmond
abroad and graduate with their class in four years.     students will be expected to enroll in Richmond
It is a common misconception that proficiency in         programs, unless there is a compelling reason why
a foreign language is necessary for study abroad.       a UR program does not meet a student’s academic
It is, in fact, quite feasible to study in English in   needs. Decisions regarding petitions for non-UR
non-English speaking countries where English is         semesters abroad are made by a subcommittee
widely used and courses in English are offered.         of the International Education Committee, in
It also is possible to combine intensive study of       collaboration with the OIE and the departments
a foreign language with other courses taught in         from which the student is seeking academic credit.
English.                                                Transfer credits for study abroad will be awarded
    Early planning is crucial to any successful study   only for preapproved programs.
abroad experience. The selection of an appropriate         After an appropriate study abroad program
program must take into account the student’s            has been selected, each student is expected to
                                                                               ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 33



follow procedures administered by the Office of          International Student Advising
International Education. Maintenance of status          The Office of International Education is the
as a current student and credit transfer for study      primary “port of call” for international students,
abroad can be assured only if the program and           scholars and visitors before and during their stay
courses have been approved and an equivalent grade      at the University. Issues related to visas, health
of C or better is earned. Please see the Academic       insurance, taxes and housing, as well as academic
Procedures section for additional administrative        and cultural concerns, are addressed by the staff
information. For specific information on financial        in consultation with relevant departments and
aid for study abroad, consult the Office of              other administrative units of the University. In
Financial Aid. Most financial aid is transferable        order to help international students and scholars
to University of Richmond academic semester             with integration to the University and the United
and year programs only. Students attending UR           States, the office organizes orientation sessions as
semester abroad programs also will receive a travel     well as cultural and social activities throughout the
allowance for most programs. See the Web site for       year.
more information.


                               ACADEMIC PROCEDURES

The University of Richmond has, for each academic       following are guidelines for the most common
program, procedures and degree requirements that        examinations warranting credit. Specific details
must be satisfied before the degree can be granted.      regarding each of these options and advanced
The student is responsible for knowing the specific      standing examinations from French, German,
requirements and planning appropriately to allow        Italian, Icelandic and English-based educational
for the completion of these requirements. The           systems can be found in the Credit-by-Exam
University provides, depending on the program,          policy. This policy is available from the Office
either or both academic advisors and administrative     of the University Registrar and the Office of
personnel to assist students with their plans. In       Admission. Both offices will further serve students
any case, the final responsibility for following         with international exams on a case-by-case basis.
procedures and meeting degree requirements rests        A. Advanced Placement
solely with the student.                                The University of Richmond participates in the
   The following sections describe academic             Advanced Placement program of the College
policies, regulations and procedures. If no             Board. Successful candidates for admission who
indication of school is given, that section pertains    have taken Advanced Placement examinations
universally to the School of Arts and Sciences, the     and have the official results submitted may be
Robins School of Business, and the Jepson School        eligible for credit or an exemption. Students who
of Leadership Studies. When a statement pertains        have received appropriate scores on Advanced
to a particular school or schools, it is listed under   Placement examinations (as established by the
the appropriate school heading.                         departments concerned) may receive credit for
                                                        or may be exempt from a general education
ADVANCED STANDING                                       requirement if the Richmond equivalent courses
I. Credit By Examination                                for which they will receive credit can be used
The University of Richmond accepts several              by Richmond students to meet fields-of-study
credit-by-examination options. A first-year student      requirements. Specific allocations of AP credit
entering the University may apply a maximum of          for communication skills or fields-of-study
30 semester hours of transfer credit from work          requirements may vary from year to year. Current
taken prior to initial enrollment, including credit     information is available from the Office of the
by exam, to a University of Richmond degree. The        University Registrar.
34 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



B. CLEP                                                Credit for U.S. Armed Services Veterans
The University of Richmond awards credit on a          In accordance with the recommendations of the
limited basis for an acceptable performance on         American Council on Education, the following
a College Level Examination Program (CLEP)             advanced credit will be allowed veterans:
examination recognized by the University                  1. A veteran may receive credit for specialized
academic department concerned. Generally a                   training courses and for correspondence
student may not attempt credit by examination                courses taken from accredited colleges
for a course in which a failing grade was received,          under the auspices of the U.S. Armed
or for a basic course in an area in which acceptable         Forces Institute. A veteran desiring such
college credit has been earned at a more advanced            credit should present the record of training
level. Students who have received appropriate                to the University Registrar either on the
scores on CLEP examinations (as established by               transcript form of the college at which the
the departments concerned) may receive course                work was taken, or on the form prepared
credit that satisfies fields-of-study requirements             for such purposes by the U.S. Armed
of the General Education Requirements, if the                Forces Institute. In cases of question,
Richmond courses for which they will receive                 the appropriate Academic Council will
credit can be used by Richmond students to meet              determine the amount of credit to be
fields-of-study requirements. Specific allocations             granted.
of CLEP credit for communication skills or fields-         2. In allowing further advanced credit for
of-study requirements may vary from year to year.            educational experience in the armed
Current information is available from the Office              services, the University is guided largely by
of the University Registrar.                                 recommendations of the American Council
   Arrangements to take CLEP examinations may                on Education.
be made with the College Board. Information on
current University policies relating to CLEP may be    Transfer Credit
obtained from the Office of the University Registrar.   Credit in transfer may be accepted only for
                                                       courses which are comparable to courses offered
C. Credit By Local Examination                         in the School of Arts and Sciences, Jepson School
Credit by local examination may be used to satisfy     of Leadership Studies, and/or Robins School
general education requirements in the areas of         of Business curriculum at the University of
communication skills and fields of study, as well       Richmond. Moreover, the coursework must have
as to satisfy major requirements or use as elective    been taken at an institution accredited by a regional
credit. Information on courses for which credit        accrediting agency or the international equivalent
by local examination may be earned is available        at the time the work was taken, and a grade or
in the Office of the University Registrar. Students     equivalent of C (2.0) or better must have been
should check with departments for examination          earned. The semester credit hours or equivalent
dates, fees and related regulations.                   as earned at the other institution will transfer.
D. International Baccalaureate                         Coursework accepted in transfer shall be applied
The University of Richmond considers only Higher       to specific degree requirements subject to the
Level exams in the International Baccalaureate         discretion of the academic department concerned.
(IB) program eligible for credit. The University       Hours awarded are added into hours required for
may award credit or give an exemption for certain      graduation, but grades are not calculated in the
general education requirements if the requisite        grade point average.
score is achieved and the test has been recognized        A first-year student entering the University of
by the academic department concerned. Specific          Richmond can bring in no more than 30 semester
allocations of IB credit for communication skills      hours of credit, including credit by examination
or fields-of-study requirements may vary from           and transfer credit.
year to year. Detailed information on current             No transfer credit shall be formally accepted
IB policies is available from the Office of the         or recorded until the University has received an
University Registrar.                                  official transcript directly from the records office
                                                                                 ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 35



of the institution which offered the coursework. If          No student may enroll for more than 19
coursework is being transferred from more than one        hours nor fewer than 12 hours of work without
institution, an official transcript must be received       the permission of the dean of his or her school.
from each institution. Note: For applicability of         (Arts and Sciences – see residential college dean;
transfer work to general education requirements,          Business and Leadership Studies – see academic
see General Education Curriculum.                         dean.) Enrollments in either category are subject
   Transcripts and documents from other                   to special charges as specified in the chapter titled
institutions are the property of the University of        Financial Affairs. Students enrolled for fewer than
Richmond and, as such, are under the control              12 hours are classified as part time. In addition, a
of the Registrar’s Office. Under federal policy,           student who wishes to register for 17.5-19 hours
a student has the right to view the documents             must have the permission of his or her advisor.
in his or her file; the University is not required
                                                          Change of Registration
to provide (or allow the making of ) copies of
                                                          Students are able to register for classes through
these documents. Transcripts submitted to the
                                                          BannerWeb, a secured Web site that may be
University of Richmond for admission or credit
                                                          accessed over the Internet at https://bannerweb.
transfer become the property of the University of
                                                          richmond.edu/ or through the University’s Web
Richmond and cannot be returned to the student
                                                          site. Through BannerWeb, students can register
or forwarded to other institutions.
                                                          for classes, add and drop classes through the end of
REGISTRATION POLICIES                                     add/drop period, view their class schedules, view
                                                          grades for a specific term and view their unofficial
Registration is limited to admitted, degree-seeking       University of Richmond transcript. Students are
students unless specific approval is granted for           responsible for all activity on their BannerWeb
unclassified status.                                       account including PIN maintenance, registration
Registration                                              and security. If a student has questions or needs
Students shall register by following the policies.        assistance with any aspect of BannerWeb, he or
   Note: A student is not fully registered for any        she should contact the Office of the University
term until satisfactory arrangements have been            Registrar at (804) 289-8639 or registrar@
made for that term’s fees.                                richmond.edu.
   Late registrations may be accepted subject to              Once registered, students may change their
the policies for adding classes, as indicated in the      registration (add/drop) according to the published
section below titled Change of Registration. A            schedule. For a regular term, generally adds and
special fee is required.                                  withdrawals without academic record may be
                                                          made during the first two weeks of classes (a
Enrollment                                                change fee of $10 is charged for each change made
Students are not technically enrolled until the           after the first week of classes). After the end of the
first day of class of a semester. Verification of           first 10 days of classes, but before the end of the
enrollment cannot be made until that time.                seventh week, a withdrawal-with-record period
Prerequisites                                             is in effect where students may withdraw from
Students should consult the catalog and/or depart-        courses provided that they receive the permission
ment for required prerequisites before registering        of the appropriate course instructor and academic
for a course. Successful registration for a course does   advisor. Students will be required to pay the fee
not mean that prerequisites have been fulfilled. A         for change in class and will receive an M if failing
student registered in a course without the required       at the time of withdrawal, or a W if passing at the
prerequisites may be disenrolled from the course.         time of withdrawal. Ordinarily, a student may not
                                                          withdraw from a course after the end of the seventh
Limits of Work                                            week of classes except for medical reasons. The
A student normally enrolls for 15 or 16 semester          student’s dean may, under special circumstances,
hours of work a week. The minimum load for a              make an exception to this policy.
full-time student is 12 semester hours.
36 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Auditing Courses                                           To opt for Pass/Fail grading, a permission
Auditing a course means the course instruction is       form must be obtained from and returned
undertaken, but not for credits and grade. With         with appropriate signatures to the Office of the
the approval of the student’s academic advisor,         University Registrar by the end of the 10th day
dean and the instructor of the course, a student        of classes. The student must first register for the
may declare a course to be taken on an audit basis.     course and then file the permission form. Once
A permission form must be obtained from and             the form is submitted to the University Registrar,
returned with appropriate signatures to the Office       the decision may not be reversed.
of the University Registrar by the end of the 10th
                                                        Repeated Courses
day of classes. The student must first register for
                                                        Coursework may not be repeated for credit toward
the course and then file the permission form. The
                                                        graduation except as sanctioned by the University;
regular rate of tuition is charged, and the audit
                                                        however, particular coursework may meet more
course is counted as a part of the student’s semester
                                                        than one requirement for graduation. An example
load. Once the form is submitted to the University
                                                        of a sanctioned repeat-for-credit is the subsequent
Registrar, the decision may not be reversed. An
                                                        registration for a course in which the content
audited course cannot subsequently be taken for
                                                        changes from term to term such as Special Topics
credit unless approved by the appropriate dean.
                                                        or Independent Studies. Also, certain courses
Pass/Fail Option                                        in a major or program may have to be repeated
School of Arts and Sciences                             if the grade earned the first time does not meet
Jepson School of Leadership Studies                     requirements; in such a case, the credit hours will
(excluding Leadership Studies courses)                  be counted only once but both grades will be
(Not available to business students)                    calculated in the cumulative grade point average.
                                                            Courses taken on an audit basis cannot
An Arts and Sciences or Leadership Studies              be repeated for credit unless approved by the
student who has completed at least 61 semester          appropriate dean.
hours of academic work may opt for one normally             Except in clear situations, the Office of the
standard-graded course per semester to be graded        University Registrar should be consulted before
on a Pass/Fail basis. The course may only be used       registration to learn if a proposed repeat is
to count as total hours of credit toward a degree,      sanctioned for credit or if sanction is possible.
and cannot be used to satisfy any general education         All courses taken at the University of Richmond
requirement or any major or minor requirement.          become a part of the permanent academic record.
No Jepson School of Leadership Studies or Robins        The grade for a course repeated at the University
School of Business courses may be taken for Pass/       of Richmond becomes a part of the grade point
Fail grading except those in the Department of          average if the grade otherwise would be included
Economics. No more than four student-opted              in the computation.
Pass/Fail courses are acceptable for degree credit.
    Note: Some courses are only available as pass/      COURSE ADMINISTRATION
fail courses, such as internships, student teaching,
and some research courses. The restrictions stated      Class Attendance
above do not apply to such courses.                     Students are expected to attend all meetings of all
    The level of performance necessary to earn a        classes (including lectures, seminars, laboratories
Pass in a student-opted Pass/Fail course is D- or       and drills) in which they are enrolled. The specific
better. A Pass grade will be recorded as P on the       attendance policy in each course, however, is
permanent record. The hours will be added into          determined by the instructor of the course, subject
hours earned toward graduation and will not             to the section on University Holidays below. At the
affect the grade point average. A Fail grade will be    start of each semester, the instructor is responsible
recorded as F on the permanent record. The hours        for describing the class attendance policy in the
will be added into GPA hours and will affect the        syllabus and distributing it to students.
grade point average.
                                                                                   ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 37



    Academic events sponsored by the University              and student body. However, the University is
(i.e. under supervision of faculty advisors) include,        very sensitive to the special needs of those who
but are not limited to: theatre/dance and musical            need to observe such holidays and will make
performances, debate, mock trial, model UN,                  accommodations for them to make up the time
conference attendance, ROTC field leadership                  missed if arrangements are made in advance.
exercise, and Oldham scholar travel. Because                     The University is officially closed on New
such events and varsity athletic competitions are            Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas.
recognized as integral to the educational experience,        In addition, some schools are closed for classes
the appropriate residential college dean or program          on Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day
coordinator will provide official notification of              while others hold classes on those days. (See the
student participation in these activities. It is also the    appropriate academic calendar for specifics.)
student’s responsibility to request such notification             Other holidays affecting University community
and to deliver it to the faculty member as early as          members include Martin Luther King Day,
possible in the semester. Faculty members (except            Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, the first two days
for Jepson School of Leadership Studies’ courses, see note   of Passover, Good Friday and Easter Sunday.
following) will honor notification from the college           In consideration of their significance for our
deans or program coordinator that a student is to be         students, students who observe these holidays will
excused for participation in a University-sponsored          be given an opportunity to make up missed work
event. (Note: Jepson School of Leadership Studies            in both laboratories and lecture courses. If a test
faculty will have independent discretion for excusing        or examination is given on the first class day after
class absences for any reason including university-          one of these holidays, it must not cover material
sponsored events recommended by the college deans            introduced in class on that holiday. Faculty and
or program coordinator.) All other absences will not         staff should be aware that Jewish and Islamic
be officially announced by a dean or coordinator,             holidays begin at sunset on the evening before the
but may be excused at the discretion of faculty.             published date of the holiday.
Examples include, but are not limited to, class                  The University recognizes that there are other
field trips, illness, funerals and family functions.          holidays, both religious and secular, which are
The University policy regarding absences related             of importance to some individuals and groups
to University or religious policies is stated below.         on campus. Such occasions include, but are not
The University encourages students to weigh the              limited to, Sukkoth, the last two days of Passover,
consequences of missing class and other sponsored            Shavuot, Shemini Atzerat and Simchat Torah, as
academic or varsity athletic events, and to make             well as the Islamic New Year, Ra’s al-sana and the
their choices accordingly.                                   Islamic holidays Eid-al-Fitr and Eid-al-Adha.
    Misrepresenting the reason for class absences to             Students who wish to observe any such
a professor is a violation of the University’s Honor         holidays must inform their instructors within the
Code.                                                        first two weeks of each semester of their intent
    A student generally will be held responsible for         to observe the holiday even when the exact date
all work of a class or laboratory missed during any          of the holiday will not be known until later, so
absence.                                                     that alternative arrangements convenient to both
    Note: Students enrolled in School of Business            the student and instructor can be made at the
or School of Continuing Studies courses must                 earliest opportunity. Students who make such
attend at least 75 percent of the class meetings—            arrangements will not be required to attend
regardless of the reasons for absence—to be eligible         classes or take examinations on the designated
to receive credit for the course.                            days, and faculty must provide reasonable
                                                             opportunities for such students to make up missed
University Holidays
                                                             work and examinations. To facilitate this, faculty
With the increasing diversity of the University
                                                             will announce and distribute all anticipated test
community and the limited flexibility in setting
                                                             and examination dates on the course syllabus,
the academic calendar, it is not possible to avoid
                                                             distributed at the beginning of each semester.
some religious and secular holidays that are very
                                                             Students should be aware that faculty may need
important to some members of our faculty, staff
                                                             to adjust these dates as necessary.
38 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Examinations                                              the work has been passed. The foregoing grades
Most classes have examinations at the close of each       may be accompanied by a plus (+) or minus (-)
term, according to a published schedule.                  to indicate a relative position within the grade
   Each student is responsible for taking final            category. P shows credit has been earned in a Pass/
examinations as scheduled. No rescheduling,               Fail course, and Z shows that a course was audited.
excuse for absence and/or provision for making up         S and U indicate satisfactory or unsatisfactory
final examinations will occur without the written          performance in nonacademic courses. W indicates
approval of the student’s dean. Such approval shall       that the student withdrew from a course with a
be made only for illness certified by a physician,         passing average. Marks indicating failure and
participation in authorized University activities         included as such in the grade point average are F,
and/or personal emergencies such as death in the          M (withdrew from a course with a failing average),
family.                                                   and V (failure because of excessive absences). The
   Appeals of the rulings associated with the             X indicates that the grade is not available from the
administration of these regulations shall be              instructor.
directed to the student’s dean and, if necessary,            I and Y mean that coursework has not been
through that dean to the academic council of the          completed by the end of the term. The I, which
faculty concerned.                                        provisionally counts as a failing grade, is given
                                                          when the reasons for incomplete work are deemed
Evaluation                                                unjustifiable by the instructor. The work is to be
Instructors establish grading criteria for their          made up by the date the instructor specifies, but
courses and prepare and submit the final course            no later than 45 calendar days from the last class
reports (using the grades defined under Grading            day of the term in which the I was given. If the
Policies) to the University Registrar for recording.      work is not made up during the grace period, the
In the event of a question about the accuracy             I will be converted to F. The Y, which does not
of the recorded grade, a student should direct            count as a failing grade, is given when the reasons
inquiries to the instructor and/or the Office of the       for incomplete work are deemed justifiable by the
University Registrar.                                     instructor, or at the end of the first term of a course
   It is recognized that each class and each student      that continues into a succeeding term. There is no
in a class has unique characteristics that the            deadline for completion of the work unless the
instructor alone is in the best position to evaluate;     instructor so specifies. In the case of an I or Y, once
consequently, except in unusual circumstances,            the make-up grade is received, it appears to the
formal appeals to others concerning the evaluation        right of the incomplete grade on the permanent
on which a grade is based are not appropriate.            record. In all cases, it is the student’s responsibility
   If unusual circumstances appear to have existed        to make arrangements for and progress to the
that could have affected the evaluation, the student      completion of an incomplete course.
should first bring the matter to the attention of the
instructor (if available). If that informal inquiry is    Grade Availability
impossible, or if its results are disputed, the student   Grades are due to the Registrar’s Office from
may next bring the matter to the attention of the         instructors as specified in the academic calendar
department chair and the instructor, jointly. In          published annually by the Office of the University
the event of continued dispute, the student may           Registrar. They will be available to students as soon
formally petition the dean of the student’s school        as possible after they have been received by the
who, in consultation with department faculty,             Registrar’s Office. Students may access grades via
may present the matter to the academic council            the Internet by using BannerWeb. Students will
for a decision.                                           need their student ID number and student PIN.
                                                          Grades are deemed correct unless notification to
Grading Policies                                          the contrary is received by the University Registrar
The level of student’s performance in classwork and       within three (3) months after the close of the term
examinations is indicated by letters. A (excellent),      specified.
B (good), C (average), and D (poor) indicate that
                                                                            ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 39



Credit and Grade Point Average                       credit hours or equivalent as awarded at the
The University of Richmond uses the semester         other institution will be the hours transferred.
hour value. A semester hour is determined by a       Hours awarded are added into hours earned for
combination of factors that include contact time     graduation, but grades are not calculated in the
with a faculty member in a formal setting and        grade point average. (Individuals admitted as
expectations of independent student work through     transfer students, please see the Advanced Standing
a nominal 15-week semester.                          section.)
   The grade point average is based on two           Study in the United States
factors:                                             The student is to obtain the approval of each
   GPA Hours - The accumulation of academic          department chair concerned before taking work
semester hours that have grades to which grade       elsewhere. The approvals ensure that the work
point values are assigned; and                       is acceptable to the University, its departmental
   Grade Points - Given for each semester hour’s     standards and the student’s curriculum. The Office
grade according to this scale:                       of the University Registrar provides a special form
A+ 4.0 B+ 3.3               C+ 2.3       D+ 1.3      for this purpose and also will answer questions
A 4.0 B 3.0                 C 2.0        D 1.0       about the procedure.
A- 3.7 B- 2.7               C- 1.7       D- 0.7
                                                     School of Arts and Sciences
F 0.0 I            0.0      M 0.0        V 0.0
                                                     Jepson School of Leadership Studies
   Calculation - The grade point average is
                                                     While students are expected to get approval before
calculated by dividing the total number of grade
                                                     taking work elsewhere, work taken without prior
points earned by the total number of GPA hours.
                                                     approval may be accepted subject to transfer credit
The grade point average is represented to two
                                                     policies.
significant decimal figures.
   The accumulations and average are shown each      Robins School of Business
term on the permanent academic record and on         The Robins School of Business will approve for
the transcript. Also shown on these reports is the   transfer credit those courses that meet the following
accumulation of Earned Semester Hours. Earned        criteria: The course is completed at an institution
hours are the academic semester hours in which the   accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate
student has earned passing grades, plus semester     Schools of Business (AACSB); the student receives
hours credit, if any, for accepted transfer work.    a final course grade of at least C as verified by an
                                                     official transcript; the approval of the appropriate
Academic Reports                                     department chair and dean is obtained. Approvals
Reports of the student’s progress are prepared       should be obtained prior to taking the coursework
each term in the form of the permanent academic      elsewhere. Courses completed at nonaccredited
record. The information included is the record of    institutions generally are not accepted for credit.
the student’s registration and grades, with such     Grades for courses taken at another institution are
other information as may be deemed important.        not included in the calculation of the University’s
All courses taken at the University of Richmond      grade point average.
become a part of the permanent academic record.
                                                     Study Abroad
Work Taken Elsewhere                                 Students wishing to study abroad should contact
This section pertains to students who wish to take   the Office of International Education for
academic work elsewhere while actively pursuing      information about the range of opportunities
a degree at the University of Richmond. Only         and the procedures they must follow. The
coursework taken at an institution accredited by     procedures ensure that academic work abroad
a regional accrediting agency or the international   will qualify for transfer credits to the University
equivalent at the time the work was taken will be    of Richmond. Further information about study
considered, and a grade or equivalent of C (2.0)     abroad is presented in the chapter on International
or better must have been earned. The semester        Education.
40 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Visiting Student Status                                  Class Standings of Students
Under certain circumstances, students, while             The class standing is established at first
not enrolled at the University of Richmond, are          matriculation and is evaluated after grade
granted visiting student status. This status is based    posting for each subsequent term of enrollment.
on attending a University-approved program               The standing is based on semester hours passed
of study. To determine if a domestic program is          including, if applicable, acceptable transfer and/or
approved, contact the Office of the University            advanced standing credit. The standings are:
Registrar; for study abroad programs, contact the           Year 1            0 - 23.9 hours
Office of International Education.                           Year 2            24 - 53.9 hours
                                                            Year 3            54 - 83.9 hours
Acceptance of Credit
                                                            Year 4            84 or more hours
Summer Study Abroad Programs
Only programs with a University of Richmond              Dean’s List
director or faculty, which also are administered by      The Dean’s List of Distinguished Students
the University, are included in this category.           recognizes outstanding scholars for each fall and
   For academic record, degree progress, and grade       spring semester.
point average purposes, coursework taken in these        School of Arts and Sciences
programs is treated as if the work were completed        Robins School of Business
on campus. There are a number of University Study        Jepson School of Leadership Studies
Abroad programs including programs in Argentina,         The student must complete at least 12 earned
China, the European Union, France, Germany, Italy,       hours for the semester (excluding P/F hours), with
London, Ireland, Greece, Japan, Spain and Russia.        no grade below a B- (2.7), and a minimum term
All of the programs above are administered through       GPA of 3.60.
the University of Richmond Summer School office.
                                                         Academic DeÞciencies
Other Programs Abroad                                    Academic deficiencies are of two types: academic
Transfer credit will be awarded for preapproved          warning and academic probation.
coursework at a regionally accredited (or
                                                         Academic Warning
international equivalent) institution in which a
                                                         At any time when a student’s overall grade point
grade, or equivalent, of C (2.0) or better has been
                                                         average falls below 2.00, the student automatically
earned. Credit for coursework to be counted toward
                                                         will be on academic warning. A student on
the major is subject to approval by the academic
                                                         academic warning should take active steps to
department concerned. No credit will be awarded
                                                         improve academic performance.
for work taken elsewhere until an acceptably
complete official transcript in English is received by    Academic Probation
the University Registrar directly from the institution   Academic reports are evaluated at the end of each
providing the instruction or the approved agency         grade-posting period. Regardless of the specific
coordinating the instruction. Such credit is recorded    provisions for each school stated below, if at the
as academic hours passed and is not computed in          end of any term a student’s record reveals such
the student’s grade point average.                       significant deterioration in performance that
   Note: Students should contact the Office               extraordinary action is deemed appropriate by
of International Education regarding summer              the dean of the student’s school or college, that
abroad programs not offered by the University of         student may be placed on probation, limited in
Richmond.                                                credit hours of enrollment, or recommended for
                                                         suspension from the school or college regardless
ACADEMIC STANDING                                        of grade point average. In addition, such student
Students are expected to achieve in the classroom        may be restricted from participation in certain
and make steady progress toward completion of            University activities.
degree requirements. Relevant designations are              Appeals of rulings associated with the
specified in the following sections.                      administration of these regulations shall be
                                                         directed to the relevant academic council.
                                                                              ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 41



School of Arts and Sciences                            READMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
Robins School of Business
                                                       Students who have withdrawn from the University
A student who falls below the following minimum
                                                       for whatever reason, other than participating in
accumulations of semester hours and grade point
                                                       an approved study abroad, exchange or visiting
average (GPA) will be placed automatically on
                                                       away program, and wish to return must make
academic probation:
                                                       their request for readmission in writing to the
Year 1 (0 - 23.9 hours passed)           1.50 GPA      dean of the appropriate academic school. Students
Year 2 (24 -53.9 hours passed)           1.70 GPA      seeking readmission to the School of Arts and
Year 3 (54 - 83.9 hours passed)          1.85 GPA      Sciences should contact the dean of Richmond
Year 4 (84 or more hours passed)         2.00 GPA      College (men) or dean of Westhampton College
   If at the end of the second consecutive             (women). Students seeking readmission to the
semester* of enrollment after being placed on          Robins School of Business or the Jepson School
academic probation, the student fails to meet the      of Leadership Studies should contact the associate
minimum standard based on hours then passed,           dean of that school.
the student shall be allowed to enroll for no more
than seven semester hours of academic work per         GRADUATION
regular semester or during the entire summer.          QualiÞcations
Such a student has a maximum of 14 semester            To graduate a student must meet certain
hours of work attempted in which to achieve the        qualifications described below.
minimum requirement. Otherwise he or she will
be suspended from the School of Arts and Sciences      Curriculum and Achievement
or the School of Business.                             A candidate for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor
   The above provisions notwithstanding, the           of Science or Bachelor of Science in Business
dean of the student’s college, in circumstances        Administration degree must satisfactorily complete
which seem to warrant such action, may allow           all degree requirements (see Summary of Degree
the student to continue as a full-time student on      Requirements section) and 120 semester hours.
probation for a single additional semester.            Undergraduate degree candidates must earn a grade
                                                       point average of not less than 2.00 on all coursework
* Work taken during an entire summer, provided 12      attempted and must receive credit for attendance at
semester hours or more are attempted, shall count as   assemblies and convocations, as required.
a regular semester.
Jepson School of Leadership Studies                    Time Limits
A student will be placed automatically on              School of Arts and Sciences
academic probation when: a semester cumulative         There is no time limit in regard to the completion
grade point average falls below 2.0; a leadership      of general education requirements. In the event
studies cumulative GPA falls below 2.30; or when       of catalog changes, a student may choose to fulfill
a grade in a leadership studies course falls below     admission and general education requirements for
C- (1.7). While on academic probation, a student’s     graduation from a subsequent catalog provided all
participation in activities such as athletics,         of the requirements of the chosen catalog are met.
debating, dramatic or musical organizations, or        Robins School of Business and
their representation of the University in any public   Jepson School of Leadership Studies
capacity, may be restricted.                           A student must complete the requirements for
   Following subsequent semesters in which a           the degree, as stated in the catalog at the time of
student fails to reach the minimum GPA required        entrance, within five years from the date of original
for the major, the record of such student will be      entry. Reinstatement to a program after five years
reviewed to determine whether further sanctions,       requires permission of the academic council of the
which may include dismissal from the Jepson            student’s school. If an extension of time is granted,
School of Leadership Studies, should be applied.       the student may be required to satisfy the degree
                                                       requirements in effect at the time of reentrance.
42 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




Changes in Catalog Information                         Undergraduate Work Taken After Graduation
Caution: The course offerings and requirements         Students who have graduated from an accredited
of the University of Richmond are under                college or university and who wish to take
continual examination and revision. This               undergraduate courses in the liberal arts and
catalog is not a contract; it merely presents the      sciences during the academic year, but not for
offerings and requirements in effect at the time       degree purposes, should apply to the Office
of publication and in no way guarantees that           of Admission for acceptance as an unclassified
the offerings and requirements will not change.        student. Permission to take such classes may be
The University specifically reserves the right to       granted on a space-available basis and with due
change requirements for any major, minor and/          regard for prior achievements. Application for such
or program, and to implement them during any           undergraduate work to be taken in the summer
particular year.                                       will be received by the summer school office.
   The student assumes full responsibility for         Students who are required to take undergraduate
compliance with all academic requirements.             work in preparation for a University of Richmond
Current course offerings may be obtained from the      Arts and Sciences graduate program, or who take
appropriate department. Current major, minor,          undergraduate and graduate work simultaneously,
program and degree requirements may be obtained        shall register through the Graduate School of Arts
from the University Registrar; the deans’ offices       and Sciences.
of the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business,            Additional majors or minors may be completed
and Leadership Studies, and Richmond and               after graduation and recorded subject to the
Westhampton Colleges; or from the department           following: The student must have a Bachelor of
chair of the appropriate department.                   Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Science
   In the event the University adopts new general      in Business Administration degree from the
education and/or major, minor and program              University of Richmond; all work required to
requirements, efforts will be made to accommodate      complete the additional major or minor subsequent
hardships during the transition period.                to graduation must be taken at the University; the
                                                       academic department concerned must certify that
Declaration of Majors/Minors
                                                       the major or minor is complete; and the student
All undergraduate degrees at the University of
                                                       must complete the work within two years of
Richmond require satisfactory completion of
                                                       graduation unless additional time is granted by
one major. Multiple majors and/or minors for
                                                       the major or minor department concerned, and
a single degree also may be pursued, and upon
                                                       the department notifies the University Registrar.
completion will be recorded on the permanent
academic record. For dual degree requirements,         Work at the University
refer to the Dual Bachelor’s Degree section. With      A student must have completed at least 60
the exception of Leadership Studies, students have     semester hours of acceptable coursework required
the option to declare a major as early as the end      for the degree in one or more of the undergraduate
of the first year. They are encouraged to declare       schools of the University. The last 30 hours are
during the second year, and are expected to declare    expected to be included within the 60 hours.
by the end of the second year.                         Robins School of Business
   All declarations of majors and minors must be       All transfer students, as part of their degree
received in the Office of the University Registrar      requirements, must complete at least 36 semester
during the two-week add/drop period to be              hours of coursework in business/economics within
effective for that term. Declarations received after   the Robins School of Business.
add/drop will not be processed until the end
                                                       Jepson School of Leadership Studies
of the term. For procedures on how to declare
                                                       At least 34 of these 60 semester hours must be
majors and/or minors both in the home school
                                                       taken in the Jepson School of Leadership Studies.
and between schools, contact the Office of the
University Registrar.
                                                                           ACADEMIC PROCEDURES • 43



Financial/Administrative Responsibilities            who does not participate in the commencement
No degree is conferred if the student’s              ceremony does not graduate. Such candidate
responsibilities to the University are in an         may graduate by again filing a degree application
unsatisfactory condition. Responsibilities in this   and by following the appropriate graduation
sense include financial and administrative matters    attendance policy.
such as, but not limited to, delinquent payments,       August degrees are conferred as of the date
parking fines or overdue library books.               specified in the academic calendar, and diplomas
                                                     are mailed to those qualified.
Degree Application                                      Note: No degree is conferred if the student’s
To graduate a student must file a degree              responsibilities to the University have not been
application. Degree applications are to be filed by   met. These responsibilities include, but are not
the second Friday in September for the coming        limited to, such matters as the payment of fees,
May or August commencement. Those enrolled           parking fines and library fines, and the return of
only in the spring file by the first Friday in         library books.
February. Students enrolled only in the summer
culminating in their graduation file by the third     Degree With Honors (Latin Honors)
Friday in June. Students planning to complete        General academic honors of three ranks are
degree requirements in December should file a         awarded to members of the graduating classes
degree application by the end of the previous        on the basis of their grade point average on work
academic semester.                                   completed at the University of Richmond.
   If degree requirements are not completed prior    School of Arts and Sciences
to the intended graduation date, the student must    Jepson School of Leadership Studies
file a new degree application according to the        Robins School of Business
schedule above.                                         Cum Laude                  3.40 - 3.59
   Degree applications are available online via         Magna Cum Laude            3.60 - 3.79
BannerWeb and in the Office of the University            Summa Cum Laude            3.80 - 4.00
Registrar.
   Students must file the degree application in the   GRADUATE STUDY
Office of the University Registrar.                   University of Richmond students who are near
Attendance At Commencement                           completion of the undergraduate degree may study
Students are required to attend the commencement     in a master’s degree program in the University’s
ceremony for the award of the degree in person       Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. To qualify
except by decision of the University not to do       for this option, a student must have already passed
so. A student who expects to have a degree           at least 100 semester hours of coursework before
awarded at the spring commencement may request       beginning his or her seventh semester of study,
absentia status from the graduation ceremony by      have an overall grade point average of at least
explaining in writing the circumstance which         3.30, and be admitted to the Graduate School
prevents participation. Students who have a          of Arts and Sciences as a regular student by its
degree application on file and anticipate winter      standard procedures. Individual departments may
or summer completion of degree requirements          set a higher minimum grade point average (both
are also expected to participate in the spring       overall and in the major) to qualify for this option
graduation ceremony. If a winter or summer degree    and/or restrict the courses that may be taken under
candidate does not intend to participate in the      it. Until students have completed requirements
ceremony a written statement requesting absentia     for the bachelor’s degree, they may take no more
must be submitted. The request for absentia must     than three courses for graduate credit and not
be received by the University Registrar no later     more than two in any given semester. Although
than eight working days before the ceremony. The     a student who is accepted to this option will be
registrar will notify the degree candidate of the    enrolled in undergraduate and graduate courses
status granted by the University. Unless approved    simultaneously, the undergraduate and graduate
for absentia status a candidate for graduation       transcripts will be kept separately. Courses
44 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



taken for graduate credit will not apply to the         sought, as well as requirements for the major, must
bachelor’s degree. The student will register as an      be met satisfactorily. Work taken for the preceding
undergraduate and pay the undergraduate tuition         degree may be considered as transfer credit for the
rate until the bachelor’s degree is completed.          purpose of meeting these requirements; however,
                                                        at least half of the major must be taken at the
SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE                             University of Richmond, and all other degree
A student may earn more than one undergraduate          requirements must be met as outlined under
degree either consecutively or concurrently in          Graduation, including the 60-hour residency
relation to another undergraduate degree provided       requirement.
the degrees are not alike, e.g., not two B.A.s or two      A student who completes the requirements
B.S.s. For information on completing one degree         for the consecutive degree is ineligible for Latin
with multiple majors, see Declaring Majors/             honors, and will not be assigned a graduating class
Minors above.                                           rank.
   The following policies apply to any student          Concurrent (Dual) Bachelor’s Degrees
seeking a second undergraduate degree.                  Dual bachelor’s degrees are two different
Consecutive Bachelor’s Degree                           bachelor’s degrees that are pursued concurrently
A consecutive bachelor’s degree is one which is         and completed at the same time.
begun after a first degree has been conferred or             A student who wishes to pursue a bachelor’s
after the degree requirements for the first degree       degree concurrently shall notify the dean of his or
have been recorded as completed on the student’s        her school promptly after the decision is reached.
permanent academic record.                              (Arts and Sciences students should contact the
   A student who wishes to pursue the second            dean of the appropriate residential college.) A
bachelor’s degree consecutively shall apply to the      student in the Robins School of Business or the
dean of the school concerned. (Arts and Sciences        Jepson School of Leadership Studies who desires
students should contact the dean of the appropriate     a second undergraduate degree in the arts and
residential college.) The dean shall make a decision    sciences must receive the approval of the dean
for admission based on the quality of prior work,       of the appropriate residential college as well as
the favorable recommendation of the intended            the sanction of the dean of their home school.
major department, and space availability. Once          Even when approved for the second degree, such
admitted, the student’s grade point average shall       student remains a member of their home school
be based only on the work taken at the University       for academic, administrative and extracurricular
of Richmond while pursuing the second degree.           purposes.
The student’s dean may limit or deny further                When two degrees are being sought
registration if the quality of the student’s work       concurrently, the grade point average computation
indicates that at least a 2.00 average will not         and all academic policies are administered on
have been achieved by the time the student has          the basis of the then-accumulated work for both
attempted 30 semester hours. A student admitted         degrees.
for a consecutive degree shall be considered                To earn a concurrent bachelor’s degree, a student
a member of the senior class for registration           must complete 150 semester hours of academic
purposes.                                               work plus the additional degree requirements with
   To earn a consecutive bachelor’s degree, a           at least 90 of the hours taken at the University of
student must achieve at least a 2.00 grade point        Richmond. In addition, the general education
average on a minimum of 30 additional semester          requirements appropriate to each degree being
hours of resident academic coursework selected          sought, as well as requirements for the majors,
from the catalog of courses. Courses in which           must be completed satisfactorily. At the proper
a student-opted Pass is earned shall not count          time, two degree applications must be submitted
in the 30 hours. In addition, general education         simultaneously to the University Registrar. Latin
requirements appropriate to the degree being            honors, if earned, will be shown on both degrees.
                                                                    GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM • 45




                      GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
A liberal arts education is typically characterized by   I. FIRST-YEAR CORE COURSE (CORE)
the development of broad intellectual and cultural
                                                         This two-semester course explores some of the
interests and by the achievement of a significant
                                                         fundamental issues of human experience through
body of skills and knowledge. It is the particular
                                                         close analysis of relevant texts drawn from a
responsibility of a general education curriculum
                                                         number of cultures, disciplines and historical
to address the first of these goals—the broadening
                                                         periods. In this course all first-year students,
of students’ interests—while also laying the
                                                         together with a significant portion of the faculty,
foundation for the acquisition of advanced skills
                                                         share a common syllabus, and thus engage in a
and deeper knowledge within optional areas of
                                                         common conversation. A central goal of the course
concentration, normally defined as majors.
                                                         is to incorporate students into a community of
   So it is at the University of Richmond, where a
                                                         learners from the very start of their collegiate
distinctive general education curriculum has been
                                                         careers. It is also hoped that the intensive reading,
designed:
                                                         focused discussions and frequent writing that
   • To provide a stimulating and challenging
                                                         typify the course will develop the fundamental
        introduction to collegiate life through a
                                                         skills required for subsequent coursework and
        First-Year Core Course
                                                         life. Sometimes associated with the course are
   • To establish the basic prerequisites of
                                                         cocurricular events such as lectures and musical
        productive scholarship through a set of
                                                         performances. This course is to be taken and
        communication skills requirements
                                                         passed by all students, without exception, in their
   • To familiarize students in a meaningful
                                                         first year of matriculation. It earns three academic
        way with some of the major approaches
                                                         credits per semester.
        to intellectual and cultural life through a
        series of fields-of-study requirements            II. COMMUNICATION SKILLS
   This curriculum is offered by a faculty that sees
general education as fundamental to its mission.         Ideas and experiences must be communicated if
Through its various general education courses,           they are to be shared, scrutinized and transformed
the faculty intends to incorporate each and every        into effective knowledge. Toward these ends, the
student into a community of learners who value           faculty expects each student to develop skills in
and practice the life of the mind. Beginning with        expository writing, oral communication and a
their general education courses and continuing           second language.
through the courses in their major, their elective       Expository Writing (COM1)
courses and their various cocurricular and               As regards expository writing, or basic composition,
extracurricular learning experiences, University of      the faculty assumes that all entering students
Richmond students are expected to develop their          have a certain level of technical competence, but
ability to think critically and independently, to        scholarly work at the collegiate level demands that
learn to tolerate ambiguity where true ambiguity         a student’s writing be not only technically correct
exists and to grow in their respect for—and their        but also purposeful and effective. For this reason,
ability to deal with—the kinds of multiplicity that      the basic course that satisfies this requirement—
characterize our complex world. The common               English 103—is essentially a course in critical
goal of the University’s faculty is the education        thinking, in which writing skills are developed as
of independent, responsible and contributing             a tool for thought and communication. Although
members of society.                                      some students are exempted from this course on
                                                         the basis of certain test scores, the majority of
                                                         incoming students still satisfy this requirement
46 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



through taking and passing English 103. In              III. FIELDS OF STUDY
addition to this course, the faculty has begun to
                                                        Fields-of-study courses introduce students to some
implement a writing program that will help to
                                                        of the primary fields, or sets of related disciplines,
enhance the expository writing skills of many
                                                        within which scholars group phenomena for
University students beyond the minimum level set
                                                        study. These courses are intended to familiarize
by this requirement.
                                                        students with the kinds of questions raised by
Oral Communication                                      scholars within each of these groupings, and with
Oral communication is another skill that is             the methods by which scholars try to answer such
essential for education and life. Students should       questions. Although fields-of-study courses are
be able to speak so that their ideas are expressed      typically offered by individual departments, they
logically, lucidly and effectively, and they should     have nonetheless been designed and approved
be able to provide relevant evidence whenever           with general education as their primary objective.
appropriate. In addition, students should be able       Thus, their scope exceeds the boundaries of
to analyze the spoken discourse of others. The          singular disciplines insofar as they seek to give
general education curriculum at the University          explicit attention to the perspectives, ways of
of Richmond assists students in these regards by        thinking and methodological approaches of larger
immediately immersing them into frequent and            fields of inquiry. In order to give students a broad
intensive oral exchanges and presentations in the       understanding as well as a basic foundation for
First-Year Core Course, and by offering relevant        further study in any of these fields, the faculty
courses, such as Rhetoric and Communication             requires students to pass specially designated courses
Studies 101, through the Department of Rhetoric         in each of six fields-of-study: historical studies,
and Communication Studies. In addition, many            literary studies, natural science, social analysis,
faculty and departments have been increasing the        symbolic reasoning and visual and performing
oral communication components in their courses          arts. The minimum number of academic credits
and seminars, with the goal of enhancing this           to be earned in each case is three.
fundamental skill. Their efforts are assisted by the
                                                        Historical Studies (FSHT)
University’s Speech Center. There is no required
                                                        Historical studies examine events and actors of
course that students must take to fulfill this
                                                        the recent or distant past within the context of the
portion of their general education.
                                                        ideas, institutions, social norms, cultural practices
Second Language (COM2)                                  and physical environments out of which they arose.
A second language has become more and more              Courses with a historical perspective enable us to
important as the world for which students are           understand the values and institutions of disparate
preparing themselves has placed increasing              societies and cultures as they have developed over
demands upon them to understand the national            time.
and cultural perspectives of other language                By emphasizing the critical analysis of
groups. The knowledge of a second language is           sources and the interrelationships among ideas,
critical for achieving such understanding as well       institutions, social structures, and events within
as for exposing the learner to other cultures, in       one or more interpretive frameworks, these courses
ancient or contemporary guise, that he or she may       foster students’ awareness of the methods and
encounter after graduation. For these reasons,          perspectives for understanding past societies and
the faculty expects all students to demonstrate         cultures in historical context. Courses that focus
functional ability in listening, speaking, reading      narrowly on the history of a discipline, that only
and writing in a modern second language or in           use chronology as an organizational structure,
reading and writing in a classical language. These      or that do not stress the context in which ideas
abilities are appraised either at entrance or through   and events occurred fall outside the category of
introductory and intermediate courses.                  historical studies.
                                                                   GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM • 47



Literary Studies (FSLT)                                 involves a systematic theoretical and empirical
The field of literary studies concerns itself with       examination of the patterns of human behavior
verbal texts read as structures of meaning. While       within or across various societies and cultures.
language is a practical tool for thought and               Courses satisfying this requirement focus on
communication of many sorts, the particular             human behavior. They teach students to analyze
focus of literary studies is on linguistic creations    individual and group behavior by utilizing a
as meaningful in themselves, and not purely             variety of theoretical and empirical frameworks.
as documents that record meaning outside                All courses in this field of study must include
themselves.                                             the reading of or involve students in research
   Courses satisfying the literary studies              on patterns of human behavior. Courses that
requirement are centrally concerned with the            employ social contextual analysis for purposes of
textual analysis of primary works. They consider a      providing a frame of reference for the study of
variety of interpretive frameworks and attend to one    other phenomena, such as literary texts, works of
or more collateral areas of investigation, including    art, etc., do not fulfill this requirement.
the study of the process by which texts are created
                                                        Symbolic Reasoning (FSSR)
and received, the historical and cultural contexts
                                                        As a field of study, symbolic reasoning is
in which they are created and received, and their
                                                        distinguished by its attention to internal logical
relationships to each other and to other fields of
                                                        consistency and by its wide external applicability.
experience and analysis. The field of literary studies
                                                        This field of study emphasizes symbolic problem
brings its perspectives and methods to bear on
                                                        solving, a process that includes translating problems
imaginative and nonimaginative works alike.
                                                        into terms that are amenable to treatment within
Natural Science (FSNB, FSNC, FSNP)                      a symbolic system; understanding consistent rules
The field of natural science is concerned with the       by which the information relevant to the problem
physical universe from subatomic to cosmic levels of    may be processed in order to obtain a solution;
organization, including inanimate as well as living     recognizing important underlying principles that
systems, their structure, diversity, interaction and    govern the application of these rules; and judging
evolution. Based upon the generation and testing        both the appropriateness of known solution
of hypotheses, scientific inquiry is restricted to       methods to a particular problem and the quality
the study of repeatable, measurable and verifiable       or reasonableness of the solution obtained.
phenomena. Within this field, knowledge may be              Courses in this field of study aim to develop in
gained either by controlled experiment or diligent      students the skills to obtain valid solutions using
observation, depending upon the phenomena               one or more symbolic systems, the ingenuity to
being studied. Similarly, some of the field’s            translate new problems into appropriate terms
methodologies rely upon quantitative analysis,          for such systems, and the persistence to carry a
while others are primarily qualitative.                 solution method through to completion. The
   The natural science requirement is designed          focus of a symbolic reasoning course should be on
to enhance students’ appreciation of the beauty         understanding the symbolic system and how it can
of science as well as their understanding of            be used to develop problem-solving tools rather
the challenges of doing science. Students gain          than on the tools themselves. Applications of these
experience in the formulation and testing of            tools, while a welcome addition, should not be the
hypotheses and are introduced to scientific              primary objective of the course.
methodology. The natural science requirement
                                                        Visual and Performing Arts (FSVP)
consists of a single laboratory course selected
                                                        The field of visual and performing arts considers
from the three areas of science represented at
                                                        questions having to do with the forms, traditions,
the University of Richmond, namely, chemistry,
                                                        meaning and historical contexts of works in visual
physics, and the biological sciences.
                                                        and performance media, and explores issues of
Social Analysis (FSSA)                                  method, process and personal resources in the
Social analysis is the systematic study of individual   media.
and social human behavior. This field of study
48 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



   Courses satisfying this requirement are                FSNC - Field of Study: Natural Science,
centrally concerned with the roles of creation and          Chemistry
interpretation in the study of art. They develop in       FSNP - Field of Study: Natural Science, Physics
students an enhanced understanding of art both by         FSSA - Field of Study: Social Analysis
fostering their intellectual appreciation of works of     FSSR - Field of Study: Symbolic Reasoning
art and by involving them in the creative process.        FSVP - Field of Study: Visual and Performing Arts
These courses are suffused with the notion that
the arts are a powerful and profound influence on          SUMMARY OF GENERAL EDUCATION
human perception and understanding.                       REQUIREMENTS
                                                          Courses used to satisfy the First-Year Core Course
CONCLUSION                                                and the communication skills requirements of
In addition to the fundamental educational                the general education requirements may not be
experiences represented by these requirements, the        used to meet the fields-of-study requirements
faculty recognizes that thoughtful reflection upon         for the degree. The First-Year Core Course must
an even wider range of topics and issues—e.g.,            be taken in the first year of matriculation. The
pertaining to gender, race, ethics, international         Communication Skills I requirement normally is
perspectives and other matters—is an important            met in the first year of university study and should
component in the education of Richmond                    not be postponed beyond the second year.
students. While some of these topics and issues
may be addressed in one or another course in the          A. First-Year Core Course
general education curriculum, the faculty feels           A student may satisfy this requirement by passing
strongly that they are best treated—sometimes             CORE 101-102.
focally, sometimes incidentally—within many               B. Communication Skills I - English 103
different courses, outside as well as inside that         A student may satisfy this requirement by meeting
curriculum. By addressing them in a variety of            one of the following alternatives:
ways, from a variety of viewpoints, and with a               (1) Completing English 103 with a grade of C
variety of voices across the entire curriculum, the              (2.0) or higher.
faculty as a whole will ensure that students are             (2) Presenting a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced
aware of the many complex and serious ways in                    Placement exam in English (carries 3 hours
which these issues touch their lives and the lives               of credit).
of others.                                                   (3) Presenting a score of 5, 6 or 7 on the IB
    Note: Courses meeting general education                      Higher Level English A exam (carries 3
requirements are approved by the General                         hours of credit).
Education Committee and denoted with the                     (4) Presenting an acceptable score on the SAT
appropriate code following the course description                Writing test (taken pre-enrollment) (carries
in this catalog, as well as in the Schedule of Classes,          no credit).
published each semester. A course will only meet             (5) Presenting an acceptable ACT composite
the general education requirement if approved and                score (carries no credit).
the corresponding code is noted on the Schedule           Only alternatives 1, 2 and 3 carry semester
of Classes for the semester in which the class is         hours credit toward a degree.
completed. The codes are as follows:
COM1 - Communication Skills -                             C. Communication Skills II - Second Language
  Expository Writing                                      A student may satisfy this requirement in a
COM2 - Communication Skills -                             modern or classical language by meeting one of
  Second Language                                         the following alternatives:
CORE - First-Year Core Course                                (1) Passing the intermediate (221 or 202) level
FSHT - Field of Study: Historical Studies                         of one language (credit varies from 3-6
FSLT - Field of Study: Literary Studies                           hours depending on the intensity of the
FSNB - Field of Study: Natural Science,                           courses).
  Biological Sciences
                                                                SUMMARY OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS • 49



   (2) Presenting a score of 3, 4 or 5 on a modern      D. Fields of Study
       language Advanced Placement exam                 A student may satisfy the fields-of-study
       (student would receive an exemption, but         requirements by passing one approved course
       no credit, for a score of 3; the credit varies   in each of the areas of historical studies, literary
       for a score of 4 or 5); presenting a score of    studies, social analysis, symbolic reasoning,
       4 or 5 on the Latin Advanced Placement           visual and performing arts, and the natural
       exam (carries 3 hours of credit).                sciences. Such courses must have been approved
   (3) Presenting a score of 5, 6 or 7 on an IB         by the General Education Committee and the
       Higher-Level exam in a modern language           faculties of the schools of Arts and Sciences,
       (credit varies).                                 Business and Leadership Studies as meeting these
   (4) Presenting an acceptable score on the SAT-       requirements.
       II Subject Test (taken pre-enrollment) -             Courses      meeting    general      education
       Language (carries no credit).                    requirements are designated in this catalog
   (5) Achieving an acceptable score on a               following the course description, as well as in the
       departmental placement exam (carries no          list of classes on the Web site. All courses used
       credit).                                         to meet general education requirements must be
   (6) For non-native English speakers, obtaining       passed with a grade of D- (.7) or higher, with the
       an acceptable score on the TOEFL (carries        exception of English 103, which requires a C (2.0)
       no credit).                                      or higher. No general education courses may be
                                                        taken Pass/Fail.


                  SUMMARY OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

I. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
                                Type of Requirement                             Credits
First-Year Core Course          Core Course (CORE 101 & CORE 102)               6 credits
Communication Skills            Expository writing (COM1)                       3 credits (a)
                                Second language (COM2)                          up to 16 credits (a)
                                Oral communication                              noncredit (b)
Fields of Study                 Historical studies (FSHT)                       3-4 credits
                                Literary studies (FSLT)                         3-4 credits
                                Natural science (FSNB/FSNC/FSNP)                4 credits
                                Social analysis (FSSA)                          3-4 credits
                                Symbolic reasoning (FSSR)                       3-4 credits
                                Visual and performing arts (FSVP)               3-4 credits
                                                                                Total: up to 49 credits
a. May be satisfied by a demonstration of proficiency upon entrance to the University without carrying credit
    (language courses carry variable credit).
b. Described in preceding text.
50 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




II. WELLNESS REQUIREMENT
In keeping with the University’s objective of fostering knowledge and personal wellness, every
undergraduate at the University of Richmond is required to complete a three-part series on wellness. The
wellness series covers 1) an alcohol awareness program called URAWARE and 2) a choice of two mini-
workshops on health and wellness-related topics such as nutrition, sexual health and fitness, called the
Plus2 program. The URAWARE component, Wellness 085, is to be taken and satisfactorily completed
in the first semester of matriculation. The Plus2 component, Wellness 090, is strongly urged to be taken
and satisfactorily completed before or during the third year.
   URAWARE (WELL 085) ........................................................................... noncredit
   Plus2 (WELL 090, two topics of choice) .................................................... noncredit

III. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SKILLS
Students must complete two library and information skills workshops, Library 100 and 101, during
their first year. They are hands-on workshops: Library 100 emphasizes the use of the libraries’ Web page,
the library catalog and Expanded Academic Index database; Library 101 focuses on locating periodicals,
citing sources correctly and the Lexis/Nexis database.
   LIB 100 ...................................................................................................... noncredit
   LIB 101 ...................................................................................................... noncredit

IV. COMPLETION OF A MAJOR
All undergraduate degrees at the University of Richmond require satisfactory completion of one major.
Multiple majors and/or minors also may be pursued, and upon completion will be recorded on the
permanent academic record.
   The major is a field of academic study chosen as an area of specialization. A major may be in a
subject area and will include courses in that subject area along with courses prerequisite to those required
courses and also may include designated courses outside the subject area. Interdisciplinary programs will
include courses from a number of different subject areas. Majors require between 30 and 54 total hours,
counting all courses both inside and outside the subject area, including all prerequisites for those courses.
(See the section for each school for specific major or minor requirements.)
   Major Requirements .............................................................................30–54 credits

V. CURRICULUM AND ACHIEVEMENT
Undergraduate degree candidates must earn a grade point average of not less than 2.00 on all coursework
attempted.
   Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration must complete 120 credit hours.

VI. ADDITIONAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Sixty-hour residency requirement
Application for degree and attendance at Commencement
Completion of financial and administrative obligations
                                                      ACADEMIC PROGRAMS: SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES • 51




                                      ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                     students to become well-informed and thoughtful
                                                                citizens, to be able to contribute to the lives of others and
The School of Arts and Sciences offers a majority of
                                                                to help advance the society of which they are a part.
the courses taken by undergraduate students at the
University. Even students who major in Business or
Leadership Studies take up to two-thirds of their
                                                                CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
courses — elective as well as general education courses         The School of Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of
— in the School of Arts and Sciences. The school                Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees.
provides a broad range of majors and offers numerous                In addition to the degree requirements previously
opportunities for interdisciplinary study. Such study           stated under Graduation, a candidate must satisfy major
takes many forms, from self-designed programs, to               requirements outlined in the following pages.
interdisciplinary concentrations within traditional fields,          Course limitations — Of the following, no more
to fully developed interdisciplinary majors. Graduates          than the stated semester hours can count toward any
today live in a world in which the ability to integrate         degree in a given school:
knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines is                • 12 semester hours — Internship courses of
increasingly important. The School of Arts and Sciences                whatever kind, excluding student teaching and
fully recognizes this fact and is constantly working to                Theatre 330-341 Practicum
create opportunities for students to integrate and apply             • 6 semester hours — Internship 388 taken in the
what they are learning.                                                same academic department
    Engagement in active and interactive learning is                Courses taken through the School of Continuing
the hallmark of education in the School of Arts and             Studies after students have been admitted may not be
Sciences. Students are involved in guided independent           used to meet general education requirements and may
study projects, collaborative research with faculty and         be used to meet major requirements only with special
other students, internships and other service-learning          permission from the appropriate department chair.
experiences, as well as artistic and creative projects.             See also the previous section titled Repeated
Active engagement enables students to assume increasing         Courses.
responsibility for their own learning and development,
and prepares them for life-long growth and adaptation           BACHELOR OF ARTS
to change.
                                                                I. Degree Requirements
    The faculty of the school are committed, first and
                                                                To qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree, students must
foremost, to teaching and learning, and to the overall
                                                                complete the degree requirements listed previously,
education and development of their students. Faculty
                                                                including general education requirements, wellness,
take the advising and mentoring of students very
                                                                library and information skills workshops, curriculum
seriously and meet frequently with their students and
                                                                and achievement and residency requirements along with
advisees to discuss course-related projects as well as
                                                                completion of the requirements for at least one major.
career plans and long-term goals.
    The school’s faculty are also productive scholars           II. Requirements for the Major
and artists who introduce students to the excitement of         The major is a field of academic study chosen as an
research and creative activity. As distinguished scholars,      area of specialization. A major will include courses in
scientists, artists and practitioners, they are able to teach   a subject area*, such other courses outside the subject
by example as well as by precept.                               area as may be designated, and any courses prerequisite
    By graduation, Arts and Sciences students are well          to those required courses. Unless a special waiver of the
prepared for further study in graduate or professional          Academic Council has been granted to a department or
schools and for employment in a variety of fields,               program and endorsed by the arts and sciences faculty,
including healthcare, government, business, law and             a major will require 30 to 36 hours in a single subject
nonprofit work. The knowledge and skills fostered by a           area, including all prerequisites within the subject area.
liberal arts education serve students well in the world of      In addition, a major will require no more than 54 total
work, as well as in their personal lives. In addition, an       hours, counting all courses both inside and outside the
education in the School of Arts and Sciences prepares           subject area, including all prerequisites for those courses.
52 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Majors in interdisciplinary programs will require a         economics, physics, interdisciplinary physics and
minimum of 30 hours and no more than 54 total hours,        psychology. For differences in the major requirements
including all prerequisites.                                for the degrees, consult the appropriate departmental
    In no case may a student count more than 60 hours       description under Curricula.
from a single subject area toward the minimum number            A major will include courses in a subject area,
of hours necessary for graduation.                          such other courses outside the subject area as may
    English 103, basic modern second language courses       be designated, and any courses prerequisite to those
through the intermediate level, and the wellness and        required courses. (See note under Bachelor of Arts for
library and information skills requirements and will not    definition of subject area.) Unless a special waiver by the
be counted toward the major. Classical languages are        Academic Council has been granted to a department
exempt from this exclusion.                                 or program, and endorsed by the faculty, a major will
    A student may concurrently fulfill the requirements      require 30 to 42 hours in a single subject area, including
of more than one major. To initiate more than one           all prerequisites within the subject area. In addition,
major, the student should declare the majors in the         a major will require no more than 64 total hours,
manner currently provided. Upon graduation, only one        counting all courses both inside and outside the subject
degree will be conferred**, but each completed major        area, including all prerequisites for those courses and
will be recorded on the student’s permanent academic        Calculus II. The interdisciplinary studies program will
record, provided the student has listed the major on the    require a minimum of 30 hours and no more than 64
degree application and is certified to have completed all    total hours, including all prerequisites.
of the requirements specified for the given major.               In no case may a student count more than 60 hours
    If a student’s major(s) and other coursework can be     from a single subject area toward the minimum number
arranged to meet the requirements for either the Bachelor   of hours necessary for graduation.
of Arts degree or the Bachelor of Science degree, no
more than one degree has been earned; however, the          DEGREE CREDIT FOR PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
student must specify which degree is desired. Any major     Professional studies in medicine, dentistry or law may be
associated with a degree not chosen shall be recorded       substituted for the fourth year of academic work under
according to the provisions previously stated.              the following conditions:
    Specific major requirements may be found under                • At the end of the second year, the student must
the appropriate academic department listing in the                 have completed at least 60 semester hours of
Curricula section. In that section, the requirements are           academic work with at least a 3.0 GPA.
presumed to be for the Bachelor of Arts degree unless            • Before registering for the third year in the School
otherwise stated. For a description of the minor option,           of Arts and Sciences, the student’s course of study
see that heading in the Program Opportunities section              must be approved by the dean of the student’s
of this chapter.                                                   school (dean of Richmond College for men, and
* Subject area refers to coursework listed under a single          dean of Westhampton College for women).
specified rubric.                                                 • At the end of the third year, the student must
** Students interested in earning more than one                    have completed at least 100 semester hours of
undergraduate degree should refer to the Second                    academic work with at least a 3.0 GPA.
Undergraduate Degree section.                                    • During the first year in a professional school, the
                                                                   student must make satisfactory progress toward
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE                                                achieving the professional degree as certified by
                                                                   the professional school.
I. Degree Requirements                                          Under the above conditions, the student’s
The requirements are the same as for the B.A. except        professional work may be offered in lieu of certain
proficiency in calculus also must be demonstrated by         degree requirements. A candidate for a B.A. may offer,
passing Mathematics 212 or 232 (cannot be taken Pass/       for example, the first year’s work in an accredited law
Fail) or completing the Advanced Placement Test with        school in lieu of 18 semester hours of related subjects in
an acceptable score.                                        the major and six semester hours of elective subjects. A
                                                            candidate for a B.S. may substitute the first year’s work
II. Requirements for the Major                              in an accredited medical or dental school for a maximum
The provisions listed under the B.A. apply. The             of eight semester hours in the major and the remaining
B.S. is offered only in biochemistry, biology,              work for elective courses.
chemistry, computer science, environmental studies,
interdisciplinary studies, mathematics, mathematical
                                                   ACADEMIC PROGRAMS: SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES • 53



Dual-Degree Engineering Programs                             an optional fourth hour of work in a second language
In cooperation with selected engineering schools, the        associated with a regular class. The LAC component
University offers the opportunity for students interested    is worth one credit and is graded as Pass/Fail. To find
in engineering careers to earn two bachelor’s degrees in     a LAC section, look for courses marked “LAC credit
five years — one from the University of Richmond and          available” or go directly to each semester’s listings
another from a cooperating engineering school. In the        under Language Across the Curriculum. The following
3-2 Engineering Program a student spends three years         departments recently have offered courses with LAC
at Richmond, completing all of the general education         sections: English, History, Leadership Studies, Modern
requirements, almost all of the requirements for a major     Literatures and Cultures, Music and Philosophy. More
in physics, plus selected other courses. The student         LAC sections are being developed in other departments.
spends the remaining two years at the engineering            For further information, contact LAC Program
school. The School of Engineering and Applied Science        Coordinator Bob Graboyes (Economics).
at George Washington University is a participant. The
University of Richmond’s Physics Department’s pre-           INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS
engineering advisor can provide information about
participating programs and requirements.                     Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Studies Major
                                                             Under the general supervision of two faculty advisors
SPECIAL PROGRAM OPPORTUNITIES                                and the coordinator of interdisciplinary studies,
                                                             a self-designed interdisciplinary major is offered.
Creative Writing Program                                     The interdisciplinary major provides a student the
Designed for students who would like to combine the          opportunity to propose and pursue, with faculty
creative and scholarly aspects of literature, this program   supervision, a unique program of study leading to either
includes course offerings in creative writing and related    a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with
disciplines (see listings in English under Curricula),       a major in interdisciplinary studies. A senior thesis,
presentations by eminent writers, workshop privileges        which is the culmination of the major and for which the
and publication outlets. The program assists students to     student receives three credit hours, is required.
become writers of poetry, fiction or drama, or to continue       Applications and further information are available
their studies on the graduate level. Further information     from the coordinator of interdisciplinary studies.
is available from the Department of English.                 Applications are to be submitted to the coordinator
                                                             of interdisciplinary studies by April 1 of the second
Honors Program                                               year. At least a 3.00 cumulative grade point average is
Outstanding students with intellectual initiative and the    recommended.
desire to pursue academic achievement beyond standard
coursework have the opportunity to broaden and deepen        Interdisciplinary Majors
knowledge in selected major fields through the Honors         In addition to the self-designed interdisciplinary
Program. Departmental honors coordinators invite             major, the School of Arts and Sciences offers support
promising qualified majors to apply, but an interested        for interdisciplinary study through a number of
student may contact his or her major department or the       interdisciplinary programs that offer majors within the
faculty committee on the Honors Program to indicate          Bachelor of Arts degree. They are American Studies;
interest and obtain further information. To qualify, a       Classical Civilization; Cognitive Science; Criminal
student should have at least a 3.30 cumulative grade         Justice; Environmental Studies; International Studies;
point average, 65 or more semester hours completed and,      Interdisciplinary Physics; Urban Practice and Policy; and
excluding coursework primarily for first-year students,       Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Environmental
12 or more semester hours completed with distinction         Studies and Interdisciplinary Physics offer a Bachelor of
in the major field. Successful completion of an Honors        Science major option. Further information is available
Program is shown on the student’s permanent academic         from the program coordinators listed under each
record and on the diploma.                                   program.

Language Across the Curriculum (LAC)                         International Studies Major
The Language Across the Curriculum program allows            International studies is a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary
students to use their language skills and other cultural     major composed of six areas of concentration, of which
perspectives to enhance learning and research in all         the student selects one. The concentrations are Africa,
disciplines. Certain courses in the School of Arts and       Asia, International Economics, Latin America, Modern
Sciences, Jepson School of Leadership Studies and the        Europe, and World Politics and Diplomacy. Further
Robins School of Business are offered in conjunction         information is available from the program coordinator.
with a Language Across the Curriculum component,
54 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Interdisciplinary Concentrations                                   Visiting away programs are approved by the academic
The School of Arts and Sciences offers a series of             council of the appropriate school and the Office of the
curricular configurations known as interdisciplinary            University Registrar, which maintains a list of approved
concentrations within disciplinary majors or minors.           visiting away programs. This list is subject to change
Instead of constituting stand-alone majors or minors,          and will be reviewed on a periodic basis. (A program
these concentrations are tied closely to selected majors,      that is approved for one student will not necessarily be
thus fostering an integrated learning experience that offers   approved for another student since the decision is based
depth in a traditional discipline combined with breadth        not only on the academic reputation of the program,
in interdisciplinary study. Current interdisciplinary          but also on the relevancy of the program to the student’s
concentrations include Fine Arts Management (for Art           individual academic program.)
History, Studio Art, Dance, Music and Theatre majors               Students wishing to participate in an approved
or minors); Arts Technology (for Studio Art, Music or          domestic program must submit a copy of their letter
Theatre majors); Comparative Literature (for English           of acceptance to the program, a completed Transfer
majors); Medieval and Renaissance Studies (for Art             Approval Form and a completed Visiting Away Approval
History or English majors); and Neuroscience (for              Application Form to the Registrar’s Office. Upon
Biology or Psychology majors). An interdisciplinary            receipt of these documents, the student will be enrolled
concentration within a disciplinary major toward a B.A.        in an off-campus (OF) enrollment status. For study
will require no more than 72 total hours, counting all         abroad programs, a subcommittee of the International
courses and including all prerequisites for those courses.     Education Committee will review student petitions. If a
An interdisciplinary concentration within a disciplinary       student’s petition is approved, the Office of International
major toward a B.S. degree will require no more than           Education will notify the Registrar’s Office to enroll the
75 total hours, counting all courses and including all         student in an abroad (AB) enrollment status. (Students
prerequisites for those courses and Calculus II. For           seeking “AB” status should consult the Office of
specific descriptions and requirements, refer to the            International Education for complete instructions.)
Interdisciplinary Concentrations section.                          Enrollment in “OF” or “AB” status entitles the
                                                               student to remain as an active Richmond student, which
Internship Program                                             entitles him or her to benefits of priority registration,
Internships provide students with supervised                   housing, certain types of financial aid (e.g., loans and
opportunities to understand by direct experience how           Pell Grants), library access, mailbox and e-mail account.
skills and theories learned in the classroom are applied in    Students with “OF” or “AB” status will not be billed
business, industry, community agencies and government.         for tuition as Richmond students during the semester(s)
Each internship must include an academic base, such            away.
as an appropriate reading list or other resources, which           Credits from visiting away programs will be treated as
demonstrates or stresses the interrelatedness of the           transfer credits, requiring transfer approval and affecting
academic background with the selected workplace.               hours toward graduation. The credits are not calculated
    Internships usually are limited to junior or senior        in the GPA and require a C or better to transfer. Credits
students who must have the prior approval of the               are applied to the student’s record only upon receipt of
department concerned. No more than 12 semester                 an official transcript from the sponsoring institution.
hours of internship courses of any kind nor more than          Exceptions to this would be programs in which the
six semester hours of Internship 388 taken in the same         decision is made to partner with the sponsoring
department may be counted toward a School of Arts              institution, in which case the courses would be listed
and Sciences degree. Student teaching and Theatre Arts         as Richmond courses on the transcript and the grades
330-341, Practicum, are not included in this policy.           treated as having been earned at Richmond. Approval
    Further information is available from the chair or         for such programs would be submitted through the
coordinator of the appropriate department or program.          same channels as outlined above.
Visiting Away Programs                                         Marine Studies
Students who wish to study away from the University            The University of Richmond Department of Biology
of Richmond for a semester or year and maintain active         and the Duke University Marine Laboratory (DUML)
status must participate in a program that has been             offer a program supplement in marine science.
approved for visiting away status. Students leaving the        Instruction is given by DUML and may be accepted as
University on any program that does not carry visiting         transfer credit in the student’s University of Richmond
away status must withdraw from the University and              program. Further information about the program can be
apply to the appropriate dean for readmission.                 obtained from the University of Richmond Department
                                                               of Biology.
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/AMERICAN STUDIES • 55



Master’s Degree, Early Beginning                              Research Grants for Undergraduates
University of Richmond students who are near                  Each year the School of Arts and Sciences offers its
completion of the undergraduate degree may begin              students unusual opportunities for research projects.
study in a master’s degree program in the University’s        Grants are awarded by the Undergraduate Research
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Please see              Committee to support research projects in a variety of
Academic Procedures section for further details.              ways such as the purchase of materials and equipment,
                                                              travel or other such expenses and presenting or publishing
Minor Option                                                  the results of the research. The grant may be awarded
A minor is a secondary academic specialization that may       for a project which is the student’s own idea or an idea
be sought in addition to the required academic major.         that has been conceived in cooperation with a faculty
A minor consists of at least 15 semester hours and may        member; in any case, there must be a faculty member
include certain other requirements as specified by the         who is willing to supervise the project. Generally, the
academic department concerned. A student may elect to         project is approved for academic credit, and often the
complete more than one minor in the degree program.           student and the faculty member will coauthor one or
The minor is declared in the same manner as the               more professional papers on the work. Application forms
major. Upon graduation, each completed minor will be          and further information are available from the associate
recorded on the student’s permanent academic record,          dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, whose office
provided the minor is listed on the degree application        is in the administrative wing of Boatwright Library, or
form and the requirements have been met. Many                 through the departmental chair of the department in
academic departments offer a minor. The requirements          which the project is to be supervised.
in the minor, for the departments in which the minor
is available, are presented under the appropriate
departmental listing in the Curricula section.


             SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA
This chapter presents departmental majors and minors, and the courses, with their descriptions, offered by each
department. In a course description, where the course numbers for a two-semester course are separated by a hyphen,
either half of the course may be taken independently for credit, and in any order, unless a prerequisite is stated. Note:
Undergraduate courses at the University of Richmond long were numbered in the range 0-399, with 300 level being
the most advanced. Beginning with the 1990 fall term, undergraduate course numbers may extend through the 400
level; however, not all departments have renumbered their courses. Therefore, it should not necessarily be concluded
that a department with 400-level courses has more advanced offerings than a department having only 300-level
courses as its highest.
Individual Internship                                         AMERICAN STUDIES
Any academic department may offer an individual               Coordinator: Kathy Hoke, Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office
internship under the following general description:           Affiliated Faculty:
388 Individual Internship. Application of academic            Betram Ashe, English
skills and theories in a selected work environment,           Abigail Cheever, English
plus related academic work supervised by a member             Margaret Denton, Art and Art History
of the faculty. Pass/fail grading may be designated by a      Jennifer Erkulwater, Political Science
department for any or all enrollments. May be repeated;       Woody Holton, History
however, no more than six semester hours in the same          Amy Howard, Center for Civic Engagement
department may be counted toward the total number             Suzanne Jones, English
of hours required for a degree. Prerequisite: Permission      Robert Kenzer, History
of department concerned. 1-6 sem. hrs. Note: No more          David Leary, University Professor
than 12 semester hours of internship of any kind may          Peter Lurie, English
count toward the total number of hours required for a         Kibibi Mack-Shelton, History
degree. Student Teaching and Theatre Arts Practica are        Gary McDowell, Leadership
not included in this policy.                                  John Pagan, Law School
                                                              Ilka Saal, English
                                                              Gary Shapiro, Philosophy
                                                              Douglas Winiarski, Religion
                                                              Thomas Wren, Leadership
56 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



   The core premise of American Studies is quite             HIST 209     African American History to 1865
simple: no discipline or perspective can satisfactorily      HIST 210     African American History Since 1865
encompass the diversity and variation that have marked       HIST 300     Early American Women
American society and culture from the very beginning.        Religion
Therefore, the American Studies major is constructed         RELG 357 Early American Religion
as an interdisciplinary program that invites students        RELG 359 American Judaism
to combine courses from a variety of academic fields
in order to create their own, unique study of America.       Sociology
Some may favor sociological, historical or political         SOC 316      Race and Ethnicity in America
interpretations; others may be drawn to literary or visual   SOC 330      Work and Society
modes of interpretation. However individual majors           SOC 332      Selected Topics in Ethnic Studies
fashion their courses of study, each major will have an      Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
opportunity to engage a range of topics and faculty          WGSS 303 Women in Television: Representations,
members in a discussion of what is entailed in the study               Images and Stereotypes
of American society and culture.                             Area B: Culture and Representation
American Studies Major                                       Art
Note: The grade point average of the coursework              ART 322      Museum Studies
comprising the major must be no less than 2.00 with no       English
course grade below C- (1.70).                                ENGL 321     Early American Literature
    The major requires nine courses for a total of 32-       ENGL 322     Literature of the American Revolution
36 semester hours selected from the courses below and        ENGL 325     Age of the American Renaissance
distributed as follows:                                      ENGL 326     From Revolution to Romanticism:
      • AMST 201, Introduction to American Studies,                       American Fiction through 1860
        4 hours                                              ENGL 330     Special Topics in American
      • One American Identities course at the 300 level*,                 Literature before 1860
        3-4 hours                                            ENGL 332     Literatures of the Caribbean
      • One Culture and Representation course at the         ENGL 334     American Indian Literatures
        300 level*, 3-4 hours                                ENGL 353     American Realism and Regionalism
      • One Politics and Beliefs course at the 300 level*,   ENGL 354     Literature of the American South
        3-4 hours                                            ENGL 355     Race and Ethnicity in
      • Four additional electives chosen from list below;                 American Literature
        must come from at least two departments, 12-16       ENGL 356     Twentieth-Century American Poetry
        hours                                                ENGL 357     From Modernism to Postmodernism:
      • AMST 400, Seminar in American Studies OR                          Twentieth-Century American Fiction
        AMST 401, Thesis, 4 hours                            ENGL 358     African-American Women Writers
*History courses taken at the 200-level may count as 300-    ENGL 359     Contemporary American Literature
level courses.                                               ENGL 360     Studies in the American Novel
    American Studies majors also may choose to pursue        ENGL 369     American Culture/American Film
a concentration in Ethnic Studies. Students choosing         History
this option would be required to take 5 courses focusing     HIST 213     African American Cultural History
on the questions of ethnicity. All of these courses need     HIST 214     US and the World 1877-1945
not study the same ethnic group (i.e. African-American,      HIST 301     The Civil War in Literature and Film
Native American, Latino/Latina, etc.).                       HIST 303     Psychology in US Society and Culture
Area A: American Identities                                  Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
English                                                      WGSS 303 Women in Television: Representations,
ENGL 334 American Indian Literatures                                   Images and Stereotypes
ENGL 355 Race and Ethnicity in                               Area C: Politics and Beliefs
         American Literature
                                                             History
ENGL 358 African-American Women Writers
                                                             HIST 200     Colonial America
History                                                      HIST 201     The American Revolution
HIST 202      American Women from the                        HIST 204     The Civil War and Reconstruction
              Colonial Period to the Present                 HIST 212     The Civil Rights Movement
                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/AMERICAN STUDIES • 57



Journalism                                                AMST 323 Psychology in American Society and
JOUR 302 Public Affairs Reporting                         Culture
JOUR 303 Journalism Law, Ethics                           Fulfills Culture and Representation seminar requirement.
Political Science                                         (See Psychology 437; same as History 303) 4 sem. hrs.
PLSC 304 Virginia Government and Politics                 AMST 325 Narratives of the Discovery and
PLSC 315 American Political Theory                        Conquest of the New World
PLSC 322 Public Opinion and Public Policy                 Almost from the moment European explorers
PLSC 325 Racial Politics                                  encountered it, the new world sparked the imagination
PLSC 326 Legislative Process                              of its discoverers and spawned a large literature. That
PLSC 327 The American Presidency                          literature was as varied as the land it described: from
PLSC 328 American National Government                     travel narratives and histories to novels, plays and poems.
PLSC 329 Campaigns and Elections                          Studies how early travelers depicted the new world and
PLSC 331 Constitutional Law                               its inhabitants and how the discovery challenged and
PLSC 333 Civil Rights/Liberties                           reshaped Europeans’ notions of themselves and the
PLSC 336 American Constitutional History                  world. Fulfills Culture and Representation seminar
PLSC 337 The American Legal System                        requirement. Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or
PLSC 350 American Foreign Policy                          permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
Religion
RELG 357 Early American Religion                          AMST 373 Witchcraft and Its Interpreters
RELG 358 Selected Topics in American                      Fulfills American Identities and Politics and Beliefs
         Religious Traditions                             seminar requirement. (See Religion 373) 3 sem. hrs.
RELG 359 American Judaism                                 AMST 375 Cults, Communes, & Utopias in Early
RELG 369 Problems in Social Ethics                        America
Sociology                                                 Fulfills Politics and Beliefs seminar requirement. (See
SOC 216      Social Inequalities                          Religion 375) 3 sem. hrs.
SOC 303      Sociology of Families
                                                          AMST 381 Community Problem Solving Seminar
SOC 309      Social Problems
                                                          Combines internship with reading and discussion
SOC 310      Crime and Justice in a
                                                          about community problems from multidisciplinary
             Post-Modern Society
                                                          perspectives. Area of study will vary according to topic
SOC 311      Juvenile Delinquency
                                                          of the course. Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or
SOC 320      Sociology of Religion
                                                          junior or senior status. 3 sem. hrs.
SOC 324      Law and Society
SOC 329      Education and Society                        AMST 398 Selected Topics
                                                          Varying multidisciplinary topics related to American
COURSES                                                   Studies. Area of study will vary according to topic of the
AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies                 course. 1-4 sem. hrs.
Surveys multidisciplinary nature of American Studies by
focusing on methodologies, sources, themes and major      AMST 400 Seminar in American Studies
ideas used when examining American culture. 4 sem.        Designed primarily as capstone experience for American
hrs.                                                      Studies majors, seminar will focus on topic in American
                                                          culture that can be approached through several
AMST 304 Early American Women                             disciplines. Prerequisites: American Studies 201, junior
Fulfills American Identities seminar requirement. (See     or senior status, and at least two American Studies
History 300) 4 sem. hrs.                                  seminars. 4 sem. hrs.
AMST 315 Civil War in Film and Literature                 AMST 401 Thesis
Fulfills Culture and Representation seminar requirement.   Thesis project involving primary sources designed,
(See History 301) 4 sem. hrs.                             researched and written by student under faculty
                                                          supervision. Prerequisites: American Studies 201, junior
AMST 321 American Immigration and Ethnicity
                                                          or senior status, and an approved prospectus with
Examination, through historical and literary materials,
                                                          bibliography. 4 sem. hrs.
of challenges confronting and posed by waves of
immigrants who shaped American civilization.
Prerequisite: American Studies 201, or at least junior
status, or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
58 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




ANTHROPOLOGY                                                       • Two regional and/or topical courses may be taken
Department of Sociology and Anthropology                             at study abroad institutions with departmental
                                                                     approval.
Joan Neff, Chair                                                   • No more than 3 study abroad courses may count
Associate Professors Neff, Nourse, Obi, Wharton                      towards the major requirements.
Assistant Professors Hass, Ransom
Professionals from the field also are employed as adjunct       The Anthropology Minor
faculty. Upper-level courses are taught on a rotating basis.   Note: The grade point average of the anthropology
                                                               coursework comprising the minor must be no less than
The major in anthropology stresses cultural anthropology,
                                                               2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.7).
the study of contemporary and historically recent
human societies around the world. Specifically, cultural        Requirements:
anthropology focuses on the ways in which various                 • ANTH 101
individuals and groups (societies) construct their ideas          • 4 additional courses in anthropology
(culture) about the world and the ways in which these          List A: Regional Courses
ideas influence how various people behave. Courses in
                                                               The Americas
anthropology compare diverse cultures to determine if
                                                               ANTH 307 Introduction to Native Peoples of the
there are any principles that operate universally. Some
                                                                          Americas
courses in cultural anthropology study particular regions
                                                               ANTH 308 Cultures and Peoples of Latin America
of the world and the way in which locals construct their
realities and find meaning in their lives. Other courses        Africa
in cultural anthropology select various dimensions of          ANTH 338 Peoples of Africa
human life - economics, family life, religion, politics,       SOC 230  Introduction to Study of Africa
art, etc., and examine how one of these subjects relates       Asia
to all the other dimensions in one particular culture or       ANTH 339 Peoples of the Pacific
across cultures in general.                                    ANTH 340 Peoples of Southeast Asia
The Anthropology Major                                         Middle East
Note: The grade point average of the anthropology              ANTH 379 Sex and Gender in the Middle East
coursework comprising the major must be no less than           ANTH 379 Cultures and Peoples of the Middle East
2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.7).                      List B: General Anthropology Courses
Requirements:                                                  ANTH 300 Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural
11 courses, including                                                    Perspectives
     • ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural                       ANTH 304 Ritual, Witchcraft and Divination
        Anthropology                                           ANTH 336 Big Men, Chiefs and Presidents:
     • ANTH 211 Fundamentals of Field Research                           Political Anthropology
        Methods and Data Analysis                              ANTH 379 Selected Topics
     • ANTH 221 Theories of Culture                            ANTH 388 Individual Internship
     • ANTH 400 Senior Thesis Proposal                         ANTH 426-427 Directed Independent Study
     • ANTH 401 Capstone Seminar                               ANTH 489 Research Practicum
     • At least two regional courses from List A
     • At least two topical courses from List B                COURSES
     • Two electives from either List A or List B              ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    Participation in an approved study abroad experience       Evolution of culture from hunting/gathering bands to
of at least six weeks in duration.                             modern industrial states. Cross-cultural perspective on
                                                               social structure, religion, economy and politics. 4 sem.
Notes:
                                                               hrs. (FSSA)
    • ANTH 101 is a prerequisite for all other courses
       in Anthropology.                                        ANTH 211 Fundamentals of Field Research and
    • Students must achieve a grade of C or better in          Data Analysis
       both ANTH 211 and ANTH 221 in order to                  Introduction to the methods of constructing and
       take 400-level courses in the department and to         analyzing ethnographic materials using qualitative and
       receive credit toward the major for courses taken       quantitative methodologies. Prerequisite: Anthropology
       outside the department.                                 101 4 sem. hrs.
    • One regional or one topical course may be
       taken in a department outside of Sociology and
       Anthropology with departmental approval.
                                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ARABIC • 59



ANTH 221 Theories of Culture                                   ANTH 340 Peoples of Southeast Asia
History of cultural and social anthropological thought,        Broadly covers cultural diversity and continuities of
major theoretical perspectives and contemporary                mainland and island Southeast Asia. Religion, gender
issues as to how humans construct their social worlds.         colonialism and economics will be discussed in general
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 4 sem. hrs.                    terms. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3 sem. hrs.
ANTH 300 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives                 ANTH 379 Selected Topics
Cross-cultural analysis of masculinity and femininity.         Various topics in the field of anthropology, such as sex
Diversity and variation. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101.       and gender in the Middle East. May be repeated for
3 sem. hrs.                                                    credit if topics differ. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101.
                                                               1-4 sem. hrs.
ANTH 301 Dependency and Development: An
                                                               ANTH 388 Individual Internship
Introduction to the Third World
                                                               Supervised independent field work. Prerequisites:
(See International Studies 301.)
                                                               Anthropology 101 and permission of instructor. 3 sem.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                               hrs.
ANTH 304 Ritual, Witchcraft & Divination                       ANTH 400 Senior Thesis Proposal Seminar
Role of religion in tribal, peasant and industrial cultures,   Preparation course for senior thesis in which students
including myth, ritual, symbolism and relation of              conduct research, write annotated bibliography, write
religion to social structure. Prerequisite: Anthropology       proposal and submit proposal to Institutional Review
101. 3 sem. hrs.                                               Board for the senior capstone thesis in the spring.
ANTH 307 Introduction to Native Peoples of the                 Prerequisites: Anthropology 211 and Anthropology 221
Americas                                                       with a grade of C or better and permission of instructor.
Historical development, culture, relations with U.S.           1 sem. hr.
government, and present issues of Native Americans             ANTH 401 Capstone Seminar
north of the Rio Grande. Prerequisite: Anthropology            Preparation of senior thesis to complete anthropology
101. 4 sem. hrs.                                               major. Prerequisite: Anthropology 400. 4 sem. hrs.
ANTH 308 Cultures and Peoples of Latin America                 ANTH 426-427 Directed Independent Study
Anthropological overview of Latin American cultures            Prerequisites: Anthropology 211 and Anthropology 221
and subcultures, including close studies of particular pre-    with a grade of C or better. 1-3 sem. hrs.
Columbian civilizations, contemporary tribal peoples,          ANTH 489 Research Practicum
peasants and urbanites. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101.        Work closely with professor on research project,
4 sem. hrs.                                                    including design, data collection, data analysis and
                                                               dissemination of results. Prerequisites: Anthropology
ANTH 310 Tribe, Nation, World: The Anthropology
                                                               211 and Anthropology 221 with a grade of C or better.
of Globalization.
                                                               1-4 sem. hrs.
(See International Studies 310.)
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                               ARABIC
ANTH 336 Big Men, Chiefs and Presidents: The                   Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures
Anthropology of Politics
Power, authority and conflict in cross-cultural perspective,    Martin Sulzer-Reichel, Director of Arabic Language
especially in preindustrial societies. Development of          Program
theory in political anthropology; types of political           This section contains information specific to the program
systems; evolution of political systems; contemporary          in Arabic. For full information regarding departmental
theory. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3 sem. hrs.            policies relevant to all MLC programs, study abroad and
                                                               course sequencing, see the main page of the Department
ANTH 338 Peoples of Africa                                     of Modern Literatures and Cultures.
Anthropological approach to history, economics,
kinship, religion and gender in various African areas.         COURSES
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3 sem. hrs.                    ARAB 101-102 Introduction to the Arabic
ANTH 339 Peoples of the Pacific                                 Language and Culture
Melanesian, Polynesian, Micronesian. Anthropological           Introduction to Arabic language and culture;
approach to history, economy, kinship, religion and            development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and
gender relationships. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. 3        writing. Prerequisite: Arabic 101 is the prerequisite to
sem. hrs.                                                      Arabic 102. 4-4 sem. hrs.
60 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




ART HISTORY                                                    E. Seminar in Art History, 4 semester hours
Department of Art and Art History                                 ART 319 Advanced Seminar, 4
Mark Rhodes, Chair                                             F. ART 365 Art Theories and Methodologies, 4
Professor Addiss                                                   semester hours
Associate Professors Denton, Rhodes, Sjovold, Softic’          G. ART 466 Thesis: Research Project, 4 semester hours
Assistant Professors Calvillo, Drummond, Pevny                    Students prepare their bibliography and thesis
Executive Director of the University Museums Waller               proposal to present to the art faculty at the end of the
Professionals from the fields in art are also employed as          fall semester; thesis is completed during the spring
adjunct faculty members.                                          semester.
The Department of Art and Art History offers programs
                                                               Majors should take Art 221-222 before enrolling in
in the studio arts, Western and non-Western art history,
                                                               300-level Art History courses. Independent studies
and museum studies. In the Modlin Center for the
                                                               cannot be substituted for required courses in the art
Arts, students work in an environment where they
                                                               history major.
can develop their intellectual and creative abilities
to the fullest potential. In addition to a rigorous and        In addition to the above, the following are strongly
stimulating curriculum, students also participate in the       recommended for the major:
activities of the University Museums. The museums              A semester of international studies through a
present exhibitions of both historical and contemporary        program approved by the department and the Dean
art with related lectures, workshops and symposia, with        of International Education. A maximum of two
visiting artists, critics and art historians. A study abroad   courses may be applied toward the major, with prior
program allows students to study art and art history in        departmental approval.
approved programs under the direction of the Office of             ART 388  Individual Internship, 1-3
International Education. Because majors are required              CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archeology, 3
to develop a senior project, it is recommended that               CLSC 302 Roman Art and Archeology, 3
prospective majors consult with the department early to           PHIL 281 Philosophy of Art, 3
allow adequate time for planning.                                          (or another course in aesthetics)
The Art History Major                                             RELG 251 Sacred Arts of India, 3
Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each     *Note: These courses cannot be substituted for major
course comprising the major.                                   requirements, which must be fulfilled through Art History
   Thirty-seven to 42 semester hours selected from the         Department offerings.
courses below, distributed as follows:
                                                               Honors Program in Art History
A. Art History Surveys, 6 semester hours                       Majors are encouraged to apply for and pursue the
   Two courses:                                                honors program in Art History. To earn honors in Art
   ART 221 Art History: Prehistory through                     History, a student must complete at least 12 hours of
                the Middle Ages, 3                             honors credit with distinction through a combination of
   ART 222 Art History: Renaissance to                         upper-level courses including Art 365-466; the program
                the Present, 3                                 must be planned in consultation with the student’s
B. Art History Courses, 9-12 semester hours                    major advisor and the department. Honors students also
   Three 300-level courses selected from Art History           must maintain an overall GPA of no less than 3.30, a
   Department offerings, one in each of the following          3.50 in the major, and receive a 3.7 on the thesis.
   three areas:
                                                               Related Concentrations
   Late Antiquity, Medieval Art History                        See Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Management
   Renaissance, 17th- and 18th-Century Art History             for Studio Art, Art History, Music, Theatre and Dance
   European and American, 19th, 20th centuries and             Majors or Minors
   Contemporary Art History
                                                               Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval and
C. Non-Western Art, 3-4 semester hours                         Renaissance Studies for Art History Majors
   One non-Western course chosen from art history
   department offerings.                                       The Art History Minor
D. Studio Art Courses (ARTS), 7-8 semester hours               Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each
   ARTS 211 Materials and Techniques, and one other            course comprising the minor.
   studio course                                                  Eighteen semester hours approved by the department,
                                                               including
                                                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ART HISTORY • 61



     • Art History 221-222, 6 hours                             ART 311 Medieval Byzantine Art, 600-1453
     • Three semester hours from a studio course                Focuses on art and architecture created in the eastern
     • Nine semester hours from three elective courses          Mediterranean between the seventh century and the fall
       chosen from Art History Department offerings,            of Constantinople in 1453. Explores cultural dialogue
       of which six semester hours must be at the 300-          among the Byzantine Empire and its Western European,
       level.                                                   Eastern European and Islamic neighbors. 3 sem. hrs.

COURSES                                                         ART 312 Medieval Art in Western Europe, 8th-15th
ART 212 Introduction to Asian Art                               Centuries
Introductory survey of the arts of India, China, Korea          Surveys the rich and varied production of visual
and Japan in historical and cultural context. 3 sem. hrs.       culture in Western Europe from early Middle Ages to
                                                                beginning of the Renaissance. Considers the changing
ART 221 Survey I: Prehistory through the Middle                 visual experiences associated with the Early Medieval,
Ages                                                            Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque and Gothic
Survey of Western Art, with some attention given to             periods. 3 sem. hrs.
non-Western Art, from prehistoric times through the
Middle Ages. Intended as introductory course for general        ART 313 Art of the United States
student as well as art majors and minors. 221 and 222           Art and architecture from 1800 to 1900. Examined in
may be taken independently and in any sequence. 3 sem.          relation to cultural, political and social contexts of 19th-
hrs.                                                            century America. 3 sem. hrs.

ART 222 Survey II: Renaissance to the Present                   ART 314 Northern Renaissance Art
Historical and analytical study of representative major         Fifteenth- and 16th-century Northern Renaissance art
works of art from Renaissance to the present for general        from Van Eyck to Bruegel. 3 sem. hrs.
student and art major. 3 sem. hrs.                              ART 315 Art of the Italian Renaissance
ART 226 Art and Culture of Japan                                A survey of Italian painting, sculpture and architecture
Introduction to art and culture of Japan stressing              between 1250 and 1500, with emphasis on the historical
interconnections between art, literature and historical         context of particular objects or monuments. Students
developments. 4 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                                will examine primary sources whenever possible and
                                                                consider issues related to the systems of patronage,
ART 279 Selected Topics                                         spirituality, intellectual life and art criticism of the
Examples include African Art, History of Architecture           period. 4 sem. hrs.
and other specialized topics. May be repeated for credit
if topics differ. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-4   ART 316 Art in the Age of Reform
sem. hrs.                                                       Beginning with the Italian High Renaissance and ending
                                                                with baroque art in early 17th-century Europe, this course
ART 282 Values in World Film                                    considers artistic production during a period of religious,
Study of films from around the world centering on                political and cultural crisis. Lectures, readings and
major themes, with focus on differing cultural values           discussions evaluate the agents, ideas and circumstances
and film art and techniques. 3 sem. hrs.                         that brought about the stylistic developments of
                                                                mannerist and early baroque art. 4 sem. hrs.
ART 309 Image and Icon in Medieval Art
Focuses on role of the panel painted image in medieval          ART 317 Nineteenth-Century Art
world. Explores the conventions, aesthetics and ideology        Major art trends during 19th-century in Europe. Special
of medieval images, as well as their production, use and        attention given to representation of women in art and
restoration. Provides introduction to techniques of             women artists. 3 sem. hrs.
medieval panel painting, and asks students to try their
hand at the creative process. 3 sem. hrs.                       ART 318 Twentieth-Century Art
                                                                Major movements and developments of modern art in
ART 310 Late Antique and Early Christian Art                    Europe and America. Examination of theoretical bases of
Surveys artistic developments in the Mediterranean              modern art, concepts of avant-garde and consideration
basin from the first to eighth centuries. Concerned with         of public’s relationship to modern art. 3 sem. hrs.
continuities as well as changes and innovations in visual
culture associated with the rise of Christianity in the
Roman Empire. 3 sem. hrs.
62 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ART 319 Advanced Seminar                                      ART 388 Individual Internship
Highly focused in-depth studies on topics of Art History      Supervised work experience at approved museum,
related to departmental course offerings. Topics to be        gallery or other art institutions. May be repeated for
chosen by instructor. Representative topics: Zen Art,         credit at a different institution. Prerequisite: Permission
Contemporary Art, Surrealism, Women Artists. May              of instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.
be repeated for credit if topic differs. Prerequisite: 300-
level Art History course in the area of the Seminar or        ART 395 Independent Study
permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                         Individually designed program under faculty supervision.
                                                              Note: Independent studies cannot be substituted for
ART 322 Museum Studies                                        required courses in the art history major. Prerequisite:
History, philosophy, functions and future of museums;         Permission of instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.
collection research, evaluation, publications, and
museum procedures and education. Prerequisite: 200-           ART 466 Thesis: Research Project
level art history course or permission of instructor. 3       Required for art history majors in their senior year.
sem. hrs.                                                     Prerequisite: Art History 365. 4 sem. hrs.

ART 323 Studies in the History of Photography                 STUDIO ART
Combines study of the photograph and its interpretation       Department of Art and Art History
with consideration of technical developments. 3 sem.
hrs.                                                          Mark Rhodes, Chair
                                                              Professor Addiss
ART 324 Art Histories                                         Associate Professors Denton, Rhodes, Sjovold, Softic’
Courses in areas of art history at a 300-level not covered    Assistant Professors Calvillo, Drummond, Pevny
in regular departmental offerings. May be repeated for        Executive Director of the University Museums Waller
credit if topic differs. 3-4 sem. hrs.                        Professionals from the fields in art also are employed as
                                                              adjunct faculty members.
ART 345 Philanthropy in the Arts
(See Music 345; Same as Theatre 345.) Prerequisite: Art       The Department of Art and Art History offers programs
322 or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs.              in the studio arts, Western and non-Western art history
                                                              and museum studies. In the Modlin Center for the
ART 365 Art Theories and Methodologies                        Arts, students work in an environment where they
Study of theoretical approaches and methods used in           can develop their intellectual and creative abilities
discipline of art history. Required for art history majors,   to the fullest potential. In addition to a rigorous and
recommended before their senior year. Permission of           stimulating curriculum, students also participate in the
instructor required for non-art history majors. 4 sem. hrs.   activities of the University Museums. The museums
ART 376 Theory and Practice of Art                            present exhibitions of both historical and contemporary
Art theory and aesthetics from different historical periods   art with related lectures, workshops and symposia, with
and different cultures will be studied and discussed in       visiting artists, critics and art historians. A study abroad
relation to current artmaking. Both research and creative     program allows students to study art and art history in
work will be required. Does not count towards the Art         approved programs under the direction of the Office of
History major or minor. Prerequisites: Studio Art majors      International Education. Because majors are required
and minors with at least two Studio Arts courses and          to develop a senior project, it is recommended that
ART 221 or 222 or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.       prospective majors consult with the department early to
                                                              allow adequate time for planning.
ART 378 Topics in Asian Art
Examples include Japanese prints, painting, ceramics,         The Studio Art Major
Buddhist art and Chinese calligraphy. May be repeated         Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each
for credit when topic varies. 1-4 sem. hrs.                   course comprising the major.
                                                                 Forty-six semester hours composed of the following
ART 383 East Asian Painting, Poetry and                       courses:
Calligraphy
                                                              A. Foundation Courses, 12 semester hours
Intense study of how the three arts of painting, poetry and
                                                                 ARTS 101 Foundation Drawing, 3
calligraphy, practiced with the same materials of brush and
                                                                 ARTS 102 Foundation Design, 3
ink, have been integrated for more than a millennium as
                                                                 ARTS 103 Foundation Sculpture, 3
“scholar arts” in East Asia, with both historical study and
                                                                 ARTS 104 Foundation Art and Technology, 3
actual practice for students. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/STUDIO ART • 63



B. Art History Courses, 10 semester hours                    COURSES
   ART 221 Art History: Prehistory through                   ARTS 101 Foundation Drawing
               the Middle Ages, 3                            Explores issues of form and visual composition,
   ART 222 Art History: Renaissance to                       traditional and contemporary concepts in drawing, and
               the present, 3                                problems of observational drawing. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
   ART 376 Art Theory and Practice, 4
               (before the senior year)-Students may         ARTS 102 Foundation Design
               substitute ART 365, Art Theories and          Theories, perceptions and interactions of color researched
               Methodologies, with both instructor’s         through painting, collage and computer design. Projects
               and advisor’s approval.                       incorporate basic principles of two-dimensional abstract
                                                             design, composition and digital art. 3 sem. hrs.
C. Three studio classes at the 200 level, one of
   which must be above 250, 12 semester hours.               ARTS 103 Foundation Sculpture
                                                             Basic introduction to material and perceptual problems
D. ARTS 350, Advanced Studio before senior year              in sculpture. Explores problems of representational,
   - exception only with advisor’s approval, 4               abstract and nonobjective sculpture. This basic
   semester hours                                            introduction to methods and concepts of sculpture will
E. ARTS 465, Thesis Development, 4 semester hours            emphasize elements of three-dimensional design and
F. ARTS 466, Honors Thesis Exhibition, 4 semester            composition. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
    hours or another ARTS 350                                ARTS 104 Foundation Art & Technology
    Students who pass the qualifying exam at midterm         An introduction to the field of art and technology.
take ARTS 466, Honors Thesis Exhibition. Others take         Students will produce original works of art using both
ARTS 350, Advanced Studio. A student seeking teaching        traditional and digital artmaking tools while studying
licensure may substitute ARTS 350, Advanced Studio,          the perceptual impact of technology throughout history
or an independent study, as approved by department,          and within contemporary art and culture. No prior
for Studio Art 465.                                          computer experience is necessary. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
                                                             ARTS 160 Basic Photography
Honors Program in Studio Art
                                                             Introduction to fundamental, technical and aesthetic
Majors are encouraged to apply for and pursue the
                                                             issues of black and white photography with emphasis on
honors program in Studio Art. To earn honors in Studio
                                                             using medium for personal expression. Includes series
Art a student must complete 12 hours of honor credit
                                                             of problems designed to increase understanding of basic
with distinction through a combination of upper-level
                                                             camera operation, darkroom techniques and artmaking
courses with Thesis Development and Honors Thesis
                                                             strategies. History of photography will be included
Exhibition; the program must be planned in consultation
                                                             through study of past and contemporary photography.
with the student’s major advisor and the department.
                                                             Camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter
Honors students also must maintain an overall GPA of
                                                             speeds required. Prerequisite: Studio Art 101 or 102. 3
no less than 3.30 while in the program.
                                                             sem. hrs.
Related Concentrations                                       ARTS 205 Observational Painting
See Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Technology       Introduction to practice of painting with emphasis
for Studio Art, Music and Theatre Majors                     on observational painting. Emphasizes working
Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Management           understanding of methods and materials of oil painting
for Studio Art, Art History, Music, Theatre and Dance        while investigating basic aspects of visual perception and
Majors or Minors                                             how to assess subject, form and content in a work of art.
                                                             4 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
The Studio Art Minor
Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each   ARTS 206 Explorations in Printmaking and
course comprising the minor.                                 Drawing
   Eighteen to 20 semester hours approved by the             Explores formal and conceptual problems through
department, including                                        simultaneous or combined drawing and printmaking
    • One foundation class (ARTS 101, Foundation             exercises. Promotes understanding of potential of graphic
      Drawing, or ARTS 102, Foundation Design)               media, introduces new image-making techniques and
    • ARTS 103, Foundation Sculpture                         concepts, including scale and sequence experiments and
    • One art history survey (ART 221 or 222) (3             multi-technique works. Technical demonstrations and
      credit hours);                                         presentations precede individual studio projects. 4 sem.
    • Three studio art courses (9-12 credit hours).          hrs. (FSVP)
64 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ARTS 208 Figure Study: Drawing and Sculpture                 ARTS 276 Printmaking Studio: Book
Explores the human figure in two- and three-dimensional       Examines the book as an art object. Introduces basics of
media. Students investigate gesture, line, value, volume,    bookbinding (Western and non-Western), printing and
surface modeling and anatomy, as well as expressive,         basic typesetting skills, while working on individual and
conceptual and historical approaches in the study of the     collaborative studio projects. Concepts explored include
figure. 4 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                                    sequencing, text and image relationships, and content
                                                             and structure relationship. Students research evolution
ARTS 209 Introduction to Visual Language                     of the artists’ book and contemporary practice in this
Through sequence of individualized creative projects         medium. Prerequisites: Studio Art 101, 102, 206, or
course explores relationship of meaning to visual            208; and Art 221 or 222. 4 sem. hrs.
form. In addition to studio projects in two- and three-
dimensional media, students engage in research and           ARTS 277 Printmaking Studio: Etching
experimentation with interdisciplinary emphasis. 4 sem.      Focuses on techniques, methods and formal and
hrs. (FSVP)                                                  conceptual potential of intaglio (etching and engraving)
                                                             and related print media. Includes the techniques of
ARTS 211 Materials and Techniques                            drypoint, mezzotint, line etching, aquatint and printing
Explores historical and experimental artmaking               in color. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Studio
materials and techniques. Topics to be covered will          Art 101, 206, or 208; and Art 221 or 222. 4 sem. hrs.
vary according to instructor. Studies may be two- and/
or three-dimensional and relate to drawing, painting,        ARTS 278 Printmaking Studio: Lithography
printmaking and sculpture processes. 4 sem. hrs.             Focuses on the techniques, methods and formal and
                                                             conceptual potential of lithography and related print
ARTS 231 Ceramics                                            media. Includes both stone and plate lithography and
Introduction to techniques and concepts of claywork.         alternative lithographic techniques. May be repeated for
3 sem. hrs.                                                  credit. Prerequisites: Studio Art 101, 206, or 208; and
ARTS 234 Advanced Design                                     Art 221 or 222. 4 sem. hrs.
Using color theory and principles of design, focuses on      ARTS 279 Selected Topics
individual studio projects with emphasis on graphic          Examples include watercolor technique, plein-air landscape
design and digital artmaking. Prerequisites: Studio Art      painting, installation art, landscape painting, nontraditional
102; and Art 221 or 222. 3 sem. hrs.                         artmaking, and others as arranged by department. May be
ARTS 240 Digital Art: Post Photography                       repeated for credit if topics differ. Prerequisite: Art 221 or
An introduction to the field of digital photography,          222 or permission of instructor. 1-4 sem. hrs.
digital imaging and image-based installation within          ARTS 280 Digital Art: Sound
the context of contemporary art. Students will produce       An intermediate-level investigation into time-based
original works of art while studying the impact of           media, specifically sound-based art. Students will
technology upon human perception, visual art and             produce original works of art that exist outside the
contemporary culture. Emphasis will be placed upon           visual realm and focus on sound as a perceptual tool for
the ways in which digital technology has transformed         contemporary art production. Additional emphasis will
our understanding of traditional photographic media.         be placed on historical, conceptual and theoretical issues
Prerequisite: Studio Art 104. 4 sem. hrs.                    relating to sound within contemporary art and culture.
ARTS 260 Advanced Photography                                Prerequisites: Studio Art 104 and Art 221 or 222, or
Explore different styles of photography through lectures,    permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
slides, critiques and assignments. Introduction to black     ARTS 285 Digital Art: Video
and white archival fiber-base printing process in addition    An intermediate-level investigation into time-based
to experimentation with different films, filters, papers and   media, specifically digital video-based art. Students
developers, and presentation techniques. Prerequisites:      will produce original works of art that utilize time
Studio Art 160; and Art 221 or 222. 3 sem. hrs.              as a perceptual tool while studying broader issues
ARTS 275 Drawing Studio                                      surrounding the video medium within contemporary
Explores abstract, conceptual and process-based drawing.     art and culture. Prerequisites: Studio Art 104 and Art
Investigates historical and experimental methods of          221 or 222, or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
drawing not covered in Studio Art 101, Foundation            ARTS 290 Digital Art: Animation
Drawing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:          An intermediate-level investigation into time-based
Studio Art 101, 102, 205, 206, 208, or 209; and Art          media, specifically digital animation. Students
221 or 222; or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/BIOLOGY • 65



will produce original works of art that incorporate           ARTS 388 Individual Internship
drawings, still images, video and sound into animated         Supervised work experience at approved artist’s studio,
sequences. Additional emphasis will be placed on              museum or gallery. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
historical, conceptual and theoretical issues relating to     1-3 sem. hrs.
motion graphics within contemporary art and culture.
Prerequisite: Studio Art 104 and Art 221 or 222, or           ARTS 395-396 Independent Study
permission of instructor 4 sem. hrs.                          Individually designed program under faculty supervision.
                                                              Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-4/1-4 sem. hrs.
ARTS 293 Sculpture Studio
Individualized in-depth training in specific sculptural        ARTS 465 Thesis Development
approaches, techniques, media and concepts. Students          Senior studio art majors will create focused body of
choose to work from stone carving, wood carving, wood         work and begin to clarify and establish future directions
fabrication, metal fabrication, claywork, plaster carving     and resources for personal research and artmaking.
and fabrication, metal and plaster casting, and mixed         Students will prepare for midterm application for the
media objects and installation. May be repeated for           Honors Thesis Exhibition course for a spring exhibition.
credit. Prerequisites: Studio Art 103, 208, or 231; and       Prerequisites: Studio art major, senior level and Art 221
Art 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.      or 222. 4 sem. hrs.

ARTS 295 Painting Studio                                      ARTS 466 Honors Thesis Exhibition
Explores abstract, conceptual and process-based painting.     Graduating studio art majors are invited, based
Students investigate historical and experimental methods      on a successful midterm review during the Thesis
of paintings not covered in Observational Painting            Development course, to enroll in the honors thesis
(ARTS 205). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:         to organize and present an exhibition of their art in
Studio Art 101, 102, 205, 206, 208, or 209; and Art           the University art museum. Students will complete a
221 or 222; or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.          focused body of work presented in exhibition and will
                                                              participate in all aspects of the organization. The course
ARTS 296 Digital Studio: Net.Art                              also will cover the business of being an artist, including
An intermediate-level investigation into the area of          writing about and presenting one’s art, resume writing,
Web-based art production. Students will produce works         exhibiting and selling of work. Prerequisites: Studio Art
of art that incorporate and merge various traditional         465 and permission of the department. 4 sem. hrs.
and digital components into cohesive, original artworks
for online publication. Additional emphasis will be           BIOLOGY
placed upon conceptual, cultural and theoretical issues       Department of Biology
surrounding the Internet within contemporary art and          Roni J. Kingsley, Chair
culture. Prerequisites: Studio Art 104 and Art 221 or         Professors de Sá, Hayden, Kish
222, or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                 Associate Professors Boland, Gindhart, Harrison, A. Hill,
ARTS 299 Digital Art: Installation                            M. Hill, Kingsley, Radice, Smallwood, Stenger
An advanced-level investigation into media-based              Assistant Professors Knight, Runyen-Janecky, Telang,
installation. Students will propose and produce original      Treonis, Warrick
works of art in digital photography, sound, video,            Directors of Biology Laboratories Boone, Lessem, Reiner
animation, or any combination thereof. Emphasis will be       Director of Biological Imaging Marks
placed on the ways in which the environment that houses       Director of Pre-Health Education Vaughan
a project becomes an integral component of the work.          Manager of Biology Laboratories Farrell
Additional emphasis will be placed on conceptual, cultural    Stockroom Manager Joseph
and theoretical issues surrounding media-based installation   The Biology Major
within contemporary art. Prerequisites: Studio Art 104 and    Note: The grade point average of the coursework in
Art 221 or 222, or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.      biology and chemistry must be no less than 2.00 with
ARTS 350 Advanced Studio                                      no course grade below C- (1.7). Four-credit courses in
Advanced, directed individual studio projects in              biology include laboratory instruction.
the medium chosen by the student. Emphasis on                 For the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology
development of analytical and critical thinking and              Required:
individual creative vocabulary. May be repeated for               • BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics
credit. Prerequisites: Studio Art 234, 260, 275, 276, 277,        • BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology
278, 293, or 295: and Art 221 or 222; or permission of            • BIOL 210 Integrative Biology I
instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                                           • BIOL 215 Integrative Biology II
66 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



    • 16 additional hours in Biology                      Related Fields
    • MATH 212 Calculus II or MATH 232 Scientific          Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program
      Calculus II                                         Interdisciplinary Concentration in Neuroscience
    • CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry                     for Biology or Psychology Majors: see section titled
    • CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I                        Interdisciplinary Concentrations
    • CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II
    • PHYS 132 General Physics with Calculus II,          Marine and Ecosystem Studies
      133 Atomic and Sub-Atomic Physics, or 134           Opportunities are available to study marine biology
      Biological Physics                                  or marine and other ecosystems through cooperative
For the Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology                agreements with the Duke University Marine Sciences
   Required:                                              Laboratory (DUML), Beaufort, N.C., and the Marine
    • BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics                   Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., Semester in
    • BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology                 Environmental Science (MBL-SES). Work taken in the
    • BIOL 210 Integrative Biology I                      program may be included in the student’s University
    • BIOL 215 Integrative Biology II                     of Richmond curriculum only with the prior approval
    • 16 additional hours in Biology                      and under the direction of the Department of Biology.
    • CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry                     Students interested in this option are encouraged to
    • CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I                        apply to the department for further information.
    • CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II
                                                          COURSES
The Biology Minor                                         BIOL 100 Biology of Plants
   Required:                                              Holistic overview of plant biology including elements
    • BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics                   of cell biology, biochemistry, biodiversity, morphology,
    • BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology                 growth and development, physiology and ecology.
    • BIOL 210 Integrative Biology I                      Emphasizes direct interaction with live plants in
    • BIOL 215 Integrative Biology II                     the laboratory, field and greenhouse integrated with
    • 4 additional hours in Biology                       understanding of cellular structures and processes and
    • CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry                     practice of scientific method. Will not serve as basis for
                                                          further work in science nor meet entrance requirements
Approved Courses for the Biology Major                    for any health profession. Three lecture and two
and Minor                                                 laboratory hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
All 200- and 300-level courses may be used to meet
major requirements with the following exceptions: any     BIOL 101 Principles of Evolution
100-level course, 260, 350, 370, 371, 388, 391, 392,      Examines fundamentals of the theory of evolution
and 395 will not count toward the biology major or        as an example of how science works and progresses.
minor.                                                    Consists of three modules. The first module will focus
                                                          on importance of genetic variation and principles of the
Honors Program                                            evolutionary theory; the second will focus on illustrating
Students invited into the Honors program may              how evolutionary theory and evolutionary tree serve as
earn honors in Biology by completing the following        guides in biological research; and the third will focus
requirements:                                             on principles of human evolution. Will not serve as
    • a minimum GPA of 3.30 in Biology and overall        basis for further work in science nor meet entrance
    • 6 credit hours BIOL 395 Honors Research (taken      requirements for any health profession. Three lecture
       for two semesters at 3 hours per semester)         and two laboratory hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
    • 4 credit hours of BIOL in addition to those
       already required for the major. A grade of B or    BIOL 102 Exploring Human Biology
       above in this course would allow it to count       Examination of human biology from perspective of
       towards the honors degree                          cellular processes, genetics, structure and function
    • 1 credit hour BIOL 391 Honors Seminar               of organ systems, and evolution. Application of the
    • 1 credit hour BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II            scientific method in the laboratory. For nonscience
    • Honors thesis written under the supervision of a    majors. Will not serve as basis of further work in
       research advisor and presented to the department   science nor meet entrance requirements for any health
       in an oral presentation.                           profession. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per
                                                          week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
                                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/BIOLOGY • 67



BIOL 104 Biology of Human Development                         are studied, as well as theories and the mathematical and
Focuses on early embryonic development, including             graphical models used to understand them. Some labs
fertilization, stem cell formation, organ development         require work outside. Will not serve as basis for further
and sex determination. Emphasis on understanding              work in science nor meet entrance requirements for
biological principles and social implications of              any health profession. Three lecture and two laboratory
manipulating human development. Will not serve                hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
as basis for further work in science nor meet entrance
requirements for any health profession. Three lecture         BIOL 110 Emerging Infectious Diseases
and two laboratory hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)         Examination of microbes responsible for emerging
                                                              infectious diseases (and perspective of diseases with
BIOL 106 Microbiology: Unseen Life                            significant impact on history) will be used to introduce
Introduction to basic concepts needed to understand           biological principles evaluating the structure/function of
microorganisms and their impact on our world. Questions       these microbes as well as discussing the role of genetics.
addressed include: What is microbial diversity? How do        The impact of these events as well as the public policy
microbes grow? How can we control microbial growth?           response will be explored. Examples of microbes to be
How can we harness the power of microbial genetics?           studied include HIV, Ebola, Escherichaicoli, Treponema
How do microbes help in food production? What roles           palladium and staphylococcus aureus. The scientific
do microbes play in the biosphere? How do microbes            method of investigations will be an integral part of the
interact with the human body? Laboratory investigations       laboratory. Will not serve as basis for further work in
will utilize the scientific method to allow students to gain   science nor meet entrance requirements for any health
insight as to how scientific experiments are performed.        profession. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per
Designed for nonscience majors. Three lecture and two         week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
laboratory hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
                                                              BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics
BIOL 107 Human Genetics                                       Introductory course addressing theory and use of
Introduction to basic concepts in human genetics              genetics in the biological sciences. Topics include 1) gene
and how advances in the field impact health care,              organization and transmission through generations,
biotechnology, public policy and the law. Topics such as      including Mendelian inheritance, linkage and mapping;
the Human Genome Project, gene therapy and prenatal           2) gene function at the molecular level, including physical
testing for genetic disorders will be discussed. Students     nature of DNA, transcription, translation and regulation
will gain working knowledge of how scientists think           of gene expression; and 3) genetic analysis of biological
and how they approach research problems. Designed             processes such as development. Emphasis is on modern
for students with little or no background in biology,         genetic techniques and applications. Three lecture and
chemistry and mathematics. Does not count toward the          three laboratory hours per week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
biology major. Will not serve as basis for further work in
science nor meet entrance requirements for any health         BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology
profession. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per        Introductory course addressing cell structure and
week. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)                                      function at the molecular level. Major topics include
                                                              1) the chemical composition of cells, including the
BIOL 108 Environmental Biology                                structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and
Basic ecological principles and selected topics in            lipids; 2) the organization of cells including organelles
environmental science, including worldwide impact             and their functions; 3) cellular metabolism, including
of growing human population, patterns of energy               respiration, fermentation and photosynthesis; 4) cell-
consumption, and issues of water quality, water               cell interactions and communication including signaling
management, land use and biological resources.                in nerve and muscle; 5) mitosis, the cell cycle and cell
Application of the scientific method will be incorporated      death. Emphasis on modern cellular and molecular
in laboratory component. For nonscience majors. Will          techniques and applications. Three lecture and three
not serve as basis of further work in science nor meet        laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biology
entrance requirements for any health profession. Three        201 and Chemistry 141 (CHEM 141 may be taken
lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite:      concurrently). 4 sem. hrs.
High school biology. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
                                                              BIOL 210 Integrative Biology I
BIOL 109 Introduction to Ecology                              Integrated examination of features and processes that
Introduction to causes and consequences of ecological         unify the diversity of life on Earth. Has three core
patterns at all scales: individuals, species, communities     themes: 1) principles and mechanisms of evolution,
and ecosystems. Terrestrial, aquatic and marine systems       including speciation; 2) diversity of and relationships
68 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



among major groups of organisms; and 3) ecology:             BIOL 306 Systematic Botany
ways in which these organisms and the environment            Identification and classification of vascular plants;
are linked. Three lecture and three laboratory hours         emphasis on local flora, principles of systematics. Two
per week. Prerequisite: Biology 205 or Environmental         lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite:
Studies 201. 4 sem. hrs.                                     Biology 210. 4 sem. hrs.
BIOL 215 Integrative Biology II                              BIOL 307 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology
Integrated examination of features and processes that        Analysis of molecular mechanisms by which cells interact
unify diversity of life on Earth. Builds on Biology 210      with each other and the environment. Topics include
by studying how plants and animals work. Physiological       signal transduction, cell cycle regulation and molecular
processes will be considered in terms of how these           models of cancer and microbial pathogenesis. Prerequisites:
functions relate to the natural environment. Three           Biology 205 and Chemistry 206. 3 sem. hrs.
lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite:
Biology 210. 4 sem. hrs.                                     BIOL 308 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
                                                             Comparative anatomy and biology of several systems of
BIOL 225 Evolution                                           organs of representative vertebrates in an evolutionary
Introduction to biological evolution including history       context. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per
of field, and mechanisms of evolution that result in          week. Prerequisite: Biology 210. 4 sem. hrs.
biological diversification, speciation, extinction and the
fossil record. Prerequisite: Biology 201. 4 sem. hrs.        BIOL 309 Invertebrate Zoology
                                                             Comprehensive study of systematics, morphology,
BIOL 229 Microbiology                                        physiology, development, behavior and ecology of
Microorganisms are everywhere and an integral part           invertebrates, the most abundant animals on the planet.
of our world. This course introduces a broad range of        Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week plus
topics in the field, including: microbial cell structure      field trips. Prerequisite: Biology 215. 4 sem. hrs.
and function, microbial growth and nutrition,
unique aspects of microbial metabolism, viruses,             BIOL 311 Microanatomy
microbial ecology and microbial pathogenesis. The            Microscopic structures and functions of vertebrate
contributions of microbes to the world, both positive        tissues and organs. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative
and negative, will be highlighted throughout the course.     light and electron microscopy and computer-assisted
Laboratory investigations will allow students to explore     image analysis. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
microbiological-based questions. Three lecture and           per week. Prerequisite: Biology 205. 4 sem. hrs.
three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biology      BIOL 312 Developmental Biology
201 and 205 and Chemistry 141. 4 sem. hrs.                   Development of animals, concentrating on fertilization
BIOL 250 Earth Systems and Physical Geography                and early embryonic development. Emphasizes
(See Geography 250; Same as Environmental Studies            mechanisms of cell differentiation and pattern
250.) 4 sem. hrs.                                            formation. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per
                                                             week. Prerequisite: Biology 205. 4 sem. hrs.
BIOL 260 Introduction to Geographic Information
Systems                                                      BIOL 313 Microbial Pathogenesis
(See Geography 260; Same as Environmental Studies            Exploration of the general mechanisms used by pathogens
260.) 3 sem. hrs.                                            to cause disease. Topics include entry into the host,
                                                             attachment to and invasion of host cells, cell and tissue
BIOL 303 Plant Morphology                                    damage, and microbial elimination/dissemination, as well as
Structure, life histories and phylogeny of major divisions   the techniques used to study these processes. Students will
of algae, fungi and terrestrial plants. Three lecture and    examine these topics in detail in context of several specific
three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology       pathogens to more thoroughly appreciate the clinical disease
210. 4 sem. hrs.                                             that results from infection. Three lecture and three laboratory
                                                             hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology 205. 4 sem. hrs.
BIOL 305 Plant Anatomy
Microscopic structure of vascular plants with emphasis       BIOL 314 Molecular Genetics
on function, development and evolution. Three lecture        Examination of experimental underpinnings of
and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite:           knowledge about gene transmission and function through
Biology 215. 4 sem. hrs.                                     critical analysis of key papers. Lab projects focus on
                                                             developing skill in posing problems that can be addressed
                                                             experimentally. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
                                                             per week. Prerequisite: Biology 201. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/BIOLOGY • 69



BIOL 318 Field Biology                                          will emphasize molecular techniques used to study
Introduction to theory and practice of field biology research,   microorganisms in situ and includes independent
including sampling, monitoring, and experimental design.        research project. Prerequisites: Biology 201 and 205 and
Emphasis on both gathering quantitative information and         Chemistry 141. 4 sem. hrs.
understanding natural history of the study organism.
Three lectures and three laboratory hours per week.             BIOL 334 Oceanography
Prerequisite: Biology 215. 4 sem. hrs.                          Integrated introduction to biological, geological,
                                                                chemical and physical oceanography. Multidisciplinary
BIOL 325 Molecular Evolution                                    approach to ocean processes. Three lecture hours, three
Introduction to molecular evolution with focus on               laboratory hours per week, plus field trips. Prerequisites:
genome structure, mutation selection and random                 Biology 215 and Chemistry 141. 4 sem. hrs.
genetic drift at molecular level. Evolution by gene
duplication, exon shuffling and transposition. Lab               BIOL 338 Comparative Animal Physiology
focuses on cloning and recombinant DNA techniques.              Introduction to major characteristics of animal function
Strong lab component, two lecture and four laboratory           at level of whole organism and component structures and
hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology 201. 4 sem. hrs.          organ systems. Emphasis on physiological function and
                                                                processes related to survival in natural environment. Three
BIOL 326 Biochemistry                                           lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:
(See Chemistry 326.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 3 sem.        Biology 215 and Chemistry 206. 4 sem. hrs.
hrs.
                                                                BIOL 339 Physiology of Marine Organisms
BIOL 327 Biochemistry Lab                                       Physiological adaptations, including osmoregulation,
(See Chemistry 327) Prerequisites: Chemistry 206 and            respiration, diving physiology and temperature
Chemistry/Biology 326 (CHEM/BIOL 326 can be                     regulation of organisms to marine environments, such
taken concurrently) 1 sem. hrs.                                 as estuaries, the open ocean and deep sea. Three lecture
                                                                hours per week. Prerequisite: Biology 215. 3 sem. hrs.
BIOL 328 Vertebrate Zoology
Comprehensive survey of vertebrate classes emphasizing          BIOL 340 Introduction to Immunology
phylogenetic theory, natural history, behavior and              Overview of immunology. Current theories and their
ecology. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per              explanation of pertinent contemporary issues included.
week. Prerequisite: Biology 210. 4 sem. hrs.                    Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
                                                                Prerequisite: Biology 205. 4 sem. hrs.
BIOL 329 Protein Structure, Function and
Biophysics                                                      BIOL 341 Animal Physiological Ecology
(See Chemistry 329.) Prerequisites: Chemistry 309, Biology/     Introduction to animal physiological adaptation to the
Chemistry 326 and Biology/Chemistry 327. 4 sem. hrs.            natural environment. Emphasis will be on physiological
                                                                responses of animals to both biotic and abiotic factors
BIOL 330 Ecology                                                and interaction with ecology and population dynamics
Interrelationships of organisms and their environments          of species. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per
examined at the levels of individuals, populations,             week. Prerequisite: Biology 215. 4 sem. hrs.
communities and ecosystems, and application of
ecological principles to conservation. Three lecture and        BIOL 342 Biology of Cancer
three laboratory hours per week plus two overnight field         Historical perspective on principal developments in
trips. Prerequisite: Biology 215. 4 sem. hrs.                   cancer research, including selection and clonal evolution
                                                                of cancer cells, oncogenes and tumor genes, control
BIOL 332 Tropical Marine Biology                                of tumor growth and metastasis, RNA and DNA
Introduction to marine biology and other oceanographic          transforming viruses, and molecular basis of cancer
disciplines using tropical marine habitats as specific           treatment. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per
examples. Three lecture hours per week and laboratory           week. Prerequisite: Biology 205. 4 sem. hrs.
portion composed of field trips and exercises including
Spring Break field experience in Caribbean (extra fee            BIOL 343 Neurobiology
required). Prerequisites: Biology 215 and permission of         Broad course focusing on study of neurons and neuronal
instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                                         systems. Topics to be explored include the neuron and
                                                                its mechanisms for the transmission of signals, neuronal
BIOL 333 Microbial Ecology                                      organization, sensory perception, integration, behavioral
Community dynamics play an important role                       output, development and basic neurogenetics. Three
in organismal interactions. Examines the role of                lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite:
microorganisms in terrestrial, freshwater and marine            Biology 205 4 sem. hrs.
habitats, as well as animal-plant systems. The laboratory
70 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



BIOL 344 Behavioral Ecology                                     components. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
Introduction to analysis of behavior of organisms,              per week. Prerequisite: Any college-level biology course.
including humans, by study of how behavior affects              4 sem. hrs.
survival and reproduction. Behaviors studied include
foraging, aggression, cooperation and reproduction.             BIOL 384 Eukaryotic Genetics
Verbal, graphical and mathematical models to describe           Principles underlying gene expression in higher
and predict behavior are studied and tested. Three              eukaryotes, examined through selected genetic
lecture and three laboratory hours per week; may                pathologies. The course seeks to increase students’
include overnight field trips. Prerequisites: Biology 210        facility in making creative use of the primary scientific
or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                        literature. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:
                                                                Biology 201 and 326. 3 sem. hrs.
BIOL 350 Undergraduate Research
Independent research conducted with faculty                     BIOL 388 Individual Internship
supervision. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite:       Supervised independent work under field conditions.
Permission of instructor. 2 sem. hrs.                           Designed to give student applied experience in biological
                                                                specialty. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite:
BIOL 351 Special Topics                                         Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, or
Special course areas covered when sufficient interest            Environmental Studies major at junior or senior rank.
exists. Considers subject matter not covered in other           3 sem. hrs.
biology courses. Prerequisite: Biology 205. 1-4 sem. hrs.
                                                                BIOL 391 Honors Seminar I
BIOL 352 Evolutionary Developmental Biology                     Special topics for junior and senior honors candidates.
Study of how evolution occurs through inherited changes         Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.
during the embryonic development of organisms.
The genetic basis of animal diversity will be studied by        BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II
examining conserved molecular, cellular and developmental       Special topics for junior and senior students with
processes. Prerequisite: BIOL 201. 4 sem. hrs.                  emphasis on topics presented in the Biology Seminar
                                                                Series. One lecture hour per week. Prerequisite:
BIOL 360 Environmental Remote Sensing                           Permission of instructor 1 sem. hr.
(See Environmental Studies 360.) 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                BIOL 395 Honors Research
BIOL 370 Women in Science                                       Laboratory or field-centered independent study. May
Critical analysis of involvement of women in science,           be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of
including the history of participation of women in              instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
science; trends and barriers to full participation in science
including real and perceived differences in the biology         BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
of the scientist; objectivity/subjectivity in science; and      Ellis Bell (Chemistry), Co-Coordinator
feminist analyses of science. Continuing dialogue on            April L. Hill (Biology), Co-Coordinator
how science is done and impact that feminist scholarship
has had on this dialogue. Class research project will be        The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program is
conducted. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:          an interdisciplinary program based in the Biology and
Students must have fulfilled their FSNS requirement or           Chemistry Departments, and is jointly administered by
have permission from the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)         a coordinating committee consisting of several faculty
                                                                from each department. The program is designed to
BIOL 380 Philosophical Issues in Evolutionary                   offer a flexible route to either the B.A. or B.S. degree
Biology                                                         and actively encourages student participation in
Philosophical problems within evolutionary biology              research, which may be conducted with faculty in
and its influence on society. Issues studied include how         either department. The flexibility of the program lends
natural selection works, evolution and human behaviors,         itself to combination with study abroad and outreach
and the influence of evolutionary theory on our ethical          opportunities. The major is designed to prepare students
and legal codes. Lecture/seminar format, with student           for future study in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
presentations and term paper. Three lecture hours               and related molecular life sciences or for employment
per week. Prerequisite: Biology 210 or permission of            in the biotechnology industry, or simply for students
instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                                         fascinated by the revolutions in the life sciences that are
                                                                shaping our future.
BIOL 383 Tropical Biology and Conservation
Introduction to principles of tropical biology and
conservation, including historical and economic
                                                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/CHEMISTRY • 71



The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major                     • 4-6 credit hours of Independent Research
Note: A grade of C- (1.7) or better is required in each          • A written thesis upon completion of their research
chemistry and biology course applied toward the major.             that is approved by at least two BCMB Program
For the Bachelor of Arts degree:                                   Committee Members or their designees (one of
A total of 41 hours in chemistry and biology including:            which must be a BCMB Program Committee
    • BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics                            member)
    • BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology                        • An oral defense of the thesis
    • BIOL 210 or 215 Integrative Biology I or II              Additionally, students must have a GPA of 3.6 or
    • CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry: Structure,           better in their major and 3.3 or better overall. The total
       Dynamics and Synthesis                               number of hours for honors course work (including
    • CHEM 205-206 Organic Chemistry                        formal courses and research) is 12.
    • CHEM 309 Physical Chemistry
    • CHEM 322 Junior Seminar                               CHEMISTRY
    • BIOL/CHEM 326 Biochemistry                            Department of Chemistry
    • BIOL/CHEM 327 Biochemistry Laboratory                 Bill Myers, Chair
    • BIOL/CHEM 329 Protein Structure, Function             Professors Bell, Gupton, Myers
       and Biophysics                                       Associate Professors Abrash, Dominey, Gentile, Goldman,
    • One course from the following: BIOL 307               Parish, Stevenson
       Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology, or              Assistant Professors Dattelbaum, Downey, Hamm,
       BIOL 314 Molecular Genetics, or BIOL 352             Leopold
       Evolutionary Developmental Biology, or BIOL          Director of Chemistry Laboratories Ferguson, Miller
       384 Eukaryotic Genetics                              Director of Instrument Facilities Norwood
    • Two hours of Senior Seminar (either CHEM              Director of Computer-Assisted Science Education Kanters
       421/422 or BIOL 391/392)                             Manager of Laboratories Collins, Wimbush
   Required from outside chemistry and biology:             Stockroom Manager Joseph
    • MATH 212 or 232                                       Visiting Senior Research Scholar Zeldin
    • PHYS 131 or 101
    • PHYS 132 or 133 or 134                                The Chemistry Major
                                                            Note: A grade of not less than C- (1.7) is required in
For the Bachelor of Science degree:
                                                            each chemistry course applied to the major or minor.
The above courses plus at least two hours of approved
research experiences in biology or chemistry that           For the Bachelor of Arts degree:
culminates in a written report or poster presentation       A. A total of 30 hours in chemistry approved by the
and one upper-level elective, from either the biology or       department including
the chemistry departments, to give a total of 46 hours in      • CHEM 141
chemistry and biology.                                         • CHEM 205-206
                                                               • CHEM 300
For either of the above degrees:
                                                               • CHEM 301
Additional upper-level elective courses in chemistry and
                                                               • CHEM 309 or CHEM 310
biology are highly recommended. Students wishing to
                                                               • CHEM 317
double major in biochemistry and molecular biology
                                                               • CHEM 322
and either chemistry or biology are required to use
                                                               • CHEM 421- 422
upper-level electives for only one degree program or the
                                                               • one additional three- or four-hour upper-level
other. Similarly, upper-level electives cannot be counted
                                                                  course in chemistry (other than CHEM 320)
for both a major and a minor in either department.
                                                            B. MATH 212 or 232
Honors Program                                              C. PHYS 131 or 101 and PHYS 132, 133 or 134
Students are invited to participate in the Biochemistry
                                                            Participation in undergraduate research is encouraged as
and Molecular Biology Honors Program by the program
                                                            an important part of the program.
co-coordinators. A student graduating with an Honors
degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology must           For the Bachelor of Science degree:
complete 6-8 hours of preapproved upper-level elective      A. A total of 36 hours in chemistry approved by the
work in Chemistry, Biology or courses approved by the          department including
BCMB committee. The student also must fulfill the               • CHEM 141
following research requirements:                               • CHEM 205-206
     • A research proposal to the student’s research           • CHEM 300
       advisor
72 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



   • CHEM 301                                                      • A total of 43 hours in chemistry approved by
   • CHEM 309-310                                                     the department including 141, 205, 206, 300,
   • CHEM 317                                                         301, 309, 310, 317, 322, 326, 421, 422, and an
   • CHEM 322                                                         additional nine hours of course credit including
   • CHEM 421-422                                                     one three- or four-hour upper-level elective
   • one additional three- or four-hour upper-level                   course in chemistry and five or six hours of an
     course in chemistry (other than CHEM 320)                        approved research experience;
   • two hours of an approved research experience                  • A research thesis turned in to the Honors
     that culminate in a written report or poster                     Coordinator and approved by at least two
     presentation                                                     chemistry faculty members or their designees.
B. MATH 212 or 232                                                To obtain Honors in Chemistry, a student must apply
C. PHYS 131 or 101 and PHYS 132, 133 or 134                   to the University Honors Program. An application can be
And for either of the above degrees:                          submitted through the Chemistry Honors Coordinator
Additional upper-level elective courses in chemistry and      after a student has completed 65 hours total coursework
two full years of either biology or physics are highly        and 12 hours in Chemistry past CHEM 141.
recommended.                                                  The Chemistry Minor
Interdisciplinary Biochemistry and Molecular                  A grade of not less than C- (1.7) is required in each course.
Biology Major                                                      • CHEM 141
For a description of the Bachelor of Arts degree and               • CHEM 205-206
the Bachelor of Science degree, see Biochemistry and               • CHEM 300-301 or 302
Molecular Biology.                                                 • CHEM 317
                                                                   • one additional three or four hour upper-level
CertiÞcations in the Chemistry Major                                 course in Chemistry (other than CHEM 320)
Certifications by the department, based on American
Chemical Society specifications, require:                      Cooperative Programs
    For chemistry: The Bachelor of Science degree in          Engineering Opportunities for University of
chemistry with the addition of Chemistry 326. Note            Richmond students at Virginia Commonwealth
that Chemistry 326 is in addition to, not in place of, the    University
upper-level elective required for the Bachelor of Science     A fundamental understanding of chemistry coupled
degree in chemistry. In addition, a written research report   with problem-solving and analytical skills in chemical
must be submitted to the Chemistry Department.                engineering represents a unique opportunity to position
    For chemistry/biochemistry: The Bachelor of               students for broad employment opportunities in
Science degree in chemistry with the addition of              chemical process technology and in the rapidly growing
Chemistry 326, 327, and 329 and one nonintroductory           areas of biotechnology and advanced materials. Toward
biology elective which contains cell biology, microbiology    this end, opportunities have been created for University
or genetics. Note that Chemistry 326, 327, and 329 are        of Richmond students who seek the advantages of a
in place of, not in addition to, the upper-level elective     liberal arts education coupled with a strong background
required for the Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry.     in the fundamentals of engineering.
In addition, a written research report must be submitted          A sequence of four courses offered in the School of
to the Chemistry Department.                                  Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University has
    The completion of the Bachelor of Science degree          been approved for University of Richmond students.
in biochemistry and molecular biology and Chemistry           The requisite math background for this core and for easy
300, 301, 310, and 317 also meets the certification            transfer into the VCU M.S. program is two semesters of
requirements. Note that Chemistry 300, 301, 310, and          calculus and one semester each of differential equations
317 are in place of, not in addition to, the upper-level      and statistics. A course in computer programming is
elective required for the Bachelor of Science degree          useful but not mandatory.
in biochemistry and molecular biology. In addition,               The core courses are listed below:
a written research report must be submitted to the                EGRC 201 Material, Energy and Economic
Chemistry Department.                                                           Balances (4 credits)
Honors Program                                                    EGRC 204 Engineering Thermodynamics (4 credits)
Departmental honors in Chemistry requires                         EGRC 301 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer
   • GPA of 3.3 overall and in the major;                                       (3 credits)
                                                                  EGRC 302 Mass Transfer and Unit Operations
                                                                                (3 credits)
                                                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/CHEMISTRY • 73



   The core courses listed above will be accepted as          CHEM 112 Biochemistry in the Real World
transfer credit. Up to four semester hours will count as      The genomics revolution of the last 10 years has given
required elective credit within the chemistry major. For      birth to the “proteome,” emphasizing the central role
a Richmond student to qualify, the following criteria         that proteins play in virtually all life and death processes.
would have to be met:                                         This course will explore central features of what proteins
     • Junior or senior standing at Richmond                  look like and how they perform their varied functions
     • Enrollment in at least 12 hours at Richmond            in a variety of biological and chemical processes. These
       during the semester coursework is taken at VCU         will include aspects of cell differentiation, cell death
     • Minimum GPA of 2.5 at Richmond                         and disease states such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and viral
     • Enrollment in no more than one course at VCU           infections by Epstein Barr Virus, Papilloma Virus and
       in any given semester                                  AIDS. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week.
     • Prerequisites for elective courses must be             Does not count toward the Chemistry major or minor. 4
       completed                                              sem. hrs. (FSNC)
     • Payment of any lab fees required by VCU
     • Acceptance by the School of Engineering at             CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry: Structure,
       VCU                                                    Dynamics and Synthesis
     • Student’s program must be approved in advance          Fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic
       by VCU registrar (case-by-case approval)               and molecular structure, bonding, periodicity; chemical
                                                              reactions including stoichiometry, acid base chemistry,
Marine and Ecosystems Studies, Cooperative                    oxidation-reduction; and an introduction to kinetics
Program with the Duke University Marine Science               and thermodynamics, chemical reactions and equilibria.
Laboratory, Beaufort, N.C.                                    Introductory course for science majors and those pursuing
Semester in Environmental Science, Cooperative                degrees in the health sciences. It is a prerequisite for
Program with the Marine Biological Laboratory at              upper-level courses. Three lecture and three laboratory
Woods Hole, Mass.                                             hours a week. Previous knowledge of chemistry is helpful
                                                              but not assumed. 4 sem. hours. (FSNC)
COURSES
CHEM 110 Pollutants in the Environment                        CHEM 205-206 Organic Chemistry
Sources, behavior and effects of chemical pollutants in       Chemistry of compounds of carbon, which is
the air, water and soil. Topics include global warming,       fundamental to understanding of both chemistry and
ozone depletion, acid rain, pesticides and radioactive        biology. Nomenclature, structure-physical property
waste. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week.       relationships,   reactions,   reaction    mechanisms,
Does not count toward the Chemistry major or minor.           spectroscopy and introduction to macromolecules
Prerequisite: None (high school chemistry desirable). 4       including those of biological significance. Three
sem. hrs. (FSNC)                                              lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite:
                                                              Chemistry 141. Chemistry 205 is prerequisite to 206.
CHEM 111 Chemistry Detectives: Solving Real
                                                              4-4 sem. hrs.
World Puzzles
A laboratory-based course in which students learn the         CHEM 220 Projects
language and techniques used in industrial and forensic       Laboratory work requiring integration of information
laboratories to conduct organic chemical analysis.            from various fields of chemistry and involving a number
Students become “chemistry detectives,” able to solve         of techniques. 1 or 2 sem. hrs.
the types of “chemistry puzzles” that are characteristic of
the fun part of doing chemistry (e.g. how chemists, such      CHEM 300 Measurement Statistics
as forensic and pharmaceutical chemists, determine the        Overview of statistics of measurements on chemical
structure of real-world unknown compounds). A range           systems. Includes characteristics of data which contain
of applications of this chemistry is discussed, including     random error. Statistics used to describe and summarize
such topics as environmental, medicinal, polymer,             trends of measured data will be introduced, as well as a
forensic and industrial chemistries, government               number of statistical tools needed to draw meaningful
regulations, natural products, pheromones and                 and objective conclusions based on data. Should be
information retrieval. In the process students will gain      taken simultaneously with Chemistry 301. 1 sem. hr.
hands-on experience using modern instrumentation,             CHEM 301 Quantitative Methods of Chemical
including IR, NMR, GC-Mass Spec and UV-Visible                Analysis
spectroscopy. Three lecture and three laboratory hours        Principles and techniques of chemical and instrumental
per week. Does not count toward the Chemistry major or        methods used for quantitative analysis. Includes lecture
minor. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission      coverage and extensive laboratory use of gravimetric,
of instructor. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNC)
74 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



titrimetric, electrochemical and spectroscopic methods.      as they pertain to inorganic compounds and materials.
Three lecture and four laboratory hours a week.              Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 300 and 317. Chemistry 300           Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 4 sem. hrs.
may be taken concurrently. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             CHEM 320 Introduction to Research
CHEM 302 Spectroscopy and Instrumentation                    Laboratory research experience with a faculty member.
Principles and techniques of chemical and instrumental       1-3 sem. hrs.
methods used for compound identification. Focus
on modern instrumental methods for compound                  CHEM 322 Junior Seminar
structure elucidation and the principles underlying both     Regular attendance in departmental seminar program.
the spectroscopic methods and the instrumentation            Normally taken in the junior year. One class hour a
itself. Three lecture and four laboratory hours a week.      week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 0 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 4 sem. hrs.                     CHEM 326 Biochemistry
CHEM 303 Separations                                         Structure and chemistry of biologically important
Principles, theory and techniques central to chemical        macromolecules and chemical processes involved in
separation sciences—both classical and instrumental          cellular synthesis degradation, and assembly of these
methods used for compound separation and                     macromolecules. Three lecture hours a week. (Same as
purification, as well as factors important to industrial      Biology 326.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 3 sem. hrs.
scalability versus nanoscale applications. Focus on          CHEM 327 Biochemistry Lab
modern theories and implementations of instrumental          Techniques associated with modern biochemistry
methods for compound separations and principles              including protein purification and quantification,
underlying instrumentation. Three lecture and four           kinetic analysis and gene mutation. Three laboratory
laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or      hours a week. Open only to Biochemistry and Molecular
302. 4 sem. hrs.                                             Biology majors or by permission of the instructor.
CHEM 308 Statistical Mechanics                               (Same as Biology 327.) Prerequisites: Chemistry 206,
(See Physics 308.) 3 sem. hrs.                               Chemistry/Biology 326 (CHEM/BIOL 326 may be
                                                             taken concurrently). 1 sem. hr.
CHEM 309-310 Physical Chemistry
Principal laws and theories of chemistry: gas laws           CHEM 329 Protein Structure, Function and
and kinetic molecular theory, classical and statistical      Biophysics
thermodynamics, wave mechanics and molecular                 Advanced topics in protein structure, function and
structure, and chemical kinetics. Principles and             biophysics. Commences with brief treatment of essential
properties of liquids, solids and solutions, and phase       elements of kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum
equilibria are examined along with electrochemistry.         mechanics necessary for a thorough understanding of
Three lecture and four laboratory hours a week.              topics to be presented later and continues with detailed
Prerequisites: Chemistry 141, Physics 132, 133, or 134       coverage of enzyme kinetics and ligand binding,
and Mathematics 212 or 232. Chemistry 317 is highly          chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis, x-
recommended. 4-4 sem. hrs.                                   ray crystallography, spectroscopic techniques used to
                                                             investigate conformation and the folding of proteins,
CHEM 316 Environmental Chemistry                             including Circular Dichroism, Fluorescence and NMR;
Study of the fate, transport and distribution of chemicals   and computational approaches used to compute and
in the environment. The chemistry of the atmosphere,         visualize both structure and reaction. Second half of
hydrosphere and geosphere will be covered, highlighting      course focuses on three classes of proteins and associated
effects of inorganic and organic pollutants. Topics          themes: i) kinases, phosphatases and regulation, ii)
such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion,       proteases and processes and iii) oligomeric enzymes and
acid rain, photochemical smog and groundwater                allosteric models. Three lecture and three laboratory
contamination will be discussed in detail. Three lecture     hours per week. (Same as Biology 329.) Prerequisite:
hours a week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 205 or permission      Chemistry/Biology 326 and 327. 4 sem. hrs.
of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                             CHEM 341 Advanced Organic Chemistry
CHEM 317 Inorganic Chemistry                                 Topics include fundamental physical organic concepts,
Inorganic chemistry embraces the chemistry of all of the     organic reaction mechanisms, examples of syntheses from
elements. This course will focus on the synthesis and        recent literature, and design of synthetic approaches to
behavior of inorganic materials. As such, it will include    target molecules of interest. Three lecture hours a week.
certain aspects of thermodynamics, atomic and molecular      Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 3 sem. hrs.
bonding theories, kinetics, and electrochemical processes
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/CHINESE PROGRAM • 75



CHEM 342 Medicinal Chemistry                                 Literatures and Cultures (MLC) degree programs, study
Provides basic principles of the drug discovery process.     abroad, and course sequencing, see the main page of the
Topics include general considerations, mode of action,       Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures.
quantitative structure activity relationships, absorption,
distribution, metabolism and inactivation of medicinal       Study Abroad
agents. In addition, major drug classes will be presented    Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for all
along with specific case studies for each category.           students. The department offers summer study programs
Prerequisite: Chemistry 206. 3 sem. hrs.                     in Argentina, China, France, Germany, Honduras,
                                                             Japan, Russia and Spain. In addition, there are exchange
CHEM 401-402 Quantum Mechanics                               agreements for study during the academic year in
(See Physics 401-402.) 3-3 sem. hrs.                         Argentina, France, Germany, Mexico, Quebec, Russia
                                                             and Spain; others are being negotiated. For a complete
CHEM 417 Organometallic Chemistry                            list, contact the Office of International Education.
Overview of the structure, reactivity and applications of
organometallic compounds. Topics include main group          The Chinese Minor
and transition metal complexes, catalysis, applications      Note: The grade point average of the coursework
to organic synthesis, and bioorganometallic chemistry.       comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
Prerequisite: Chemistry 317 or permission of instructor.     2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.7).
3 sem. hrs.                                                     Eighteen semester hours language study beyond the
                                                             intermediate level (202); must include an approved
CHEM 419 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry                        study abroad experience.
Study of principles of chemistry involved in bonding,
structure, properties and reactions of main group metal,     COURSES
transition metal, coordination and organometallic            CHIN 101-102 Elementary Chinese
compounds with emphasis on periodic trends,                  Introduction to standard Chinese (Putonghua) and
thermodynamic and kinetic factors and symmetry.              culture, with emphasis on spoken language as it is
Three lecture hours a week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 317     used today. Both Jiantizi (simplified forms) and Fantizi
and 309 (309 may be taken concurrently). 3 sem. hrs.         (complex form) will be taught. Development of basic
CHEM 421-422 Senior Seminar                                  reading and writing skills. Study of Chinese cultural
Participation in departmental seminar program, to include    forms that underlie the language. Prerequisite: 101 is
regular attendance and one presentation during one of        prerequisite to 102. 4-4 sem. hrs.
the two semesters. Presentation will include both written    CHIN 201-202 Intermediate Chinese
and oral component, each prepared on specific topic in        Reinforcement and expansion of skills in speaking,
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 322. 1-1 sem. hrs.        listening, reading and writing. Appreciation of Chinese
                                                             culture. Prerequisites: Chinese 102 is prerequisite to
CHEM 427 Independent Study
                                                             201; 201 is prerequisite to 202. 4-4 sem. hrs. (202 only,
In-depth exploration of subjects not included in other
                                                             COM2)
courses, done independently but under faculty member’s
supervision. Prerequisites: Four semesters of chemistry      CHIN 301 Conversational Chinese
and permission of instructor. 1-2 sem. hrs.                  Development of competent aural, oral communication
                                                             and writing skills in Chinese, with stress on vocabulary
CHEM 433 Special Topics                                      extension, pronunciation and grammatical and
Special course areas covered when sufficient interest         communicative accuracy. Materials in relation to
exists. Considers subject matter not covered in other        business documents and transactions commonly used in
chemistry courses. See Chemistry department home             China also will be discussed. Prerequisite: Chinese 202.
page (http://chemistry.richmond.edu/) for special topics     3 sem. hrs.
course descriptions currently scheduled. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.                      CHIN 302 Conversational Chinese
                                                             (Summer only; taught in China.) Reinforcement of
CHINESE PROGRAM                                              competent aural and oral communication skills in
                                                             Chinese. Opportunities to interact with native speakers/
Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures
                                                             language partners on a regular basis. Prerequisite: Chinese
Rose Tan, Director of the Chinese Language Program           202. 3 sem. hrs.
This section contains information specific to the degree      CHIN 311 Insights into Chinese Culture
programs in Chinese. For full information regarding          Introduction to major current issues and influential
departmental policies relevant to all the Modern             figures on political, social and, in particular, cultural
76 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



scenes of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, with reference             A faculty member selected by the coordinator shall be
to relevant historical background. Prerequisite: Chinese      involved in the on-going advising of each major. Courses
202. 3 sem. hrs.                                              may be selected from courses offered by the Department
                                                              of Classical Studies and from those courses preapproved
CHIN 312 Insights into Chinese Culture                        as belonging to the Classical Civilization major, or other
(Summer only; taught in China). Reinforcement of              courses approved by the coordinator. All courses selected
communicative language skills, reading and writing.           must be appropriate to the emphasized area.
Emphasis on major current issues and cultural scenes
of China and Hong Kong, with reference to relevant            The Classical Civilization Minor
historical background. Students will be participating in      Eighteen semester hours approved by the coordinator, of
various field trips. Prerequisite: Chinese 202. 3 sem. hrs.    which at least 12 must be in the Department of Classical
                                                              Studies and the remainder from the courses listed or
CHIN 401-402 Advanced Chinese Language,
                                                              other courses approved by the coordinator. Latin and
Literature and Culture
                                                              Greek courses may not be counted toward this minor.
This course prepares for more advanced study of
                                                                 See the departmental listings for descriptions of
Chinese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more
                                                              the following courses offered for Classical Civilization
sophisticated language usage patterns, and introduction
                                                              credit:
to basics of formal and literary styles. Materials
are designed to advance the student’s fluency for              Anthropology
everyday communicative tasks as well as reading skills.       ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Prerequisites: Chinese 301 and 311 or permission of the       Art History
instructor. 3-3 sem. hrs.                                     ART 221     Survey I: Prehistory through the
CHIN 495 Independent Study                                                Middle Ages
Special projects individually pursued under supervision       ART 309     Image and Icon in Medieval Art
of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.    ART 310     Late Antique and Early Christian Art
1-3 sem. hrs.                                                 ART 311     Medieval Byzantine Art, 600-1453
                                                              ART 312     Medieval Art in Western Europe,
CHIN 497 Selected Topics                                                  8th-15th Centuries
Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion.   ART 314     Northern Renaissance Art
Recent topics include Contemporary Readings in                ART 315     Art of the Italian Renaissance
Culture, Literature and History; and Romance.                 ART 316     Art in the Age of Reform
Prerequisite: Chinese 301 or permission of instructor.        ART 322     Museum Studies
1-3 sem. hrs.                                                 English
                                                              ENGL 226      Love and War in Medieval Literature
CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION                                        ENGL 234      Shakespeare
The Classical Civilization Major                              ENGL 301      Literature of the Middle Ages
Note: The grade point average of the coursework               ENGL 302      Literature of the English Renaissance
comprising the major must be no less than 2.00 with no        ENGL 304      Shakespeare
course grade below C- (1.7).                                  ENGL 305      Critical Approaches to Shakespeare
   Thirty-three semester hours, including:                    ENGL 306      Milton
    • CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values or CLSC                 ENGL 310      Topics in British Literature before 1660
       306 The Classical Tradition, 3 hours                   ENGL 338      Versions of Tragedy
    • CLCV 498 Major Seminar, 3 hours                         ENGL 339      Epic Tradition
    • 27 hours of electives, chosen with the advice of        ENGL 390      Interdisciplinary Studies in the
       an advisor from the faculty of the Department                        Middle Ages and Renaissance
       of Classical Studies or the Classical Civilization     History
       Advisory Committee and with the approval of            HIST 220      The Aegean Bronze Age
       the program coordinator.                               HIST 221      Classical Greece
   Although each student plans his or her major               HIST 222      Hellenistic Greece and
according to individual interests, the following emphases                   Republican Rome
are recommended possibilities: Greek and Roman                HIST 223      The Roman Empire
archaeology; Classical and Medieval history; Classical,       HIST 225      Medieval Italy
Medieval and Renaissance literature; and the Classical        HIST 226      Early Middle Ages
Tradition in art history, literature and philosophy. For      HIST 227      High Middle Ages
examples of such major programs, see the coordinator.         HIST 228      Renaissance
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/CLASSICAL STUDIES • 77



Philosophy                                                  CLSC 205 Greek and Roman Mythology: Epic
PHIL 271 Ancient Greek Philosophy                           Selected mythic themes in Greek and Roman epic
PHIL 281 Philosophy of Art                                  literature from Homer to Ovid. Emphasis on myths
Political Science                                           prominent in Western literature. 3 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
PLSC 311 Political Theory: Plato to Locke                   CLSC 207 Greek Magic
Religion                                                    Exploration of magic as a means to understanding and
RELG 200      Symbol, Myth and Ritual                       affecting the natural world. Major topics include erotic
RELG 230      The History of Israel                         magic, dreams and divination, ritual purification, sacred
RELG 241      Introduction to Early Christian Era           plants and healing. 3 sem. hrs.
RELG 243      The World of the New Testament                CLSC 208 Mythology: Greek Drama
RELG 258      Medieval Religious Thought                    Study of myths preserved in Greek dramas, and historical
RELG 331      The Hebrew Prophets                           and literary analysis of these plays. 3 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
RELG 332      Hebrew and Christian
              Wisdom Literature                             CLSC 209 The Built Environment
RELG 340      Varieties of Early Christianity               (See Urban Practice and Policy 209.) 3 sem. hrs.
RELG 341      Paul and Christian Origins                    CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archaeology
RELG 342      John in Early Christian Literature            Architecture, painting and sculpture of Greece; the
RELG 360      Goddess Traditions Ancient                    techniques by which these were produced and are
              and Modern                                    reclaimed and displayed. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
Rhetoric and Communication Studies                          CLSC 302 Roman Art and Archaeology
RHCS 323 Classical Rhetoric                                 Architecture, painting and sculpture of Roman world.
RHCS 325 Medieval to Modern Rhetorics                       3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
COURSES                                                     CLSC 304 The Feminine in Greco-Roman
CLCV 498 Major Seminar                                      Literature
Study of research strategy and methodology inherent         Concept of the feminine as seen in major works of
in classical civilization. Preparation of research paper.   Greek and Roman poetry, prose and drama. 3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite: Permission of coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.        (FSLT)
                                                            CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values
CLASSICAL STUDIES                                           Investigation of ancient Greco-Roman values, artistic,
Department of Classical Studies                             religious, political and personal, as found in eclectic
Dean W. Simpson, Chair                                      survey of unusual primary texts. Focuses on methods of
Associate Professors Laskaris, Simpson, Stevenson           understanding these distant and relatively well-preserved
                                                            civilizations. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)
The Department of Classical Studies offers majors and
minors in both Greek and Latin.                             CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition
                                                            Legacy of classical Greece and Rome in medieval,
Combined Major in Classical Studies and                     renaissance and modern worlds. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)
English Literature                                          CLSC 307 Myth and Film
The combined program in Classics and English is             Study of use of ancient myth in modern cinema. 3 sem.
intended for students who wish to pursue in-depth work      hrs.
in both literary traditions.
                                                            CLSC 308 Women in Greece and Rome
The following courses are designed for the student          Structure of Greek and Roman societies based on analysis
who is interested in the cultures and literatures of        of the position of women within them. Comparison
Greece and Rome. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not         with other disenfranchised groups, particularly ethnic
required. While these courses do not fulfill the language    minorities. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)
communication skills requirement, courses so designated
meet various fields-of-study requirements.                   CLSC 312 The Land of Hellas: Ancient
                                                            Topography— Modern Legacy
COURSES                                                     (Summer only taught abroad.) Study of ancient remains
CLSC 201 Classical Elements in the English Language         of Bronze Age and Classical Greece and their role as a
Vocabulary development and use of English through           binding force for the ethnic and national identity of the
study of Greek and Latin elements in English. 3 sem. hrs.   modern country. 3 sem. hrs.
78 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



CLSC 388 Individual Internship                                   • PSYC 449 Advanced Seminar
Supervised independent work. Prerequisite: Permission           Four electives chosen from
of department. 3 sem. hrs.                                       • ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
                                                                 • BIOL 343 Neurobiology
CLSC 398 Selected Topics                                         • BIOL 350 Independent Research
Topics or themes in Classics. Prerequisite: Permission of        • CMSC 221 Data Structures
department. 3 sem. hrs.                                          • CMSC 301 Computer Organizations
CLSC 499 Independent Study                                       • CMSC 340 Independent Research
Content adapted to requirements and interests of                 • PHIL 251 Symbolic Logic
participant. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-3         • PHIL 390 Independent Research
sem. hrs.                                                        • PSYC 361 Independent Research
                                                                 • PSYC 449 Psychology of Gender
COGNITIVE SCIENCE                                               The Cognitive Science major is offered as a Bachelor
                                                             of Arts degree only.
Scott Allison, Coordinator
Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of the      COMBINED MAJORS
structures and functions of the human mind. Cognitive
                                                             Designated faculty members from each department will
science investigates such topics as our sensory/perceptual
                                                             advise students upon declaration and as they progress
apparatus, including vision, audition, olfaction;
                                                             through the major.
internal mental processes such as language, thinking,
                                                                The combined majors offer options for students who
reasoning and problem solving; motor control and the
                                                             want to combine in-depth study in two different areas.
organization of skilled behavior such as speech and
musical performance; memory; consciousness; attention;       English/Classics
and many other aspects of the human mind. Cognitive          Combined major in English and Classics
science requires a multi-disciplinary approach and              Required: Sixteen courses (54 hours), including a
includes such fields as psychology, biology, neuroscience,    senior writing project, distributed as follows:
philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, sociology and
                                                             Classics
computer science.
                                                             Eight courses (24 hours)
The Cognitive Science Major                                      • CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values or 306 The
Note: The grade point average of the coursework                    Classical Tradition
comprising the major must be no less than 2.00 with no           • CLSC 205 Greek and Roman Mythology: Epic
course grade below C- (1.70).                                    • CLSC 208 Mythology: Greek Drama
                                                                 • Two other literature classes in Classics (may
Thirty-eight to 52 hours, distributed as follows:
                                                                   include language classes at the 200 level or
  Required
                                                                   higher)
    • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
                                                                 • A minimum of three other Classics Department
    • PSYC 200 Psychology Research Methods and
                                                                   courses
      Analyses
    • PSYC 331 Neuroscience Theory                           English
    • PSYC 332 Neuroscience Methods and Analyses             Seven courses (28 hours), to include
    • PSYC 333 Cognitive Science Theory                          • One 200-level FSLT course and
    • PSYC 334 Cognitive Science Methods and                     • Six courses at the 300 and 400 levels, including
      Analyses                                                      • One course in pre-1660 British literature
  Two additional foundation courses chosen from                     • One course in British literature from
    • BIOL 201 Genetics                                               1660-1900
    • MLC 350 Linguistics                                           • One Junior/Senior Seminar, and
    • CMSC 101 Minds and Machines                                   • A minimum of three courses from a list to
    • CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing or CMSC                      be determined by the student’s advisor
      155 Introduction to Scientific Computing                Senior Writing Project
    • PHIL 370 Philosophy of Mind                            A senior writing project (taken for two credit hours
  One advanced senior-level course chosen from               as IDST 379) on a comparative topic dealing with
    • BIOL 391 Senior Seminar                                literatures in Latin or Greek and English will be
    • CMSC 395 Artificial Intelligence                        required. The paper will be 20-30 pages long and will
    • PHIL 380 Topics Seminar (subject to approval of        make significant use of primary and secondary sources.
      Cognitive Science Coordinator)                         A two hour writing project course cross-listed in both
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/COMBINED MAJORS • 79



departments will be additional to the courses listed         also will present a portfolio documenting significant
above. The writing project will have two advisors,           achievements in their studies and including a reflective
one from the English Department and one from the             self-assessment of their work in the major.
Classics Department. By the beginning of senior year,            Designated faculty members from each department
the student should designate one of the advisors as the      will advise students upon declaration and as they
primary advisor, and this advisor will have primary          progress through the major. Study abroad in a French-
responsibility for determining the student’s grade on the    speaking country is very strongly recommended.
writing project. If there is sharp disagreement between
the two advisors over the final grade, the primary            English/German
advisor’s departmental chairperson will appoint a third      Combined major in English and German
reader/grader, whose decision will break the deadlock           Required: Fourteen courses (54 hours), including a
between the first and second advisors.                        senior writing project, distributed as follows:
                                                             German
English/French                                               Six courses (24 hours)
Combined major in English and French                              • GERM 311 German Culture and Civilization
    Required: Fourteen courses (54 hours), including a            • GERM 321 Introduction to German Literature
senior writing project/portfolio (two hours) distributed          • Three-400 level courses
as follows (students have the option of taking six courses        • One elective, either an MLC course with a LAC
in English and seven in French, or seven in English and             in German or a 400-level German course
six in French):
                                                             English
French                                                       Seven courses (28 hours) at the 300 and 400 levels.
Six or seven courses (24 or 28 hours)                        (Prerequisite to all advanced English courses: a 200-level
     • FREN 305 French Composition                           FSLT English course OR German 321.)
     • Two courses selected from:                                 • One course in British literature before 1660
          • FREN 321 Introduction to French Literature:           • One course in British literature between 1660
            Poetry                                                  and 1900
          • FREN 322 Introduction to French Literature:           • One course in American literature
            Theater                                               • Three electives at the 300 level
          • FREN 323 Introduction to French Literature:           • One Junior/Senior Seminar
            Prose
          • FREN 324 Introduction to French Literature:      Senior Research Project (taken for two credit hours
            Francophone                                      as IDST 379)
     • Three 400-level courses in literature/culture         Senior writing project on a comparative topic dealing
     • One elective at the 300 or 400 level (students        with literatures in English and in German, written in
       taking a total of six courses in French will not      English or in German, making significant use of primary
       need an elective)                                     and secondary materials in both languages, conducted
                                                             through independent study.
English                                                          Designated faculty members from each department
Six or seven courses (24 or 28 hours) at the 300 and         will advise students upon declaration and as they
400 levels. (Prerequisite to all advanced English courses:   progress through the major. Study abroad in a German-
a 200-level FSLT English course OR French 321, 322           speaking country is very strongly recommended.
or 323.)
    • One course in British literature before 1660           English/Greek
    • One course in British literature between 1660          Combined major in English and Greek
      and 1900                                                  Required: Sixteen courses (54 hours), including a
    • One course in American literature                      senior writing project, distributed as follows:
    • Three electives at the 300 level                       Greek
    • One Junior/Senior Seminar                              Eight courses (24 hours)
Senior Writing/Portfolio Project                                 • CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition
Senior Writing/ Portfolio Project (taken for two                 • Seven courses in Greek language and literature
credit hours as IDST 379) Senior writing project on          English
a comparative topic dealing with literatures in English      Seven courses (28 hours), to include
and in French, 20-30 pages, written in English or in             • A 200-level FSLT course and
French, making significant use of primary and secondary           • Six courses at the 300 and 400 levels, including
materials in both languages, conducted through                       • One course in pre-1660 British literature
independent study. During the senior year, students
80 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



         • One course in British literature from 1660-        reader/grader, whose decision will break the deadlock
           1900                                               between the first and second advisors.
         • One Junior/Senior Seminar, and
         • A minimum of three courses from a list to be       English/Russian
           determined by the student’s advisor                Combined major in English and Russian
                                                                 Required: Fourteen courses (54 hours), including a
Senior Writing Project                                        senior writing project, distributed as follows:
A senior writing project (taken for two credit hours as
IDST 379) on a comparative topic dealing with literatures     Russian
in Greek and English will be required. The paper will be      Six courses (24 hours)
20-30 pages long and will make significant use of primary           • RUSN 311 Russian Language in Culture
and secondary sources. The writing project will have two           • RUSN 321 Introduction to 19th-Century
advisors, one from the English Department and one                    Russian Literature
from the Classical Studies Department. By the beginning            • RUSN 322 Introduction to 20th-Century
of senior year, the student should designate one of the              Russian Literature
advisors as the primary advisor, and this advisor will have        • Two 300- 400-level courses, selected from:
primary responsibility for determining the student’s grade              • RUSN 421 Russian literature in the original
on the writing project. If there is sharp disagreement                    (poetry or genre)
between the two advisors over the final grade, the primary               • RUSN 422 Russian literature in the original
advisor’s departmental chairperson will appoint a third                   (prose)
reader/grader, whose decision will break the deadlock                   • Russian literature (selected from approved
between the first and second advisors.                                     courses offered in St. Petersburg, Richmond
                                                                          Study Abroad program)
English/Latin                                                           • RUSN 497 ST: Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, or Film
Combined major in English and Latin                                       and Russian Literature
   Required: Sixteen courses (54 hours), including a               • One elective at the 300 or 400 level: RUSN 312,
senior writing project, distributed as follows:                      Russian Culture and Civilization, or another from
Latin                                                                relevant offerings in a number of departments
Eight courses (24 hours)                                             (classics, religion, philosophy, art) depending on
    • Classics 306 The Classical Tradition                           the focus of the student’s comparative topic.
    • Seven courses in Latin language and literature          English
English                                                       Seven courses (28 hours) at the 300 and 400 levels.
Seven courses (28 hours), to include                          (Prerequisite to all advanced English courses: a 200-level
    • 200-level FSLT course and                               FSLT English course.)
    • Six courses at the 300 and 400 level, including              • One course in British literature before 1660
        • One course in pre-1660 British literature                • One course in British literature between 1660
        • One course in British literature from 1660-                and 1900
           1900                                                    • One course in American literature
        • One Junior/Senior Seminar                                • Three electives at the 300 level
        • A minimum of three courses from a list to be             • One Junior/Senior Seminar
           determined by the student’s advisor                Senior Writing/Portfolio Project (taken for two
Senior Writing Project                                        credit hours as IDST 379)
A senior writing project (taken for two credit hours as       Senior writing project on a comparative topic dealing
IDST 379) on a comparative topic dealing with literatures     with literatures in English and in Russian, 20-30 pages,
in Latin and English will be required. The paper will be      written in English or in Russian, making significant use
20-30 pages long and will make significant use of primary      of primary and secondary materials in both languages,
and secondary sources. The writing project will have two      conducted through independent study. During the senior
advisors, one from the English Department and one             year, students also will present a portfolio documenting
from the Classical Studies Department. By the beginning       significant achievements in their studies and including a
of senior year, the student should designate one of the       reflective self-assessment of their work in the major.
advisors as the primary advisor, and this advisor will have      Designated faculty members from each department
primary responsibility for determining the student’s grade    will advise students upon declaration and as they
on the writing project. If there is sharp disagreement        progress through the major. Study abroad in a Russian-
between the two advisors over the final grade, the primary     speaking country is very strongly recommended.
advisor’s departmental chairperson will appoint a third
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/COMBINED MAJORS • 81



English/Theatre                                             Please note the following caveats:
Combined Major in English and Theatre                          1. No single course can count in two categories.
   Required: Fifteen-17 courses (54 hours) including a         2. Students in the combined major cannot also
senior writing project, distributed as follows:             minor in Theatre or English.
Theatre                                                     English/Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Seven courses (24 hours)                                    Combined major in English and Women, Gender and
    • THTR 309 Theatre History I or THTR 319                Sexuality Studies
      Theatre History II                                       Required: Fifteen courses (53 hours), including a
    • THTR 205 Production Studies I                         senior writing project, distributed as follows:
    • THTR 306 Production Studies II or THTR 407
      Production Studies III                                English
    • THTR 202 Lighting Design or THTR 206                  Minimum 28 hours, to include
      Costume Design or THTR 301 Scene Design                   • 200-level FSLT course and
    • THTR 212 Basics of Acting or THTR 308 Basics              • Six courses at the 300 and 400 level, including
      of Directing                                                  • One course in British literature prior to
    • THTR 327 Acting Shakespeare I                                    1660
    • THTR 328 Acting Shakespeare II                                • One course in British literature between
                                                                       1660 and 1900
English                                                             • One course in American literature
Five courses (20 hours)                                             • One Junior/Senior Seminar
     • Any 200-level English course except ENGL 234                 • A minimum of two additional courses at the
     • One 300-level course in British literature between              300 level or above
       1660 and 1900
     • One 300-level course in American literature          Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
     • One Junior/Senior Seminar                            The following Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
     • ENGL 304 Shakespeare or ENGL 305 Critical            and cross-listed courses will be required (minimum 23
       Approaches to Shakespeare                            hours):
                                                                • WGSS 200 Introduction to Women, Gender &
Theatre and English                                               Sexuality Studies
One course (3-4 hours) selected from the following:             • WGSS 221 Introduction to Feminist Political
     • THTR 370 Staging Gender, THTR 210                          Theory
       Performing Diversity, or THTR 320 Twentieth-             • One course in advanced gender or feminist
       Century Acting Styles and Theory                           theory
     • Any 300-level English course                             • One course in women’s history
Two or three electives (eight-nine hours) as needed to          • A minimum of three additional Women, Gender
bring the course total to 54 hours, selected from the             and Sexuality Studies or cross-listed courses (not
following:                                                        from the English department) at or above the 300
     • Any additional THTR course                                 level
     • Any additional 300-level English course                 No more than three hours of internship credit will be
     • ENGL 398 Independent Study                           counted towards the combined major.
Capstone Project (two hours)                                Senior Writing Project
A capstone project (taken for two hours as IDST 379)        A senior writing project (taken for two credits as IDST
on a topic related to both theatre and English will be      379) on a topic related to Women, Gender and Sexuality
required. The project will be supervised by a faculty       Studies and English will be required. This course will be
member from either theatre or English and read by a         cross-listed in both departments and is in addition to
member of each department. When a student declares          the courses listed above. The thesis will have two readers,
the combined major, he or she will be assigned an advisor   one from the English department and one, approved by
in each department. Each advisor will be responsible for    the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Board, not
advising the student on the selection of courses in the     from the English department.
advisor’s department.
82 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




COMPUTER SCIENCE                                             The Computer Science Minor
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science                    •   Computer Science 150 or 155
                                                                  •   Computer Science 221
B. Lewis Barnett III, Chair
                                                                  •   Computer Science 222
Professors Charlesworth, Davis, J. Hubbard, Ross
                                                                  •   Computer Science 301
Associate Professors Barnett, Caudill, Fenster, Greenfield,
                                                                  •   One additional three- or four-hour Computer
Hoke, Kerckhove, Nall, Szajda
                                                                      Science course for which Computer Science 222
Assistant Professors Lawson, Owen, Shaw, Trapp
                                                                      is a prerequisite.
Director of Computer Science Laboratories A. Hubbard
Students are strongly advised to consult with faculty in     COURSES
planning their major or minor curricula.                     CMSC 101 Minds and Machines
   Note: The grade point average of the coursework           Formal deduction in propositional logic. The
comprising the major or the minor must be no less than       fundamentals of computer architecture. An elementary
2.00 with no Computer Science course grade below C-          exploration of extent to which symbolic reasoning can be
(1.70).                                                      automated, including a consideration of related results
                                                             in fields such as neuroscience and artificial intelligence.
The Computer Science Major for the Bachelor of               4 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
Arts degree:                                                 CMSC 105 Elementary Programming
    • Computer Science 150 or 155                            Solving problems by writing computer programs.
    • Computer Science 221                                   Introduction to computer architecture. Emphasis on
    • Computer Science 222                                   symbolic reasoning using examples from a particular
    • Computer Science 301                                   computing context. For nonmajors. Not open to
    • Computer Science 315                                   students who have completed a computer science course
    • Computer Science 323                                   that fulfills major requirements. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
    • Sufficient additional three-hour (or more)
                                                             CMSC 108 Digital Artmaking
      Computer Science courses at the 300 level to
                                                             Introduction to digital art, including its brief history and how
      total at least 10 hours. Without departmental
                                                             to use it as an art medium. Interdisciplinary course provides
      approval, no more than one of these courses can
                                                             basic background to the field of computer technology-based
      be an Independent Study course.
                                                             artmaking combined with the studio experience of using
    • Mathematics 211 or 231 and
                                                             this technology to create art. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
    • Mathematics 245
                                                             CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing
The Computer Science Major for the Bachelor of               Techniques for writing computer programs to solve
Science degree:                                              problems. Topics include elementary computer
    •   Computer Science 150 or 155                          organization, object-oriented programming, control
    •   Computer Science 221                                 structures, arrays, methods and parameter passing,
    •   Computer Science 222                                 recursion, searching, sorting, file I/O. Three lecture
    •   Computer Science 301                                 and two laboratory hours a week. A student may not
    •   Computer Science 315                                 receive credit for both Computer Science 150 and 155.
    •   Computer Science 323                                 Students who have received credit for courses numbered
    •   Sufficient additional three-hour (or more)            221 or higher may not take 150 for credit. Prerequisite:
        Computer Science courses at the 300-level to         None, however, strong mathematics aptitude usually
        total at least 10 hours. Without departmental        predicts success in computer science. 4 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
        approval, no more than one of these courses can      CMSC 155 Introduction to Scientific Computing
        be an Independent Study course.                      Same course as Computer Science 155 but with greater
    •   Mathematics 211 or 231                               emphasis on programming applications in the sciences.
    •   Mathematics 212 or 232                               A student may not receive credit for both Computer
    •   Mathematics 245                                      Science 150 and 155. Students who have received credit
    •   Two three-hour courses at the 300 level or above     for courses numbered 221 or higher may not take 155 for
        in Mathematics or two three-hour (or more)           credit. Prerequisite: Math 211 or 231. 4 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
        courses beyond the introductory level in one of
        the following fields: Physics (200 level or above),   Note: Knowledge of the topics of Computer Science 150
        Chemistry (200 level or above), or Biology           or 155 is prerequisite to all higher numbered Computer
        (beyond 201-205).                                    Science courses. Students who have obtained this knowledge
                                                             through a high school or some other course are permitted to
                                                             begin with Computer Science 221.
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/COMPUTER SCIENCE • 83



CMSC 195 Special Topics                                      processing, distributed systems and numerical algorithms.
Special topics satisfying neither major nor minor            Consulting laboratory. Prerequisite: Computer Science
requirements. 1-3 sem. hrs.                                  222. 4 sem. hrs.
CMSC 221 Data Structures with Lab                            CMSC 321 Operating Systems
Introduction to data structures, including stacks,           Structure of operating systems, process management,
queues, linked lists, and binary trees. Topics include       memory management, file systems and case studies.
abstraction, object-oriented programming, recursion          Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science
and computational complexity. Three lecture and two          222 and 301. 4 sem. hrs.
laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite: Computer Science
150 or 155. 4 sem. hrs. (FSSR)                               CMSC 322 Software Engineering Practicum
                                                             Project-oriented course. Principles of software
CMSC 222 Discrete Structures for Computing                   engineering will be emphasized throughout. Consulting
Sets, functions, elementary propositional and predicate      laboratory. Prerequisites: Senior standing or two courses
logic, proof techniques (including mathematical              at the 300 level that have Computer Science 315 or 301
induction and proof by contradiction), elementary graph      as a prerequisite. 4 sem. hrs.
theory, matrices, recurrence relations, combinatorics,
and probability, with applications to computing.             CMSC 323 Design and Implementation of
Corequisite: Computer Science 221. 3 sem. hrs.               Programming Languages
                                                             Concepts in design and implementation of programming
CMSC 288 Computer Science Apprenticeship                     languages, including compile-time and run-time issues.
Participation in development of software, with               Support for block-structured procedural languages,
supervision of computer science faculty. Fifty hours         object-oriented languages and functional languages.
work for one hour of credit. Prerequisite: Computer          Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science
Science 221 and permission of department. Does not           301 and 315. 4 sem. hrs.
count for Computer Science major or minor. No more
than a total of 12 semester hours of Computer Science        CMSC 325 Database Systems
288 may count toward the total number of hours               Introduction to systematic management of data: design
required for a degree. 1-2 sem. hrs.                         and implementation of relational database systems,
                                                             data modeling, normalization, indexing, relational
Note: Many 300-level courses in computer science include     algebra, query processing and transaction management.
a “consulting laboratory.” This is an instructor-designed,   Programming projects include substantial use of SQL
organized and supervised component of the course that        and its extensions. Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites:
may occur as a fourth hour of lecture or as an extra         Computer Science 221 and 222. 4 sem. hrs.
course component scheduled outside of the lecture period.
Scheduling and format will be discussed at the first class    CMSC 328 Numerical Analysis
session. The format may vary by instructor and course.       (See Mathematics 328.) 3 sem. hrs.
Students are urged to contact the instructor prior to
                                                             CMSC 330 Theory of Computation
registration if they have questions about the laboratory.
                                                             Finite state machines, regular languages, push down
CMSC 301 Computer Organization                               automata and context-free languages. Turing machines,
Fundamentals of computer organization with focus on          recursive functions and related topics. Consulting
machine and assembly language levels. Topics include         laboratory. Prerequisite: Computer Science 315. 4 sem. hrs.
Boolean algebra, digital logic, data representations,
                                                             CMSC 331 Introduction to Compiler Construction
study of a modern processor’s architecture and assembly
                                                             Regular languages, context-free languages, finite
language, and creation of simulators and assemblers.
                                                             automata, push-down automata, lexical analysis, parsing,
Consulting laboratory. Prerequisite: Computer Science
                                                             intermediate representation and code generation.
221. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science
CMSC 315 Algorithms                                          222 and 301. 4 sem. hrs.
Design, analysis and implementation of advanced
                                                             CMSC 332 Computer Networks
computer algorithms. Emphasis is given to problem
                                                             Principles and techniques for data communication
solving techniques, including the greedy method,
                                                             between computers. Topics include design and analysis
divide-and-conquer and dynamic programming.
                                                             of communication protocols, routing, congestion
Specific problem domains vary. Topics may include
                                                             control, network-centric applications, and recent
sorting, graphs, networks, computational geometry,
                                                             advances. Consulting laboratory. Prerequisite: Computer
NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, text
                                                             Science 301. 4 sem. hrs.
84 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



CMSC 333 Parallel Programming                                    select courses together with their advisor, Dr. Joan L.
Principles and techniques for programming computers              Neff, coordinator of the program. Upon completion of
that have multiple processors. Writing programs for              the major, students are prepared to enter a variety of
parallel computers that enhance run-time efficiency,              fields, such as law enforcement, correctional counseling,
portability, correctness and software modifiability.              probation and parole counseling, and criminal justice
Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites: Computer Science           administration. In addition, many students elect to
222 and 301. 4 sem. hrs.                                         continue their education by pursuing graduate degrees
                                                                 in criminal justice, public administration, social work,
CMSC 335 Computer Graphics
                                                                 sociology or law.
Device independent two- and three-dimensional
computer graphics, interactive graphics, user interfaces         Requirements: Thirty-six semester hours, including
and human factors. Consideration of advanced modeling               • One course in Philosophy (220, 260 or 364)
and rendering. Consulting laboratory. Prerequisites:                • One course in Political Science (331, 333 or 337)
Mathematics 245 and Computer Science 222. 4 sem. hrs.               • Sociology 310 Crime and Justice in a Post-
CMSC 340 Directed Independent Study                                    Modern Society
To enable well-qualified students who have completed                 • Sociology 311 Juvenile Delinquency, or 206
basic requirements for major to work independently                     Conformity, Deviance, and Institutions of Social
in areas not included in curriculum. Prerequisites:                    Control
Permission of departmental chair and instructor. 1-3                • Criminal Justice 490 Senior Seminar
sem. hrs.                                                           • Twelve hours from Group A selected in
                                                                       consultation with the department coordinator
CMSC 395 Special Topics                                             • Nine hours from Group B selected in consultation
Selected topics in computer science. Prerequisite:                     with the department coordinator, with careful
Permission of instructor. 1-4 sem. hrs.                                consideration given to the student’s graduate
CMSC 420 Senior Research                                               study or career objectives and the potential for
1-3 sem. hrs.                                                          double majors or minors in other disciplines

CORE COURSE                                                      The Criminal Justice Minor
                                                                 Requirements: Eighteen hours including
Raymond F. Hilliard , Coordinator (English)                           • One course in Philosophy (220, 260 or 364)
This course provides an intensive introduction to                     • One course in Political Science (331, 333 or 337)
critical analysis at the college level for first-year students.        • Sociology 310 Crime and Justice in a Post-
Students examine important primary texts from a                         Modern Society
number of world cultures and historical periods. The                  • Sociology 311 Juvenile Delinquency, or 206
course’s primary concern is to develop students’ ability                Conformity, Deviance, and Institutions of Social
to analyze texts and to express their ideas about these                 Control
texts and about the issues they raise. The course is                  • Criminal Justice 490 Senior Seminar
required of all first-year students.                                   • One additional elective from Group A
                                                                     Note: Students are responsible for completing all
COURSES                                                          prerequisites for courses that are part of the criminal
CORE 101-102 Exploring Human Experience                          justice program.
Intensive reading and analysis of important primary
texts dealing with basic issues of human existence.              Group A: Core Courses
Strong emphasis on discussion and writing. To be taken           Criminal Justice
in consecutive semesters during the first year. 3-3 sem.          CJ 320     Fundamentals of Criminal Law
hrs.                                                             CJ 321     Fundamentals of Criminal Procedure
                                                                 CJ 379     Selected Topics
CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                 CJ 388     Individual Internship
Sociology and Anthropology Department                            CJ 400     Directed Independent Study
                                                                 CJ 450     Research Practicum
Joan L. Neff, Coordinator (Sociology)                            CJ 490     Criminal Justice Senior Seminar
The Criminal Justice Major                                       Philosophy
The criminal justice major is an interdisciplinary               PHIL 220 Contemporary Moral Issues
program designed to provide students with a basic                PHIL 260 Philosophical Problems in Law and
understanding of significant issues in the criminal                          Society
justice system. Students majoring in criminal justice            PHIL 364 Philosophy of Law
                                                       SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/DANCE • 85



Political Science                                            CJ 321 Fundamentals of Criminal Procedure
PLSC 331 Constitutional Law                                  Overview of procedural aspects of criminal law in
PLSC 333 Civil Rights/Civil Liberties                        the United States. Focuses on processing of criminal
PLSC 337 The American Legal System                           cases through the legal system and rules applied and
Psychology                                                   decisions made at each point in the process. Prerequisite:
PSYC 317 Psychopathology                                     One of the following: Political Science 331, 333, or
PSYC 436 Developmental Psychopathology                       337; Sociology 310 or 311; or permission of program
                                                             coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.
Sociology
SOC 206      Conformity, Deviance and Institutions           CJ 379 Criminal Justice: Selected Topics
             of Social Control                               Varying topics of current relevance and interest in the
SOC 310      Crime and Justice in a Post-Modern              field of criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if
             Society                                         topics differ. Prerequisite: One of the following: Political
SOC 311      Juvenile Delinquency                            Science 331, 333, or 337; Sociology 206, 310, 311, 313,
SOC 313      Field Investigation of the Juvenile and         324; or permission of program coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.
             Adult Criminal Justice Systems
SOC 324      Law and Society                                 CJ 388 Individual Internship
                                                             Prerequisite: Permission of program coordinator. 1-6
Group B: Related Courses                                     sem. hrs.
Note: These electives must be selected in consultation
with the program coordinator.                                CJ 400 Directed Independent Study
Accounting                                                   Individually designed in-depth study of a specific topic
ACCT 201 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting                in criminal justice. Not available for minor credit.
ACCT 202 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting               Prerequisite: Permission of program coordinator. 1-3
                                                             sem. hrs.
Mathematics
MATH 119 Statistics for Social and Life Sciences             CJ 450 Research Practicum
Political Science                                            Student-designed research project. Not available for
PLSC 260 Introduction to Public Policy                       minor credit. Prerequisite: Permission of program
PLSC 303 Metropolitan Problems and Politics                  coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 372 Methods for Public Opinion Research                 CJ 490 Criminal Justice Senior Seminar
PLSC 373 Methods for Public Policy Research                  In-depth discussion and analysis of major components
Psychology                                                   of the criminal justice system: police, courts and
PSYC 200 Methods and Analysis                                corrections. Prerequisite: Senior status in the Criminal
PSYC 311-312 Child Development                               Justice major or minor, or permission of program
PSYC 313-314 Social Psychology                               coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 435 Advanced Personality and Social
           Psychology                                        DANCE
Rhetoric and Communication Studies                           Department of Theatre and Dance
RHCS 102 Interpersonal Communication                         Walter Schoen, Chair
RHCS 201 Argumentation and Debate                            Associate Professors Holland, Mike, Schoen, West
RHCS 309 Persuasion                                          Director of Costume and Makeup Allen
Sociology                                                    Assistant Director of Costume and Makeup Pope
SOC 211      Sociological Research Methods and Data          Director of Dance Daleng
             Analysis                                        Assistant Director of Dance Van Gelder
SOC 216      Social Inequalities                             Each year two professional guest artists join the faculty
SOC 316      Race and Ethnicity in America                   to work with students and in productions. Additional
                                                             professionals from the field also are employed as adjunct
COURSES                                                      faculty members. Upper-level courses are taught on a
CJ 320 Fundamentals of Criminal Law                          rotating basis.
Overview of general structure of substantive aspects of
criminal law in the United States. Analyzes concepts of      The Dance Minor
law and crime. Discusses objectives of criminal law and      Twenty-one semester hours to include the following:
distinction between crimes and civil wrongs. Prerequisite:      • THTR 202 Stage Lighting, or THTR 212 Basics
One of the following: Political Science 331, 333, or              of Acting, 3 hours
337; Sociology 310 or 311; or permission of program
coordinator. 3 sem. hrs.
86 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



     • DANC 250 Dance History, 3 hours                          intermediate technique using movement to build
     • DANC 255 Choreography, 3 hours                           strength and coordination. Syncopated rhythms are
     • Two courses in Performance Dance: DANC 256,              explored with the sounds of the taps. Prerequisite:
       257, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 266, 306, 361,             Previous tap dance technique. 3 sem. hrs.
       362, 363, or 366, 6 hours
     • One course in Technical Theatre/Design: THTR             DANC 263 Intermediate Modern Dance
       201, 202, 206, 213, 301, or 302, 3 hours                 Continuation of beginning modern dance, emphasizing
     • Elective in Dance or Theatre, 3 hours                    intermediate technique and development of an aesthetic
                                                                vocabulary of contemporary modern dance. Prerequisite:
   Limitations: No course credit hours can be counted           Previous modern dance technique. 3 sem. hrs.
twice. Theatre 330-341 (Practica) cannot be counted in
the Dance minor. Theatre 388 (Individual Internship)            DANC 266 Intermediate Ballet
cannot be counted toward the Dance minor.                       Continuation of beginning ballet, emphasizing
                                                                intermediate technique and vocabulary. Prerequisite:
Related Concentration                                           Previous ballet technique. 3 sem. hrs.
See Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Management
for Studio Art, Art History, Music, Theatre and Dance           DANC 306 University Dancers
Majors or Minors                                                Technique, rehearsal, and performance of dance works
                                                                choreographed by dance faculty, students and visiting
COURSES                                                         choreographers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:
DANC 250 Dance History                                          Audition or invitation by director. 1 sem. hr. Fall - 1 sem.
Study of the development of dance from its primitive            hr. Spring.
beginnings to present. Students will create dance
sequences in movement labs. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                  DANC 312 Special Topics in Dance
                                                                Offered on an as-needed basis. Representative topics
DANC 255 Choreography                                           include ballet, jazz, modern, tap, dance history,
Study of choreographic process covering fundamentals            advanced choreography, dance theory, music for dancers,
of movement composition. Studio time includes                   kinesiology, contact improvisation, pointe and writing
improvisation    and    choreography.     Prerequisite:         from the body. 1-3 sem. hrs.
Departmental approval. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
                                                                DANC 315 Independent Study
DANC 256 Beginning Jazz Dance                                   Restriction: Prospectus must be submitted and approved
Introduction to jazz dance as an eclectic form of artistic      prior to the end of advance registration. Prerequisite:
expression with emphasis on rhythm and technique. 3             Permission of instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.
sem. hrs. (FSVP)
                                                                DANC 361 Advanced Jazz Dance
DANC 257 Beginning Ballet                                       Continuation of intermediate jazz, emphasizing
Introductory course in ballet as a theatrical art form. Study   advanced technique, vocabulary and style. Prerequisite:
of basic ballet terminology, understanding of correct           Previous intermediate jazz technique. 3 sem. hrs.
body placement, and a general knowledge of performing
elementary ballet technique. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                 DANC 362 Advanced Tap Dance
                                                                Continuation of intermediate tap dance, emphasizing
DANC 259 Beginning Tap Dance                                    advanced technique using movement to build strength
Introduction to tap dance, a theatrical form of artistic        and coordination. Syncopated rhythms are explored
expression with development of a movement vocabulary            with the sounds of the taps. Prerequisite: Previous
based on rhythms made with taps. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)             intermediate tap dance technique. 3 sem. hrs.
DANC 260 Beginning Modern Dance                                 DANC 363 Advanced Modern Dance
Introduction to modern dance as a diverse form of               Continuation of intermediate modern dance,
expression with development of language of movement.            emphasizing advanced technique and developing an
3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                                              aesthetic vocabulary of contemporary modern dance.
                                                                Prerequisite: Previous intermediate modern dance
DANC 261 Intermediate Jazz Dance
                                                                technique. 3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of beginning jazz, emphasizing
intermediate technique, vocabulary and style.                   DANC 366 Advanced Ballet
Prerequisite: Previous jazz technique. 3 sem. hrs.              Continuation of intermediate ballet, emphasizing
                                                                advanced technique and vocabulary. Prerequisite:
DANC 262 Intermediate Tap Dance
                                                                Previous intermediate ballet technique. 3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of beginning tap dance, emphasizing
                                                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ECONOMICS • 87



ECONOMICS                                                    Related Interdisciplinary Majors
Department of Economics                                      Mathematical-Economics
                                                             International Studies: International Economics
Robert M. Schmidt, Chair
Professors Dolan, Schmidt                                    Curriculum
Associate Professors Cook, Craft, Croushore, Dean,           Basic Economics Courses
McGoldrick, Nicholson, Wight, Yates                          ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics
Assistant Professors Asaftei, Datta, Monks                   ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics
The Economics Major (for B.A. degree)                        ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics
Note: A grade point average of C (2.00) is required in       Unless otherwise noted, Economics 101 and 102 are
the major, with no course grade below a C- (1.7) in an       prerequisites to all the following Economics courses. 300-
economics course required for the major.                     level courses may require additional prerequisites (noted in
   Nine courses in economics, including                      course descriptions).
    • ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics                  Business Economics
    • ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics                  ECON 200 The Economics of Money, Banking and
    • ECON 271 Microeconomic Theory                                      Financial Markets
    • ECON 272 Macroeconomic Theory                          ECON 300 Industrial Organization and Public Policy
    • Four economics electives (at least two of which
      must be at the 300 level)                              International Economics
    • ECON 480 Senior Capstone Seminar or ECON               ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union
      491 Honors Thesis in Economics                         ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,
   Additional requirements                                                Africa and Latin America
    • BUAD 203 Software Tools and Applications               ECON 310 International Trade and Finance
    • BUAD 201 and 301 or MATH 329 and 330                   Economic History
    Note: Majors are strongly encouraged to take Economics   ECON 220 History of Economic Thought
101 and 102 during their first year, and Economics 271        ECON 221 American Economic History
and 272 during their second year. A basic foundation in      Public Policy
calculus (e.g., Math 211) is required for Economics 271.     ECON 230 Environmental Economics
    Students may plan their course load to pursue a          ECON 231 Law and Economics
general major in economics or to study a specific area in     ECON 232 Women and Gender Issues in Economics
economics. Voluntary elective fields have been developed      ECON 330 Environmental and Resources
in the areas of Business Economics, International                         Economic Theory
Economics, Economic History, Public Policy and               ECON 331 Labor Economics
Quantitative Economics. Students are encouraged to           ECON 332 Public Economics
speak with their academic advisor about the options          ECON 333 Federal Reserve Challenge Preparation
available to them. Students interested in pursuing a         ECON 334 Federal Reserve Challenge Competition
graduate degree in economics are encouraged to seek          ECON 372 Advanced Macroeconomics
advice concerning the Honors program in Economics,           Quantitative Economics
the combined major in Mathematical Economics, and/           ECON 340 Econometrics
or taking Math 235 Multivariate Calculus, Math 312           ECON 341 Mathematical Economics
Differential Equations, and Math 245 Linear Algebra.
                                                             Special Topics
The Economics Minor (for B.A. degree)                        ECON 260 Selected Economic Topics
Note: A grade point average of C (2.00) is required          ECON 269 Independent Study
in the minor with no grade less than C- (1.7) in an          ECON 360 Selected Economic Topics
economics course required for the minor.                     ECON 369 Independent Study
   Eighteen semester hours in economics including            Intermediate Core
     • ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics                 ECON 271 Microeconomic Theory
     • ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics                 ECON 272 Macroeconomic Theory
     • ECON 271 Microeconomic Theory                         BUAD 301 Statistics for Business and Economics II
     • ECON 272 Macroeconomic Theory
     • Two economics electives (at least one of which        Capstone Seminar
       must be at the 300 level)                             ECON 480 Senior Capstone Seminar
   A basic foundation in calculus (e.g., Math 211) is        Honors
required for Economics 271.                                  ECON 490-491 Honors in Economics
88 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




COURSES                                                      ECON 220 History of Economic Thought
ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics                        Survey of development of economic analysis with
Provides students with the analytical perspective to think   emphasis on contributions from Adam Smith through
critically about the market system and social objectives     J.M. Keynes. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102. 3
it may serve. Topics include supply and demand, market       sem. hrs.
structure, production, market failure (e.g., pollution)
                                                             ECON 221 American Economic History
and benefits and costs of government intervention. 3
                                                             Use of economic theory and methods to study American
sem. hrs. (FSSA)
                                                             history with special emphasis on economic growth.
ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics                        Topics include Native American development up to
The study of national income determination                   the arrival of Europeans, transportation revolutions,
within a global economy. Topics include inflation,            slavery, agriculture and monetary controversies in the
unemployment, GDP determination, money supply,               late 19th century, health and nutrition, immigration,
balance of payments, currency markets and role of fiscal      technological change, the Great Depression and New
and monetary policies. Students who have not taken           Deal, and civil rights. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and
Economics 101 should notify their instructor on the          102. 3 sem. hrs.
first class day and will be required to spend extra time
                                                             ECON 230 Environmental Economics
outside of class on supply and demand. Prerequisite:
                                                             Development and application of economic principles
Economics 101 is recommended but not required. 3
                                                             to understand and evaluate causes and solutions
sem. hrs.
                                                             to environmental problems such as pollution and
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics                    conservation. Topics include economics of biodiversity
Survey of international economic issues for nonmajors.       protection, global warming, natural resource damage
The U.S.’s role in the global economy is covered             assessment, measurement of environmental values,
analytically, historically and institutionally, with         and alternative strategies for pollution control. Special
special attention given to balance of payments analysis,     attention given to optimal use of exhaustible and
exchange rate determination, gains from trade, trade         renewable natural resources. (Same as Environmental
policy, the IMF, GATT and other topics. Note: This           Studies 230). Prerequisite: Economics 101. 3 sem. hrs.
course has no prerequisites and fulfills no prerequisites
                                                             ECON 231 Law and Economics
for other economics or business courses. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                             Application of economic analysis to legal concepts. Using
ECON 200 The Economics of Money, Banking and                 goals of efficiency and wealth maximization, shows how
Financial Markets                                            economic theory can unify property law, contract law,
Role and functions of money; operation of financial           tort law, criminal law and family/sex law, as well as offer
institutions; structure and influence of Federal Reserve      new insights to old problems. Prerequisite: Economics
System; effects of money and credit on economic activity.    101. Business Administration 301 or Mathematics 119
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs.            encouraged. 3 sem. hrs.

ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union                 ECON 232 Women and Gender Issues in Economics
Comparative analysis of European and United States’          Designed to point out differences in economic
economics systems, including a review of the evolution       circumstances of men and women. Topic discussions
of the European Union. Although the scope of the course      include educational attainment, labor market
is primarily European, Japan and China also are studied.     participation decisions, joblessness, poverty and
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs.            associated policy. Different theoretical explanations
                                                             (neoclassical, Marxist, institutionalist and feminist) are
ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa                covered and students evaluate rationale for each theory.
and Latin America                                            Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs.
Comparative analysis of economic growth, income
and wealth distribution, trade and finance, population,       ECON 260 Selected Economic Topics
agriculture, and industrialization in Latin America,         Major areas in economics, application of economic
Africa and Asia. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102.       principles, and analysis of policy issues. Prerequisites:
3 sem. hrs.                                                  Economics 101 and 102. 1-3 sem. hrs.

ECON 212 Geographies of Economic Development                 ECON 269 Independent Study
and Globalization                                            Specialized study or directed research in an area of
(See Geography 370.) Prerequisites: Economics 101 and        economics. Prerequisites: A written outline worthy of
102. 3 sem. hrs.                                             academic credit and permission of departmental chair.
                                                             1-3 sem. hrs.
                                                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ECONOMICS • 89



ECON 271 Microeconomic Theory                                 affecting labor markets. Prerequisites: Economics 101,
Theory of price determination in both output and input        102 and 271. 3 sem. hrs.
markets; in-depth analysis of behavior of individual
consumers, firms and industries under various market           ECON 332 Public Economics
structures; theories of exchange and distribution.            Economic analysis of government spending and taxation
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102 and Mathematics          with particular emphasis on current public policy issues
211 or 231. 3 sem. hrs.                                       (e.g., social security, health care and fundamental
                                                              income tax reform). Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102
ECON 272 Macroeconomic Theory                                 and 271. 3 sem. hrs.
Theory of national income determination; short/
medium-run monetary and fiscal policy issues are               ECON 333 Federal Reserve Challenge Preparation
examined using Keynesian and New Classical models;            Analysis of current macroeconomic events and how
long-run analysis focuses on recent extensions of the         they affect monetary policy decisions. Students prepare
Neo-classical growth model. Prerequisites: Economics          for the Fed Challenge, competing for a position on the
101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs.                                      team based on their knowledge of current events, the
                                                              determinants of monetary policy, and communication
ECON 300 Industrial Organization and Public                   skills. The team also is responsible for economic
Policy                                                        conditions reports and presentations that support the
Designed to identify features of industries with various      activities of the RSB Student-Managed Investment Fund.
degrees of competition. Issues to be explored include:        Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 272 and permission of
identifying dominant firm, tight or loose oligopoly,           instructor. 1 sem. hr.
competitive and monopoly industries; product vs.
geographic markets; technological innovations;                ECON 334 Federal Reserve Challenge Competition
collusion, product differentiation; mergers; advertising;     Analysis of current macroeconomic events and how they
efficiency; price discrimination; etc. In addition,            affect monetary policy decisions. Select students prepare
antitrust policies will be reviewed as they pertain to        and present a mock policy briefing in the Fed Challenge
these issues. Note: This course also may be applied to        competition at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
the Public Policy area. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102     The team also is responsible for economic conditions
and 271. 3 sem. hrs.                                          reports and presentations that support the activities
                                                              of the RSB Student-Managed Investment Fund.
ECON 310 International Trade and Finance                      Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 272 and permission of
Introduction to basic argument for free trade with            instructor. 1 sem. hr.
emphasis on general equilibrium analysis; survey of trade
restrictions including theory on tariffs, quotas, subsidies   ECON 340 Econometrics
and preferential trade agreements. International              Development of the theory, methodology and
monetary theory; determination of exchange rates in           application of econometric topics of the classical linear
spot and forward markets; extension of national income        regression model as well as model extensions including
model to international markets. Prerequisite: Economics       dummy and limited dependent variables, time-series
271. 3 sem. hrs.                                              analysis, forecasting and simultaneous equation systems.
                                                              Excel, SPSS, and SAS are used in weekly computer lab
ECON 330 Environmental and Resource Economic                  sessions. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102 and Business
Theory                                                        Administration 301 or Mathematics 330. 4 sem. hrs.
A rigorous treatment of environmental and resource
issues, with particular emphasis on problem of                ECON 341 Mathematical Economics
designing appropriate institutions and regulations under      Examines various economic concepts by means of
uncertainty. Topics include emission fees and marketable      mathematical analysis. Prerequisites: Economics 101,
permits; enforcement, risk regulation, the economics          102 and 271 and Mathematics 211 or 231. 3 sem. hrs.
and regulation of the fishery; depletion of nonrenewable       ECON 360 Selected Economic Topics
resources; and forest use. (Same as Environmental Studies     Major areas in economics, application of economic
330.) Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102 and 271. 3 sem.       principles and analysis of policy issues. Prerequisite: A
hrs.                                                          core course to be announced. 1-3 sem. hrs.
ECON 331 Labor Economics                                      ECON 369 Independent Study
Economic analysis of labor markets including labor            Specialized study or directed research in an area of
supply, investment in human capital, labor demand and         economics. Prerequisites: Economics 271 and/or
wage determination. Policy issues include labor unions,       272, a written outline worthy of advanced credit and
discrimination and analysis of government programs            permission of departmental chair. 1-3 sem. hrs.
90 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ECON 372 Advanced Macroeconomics                                In order for programs to remain current with
Examination of selected topics in macroeconomics            licensure regulations as mandated by the Virginia
beyond the basic theory level covered in Economics          State Department of Education, the requirements as
272. Topics may include forecasting, time-series            stated may be subject to change. Please check with the
econometrics, growth theory, analysis of dynamic,           department for the most recent version of licensure and
stochastic general-equilibrium models and open-             program requirements.
economy macroeconomics. Prerequisites: Economics
272 and Business Administration 301. 3 sem. hrs.            Title II Results
                                                            In October 1998, the U.S. Congress enacted
ECON 480 Senior Capstone Seminar                            amendments to the Higher Education Act (HEA). As
Utilizes theoretical and applied economic models from       amended, Title II of the HEA addressed the issue of the
previous economics courses. Semester assignments            quality of teacher preparation by doing two things:
guide students through a major research project of              It authorized new federal grant programs to support
one of the following forms: contemporary economic           states, institutions of higher education and their
analysis, historical economic analysis, viewpoints in       school district partners, in improving the recruitment,
economic analysis, or quantitative economic analysis.       preparation and support of new teachers.
Students develop an economic question; gain access to           Title II also included new accountability measures:
existing knowledge; demonstrate command of existing         reporting requirements for institutions and states on
knowledge; use existing knowledge to explore an issue of    teacher preparation and licensing
interest; understand the steps to complete a substantial        The University of Richmond Institutional Report
research project; and sharpen written communication         contains:
skills. Note: Participation in the Honors program fulfills         • Program completer pass rates
the Capstone requirement. Prerequisites: Economics                • Basic features of the teacher preparation program
271 and 272, Business Administration 301, and senior              • Whether the teacher preparation program has
standing. 3 sem. hrs.                                               been classified as “low performing”
                                                                  • Supplemental information the institution believes
ECON 490 Honors Seminar in Economics
                                                                    is important to providing necessary context
Honors seminar. Prerequisite: Departmental invitation.
                                                                We at the University of Richmond are very proud of
3 sem. hrs.
                                                            the accomplishments of our teacher education graduates,
ECON 491 Honors Thesis in Economics                         and hope that you find this information useful. For the
Capstone independent research project and Honors            most current data regarding the pass rates of students in
paper. Note: Participation in the Honors program fulfills    our programs, visit our Web site at: http://education.
the Capstone requirement. Prerequisite: Departmental        richmond.edu/.
invitation. 3-3 sem. hrs.
                                                            Education Minor
                                                            Students seeking teacher licensure in the state of Virginia
EDUCATION
                                                            cannot major in Education. They must major in another
Department of Education                                     liberal arts area and complete the teacher preparation
Patricia Stohr-Hunt, Chair                                  program. Education is not, therefore, an academic
Associate Professor Brown                                   major at the University of Richmond. Students who
Assistant Professor Stohr-Hunt                              complete the requirements of the Teacher Preparation
Director of Field Placement Moore                           Program will receive a minor in Education.
Director of Curriculum Materials and Technologies Center
(CMTC) Joyce                                                Program Objectives
                                                            The Teacher Preparation Program at the University
State-Approved Teacher Licensure Programs at                of Richmond is structured to assist students in
the University of Richmond                                  achieving (1) knowledge of public education as a
The University of Richmond was first granted an              contemporary institutional, functions and governance;
Approved Teacher Education Program by the Virginia          (2) an understanding of the philosophical, sociological,
State Board of Education in 1972. Since that time, the      psychological and historical foundations of education; (3)
University’s Department of Education has maintained         an understanding of student development with emphasis
approved program status and, as such, participates in       on student learning and achievement; (4) familiarity
reciprocity of licensure with states that have interstate   with the intellectual, social, emotional and physical
agreements with Virginia. Currently Virginia has            characteristics of students which affect the learning
licensure reciprocity with 48 states, territories and the   process; (5) knowledge of instructional techniques,
District of Columbia.                                       materials and procedures pertinent to particular content
                                                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/EDUCATION • 91



areas and grade levels; (6) competency in planning,         the fall semester of the fourth year. Students must
implementing and evaluating classroom instruction; (7)      maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.70, and
competency in establishing and maintaining an orderly       a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in Education,
and supportive classroom environment.                       to be eligible for student teaching.
Undergraduate Teacher Preparation                           Year Four
The Teacher Preparation Program at the University of        Students enroll in and complete the semester-long
Richmond prepares teachers for licensure in Elementary      teaching experience and the accompanying seminar.
Education (PK-6), Secondary Education (6-12) or             Students also complete a Career Development Center
Comprehensive Education (PK-12). Students interested        placement file and licensure application forms. (The
in becoming teachers should contact the Department of       Department of Education will forward licensure
Education to meet with an Education faculty member          applications and recommendations for licensure only
to discuss program requirements. All students seeking to    for those students who complete the student teaching
enroll in the Teacher Preparation Program must formally     experience through the University of Richmond.)
apply for admission and submit:                                Students also must take and submit passing scores
     • A completed application form                         on all required exams for their licensure area. Students
     • A Statement of Intent                                should consult their faculty advisor in the Department
     • Two letters of recommendation                        of Education for information about this requirement.
     • Official scores on ONE of the following tests:
          • Praxis I - minimum scores of 178 for reading,   Academic Requirements
            176 for writing and 178 for mathematics.        All formally accepted students must maintain a grade
          • SAT - minimum score of 1100, with a             point average of 3.00 in Education and a cumulative
            minimum score of 530 on verbal and              grade point average of 2.70 to remain in the program
            minimum score of 530 on math.                   and be eligible for student teaching. Only one grade
          • ACT - minimum composite score of 24, with       of C or lower is allowed in Education course work.
            a minimum of 22 on math and a minimum           Therefore, students who earn more than one grade of C
            combined score of 46 on English and reading     in Education courses must repeat those courses and earn
     • Evidence of a minimum cumulative grade point         higher grades or they will not be permitted to remain in
       average of 2.70                                      the program.

Teacher Preparation Program Chronology                      Licensure of Teachers
(Transfer students may need an extra semester or year to    Licensure application forms may be obtained from, and
complete the requirements for licensure.)                   when complete should be returned to, the Department
                                                            of Education at the University of Richmond. With the
Year One                                                    licensure application, students also must submit (1)
Students interested in becoming licensed to teach should    official transcripts of all college work including transfer
contact the Department of Education during their            credit, (2) passing scores on all required licensure exams,
first year at the University and arrange to meet with a      and (3) a money order or cashier’s check made payable
faculty advisor. Students begin the education sequence      to the State Department of Education to cover the
by taking Education 205. If necessary, students should      application fee. Upon satisfactory completion of degree
arrange to take the Praxis I exam before the beginning of   requirements and the University’s Approved Teacher
their sophomore year.                                       Education Program, and upon receipt of the required
                                                            licensure materials, the Virginia State Department of
Year Two                                                    Education will issue a Collegiate Professional License
Students enroll in Education 207 and 208. Students          that is valid for five years and renewable with additional
complete a formal application to the program and return     professional and/or college credit.
the completed forms to the Department of Education
department no later than October 15 of the fall semester    Core Requirements
or March 15 of the spring semester. Students declare        All students seeking licensure engage in a series of
Education as a minor only after they have been officially    professional courses and field experience that serve as
accepted into the program.                                  the foundation of the programs. These include:
                                                                 • Professional Courses: Foundations of Education,
Year Three                                                         Diverse Learners and Environments, Classroom
Students enroll in the sequence of courses for elementary          Management, Technology Enhanced Learning
or secondary/comprehensive education. During the                 • Field Experience: Integrated course-related
spring semester of this year, students also apply for              practica and observation experiences
the student teaching experience that will occur during
92 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



    • Student Teaching: Fifteen weeks of full-time         Comprehensive (PK-12) Education
      experience in local school divisions, Student        Students seeking secondary licensure MUST complete
      Teaching Seminar                                     the requirements for a liberal arts major in one of the
                                                           following areas: French, German Studies, Latin, Spanish
Elementary Education (PK-6)                                or Studio Art. For Foreign Language endorsement
Students seeking Elementary licensure MUST complete        areas, one additional methodology course in the major
the requirements for ANY liberal arts major. Students      is required for licensure. Comprehensive Education
majoring only in Business or Leadership Studies            sequence:
are NOT eligible for a teaching license in Virginia.
Elementary Education sequence:                                EDUC 205 Foundations of Education, 3 hours
                                                              EDUC 207 Diverse Learners and Environments,
   EDUC 205 Foundations of Education, 3 hours                          3 hours
   EDUC 207 Diverse Learners and Environments,                EDUC 208 Classroom Management, 3 hours
            3 hours                                           EDUC 342 Secondary Curriculum Methods,
   EDUC 208 Classroom Management, 3 hours                              3 hours
   EDUC 306 Integrated Curriculum Methods,                    EDUC 343 Technology-Enhanced Learning,
            3 hours                                                    3 hours
   EDUC 325 Teaching Language Arts and                        EDUC 352 Content Area Literacy, 3 hours
            Literature, 3 hours                               EDUC 367 Middle School Practicum, 1 hours
   EDUC 326 Foundations of Reading Instruction,               EDUC 368 Secondary School Practicum, 1 hours
            4 hours                                           EDUC 478 Student Teaching, Comprehensive
   EDUC 327 Foundations of Math Instruction,                           (preK-12), 12 hours
            4 hours                                           EDUC 485 Student Teaching Seminar, 2 hours
   EDUC 343 Technology-Enhanced Learning,
            3 hours                                        Subject Area Endorsements
   EDUC 365 Elementary Reading Practicum,                  For all endorsement areas, students seeking a particular
            1 hours                                        endorsement must meet the requirements of that major.
   EDUC 366 Elementary Mathematics Practicum,              The state of Virginia has specified competencies and
            1 hours                                        courses for the endorsements listed below.
   EDUC 475 Student Teaching, Elementary                   Art Endorsement (preK-12)
            Education (preK-6), 12 hours                   Students seeking the Art endorsement must meet the
   EDUC 485 Student Teaching Seminar, 2 hours              requirements of the Studio Art major.
Secondary (6-12) Education                                 English Endorsement
Students seeking secondary licensure MUST complete         Students seeking the English endorsement must meet
the requirements for a liberal arts major in one of the    the requirements of the English major. Combined
following areas: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science,     majors in English do NOT meet the standard for this
English, History, Mathematics or Physics. For some         endorsement. Additionally, the following courses and/or
endorsement areas, additional methodology courses          experiences are required:
and/or subject specific courses in the major are required       • ENGL 304 Shakespeare, 4 hours
for licensure. Secondary Education sequence:                   • ENGL 381 Modern Grammar, 4 hours
   EDUC 205 Foundations of Education, 3 hours                  • MLC 350 Introductory Linguistics, 3 hours
   EDUC 207 Diverse Learners and Environments,                 • Completion of the Teaching of Writing Tutorials
            3 hours                                               or ENGL 383 Introduction to Composition
   EDUC 208 Classroom Management, 3 hours                         Theory and Pedagogy, 4 hours
   EDUC 342 Secondary Curriculum Methods,                  Foreign Language Endorsements
            3 hours                                        Students seeking a language endorsement must meet the
   EDUC 343 Technology-Enhanced Learning,                  requirements of the major in French, German Studies,
            3 hours                                        Latin or Spanish. Additionally, the following courses
   EDUC 352 Content Area Literacy, 3 hours                 and/or experiences are required:
   EDUC 367 Middle School Practicum, 1 hours               French, German, and Spanish
   EDUC 368 Secondary School Practicum, 1 hours                • MLC 410 The Teaching of a Modern Second
   EDUC 477 Student Teaching, Secondary                          Language, 3 hours
            Education (6-12), 12 hours                         • One course in advanced grammar and
   EDUC 485 Student Teaching Seminar, 2 hours                    composition
                                                SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/EDUCATION • 93



    • One course in conversation                           Additional Science Endorsements
    • One course in culture and civilization               Students completing the requirements for an
    • One course in literature                             endorsement in Biology, Chemistry or Physics may add
Latin                                                      an endorsement in a second science by completing 18
Students seeking the Latin endorsement must meet           hours of coursework in the second science.
the requirements of the Latin major and also take the      Add-On Endorsement Requirements
following course:                                          Students who meet the endorsement requirements
     • LATN 411 The Teaching of High School Latin, 3       in ANY teaching area may apply for an add-on
       hours                                               endorsement if they meet the requirements for a minor
Additional Foreign Language Endorsements                   that is compatible with one of the following licensure
Students completing the requirements for an endorsement    (endorsement) areas:
in French, German or Spanish may add an endorsement           Computer Science
in a second modern language by completing 24 hours of         Dance (preK-12)
coursework above the intermediate level in the second         Journalism
language.                                                     Mathematics - Algebra I
                                                              Speech Communication
History and Social Science Endorsement                        Theatre Arts (preK-12)
Students seeking the history and social science
endorsement must meet the requirements of the History      COURSES
major. Additionally, the following courses and/or          EDUC 205 Foundations of Education
experiences are required:                                  Introductory analysis of education. Readings from
    • PLSC 220 Introduction to American Government,        various texts provide exposure to historical, philosophical,
       3 hours                                             sociological and legal issues of education. Emphasis will
    • One course in Economics (ECON)                       be placed on learning theory, curriculum theory and link
    • Completion of the Teaching of Geography              between child development and instruction. Particular
       Tutorials or one course in Geography (GEOG          attention given to recently developed approaches to
       210 or 320)                                         teaching and learning. Service learning in an educational
Mathematics Endorsement                                    context is required. 3 sem. hrs.
Students seeking the Mathematics endorsement must          EDUC 207 Diverse Learners and Environments
meet the requirements for either the Bachelor of Arts or   Introduction to the wide range of diversity that
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics.                 exists across today’s general school population and
Science Endorsements                                       examination of increased professional demands that
Biology                                                    this diversity makes upon teachers. Students will
Students seeking the Biology endorsement must              explore range of diversity issues that teachers confront
meet the requirements of the Biology major. The            in our pluralistic society leading to the development
Biochemistry major does NOT meet the standard for          and practice of multicultural education. Areas of study
this endorsement. Additionally, the following courses      include ethnicity, race, gender, exceptionality, religion,
and/or experiences are required:                           language and age. Field experience in a public school
     • BIOL 201 Introduction to Genetics, 4 hours          setting is required. 3 sem. hrs.
     • BIOL 205 Cell and Molecular Biology, 4 hours        EDUC 208 Classroom Management
     • One course in botany (BIOL 303, 305 or 306)         Introduces learning and curriculum theories and
     • One course in zoology (BIOL 308, 309 or 328)        analyses and how they contribute to the understanding
     • One course in ecology (BIOL 330 or 344)             and application of classroom management techniques.
     • One course in anatomy/physiology                    Emphasis on individual interventions, including
Chemistry                                                  techniques to promote educational well-being, maximize
Students seeking the Chemistry endorsement must meet       learning time, increase motivation, and address
the requirements of the Chemistry major.                   inappropriate behavior. Approaches will be examined
Physics                                                    based on theory and practice to meet the needs of diverse
Students seeking the Physics endorsement must meet         learners. Prerequisite: Education 207. 3 sem. hrs.
the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree
in Physics. In addition, we highly recommend the
following course as part of the major:
     • PHYS 215 Computational Methods in Physics, 3
94 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



EDUC 306 Integrated Curriculum Methods                          mathematics for understanding. Course content
Introduces use of appropriate methods and assessments           emphasizes and integrates state and national curriculum
to help learners develop knowledge and basic skills,            standards, problem solving approaches, use of
sustain intellectual curiosity and problem solve.               manipulatives and technology, current research and
Examines selection of strategies and procedures to              learning theory. Practicum experience in elementary
enhance classroom instruction and support learners              mathematics, grades 3-5, is required. Prerequisite:
in achievement of the Virginia Standards of Learning.           Education 306. Corequisite: Education 366. 3 sem. hrs.
Explores curriculum integration and subject-specific
methodology in science and social studies. Prerequisite:        EDUC 342 Secondary Curriculum Methods
Education 205 or 207. 3 sem. hrs.                               Process of establishing appropriate goals and objectives
                                                                for instruction in middle and secondary schools
EDUC 312-313-314 Independent Study in Education                 targeting diverse learners. Use of objectives in planning
Special projects and practical experience in educational        of instruction and assessment, with attention to design
programs. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-2-3         of traditional and alternative assessment theories and
sem. hrs.                                                       practices. Development of wide variety of teaching
                                                                methods addressing the needs of gifted, general and
EDUC 316 Special Topics                                         special education students. Practicum experience in a
Accommodates special needs of teachers and school               high school setting is required. Prerequisite: Education
systems through use of selected contemporary topics,            208. Corequisite: Education 368. 3 sem. hrs.
resource persons and prepared programs; supports
requests for professional development. Variable credit          EDUC 343 Technology-Enhanced Learning
depending on course structure and time commitment.              Theory and pedagogy of using technology for instruction
Prerequisite: Varies by topic. 1-3 sem. hrs.                    in all areas of PreK-12 curriculum. Includes current
                                                                practice, skill building and exploration of resources
EDUC 319 Student Development Theory and Its                     to better prepare educators to fully understand the
Application to Residential Life                                 potential, consequences and future uses of instructional
Theoretical and experiential study of human behavior.           technology in teaching diverse learners. Prerequisite:
Emphasis on self-awareness and growth, and its                  Education 326 or 342. 3 sem. hrs.
application to understanding students and their lives.
Attention given to leadership skills in residential setting.    EDUC 352 Content Area Literacy
Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Selection as Residential        Reading and critical thinking in middle and secondary
Life staff member or permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.       school content areas. Specific strategies are explored that
                                                                enhance comprehension, concept development and
EDUC 325 Teaching Language Arts and Literature                  vocabulary knowledge. Effects of text organization and
Theories, research, methods and materials relevant              relationship between reading and writing are examined
to teaching language arts to diverse learners. Reviews          for all content areas. Practicum experience in a middle
knowledge, skills and processes necessary for teaching          school setting is required. Prerequisite: Education 342.
writing, including grammar, punctuation, spelling,              3 sem. hrs.
syntax, etc. Includes study of selected children’s literature
and literature appreciation. Prerequisite: Education 208.       EDUC 365 Elementary Reading Practicum
3 sem. hrs.                                                     Weekly field experience under the guidance of a classroom
                                                                teacher focused on the teaching of reading in the early
EDUC 326 Foundations of Reading Instruction                     elementary grades. Practicum will include classroom
In-depth examination of complex nature of language              observations; collaboration with practicing teachers;
acquisition and reading, to include: phonemic awareness,        gradually increased instructional responsibility; and the
understanding of sound/symbol relationships, explicit           design, development, implementation and evaluation of self-
phonics instruction, syllables, phonemes, morphemes,            constructed lessons. Corequisite: Education 326. 1 sem. hr.
decoding skills, word attack skills and knowledge of
how phonics, syntax and semantics interact. Additional          EDUC 366 Elementary Mathematics Practicum
study to include strategies to foster comprehension             Weekly field experience under the guidance of a classroom
and independent reading. Practicum experience in                teacher focused on the teaching of mathematics in
elementary reading, grades K-2, is required. Prerequisite:      the upper elementary grades. Practicum will include
Education 208. Corequisite: Education 365. 3 sem. hrs.          classroom observations; collaboration with practicing
                                                                teachers; gradually increased instructional responsibility;
EDUC 327 Foundations of Math Instruction                        and the design, development, implementation and
In-depth examination of fundamental mathematical                evaluation of self-constructed lessons. Corequisite:
concepts and methods of teaching elementary                     Education 327. 1 sem. hr.
                                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENGLISH • 95



EDUC 367 Middle School Practicum                              ENGLISH
Weekly field experience under the guidance of a                Department of English
classroom teacher focused on the teaching of subject-
specific content in the middle school grades. Practicum        Louis Tremaine, Chair
will include classroom observations; collaboration with       Professors Dance, Givens, Hickey, Hilliard, S. Jones,
practicing teachers; gradually increased instructional        Loxterman, Tremaine
responsibility; and the design, development,                  Associate Professors Ashe, Gruner, Henry, Hewett-Smith,
implementation and evaluation of self-constructed             MacAllister, Marx, Russell, Schwartz, Stevens
lessons. Corequisite: Education 352. 1 sem. hr.               Assistant Professors Cheever, Lurie, Saal
                                                              Director of ESL Services Grove
EDUC 368 Secondary School Practicum                           Director of Writing Center Essid
Weekly field experience under the guidance of a classroom
                                                                  Note: Students must complete English 103 with a
teacher, focused on the teaching of subject-specific
                                                              grade of C or better before taking any other English
content in the secondary grades. Practicum will include
                                                              courses. (This does not apply to students who are
classroom observations, collaboration with practicing
                                                              exempt from English 103 on the basis of an Advanced
teachers, gradually increased instructional responsibility,
                                                              Placement or SAT-Writing score.) A 200-level FSLT
and the design, development, implementation, and
                                                              English course is a prerequisite to all 300- and 400-level
evaluation of self-constructed lessons. Corequisite:
                                                              literature courses. (For possible exceptions, see below.)
Education 342. 1 sem. hr.
                                                                  Courses beyond the 100-level involve intensive
EDUC 451 Survey of Children’s Literature                      reading and writing and carry four semester hours of
Survey of modern and traditional literature with              credit.
emphasis on evaluative criteria used in selecting books
based on school and recreational needs and interests of       The English Major
children. Features storytelling, creative dramatics and       A grade of C (2.0) or better is required in all coursework
ways of integrating books into curriculum. 3 sem. hrs.        comprising the English major.
                                                                 Forty semester hours in English approved by the
EDUC 475 Student Teaching, Elementary                         department, including
Education (preK-6)                                                • One 200-level FSLT course, 4 hours
Involves working directly with students in classroom on           • Two courses at the 300 level in British literature
full-time basis under direction of cooperating teacher              before 1660, 8 hours
and University supervisor; student assumes full teacher           • One course at the 300 level in British literature
responsibility for all instructional periods and school             between 1660 and 1900, 4 hours
activities. Weekly seminar. Graded pass/fail; however, a          • One course at the 300 level in American literature
comprehensive evaluation is completed for each student              before 1860, 4 hours
teacher. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval. 12 sem. hrs.        • One course at the 300 level in world literature, 4
                                                                    hours
EDUC 477 Student Teaching, Secondary Education                    • Two additional English courses at the 300 level, 8
(6-12)                                                              hours
(See description under Education 475.) Prerequisite:              • Two English 400 seminars, 8 hours
Departmental Approval. 12 sem. hrs.
                                                              Combined Majors
EDUC 478 Student Teaching, Comprehensive
                                                              The following combined programs are available for
Endorsement (preK-12)
                                                              students who wish to pursue in-depth work in two
(See description under Education 475.) Prerequisite:
                                                              areas: English/Classics, English/French, English/
Departmental Approval. 12 sem. hrs.
                                                              German, English/Greek, English/Latin, English/
EDUC 485 Student Teaching Seminar                             Russian, English/Theatre, English/Women, Gender and
Weekly seminar for student teachers. Provides a forum         Sexuality Studies.
for discussion and examination of critical issues related
to students’ teaching responsibilities and competence.
                                                              The English Minor
                                                              A grade of C (2.0) or better is required in all coursework
Also provides guidance in the preparation of the Teacher
                                                              comprising the English minor.
Work Sample. Corequisite: Education 475, 477, or 478.
                                                                 Twenty-four hours in English approved by the
2 sem. hrs.
                                                              department, including
                                                                  • One 200-level FSLT course, 4 hours
                                                                  • One 300-level British literature course, 4 hours
                                                                  • One 300-level American literature course, 4 hours
96 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



     • Two additional literature courses at the 300 level,   fields: Art History, Classics (literature in the original
       8 hours                                               language or in translation), History, Philosophy,
     • One English 400 seminar, 4 hours                      Religion, Theatre and the modern literatures (Chinese,
   Creative writing courses may not be counted towards       French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian or Spanish).
the English minor.                                           Students are expected to select four courses that seem
                                                             relevant to, or that promise to complement, the study
The Creative Writing Minor                                   of English. In making the selections, a student must
A grade of C (2.0) or better is required in all coursework   consult both with the major advisor in English and with
comprising the Creative Writing minor.                       a secondary advisor in the Allied Field. Students who
   Six courses, including                                    successfully complete an Allied Field option will receive
    • ENGL 384 Introduction to Creative Writing, 4           a certificate and a letter of recognition at the time of
       hours                                                 Commencement.
    • Three writing courses in at least two genres
       selected from                                         Related Concentrations
       • ENGL 385 Fiction Writing, 4 hours                   Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval and
       • ENGL 386 Poetry Writing, 4 hours                    Renaissance Studies for English Majors
       • ENGL 387 Writing for the Stage, 4 hours             Interdisciplinary Concentration       in   Comparative
       • ENGL 392 Creative Nonfiction Writing, 4 hours        Literature for English Majors
       • ENGL 397 Selected Topics in Writing, 4 hours
    • One 200- or 300-level English course in literature,    CURRICULUM
       4 hours                                               First- and Second-Year English Courses
    • One additional 300-level English course, either        ENGL 100A-100B Interdisciplinary Writing
       in literature or in writing, 4 hours                  ENGL 103 Introduction to Expository Writing
   ENGL 384 is a prerequisite to ENGL 385, 386, 387,         ENGL 140 English as a Second Language and
392 and 397. Each may be taken no more than three                         American Culture
times for credit.                                            ENGL 198 Teaching English as a Second
Honors Program                                                            Language through Literature and Film
To earn honors in English, a major must complete             Field of Study, Literary Topics (FSLT) Courses
English 498, Honors Seminar (two semester hours).            ENGL 203 Children’s Literature
The student also must complete four hours of thesis          ENGL 204 Literature and Culture
writing (English 499, Honors Thesis). Credits earned         ENGL 205 Latino/a Literature and Film
for English 498 and 499 are in addition to the 40            ENGL 206 Selected Readings in American Literature
credit hours required in the English major. Students         ENGL 207 Revolutionary American Literature
must have attained a departmental GPA of 3.50 by the         ENGL 208 Twentieth-Century American Fiction
beginning of the fall semester of the senior year. They      ENGL 214 Literature of India
also must maintain that GPA through the completion           ENGL 215 Reading Science Fiction
of the program and an overall GPA of no less than 3.30       ENGL 216 Literature, Technology and Society
while in the program. The thesis must be submitted to        ENGL 217 The Bible as Literature
a faculty committee in the spring of the student’s senior    ENGL 218 African Literature
year. Honors will be granted only to those students          ENGL 220 Film Studies
whose theses meet departmental standards. Students           ENGL 221 Introduction to Poetry
should declare their intention to seek honors and meet       ENGL 222 Short Fiction
with the honors coordinator in their sophomore year.         ENGL 223 The Modern Novel
Students who have not declared by the second semester        ENGL 224 Great Novels
of their junior year are disqualified from further honors     ENGL 226 Love and War in Medieval Literature
consideration. Those who have declared that they are         ENGL 227 Life-Writing as Literature: Studies in
seeking honors will be considered candidates until                        Biography and Autobiography
they fail to meet one of the program’s requirements.         ENGL 228 World Drama
For further information and advice on standards and          ENGL 230 Women in Modern Literature
curriculum, see the honors coordinator.                      ENGL 231 African-American Literature
                                                             ENGL 232 Southern Fiction
Allied Fields Option                                         ENGL 233 Tradition and Renewal in Native
To enrich the value of the major in English by doing                      American Literatures
focused work in an Allied Field, students have the           ENGL 234 Shakespeare
option of taking four courses in one of the following
                                                    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENGLISH • 97



ENGL 235 Narratives of Personal Development                 ENGL 348      Modernist Sexuality
ENGL 236 On the Road: Literature of Quest                   ENGL 349      Late Imperial Fiction
         and Pilgrimage                                     ENGL 353      American Realism and Regionalism
ENGL 238 Selected Readings in Caribbean Literature          ENGL 354      Literature of the American South
ENGL 299 Special Topics in Literary Analysis                ENGL 355      Race and Ethnicity in
Courses in British Literature Before 1660                                 American Literature
These courses may be period surveys, courses in a single    ENGL 356      Twentieth-Century American Poetry
author, or courses in a special topic. English 310 may be   ENGL 357      From Modernism to Postmodernism:
taken more than once for credit as its content changes.                   Twentieth-Century American Fiction
Students also may count English 390 as one of their two     ENGL 358      African-American Women Writers
pre-1660 courses.                                           ENGL 359      Contemporary American Literature
ENGL 301 Literature of the Middle Ages                      ENGL 360      Studies in the American Novel
ENGL 302 Literature of the English Renaissance              ENGL 365      Modern Drama
ENGL 303 Chaucer                                            ENGL 366      Contemporary British and American
ENGL 304 Shakespeare                                                      Drama
ENGL 305 Critical Approaches to Shakespeare                 ENGL 368      History and Aesthetics of Film
ENGL 306 Milton                                             ENGL 369      American Culture/American Film
ENGL 310 Topics in British Literature Before 1660           ENGL 370      Literature and Film
                                                            ENGL 372      Topics in Film
Courses in British Literature Between 1660 and 1900         ENGL 375      Critics Since Plato
These courses may be period surveys, courses in a single    ENGL 376      Modern Literary Theory
author, or courses in a special topic. English 320 may be   ENGL 377      Poetics
taken more than once for credit as its content changes.     ENGL 378      The Novel in Theory and Practice
ENGL 311 English Literature of the                          ENGL 381      Modern Grammar
              Restoration and 18th Century                  ENGL 382      Topics in Advanced Composition
ENGL 312 English Literature of the Romantic                 ENGL 383      Introduction to Composition Theory and
              Movement                                                    Pedagogy
ENGL 313 English Literature of the Victorian Period         ENGL 384      Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGL 320 Topics in British Literature 1660-1900             ENGL 385      Fiction Writing
Courses in American Literature Before 1860                  ENGL 386      Poetry Writing
ENGL 321 Early American Literature                          ENGL 387      Writing for the Stage
ENGL 322 Literature of the American Revolution              ENGL 388      Individual Internship
ENGL 325 Age of the American Renaissance                    ENGL 389      Women and Creativity
ENGL 326 From Revolution to Romanticism:                    ENGL 390      Interdisciplinary Studies in the Middle
            American Fiction Through 1860                                 Ages and Renaissance
ENGL 330 Special Topics in American Literature              ENGL 391      Themes and Methods in Comparative
            Before 1860                                                   Literature
                                                            ENGL 392      Creative Nonfiction Writing
Courses in World Literature
                                                            ENGL 393      Literary Magazine Editing
These courses study the world of literatures outside the
                                                            ENGL 397      Selected Topics in Writing
predominant British and American traditions. English
                                                            ENGL 398      Independent Study
majors must take one of the following courses.
                                                            ENGL 399      Selected Topics
ENGL 331 Literatures of Africa
                                                            ENGL 498      Honors Seminar
ENGL 332 Literatures of the Caribbean
                                                            ENGL 499      Thesis Direction
ENGL 333 Literatures of South Asia
ENGL 334 American Indian Literatures                        Seminar Requirement
ENGL 335 Black Women Writers                                ENGL 400 Junior/Senior Seminar
ENGL 336 Literatures of Globalization                       English 400 may be taken more than once for credit when
ENGL 337 Postcolonial Literatures                           topic changes. Students who have at least a 3.5 GPA in
ENGL 338 Versions of Tragedy                                the English major may seek permission to take a 500-level
ENGL 339 Epic Traditions                                    M.A. seminar as a substitute for English 400. Students also
ENGL 345 Topics in World Literature                         may seek permission to take appropriate 400-level seminars
Other Advanced English Courses                              in American Studies as courses that satisfy the seminar
ENGL 346 Twentieth-Century British Literature               requirement in the English major.
ENGL 347 Topics in Twentieth-Century British
           Literature
98 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




COURSES                                                        backgrounds. Explores questions of acculturation,
ENGL 100A-100B Interdisciplinary Writing                       identity, frontiers/borders, and mobility that have been
Provides students with critical writing/reading skills         the particular focus of these artists. Prerequisite: English
within interactive computer classroom. Focus on                103 with a grade of C or better or exemption. 4 sem.
frames of inquiry which inform various academic                hrs. (FSLT)
disciplines. Part I (100A) includes introduction to
                                                               ENGL 206 Selected Readings in American
computer technology and critical reading and writing
                                                               Literature
with emphasis on personal responses to individual texts
                                                               Selected works reflecting one or more major patterns
(visual and print) drawn from across disciplines, along
                                                               in American literature. Specific emphasis may change
with a short research-based assignment. Part II (100B)
                                                               from term to term and will be announced each term.
includes continuation of critical reading and writing
                                                               Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
with emphasis on cross-disciplinary texts, library
                                                               exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
skills orientation, research-based assignment, oral
presentations, and collaboration on creating a Web site.       ENGL 207 Revolutionary American Literature
(Limited to Bridge to Success students). 1-1 sem. hrs.         Key texts, including political documents, essays, personal
                                                               narratives, novels, plays, and poems, from the founding
ENGL 103 Introduction to Expository Writing
                                                               era when the young republic was trying to forge both
Introduction to critical reading, thinking and writing
                                                               a political and cultural identity for itself. Prerequisite:
across disciplines. Students must complete English 103
                                                               English 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption.
with grade of C or better to meet Communications I,
                                                               4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Expository Writing general education requirement and
receive credit toward graduation. 3 sem. hrs. (COM1)           ENGL 208 Twentieth-Century American Fiction
                                                               Textual analysis of novels and shorter fiction representing
ENGL 140 Topics in ESL and US Culture
                                                               diverse authors, themes, movements and techniques.
Selected topics in ESL (English as a second language) and
                                                               Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
U.S. culture. International students will be able to improve
                                                               exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
their proficiency in English and understand U.S. culture
simultaneously, through reading materials, videos, guest       ENGL 214 Literature of India
speakers and research that students themselves conduct.        Explores the multiple strains of the Indian novel that
Topics will vary by semester. Can be taken for credit up       have emerged over the past 50 years. Prerequisite:
to two times with change of topic. This course can be          English 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption.
taken ONLY by ESL speakers. 2 sem. hrs.                        4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
ENGL 198 Teaching English as a Second Language                 ENGL 215 Reading Science Fiction
through Literature and Film                                    Analysis of selected works of science fiction. Prerequisite:
Introduction to methods of teaching ESL. Emphasis              English 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption.
on using literature and film as texts to enhance the            4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
ESL learning experience. Hands-on application of ESL
theories. Includes experience with lesson planning,            ENGL 216 Literature, Technology and Society
materials development and instructional technology. 3          Literary and nonliterary texts that react, in a given
sem. hrs.                                                      society and period of history, to technological change
                                                               and social effects of technology. Prerequisite: English
ENGL 203 Children’s Literature                                 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption. 4 sem.
Analysis of children’s literature, from folk and fairy         hrs. (FSLT)
tales to today’s stories, poems and novels for children.
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or       ENGL 217 The Bible and Literature
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                  Study of representative texts from Hebrew bible and
                                                               New Testament, and examination of their relationships
ENGL 204 Literature and Culture                                to later works of drama, poetry, short stories and the
Representation of cultural identity and experience             novel. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or
in works drawn from diverse cultural traditions.               better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                  ENGL 218 African Literature
                                                               Representative works from written traditions in modern
ENGL 205 Latino/a Literature and Film                          African literature. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade
Representative films and literary works created by U.S.         of C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
writers and filmmakers from a variety of Latin American
                                                     SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENGLISH • 99



ENGL 220 Film Studies                                        ENGL 232 Southern Fiction
Introduces the methodology of film studies through            Fiction of both old and new South with attention to
close textual analysis of narrative film. Special attention   themes, techniques and perspectives of the region.
paid to the international history of the medium, the         Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
language of production, and major critical approaches.       exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                ENGL 233 Tradition and Renewal in Native
                                                             American Literatures
ENGL 221 Introduction to Poetry                              Selected works (songs, stories, novels and poetry)
Analysis of works by selected poets.                         representative of oral and written traditions of American
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or     Indian cultures. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of
exemption. 4 sem hrs. (FSLT)                                 C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
ENGL 222 Short Fiction                                       ENGL 234 Shakespeare
Rigorous textual analysis of short fiction as a means of      Analysis of selected plays and poems from variety of
defining its many formal and philosophical expressions.       critical perspectives. Prerequisite: English 103 with a
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or     grade of C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
                                                             ENGL 235 Narratives of Personal Development
ENGL 223 The Modern Novel                                    Analysis of literature of personal growth and human
Analysis of selected 20th- and 21st-century novels.          development, from autobiography and biography to
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or     various forms of fiction—bildungsroman, novels of
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                education, fictionalized biography, autobiography in
                                                             verse, etc. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or
ENGL 224 Great Novels                                        better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Selected major novels of 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.
Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or     ENGL 236 On the Road: Literature of Quest and
exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                Pilgrimage
                                                             Survey of literature of quest and pilgrimage with
ENGL 226 Love and War in Medieval Literature                 attention to issues of race and gender. Prerequisite:
Selected readings in medieval literature (some in            English 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption.
translation), with focus on literary representations of      4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
love and war. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C
or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                   ENGL 238 Selected Readings in Caribbean
                                                             Literature
ENGL 227 Life-Writing as Literature: Studies in              Analysis of literary works from the Caribbean
Biography and Autobiography                                  representing various periods, areas and groups. Focus
Study of resources, methods, and aims governing the re-      mainly on English-speaking Caribbean, but occasional
creation of individual lives by writers of biography and     focus on Spanish, Dutch or French works in translation.
autobiography. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of     Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of C or better or
C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                 exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
ENGL 228 World Drama                                         ENGL 299 Special Topics in Literary Analysis
Analysis of significant works, both traditional and           Essentials of close textual analysis with special attention
contemporary. Prerequisite: English 103 with a grade of      to theory, critical vocabulary and methodology of literary
C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                 interpretation. The focus will vary from one section or
ENGL 230 Women in Modern Literature                          semester to the next. Prerequisite: English 103 with a
Modern woman’s search for identity and struggle for          grade of C or better or exemption. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
self-realization through study of selected figures from       ENGL 301 Literature of the Middle Ages
19th- and 20th-century literature. Prerequisite: English     Studies in British and Continental medieval literature
103 with a grade of C or better or exemption. 4 sem.         from Beowulf through the 15th century with attention
hrs. (FSLT)                                                  to social, cultural and political backgrounds. Prerequisite:
ENGL 231 African-American Literature                         A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or
Survey of major works of African-American literature         better. 4 sem. hrs.
with attention to oral traditional contexts. Prerequisite:   ENGL 302 Literature of the English Renaissance
English 103 with a grade of C or better or exemption.        Studies in literature and cultural traditions of 16th- and
4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
100 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



early 17th-century Great Britain. Prerequisite: A 200-        Focus on representative British authors, 1832-1901, with
level FSLT English course with grade of C or better. 4        attention to contemporary social, political, religious and
sem. hrs.                                                     scientific issues. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
                                                              course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 303 Chaucer
Selected early works, Troilus and Criseyde and The            ENGL 320 Topics in British Literature 1660-1900
Canterbury Tales, with attention to Chaucer’s life in         Selected topics in British Literature between 1660 and
context of late 14th-century culture and ideology.            1900. Topics may include, for example, the Victorian
Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a          novel, romantic narrative poetry, Restoration comedy,
grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                             or studies in a single author. Recent titles have included
                                                              The Idea of the Child in 19th-Century Literature and
ENGL 304 Shakespeare                                          Religion and Romantic Literature. May be taken more
Selected plays by Shakespeare grouped according to            than once for credit. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT
genre. The course will alternate between investigating the    English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
histories and tragedies and the comedies and romances.
May be taken more than once for credit with permission        ENGL 321 Early American Literature
of instructor as content changes. Prerequisite: A 200-level   Analysis of major texts produced in colonial British North
FSLT English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem.       America and the United States from the first European
hrs.                                                          voyagers to North America in the early 17th century to
                                                              the writers of the Early National Period. Prerequisite: A
ENGL 305 Critical Approaches to Shakespeare                   200-level FSLT English course or American Studies 201
Selected plays, with attention to different modes of          with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
critical analysis. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.               ENGL 322 Literature of the American Revolution
                                                              Close study of major literary, political and cultural texts
ENGL 306 Milton                                               and concerns of the Revolutionary and Early National
Detailed study of the life and work of John Milton,           periods. May often focus on questions related to the
with attention to cultural, political and intellectual        formation of a distinctly American culture that arises in
backgrounds. Selected major and minor poems and               the written works of the time. Prerequisite: A 200-level
prose with emphasis on Paradise Lost. Prerequisite: A         FSLT English course or American Studies 201 with a
200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or            grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                              ENGL 325 Age of the American Renaissance
ENGL 310 Topics in British Literature Before 1660             Readings in the traditional American Renaissance
Selected topics in British Literature from the 7th through    canon—Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Melville and
the later 17th century, with attention to intellectual        Whitman—as well as other writers working in the
backgrounds and cultural context. Topics will vary            period, such as Poe and Dickinson. Prerequisite: A 200-
by semester. May be taken more than once for credit.          level FSLT English course or American Studies 201 with
Recent topics have included Romance, Allegory and             a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
Mysticism in Medieval Literature; and Eros, Magic, and
the Divine in the Renaissance Imagination. Prerequisite:      ENGL 326 From Revolution to Romanticism:
A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or          American Fiction Through 1860
better. 4 sem. hrs.                                           Selected American novels and short fiction from the
                                                              Early National period through the Civil War, with
ENGL 311 English Literature of the Restoration and            attention to the political and cultural contexts of these
18th Century                                                  works. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course or
Focus on representative British authors of the late 17th      American Studies 201 with a grade of C or better. 4
and 18th centuries. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT            sem. hrs.
English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                              ENGL 330 Special Topics in American Literature
ENGL 312 English Literature of the Romantic                   Before 1860
Movement                                                      In-depth treatment of topics in American literature before
Focus on major British authors of the early 19th              1860. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite:
century with some attention to European currents and          A 200-level FSLT English course or American Studies
backgrounds. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English           201 with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 313 English Literature of the Victorian Period
                                                       SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENGLISH • 101



ENGL 331 Literatures of Africa                                   Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a
Survey of major writers from the African continent,              grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
with attention to historical and cultural contexts and to
African oral traditions. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT          ENGL 345 Topics in World Literature
English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.          Topics stated for term; may change from term to term.
                                                                 Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a
ENGL 332 Literatures of the Caribbean                            grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
Survey of Anglo-Caribbean literatures with emphasis
on contemporary works. Occasional studies of Spanish,            ENGL 346 Twentieth-Century British Literature
Dutch or French works in translation. Prerequisite: A            Reflections of modern sensibility in fiction and poetry
200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or               of native British and Irish authors and American
better. 4 sem. hrs.                                              expatriates. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
                                                                 course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 333 Literatures of South Asia
An exploration of the multiple strains of the Indian             ENGL 347 Topics in Twentieth-Century British
novel that have emerged since 1950. Prerequisite: A 200-         Literature
level FSLT English course with a grade of C or better.           Selected topics in British Literature 1900-2000. Topics
4 sem. hrs.                                                      vary by semester. May be taken more than once for
                                                                 credit. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course
ENGL 334 American Indian Literatures                             with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
An examination of non-Western elements of
representative traditional and contemporary American             ENGL 348 Modernist Sexuality
Indian oral and written verbal art. Prerequisite: A 200-         British fiction in the context of early 20th-century study
level FSLT English course with a grade of C or better.           on sexuality, including psychoanalysis, sexology and
4 sem. hrs.                                                      anthropology. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
                                                                 course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 335 Black Women Writers
Study of major works by Black women writers from                 ENGL 349 Late Imperial Fiction
Africa, the Caribbean and the United States. Focus and           Late 19th- and early 20th-century British fiction and
content will be announced each semester. Prerequisite:           culture in the decades before decolonization. Prerequisite:
A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or             A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or
better. 4 sem. hrs.                                              better. 4 sem. hrs.

ENGL 336 Literatures of Globalization                            ENGL 353 American Realism and Regionalism
Selected contemporary fiction and criticism that                  American fiction of the late 19th century, with attention
considers problems of global economy, culture and                to the formation of a national literary culture and the
language. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course          concomitant development of regional voices. Authors
with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                         studied may include Henry James, Mark Twain and
                                                                 Edith Wharton. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
ENGL 337 Postcolonial Literatures                                course or American Studies 201 with a grade of C or
Survey of major debates and movements in postcolonial            better. 4 sem. hrs.
literature, with attention to cultural contexts. Prerequisite:
A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or             ENGL 354 Literature of the American South
better. 4 sem. hrs.                                              Representative poetry and prose of the Southern
                                                                 states, with attention to cultural, social and political
ENGL 338 Versions of Tragedy                                     backgrounds. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
An exploration of the nature and function of tragedy             course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
in the West, based on a study of the theory of tragic
drama and of representative works from the Greeks to             ENGL 355 Race and Ethnicity in American
the moderns. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English              Literature
course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                  Literature by American writers dealing with issues of
                                                                 racial or ethnic identity studied in relation to historical
ENGL 339 Epic Traditions                                         contexts. May be taken more than once as content
The development of the epic, including works by Homer,           changes. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course
Virgil, Dante and James Joyce. Particular attention              or American Studies 201 with a grade of C or better.
will be paid to the role of epic poetry in formulating           4 sem. hrs.
notions of history and of national and cultural identity.
102 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ENGL 356 Twentieth-Century American Poetry                  Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a
Analysis of representative works by major American poets,   grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
with demonstration of modern technical innovations
and discussions of thematic concerns. Prerequisite: A       ENGL 370 Literature and Film
200-level FSLT English course or American Studies 201       Examines the filmic adaptation of literary works—the
with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                    Shakespearean drama, the 19th-century novel—with
                                                            particular consideration given to questions of genre,
ENGL 357 From Modernism to Postmodernism:                   interpretation and historical relevance. Prerequisite: A
Twentieth-Century American Fiction                          200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or
Attention to new concerns and new forms of fiction in        better. 4 sem. hrs.
the 20th century. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
course or American Studies 201 with a grade of C or         ENGL 372 Topics in Film
better or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.             Topics vary from semester to semester. Possible subjects
                                                            include New Deal Hollywood, Conspiracy: Hollywood
ENGL 358 African-American Women Writers                     and the Cold War, Seeing Red: Films of the 1950s.
Representative prose and poetry written by African-         Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a
American women. Focus and content announced each            grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
semester. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course
with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                    ENGL 375 Critics Since Plato
                                                            Ways of looking at art and literature in their philosophical
ENGL 359 Contemporary American Literature                   context. Theories applied to a variety of literary texts.
Close study of important recent texts (fiction, poetry       Prerequisites: A 200-level FSLT English course and three
and/or drama by U.S. authors or other contemporary          semester hours of 300-level English with grades of C or
writers who strongly influenced them) with respect           better. 4 sem. hrs.
to their special social, philosophical and aesthetic
contexts. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course     ENGL 376 Modern Literary Theory
or American Studies 201 with a grade of C or better. 4      Developments in literary theory from Formalism to the
sem. hrs.                                                   present. Schools and approaches include New Criticism,
                                                            Feminism, Marxism, Structuralism, Deconstruction,
ENGL 360 Studies in the American Novel                      Psychoanalytic Criticism, New Historicism and Cultural
Selected American novels that may be drawn from the         Studies. Prerequisites: A 200-level FSLT English course
18th century to the present; period or topic of study       and three semester hours of 300-level English with
will vary. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course    grades of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
or American Studies 201 with a grade of C or better. 4
sem. hrs.                                                   ENGL 377 Poetics
                                                            How creative tools available to poets shape and influence
ENGL 365 Modern Drama                                       presentation of theme. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT
British and American drama with attention to European       English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
backgrounds. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.             ENGL 378 The Novel in Theory and Practice
                                                            Considers novels in the context of a variety of theoretical
ENGL 366 Contemporary British and American                  approaches, asking what theory can tell us about the
Drama                                                       novel and, equally importantly, what the novel can tell
Developments since World War II. Prerequisite: A 200-       us about theory. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
level FSLT English course with a grade of C or better.      course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
4 sem. hrs.
                                                            ENGL 381 Modern Grammar
ENGL 368 History and Aesthetics of Film                     Introduction to linguistics, including theories and
Topics include major international directors, the           practices of structuralists and transformationalists.
conventions and innovations of popular genres, and          (Meets state licensure requirements for teaching. MLC
key aesthetic movements. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT     407, Topics in Linguistics, may be substituted for this
English course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.     licensure requirement.) Prerequisite: English 103 with a
                                                            grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 369 American Culture/American Film
Explores the intersection of American film and               ENGL 382 Topics in Advanced Composition
culture, with special attention to the dialogue between     Special topics in writing with emphasis on the writing
Hollywood and other institutions, ideologies and            process. Can be taken for credit up to three times with
events. Specific topics vary from semester to semester.      change of topic. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
                                                            course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                     SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENGLISH • 103



ENGL 383 Introduction to Composition Theory                    order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of period
and Pedagogy                                                   constructions. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English
Serves as practicum for writing fellows and students           course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
seeking teacher licensure. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                                        ENGL 391 Themes and Methods in Comparative
                                                               Literature
ENGL 384 Introduction to Creative Writing                      Interdisciplinary approach to selected themes or topics
Introduction to general principles. Students’ fiction and       in comparative literature. While theme may vary from
poetry receive critical evaluation through workshops           year to year, it will provide basis for the study of literary
and conferences. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English        relations as they exist across various boundaries: generic,
course with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                historical, disciplinary and linguistic. Will also contain
                                                               component on history and theory of comparative
ENGL 385 Fiction Writing                                       literature as a discipline, as well as brief unit on journals,
Analysis of literary models. Discussion and evaluation         bibliographies and resources particular to the discipline.
of students’ own fiction. May be taken up to three times        Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English course with a
for credit. Prerequisite: English 384 with a grade of C or     grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               ENGL 392 Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENGL 386 Poetry Writing                                        Analysis of literary models. Discussion and evaluation
Analysis of literary models. Discussion and evaluation         of students’ own creative nonfiction. May be taken up
of students’ own poetry. May be taken up to three times        to three times for credit. Prerequisite: English 384 with a
for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 384 with a grade of C or        grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               ENGL 393 Literary Magazine Editing
ENGL 387 Writing for the Stage                                 Editorial work with Verse, an international poetry
Analysis of literary models. Discussion and evaluation of      magazine. May be taken up to three times for credit.
students’ own dramatic work. May be taken up to three          Prerequisite: English 384 with a grade of C or better. 2
times for credit. Prerequisite: English 384 with a grade of    sem. hrs.
C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               ENGL 397 Selected Topics in Writing
ENGL 388 Individual Internship                                 Topics in creative writing. These will vary from semester
Application of academic skills and theories in                 to semester at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite:
placement approved by department. Includes academic            English 384 with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.
work. Supervised by member of the English faculty.
Approximately 50 hours of work required for each               ENGL 398 Independent Study
hour of credit. No more than four semester hours of            Individually designed course of study conducted under
credit may be earned in English 388. Prerequisites: Three      supervision of faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of
semester hours of 300-level English with a grade of C or       directing faculty member. 1-4 sem. hrs.
better, written application in advance of internship, and
recommendation of the English faculty member who               ENGL 399 Selected Topics
will supervise the internship. 1-4 sem. hrs.                   Topics will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite:
                                                               A 200-level FSLT English course with a grade of C or
ENGL 389 Women and Creativity                                  better. 4 sem. hrs.
Selected women writers, their work and relationship
to their society. Prerequisite: A 200-level FSLT English       ENGL 400 Junior/Senior Seminar
course or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies 200              In-depth treatment of topics in genre, historical periods,
with a grade of C or better. 4 sem. hrs.                       critical theory and other areas of literary study. Topics
                                                               vary from semester to semester. Recently offered topics
ENGL 390 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Middle               include Romance, Picaresque Fiction, the Novels of
Ages and Renaissance                                           George Eliot and Elizabeth Gaskell, and Poetry of
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of Middle           the Native American Renaissance. English majors are
Ages and Renaissance. Medieval and Renaissance                 expected to take one advanced seminar in the junior
perspectives on topics such as love, politics, individualism   year and at least one in the senior year. May be taken
and the divine will be explored through study of selected      more than once for credit, provided topics are different.
works from literature, art, architecture, political theory,    Prerequisites: A 200-level FSLT English course and two
theology and philosophy of both periods. Modern                300-level English courses with grades of C or better. 4
historiographical studies also will be examined in             sem. hrs.
104 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ENGL 498 Honors Seminar                                         Environmental Science Concentration: Twelve
Seminar for students preparing to write an English honors    hours of electives chosen from BIOL 108, BIOL 225,
thesis. Prerequisite: Department approval. 2 sem. hrs.       BIOL 306, BIOL 318, BIOL 328, BIOL 330, BIOL
                                                             332, BIOL 333, BIOL 334, BIOL 341, BIOL 344,
ENGL 499 Thesis Direction                                    BIOL 383, CHEM 110, CHEM 301, CHEM 302,
Research and writing of honors thesis in English.            CHEM 303, CHEM 316, ENVR 250, ENVR 260,
Prerequisite: Department approval. 4 sem. hrs.               ENVR 360, ENVR 365, MATH 324.
                                                                Environment and Society Concentration: Twelve
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES                                        hours of electives chosen from ECON 211, ECON
Christopher L. Stevenson, Coordinator                        330, ENGL 233, ENVR 260, ENVR 365, GEOG 320,
Associate Professors Harrison (Environmental Studies and     GEOG 345, GEOG 370, HIST 390, IS 301, JOUR
Geography), Stevenson (Chemistry and Environmental           304, MGMT 348, PLSC 260, PLSC 360, PSYC 317.
Studies)                                                        Experiential learning (ENVR 388, ENVR 320, or
Assistant Professor Brook (Environmental Studies and         equivalent) and Special Topics (ENVR 300) may be
Geography)                                                   counted towards a Concentration with approval of the
The environmental studies major consists of courses in       Environmental Studies Coordinator.
the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, law and   The Environmental Studies Minor
business.                                                    Note: The grade point average of all the coursework
The Environmental Studies Major                              comprising the minor in environmental studies must
Note: The grade point average of all the coursework          be no less than 2.00 with no course grade below C-
comprising the major in environmental studies must           (1.70).
be no less than 2.00 with no course grade below C-              Nineteen hours of Environmental Studies courses,
(1.70).                                                      including:
   For the Bachelor of Arts degree, 37 hours including:           • ENVR 201 Introduction to Environmental
    • ENVR 201 Introduction to Environmental                        Studies
       Studies                                                    • ENVR 269 Environmental Ethics
    • ENVR 230 Environmental Economics                            • Either ENVR 230 Environmental Economics or
    • ENVR 269 Environmental Ethics                                 ENVR 362 Environmental Law and Policy
    • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Methods                     • One course in environmental life science: BIOL
    • ENVR 362 Environmental Law and Policy                         109* or BIOL 330*
    • ENVR 391 Environmental Senior Seminar                       • One course in physical environmental science:
    • One course in environmental life science: BIOL                CHEM 110*, CHEM 316*, or ENVR 250
       109* or BIOL 210*                                          • One approved elective in Environmental Studies
    • One course in physical environmental science:          *Credit toward the Environmental Studies minor will be
       CHEM 110*, CHEM 316*, or ENVR 250                     given for either CHEM 110 or CHEM 316, but not both.
    • Twelve credit hours of electives approved for          Credit toward the Environmental Studies minor will be
       Environmental Studies. Must include at least          given for either BIOL 109 or BIOL 330, but not both.
       two hours of an approved experiential learning
       component (ENVR 388, ENVR 320, or                     Environmental Studies Electives
       equivalent).                                          Biology
*Credit toward the Environmental Studies major will be       BIOL 108     Environmental Biology
given for either CHEM 110 or CHEM 316, but not both.         BIOL 225     Evolution
Credit toward the Environmental Studies major will be        BIOL 306     Systematic Botany
given for either BIOL 109 or BIOL 330, but not both.         BIOL 318     Field Biology
                                                             BIOL 328     Vertebrate Zoology
   For the Bachelor of Science degree, same as for           BIOL 330     Ecology
B.A. plus MATH 212 or 232 and six credit hours in            BIOL 332     Tropical Marine Biology
natural science courses at or above the 300 level.           BIOL 333     Microbial Ecology
Concentrations in Environmental Studies                      BIOL 334     Oceanography
Note: a student does not have to choose a concentration      BIOL 341     Animal Physiological Ecology
in order to receive a degree in Environmental Studies.       BIOL 344     Behavioral Ecology
Students may satisfy the elective hours requirement          BIOL 383     Tropical Biology & Conservation
of the degree by pursuing one of the following
concentrations:
                               SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES • 105



Chemistry                                                  COURSES
CHEM 110 Pollutants in the Environment                     ENVR 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies
CHEM 301 Quantitative Chemical Analysis                    Overview of contemporary environmental issues,
CHEM 302 Instrumentation and Spectroscopy                  including species extinction, resource depletion and
CHEM 303 Chemical Separations                              pollution. Students examine behavior leading to
CHEM 316 Environmental Chemistry                           environmental degradation, the scientific, ethical and
Note: Credit towards the Environmental Studies major       economic aspects of the resulting problems, and study
will be given for either CHEM 110 or CHEM 316, but         policies intended to provide solutions. 3 sem. hrs.
not both.
                                                           ENVR 230 Environmental Economics
Economics
                                                           (See Economics 230) Prerequisite: Economics 101. 3
ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,
                                                           sem. hrs.
          Africa & Latin America
ECON 330 Environmental and Resource                        ENVR 250 Introduction to Earth Systems and
          Economic Theory                                  Physical Geography
English                                                    (See Geography 250; same as Biology 250) 4 sem. hrs.
ENGL 233 Tradition & Renewal in Native                     (FSNB)
         American Literatures                              ENVR 260 Introduction to Geographic Information
Geography                                                  Systems
GEOG 250 Introduction to Earth Systems                     (See Geography 260; same as Biology 260) 3 sem. hrs.
          and Physical Geography
GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic                        ENVR 269 Environmental Ethics
          Information Systems                              (See Religion 269) 3 sem. hrs.
GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory:                       ENVR 300 Special Topics
          Geographies of Political Change                  Selected topics about the environment. 1-4 sem. hrs.
GEOG 345 Society, Economy and Nature:
          Global Perspectives on                           ENVR 301 Environmental Research Methods
          Sustainable Development                          Strategies of data collection and methods of evaluating
GEOG 360 Environmental Remote Sensing                      and interpreting data on the environment. Emphasis
GEOG 365 Advanced Spatial Analysis                         on multidisciplinary sources of data derived from such
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic                           diverse sources as sociology, epidemiology, ecology and
          Development and Globalization                    laboratory experimentation. Prerequisites: Environmental
History                                                    Studies 201; Math 119 (or Business Administration 201
HIST 390     Food & Power in Africa and Asia               or Chemistry 300 or Psychology 200). 3 sem. hrs.
Journalism                                                 ENVR 320 Directed Research
JOUR 304 Reporting on the Environment *                    Research with a faculty member in an environmental
Management                                                 area. 1 sem. hr.
MGMT 348 Environmental Management                          ENVR 330 Environmental and Resource Economic
Math                                                       Theory
MATH 324 Continuous Math Models                            (See Economics 330) Prerequisite: Economics 271. 3
Political Science                                          sem. hrs.
PLSC 260 Introduction to Public Policy                     ENVR 345 Society, Economy, and Nature: Global
PLSC 360 International Development Policy                  Perspectives on Sustainable Development.
Psychology                                                 (See Geography 345; same as Sociology 345) Prerequisite:
PSYC 317 Applied Social Psychology:                        International Studies 290 or Environmental Studies 201
           Theory and Research                             or Sociology 101. 3 sem. hrs.
*permission of instructor needed for ES students without   ENVR 360 Environmental Remote Sensing
prerequisites                                              (See Geography 360; same as Biology 360) Prerequisite:
                                                           Environmental Studies/Biology/Geography 260 or
                                                           permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                           ENVR 362 Environmental Law and Policy
                                                           (See Political Science 362) Prerequisite: Environmental
                                                           Studies 201 or Political Science 260. 3 sem. hrs.
106 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



ENVR 365 Advanced Spatial Analysis                               • One elective at any level (may be an MLC course
(See Geography 365) Prerequisite: Environmental                    with LAC component)
Studies/Geography/Biology 260. 3 sem. hrs.                       • Senior portfolio project (noncredit)
ENVR 388 Individual Internship                               French Major/International Business Option
Prerequisite: Permission of Environmental Studies            (Earned in conjunction with a major in the Robins
coordinator. 2 sem. hrs.                                     School of Business with an International Business
                                                             concentration.)
ENVR 391 Environmental Senior Seminar
                                                                 Requirements:
Close study of a current environmental problem.
                                                                  • Three 300-level courses (at least one FSLT),
Student develops a project to address the problem using
                                                                     normally taken prior to study abroad
approaches and skills from the Environmental Studies
                                                                  • One semester full-time study at an approved
core and elective courses. Prerequisite: Environmental
                                                                     business school (with all-French curriculum) in a
Studies 301. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                     French-speaking country
                                                                  • Two 400-level seminars upon return to
FRENCH PROGRAM                                                       Richmond
Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures                     • Senior portfolio project (noncredit)
Kasango Kapanga, Section Coordinator                             The French Major/International Business Option
Professor Ravaux-Kirkpatrick, Terry                          represents a joint project between the Department of
Associate Professor Kapanga                                  Modern Literatures and Cultures and the International
Assistant Professors Pappas, Radi                            Business Program in the Robins School of Business.
Director of Intensive Language Program Baker                 The curriculum includes a semester abroad at one of
Director of Multimedia Language Laboratory Scinicariello     the University’s partner institutions (for example, IFI-
                                                             Rouen, EPSCI, MICEFA/Université Paris IX). There
This section contains information specific to the degree
                                                             students will continue their business concentrations in
programs in French. For full information regarding
                                                             classes with both local and other international students.
departmental policies relevant to all the MLC degree
                                                                 To prepare for the experience abroad, students will
programs, study abroad and course sequencing, see the
                                                             have a solid base of 300-level French courses taken on
main page of the Department of Modern Literatures
                                                             the Richmond campus. Upon return, they will broaden
and Cultures.
                                                             their knowledge of literary and cultural studies through
Study Abroad                                                 advanced seminars as well as additional Robins School
Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for all      of Business coursework. The French component of this
students. For students of French, the department offers      program thus consists of five courses taken on campus
summer study programs in France. In addition, there are      plus four or five courses taken abroad, or the equivalent
exchange agreements for study during the academic year       of a nine-course major in MLC. French/IB Option
in France, Quebec and West Africa; others are being          students also will complete the senior portfolio project.
negotiated. For a complete list, contact the Office of
                                                             Related Majors
International Education.
                                                             See International Studies curriculum for the following
   Introductory courses in literature, numbered
                                                             French-related majors: African Studies, International
321-332, fulfill the Literary Studies field-of-study
                                                             Economics, Modern Europe, World Politics and
requirement in the general education curriculum.
                                                             Diplomacy.
French Major
                                                             Combined Major in French and English Literature
Note: The grade point average of the coursework
                                                             The combined program in French and English is
comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
                                                             intended for students who wish to pursue in-depth work
2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.70).
                                                             in both languages and literary traditions.
   Requirements:
    • Four 300-level courses, including two of the four      French Minor
      Introduction to Literary Studies courses (Poetry,      Note: The grade point average of the coursework
      Theatre, Prose, Francophone Survey). Students          comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
      prepare for the Introduction to Literary Studies       2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.70).
      courses by completing FREN 305 and either                  • Four courses at the 300 level (at least two literature
      301, 306 or 311.                                             courses)
    • Four 400-level courses; at least three must be             • One 400-level course
      numbered 411 or higher (literature/culture seminars)
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/FRENCH PROGRAM • 107




COURSES                                                      Prerequisites: French 305 plus one of the following:
FREN 121 Intensive Elementary French                         French 301, 304, 306 or 311. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Introduction to French language and culture. Emphasis
                                                             FREN 323 Introduction to French Literature: Prose
on oral communication. Development of elementary
                                                             Introduction to French literature and literary analysis
reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: Permission of
                                                             emphasizing both narrative and nonnarrative prose.
department. 6 sem. hrs.
                                                             Prerequisites: French 305 plus one of the following:
FREN 221 Intensive Intermediate French                       French 301, 304, 306 or 311. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Reinforcement of communicative language skills.
Increased emphasis on reading, writing and culture.          FREN 324 Introduction to Francophone Literature
Prerequisite: French 121 or permission of department.        Introduction to Francophone texts by African,
6 sem. hrs. (COM2)                                           Caribbean, Maghrebian and Canadian writers from the
                                                             Negritude era to the Post-Colonial period. Prerequisites:
FREN 301 French Conversation through Cinema                  French 305 plus one of the following: French 301, 304,
Development of speaking ability in French, with              306 or 311. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
stress upon vocabulary expansion, pronunciation and
communicative accuracy, through representations of           FREN 388 Individual Internship
French culture in film. Prerequisite: French 221 or           (See Modern Literatures and Cultures 388.) Prerequisite:
permission of department. 4 sem. hrs.                        Permission of the department. 1-2 sem. hrs.
FREN 304 French Grammar Review                               FREN 397 Selected Topics
An in-depth study of French grammar designed to              Prerequisite: French 221 or permission of department.
improve the written expression of more advanced              1-4 sem. hrs.
students in preparation for writing. Prerequisite: French
                                                             FREN 402 Advanced French Conversation
301 or 305. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             Development of advanced speaking skills beyond 301
FREN 305 French Composition                                  level. Prerequisite: French 301. 4 sem. hrs.
Development of competent writing skills on variety of
textual genres such as narration, description and essay.     FREN 404 Advanced Composition and Syntax
Prerequisite: French 221 or permission of department.        Further refinement of written expression and advanced
4 sem. hrs.                                                  grammar review. Prerequisite: French 305. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             Prerequisite to French courses numbered 411 or above is
FREN 306 French at Work
                                                             two of the following: French 321, 322, 323 or 324 or
Task-based course designed to develop students’ ability
                                                             permission of department.
to interact in French situations specific to the workplace.
Acquisition of business terminology and etiquette and        FREN 411 The French Middle Ages
exploration of cross-cultural differences, economic          Analysis of issues such as morality and literacy,
and political issues influencing business in the French-      governance, social order, human values and ideals,
speaking world. Prerequisite: French 221 or permission       authorship, gender, and artistic production as manifested
of department. 4 sem. hrs.                                   in significant texts from the 11th to the 15th centuries.
FREN 311 Life and Issues in the French-Speaking              Prerequisites: Two of the following: French 321, 322,
World                                                        323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.
Exploration of significant themes and issues in               FREN 421 Renaissance
contemporary French and Francophone cultures set in          Exploration of literature of a France transformed by
the context of French history and cultural traditions.       Reformation and Renaissance: the poetry of love;
Prerequisite: French 221 or permission of department.        devotion and play; the prose of wisdom. Prerequisites:
4 sem. hrs.                                                  Two of the following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem.
FREN 321 Introduction to French Literature: Poetry           hrs.
Introduction to French poetry and literary analysis.         FREN 431 Le Siècle Classique
Fundamental questions concerning the nature of poetry        Exploration of both triumphs and powerful tensions
as artistic phenomenon. Prerequisites: French 305 plus       within 17th-century culture, with attention to such issues
one of the following: French 301, 304, 306 or 311. 4         as political patronage of the arts, women intellectuals
sem. hrs. (FSLT)                                             and salon culture, courtly life at Versailles, social satires
FREN 322 Introduction to French Literature: Theater          of Molière, and place of dissent within the absolutist
Introduction to French theater through literary analysis     state. Prerequisites: Two of the following: French 321,
of representative plays from Middle Ages to the present.     322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.
108 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



FREN 441 Enlightenment                                         GEOGRAPHY
Literary and philosophical texts of 18th century,
                                                               Associate Professor Harrison
emphasizing questions on selfhood, social life, gender
                                                               Assistant Professor Brook
relations and power. Topics include the libertine tradition,
novel and society, women writers and Enlightenment’s           The Geography Minor
others. Prerequisites: Two of the following: French 321,       Note: No grade below a C- (1.70) will be allowed for
322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.                                     credit within the minor.
                                                                  Eighteen hours in Geography, including
FREN 451 From Romanticism to Decadence
                                                                    • GEOG 210
Issues of gender, subjectivity and sociohistorical
                                                                    • GEOG 250
contexts in works by poets, novelists and historians
                                                                    • Elective hours sufficient to bring the total hours
in the numerous and varied cultural movements of
                                                                      in Geography to 18
19th-century France. Recent topics include desire and
                                                                  A maximum of four hours will be allowed from
representation in the novel, “Fin de Siècle,” Symbolist
                                                               GEOG 390 and two hours from GEOG 388.
Poetry and Romanticism. Prerequisites: Two of the
following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.              COURSES
FREN 461 From Modern to Postmodern                             GEOG 206 World Regional Geography—Developed
Trends in 20th century and contemporary French                 Regions
poetry, drama and fiction, set in the context of painting,      World’s economically developed areas (Europe, North
film and other experimental art forms. Recent topics            America, Australia, CIS [former Soviet Union], Japan).
include otherness, gender, creativity, the nature of truth,    3 sem. hrs.
and the quest for self-expression. Prerequisites: Two of       GEOG 207 World Regional Geography—
the following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.          Developing Regions
FREN 465 French Film                                           World’s economically developing areas (Middle America,
Survey of development of French cinema with emphasis           South America, Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia, India,
on the contemporary period. Introduction to film                China, Africa, Middle East). 3 sem. hrs.
aesthetics and film theories. Film topics include French        GEOG 210 Geographic Dimensions of Human
current events and trends, personal and social challenges,     Development
ethnicity, women’s issues and historical or political          Introduction to geographic approaches to study of
perspectives. Prerequisites: Two of the following: French      cultural, societal, economic, political and environmental
321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.                                change. Topics include: spatial analysis techniques
FREN 471 Francophone Studies                                   and theories; population distributions and migration;
Literary and cultural studies of modern Francophone            cultural geographies; global economic development and
texts by African, Caribbean, Québecois, Maghrebian and         its distribution; urbanization; political geography; and
other French-speaking writers. Recent topics include:          human-environment relations. (Same as International
tradition, postcolonialism and modernity; aesthetics;          Studies 210). 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)
négritude; and globalization. Prerequisites: Two of the        GEOG 250 Introduction to Earth Systems and
following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.              Physical Geography
FREN 487 Contemporary Ideas                                    Basic concepts of earth systems science and physical
Readings and discussion of recent works which have             geography. Includes earth-sun relationships, weather
provoked political or intellectual debate in France and        and climate, environmental hydrology, landforms
the French-speaking world. Prerequisites: Two of the           and geomorphology, climate change, and human-
following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 4 sem. hrs.              environment interactions. (Same as Biology 250 and
                                                               Environmental Studies 250.) 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB)
FREN 495 Independent Study
Special projects individually pursued under supervision        GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic
of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of                 Information Systems
department. 1-4 sem. hrs.                                      Concepts of mapping and spatial analysis using the
                                                               ArcView GIS software package. Includes map analysis,
FREN 497 Selected Topics                                       data presentation, analysis of spatial relationships, the
Experimental topics based on student and faculty               creation of spatial and tabular data, and the introduction
interests. Recent topics: Autobiography, The Emergence         of ArcView software extensions. (Same as Biology 260
of Drama, The Letter in Philosophy and Literature,             and Environmental Studies 260.) 3 sem. hrs.
Women Writing in French. Prerequisites: Two of the
following: French 321, 322, 323, 324. 1-4 sem. hrs.
                              SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/GERMAN STUDIES PROGRAM • 109



GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory:                           commodity flows and chains; technological change
Geographies of Political Change                                and diffusion; international trade; entrepreneurship
Analyses of and explorations into the spatial dimensions       and innovation; industrial location theory; social and
and geographic characteristics of global, regional and local   cultural dimensions of development; geographies of
political change; and the political economy and ecology of     labor; and regional development theories and trends.
globalization. Topics include: imperialism, world systems      (Same as Economics 212) Prerequisites: Geography 210
theory; nationalism; regionalism; electoral geography; race,   or Economics 101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs.
class and gender; political economy of trade and foreign
aid; and political ecology. (Same as International Studies     GEOG 380 Selected Topics.
320 and Political Science 320) Prerequisite: Geography         May be repeated when topics vary. (Same as International
210 or Political Science 240 or 250. 3 sem. hrs.               Studies 350) 1-4 sem. hrs.

GEOG 345 Society, Economy and Nature: Global                   GEOG 388 Individual Internship
Perspectives on Sustainable Development                        Prerequisite: Permission of supervising instructor. 1-6
Applies geography’s human-environment tradition                sem. hrs.
to examine social, cultural and economic dimensions            GEOG 390 Independent Study.
of sustainability and sustainable development.                 Topics independently pursued under supervision of a
Examinations into foundations and theories behind              faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
the concept of sustainable development, discussions            1-3 sem. hrs.
and debates about its real-world applicability, and
explorations into case studies addressing relationships        GERMAN STUDIES PROGRAM
and contradictions between human desires for
                                                               Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures
material well-being, environmental protection, and
maintenance of cultural and/or social traditions. (Same        Section Coordinator Thomas Bonfiglio
as Environmental Studies 345 and Sociology 345)                Professor Bonfiglio
Prerequisites: Geography 210 or Environmental Studies          Associate Professor Bower
201 or Sociology 101. 3 sem. hrs.                              Director of German Language Program Sulzer-Reichel

GEOG 360 Environmental Remote Sensing                          This section contains information specific to the degree
Concepts of image acquisition, image interpretation            programs in German Studies. For full information
and satellite remote sensing. Includes electromagnetic         regarding departmental policies relevant to all the MLC
spectrum concepts, acquisition of image data, visual           degree programs, study abroad, and course sequencing,
characteristics of vegetation and landforms, image             see the main page of the Department of Modern
interpretation, classification and transformation, and          Literatures and Cultures.
integration of remotely sensed imagery into other              Study Abroad
spatial analysis systems. Student research projects.           Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for all
(Same as Biology 360 and Environmental Studies 360.)           students. German Studies students can take advantage
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies/Biology/Geography          of semester or year exchange programs in Konstanz and
260 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                   Munster, Germany, as well as the summer program in
GEOG 365 Advanced Spatial Analysis                             Berlin.
Advanced topics in Geographic Information Systems                  German 321, Introduction to German Literature,
(GIS) theory and application. Topics include use               satisfies the Literary Studies field-of-study requirement
of the Spatial Analyst, 3-D Analyst, raster data sets,         in the general education curriculum.
the Idrisi software System, projects in environmental          German Studies Major
location analysis, retail site location, and application       Note: The grade point average of the coursework
of GIS techniques to biological, environmental, and            comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
social science issues. (Same as Environmental Studies          2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.70).
365) Prerequisites: Environmental Studies/Biology/
Geography 260. 3 sem. hrs.                                     Requirements: Nine courses (and a two hour senior
                                                               research project)
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic Development                        • GERM 301 Conversation and Composition
and Globalization                                                   • GERM 311 Culture & Civilization
Geographic perspectives on economic development and                 • GERM 321 Introduction to German literature
spatial analysis of trends in the global economy. Topics              (18th-20th century)
include: natural resource location and distribution;
110 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



     • Three 400-level courses in German                      In order to prepare for the experience abroad, students
    AND                                                    in German will need to have completed at least German
     • Three additional courses selected from the list     202 on the Richmond campus; they must take at least
       below (no more than two courses can be taken        one concurrent course in German while in Vienna.
       in a specific area; LAC in German required for all
       three courses)                                      Related Majors
       • MLC 256 Psychoanalysis, Literature and            Combined Major in German and English Literature
         Culture                                           The combined program in German and English is
       • MLC 350 Linguistics                               intended for students who wish to pursue in-depth work
       • MLC 360 Representing the Holocaust                in both languages and literary traditions.
       • MLC 365 German Film in Context
       • HIST 229 The Reformation                          See International Studies curriculum for the following
       • HIST 240 European Thought 1650-1850               MLC-related majors: Modern Europe, World Politics
       • HIST 241 European Thought since 1850              and Diplomacy.
       • HIST 242 Modern Germany                           German Studies Minor
       • HIST 244 The Hapsburg Empire and After            Note: The grade point average of the coursework
       • HIST 248 European Diplomacy from Bismarck         comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
         to Hitler                                         2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.70).
       • HIST 249 Twentieth-Century Europe
       • HIST 399 Holocaust                                Requirements: Five courses
       • PHIL 275 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud                      • GERM 301 Conversation and Composition
       • PHIL 336 Nineteenth-Century European                 • GERM 311 Culture & Civilization
         Philosophy                                           • GERM 321 Introduction to German literature
       • PHIL 339 Existentialism                                 (18th-20th century)
       • PHIL 344 Twentieth-Century Continental               • One 400-level course in German
         Philosophy                                           • One course from the following list, with LAC in
       • PHIL 357 Nietzsche                                      German:
       • RELG 356 Renaissance and Reformation                    • MLC 256 Psychoanalysis, Literature and
    In addition to the courses listed above, the German            Culture
Studies major must complete a two-hour senior research           • MLC 350 Linguistics
project (GERM 498-499) on a topic determined in                  • MLC 360 Representing the Holocaust
consultation with the German Studies faculty, to result          • MLC 365 German Film in Context
in a 20 page paper written in English or German.
                                                           COURSES
German Major/International Business Option                 GERM 101-102 Elementary German
(Earned in conjunction with a major in the Robins          Introduction to German language and culture. Prerequisite:
School of Business with an International Business          German 101 is prerequisite to 102. 3-3 sem. hrs.
concentration.)
                                                           GERM 201-202 Intermediate German
    Requirements:
                                                           Active practice and reinforcement of language skills and
     • Six courses in German at the 300 or 400 level
                                                           study of culture. Prerequisite: German 102 or permission
     • One semester full-time study at the Vienna
                                                           of department. German 201 is prerequisite to 202. 3-3
       University of Economics and Business
                                                           sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2)
       Administration
     • Two-hour senior research project on a topic         GERM 301 German Conversation and Composition
       connected to the combined major, resulting in a     Development of fluency through conversation on
       paper of 20 pages written in English or German.     topics selected for learning most common idiomatic
    The German Major/International Business Option         expressions. Practice in composition. German 321 may
represents a joint project between the Department of       be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: German 202 or
Modern Literatures and Cultures in the School of Arts      permission of department. 4 sem. hrs.
and Sciences and the International Business Program in
the Robins School of Business. The curriculum includes     GERM 305 German Grammar and Composition
a semester abroad at one of the University’s partner       Concise review of basic principles of German grammar
institutions. There, students will continue their Robins   and development of competent writing skills. German
School concentrations in classes with both local and       321 may be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: German
other international students.                              202 or permission of department. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/GREEK • 111



GERM 311 German Culture and Civilization                       complexity of identities and social relations in the German
An overview of the movements affecting cultural                context. Prerequisite: German 321. 4 sem. hrs.
development in German-speaking countries from the
                                                               GERM 495 Independent Study
Reformation to the present through the analysis of
                                                               Special projects individually pursued under supervision
selected historical documents, literary and philosophical
                                                               of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of
texts, films and the visual arts. Prerequisite: German 202
                                                               department. 1-4 sem. hrs.
or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               GERM 497 Selected Topics
GERM 321 Introduction to German Literature
                                                               Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion.
Introduction to analysis and interpretation of literary
                                                               Prerequisite: German 321. 1-4 sem. hrs.
texts in their aesthetic, historical, socioeconomic and
cultural contexts. Attention to representation, polyphony,     GERM 498 Senior Research Project
rhetorical devices and politics of text. Development of        Consultation with faculty mentors and selection of
written critical apparatus. Prerequisite: German 202 or        topic for research project. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
permission of department. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)                   0 sem. hrs.
GERM 388 Individual Internship                                 GERM 499 Senior Research Project
(See Modern Literatures and Cultures 388.) Prerequisite:       Research and written completion of senior project.
Audition/Permission of department. 1-2 sem. hrs.               Prerequisite: Senior standing. 2 sem. hrs.
GERM 397 Selected Topics
                                                               GREEK
1-4 sem. hrs.
                                                               Department of Classical Studies
GERM 402 Advanced German Conversation
Discussion at advanced level of fundamental themes             Dean W. Simpson, Chair
in development of German thought or production of              Associate Professors Laskaris, Simpson, Stevenson, Wheeler
German play. Prerequisite: German 301. 4 sem. hrs.             No Greek 100- or 200-level course may be used to meet the
                                                               Literary Studies field-of-study requirement.
GERM 404 Advanced Composition and Syntax
Advanced grammar, syntax and stylistics. Prerequisite:         The Greek Major
German 301. 4 sem. hrs.                                        Note: A grade of not less than C- (1.70) is required in all
GERM 440 The Age of Idealism                                   coursework comprising the Greek major.
Survey of major movements of 18th and early 19th                  Thirty-six semester hours including 12 hours of a
centuries: enlightenment, storm and stress, classicism         core curriculum and 24 hours of Greek:
and romanticism. Analysis of texts by Lessing, Kant,           I. Core Curriculum, 12 hours
Winckelmann, Goethe, Schiller, Schlegel, Tiede, Kleist             • CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archaeology, 3 hours
and Novalis. Taught in German. Prerequisite: German                • CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values OR CLSC
321. 4 sem. hrs.                                                     306 The Classical Tradition, 3 hours
                                                                   • HIST 220 The Aegean Bronze Age OR HIST
GERM 452 Fin-de-siècle
                                                                     221 Classical Greece 4 hours
A comparison of Austrian writers from 1900s and 2000s,
                                                                   • GREK 498 Major Seminar, 3 hours
including Freud, Schnitzler, Kafka, Mach, Steeruwitz,
Jelinke and others. Prerequisite: German 321. 4 sem. hrs.      II. Twenty-four semester hours of Greek
GERM 465 Rebels with a Cause: Political Satire                 Note: A minimum of two years of Latin is recommended
Examination of political and socially critical poetry and      for students intending to pursue graduate study.
prose from the 19th century to the present. Authors            Related Majors
include Heine, Brecht, Enzensberger and Biermann.
                                                               Combined Major in Greek and English Literature
Prerequisite: German 321. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               The combined program in Greek and English is intended
GERM 471 Sexuality and German Society                          for students who wish to pursue in-depth work in both
Examination of various representations of sexuality and        languages and literary traditions.
the construction of gender in 20th-century German
literature and film. Prerequisite: German 321. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               The Greek Minor
                                                               Note: A grade of not less than C- (1.7) is required in all
GERM 472 Multiculturalism, Identity and                        coursework comprising the Greek major or minor.
Authorship in the German Context                                  Eighteen semester hours of Greek with at least six
Investigation of literary and filmic texts from Expressionism   semester hours at the 300 or 400 level.
to the present to examine increasing diversity and             Note: Greek 202 or permission of department is prerequisite
                                                               for all 300- and 400-level Greek courses.
112 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




COURSES                                                         The History Major
GREK 101-102 Elementary Greek                                   Note: A grade of not lower than C (2.0) is required in
Introduction to ancient Greek language and culture.             each course comprising the major or minor.
Prerequisite: Greek 101 is prerequisite to 102. 3-3 sem. hrs.       Nine courses, totaling 33-35 semester hours in
                                                                History, with no more than three at the 100 level and
GREK 201-202 Intermediate Greek                                 including the following:
Continued study of ancient Greek language and culture                • History 100
plus selected readings. Prerequisite: Greek 102 or                   • One course each in United States, Europe and
permission of department. Greek 201 is prerequisite to                 ALAMEA (Asia, Latin American, Middle East,
202. 3-3 sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2)                                    Africa)
GREK 301 Greek Epic                                                  • One course at the 300 level
Readings from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Prerequisite:               • History 400
Greek 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                  History 100- and 300-level courses may be applied
                                                                to the distribution requirement.
GREK 302 Greek Drama
Readings from Sophocles and Euripides. Prerequisite:            The History Minor
Greek 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hr.               Note: A grade of not lower than C (2.0) is required in
                                                                each course comprising the major or minor.
GREK 303 Greek Historiography                                      Five courses totaling at least 15 semester hours in
Readings from Herodotus and Thucydides. Prerequisite:           History, with no more than two at the 100 level.
Greek 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                Honors Program
GREK 304 Greek Philosophical Prose                              Majors who meet the Arts and Sciences requirements for
Readings from Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite: Greek          departmental honors are encouraged to apply for and
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                    pursue the honors program in history. To earn honors
GREK 398 Selected Topics                                        in history a student must complete 12 semester hours
Topics or themes in Greek literature. Prerequisite: Greek       in Honors courses:
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                         • History 410 Historiography, 4
                                                                     • History 411 Honors Thesis Prospectus, 1
GREK 498 Major Seminar                                               • History 412-413 Honors Thesis, 3-4
Required of all majors. Study of research strategy and              Honors students are exempt from History 400,
methodology inherent in classical studies. Preparation of       but must satisfy all other requirements for the major.
research paper. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3       History 410 may be applied to any field requirement
sem. hrs.                                                       in the major.
GREK 499 Independent Study                                      Internships
Content adapted to the requirements and interests of            The Department of History has a program of prearranged
participant. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-3        individual internships. Interested students should
sem. hrs.                                                       inquire in the department or check the department Web
                                                                page for details.
HISTORY
                                                                History Courses
Department of History
                                                                100 Level: Foundation Course and Comprehensive
Hugh A. West, Chair
                                                                Surveys
Professors Bak, Gordon, Kenzer, Summers, Treadway
                                                                For beginners, either introducing them to the discipline
Douglas Southall Freeman Professors Dan Carter (Spring
                                                                of history as a whole or offering them a broad foundation
2007), Elaine Tyler May (Spring 2008)
                                                                of knowledge in several regional histories as basis for
Associate Professors Drell, Holton, Mack-Shelton, Watts,
                                                                more focused study. History 100 is discussion based; the
H. West
                                                                other 100-level courses are likely to have a combination
Assistant Professors Brandenberger, Sackley, Yanikdag,
                                                                of lecture and discussion. All courses at this level will
Yellin
                                                                have a mix of secondary and primary reading and papers
Affiliated Faculty: Howard (Center for Civic
                                                                and examinations.
Engagement), Leary (University Professor), Pagan (Law),
                                                                    HIST 100 Introduction to Historical Thinking
Roberts (Continuing Studies), Stevenson (Classics),
                                                                    HIST 110-111 Ideas and Institutions of
Wheeler (Classics)
                                                                                  Western Civilization
                                                                    HIST 120-121 History of the United States
                                                                    HIST 130 East Asian Civilizations
                                                     SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/HISTORY • 113



200 Level: Period Courses                                     Asia
More advanced comprehensive explorations of some              HIST 250     Modern Asia
coherent-whether extended or intensive-period in              HIST 251     Introduction to Chinese Civilization
human history, one usually confined to the experience          HIST 252     Modern China
of some state, nation, people or region. Designed both        HIST 253     Empires and Nations in Modern East
to cover ground and improve students’ interpretive                         Asia
skills, they are likely to involve a combination of lecture   HIST 254     Modern Japan
and discussion, secondary and primary reading, papers         Latin America
and examinations.                                             HIST 261 Modern Latin America
United States                                                 HIST 262 The Making of Modern Brazil
HIST 200 Colonial America                                     Middle East
HIST 201 The American Revolution                              HIST 271 The Modern Middle East
HIST 202 American Women from the Colonial                     HIST 272 Palestine, Zionism and the
            Period to the Present                                         Arab-Israeli Conflict
HIST 204 The Civil War and Reconstruction
                                                              Africa
HIST 205 Late Nineteenth-Century America
                                                              HIST 281     Africa, c. 1500 to c. 1900
HIST 209 African American History to 1865
                                                              HIST 282     Africa in the Twentieth Century
HIST 210 African American History since 1865
                                                              HIST 283     South Africa since 1500
HIST 212 The Civil Rights Movement
HIST 213 African American Cultural History                    International and Comparative
HIST 214 United States and the World, 1877-1945               HIST 290 British Empire and Commonwealth
HIST 215 United States and the World Since 1945               HIST 291 History of Canada
HIST 216 American Cultural and Intellectual                   Special Topics
            History Since 1865                                HIST 299 Special Topics: Periods and Regions
Europe                                                        300 Level: Colloquia
HIST 220      The Aegean Bronze Age                           Exploration by a small group of students of the state of
HIST 221      Classical Greece                                knowledge and interpretation on some focused theme.
HIST 222      Hellenistic Greece and Republican Rome          Classes are discussion only, emphasis is on historical
HIST 223      The Roman Empire                                argument, and writing will be predominantly papers.
HIST 224      European Women and Gender
                                                              United States
              before Suffrage
                                                              HIST 300 Early American Women
HIST 225      Medieval Italy
                                                              HIST 301 The Civil War in Film and Literature
HIST 226      The Early Middle Ages
                                                              HIST 303 Psychology in American Society
HIST 227      The High Middle Ages
                                                                          and Culture
HIST 228      The Renaissance
                                                              HIST 304 African American Women’s History
HIST 229      The Reformation
HIST 230      England to 1688                                 Europe
HIST 231      England from 1688 to Present                    HIST 321     History of Work in Europe
HIST 232      Tudor England, 1485-1603                        HIST 323     The Victorians
HIST 233      Stuart England, 1603-1714                       HIST 324     Text and Context: Anna Karenina
HIST 234      Georgian Britain, 1714-1837                                  and Her World
HIST 235      France, Old Regime and Revolution               Asia
HIST 236      Russian Empire, Soviet Union, and After         HIST 340     Imagining the Other:
HIST 240      Modern European Thought, 1650-1850                           China and the West
HIST 241      Modern European Thought since 1850              HIST 341     The Politics of Asian-Pacific
HIST 242      Modern Germany                                               War Memories
HIST 243      Modern Britain                                  Middle East
HIST 244      The Hapsburg Empire and After                   HIST 370 Land and Power in Palestine
HIST 245      Modern Balkans                                              and Israel: Advanced Readings
HIST 246      Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934                             in the Arab-Israeli Conflict
HIST 247      Modern Ireland
HIST 248      European Diplomacy from                         Africa
              Bismarck to Hitler                              HIST 380     Women and Gender in African History
HIST 249      Twentieth-Century Europe
114 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



International and Comparative                                HIST 201 The American Revolution
HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia                   War of Independence and formation of the Republic,
HIST 391 Transnational Social Reform                         1763-1788. 4 sem. hrs.
Special Topics                                               HIST 202 American Women from the Colonial
History 399 Special Topics: Focused Themes                   Period to the Present
400 Level: Research and Honors Seminars,                     Introduction to experience of women in history of
Individual Study and Internships                             America from colonial times to present. 4 sem. hrs.
Engagement by students in original primary research,
                                                             HIST 204 The Civil War and Reconstruction
independent inquiry or applied study. Classes will
                                                             Focus on slavery and sectional controversy, secession
proceed by discussion only and a great deal of instruction
                                                             and the war; political, economic and social problems of
will occur outside the classroom. Writing will be
                                                             Reconstruction. 4 sem. hrs.
extended papers or journals, not examinations.
HIST 400 Research Seminar for Majors                         HIST 205 Late Nineteenth-Century America
HIST 401 Directed Study                                      Focus on social, economic, cultural and political
HIST 402 Internship                                          development of United States from 1875 to 1900. 4
HIST 410 Historiography                                      sem. hrs.
HIST 411 Honors Thesis Prospectus
HIST 412-413 Honors Research Seminar                         HIST 209 African American History to 1865
                                                             Analysis of African American experience from
COURSES                                                      pre-colonial African roots through U.S. colonial,
HIST 100 Introduction to Historical Thinking                 revolutionary and Civil War eras with particular
Introduction to aims and methods of historical thinking.     attention to slavery, abolitionism, development of
Through concentrated exploration of a particular             African American cultural practices, and African
historical issue, students develop their understanding       American participation in the Revolutionary and Civil
of the nature and limits of historical evidence, various     wars. 4 sem. hrs.
legitimate ways of approaching it, and the art of making
persuasive claims about it. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)               HIST 210 African American History Since 1865
                                                             Analysis of African American history after the Civil War
HIST 110 Ideas and Institutions of Western                   with particular attention to work, culture, family and
Civilization I                                               achievement; and to the impact of the Great Migration,
Topical study of western heritage from Classical Greece      Great Depression, segregation, and the Civil Rights
through Reformation. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)                      Movement. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 111 Ideas and Institutions of Western                   HIST 212 The Civil Rights Movement
Civilization II                                              Examination of the Civil Rights movement in the
Topical study of western heritage from rise of modern        U.S., especially its social origins and consequences
political concepts in 17th century to present. 3 sem. hrs.   and implications. Topics include sit-ins, mass protest,
(FSHT)                                                       freedom rides, the voting rights campaign, the black
                                                             power movement, and radical and reform organizations
HIST 120 The United States to 1877
                                                             and leaders. 4 sem. hrs.
Analysis of American history in precolonial, colonial,
revolutionary, early national, antebellum, Civil War and     HIST 213 African American Cultural History
Reconstruction periods. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)                   Analysis of African American culture from its African
                                                             roots to present, focusing on the impact of slavery, racial
HIST 121 The United States since 1877
                                                             discrimination, gender and class on family practices,
Analysis of American history in post-Reconstruction,
                                                             language, dress, food, religion and artistic/intellectual
progressive, interwar, World War II, and post-World
                                                             production. 4 sem. hrs.
War II periods. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT)
                                                             HIST 214 United States and the World, 1877-1945
HIST 130 East Asian Civilizations
                                                             A survey of the history of the United States from the
Survey of traditional East Asian thought, institutions
                                                             end of the 19th through first half of the 20th century in
and culture in China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. 3 sem.
                                                             transnational perspective. Students will examine how the
hrs.
                                                             modern United States was formed through economic,
HIST 200 Colonial America                                    cultural, political and military encounters with peoples,
Colonial history from earliest British settlements to the    governments and places around the world. Topics covered
end of French and Indian War in 1763. 4 sem. hrs.            will include imperialism, migration and citizenship, the
                                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/HISTORY • 115



rise of the United States as a global power, American           HIST 226 The Early Middle Ages
culture abroad, and the role of the United States in            Social and intellectual history of Europe from Late
World War I and World War II. 4 sem. hrs.                       Antiquity to the 11th century. Emphasis on the birth
                                                                and development of the political and institutional
HIST 215 United States and the World Since 1945                 successors to the Roman Empire. 4 sem. hrs.
A survey of the history of the United States since World
War II in transnational perspective. Topics will include        HIST 227 The High Middle Ages
the Cold War, the interrelationship between foreign             Overview of some of the principal social, political and
policy and domestic politics, American involvement              cultural developments in Europe c. 1000-1450 with
in the developing world, migration, citizenship and             special attention to the increasing vitality of urban
economic and cultural globalization. 4 sem. hrs.                culture, the varying position of women, the formation of
                                                                bureaucratic “states,” and the emergence of such concepts
HIST 216 American Cultural and Intellectual                     as romantic love and individualism. 4 sem. hrs.
History Since 1865
A survey of American ideas and culture since the Civil          HIST 228 The Renaissance
War. Topics will include the “social questions” of the          Culture, politics, economics, modern science and
19th century; visions of the self and society; the role of      overseas expansion of the Renaissance. 4 sem. hrs.
science and expertise in American life; political debates
over freedom and the market; and cultural battles over          HIST 229 The Reformation
pluralism and American identity. 4 sem. hrs.                    Protestant and Catholic reformations and their impact
                                                                on political, social and economic conditions. Emphasis
HIST 220 The Aegean Bronze Age                                  on religious and political thought. 4 sem. hrs.
Survey of the third and second millennia B.C.E. civilizations
of the Aegean Sea basin and the interconnections between        HIST 230 England to 1688
them and other major civilizations of the ancient Near          Emphasis on institutional development, legal and
East Bronze Age. 4 sem. hrs.                                    constitutional history, the Tudors and the civil war. 4
                                                                sem. hrs.
HIST 221 Classical Greece
Greek history from end of the Bronze Age through                HIST 231 England from 1688 to the Present
career of Philip II of Macedon. 4 sem. hrs.                     Emphasis on development of cabinet government, and
                                                                expansion of political participation, economic and social
HIST 222 Hellenistic Greece and Republican Rome                 change, and Britain’s international role. 4 sem. hrs.
Investigation of rise of the Roman hegemony in context
of the Hellenistic Mediterranean. Special attention given       HIST 232 Tudor England, 1485-1603
to role of Hellenistic kings. 4 sem. hrs.                       Political, institutional, social and cultural study emphasizing
                                                                reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 223 The Roman Empire
Study of how the Romans and their Byzantine followers           HIST 233 Stuart England, 1603-1714
maintained an empire in hostile atmosphere of the first          Emphasis on conflict between Stuarts and Parliament,
five centuries of our era. 4 sem. hrs.                           Cromwell and the civil war, the restoration, and
                                                                revolutionary settlement. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 224 European Women and Gender before
Suffrage                                                        HIST 234 Georgian Britain, 1714-1837
Introduction to the history of women in Europe from             Constitutional, political, economic, social and cultural
ancient times through the 19th century. Focus on                developments in England, Scotland and Ireland from
continuities and changes in the female experience in            accession of the Hanoverians through the Great Reform
such historical moments as Ancient Greece, reformation          Bill. 4 sem. hrs.
Germany, and the French Revolution. Source material             HIST 235 France: Old Regime and Revolution
includes women’s diaries, letters, speeches and                 History of the social, political and economic institutions
philosophical treatises. 4 sem. hrs. (FSHT)                     that helped shape the modern French state from the Age
HIST 225 Medieval Italy                                         of Absolutism through the French Revolution and rise
Italy from the formation of the communes to the                 of Napoleon. 4 sem. hrs.
first stirrings of the Renaissance. Emphasis on the              HIST 236 Russian Empire, Soviet Union, and After
development of the commercial economy, differential             Political, social, diplomatic and cultural overview of the
development between North and South, the emergence              fate of the Russian Empire and Soviet Union from the
of a strong Papal State, and the causes and effects of the      Napoleonic Wars through the end of the Cold War with
Great Plague. 4 sem. hrs.                                       special focus on nationalism, socialism, Stalinism and
                                                                the fall of the USSR. 4 sem. hrs.
116 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



HIST 240 Modern European Thought, 1650-1850                     HIST 250 Modern Asia
Focus on nature and role of science, art, politics, religion,   Political, social and economic development of East Asia
sex, emotion and history. 4 sem. hrs.                           during 19th and 20th centuries. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 241 Modern European Thought since 1850                     HIST 251 Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Focus on liberalism, Marxism, Freudianism,                      Survey of Chinese history to mid-19th century;
existentialism and structuralism. 4 sem. hrs.                   intellectual, institutional and cultural development. 4
                                                                sem. hrs.
HIST 242 Modern Germany
Prussia and Germany from 1848 to present. Emphasis              HIST 252 Modern China
on unification, political movements, Nazism and origins          Western impact on China, decay of the Qing, and
and effects of World Wars I and II. 4 sem. hrs.                 revolutions of 19th and 20th centuries. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 243 Modern Britain                                         HIST 253 Empires and Nations in Modern East Asia
Constitutional, political, economic and social                  Examination, using East Asia as a case, of ideologies and
developments in the United Kingdom during the                   logics of modern empire and nation formations, and
Victorian era and 20th century. 4 sem. hrs.                     their dynamic interactions in the modern world. Topics
                                                                include the collapse of the Chinese Qing Empire, the
HIST 244 The Hapsburg Empire and After                          arrival of Western imperialism, the rise of the Japanese
Survey of rise and fall of Hapsburg Empire beginning            empire, and the emergence of East Asian nationalism as
with development of lands of the house of Hapsburg              reactions to these developments. 4 sem. hrs.
from Middle Ages to Napoleonic era; political, military,
diplomatic, economic, social and cultural issues in             HIST 254 Modern Japan
Austrian (Austro-Hungarian) Empire from Congress                Japan’s response to Western pressures and rise to world
of Vienna to end of World War I, and in the empire’s            power in 19th and 20th centuries. 4 sem. hrs.
successor states in Central Europe. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                                HIST 261 Modern Latin America
HIST 245 Modern Balkans                                         Introductory survey of Latin American history from
Survey of Balkan history in modern times, focusing              independence; focus on quest for political stability,
on development of Bulgaria, Romania, Albania, the               economic development and social change. 4 sem. hrs.
Yugoslav lands and Greece. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                                HIST 262 The Making of Modern Brazil
HIST 246 Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934                        Constructing and contesting inequality in modern Brazil,
Examination of Russia in revolution from the attempts           with special attention to comparative issues in the study
at reform in 1905, through the Bolshevik seizure of             of slavery, race, gender and ethnicity. 4 sem. hrs.
power in 1917 and the subsequent consolidation of
power under Lenin and Stalin. Special emphasis on               HIST 271 The Modern Middle East
the nature of “revolution” and questions of agency and          Survey of Middle East from last years of Ottoman
contingency. 4 sem. hrs.                                        Empire to present. Emphasis on culture, Zionism, Arab
                                                                nationalism, diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli conflict. 4
HIST 247 Modern Ireland                                         sem. hrs.
Topical approach to the history of Ireland from late 17th
century to present. Attention will be given to Ireland’s        HIST 272 Palestine, Zionism, and the Arab-Israeli
society, economy, politics, international position and          Conflict
special, often tortuous, relationship with its more             Introduction to history of Arab-Israeli conflict with
powerful neighbor, the United Kingdom. 4 sem. hrs.              heavy emphasis on Israel and Palestine, beginning in
                                                                the mid-19th century and concluding with the current
HIST 248 European Diplomacy from Bismarck to                    Palestinian uprising. Considerable attention paid to
Hitler                                                          questions of nationalism and imperialism, both in
Studies in European diplomatic history from mid-19th            terms of structural change and ways in which people
century to World War II. 4 sem. hrs.                            lived, expressed and produced their identities. While
                                                                structured chronologically, the course also moves
HIST 249 Twentieth-Century Europe                               thematically through such topics as resistance, refugees,
Overview of European political, diplomatic, military,           ethnic minorities, and gender, and considers the various
social, economic and cultural history since 1900. 4 sem.        ways that scholars, activists, politicians and novelists
hrs. (FSHT)                                                     have represented the Arab-Israeli conflict in their
                                                                writings. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                   SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/HISTORY • 117



HIST 281 Africa, c. 1500 to c. 1900                          HIST 321 History of Work in Europe
Introduction to economic, social, political and              Historical study of world of work in early modern and
intellectual history of Africa from time of trans-Atlantic   modern Europe. Focus on nature of work itself, how
slave trade to colonial conquest. 4 sem. hrs.                it framed mentalities, created social classifications,
                                                             informed economic thought, and shaped the political
HIST 282 Africa in the Twentieth Century                     process. Topics include history of wage labor and guilds,
Introduction to economic, social, political and              early industry from countryside to cities, working class
intellectual history of Africa from colonial period to       formation, division of labor in industry, and policing
present. 4 sem. hrs.                                         labor. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 283 South Africa since 1500                             HIST 323 The Victorians
South Africa from precolonial period to present, with        Exploration of individuals and socio-economic groups
special attention to conquest, economic development,         who lived in and helped define Britain in the reign of
establishment of migrant labor system, segregation and       Queen Victoria, 1837-1901. 4 sem. hrs.
rise and fall of formal apartheid. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             HIST 324 Text and Context: Anna Karenina and
HIST 290 British Empire and Commonwealth                     Her World
British imperialism from end of American Revolution          Interdisciplinary course investigating the Russian Great
through development of the modern Commonwealth.              Reforms (1861-1881) through the lens of L.N. Tolstoi’s
Emphasizes Canada, India, Africa and Australia. 4 sem.       Anna Karenina. Examines issues connected to imperial
hrs.                                                         Russian literary, social, cultural and political history, as
HIST 291 History of Canada                                   well as the subject of gender relations. 4 sem. hrs.
Development of Canadian society and state, emphasizing       HIST 340 Imagining the Other: China and the West
factors of geography, politics and economics; influences      Examination of selected images China and “the West”
from France and Great Britain; problems of regionalism       constructed of each other in the past two and a half
and nationalism; and Canadian-American relations. 4          centuries and of the driving forces and mechanisms
sem. hrs.                                                    behind their production. 4 sem. hrs.
HIST 299 Special Topics: Periods and Regions                 HIST 341 The Politics of Asian-Pacific War
First-time or one-time courses in regions and periods        Memories
not covered or not yet covered in the History program.       Examination of the competing voices and lingering
4 sem. hrs.                                                  controversies associated with the wider Asian-Pacific
HIST 300 Early American Women                                conflict in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan and the U.S.
American women of all ranks and ethnicities from             in the 20th century, and their political, intellectual and
the transatlantic encounter in 1492 to the Seneca            emotional implications. Focus on bitterly contested
Falls convention of 1848. Major themes include               representations of war atrocities such as the Nanjing
changing constructions of gender, political struggles        Massacre, the comfort women system, bio-chemical
and interactions among women of native, African and          warfare experiments, and the bombings of Hiroshima
European origins. (Same as American Studies 304) 4           and Nagasaki that continue to reshape identities in this
sem. hrs.                                                    culturally and economically intertwined region. 4 sem.
                                                             hrs.
HIST 301 The Civil War in Film and Literature
Comparison of historians’ treatments of the Civil War        HIST 370 Land and Power in Palestine/Israel:
with its portrayal in documentaries, feature films and        Advanced Readings in the Arab-Israeli Conflict
literature. (Same as American Studies 315) 4 sem. hrs.       Advanced examination of history of, and historiographic
                                                             debates around, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, focusing
HIST 303 Psychology in American Society and                  on a variety of contested events to shed light on
Culture                                                      contemporary politics as well as to map the contours of
(See Psychology 437; same as American Studies 323) 4         current scholarship in the field of Middle Eastern studies.
sem. hrs.                                                    While course follows a chronological progression, it
HIST 304 African American Women’s History                    emphasizes the historiography of the conflict; students
Examination of major themes in African American              will be expected to complete a historiographic study of
women’s history, focusing on race, gender and class          some aspect of the conflict as a final project. Students
as they affect black women’s relation to family, work,       should already know the basics of Middle Eastern and/
activism and other female groups. 4 sem. hrs.                or Israeli-Palestinian history. Prerequisites: History 271
                                                             and History 272 or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
118 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



HIST 380 Women and Gender in African History                 HIST 412-413 Honors Research Seminar
Women’s roles in and perspectives on some of the major       Research and writing of honors thesis in history.
issues in African history, including slavery, colonialism    Prerequisites: History 410, 411 and admission to
and development. 4 sem. hrs.                                 departmental honors program. History 412 is a
                                                             prerequisite to 413. 4-4 sem. hrs.
HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia
Comparative exploration of connection between food           INTERDISCIPLINARY CONCENTRATIONS
(cultivation, processing, distribution, consumption and
denial) and political legitimacy, social institutions, and   Interdisciplinary Concentrations Within
individuals’ identities and values in Asia and Africa from   Disciplinary Majors or Minors
antiquity to present. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             Interdisciplinary Concentration in Fine Arts
HIST 391 Transnational Social Reform                         Management
Seminar exploring the ideas, institutions and social         Approachable by Studio Art, Art History, Music, Theatre
networks around which movements for transnational            and Dance majors or minors and provides curricular links
reform have been built. Students will examine the history    for students interested in further practical and academic
of four movements for transnational social reform since      experiences in the area of arts management. Faculty
the early 19th century: abolitionism, women’s rights,        coordinators are the director of the Modlin Center for
anticolonialism and environmentalism. Prerequisite: At       the Arts and the director of University Museums.
least one other History course. 4 sem. hrs.                  Course Requirements:
HIST 399 Special Topics: Focused Themes                         • ART 322 Seminar in Museum Studies OR
First-time or one-time colloquia on focused topics not            MUS/THTR 310 Managing Performing Arts
covered or not yet covered in the History program. 4              Organization
sem. hrs.                                                       • MUS/THTR/ART 345 Philanthropy in the Arts
                                                                • MUS/THTR/ART 388 Internship
HIST 400 Research Seminar for Majors                            • Plus one three-credit course in both basic
Required seminar for majors taken in junior or senior             accounting and basic marketing
year. Investigation of topic of limited focus. Substantial   Courses in accounting and marketing may be taken in the
paper based on common reading and individual                 School of Business, the School of Continuing Studies or
research in primary and secondary materials. Topics and      by transfer in consultation with one of the concentration’s
instructors vary. See departmental Web site for seminar      coordinators. A concentration coordinator should be
topics. Enrollment limited to 12 students. 4 sem. hrs.       consulted for approval of the internship as appropriate for
HIST 401 Directed Study                                      the concentration.
Individually designed reading or research program                The arts management coordinators may be
conducted under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: Five     consulted for additional recommended courses in areas
courses in History and permission of department. 1-4         of arts, business or leadership that support the student’s
sem. hrs.                                                    particular area of interest. An arts course in an area other
                                                             than a student’s major or minor is encouraged, and may
HIST 402 Individual Internship
                                                             include applied music study or music ensembles.
Practical history-related work combined with some
academic study. Prerequisite: Permission of department.      Prerequisite: Must be a major or minor in Studio Art, Art
3-4 sem. hrs.                                                History, Music, Theatre or Dance.
                                                             Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Technology
HIST 410 Historiography
                                                             for Studio Art, Music and Theatre Majors
Introduction to principles and practices of historical
                                                             Approachable by Studio Art, Music and Theatre majors,
writing. Although some attention paid to the history of
                                                             provides curricular links for students interested in
historical writing since classical times, focus will be on
                                                             further performance and academic experiences in the
contemporary modes of historical writing. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                             area of arts technology.
HIST 411 Honors Thesis Prospectus                               Students take courses from the department in which
Preparation of research prospectus for Honors                they have declared their major, plus a combination
research seminar under direction of appropriate              of three courses from the nonmajor departments. In
faculty. Prerequisites: History 410 and admissions to        addition, students are required to complete a senior
departmental honors program. 1 sem. hr.                      paper or senior project to be taken as an Independent
                                                             Study in their major department. Each participating
                                                             department designates at least one faculty member to
                                                             coordinate the curriculum with individual students.
                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERDISCIPLINARY CONCENTRATIONS • 119



Designated Courses for Theatre Majors                           • PHYS 131-132 General Physics with Calculus,
In addition to requirements for the major, students must          4-4 hours
take the following course:                                      • PHYS 216-217 Electronics, 4-4 hours
     • THTR 202 Lighting Design, 3 hours                   Prerequisite: Major in Studio Art, Music or Theatre.
    Choose three of the following from the Department
of Art and Art History or the Department of Music:         Interdisciplinary Concentration in Comparative
     • ARTS 102 Foundation Design, 3 hours                 Literature for English Majors
     • ARTS 104 Foundation Art and Technology, 3           The basic assumption behind this concentration is that
       hours                                               literary studies can be unduly limited by restricting
     • ARTS 234 Advanced Design, 3 hours                   the context and parameters of scholarly inquiry to
     • MUS 109 Elementary Musicianship, 2 hours            the literary works of one particular literary tradition,
     • MUS 213 Computer Music, 3 hours                     usually defined in fairly narrow geographical and
     • MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music, 3 hours            linguistic terms. Comparative Literature in the broadest
                                                           sense may be defined as the text-based investigation of
Except for ARTS 234, normal prerequisites may be modified   themes, issues and works of art, free from the fetters of
or waived by consent of instructor.                        artificial geographical, cultural, political or disciplinary
Designated Courses for Studio Art Majors                   demarcations. Students of comparative literature
In addition to requirements for the major, one of the      achieve a greater awareness of certain boundaries
following courses:                                         involved in the traditional study of literature-national,
     • ARTS 234 Advanced Design, 3 hours OR                linguistic, generic, disciplinary, etc.-and of the issues
     • ARTS 104, Foundation Art and Technology, 3          and advantages involved in crossing those boundaries.
       hours                                               In this concentration, students willing to acquire
    Choose three of the following from the Department      additional linguistic and disciplinary skills will develop
of Music or the Department of Theatre and Dance:           the habits and tools necessary to address problems
     • MUS 109 Elementary Musicianship, 2 hours            or topics of interest from a number of literary and
     • MUS 213 Computer Music, 3 hours                     disciplinary perspectives.
     • MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music, 3 hours                Majors who complete all the requirements for this
     • THTR 202 Lighting Design, 3 hours                   course of study will be granted a B.A. in English with
Except for ARTS 234, normal prerequisites may be modified   an Interdisciplinary Concentration in Comparative
or waived by consent of instructor.                        Literature.
Designated Courses for Music Majors                        Concentration Requirements:
In addition to requirements for the major, one the            • ENGL 391 Methods and Themes in Comparative
following courses:                                              Literature
     • MUS 213 Computer Music, 3 hours                        • Three upper-level literature courses from
     • MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music, 3 hours                 the Modern Literatures and Cultures, Latin
    Choose three of the following from the Department           American and Iberian Studies, or Classical Studies
of Art and Art History or the Department of Theatre             Departments, in the original language
and Dance:                                                    • Two courses in fields outside of literature (Students
     • THTR 202 Lighting Design, 3 hours                        will choose from ancillary fields like philosophy,
     • ARTS 102 Foundation Design, 3 hours                      art history, religious studies, etc., in support of
     • ARTS 104 Foundation Art and Technology, 3                their research concentration, and subject to
       hours                                                    approval of concentration coordinator.)
     • ARTS 234 Advanced Design, 3 hours                      • A four-credit independent study culminating in a
                                                                substantial research project; honors students can
Except for ARTS 234, normal prerequisites may be modified
                                                                use this research project as their Honors Thesis.
or waived by consent of instructor.
                                                           Prerequisite: Major in English.
Additional Recommended Courses:
   • CMSC 221-222 Fundamentals of Computing I-             Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval and
      II, 3-3 hours                                        Renaissance Studies for English Majors
   • CMSC 301-302 Computer Systems and                     This concentration was created for English majors
      Architecture I-II, 3-3 hours                         interested in deepening their knowledge of the
   • CMSC 335 Computer Graphics, 3 hours                   cultures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance through
   • MATH 245 Linear Algebra, 3 hours                      interdisciplinary study. It thus requires that in addition to
   • PHYS 101-102 General Physics, 4-4 hours, OR           taking upper-level courses in Medieval and Renaissance
                                                           English literature, majors also explore these periods from
120 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



the perspective of other academic disciplines including,                • SPAN 432 True Lies: Fiction and Truth in
but not limited to, the history of art and architecture,                  Don Quijote
foreign literatures, philosophy, religious studies and         Special courses in Medieval and Renaissance topics which
history. It is hoped that the breadth of knowledge and         are offered only infrequently may be substituted with
intellectual flexibility that interdisciplinary study fosters   prior approval from the departmental coordinator of the
will enable students in this concentration to undertake        Medieval and Renaissance Studies Concentration.
more complex kinds of research projects and achieve                 • A final critical paper examining one or more
more sophisticated levels of critical thinking and writing            works relevant to the major to be completed in
than might otherwise have been possible.                              the junior or senior year preferably as the final
    Majors who complete all requirements for this                     project in ENGL 390/IDST 390 or in another
course of study will be granted a B.A. in English with                appropriate upper-division English course
an Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval and                    with prior approval from the concentration
Renaissance Studies.                                                  coordinators.
Concentration Requirements:                                        Students also will be encouraged to consider
     • ENGL 390/ID 390: Interdisciplinary Studies in           enrolling in any number of the following courses (these
       the Middle Ages and Renaissance                         courses will not, however, count toward the six courses
     • One 300- or 400-level course in Medieval                in Medieval and Renaissance Studies required of English
       literature                                              major concentrators):
     • One 300- or 400-level course in Renaissance                  • ART 221 Survey I: Prehistory through the Middle
       literature. Students will choose Medieval and                  Ages
       Renaissance literature courses from among the                • ART 222 Survey II: Renaissance to the Present
       following:                                                   • CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archeology
          • ENGL 301 Literature of the Middle Ages                  • CLSC 302 Roman Art and Archeology
          • ENGL 302 Literature of the English                      • CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition
            Renaissance                                             • ENGL 226 Love and War in Medieval Literature
          • ENGL 303 Chaucer                                        • ENGL 234 Shakespeare
          • ENGL 304 Shakespeare                                    • ENGL 236 On the Road: Literature of Quest
          • ENGL 305 Critical Approaches to Shakespeare               and Pilgrimage
          • ENGL 306 Milton                                         • FREN 431 Le Siècle Classique
          • ENGL 400 Junior/Senior Seminar                          • GREK 301 Greek Epic
            (depending on topic)                                    • GREK 302 Greek Drama
          • ENGL 506 Graduate Seminar in Shakespeare                • HIST 110 Ideas and Institutions of Western
            (with instructor permission)                              Civilization I
          • ENGL 511 Graduate Seminar in Medieval                   • HIST 223 The Roman Empire
            Literature (with instructor permission)                 • PHIL 281 Philosophy of Art
          • ENGL 512 Graduate Seminar in Renaissance                • PHIL 362 Philosophy of Religion
            Literature (with instructor permission)                 • RELG 241 Introduction to Early Christian Era
     • Three courses from at least two different                    • RELG 243 The World of the New Testament
       departments outside the English department.                  • RELG 340 Varieties of Early Christianity
       Students will choose from among the following:               • RELG 341 Paul and Christian Origins
          • ART 314 Northern Renaissance Art                        • RELG 342 John and Early Christian Literature
          • ART 315 Art of the Italian Renaissance             Prerequisite: Major in English.
          • ART 316 Art in the Age of Reform
          • FREN 411 The French Middle Ages                    Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval and
          • FREN 421 Renaissance                               Renaissance Studies for Art History Majors
          • HIST 225 Medieval Italy                            This concentration is intended to encourage Art History
          • HIST 227 High Middle Ages                          majors to develop an interdisciplinary approach to the
          • HIST 228 Renaissance                               study of Medieval and Renaissance visual cultures.
          • HIST 230 England to 1688                           The concentration aims to expose students to a variety
          • HIST 232 Tudor England, 1485-1603                  of disciplines, approaches and methodologies by
          • HIST 233 Stuart England, 1603-1714                 supplementing their upper-level courses in Medieval
          • RELG 258 Medieval Religious Thought                and Renaissance art with those covering aspects of these
          • SPAN 321 Literary Spain: Poetry, Drama,            historical periods in other academic disciplines. The
            Fiction                                            selection of courses offered through the concentration
                                                               allows students with a specific interest in Medieval
                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERDISCIPLINARY CONCENTRATIONS • 121



and Renaissance art to broaden their knowledge of                  •   HIST 232 Tudor England, 1485-1603
the periods, and provides them with opportunities to               •   HIST 233 Stuart England, 1603-1714
comprehensively examine topics of interest. Students               •   ITAL 321 Readings in Italian Literature
will meet with their Medieval and Renaissance Studies              •   LATN 302 Ovid
advisor in the Art History Department to outline                   •   LATN 303 Roman Epic
a track of study from among the broad range of                     •   LATN 304 Roman Historiography
interdepartmental courses listed below. Majors who                 •   LATN 305 Horace
complete all requirements for the concentration will               •   LATN 306 Roman Philosophical Literature
receive a B.A. in Art History with an Interdisciplinary            •   LATN 307 Catullus
Concentration in Medieval and Renaissance Studies.                 •   LATN 308 The Novel
Concentration Requirements:                                        •   LATN 309 Cicero
   • Three 300- or 400-level Art and Art History                   •   PHIL 271 Ancient Greek Philosophy
     Department courses in the areas of Early                      •   RELG 241 Introduction to Early Christian
     Christian, Medieval or Renaissance Art.                           Era
   • Three courses from at least two different                     •   RELG 243 The World of the New Testament
     departments outside the Art and Art History                   •   RELG 258 Medieval Religious Thought
     department. Selected courses must be approved                 •   RELG 332 Hebrew and Christian Wisdom
     by a Medieval and Renaissance Studies advisor                     Literature
     in the Art History Department. Students will                  •   RELG 340 Varieties of Early Christianity
     choose from among the following:                              •   RELG 341 Paul and Christian Origins
       • CLSC 205 Greek and Roman Mythology: Epic                  •   RELG 342 John and Early Christian
       • CLSC 207 Mythology: Greek Drama                               Literature
       • CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archaeology                        •   RELG 356 Religious Thought of the
       • CLSC 302 Roman Art and Archaeology                            Renaissance and Reformation
       • CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values                           •   SPAN 432 True Lies: Fiction and Truth in
       • CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition                              Don Quijote
       • ENGL 226 Love and War in Medieval                Special courses in Medieval and Renaissance topics which
         Literature                                       are offered only infrequently may be substituted with
       • ENGL 234 Shakespeare                             prior approval from the departmental coordinator of the
       • ENGL 236 On the Road: Literature of Quest        Medieval and Renaissance Studies Concentration.
         and Pilgrimage                                        • Senior Thesis project on a subject in Early
       • ENGL 301 Literature of the Middle Ages                  Christian, Medieval or Renaissance Art.
       • ENGL 302 Literature of the English                   Students also will be encouraged to consider enrolling
         Renaissance                                      in any number of the following courses (these courses
       • ENGL 303 Chaucer                                 will not, however, count toward the three courses in
       • ENGL 304 Shakespeare                             Medieval and Renaissance Studies taken outside the
       • ENGL 305 Critical Approaches to Shakespeare      Art and Art History Department required for the Art
       • ENGL 306 Milton                                  History Concentration):
       • ENGL 310 Topics in British Literature                 • FREN 431 Le Siècle Classique
         before 1660                                           • HIST 110 Ideas and Institutions of Western
       • ENGL 339 Epic Traditions                                Civilization I
       • ENGL 390 Interdisciplinary Studies in the             • PHIL 281 Philosophy of Art
         Middle Ages and Renaissance                           • PHIL 362 Philosophy of Religion
       • FREN 411 The French Middle Ages                       • RELG 263 Religion and the Arts
       • FREN 421 Renaissance                             Prerequisite: Major in Art History.
       • GREK 301 Greek Epic
       • GREK 302 Greek Drama                             Interdisciplinary Concentration in Neuroscience for
       • GREK 303 Greek Historiography                    Biology and Psychology Majors
       • GREK 304 Greek Philosophical Prose               Majors in Biology or Psychology with a special interest
       • HIST 223 The Roman Empire                        in neurobiology or behavioral neuroscience may
       • HIST 225 Medieval Italy                          apply to pursue an Interdisciplinary Concentration in
       • HIST 226 Early Middle Ages                       Neuroscience. Because of the scheduling demands of
       • HIST 227 High Middle Ages                        the concentration, students are strongly encouraged to
       • HIST 228 Renaissance                             apply during the fall semester of the sophomore year.
       • HIST 229 The Reformation
122 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Designated Courses for Biology Majors                        The Interdisciplinary Studies Major
To complete the Neuroscience Concentration, a Biology        Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each
major must complete:                                         course comprising the major.
    • Biology 201, 205, 210, 215                                The nature of the approved program will determine
    • Chemistry 141 and 205-206                              whether the degree is a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
    • Mathematics 211-212 or 231-232                         Science. The Interdisciplinary Studies major provides a
    • Physics 132, 133, or 134                               student the opportunity to propose and pursue, with
    • Psychology 200, 331, and 332                           faculty supervision, a unique program of study.
    • Sixteen hours of biology courses approved for the         For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
      major, with at least three of those courses selected   degree: Thirty semester hours of coursework including
      from Biology 308, 311, 312, 338, 344, 351 ST           the senior thesis.
      (Cellular Neurophysiology) or 352.                        The specific program of study is developed by the
    • One additional neuroscience-related psychology         student in consultation with two faculty advisors,
      course selected from Psychology 440, 442, 449          cohering to a central student-determined theme,
    • An approved research project in neuroscience           involving two or more departments, culminating in a
      (Biology 350 or 395) which culminates in a             significant senior thesis. The program must be approved
      paper.                                                 by two faculty advisors, the Interdisciplinary Studies
Designated Courses for Psychology Majors                     coordinator, and the dean of the School of Arts and
To complete the Neuroscience Concentration, a                Sciences.
Psychology major must complete:
                                                             The Interdisciplinary Studies Minor
    • Psychology 100
                                                             Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in each
    • Psychology 200
                                                             course comprising the minor.
    • One Methods & Analyses course and corequisite
                                                                Requirements: Eighteen semester hours of coursework
      in the 310-328 series
                                                             including the senior thesis.
    • One Methods & Analyses course and corequisite
                                                                The specific program of study is developed by the
      in the 330-348 series
                                                             student with consultation with two faculty advisors,
    • One approved course in the 433-449 series
                                                             cohering to a central student-determined theme,
    • Either Psychology 361, Psychology 461/462 or
                                                             involving two or more departments, culminating in a
      Psychology 491/492
                                                             significant senior thesis. The program must be approved
    • Math 211-212 or Math 231-232
                                                             by two faculty advisors, the Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Biology 201, 210, 215
                                                             coordinator, and the dean of the School of Arts and
    • Any two of Biology 308, 311,312, 338, 343, 344,
                                                             Sciences.
      351 ST (Cellular Neurophysiology), or 352.
    • Chemistry 141, 205, 206                                COURSES
Prerequisite: Major in Biology or Psychology.                IDST 280 Principles of the Natural Sciences
                                                             Explores foundational principles of biology, chemistry
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES                                    and physics. Students gain experience using these
                                                             principles in an applied context, fostering critical
Scott Davis (Religion), Interdisciplinary Studies
                                                             thought. Designed for pre-medical students preparing
Coordinator
                                                             to take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT).
Interdisciplinary Studies offers two distinct programs–      Graded      Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  Prerequisites:
Interdisciplinary Colloquia and the Self-Designed            Biology 205 and Chemistry 206. 0 sem. hrs.
Interdisciplinary Studies major and minor (see below).
                                                             IDST 281 Principles of the Natural Sciences
The Interdisciplinary Colloquia                              Explores foundational principles of biology, chemistry and
The Interdisciplinary Colloquia, which are one-semester      physics. Students gain experience using these principles in
electives, provide an opportunity to explore a variety       an applied context, fostering critical thought. Designed
of topics that do not typically fall within disciplinary     for premedical students preparing to take the Medical
boundaries. They are taught on a small-group basis,          College Admissions Test (MCAT). Continuation
stressing student-faculty interaction, and are open to all   of Interdisciplinary Studies 280. Graded Pass/Fail.
students without prerequisites. Students should ascertain    Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 280. 1 sem. hr.
which courses are available in any given semester.
                                                             IDST 285 Developing Interdisciplinary Research
                                                             Will focus on development of an interdisciplinary
                                                             research project from inception through writing of
                                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERNATIONAL STUDIES • 123



grant proposal. Will begin with discussion of scientific       INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
question being addressed, followed by discussions of
                                                              Vincent Wang (Political Science), Coordinator
broad concepts of a research proposal and, finally, the
development and completion of a final proposal. Will           The International Studies major is composed of six
involve literature search, discussions concerning design      concentrations that are coordinated by advisors with
and execution of experiments, as well as interpretation of    special expertise in the areas. Students with specific
data [both quantitative and qualitative]. Experimentation     interests outside the described concentrations may
will involve a variety of techniques and approaches;          petition to create an independent concentration.
expose students to interdisciplinary nature of modern
                                                              Major Requirements
biomedically related research and how collaboration
                                                              Note: A grade of not less than C (2.0) is required in all
leads to enhancement of a project; and promote
                                                              coursework comprising the major.
students’ ability to think critically, write a proposal and
discuss and present their ideas to others in an effective     A. Enhanced Language Proficiency
manner. The faculty/research student teams will work          At least two 300- or 400-level three or four semester hour
to develop a final research proposal for NSF or another        courses in the Department of Modern Literatures and
suitable funding agency. Prerequisites: Chemistry 141         Cultures or Department of Latin American and Iberian
and Biology 201 or 205. 1 sem. hr.                            Studies, excluding courses taught in English (each grade
                                                              must be C (2.0) or higher) or satisfactory completion
IDST 299 Selected Topics                                      of an approved language achievement examination for
One semester elective. Explores a variety of topics that      300-level equivalency.
do not typically fall within disciplinary boundaries. 3
sem. hrs.                                                     Note: Students with unusual or advanced language
                                                              preparation may petition the IS Coordinator, their
IDST 300 Technologies of Change: Information                  concentration advisor, and the chair of MLC or LAIS for a
Resources, Policies and Communities                           waiver of this requirement.
Focus on understanding, using, and evaluating                 B. Approved Experience Abroad
information technologies for research, communication,         In order to provide for a significant degree of cultural
manipulation of data and presentation of ideas and            immersion, the experience abroad will be related to the
results. Consideration of public policy, ethical and          student’s concentration and will be at least one semester
technological issues related to information access,           in length. Any program which does not meet these
presentation, ownership and distribution. 3 sem. hrs.         requirements must be approved by the concentration
IDST 334 Urban Revitalization and Preservation                advisor in consultation with the program coordinator.
Using the city of Richmond as a laboratory, a study of        C. International Studies Coursework Required:
importance of preserving old and historic structures,             • Political Science 250 or Geography/International
districts and artifacts, and of maintaining integrity               Studies 210
and flavor of existing neighborhoods within context of             • International Studies 290 and 400
modern urban environment. 3 sem. hrs.                             • An International Studies Concentration (within
                                                                    the concentration: nine courses (three or four
IDST 379 Combined Major Project/Portfolio
                                                                    semester hours each) selected from three or more
Working with faculty mentors, students will write a 20-
                                                                    departments with no more than five courses
30 page research paper on an interdisciplinary topic. For
                                                                    (three or four semester hours each) from a single
students in combined majors with French and German,
                                                                    department and at least four courses above the
this paper will become part of a portfolio representing
                                                                    200 level while meeting concentration-specific
significant achievements in the major and emphasizing
                                                                    requirements
the interdisciplinary and/or cross-cultural aspects of the
major. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval. 2 sem. hrs.       NOTE: With prior approval, study abroad courses may be
                                                              applied toward the major. Be aware of the fact that courses
IDST 390 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Middle              may be added after this catalog is printed. For eligibility of
Ages and Renaissance                                          new courses for inclusion in the major, see the concentration
(See English 390) 3 sem. hrs.                                 advisor.
IDST 397 Special Topics                                       International Studies: Africa
Topics will vary from semester to semester. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                              Joseph Obi (Sociology), Advisor
IDST 398-399 Senior Thesis                                    Select nine courses from the following (may include
For students in the Interdisciplinary Studies major.          up to two courses dealing with the African diaspora,
1.5/1.5 sem. hrs.                                             marked with an *).
124 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Anthropology                                      International Studies: Asia
ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
                                                  Vincent Wei-cheng Wang (Political Science), Advisor
ANTH 300 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
ANTH 304 Ritual, Witchcraft and Divination            Required:
ANTH 338 Peoples of Africa                             • At least two 300- or 400-level three or four
                                                         semester hour courses in Chinese or Japanese
Art
                                                       • Approved experience abroad
ART 279     ST: African Art
                                                       • Three courses from area A chosen in consultation
Economics                                                with the concentration advisor
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics              • Three courses from area B chosen in consultation
ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa            with the concentration advisor
          and Latin America                            • Three courses from area A or B chosen in
ECON 212 Geographies of Economic                         consultation with the concentration advisor
          Development and Globalization               For eligibility of other relevant courses for inclusion
English                                           in the major, see the concentration advisor.
ENGL 218    African Literature                    Note: Students taking courses marked with an * can receive
ENGL 231    African-American Literature*          credits toward the concentration, provided they have the
ENGL 238    Readings in Caribbean Literature*     concentration advisor’s approval and their papers/projects
ENGL 331    Literatures of Africa                 are related to Asia.
ENGL 332    Literatures of the Caribbean*
ENGL 335    Black Women Writers                   Area A: Humanities
ENGL 358    African-American Women Writers*       Art History
French                                            ART 212       Introduction to Asian Art
FREN 324 Introduction to Francophone Literature   ART 226       Art and Culture of Japan
FREN 471 Francophone Studies                      ART 378       Topics in Asian Art
                                                  ART 383       East Asian Painting, Poetry
Geography                                                        and Calligraphy
GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory:
          Geographies of Political Change         Chinese
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic                  CHIN 311 Insights to Chinese Culture
          Development and Globalization           English
History                                           ENGL 214 Literature of India
HIST 100    Changing Africa                       ENGL 333 Literatures of South Asia
HIST 281    Africa c. 1500-1900                   History
HIST 282    Africa in the Twentieth Century       HIST 130      East Asian Civilization
HIST 283    South Africa since 1500               HIST 250      Modern Asia
HIST 380    Women and Gender in African History   HIST 251      Introduction to Chinese Civilization
HIST 390    Food and Power in Africa and Asia     HIST 252      Modern China
International Studies                             HIST 253      Empires and Nations in
IS 230     Introduction to Africa                               Modern East Asia
IS 240     Gods, Spirits and Faith in Africa      HIST 254      Modern Japan
IS 301     Dependency and Development:            HIST 290      British Empire and Commonwealth
           An Introduction to the Third World     HIST 299      ST: Asian in the Making of the
IS 350     ST: Zimbabwe: Nation and Culture                     Modern World
           (Summer only, 6 sem. hrs.)             Japanese
Music                                             JAPN 310      Japanese Culture
MUS 115     The Jazz Tradition                    Religion
MUS 203     Global Hip Hop*                       REGL 250      Introduction to World Religions
Political Science                                 RELG 251      Sacred Arts of India
PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism           RELG 252      East Asian Philosophical Literature
PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations           RELG 253      Body/Sex in World Religious Literature
PLSC 348 Politics of Africa                       RELG 352      Buddhism in India and Tibet
                                                  RELG 353      Buddhism in China and Japan
Sociology                                         RELG 355      Selected Asian Religions
SOC 230     Introduction to Africa                RELG 366      Buddhist Philosophy
SOC 316     Race and Ethnicity in America*
                                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERNATIONAL STUDIES • 125



Area B: Social Sciences                                           • ECON 310 International Trade And Finance
Anthropology                                                      • Six elective courses from two or more departments
ANTH 310 Tribe, Nation, World:                                      in the following list:
           The Anthropology of Globalization*                 Accounting
ANTH 339 Peoples of the Pacific                                ACCT 315 International Accounting Issues
ANTH 340 Peoples of Southeast Asia                            Anthropology
Economics                                                     ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics                     ANTH 308 Cultures and Peoples of Latin America
ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,                        ANTH 310 Tribe, Nation, World: The Anthropology
          Africa and Latin America                                       of Globalization
Geography                                                     ANTH 336 Big Men, Chiefs and Presidents:
GEOG 207 World Regional Geography-                                       Political Anthropology
          Developing Regions*                                 ANTH 338 Peoples of Africa
GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory:                          ANTH 339 Peoples of the Pacific
          Geographies of Political Change*                    ANTH 340 Peoples of Southeast Asia
GEOG 345 Society, Economy and Nature:                         Finance
          Global Perspective on                               FIN 462     International Financial Management
          Sustainable Development*                            Geography
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic                              GEOG 206 World Geography - Developed Regions
          Development and Globalization*                      GEOG 207 World Geography - Developing Regions
History                                                       GEOG 210 Geographic Dimensions of
HIST 340      Imagining the Other:                                      Human Development
              China and the West                              GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory
HIST 341      The Politics of Asia-Pacific                     GEOG 345 Society, Economy and Nature
              War Memories                                    GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic
HIST 390      Food and Power in Asia and Africa                         Development and Globalization
International Business                                        History
IBUS 390 International Business Issues                        HIST 236    Russian Empire, Soviet Union and After
            (Asia/Pacific Management)-                         HIST 241    Modern European Thought Since 1850
            no business course prerequisites *                HIST 242    Modern Germany
International Studies                                         HIST 243    Modern Britain
IS 245      Introduction to South Asia                        HIST 244    The Hapsburg Empire and After
                                                              HIST 245    Modern Balkans
Political Science                                             HIST 246    Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934
PLSC 343 Politics of Asia                                     HIST 247    Modern Ireland
PLSC 345 Politics of China, Hong Kong                         HIST 248    European Diplomacy from
              and Taiwan                                                  Bismarck to Hitler
PLSC 357 International Relations of East Asia                 HIST 249    Twentieth-Century Europe
PLSC 358 The United States and the Pacific Rim                 HIST 250    Modern Asia
PLSC 400 Senior Seminar: Comparative Political                HIST 251    Introduction to Chinese Civilization
              Economy: East Asia vs. Latin America            HIST 252    Modern China
International Studies: International Economics                HIST 253    Empires and Nations in
                                                                          Modern East Asia
Jonathan B. Wight (Economics), Advisor                        HIST 254    Modern Japan
Students are strongly encouraged to develop proficiency        HIST 261    Modern Latin America
in economics with either a minor or double major (see         HIST 262    The Making of Modern Brazil
Economics Department listings for requirements.) Note         HIST 271    The Modern Middle East
that the Economics courses listed below have prerequisites.   HIST 272    Palestine, Zionism and the
   At a minimum, the following courses are required for                   Arab-Israeli Conflict
the concentration:                                            HIST 282    Africa in the Twentieth Century
     • ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union           HIST 283    South Africa since 1500
     • ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,                 HIST 290    British Empire and Commonwealth
       Africa and Latin America                               HIST 291    History of Canada
126 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



HIST 340    Imagining the Other: China and the West   Religion
HIST 341    The Politics of Asian-Pacific              RELG 250 Introduction to World Religions
            War Memories                              Sociology
HIST 370    Land and Power in Palestine               SOC 230       Introduction to Africa:
            and Israel: Advanced Readings                           The Sociology of Africa
            in the Arab-Israeli Conflict
HIST 380    Women and Gender in African History       International Studies: Latin America
HIST 390    Food and Power in Africa and Asia         Joan Bak (History), Advisor
International Business                                Required: A minimum of nine courses distributed as
IBUS 381 International Business Environment           follows:
IBUS 390 International Business Issues and Topics          • One introductory course on Latin America
IBUS 411 International Business Strategy                     (Group A)
International Studies                                      • At least three courses focusing on Latin America
IS 230      Introduction to Africa:                          (Group B)
            The Sociology of Africa                        • No more than three courses with partial content
IS 245      Introduction to South Asia                       on Latin America (Group C)
IS 301      Dependency and Development:                    • No more than two background courses (Group D)
            An Introduction to the Third World        Courses marked with an asterisk * may vary in emphasis
IS 310      Tribe, Nation, World : The                depending upon instructor. Check before taking the class.
            Anthropology of Globalization
IS 321      Exploring Latin American Experience:      Courses marked with two asterisks ** are similar in content;
            An Interdisciplinary Seminar              students may received credit towards the concentration for
                                                      only one course.
Management Systems
MGMT 333 International Management                     Classes in which the language of instruction is other than
                                                      English are specified.
Marketing
MKT 325 International Marketing                       Group A, Introductory Courses on Latin America:
                                                      ANTH 308 Cultures and Peoples of Latin America
Philosophy
                                                      IS 321      Exploring Latin American Experience
PHIL 337 Social and Political Philosophy
                                                      SPAN 312 Perspectives on Nations and Cultures
PHIL 344 Twentieth-Century Continental
                                                                  of Latin America (Spanish)
           Philosophy
                                                      Group B, Courses Focusing on Latin America:
Political Science
                                                      BIOL 383 Tropical Biology and Conservation
PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics
                                                      ENGL 205 Latino/a Literature and Film **
PLSC 312 Modern Political Theory
                                                      ENGL 332 Literatures of the Caribbean
PSLC 340 Islam and Politics
                                                      HIST 100 Race and Color in Brazil
PLSC 341 Great Britain, France and Germany
                                                      HIST 261 Modern Latin America
PLSC 342 Russia and the Newly Independent States
                                                      PLSC 349 Politics of Latin America
PLSC 343 Politics of Asia
                                                                 and the Caribbean
PLSC 344 Europe Today
                                                      SPAN 331-332 Introduction to Spanish-American
PLSC 345 Politics of China, Hong Kong
                                                                 Literature, I-II (Spanish)
              and Taiwan
                                                      SPAN 391 Contemporary Luzo-Brazilian
PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism
                                                                 Readings (Portuguese)
PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations
                                                      SPAN 452 Spanish-American Poetic Texts (Spanish)
PLSC 348 Politics of Africa
                                                      SPAN 471 Latin American Cinema (Spanish)
PLSC 349 Politics of Latin America and the
                                                      SPAN 472 Contemporary Spanish-American
              Caribbean
                                                                 Theater (Spanish)
PLSC 350 American Foreign Policy
                                                      SPAN 475 Women and Writing in
PLSC 352 International Law and Organizations
                                                                 Latin America (Spanish)
PLSC 355 Middle East Security
                                                      SPAN 477 Literature of the Spanish-Speaking
PLSC 356 International Political Economy
                                                                 Caribbean (Spanish)
PLSC 357 International Relations of East Asia
                                                      SPAN 484 The Latin American Essay (Spanish)
PLSC 358 The United States and the Pacific Rim
                                                      SPAN 485 Spanish-American Narrative (Spanish)
PLSC 360 International Development Policy
                                                      SPAN 486 U.S. Latino/a Literature ** (Spanish)
PLSC 374 Methods for Cross National Research
                                                      SPAN 487 Latin America: Encounter
                                                                 and Conflict (Spanish)
                               SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERNATIONAL STUDIES • 127



Group C, Courses with Partial Content on Latin         HIST 232    Tudor England, 1485-1603
America:                                               HIST 233    Stuart England, 1603-1714
ANTH 301 Dependency and Development:                   HIST 234    Georgian Britain, 1714-1837
           An Introduction to the Third World          HIST 235    France: Old Regime and Revolution
ANTH 310 Tribe, Nation, World:                         HIST 236    Russian Empire, Soviet Union and After
           The Anthropology of Globalization*          HIST 242    Modern Germany
ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,                 HIST 243    Modern Britain
           Africa and Latin America                    HIST 244    The Hapsburg Empire and After
GEOG 207 World Regional Geography -                    HIST 245    Modern Balkans
           Developing Regions *                        HIST 246    Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934
GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory:                   HIST 247    Modern Ireland
           Geographies of Political Change             HIST 248    European Diplomacy from
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic                                   Bismarck to Hitler
           Development and Globalization               HIST 249    Twentieth-Century Europe
MUS 117 Salsa Meets Jazz                               HIST 321    History of Work in Europe
PLSC 400 Senior Seminar: Comparative Political         Political Science
           Economy-East Asia vs. Latin America         PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics
Group D, Background Courses                            PLSC 341 Great Britain, France and Germany
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics              PLSC 342 Russia and the Newly
PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism                              Independent States
PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations                Area B: Intellectual and Cultural History
PLSC 356 International Political Economy
PLSC 360 International Development Policy              Art
                                                       ART 222     Art History: Renaissance to the Present
International Studies: Modern Europe                   ART 314     Northern Renaissance Art
                                                       ART 315     Art of the Italian Renaissance
Yvonne Howell (Modern Literatures and Cultures) and
                                                       ART 316     Art in the Age of Reform
Hugh A. West (History), Advisors
                                                       ART 317     Nineteenth-Century Art
   Required:                                           ART 318     Twentieth-Century Art
    • History 111 Ideas and Institutions of Western
                                                       French
      Civilization
                                                       FREN 311 Life and Issues in the
    • Political Science 344 Europe Today
                                                                French-Speaking World
    • Two courses from area A chosen in consultation
                                                       FREN 441 Enlightenment
      with the concentration advisor
                                                       FREN 465 French Film
    • Two courses from area B chosen in consultation
                                                       FREN 487 Contemporary Ideas
      with the concentration advisor
    • Two courses from area C chosen in consultation   History
      with the concentration advisor                   HIST 240    Modern European Thought, 1650-1850
    • One course from area A, B or C chosen in         HIST 241    Modern European Thought since 1850
      consultation with the concentration advisor      German
Area A: Social Sciences/History                        GERM 311    German Culture and Civilization
                                                       GERM 440    Age of Idealism
Economics                                              GERM 452    Fin de Ciecle, 1900/2000
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics              GERM 465    Rebels with a Cause: Political Satire
ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union           GERM 471    Sexuality and German Society
ECON 220 History of Economic Thought                   GERM 472    Multiculturalism, Identity and
Geography                                                          Authorship in the German Context
GEOG 206 World Geography - Developed Regions           Modern Languages
History                                                MLC 256 Psychoanalysis, Literature and Culture
HIST 224     European Women and Gender                 MLC 331 Russian Cinema
             before Suffrage                           MLC 332 Russian Painting
HIST 228     The Renaissance                           MLC 360 Representing the Holocaust
HIST 229     The Reformation                           MLC 365 German Film in Context
HIST 231     England from 1688 to Present
128 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Music                                                German
MUS 228     Critical Studies in Music History II     GERM 321 Introduction to German Literature
MUS 330     An Era of Spectacle: Music and Art       Modern Languages
            in the Baroque Period                    MLC 313 French Literature in Translation
MUS 343     The Mass from Plainshant to Part         MLC 321-322 Russian Literature in Translation
MUS 344     Opera Studies
                                                     Russian
Philosophy                                           RUSN 321 Introduction to Nineteenth-Century
PHIL 272 Modern Western Philosophy                             Russian Literature
PHIL 275 Marx, Nietzsche and Freud                   RUSN 322 Introduction to Twentieth-Century
PHIL 336 Nineteenth-Century European                           and Contemporary Russian Literature
           Philosophy                                RUSN 421-422 Russian Literature in the Original
PHIL 339 Existentialism
PHIL 343 Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy       Spanish
PHIL 344 Twentieth-Century Continental               SPAN 321     Literary Spain: Poetry, Drama, Fiction
           Philosophy                                SPAN 432     True Lies: Fiction and Truth in
PHIL 357 Nietzsche                                                Don Quixote
                                                     SPAN 451     Spanish Literature of Exile
Political Science                                    SPAN 463     Modern Spanish Narrative
PLSC 312 Modern Political Theory                     SPAN 464     Modern Theatre in Spain
Religion
RELG 356 Religious Thought of the                    International Studies: World Politics and
         Renaissance and Reformation                 Diplomacy
Russian                                              Sheila Carapico (Political Science), Melissa LaBonte
RUSN 311 Russian Language in Culture                 (Political Science), and John D. Treadway (History),
RUSN 312 Russian Culture and Civilization            Advisors
Spanish                                                 Required:
SPAN 311    Perspectives on People and                   • One course from History 214, 215, 248, or 391
            Cultures of Spain                            • One course from Political Science 356, 360;
SPAN 431    Imperial Spain                                 Economics 105, 210, 211, or 310; or Geography
SPAN 462    Visions of Contemporary Spain                  370
SPAN 465    Spanish Cinema                               • One course from Political Science 350 or 352
                                                         • Six additional courses selected from above and
Area C: Literature
                                                           below
English
                                                     Anthropology
ENGL 302    Literature of the English Renaissance
                                                     ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ENGL 304    Shakespeare
                                                     ANTH 336 Big Men, Chiefs and Presidents
ENGL 306    Milton
ENGL 311    English Literature of the Restoration    Economics
            and Eighteenth Century                   ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics
ENGL 312    English Literature of the                ECON 210 The Economics of the
            Romantic Period                                    European Union
ENGL 313    English Literature of the                ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia,
            Victorian Period                                   Africa and Latin America
ENGL 320    Topics in British Literature 1660-1900   ECON 212 Geographies of Economic
ENGL 346    Twentieth-Century British Literature               Development and Globalization
ENGL 347    Topics in Twentieth-Century                        (same as Geography 370)
            British Literature                       ECON 230 Environmental Economics
ENGL 348    Modernist Sexuality                      ECON 310 International Trade and Finance
French                                               English
FREN 321, 322, 323 Introduction to French            ENGL 336 Literatures of Globalization
           Literature                                Geography
FREN 421 Renaissance                                 GEOG 206 World Geography—Developed Regions
FREN 451 From Romanticism to Decadence               GEOG 207 World Geography—
FREN 461 From Modern to Post-Modern                            Developing Regions
                              SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/INTERNATIONAL STUDIES • 129



GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic                  PLSC 341      Great Britain, France and Germany
         Information Systems                         PLSC 342      Russia and the Newly
GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory                                Independent States
GEOG 345 Society, Economy and Nature                 PLSC 343      Politics of Asia
GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic                     PLSC 344      Europe Today
         Development and Globalization               PLSC 345      Politics of China, Hong Kong
History                                                            and Taiwan
HIST 214    United States and the World 1877-1945    PLSC 346      Politics of Cultural Pluralism
HIST 215    United States and the World Since 1945   PLSC 347      Politics of Developing Nations
HIST 236    Russian Empire, Soviet Union and After   PLSC 348      Politics of Africa
HIST 240    Modern European Thought, 1650-1850       PLSC 349      Politics of Latin America
HIST 242    Modern Germany                                         and the Caribbean
HIST 243    Modern Britain                           PLSC 350      American Foreign Policy
HIST 244    The Hapsburg Empire and After            PLSC 352      International Law and Organization
HIST 245    Modern Balkans                           PLSC 355      Middle East Security
HIST 246    Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934          PLSC 356      International Political Economy
HIST 247    Modern Ireland                           PLSC 358      The United States and the Pacific Rim
HIST 248    European Diplomacy from                  PLSC 360      International Development Policy
            Bismarck to Hitler                       PLSC 374      Methods for Cross National Research
HIST 249    Twentieth-Century Europe                 Religion
HIST 250    Modern Asia                              RELG 250 Introduction to World Religions
HIST 252    Modern China
HIST 253    Empires and Nations in                   Individual Programs
            Modern East Asia                         A student who has an interest in an international
HIST 254    Modern Japan                             studies area not listed here may be able to develop an
HIST 261    Modern Latin America                     individual program of study to meet the concentration
HIST 262    The Making of Modern Brazil              requirement. Such a program will have a theme
HIST 271    The Modern Middle East                   supported by appropriate courses and shall be approved
HIST 272    Palestine, Zionism and the               by the coordinator of International Studies. Students
            Arab-Israeli Conflict                     who wish to pursue this option should see the program
HIST 282    Africa in the Twentieth Century          coordinator early in their college career to allow adequate
HIST 290    British Empire and Commonwealth          time for planning.
HIST 291    History of Canada                        COURSES
HIST 340    Imagining the Other:                     IS 210 Geographic Dimensions of Human
            China and the West                       Development
HIST 341    The Politics of Asian-Pacific             (See Geography 210.) 3 sem. hrs.
            War Memories
HIST 390    Food and Power in Africa and Asia        IS 230 Introduction to Africa
HIST 391    Transnational Social Reform              Survey of African history, geography, institutions and
                                                     current issues. 3 sem. hrs.
International Studies
IS 230      Introduction to Africa                   IS 240 Gods, Spirits and Faith in Africa
IS 301      Dependency and Development:              Religious practices, institutions and forms of
            An Introduction to the Third World       experience in Africa. Topics include creation myths,
IS 310      Tribe, Nation, World:                    apocalyptic faiths, conventional and modified versions
            The Anthropology of Globalization        of Islam; mission and Zionist Christianities; sorcery in
IS 321      Exploring Latin American Experience      contemporary politics; spirit possession and ancestor
                                                     worship. 3 sem. hrs.
Leadership Studies
LDST 307 Leadership in International Contexts        IS 245 Introduction to South Asia
LDST 354 Conflict Resolution                          General introduction to South Asia emphasizing the
Political Science                                    themes of tradition and change. Approach will be topical
PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics        with attention to geography and history, literature and
PLSC 320 Power, Space and Territory                  rhetoric, the social order, music and the visual arts,
PLSC 340 Islam and Politics                          political systems, and relations among South Asian
                                                     nations. 3 sem. hrs.
130 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



IS 250 Selected Topics                                        in International Studies 290; sets of international issues
Topics and issues in International Studies. May be            and relationships are studied using tools and approaches
repeated when topics vary. 1-3 sem. hrs.                      of several disciplines. Seminar topics change from
                                                              semester to semester. While readings are common,
IS 290 Perspectives in International Studies                  student’s area of individual inquiry is, where possible,
Issues in cross-cultural representation and interpretation.   related to the concentration. Prerequisite: International
Analysis of origins and implications of diversity and         Studies 290. 3 sem. hrs.
interdependence among nations, cultures, regions. Not
open to seniors except by permission of instructor. 3         ITALIAN PROGRAM
sem. hrs.
                                                              Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures
IS 301 Dependency and Development: An
                                                              Minor Program Coordinator Anthony Russell
Introduction to the Third World
                                                              Associate Professor Russell
Interdisciplinary overview of less developed countries.
                                                              Assistant Professor Radi
Includes history of Third World, economics, politics,
                                                              Director of Language Instruction Marcin
population growth, urbanization, world hunger,
the environment, human rights and theories of                 Courses in Italian language, literature and culture are
underdevelopment. (Same as Anthropology 301.) 3 sem.          offered in the Department of Modern Literatures
hrs.                                                          and Cultures. Additionally, students may pursue
                                                              the interdisciplinary Italian Studies minor, which
IS 310 Tribe, Nation, World: The Anthropology of              combines work in MLC with related courses in other
Globalization                                                 departments.
Globalization “from the ground up,” i.e., the perspective
of people affected by the spread of consumerism,              Italian Studies Minor
entertainment media and Western values. Theoretical           Interdisciplinary investigation of Italian culture and
controversies and particular case studies. (Same as           history. Program requires completion of five or six
Anthropology 310.) 3 sem. hrs.                                courses (a minimum of 18 semester hours), with courses
                                                              distributed as follows:
IS 320 Power, Space, and Territory: Geographies of                 A. Three Italian courses (above the 200 level) in the
Political Change                                                     Modern Literatures and Cultures Department
(See Geography 320; same as Political Science 320.) 3             OR
sem. hrs.                                                            Two Italian courses and two courses outside
IS 321 Exploring Latin American Experience: An                       MLC with a Languages Across the Curriculum
Interdisciplinary Seminar                                            component.
Multiple disciplinary perspectives on history, society,            B.Remaining coursework must be fulfilled outside
politics, economics and culture of Latin America.                    the Modern Literatures and Cultures Department.
Prerequisite: One course on Latin America. 3 sem. hrs.               A substantial portion of the content of these
                                                                     courses must be devoted to Italian Studies. For a
IS 350 Selected Topics                                               list of existing courses that satisfy this requirement,
Selected topics in related subjects as arranged by the               contact the program coordinator. In addition to
Program Coordinator. May be repeated when topics vary.               the regularly offered courses there will be others
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-6 sem. hrs.                offered occasionally that may count towards an
                                                                     Italian Studies minor. All courses outside MLC
IS 388 Internship
                                                                     that can be taken for credit towards the minor
May be taken for a grade or pass/fail. Up to three credits
                                                                     will be announced by the program coordinator
may be applied towards the major, only when a grade
                                                                     at the beginning of each registration period.
is awarded. Prerequisites: International Studies 201 and
                                                                     Students are strongly encouraged to satisfy some
permission of department. 1-3 sem. hrs.
                                                                     of the requirements of the minor by studying
IS 390 Independent Study                                             abroad.
Topics independently pursued under supervision of
faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of department.
                                                              COURSES
                                                              ITAL 101-102 Elementary Italian
1-3 sem. hrs.
                                                              Introduction to Italian language and culture;
IS 400 Senior Seminar                                         development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and
Follow up on core concepts and approaches introduced          writing. Prerequisite: Italian 101 is prerequisite to 102.
                                                              3-3 sem. hrs.
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/JAPANESE PROGRAM • 131



ITAL 201-202 Intermediate Italian                               Study Abroad
Active reinforcement and practice of listening, speaking,       Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for
reading and writing, within contemporary cultural               all students. The department offers summer study
contexts. Prerequisite: Italian 201 is prerequisite to 202.     programs in China, France, Germany, Japan and Russia.
3-3 sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2)                                  In addition, there are exchange agreements for study
                                                                during the academic year in France, Germany, Japan,
ITAL 301 Italian Conversation through Cinema
                                                                Quebec and Russia; others are being negotiated. For
Development of effective communication through
                                                                a complete list, contact the Office of International
viewing and discussion of contemporary films.
                                                                Education.
Prerequisite: Italian 202 or permission of instructor. 4
sem. hrs.                                                       The Japanese Minor
                                                                Note: The grade point average of the coursework
ITAL 305 Italian Composition, Grammar and
                                                                comprising the major or the minor must be no less than
Conversation
                                                                2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.70).
Development of writing, speaking and comprehension.
                                                                   Eighteen semester hours of language study beyond
Emphasis will be placed on enhancing writing skills,
                                                                the intermediate level (202); must include an approved
vocabulary expansion, pronunciation, grammatical
                                                                study abroad experience.
and communicative, both written and oral, accuracy.
Prerequisite: Italian 202 or permission of instructor. 4        COURSES
sem. hrs.                                                       JAPN 101-102 Elementary Japanese
                                                                Basic speaking, reading and writing (hiragana, katakana
ITAL 311 The Three Regions
                                                                and simple kanji) with emphasis on oral performance in
Comparative investigation of Tuscany, Veneto and Sicily
                                                                class. Prerequisite: Japanese 101 is prerequisite to 102.
through historical, literary, artistic, political and other
                                                                4-4 sem. hrs.
cultural perspectives. Emphasis will be placed on the
development of reading and writing skills. Prerequisite:        JAPN 201-202 Intermediate Japanese
Italian 202 or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.            Further development of skills in speaking, reading and
                                                                writing (appr. 250 kanji), continued emphasis on oral
ITAL 321 Readings in Italian Literature
                                                                performance. Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or permission
Introduction to Italian literature through analysis of
                                                                of department; Japanese 201 is prerequisite to 202. 4-4
selected works in their historical, aesthetic, sociopolitical
                                                                sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2 )
and other cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Italian 301 or
311. 4 sem. hrs.                                                JAPN 301-302 Japanese Conversation
                                                                Continued development of speaking, reading and
ITAL 388 Individual Internship
                                                                writing (with concentration of joyo kanji list). Strong
(See Modern Literatures and Cultures 388.) Prerequisite:
                                                                emphasis on contemporary oral language of Japan.
Audition/permission of department. 1-2 sem. hrs.
                                                                Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or permission of department.
ITAL 495 Independent Study                                      Japanese 301 is prerequisite to 302. 3-3 sem. hrs.
Special projects individually pursued under supervision
                                                                JAPN 310 Japanese Culture-Programmed Activities
of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of
                                                                Practical approach to relationship between Japanese
department. 1-4 sem. hrs.
                                                                language and culture. Emphasis on oral and written
ITAL 497 Selected Topics                                        skills in weekly schedule of three to four days in local
Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion.     business along with three days in class. (Summer only;
Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 1-4 sem. hrs.       taught in Japan.) Prerequisite: Japanese 302. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                JAPN 401-402 Advanced Japanese Language,
JAPANESE PROGRAM
                                                                Literature and Culture
Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures                   This course prepares for more advanced study of
Director of the Japanese Language Program Akira Suzuki          Japanese through rigorous vocabulary expansion, more
                                                                sophisticated language usage patterns, and expanded work
This section contains information specific to the degree
                                                                in kanji. Materials are designed to advance the student’s
programs in Japanese. For full information regarding
                                                                fluency for everyday communicative tasks as well as
departmental policies relevant to all the MLC degree
                                                                reading skills. Prerequisite: Japanese 302. 3-3 sem. hrs.
programs, study abroad and course sequencing, see the
main page of the Department of Modern Literatures               JAPN 495 Independent Study
and Cultures.                                                   Special projects individually pursued under supervision of
                                                                faculty member. Prerequisite: Japanese 302. 1-3 sem. hrs.
132 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



JAPN 497 Selected Topics                                       JWST 397 Special Topics in Jewish Studies
Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion.    Special topics related to Jewish history and/or culture
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.            that contribute to the Jewish Studies minor. Prerequisite:
                                                               Permission of instructor. 3-4 sem. hrs.
JEWISH STUDIES
                                                               JWST 388 Individual Internship in Jewish Studies
Samuel A. Abrash, Coordinator (Chemistry)
                                                               Up to three credits may be applied toward the Jewish
The Jewish Studies Minor                                       Studies minor. Prerequisite: Approval by the Jewish
Six courses selected from among the courses listed or          Studies coordinator. 1-3 sem. hrs.
taken with approval of the Jewish Studies program
coordinator, including:                                        JOURNALISM
     • RELG 230 The History of Israel, 3 hours OR              Department of Journalism
       RELG 260 History of Judaism, 3 hours
                                                               Steve Nash, Chair
     • Five electives. Of the five remaining courses, two
                                                               Associate Professors Kindel, Nash, Spear
       must be at the 300 level or higher, and no more
                                                               Journalism professionals also are employed as adjunct
       than one may be chosen from Group II (below).
                                                               faculty members.
   A maximum of two courses may be taken at VCU’s
Judaic Studies Program and applied to the minor with           The Journalism Major
the prior permission of the program coordinator.               Note: Except for pass/fail courses, a grade of not lower
Group I: Jewish Studies Core Courses                           than C (2.0) is required in each journalism course
ENGL 217 The Bible and Literature                              comprising the major.
HIST 271 The Modern Middle East                                   Twenty-eight semester hours in journalism,
HIST 399 The Holocaust                                         including
JWST 297 Special Topics                                             • Journalism 200
JWST 397 Special Topics                                             • Journalism 204 (two semesters)
MLC 360 Representing the Holocaust                                  • Journalism 201
RELG 201 The Bible as Literature                                    • Journalism 301
RELG 230 The History of Israel                                      • Journalism 302
RELG 232 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew                            • Journalism 303
RELG 260 History of Judaism                                         • Journalism 304
RELG 331 The Hebrew Prophets                                        • Journalism 388 (two semesters at The Collegian
RELG 332 Hebrew and Christian                                         or one and an acceptable substitute)
            Wisdom Literature                                       • Two journalism electives
RELG 359 American Judaism
                                                               The Journalism Minor
Group II: Related Courses                                      Note: Except for pass/fail courses, a grade of not lower
GERM 472 Multiculturalism, Identity and                        than C (2.0) is required in each journalism course
            Authorship in the German Context                   comprising the minor.
HIST 242 Modern Germany                                           Eighteen semester hours in journalism, including
HIST 249 Twentieth-Century Europe                                  • Journalism 200
PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism                            • Journalism 201
RELG 241 Introduction to Early Christian Era                       • Journalism 204 (two semesters)
RELG 242 Jesus and Christian Origins                               • Journalism 301
RELG 243 The World of the New Testament                            • Journalism 303
RELG 340 Varieties of Early Christianity                           • Journalism 388 (one semester at The Collegian)
SPAN 421 Arabs, Jews and Christians from                           • One journalism elective
            Frontier to Empire
                                                               General Prerequisites: Journalism 200 with a grade of C
COURSES                                                        or better, and one semester of 204 with a grade of P are
JWST 297 Special Topics in Jewish Studies                      prerequisites for Journalism 201. Journalism 200 and 204
Special topics related to Jewish history and/or culture that   may be taken concurrently. Journalism 201 with a grade of
contribute to the Jewish Studies minor. 3-4 sem. hrs.          C or better is prerequisite for all other journalism courses,
                                                               and is best completed before the end of the sophomore year.
JWST 395 Independent Study in Jewish Studies
Topics independently pursued under supervision of
faculty member. Prerequisite: Religion 230 or 260. 1-4
sem. hrs.
                                               SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/JOURNALISM • 133




COURSES                                                      J0UR 306 News Graphics
JOUR 200 News Media and Society                              Introduction to publication design, including history
History and development of print and electronic              and basics of typography, newspaper design, photo
media. Conflicts between the free press and other social      editing and infographics. Prerequisite: Journalism 201
objectives. External and internal controls affecting news    with a grade of C or better. 3 sem. hrs.
media and flow of information. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)
                                                             JOUR 307 Documentary Journalism I: Evolution of
JOUR 201 News Writing and Reporting                          the Social Narrative
Intensive training in basic writing and reporting skills,    Exploration of genre of social documentaries, including
news values and research. Includes frequent writing          works of prominent documentary makers (audio,
assignments. Prerequisites: Journalism 200 with a grade      video and film), and relevant ethical, aesthetic,
of C or better, one semester of Journalism 204 with a        legal and economic issues. Requires production of
P grade, and basic typing, transcription and grammar         short documentary feature in digital video or audio.
skills. 3 sem. hrs.                                          Prerequisite: Journalism 201 with a grade of C or better.
                                                             3 sem. hrs.
JOUR 202 Feature and Magazine Article Writing
Research and writing of news-feature and magazine            JOUR 308 Documentary Journalism II: Study and
articles. Prerequisites: Journalism 201 with a grade of C    Practice
or better. 3 sem. hrs.                                       Application of principles and practices of documentary
                                                             making, including story research; production
JOUR 204 Colloquium                                          organization and budgeting; writing; field and technical
Reading, viewing, analysis and discussion of critical        production. Completion of one or more documentary
issues of contemporary journalism in all media. Two          works. Prerequisite: Journalism 307. 3 sem. hrs.
semesters required for the major and minor. Graded
pass/fail. 1 sem. hr.                                        JOUR 309 Digital News I: Multimedia Reporting
                                                             and Convergence
JOUR 205 Photojournalism                                     Specialized training and practice in news writing,
Theory and practice of news and feature photography,         reporting and editing for electronic distribution.
properties of light and lenses. Prerequisites: Journalism    Exploration of how digital technology affects the
201 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor     gathering, production and dissemination of news.
and an approved 35mm digital SLR camera. 3 sem. hrs.         Examines convergence, audience, research and business
JOUR 301 Copy Editing                                        and legal aspects of electronic publishing. Prerequisite:
Improving news writing through practice in copy              Journalism 201 with a grade of C or better. 3 sem. hrs.
reading, editing and discussion of news styles, grammar,     JOUR 310 Digital News II: Multimedia Production
usage, page design, headline writing, picture selection,     and Convergence.
news judgment. Prerequisites: Journalism 201 with a          Specialized training and practice in use of audio and
grade of C or better. 3 sem. hrs.                            video field and studio equipment used for electronic
JOUR 302 Public Affairs Reporting                            newsgathering (ENG) and production. Will explore
Writing and reporting on public institutions such as         latest developments in Web news production and
police, courts and legislative bodies. Interviewing and      publishing and other evolving technologies such as
researching using public documents. Frequent off-            digital and satellite radio. Prerequisite: Journalism 309.
campus writing assignments. Prerequisite: Journalism         3 sem. hrs.
201 with a grade of C or better. 3 sem. hrs.                 JOUR 311 Press and Politics
JOUR 303 Journalism Law, Ethics                              Exploration of roles and responsibilities of the press in
Case studies of ethical conflicts encountered in reporting    the political processes of the United States, post World
and editing. State and federal case and statutory            War II to present. Prerequisite: Journalism 201 with a
law affecting news media, especially regarding libel,        grade of C or better. 3 sem. hrs.
privacy, free expression and “freedom of information.”       JOUR 312 Independent Study
Prerequisites: Journalism 201 with a grade of C or better.   Enables qualified students who have completed basic
3 sem. hrs.                                                  requirements for major to work independently on special
JOUR 304 Seminar                                             reporting and research projects. Prerequisites: Permission
Study of specialized field of reporting or writing.           of departmental chair and instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisites: Journalism 201 with a grade of C or better
or consent of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
134 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



JOUR 388 Internship                                            LAC 255 Chinese: Language Across the Curriculum
Supervised work in writing, research or production for         Students will be guided in their study and discussion
on- or off-campus news media. et. Must be taken pass/          of authentic Chinese materials relevant to materials in
fail. May be repeated with the consent of the instructor.      the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:
Prerequisite: Journalism 201 with a grade of C or better.      COM2 proficiency in Chinese or permission of
1-2 sem. hr.                                                   instructor. 1 sem. hr.

LANGUAGE ACROSS THE CURRICULUM                                 LAC 256 Japanese: Language Across the Curriculum
                                                               Students will be guided in their study and discussion
PROGRAM                                                        of authentic Japanese materials relevant to materials in
Robert Graboyes, Coordinator (Economics)                       the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:
Language Across the Curriculum offers one-credit, pass/fail    COM2 proficiency in Japanese or permission of
courses in a variety of languages. LAC sections are usually    instructor. 1 sem. hr.
taught by international students or bilingual students,        LAC 257 Language Across the Curriculum: Other
and they are offered in conjunction with primary courses       Students will be guided in their study and discussion
throughout the curriculum, including CORE, political           of authentic materials in another language relevant to
science/social sciences, arts/literatures, science/health,     materials in the primary course. Pass/fail grades only.
business administration and leadership studies. The            Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1 sem. hr.
purpose of an LAC section is to engage students’ foreign
language skills in the context of another discipline. A LAC    LAC 388 LAC Internship
course will not count toward a major or minor. No more         Students lead language across the curriculum sections
than three hours of LAC credit may count toward the total      of courses in various languages. Internship credit does
number of hours required for a degree.                         not count toward a major or minor in the language.
                                                               Prerequisite: Selection by LAC faculty director and
COURSES                                                        approval of the primary course instructor. 1 sem. hr.
LAC 250 Spanish: Language Across the Curriculum
Students will be guided in their study and discussion          LATIN
of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in
                                                               Department of Classical Studies
the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:
COM2 proficiency in Spanish or permission of                    Dean W. Simpson, Chair
instructor. 1 sem. hr.                                         Associate Professors Laskaris, Simpson, Stevenson
LAC 251 French: Language Across the Curriculum                 The Latin Major
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of       Thirty-six semester hours including 12 hours of a core
authentic French materials relevant to materials in the        curriculum and 24 hours of Latin.
primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite: COM2         I. Core Curriculum 12 hours
proficiency in French or permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.          • CLSC 302, Roman Art and Archaeology, 3
LAC 252 Italian: Language Across the Curriculum                         hours
Students will be guided in their study and discussion                 • CLSC 305, Greek and Roman Values OR
of authentic Italian materials relevant to materials in                 CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition, 3 hours
the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:              • HIST 222 Hellenistic Greece and Republican
COM2 proficiency in Italian or permission of instructor.                 Rome OR HIST 223 The Roman Empire, 4
1 sem. hr.                                                              hours
                                                                      • LATN 498 Major Seminar, 3 hours
LAC 253 German: Language Across the Curriculum                    II. Twenty-four semester hours of Latin
Students will be guided in their study and discussion
                                                               Note: A minimum of two years of Greek is recommended
of authentic German materials relevant to materials in
                                                               for students intending to pursue graduate study.
the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:
COM2 proficiency in German or permission of                     Combined Major in Latin and English Literature
instructor. 1 sem. hr.                                         The combined program in Latin and English is intended
LAC 254 Russian: Language Across the Curriculum                for students who wish to pursue in-depth work in both
Students will be guided in their study and discussion          languages and literary traditions.
of authentic Russian materials relevant to materials in        The Latin Minor
the primary course. Pass/fail grades only. Prerequisite:       Eighteen semester hours of Latin, with at least six hours
COM2 proficiency in Russian or permission of                    at the 300 or 400 level.
instructor. 1 sem. hr.
                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/LATIN AMERICAN AND IBERIAN STUDIES • 135



No Latin 100- or 200-level course may be used to meet the       teachers to meet state licensure requirements. Prerequisite:
Literary Studies field-of-study requirement.                     Latin 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level Latin courses: Latin    LATN 498 Major Seminar
202 or permission of department.                                Required of all majors. Study of research strategy and
COURSES                                                         methodology inherent in Latin studies. Preparation of
LATN 101-102 Elementary Latin                                   research paper. Prerequisite: Permission of department.
Introduction to Latin language and Roman culture.               3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite: Latin 101 is prerequisite to 102. 3-3 sem. hrs.   LATN 499 Independent Study
LATN 201-202 Intermediate Latin                                 Content adapted to requirements and interests of
Continued study of Latin language and Roman culture             participant. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-3
plus selected readings. Prerequisite: Latin 102 or the          sem. hrs.
permission of department. Latin 201 is prerequisite to
202. 3-3 sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2)                             LATIN AMERICAN AND IBERIAN STUDIES
                                                                Department of Latin American and Iberian Studies
LATN 301 Plautus
Study of Roman comedy using Latin texts, videotapes             Claudia Ferman, Chair
and live performance. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or                Associate Professors Feldman, Ferman, Hermida-Ruiz,
permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                    Marrero-Fente
                                                                Assistant Professors Abreu, Kaempfer
LATN 302 Ovid                                                   Visiting Assistant Professors Albin, Middlebrooks, Valencia
Mythic traditions of Greco-Roman culture. Prerequisite:         Director of the Intensive Language Program in Spanish
Latin 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.              Peebles
                                                                Assistant Director of the Intensive Language Program in
LATN 303 Roman Epic
                                                                Spanish Dean
Special emphasis on Vergil’s Aeneid. Prerequisite: Latin
                                                                Director of the Outreach Program Lawrence
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                Director of the Multi-Media Language Laboratory
LATN 304 Roman Historiography                                   Scinicariello
Emphasis on Livy and Tacitus. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or
permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                           Related Majors and Minors
                                                                Spanish
LATN 305 Horace                                                 See International Studies major curriculum for the
The lyric poetry. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or permission of      following LAIS-related concentrations: Latin American
department. 3 sem. hrs.                                         Studies, Modern Europe, and World Politics and
LATN 306 Roman Philosophical Literature                         Diplomacy.
Special emphasis on Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura or               Spanish Major/International Business Option
Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations. Prerequisite: Latin 202         To be carried out in conjunction with a major in the
or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                        Robins School of Business with an International
                                                                Business concentration.
LATN 307 Catullus
Literary analysis of selected readings. Prerequisite: Latin     Study Abroad
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. (FSLT)             Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for
LATN 308 The Novel                                              all students. The department offers summer study
Latin novels of Petronius and Apuleius. Prerequisite:           programs in Argentina and Spain. In addition, there are
Latin 202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.              exchange agreements for study during the academic year
                                                                in Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Spain. For a complete
LATN 309 Cicero                                                 list, contact the Office of International Education.
Theory and history of Roman oratory. Prerequisite: Latin
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                    Outreach Program
                                                                The LAIS Outreach Program at the University of
LATN 398 Selected Topics                                        Richmond builds bridges with the Hispanic community,
Topics or themes in Roman literature. Prerequisite: Latin       giving students the opportunity to enrich their cultural
202 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.                    experience and use their language skills. Participating
                                                                in this program, students may work a minimum of 20
LATN 411 The Teaching of High School Latin
                                                                hours per semester for an additional one hour of credit.
Theory and practice of teaching Latin. Designed to enable
136 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




LAW AND THE LIBERAL ARTS                                   Area 5: Legal System
                                                           CJ 321      Fundamentals of Criminal Procedure
Nancy Schauber, Coordinator (Philosophy)
                                                           PLSC 337 Legal System
Law and the Liberal Arts is an interdisciplinary minor     SOC 310 Criminology
that consists of courses from across the curriculum. The   SOC 324 Law and Society
courses that count toward the minor are those that are
                                                           Area 6: Logical Reasoning
generally recommended by law schools for students
                                                           CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing
thinking about going to law school. The purpose of
                                                           CMSC 155 Introduction to Scientific Computing
the courses within the minor is to prepare one to think
                                                           LDST 250 Critical Thinking
critically and analytically as a well-rounded liberal
                                                           MATH 250 Fundamentals of Abstract Mathematics
artist.
                                                           PHIL 251 Elementary Symbolic Logic
The Law and the Liberal Arts Minor                         Area 7: Public Speaking and Debate
Students must receive a C- (1.7) or above for these        RHCS 101 Rhetoric and Public Address
courses to count toward the minor.                         RHCS 201 Argumentation and Debate
   The courses are divided into eight areas: Law,          RHCS 325 Medieval to Modern Rhetorics
American History, Economics, Ethics, Legal System,         RHCS 332 Practicum/Debate (two hours)
Logical Reasoning, Public Speaking and Debate, and         RHCS 343 Rhetoric and Politics
Writing.                                                   PLSC 290 Mock Trial (two hours)
   In order to complete a Law and the Liberal Arts         Area 8: Writing
minor, a student must take one course in Area 1 and        ENGL 382 Topics in Advanced Composition
one course in five of the remaining areas (see below). No   ENGL 383 Introduction to Composition
more than three of the courses to be applied toward the                Theory and Pedagogy
minor may be from any one department.
Courses:                                                   LIBRARY INFORMATION SKILLS
Area 1: Law                                                Taught by University Librarians
CJ 320      Fundamentals of Criminal Law                   Students must complete two Library and Information
ECON 231 Law and Economics                                 Skills Workshops, Library 100 and 101, during their
PHIL 260 Philosophical Problems in Law                     first year.
            and Society
PLSC 331 Constitutional Law                                COURSES
PLSC 333 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties                  LIB 100 Library/Information Skills I
PLSC 352 International Law                                 Library 100 provides an introduction to university
WGSS 302 Women and the Law                                 library resources, including the libraries’ Web site,
PLSC 379 Selected Topics                                   the library catalog, and full-text periodical databases.
            (appropriate when the subject relates          Students are responsible for enrolling in Library 100 for
            primarily to law and the course is             the Fall of their first year of enrollment. 0 sem. hrs.
            approved by the Law and the Liberal
            Arts advisory council)                         LIB 101 Library/Information Skills II
                                                           Library 101 builds on Library 100 with emphasis on
Area 2: American History                                   searching full-text newspapers, locating periodical
HIST 120 U.S. to 1877                                      archives and citing sources. Students are responsible for
HIST 121 U.S. Since 1877                                   enrolling in Library 101 for the Spring of their first year
PLSC 336 American Constitutional History                   of enrollment. 0 sem. hrs.
Area 3: Economics
ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics                      MATH
ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics                      Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics
                                                           B. Lewis Barnett III Chair
Area 4: Ethics                                             Professors Charlesworth, Davis, J. Hubbard, Ross
LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society                         Associate Professors Barnett, Caudill, Fenster, Greenfield,
PHIL 220 Contemporary Moral Issues                         Hoke, Kerckhove, Nall, Szajda
PHIL 360 Ethics                                            Assistant Professors Lawson, Owen, Shaw, Trapp
RELG 267 Varieties of Christian Ethics                     Director of Computer Science Laboratories A. Hubbard
BUAD 392 Ethical, Social and Legal Responsibilities
                                                     SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MATH • 137



The Math Major                                             MATH 103 An Introduction to Simulation (The
Note: The grade point average of the coursework            Mathematics of Waiting in Line)
comprising the major or the minor must be no less than     Introduction to fundamentals of abstracting practical
2.00 with no Mathematics course grade below C- (1.7).      situations involving waiting lines (e.g., supermarket
Students are strongly advised to consult with faculty in   lines, assembly lines, emergency rooms, computer
planning their major or minor curricula.                   networks) into mathematical models. Abstracted
For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of             models will be simulated using computer software to
Science degree:                                            obtain approximate solutions. Introduction to statistical
     • Mathematics 211 or 231                              analysis of data is also included. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
     • Mathematics 212 or 232                              MATH 104 Symmetry in Tilings and Patterns
     • Mathematics 235                                     Introduction to symmetry and its use in the generation and
     • Mathematics 245                                     classification of geometric patterns. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
     • Mathematics 250
     • Mathematics 306                                     MATH 119 Statistics for Social and Life Sciences
     • Two of the following Mathematics courses: 307,      Introduction to statistical methods with some
       321, 324, 330, 331, and 336                         applications in the social and life sciences. Topics include
     • Six additional semester hours from 300-level        descriptive statistics, graphical methods, estimation,
       mathematics courses                                 hypothesis testing, regression, correlation and the
    Note: Students are strongly advised to complete        analysis of categorical data. The proper use of statistical
either Math 306 or 320 prior to the senior year.           computing software like SPSS will be emphasized.
                                                           NOTE: Credit cannot be received for both Mathematics
And for the Bachelor of Arts degree:
                                                           119 and either Psychology 200 or Business Administration
   • Computer Science 150 or 155
                                                           301. 3 sem. hrs.
And for the Bachelor of Science degree:
   • Computer Science 150 or 155                           MATH 195 Special Topics
   • Four other courses in Computer Science with           Special topics satisfying neither major nor minor
      at least two at the 300 level, or two three-hour     requirements. 1-3 sem. hrs.
      (or more) courses beyond the introductory level      MATH 211 Calculus I
      in one of the following fields: Physics (200 level    Limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals. Derivatives
      or above), Chemistry (200 level or above), or        of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and
      Biology (beyond 201-205)                             inverse trigonometric functions; applications to curve
The Math Minor                                             sketching; applications to the physical, life and social
Note: The grade point average of the coursework            sciences; Mean Value Theorem and its applications;
comprising the major or the minor must be no less than     Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: High
2.00 with no Mathematics course grade below C- (1.7).      school precalculus. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
Students are strongly advised to consult with faculty in   MATH 212 Calculus II
planning their major or minor curricula.                   Techniques of integration; applications of integration;
   Requirements:                                           improper integrals; Taylor’s Theorem and applications;
    • Mathematics 211 or 231                               infinite series; differential equations. Credit will not be
    • Mathematics 212 or 232                               given for both Mathematics 212 and 231. Prerequisite:
    • Mathematics 235                                      Mathematics 211 or one year of high school AP calculus.
    • Mathematics 245                                      3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
    • Two courses at the 300-level
                                                           MATH 219 Introduction to the Design of Experiments
Interdisciplinary major in Mathematics and
                                                           The basic theory and principles related to the design
Economics: See Mathematical-Economics.
                                                           of modern scientific experiments. Topics include:
COURSES                                                    analysis of variance (ANOVA) for experiments with a
MATH 102 Problem Solving Using Finite                      single factor, multiple comparisons of treatment means,
Mathematics                                                factorial experiments, blocking, randomized block
Topics to demonstrate power of mathematical reasoning.     designs, Latin square designs, random effects models,
Course has two components: (1) introduction to sets        analysis of covariance, nested models, and other topics.
and symbolic logic (the fundamentals of proving results)   Prerequisite: Either Mathematics 119, Psychology
and (2) the application of these fundamentals to one       200, Chemistry 300, Business Administration 301, or
particular area of mathematics. The area is dependent      Mathematics 330. 3 sem. hrs.
on the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
138 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



MATH 231 Scientific Calculus I                                   MATH 315 Modern Geometry
Topics of calculus—limits, derivatives, integration,            Geometry of surfaces in 3-dimensional space, including
differential equations-with applications in the natural         lengths, areas, angles, curvature and topology.
sciences. Includes trigonometric, exponential and               Classification of Euclidean isometries. Classification of
logarithmic functions; techniques of integration,               compact surfaces having constant Gaussian curvature.
probalistic thinking, error and unit analysis. Credit           Prerequisites: Mathematics 235 and 245. 3 sem. hrs.
will not be given for both Mathematics 212 and 231.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)               MATH 320-321 Real Analysis I and II
                                                                Topological properties of the real line and Euclidean
MATH 232 Scientific Calculus II                                  space. Convergence, continuity, differentiation,
Continuation of Mathematics 231. Taylor series and              integration properties of real-valued functions of real
geometric series; topics in Mathematics 231 extended to         variables. Prerequisites: Mathematics 235 and 250.
functions of two or more variables; topics in linear algebra.   Mathematics 320 is prerequisite to 321. 3-3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 231. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR)
                                                                MATH 323 Discrete Mathematical Models
MATH 235 Multivariate Calculus                                  Applications of discrete mathematics from two
N-dimensional Euclidean space, functions of several             viewpoints: how mathematical models are used to solve
variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line        problems from other fields and how problems from other
and surface integrals, classical integral theorems,             fields stimulate the development of new mathematics.
applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212 or 232. 3           Probabilistic models are emphasized. Examples of
sem. hrs. (FSSR)                                                problems include analysis of board games, elections and
                                                                DNA. Prerequisite: Mathematics 245. 3 sem. hrs.
MATH 245 Linear Algebra
Vector spaces, matrices, systems of linear equations,           MATH 324 Continuous Mathematical Models
linear transformations, Eigenvalues, applications.              Continuous models in modern applications. Primary
Prerequisite: Mathematics 212 or 232 or Computer                focus on practical understanding of the modeling
Science 222. 3 sem. hrs.                                        process, with goals of developing individual modeling
                                                                skills, and ability to critically read modeling reports
MATH 250 Fundamentals of Abstract Mathematics                   in scholarly journals. Mathematical topics include
Logic, quantifiers, negations of statements with                 ordinary differential and partial differential equations.
quantifiers, set theory, induction, counting principles,         Prerequisite: Mathematics 312. 3 sem. hrs.
relations and functions, cardinality. Emphasis on
methods of proof and proper mathematical expression.            MATH 328 Numerical Analysis
Prerequisite: Mathematics 212 or 232. 3 sem. hrs.               Analysis and implementation of algorithms used in applied
                                                                mathematics, including root finding, interpolation,
MATH 306-307 Abstract Algebra I and II                          approximation of functions, integration, solutions to
Systematic study of the theory of groups, rings and fields.      systems of linear equations. (Same as Computer Science
Prerequisites: Mathematics 245 and 250. Mathematics             328.) Prerequisites: Mathematics 212 or 232, 245, and
306 is prerequisite to 307. 3-3 sem. hrs.                       Computer Science 150 or 155. 3 sem. hrs.
MATH 310 Advanced Multivariable Calculus                        MATH 329 Probability
Differentiation of vector-valued functions, Jacobians,          Introduction to the theory, methods and applications of
integration theorems in several variables. Fourier series,      randomness and random processes. Probability concepts,
partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics       independence, random variables, expectation, discrete
235. 3 sem. hrs.                                                and continuous probability distributions, moment-
MATH 312 Differential Equations                                 generating functions, simulation, joint and conditional
Introduction to ordinary differential equations and their       probability distributions, sampling theory, laws of large
use as models of physical systems. Linear and nonlinear         numbers, limit theorems. Prerequisites: Mathematics
equations and systems of equations, including existence         235. Corequisite: Mathematics 245. 3 sem. hrs.
and uniqueness theorems, analytical solution techniques,        MATH 330 Mathematical Statistics
numerical methods, and qualitative analysis. Includes           Introduction to basic principles and procedures for
studies of global behavior and local stability analysis of      statistical estimation and model fitting. Parameter
solutions of nonlinear autonomous systems; bifurcation          estimation, likelihood methods, unbiasedness,
analysis; Laplace transforms. Application and modeling          sufficiency, confidence regions, Bayesian inference,
of real phenomena included throughout. Prerequisite:            significance testing, likelihood ratio tests, linear models,
Mathematics 212 or 232. Corequisite: Mathematics                methods for categorical data, resampling methods.
245. 3 sem. hrs.                                                Prerequisite: Mathematics 329. 3 sem. hrs.
                             SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS • 139



MATH 331 Complex Analysis                                   economics. The MATH-ECON major is designed to
Introduction to the calculus of functions of a single       develop those skills. Additionally, the combined major
complex variable, including series, calculus of residues,   provides a stronger, more coordinated curriculum for
and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: Mathematics 310        students who would otherwise major in economics or
or Physics 301. 3 sem. hrs.                                 business and minor in mathematics.
MATH 336 Operations Research                                The Mathematical Economics Major for the
Linear and Integer Programming: algorithms,                 Bachelor of Science Degree
complexity, sensitivity and duality. Applications such      Note: A grade point average of C (2.00) is required in
as assignments, networks, scheduling. Prerequisite:         the major, with no course grade below a C- (1.70) in
Mathematics 323. 3 sem. hrs.                                courses counting towards the major.
MATH 340 Directed Independent Study                         I. Required
For well-qualified students who wish to work                     MATH 211 Calculus I, 3
independently in areas not included in curriculum.              MATH 212 Calculus II, 3
Proposal must be approved by departmental committee.           Note: Math 231-232 can be substituted for Math
Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chair and             211-212.
instructor. 1-4 sem. hrs.                                       MATH 235 Multivariate Calculus, 3
                                                                MATH 245 Linear Algebra, 3
MATH 350 Coding Theory                                          MATH 329 Probability, 3
Error-correcting codes are used to ensure reliable              MATH 330 Mathematical Statistics, 3
electronic communication in everything from compact             CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing, 4, or
disc players to deep space transmission. Topics include         CMSC 155 Introduction to Scientific Computing, 4
linear codes, design theory, cyclic codes, counting             ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics, 3
arguments for nonexistence, decoding algorithms.                ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics, 3
Prerequisite: Mathematics 245 or permission of                  ECON 271 Microeconomic Theory, 3
instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                                         ECON 272 Macroeconomic Theory, 3
MATH 355 Cryptography                                           ECON 340 Econometrics, 4
History and development of “secret codes” with                  ECON 341 Mathematical Economics, 3
applications to electronic commerce, diplomatic                 MTEC 400 Capstone in Mathematical Economics, 3
and military communication and computer security.           II. One elective from
Emphasis on mathematical structures underlying                  MATH 310 Advanced Multivariate Calculus, 3
classical, arithmetic, algebraic, mechanical, electronic        MATH 312 Differential Equations, 3
and public-key cryptosystems. Prerequisites: Mathematics        MATH 320 Real Analysis I, 3
245 and either Mathematics 250 or Computer Science              MATH 323 Discrete Mathematical Models, 3
222 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                    MATH 328 Numerical Analysis, 3
MATH 395 Special Topics                                     III. One elective from
Selected topics in mathematics. Prerequisite: Varies with       ECON 300 Industrial Organization and
topic. 1-3 sem. hrs.                                                        Public Policy, 3
                                                                ECON 310 International Trade and Finance, 3
MATH 420 Senior Research                                        ECON 330 Environmental and Resource
1-3 sem. hrs.                                                               Economic Theory, 3
                                                                ECON 331 Labor Economics, 3
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS                                          ECON 332 Public Economics, 3
Jason Owen, Mathematics Program Coordinator                     ECON 360 Selected Economic Topics, 1-3
Andrew Yates, Economics Program Coordinator
                                                            COURSES
The mathematical economics (MATH-ECON)
major includes courses taught by faculty in both the        MTEC 400 Capstone in Mathematical Economics
Mathematics and Economics departments. Faculty              Seminar that focuses on an area of advanced mathematics
members, graduate students and recent Ph.D.s ranked         with broad economic applications. Students will
analytical skills and mathematics as the most important     independently explore the area through readings from
skills necessary for success in the graduate study of       both the mathematical and economic literatures.
                                                            Prerequisites: Economics 271, Mathematics 330 and
                                                            senior standing. 3 sem. hrs.
140 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND




MILITARY SCIENCE AND LEADERSHIP                                team dynamics and two historical leadership theories
                                                               that form the basis of the Army leadership framework.
Richard D. Gillem, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army,
                                                               Aspects of personal motivation and team building
Chair
                                                               are practiced planning, executing and assessing team
Professor Gillem
                                                               exercises and participating in leadership labs. The focus
Associate Professors Jankowski, Jeffress
                                                               continues to build on developing knowledge of the
Assistant Professors Bryant, Phillips, Underwood
                                                               leadership values and attributes through understanding
The objective of the military science and leadership           Army rank, structure and duties as well as broadening
program is to provide the leadership and management            knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Case
foundation required for military service as a                  studies will provide a tangible context for learning the
commissioned officer or in a civilian counterpart               Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the
position. In support of this objective the program             contemporary operating environment. Prerequisites:
includes classroom instruction and activities geared to        Military Science and Leadership 101 and 102 or
the development of leadership skills.                          permission of department chair. 2 sem. hrs.
    Military Science and Leadership classes may be taken
by all University students. Class enrollment in the Military   MSCL 202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership
Leadership classes carries no U.S. Army commitment             Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the
and there is no obligation to enroll for successive course     complex contemporary operating environment (COE).
offerings. College and/or commissioning credit may             Highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling and
be awarded for prior military service, attendance at           operations orders. Continued study of the theoretical basis
the ROTC Leader’s Training Course, or Junior ROTC              of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics
participation. International students desiring to attend       of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations.
Military Science and Leadership classes must have              Provides a smooth transition to MSCL 301. Cadets develop
written approval from their respective embassies prior         greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership
to taking classes.                                             styles and practice communication and team-building
                                                               skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance
COURSES                                                        and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world
MSCL 101 Foundations of Officership                             scenarios. Prerequisite: Military Science and Leadership 201
Introduces students to fundamental components of               or permission of department chair. 2 sem. hrs.
service as an officer in the United States Army. These
initial lessons form building blocks of progressive            MSCL 204 Leader’s Training Course
lessons in values, fitness, leadership and officership.          Five-week summer course consisting of leadership
Additionally, the program of instruction addresses             training at Fort Knox, Ky. Completion of this course
“life skills” including fitness, communications theory          equates to completion of Military Science and Leadership
and practice (written and oral), and interpersonal             101-202 and enables students to enroll in the advanced
relationships. Prerequisite: First-year or second-year class   military leadership courses. Amount of academic credit
standing, or permission of department chair. 1 sem. hr.        awarded depends upon amount of basic military science
                                                               credit previously earned. Travel pay and salary provided
MSCL 102 Introduction to Leadership                            through Department of Military Science and Leadership.
Introduction to “life skills” of problem solving, decision     Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the ROTC
making and leadership designed to help students in the         program, military service obligation and permission of
near term as leaders on campus. Also will help students        department chair. 0-6 sem. hrs.
be more effective leaders and managers in the long term,
whether they serve in the military or as leaders in civilian   MSCL 205 Military History
life. This course is designed to introduce the student to      Analyzes the U.S. Army from Colonial times to the present.
fundamental officer skills such as map reading, land            Emphasizes the Revolutionary War, Civil War, and 20th
navigation, tactics and leadership values/actions. Using       century wars. Focuses on the Army’s leadership, doctrine,
these basic skills, students will build a rudimentary          organization and technology while simultaneously
understanding of the core competencies necessary to            investigating the intellectual and ethical aspects of the
become an Army officer and leader. Prerequisite: First-         Army in American and world society. 3 sem. hrs.
year or second-year class standing, or permission of           MSCL 301 Adaptive Team Leadership
department chair. 1 sem. hr.                                   Study, practice and evaluation of adaptive team
MSCL 201 Innovative Team Leadership                            leadership skills as presented with the demands of the
Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative             ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course
tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining         (LDAC). Challenging scenarios related to small-unit
                                                               tactical operations are used to develop self awareness and
                  SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MODERN LITERATURES AND CULTURES • 141



critical thinking skills. Provides systematic and specific    MODERN LITERATURES AND CULTURES
feedback on leadership abilities. Prerequisite: Military     Department of Modern Literatures and Cultures
Science and Leadership 202, 204, or permission of
department chair. 3 sem. hrs.                                Kathrin Bower, Chair
                                                             Professors Bonfiglio, Ravaux-Kirkpatrick, Terry
MSCL 302 Leadership in Changing Environments                 Associate Professors Bower, Howell, Kapanga, Troncale
Instruction and case studies that build upon leadership      Assistant Professors Pappas, Radi
competencies and military skills attained in Military        Director of the Arabic Language Program Sulzer-Reichel
Science and Leadership 301 in preparation for future         Director of the Chinese Language Program Tan
responsibilities as army officers. Specific instruction is     Director of the Intensive Language Program in French
given in individual leader development, planning and         Baker
execution of small-unit operations, individual and           Director of German Language Program Bonfiglio
team development, and the army as a career choice.           Director of the Italian Language Program Marcin
Prerequisite: Military Science and Leadership 301 or         Director of the Japanese Language Program Suzuki
permission of department chair. 3 sem. hrs.                  Director of the Multi-Media Language Laboratory
MSCL 390 Independent Study                                   Scinicariello
In-depth exploration of a subject not included in            Introductory courses in literature, numbered 321-332,
other courses offered by the department to be done           fulfill the Literary Studies field-of-study requirement in
independently but under the supervision of a faculty         the general education curriculum.
member. Prerequisites: Two semesters of military science
and permission of department chair. 1-4 sem. hrs.            Modern Literatures and Cultures Majors
                                                             French Major
MSCL 401 Developing Adaptive Leaders
Develops student proficiency in planning, executing           French Major/International Business Option
and assessing complex operations, functioning as             (To be carried out in conjunction with a major in
a member of a staff, and providing performance               the Robins School of Business with an International
feedback to subordinates. Students are given situational     Business concentration.)
opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions and     German Studies Major
lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice
                                                             German Studies Major/International Business
and personnel processes prepare students to make the
                                                             Option
transition to becoming an Army officer. During the
                                                             (To be carried out in conjunction with a major in
MSCL IV year, students will lead cadets at lower levels.
                                                             the Robins School of Business with an International
Both classroom and battalion leadership experiences
                                                             Business concentration.)
are designed to prepare students for the first unit of
assignment. Students will identify responsibilities of key   Russian Studies Major
staff, coordinate staff roles and use battalion operations   (Note the Spanish Major is available through the
situations to teach, train and develop subordinates.         Department of Latin American and Iberian Studies)
Prerequisite: Military Science and Leadership 302 or
permission of department chair. 3 sem. hrs.                  Residency Requirement
                                                             For all majors, at least five of the nine courses must be
MSCL 402 Leadership in a Complex World                       taken on the University of Richmond campus in the
Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations   language of the major. If the student participates in a
of current military operations in the contemporary           study abroad program, at least one of these courses must
operating environment (COE). Students will examine           be taken upon return from the program.
differences in customs and courtesies, military law,
principles of war and rules of engagement in the face        Combined Majors
of international terrorism. Exploration of aspects of        Combined major in French and English Literature
interacting with nongovernment organizations, civilians      Combined major in German and English Literature
on the battlefield and host nation support. Places            Combined major in Russian and English Literature
significant emphasis on preparation for BOLC II and III       See International Studies curriculum for the following
and first unit of assignment. Uses case studies, scenarios,   MLC-related majors: African Studies, Asian Studies, Latin
and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare to          American Studies, Modern Europe and World Politics and
face the complex ethical and practical demands of            Diplomacy.
leading as a commissioned officer in the United States
Army. Prerequisite: Military Science and Leadership 302
or permission of department chair. 3 sem. hrs.
142 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Senior Portfolio Project (for the majors in French              has been earned in coursework more advanced in the
and Russian Studies)                                            sequence.
The Portfolio Project provides an opportunity for                  Medium of Instruction: All courses taught in the
synthesis and self-reflection and represents the range of        department are taught in the respective language with
interests and goals among students in the department’s          the exception of the courses listed in the Modern
major programs. Students will structure their portfolios        Literatures and Cultures category and designated
in accordance with the recommendations of the National          courses in Russian.
Standards for Language Learning (Communication,                 Modern Literatures and Cultures (MLC)
Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, Communities).               All courses under Modern Literatures and Cultures are
Upon declaring their major, students will receive a             taught in English; they have no prerequisite, except as
packet explaining the portfolio project and encouraging         noted. MLC courses numbered 350 and above may
them to begin planning it well in advance with their            be counted as elective credit toward a French, German
major advisor. Students will submit the portfolio during        Studies, Russian Studies or Spanish major if taken in
the spring of the senior year.                                  conjunction with a Languages-Across-the-Curriculum
                                                                (LAC) component (1 sem. hr.).
Senior Research Project in German Studies
Please consult the German Studies major.                        COURSES
                                                                MLC 256 Psychoanalysis, Literature and Culture
Study Abroad
                                                                General introduction to use of psychoanalytic techniques
Study and travel abroad are strongly encouraged for all
                                                                to analyze literature and culture. Readings from Freud
students. The department offers summer study programs
                                                                and post-Freudian theorists used to interpret variety of
in China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia.
                                                                literary texts, as well as films, ads and other examples
In addition, there are exchange agreements for study
                                                                from popular culture. Offered in English with optional
during the academic year in France, Germany, Italy,
                                                                LAC component. 3 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Japan, Quebec and Russia; others are being negotiated.
For a complete list, contact the Office of International         MLC 313 French Literature in Translation
Education.                                                      Introduction to French literature through analysis of major
                                                                and representative texts. Not available as elective credit
The Modern Literatures and Cultures Minors                      toward the French major or minor. 4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Chinese Minor
French Minor                                                    MLC 321-322 Russian Literature in Translation
German Studies Minor                                            (See Russian 321-322.) 4-4 sem. hrs. (FSLT)
Italian Studies Minor
Japanese Minor                                                  MLC 331 Russian Cinema
Russian Studies Minor                                           General introduction to Russian cinema focusing
                                                                on the significant portion of Russian cinema within
For full course listings in Chinese, French, German, Italian,   the context of European and world cinemas. Will
Japanese and Russian, see the individual program pages.         emphasize historical and theoretical contributions of
Courses in Arabic                                               Russian cinema and will trace development of cinema
                                                                in Russia from Protazanov and Eisentein to Tarkovsky,
Administration                                                  Todorovsky, Mikhalkov and Sokurov. Different variants
Placement: A student who desires to continue study of           of course that would appear in alternate years will have
a language begun elsewhere or spoken as a first language         variety of topical foci such as Russian and European
will be placed for continuation by the Department of            cinema, World War II, ideology and art in film, Soviet
Modern Literatures and Cultures. The determination              social realism, literature and cinema, Shakespeare in
of level may be by the score received on the AP, IB or          Russian cinema, the auteur in Russian cinema, Russian
SATII Test in a given language, by the evaluation of a          female directors, the female image in Russian cinema,
required placement test or, in special cases, by interview.     Stalin and Lenin in film, etc. (Same as Russian 331.)
Students who meet the language communication skills             4 sem. hrs.
requirement by placement may not take for credit 100-
or 200-level courses in the same language.                      MLC 332 Russian Painting
    Sequential Credit: Once the 100 or 200 level is             Survey and analytical study of significant periods of
begun, continuation, if any, must be to the next higher         Russian painting, focusing on interconnections between
level within the sequence of courses. Students cannot           philosophy, literature, spirituality and ideology in
receive credit toward the degree for 100- or 200-level          Russian painting during various historical periods and
sequential coursework which is taken after credit               developments in Russian culture and intellectual history.
                                                                (Same as Russian 332.) 4 sem. hrs. (FSHT)
                                                       SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MUSIC • 143



MLC 350 Introductory Linguistics                              MLC 498-499 Senior Portfolio Project I-II
General, historical and/or descriptive linguistics.           Production of a portfolio under the supervision of
Prerequisite: Completion of Communication Skills II-          a faculty mentor. Required of all French and Russian
Language requirement. 3 sem. hrs.                             Studies majors in the fall and spring of the senior year.
                                                              Noncredit; graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite:
MLC 351 Contemporary Literary Theory                          Senior status; declared French or Russian Studies major.
Recent developments in critical theory, including post-       0-0 sem. hrs.
structuralist, feminist and psychoanalytic perspectives.
3 sem. hrs.                                                   MUSIC
MLC 360 Representing the Holocaust                            Department of Music
Critical analyses of visual and textual representations
                                                              Gene Anderson, Chair
of the Holocaust in an international context. The
                                                              Professors Anderson, Davison
course raises questions about the limits and meaning of
                                                              Associate Professors Becker, Broening, Cable, Riehl
Holocaust representations as well as their ideological and
                                                              Assistant Professor Longobardi
moral implications. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 3
                                                              Artist-in-Residence eighth blackbird
sem. hrs.
                                                              Director of Accompaniment Kong
MLC 365 German Film in Context                                Director of the Modlin Center for the Arts Panoff
Survey of German cinema from the 1920s to the present         Music Librarian Fairtile
emphasizing the historical and cultural content in            Piano Technician Breakall
which the films were produced. Prerequisite: Sophomore         Over 30 adjunct music faculty members teach applied
standing. 3 sem. hrs.                                         music lessons. Adjuncts are professional musicians
                                                              including principals of the Richmond Symphony.
MLC 388 Individual Internship
Students lead practice sections of elementary and             The Department of Music offers a major in Music with
intermediate language courses in French, German,              concentrations in Critical Studies, Performance and
Italian and Spanish. Internship credit does not count         Theory/Composition.
toward a major or minor in the department. Prerequisite:      Information for Prospective Majors: All prospective music
Audition/permission of department. 1-2 sem. hrs.              majors must take a theory placement test at the beginning
                                                              of their first semester of study. Those in the Performance
MLC 397 Selected Topics                                       Concentration must audition on voice or their primary
Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion.   instrument before beginning private lessons and pass a
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-4 sem. hrs.         Continuation Exam in the form of an expanded jury after
MLC 410 The Teaching of a Modern Second                       four semesters of applied study.
Language                                                      The Music Major
Theory and practice of teaching modern second                 Note: A grade of C- (1.7) or better is required in all
language, including English as second language, at            coursework comprising the Music Major.
the K-12 levels. Designed to enable teachers to meet             Requirements: Forty-five semester hours of music
state licensure requirements. Prerequisites: For MLC:         courses, including completion of the core requirements
Completion of Modern Literatures and Cultures minor           AND those of the student’s selected concentration:
or the equivalent, or permission of department. For
Education Minors seeking licensure in Spanish that            Core Requirements for all concentrations:
requires MLC 410: the completion of a Spanish minor,             • Piano proficiency (by examination) or successful
the equivalent, or permission of the Latin American and            completion of MUS 155* or MUS 161*
Iberian Studies Department. 4 sem. hrs.                          • Music theory proficiency (by examination) or
                                                                   successful completion of MUS 108*
MLC 495 Independent Study                                        • Aural skills proficiency (by examination) or
Special projects individually pursued under supervision            successful completion of MUS 109*
of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of                   • MUS 095 Repertoire Class, 0 (satisfied by
department. 1-4 sem. hrs.                                          successfully completing MUS 095 each semester
                                                                   a student is a major)
MLC 497 Selected Topics
                                                                 • MUS 301 Music Research Methods, 1 hour
Experimental and special interest topics offered at
                                                                 • MUS 401-402 Final Project/Thesis/Recital, 1-1
department’s discretion. Recent topics: Cultures in
                                                                   hour
Translation; Constructions of Identity. 1-4 sem. hrs.
                                                              (*credits do not count toward major )
144 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



Music Theory                                                The Music Minor
   • MUS 110 Tonal Harmony I: Common Practice               Note: A grade of C- (1.7) or better is required in all
     Period, 4 hours                                        coursework comprising of the Music minor.
   • MUS 211 Tonal Harmony II: Chromaticism,                   Requirements: Twenty-one hours of music courses
     4 hours                                                including:
   • MUS 212 Analytical Approaches to Contemp-
                                                            Seven hours in Music Theory:
     orary Music, 4 hours
                                                                • MUS 110 Tonal Harmony I: Common Practice
Critical Studies                                                  Period, 4 hours
    • MUS 227 Critical Studies in Music History I,              • Additional course in Theory/Technology, 3-4
      4 hours                                                     hours
    • MUS 228 Critical Studies in Music History II,
                                                            Seven hours in Critical Studies:
      4 hours
                                                                • MUS 227-228 Critical Studies in Music I & II;
    • MUS 229 Critical Studies in Ethnomusicology,
                                                                  OR another 200-level course or above in Critical
      4 hours
                                                                  Studies in place of 227 or 228, 3-4 hours
Performance                                                     • Two semesters of applied study, 2 hours
    • Applied Music Study (2 semesters)                         • Two semesters of Category B ensemble
    • Category A ensembles (2 semesters)                          participation, 2 hours
    • Category B ensembles (2 semesters)                        • Three hours of electives at the 200 level or above,
In addition to the core requirements above,                       excluding ensembles, applied courses, MUS 155
following are specific requirements for each                       or MUS 388
concentration:
                                                            Related Concentrations
Critical Studies Concentration                              Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Technology for
Core requirements plus 12 semester hours of electives       Studio Art, Music and Theatre Majors
from the Critical Studies category above the 200 level
                                                            Interdisciplinary Concentration in Arts Management
selected in consultation with and approved by the
                                                            for Studio Art, Art History, Music, Theatre and Dance
Critical Studies faculty, six semester hours of which may
                                                            Majors or Minors
be taken in 300-level courses outside the department
with faculty permission.                                    CURRICULUM
Music Theory/Composition Concentration                      MUS 095      Repertoire Class, 0
Core requirements plus                                      Applied Music Courses (MSAP) 0, 1 credit per
    • MUS 306 Introduction to Composition, 2                semester
      hours
    • MUS 307 Composition Lessons, 1 hour                   Music Ensembles (MSEN), 1 credit per semester
  AND three courses selected from the following:            Category A
    • MUS 213 Computer Music, 3 hours                       MSEN 195     Jazz Combo
    • MUS 308 Tonal Counterpoint, 3 hours                   MSEN 197     Woodwind Ensemble
    • MUS 309 Orchestration, 3 hours                        MSEN 198     Brass Ensemble
    • MUS 311 Form and Analysis, 3 hours                    MSEN 199     Percussion Ensemble
    • MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music, 3 hours              MSEN 200     String Ensemble
    • MUS 413 Special Topics in Computer Music, 3           MSEN 201     Chamber Music
      hours                                                 MSEN 202     Guitar Ensemble
Performance Concentration (Classical and Jazz               Category B
Studies)                                                    MSEN 191     University Orchestra
Core requirements plus                                      MSEN 192     Jazz Ensemble
    • Four semesters of applied study (beyond the Core      MSEN 193     University Wind Ensemble
      requirement)                                          MSEN 194     University Choir
    • Two semesters of Category B ensembles (beyond         MSEN 196     Schola Cantorum
      the Core requirement)
    • Six semester hours of electives at or above the 200   Note: Completion of three semester hours in MSEN 191,
      level selected consultation with and approved         192, 193, 194, 196, or 201 taken in Fall 2003 or later
      by the Performance faculty; at least one course       fulfills the FSVP requirement. (All three hours must be in
      of which will be from the Performance or Jazz         the same ensemble)
      Studies categories.
                                                    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MUSIC • 145



Music In Popular Culture Courses                         Music Technology Courses
MUS 112 Topics in Music Literature, 3 hours              MUS 213 Computer Music, 3 hours
MUS 115 The Jazz Tradition, 3 hours                      MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music, 3 hours
MUS 117 Salsa Meets Jazz, 3 hours                        MUS 413 Special Topics in Computer Music,
MUS 118 The Life and Music of Duke Ellington,                       3 hours
           3 hours                                       Arts Management Courses
MUS 119 Broadway Musical Theatre, 3 hours                MUS 310 Managing Performing Arts
MUS 120 The Music and Poetry of Jazz, 3 hours                      Organizations, 3 hours
MUS 121 Music In Film, 3 hours                           MUS 345 Philanthropy in the Arts, 3 hours
MUS 122 America’s Music, 3 hours
MUS 123 Meaning and Music, 3 hours                       Music Education Courses
MUS 126 Side by Side with Sondheim, 3 hours              MUS 305 Introduction to Music Education,
MUS 209 Music and Society, 3 hours                                 3 hours
MUS 233 Creating Original Opera, 3 hours                 MUS 338 Special Topics, 3 hours
Critical Studies Courses                                 Project and Independent Study Courses
MUS 112 Topics in Music Literature, 3 hours              MUS 301 Music Research Methods, 1 hour
MUS 116 The Music Scene, 3 hours                         MUS 388 Individual Internship, 1 hour
MUS 203 Global Hip Hop, 3 hours                          MUS 395 Independent Study, 1-3 hours
MUS 204 Choral Music and Creed, 3 hours                  MUS 401 Final Project/Thesis/Recital, 1 hour
MUS 227 Critical Studies in Music History I,             Performance Study Courses
            4 hours                                      MUS 130 Class Guitar, 1 hour
MUS 228 Critical Studies in Music History II,            MUS 131 Class Piano, 1 hour
            4 hours                                      MUS 205 English and Italian Diction for Singers
MUS 229 Critical Studies in Ethnomusicology,                       and Accompanists, 2 hours
            4 hours                                      MUS 206 German and French Diction for Singers
MUS 230 Music and Culture: Introduction to                         and Accompanists, 2 hours
            World Music, 3 hours                         MUS 207 Musical Theatre and Opera Scene
MUS 330 An Era of Spectacle: Music and Art                         Workshop, 2 hours
            in the Baroque Period, 3 hours               MUS 231 Conducting Fundamentals, 3 hours
MUS 338 Special Topics in Music History, 3 hours         MUS 232 Conducting Techniques, 3 hours
MUS 339 Passion and Pleasure: Study of Secular           MUS 350 Student Recital, 1 hour
            Voice Music, 1600 to Present, 3 hours
                                                         Jazz Studies Courses
MUS 342 Musical Ethnography, 4 hours
                                                         MUS 214 Jazz Arranging, 3 hours
MUS 343 The Mass from Plainchant to Pärt,
                                                         MUS 215 Jazz Theory and Harmony, 3 hours
            3 hours
                                                         MUS 216 Jazz Performance and Analysis, 3 hours
MUS 344 Opera Studies, 4 hours
Music Theory Courses                                     COURSES
MUS 107 Music Fundamentals, 3 hours                      MUS 095 Repertoire Class
MUS 108 Elementary Music Theory, 3 hours                 Attendance and performance at weekly repertoire class.
MUS 109 Elementary Musicianship, 2 hours                 May be repeated. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.
MUS 110 Tonal Harmony I: Common Practice                 Prerequisite: Music major. 0 sem. hrs.
          Period, 4 hours                                MUS 107 Music Fundamentals
MUS 155 Keyboard Skills, 1 hour                          For students with little or no previous training in theory
MUS 211 Tonal Harmony II: Chromaticism,                  or piano. Practical understanding of intervals, scales,
          4 hours                                        keys, chord structures and rhythm, using keyboard and
MUS 212 Analytic Approaches to                           sight-singing as vehicles of instruction. Does not count
          Contemporary Music, 4 hours                    toward music major degree. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
MUS 306 Introduction to Composition, 2 hours
MUS 307 Composition, 1 hour                              MUS 108 Elementary Music Theory
MUS 308 Tonal Counterpoint, 3 hours                      Basic music writing skills for majors and minors.
MUS 309 Orchestration, 3 hours                           Introduction to computerized notation (Finale), music
MUS 311 Form and Analysis, 3 hours                       literature and principles of voice-leading by means
MUS 338 Special Topics, 3 hours                          of species counterpoint. May be satisfied by local
                                                         examination. 3 sem. hrs.
146 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



MUS 109 Elementary Musicianship                                musical meaning, music and association, and music as a
Proficiency-based study of sight-singing, ear-training,         cultural code. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
rhythm-reading and other essential musicianship skills
for music majors and minors. May be satisfied by local          MUS 122 America’s Music
examination. 2 sem. hrs.                                       Topically-based survey of America’s music from that
                                                               of Native Americans and European colonists to the
MUS 110 Tonal Harmony I: Common Practice Period                diversity of the contemporary music scene. 3 sem. hrs.
Entry-level music theory course. Study and application         (FSVP)
of harmonic practice in Western music of 17th and 18th
centuries by means of original compositions and analysis       MUS 123 Meaning and Music
of selected literature. Continuation of musicianship           For general student. Explores aspects of meaning as it
exercises from Music 109. Prerequisites: Music 108-109         pertains to the musical arts. Considers such issues of
or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                       emotion and music, expectations of the listener, music
                                                               and representation, and composer/performer intentions.
MUS 112 Topics in Music Literature                             3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
Special topics for general study. May be repeated for
credit when topics vary. 3 sem. hrs.                           MUS 126 Side by Side with Sondheim
                                                               For general student. Focuses on Broadway musicals
MUS 115 The Jazz Tradition                                     of Stephen Sondheim. Provides basic background in
For general student. Survey of cultural history of jazz; of    music theory and listening skills and culminates with
jazz styles from 1917 to present; and of evolution of jazz     performances of scenes from Sondheim’s works by class
from African music, music of slavery, ragtime and blues.       members. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
Includes concert attendance and performance project. 3
sem. hrs. (FSVP)                                               MUS 130 Class Guitar
                                                               Introduction to guitar through folk music. 1 sem. hr.
MUS 116 Music Scenes
Sections are designed each semester around on- and off-        MUS 131 Class Piano
campus concerts. Students consider historical, social and      For beginning piano student. Introduction to elements
cultural issues particular to each concert and interact with   of music via the keyboard. 1 sem. hr.
visiting artists and University of Richmond’s ensemble         MUS 155 Keyboard Skills
in residence, eighth blackbird. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)             Development of keyboard proficiency, including reading,
MUS 117 Salsa Meets Jazz                                       interpretive skills, harmonization and technique. May
For general student. Traces influx of Latin-American            be repeated until proficiency is reached. Class twice
music into North American jazz. Connects music and             weekly. 1 sem. hr.
dances of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Argentina and Brazil to           MUS 203 Global Hip Hop
their subsequent synthesis in jazz. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)         Uses the music of hip hop as a foundation upon which
MUS 118 The Life and Music of Duke Ellington                   we will ask the theoretical and historical questions
For general student. Musician and bandleader Edward            regarding the political, social and sonic dimensions of
Kennedy Ellington was one of the most prolific                  global popular culture. 3 sem. hrs.
American composers of the 20th century. Examines his           MUS 204 Choral Music and Creed
life and considers aspects of his unique contribution to       Major religious and cultural trends in the history of the
jazz history. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                               West approached through selected choral masterworks
MUS 119 Broadway Musical Theatre                               by considering the sources and cultural functions of the
(See Theatre Arts 119.) 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                     texts, the philosophical outlook of the composer, and
                                                               the ways the available musical resources of the period
MUS 120 The Music and Poetry of Jazz                           were used. (Same as Religion 204.) 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
For general student. Exploration of form, rhythm, and
sound of jazz and its impact upon poets who respond            MUS 205 English and Italian Diction for Singers
to jazz in all its musical and cultural overtones. Music       and Accompanists
includes range of jazz: from early blues to free jazz and      Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
experimental music. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)                         with application to the English and Italian languages.
                                                               Preparation and performance of works in each language
MUS 121 Music in Film                                          using IPA. Prerequisite: Current enrollment in applied
For general student. Study of interaction of music and         study in voice or piano. 2 sem. hrs.
visual image in Hollywood film; emphasis on nature of
                                                       SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/MUSIC • 147



MUS 206 German and French Diction for Singers                 MUS 215 Jazz Theory and Harmony
and Accompanists                                              Development of theoretical and harmonic skills which
Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)            bridge tonal and chromatic approaches. Students will
with application to the German and French languages.          work to develop ability to assess and modify harmonic
Preparation and performance of works in each language         schemes with the goal of systematic growth and increased
using IPA. Prerequisite: Current enrollment in applied        individuality in their jazz compositions. Extensive
study in voice or piano. 2 sem. hrs.                          listening. Prerequisite: Music 110. 3 sem. hrs.
MUS 207 Musical Theatre and Opera Scene                       MUS 216 Jazz Performance and Analysis
Workshop                                                      Performance and analysis of original jazz works
Study of stage techniques for the singer applied to various   and transcriptions.      Discussion, demonstration
scenes from operatic and musical theater repertoire           and performance of advanced jazz improvisational
resulting in staged performance by class members. May         techniques. Transcribe and study transcriptions of jazz
be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Current enrollment      masters and engage in critical analysis of great printed
in applied voice instruction or permission of instructor.     and recorded improvised jazz solos. Prerequisites: Music
2 sem. hrs.                                                   110 and permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
MUS 209 Music and Society                                     MUS 227 Critical Studies in Music History I
Explores effects of social, economic and political            First in a series of three courses devoted to exploration
structures on composition, performance and listening of       of significant topics, issues, methodologies and theories
music. Topics include autonomous music and aesthetic          applicable to historical and ethnographic music studies.
ideology, the role of the composer in several historical      Taught principally through examination of the core
periods, and new modes of listening developed in response     repertoire of Western art music. Prerequisites: Music
to electronic dissemination of music. Prerequisites: Any      108-109. 4 sem. hrs.
100-level music course or experience in music ensemble
or permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                      MUS 228 Critical Studies in Music History II
                                                              Second in series of three courses devoted to exploration
MUS 211 Tonal Harmony II: Chromaticism                        of significant topics, issues, methodologies and theories
Continuation of MUS 110. Study and application of             applicable to historical and ethnographic music studies.
harmonic practice in Western music of the 18th and            Taught principally through the examination of the core
19th centuries by means of original compositions              repertoire of Western art music. Prerequisite: Music 227.
and analysis of selected literature. Continuation of          4 sem. hrs.
musicianship exercises from Music 109. Prerequisite:
Music 110. 4 sem. hrs.                                        MUS 229 Critical Studies of Ethnomusicology
                                                              Third in series of courses devoted to the exploration of
MUS 212 Analytic Approaches to Contemporary                   significant topics and issues, methodologies and theories
Music                                                         applicable to historical and ethnographic music studies.
Study and application of harmonic practice in Western         Taught through examination of a broad cross selection
music of the 20th and 21st centuries by means of              of musical styles, genres and traditions. Prerequisite:
original compositions and analysis of selected literature.    Music 228. 4 sem. hrs.
Continuation of musicianship exercises from Music
211. Prerequisite: Music 211. 4 sem. hrs.                     MUS 230 Music in Culture: Introduction to World
                                                              Music
MUS 213 Computer Music                                        Introduction to ethnomusicology and the study of music
Study of techniques and aesthetics of computer-               as a human activity. Will explore ways different people
generated music with extensive laboratory experience in       create music, communicate about music, consume and
Music Technology Lab. Emphasis on MIDI technology             transmit music, and use music to create meaning. Topics
and application. 3 sem. hrs.                                  may include traditional (folk), popular and cultivated
                                                              music around the world, including North America.
MUS 214 Jazz Arranging                                        Includes participation in and observation of music
Comprehensive study of evolution of jazz arranging and        events. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP)
composition from 1920s to present. Score analysis of
representative works by Sammy Nestico, Thad Jones,            MUS 231 Conducting Fundamentals
Bob Brookmeyer and others. Extensive listening.               Essentials of instrumental and choral conducting.
Students will arrange for small and large jazz ensembles.     Rehearsal techniques and practical experience in
Prerequisite: Music 110. 3 sem. hrs.                          directing musical groups. Prerequisites: Music 108 and
                                                              109. 3 sem. hrs.
148 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



MUS 232 Conducting Techniques                                 MUS 310 Managing Performing Arts Organizations
Study and practical application of advanced conducting        Review of topics essential for successful management of
techniques such as score study and analysis, choral and       performing arts organizations. Includes organizational
instrumental rehearsal procedures and recitative and          structure, budget development and management,
performance practice issues. Prerequisite: Music 231. 3       strategic planning, marketing, audience development,
sem. hrs.                                                     box-office management, and related topics. (Same as
                                                              Theatre 310.) Prerequisite: Major or minor in Music,
MUS 233 Creating Original Opera                               Theatre, Dance or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
A forum in which students of varied interests and
majors come together to produce an original opera in          MUS 311 Form and Analysis
partnership with the Metropolitan Opera. Students             Study of principles of organization in music with
will apply for one of 12 jobs that parallel the division      emphasis on European music since the Renaissance.
of labor in a real opera company- production manager,         Reading and analysis of scores exemplifying various
stage manager, historian, carpenter, electrician, set         musical forms. Prerequisite: Music 211 or permission of
designer, costume designer, make-up artist, librettist,       instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
composer, performer or public relations - and will work
together to create a signed integrated production. 3 sem.     MUS 313 Advanced Computer Music
hrs. (FSVP)                                                   Continuation of Music 213. Exploration of audio
                                                              computer systems, including digital recording and
MUS 301 Music Research Methods                                mixing devices. Creation and transcription of music for
Hands-on examination of research process as it applies        computer-controlled performance. Prerequisite: Music
to music, including the identification, evaluation and         213 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
use of information sources. Introduction to research
methodologies appropriate to advanced study of music and      MUS 330 An Era of Spectacle: Music and Art in the
its contexts. Prerequisite: Junior music major. 1 sem. hr.    Baroque Period
                                                              Explores music and art of the Baroque period. Also looks
MUS 305 Introduction to Music Education                       at aspects of the role of artist/musician as well as the role
Basic principles, purposes and philosophies of music          of art and music in Baroque society. 3 sem. hrs.
education. Overview of each level (elementary, middle
school, senior high) including directed observations.         MUS 338 Special Topics in Music History
Participation in weekly seminars, reviewing current           Theory or Music Education. Selected topics such as
music education methods and materials. Prerequisite:          musical genre, works of a specific composer, or methods
Music 108-109. 3 sem. hrs.                                    of teaching and learning music. May be repeated for
                                                              credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Music 227 or 228
MUS 306 Introduction to Composition                           or permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Music 109 and
Introduction of materials and techniques of acoustic          227 or 228 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
composition through readings, listening assignments,
composition exercises and performances. Prerequisite:         MUS 338 Special Topics in Music History, Theory
Music 110 or permission of instructor. 2 sem. hrs.            or Music Education
                                                              Selected topics such as musical genre, works of specific
MUS 307 Composition                                           composers, or techniques of teaching and learning
Directed projects in various styles for traditional and/or    music. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
electronic media. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:   Prerequisites: Music 109 and 227 or 228 or permission
Music 306 or permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.             of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
MUS 308 Tonal Counterpoint                                    MUS 339 Passion and Pleasure: Study of Secular
Study and application of tonal counterpoint. Written          Vocal Music, 1600 to present
musical exercises include original compositions and           Study of use of text in popular secular vocal music,
written commentary on excerpts from tonal literature.         beginning in 1600 and ending with the popular music of
Prerequisite: Music 110 or permission of instructor. 3        our time. Areas of concentration include solo song, solo
sem. hrs.                                                     cantata, opera, blues, funk and rock. Prerequisite: Music
                                                              227 or 228 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
MUS 309 Orchestration
Study of orchestration, instrumentation and arranging         MUS 342 Musical Ethnography: Politics and Practices
for classical and contemporary groups. Prerequisite:          Intended for Music and Anthropology students who
Music 211 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.            have an interest in developing a critical understanding
                                                              of the ethnographic process as it relates to the study of
                                                              musical performance. Prerequisites: Music 108-109 or
                                                              Anthropology 101. 4 sem. hrs.
                                 SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/APPLIED MUSIC COURSES • 149



MUS 343 The Mass from Plainchant to Pärt                      Individual Instruction Courses (MSAP)
Study of representative musical settings of the Mass          Note: Individual instruction courses require an
from middle ages to present day; emphasis on tensions         additional fee per course, nonmajors only. Fee for
between artistic expression and liturgical function.          2006-2007 is $425.00.
Prerequisite: Music 227 or 228 or permission of               Prerequisite for Applied Courses: Placement at the discretion
instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                                       of department.
MUS 344 Opera Studies                                         Offered without credit. May be repeated.
Explores significant topics and issues in the study of         MSAP 060 Voice, 0 sem. hrs.
opera through variety of approaches and methodologies;        MSAP 061 Piano, 0 sem. hrs.
opera’s connections to other disciplines, histories and       MSAP 062 Organ, 0 sem. hrs.
contexts will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Music 108 or       MSAP 063 Guitar, 0 sem. hrs.
109. 4 sem. hrs.                                              MSAP 064 Flute, 0 sem. hrs.
                                                              MSAP 065 Oboe, 0 sem. hrs.
MUS 345 Philanthropy in the Arts
                                                              MSAP 066 Clarinet, 0 sem. hrs.
Survey of strategies, tools and techniques involved in
                                                              MSAP 067 Saxophone, 0 sem. hrs.
generating contributed income for arts organizations
                                                              MSAP 068 Bassoon, 0 sem. hrs.
from private individuals, foundations, corporations,
                                                              MSAP 069 French Horn, 0 sem. hrs.
business and government agencies. Central issues include
                                                              MSAP 070 Trumpet, 0 sem. hrs.
underlying psychological and practical bases of fundraising
                                                              MSAP 071 Trombone/Baritone, 0 sem. hrs.
in the arts and exposure to research and methods involved
                                                              MSAP 072 Tuba, 0 sem. hrs.
in developing donor prospects. Fundraising techniques,
                                                              MSAP 073 Percussion, 0 sem. hrs.
including direct mail, telemarketing, grant writing,
                                                              MSAP 074 Violin, 0 sem. hrs.
personal appeals, major gift solicitation, special events,
                                                              MSAP 075 Viola, 0 sem. hrs.
capital campaigns, endowment campaigns, sponsorships
                                                              MSAP 076 Cello, 0 sem. hrs.
and planned giving. (Same as Art 345 and Theatre
                                                              MSAP 077 String Bass/Electric Bass, 0 sem. hrs.
345.) Prerequisite: Music 310, Art 322, or permission of
                                                              MSAP 078 Harp, 0 sem. hrs.
instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                              MSAP 079 Banjo, 0 sem. hrs.
MUS 350 Student Recital                                       MSAP 080 Mandolin, 0 sem. hrs.
Preparation and performance of a solo recital by              MSAP 081 Harpsichord, 0 sem. hrs.
students in applied study or composition. Prerequisite:       MSAP 082 Miscellaneous Instruments, 0 sem. hrs.
Current enrollment in applied study or composition or         Offered for one credit. May be repeated for credit.
permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.                          MSAP 160 Voice, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 388 Individual Internship                                 MSAP 161 Piano, 1 sem. hr.
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 1-3 sem. hrs.         MSAP 162 Organ, 1 sem. hr.
                                                              MSAP 163 Guitar, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 395 Independent Study                                     MSAP 164 Flute, 1 sem. hr.
Prerequisite: Departmental Approval. 3 sem. hrs.              MSAP 165 Oboe, 1 sem. hr.
                                                              MSAP 166 Clarinet, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 401-402 Final Project/Thesis/Recital
                                                              MSAP 167 Saxophone, 1 sem. hr.
Capstone course. Projects or presentations chosen from
                                                              MSAP 168 Bassoon, 1 sem. hr.
student’s area of concentration and supervised by a
                                                              MSAP 169 French Horn, 1 sem. hr.
faculty mentor. Cannot be taken simultaneously with
                                                              MSAP 170 Trumpet, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 350 except with permission of faculty. Prerequisite:
                                                              MSAP 171 Trombone/Baritone, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 301 and Senior music major. 1-1 sem. hrs.
                                                              MSAP 172 Tuba, 1 sem. hr.
MUS 413 Special Topics in Computer Music                      MSAP 173 Percussion, 1 sem. hr.
Special topics in computer music such as interactive          MSAP 174 Violin, 1 sem. hr.
computer music and computer music programming with            MSAP 175 Viola, 1 sem. hr.
emphasis on using technology to realize compositional         MSAP 176 Cello, 1 sem. hr.
objectives. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.      MSAP 177 String Bass/Electric Bass, 1 sem. hr.
Prerequisite: Music 213 or permission of instructor. 3        MSAP 178 Harp, 1 sem. hr.
sem. hrs.                                                     MSAP 179 Banjo, 1 sem. hr.
                                                                           (Effective: Spring 2005.)
                                                              MSAP 180 Mandolin, 1 sem. hr.
                                                                           (Effective: Spring 2005.)
150 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



MSAP 181 Harpsichord, 1 sem. hr.                               MSEN 197 Woodwind Ensemble
         (Effective: Spring 2005.)                             Study and performance of woodwind trio, quartet,
MSAP 182 Miscellaneous Instruments, 1 sem. hr.                 quintet or woodwind choir literature. Two rehearsals
         (Effective: Spring 2005.)                             weekly. May be repeated. 1 sem. hr.

Large Performing Ensembles (MSEN)                              MSEN 198 Brass Ensemble
Prerequisite for All Ensembles: Audition with ensemble’s       Study and performance of brass trio, quartet, quintet,
director. Auditions are open to all students.                  or brass choir literature. Two rehearsals weekly. May be
                                                               repeated. 1 sem. hr.
 MSEN 191 University Orchestra
Study and performance of works for symphony                    MSEN 199 Percussion Ensemble
orchestra. One three-hour rehearsal weekly, plus               Study and performance of percussion literature. May be
additional sectionals. Regular performances on and off         repeated. 1 sem. hr.
campus. May be repeated. 1 sem. hr. (FSVP-must take            MSEN 200 String Ensemble
same course for three semester hours before FSVP credit        Study and performance of string ensemble literature.
is awarded.)                                                   May be repeated. 1 sem. hr.
MSEN 192 Jazz Ensemble                                         MSEN 201 Chamber Music
Study and performance of Big Band repertoire from              Study and performance of chamber music. Coaching by
swing era to present. Two 1 1/2-half hour rehearsals           various members of the Department of Music. May be
weekly, with two or more concerts each year. May be            repeated. 1 sem. hr. (FSVP-must take same course for
repeated. 1 sem. hr. (FSVP-must take same course for           three semester hours before FSVP credit awarded.)
three semester hours before FSVP credit awarded.)
                                                               MSEN 202 Guitar Ensemble
MSEN 193 University Band                                       Study and performance of guitar ensemble literature.
Study and performance of wind band literature. Wind            May be repeated. 1 sem. hr.
Ensemble of 50-60 members and Pep Band of selected
players. Two on-campus concerts and a brief tour by            MSEN 203 Brazilian Music Ensemble
the Wind Ensemble and performances at home football            Small mixed ensemble dedicated to performing a
and basketball games by Pep Band. Two 1 1/2-half hour          variety of Brazilian music styles. Instruction given on
rehearsals weekly. May be repeated. 1 sem. hr. (FSVP-          Brazilian percussion and string instruments. Songs sung
must take same course for three semester hours before          in Portuguese. Regular performances both on and off
FSVP credit awarded.)                                          campus. 1 sem. hr.
MSEN 194 University Choir                                      PHILOSOPHY
Mixed chorus. Study and perform a cappella and
accompanied choral literature appropriate to the group         Department of Philosophy
from variety of style periods and origins. Regular             Nancy Schauber, Chair
performances on and off campus; biannual tour. May             Professors McWhorter, Shapiro
be repeated. 1 sem. hr. (FSVP-must take same course for        Associate Professor Goddu, McCormick, Schauber
three semester hours before FSVP credit awarded.)              Note: All 200 level courses are open to first-year students.
Small Performing Ensembles (MSEN)                              All 300 level courses presume some previous exposure to
                                                               philosophy or a related area of study. Each course offered
MSEN 195 Jazz Combo                                            for four semester hours involves a significantly enhanced
Small jazz ensemble. Regular performances on and off           component of research, primary reading, written work
campus. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of           and/or oral presentations.
instructor. 1 sem. hr.
                                                               The Philosophy Major
MSEN 196 Schola Cantorum                                       Note: No more than one grade below C (2.0) will be
Small mixed chorus; study and perform choral literature        counted toward the major.
appropriate to the group from variety of style periods            1. Thirty semester hours in the Philosophy
and origins; emphasis on a cappella repertoire. Regular               Department, composed of:
performances on and off campus; biannual tour. May be                • Philosophy 251 Symbolic Logic
repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 sem. hr.         • Philosophy 271 Ancient Greek Philosophy
(FSVP-must take same course for three semester hours                 • Philosophy 272 Modern Western Philosophy
before FSVP credit is awarded.)                                      • Philosophy 343 or 344 Twentieth-Century
                                                                        Analytic or Continental Philosophy
                                                SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/PHILOSOPHY • 151



      • Philosophy 353 Philosophical Methods:                  PHIL 250 Topics Seminar: Historical
         Majors’/Minors’ Seminar                               Selected topics in philosophy arranged historically.
      • One 300-level course in value theory and its           Recent topics: Kant, Critical Theory, Freud, Bertrand
         applications, such as: Philosophy 360 Ethics or       Russell’s Radical Essays. May be repeated for credit
         Philosophy 364 Philosophy of Law, or another          when topic differs. 2-4 sem. hrs.
         specific course such as may be approved by the
                                                               PHIL 251 Elementary Symbolic Logic
         department from year to year;
                                                               Introduction to modern logic beginning with truth-
      • Sufficient two, three or four-hour approved
                                                               functions and covering formal proofs (propositional
         elective philosophy courses to total 10 semester
                                                               and predicate) to the level of multiply-general and
         hours (at least 3 hours of which must be at the
                                                               relational statements. No mathematical applications.
         300 level).
                                                               Recommended for pre-law and pre-computer studies. 3
   2. Sufficient, two, three or four-hour approved
                                                               sem. hrs. (FSSR)
       courses in related fields to total 12 semester
       hours.                                                  PHIL 260 Philosophical Problems in Law and
                                                               Society
The Philosophy Minor                                           Examination of purpose and justification for legal limits
Note: A grade of not less than C- (1.7) is required in         on individual liberty, with special attention to problems
each course comprising the minor.                              of liability and punishment. 3 sem. hrs.
   Fifteen semester hours in the philosophy department,
composed of:                                                   PHIL 271 Ancient Greek Philosophy
    • Philosophy 271 Ancient Greek Philosophy                  Introduction to ancient Western philosophy, with
    • Philosophy 272 Modern Western Philosophy;                emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Discussion of both the
       and                                                     development of philosophical thought and topics such
    • Sufficient two, three or four-hr. approved                as: What is knowledge? Why should I be moral? What
       philosophy elective courses to total nine semester      is the good life? Readings drawn from primary texts. 3
       hours (at least 3 hours of which must be at the         sem. hrs. (FSHT)
       300 level).
                                                               PHIL 272 Modern Western Philosophy
COURSES                                                        Study of development of modern philosophy from
PHIL 200 Introduction to Philosophical Problems                Descartes to Kant. Readings from Descartes, Hume,
and Arguments                                                  and Kant; some attention may be given to other
Introduction to philosophy as a working discipline, with       modern philosophers such as Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke
emphasis on analysis of problems and proposed solutions.       and Berkeley. Readings drawn from primary texts. 3
Sample topics: Is there a thing that can be called the self?   sem. hrs. (FSHT)
What is the meaning of life? What is the relationship          PHIL 275 Marx, Nietzsche and Freud
between knowledge and opinion? Can individuals be              Study of three major thinkers of the European tradition,
held responsible for their actions? 3 sem. hrs.                in the context of the cultural history of the 19th and
PHIL 220 Contemporary Moral Issues                             20th centuries. Their theories of history, psychology and
Philosophical introduction to the application of moral         culture will be analyzed, and their conceptions of ethical
reasoning. Aims to clarify, organize and sharpen our           and political possibilities will be critically compared.
ideas about moral concerns of everyday life, and to            Readings from their major texts will be included. 3 sem.
examine and critique prominent moral theories. Topics          hrs.
may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment,          PHIL 280 Topics Seminar: Issues
animal rights. 3 sem. hrs.                                     Selected topics in philosophy arranged by issues. Recent
PHIL 221 Feminist Political Theories                           topics: The Emotions; Science, Pseudoscience and the
Provides students with background in major political           Paranormal; Intermediate Logic; Ethics, Human and
theories that feminists have employed and developed            Nonhuman. May be repeated for credit when topic
over the past 200 years. These include classical               differs. 2-4 sem. hrs.
liberalism, Marxism and various forms of socialism, and        PHIL 281 Philosophy of Art
some existentialist, post-structuralist, and post-colonial     Poses and considers the question “What is art?” Explores
theoretical work. Students will study these feminist           issues concerned with the creation of, interpretation of
theoretical frameworks in depth and also will consider         and social response to art. Examples are drawn from a
serious criticisms of them. (Same as Women, Gender             variety of arts (e.g., literature, architecture, painting);
and Sexuality Studies 221.) 3 sem. hrs.                        readings from major philosophers of art, traditional and
                                                               recent. 3 sem. hrs.
152 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



PHIL 299 Philosophy of Science                                PHIL 358 Topics in Feminist Philosophy
General introduction to philosophy of science. Topics         Examination of recent and contemporary feminist
may include distinguishing science from nonscience;           theory. (Same as Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
the structure of scientific theories and explanations; the     399 and Political Science 379.) 2-4 sem. hrs.
nature of scientific activity; and the relationship(s) of
science with values, culture and society. 3 sem. hrs.         PHIL 359 Thinking and Seeing: Philosophy and
                                                              the Visual Arts
PHIL 336 Nineteenth-Century European                          Devoted to exploring some questions having to do
Philosophy                                                    with the meaning and significance of the visual arts.
Examination of movements and individuals; emphasis            Among topics of the course are relation between words
on Kierkegaard’s and Marx’s response to Hegel. Previous       and visual images; use of art as a way of learning about
work in philosophy or good background in history and/         ourselves and the world; phenomenology of visual
or literature is presumed. 3 sem. hrs.                        experience; and criteria for interpreting the meaning
                                                              of art works. Theorists include G.E. Lessing and
PHIL 337 Social and Political Philosophy                      representative thinkers from such recent tendencies as
Examination of major theories in social and political         phenomenology, existentialism, deconstruction and
philosophy, historical and current. 3 sem. hrs.               psychoanalysis. 3 sem. hrs.
PHIL 339 Existentialism                                       PHIL 360 Ethics
Systematic study of conditions of human experience            Critical examination of main types of ethical theory.
to develop and justify descriptive categories for             Discussion of current topics and controversies, as well as
understanding of persons and their world. Readings            fundamental questions about the object of morality and
from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre. 3          the objectivity and justification of moral evaluations. 3
sem. hrs.                                                     sem. hrs.
PHIL 343 Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy                PHIL 362 Philosophy of Religion
Critical examination of 20th-century topics and thinkers      Is there such a thing as religious knowledge? Can
in the analytic tradition. 4 sem. hrs.                        a rational individual believe in God(s)? Alternative
PHIL 344 Twentieth-Century Continental                        conceptions of use and meaning of theological language
Philosophy                                                    (description, ritual, belief formation, moral persuasion).
Critical examination of 20th-century topics and thinkers      Transcendence. Mysticism and logic. Prerequisite: One
in the French and German traditions. Prerequisite:            previous philosophy course or, for religion majors,
Philosophy 272. 4 sem. hrs.                                   permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.

PHIL 350 Topics Seminar: Historical                           PHIL 363 Power and Politics
Selected topics in philosophy arranged historically.          Examination and appraisal of classical liberal political
Recent topics: Kant, Critical Theory, Freud, Bertrand         philosophies–particularly their treatment of consent,
Russell’s Radical Essays. May be repeated for credit          rebellion, and political change–in light of 20th-century
when topic differs. 2-4 sem. hrs.                             civil rights movements. Theorists studied include John
                                                              Locke and various American revolutionaries such as
PHIL 353 Philosophical Methods: Majors’/Minors’               James Madison. Movements studied are the Montgomery
Seminar                                                       Bus Boycott of 1955-56, the Birmingham desegregation
Reading, writing, critiquing, presenting and defending        movement of 1963, and the gay and lesbian movement
philosophical essays. Techniques of analysis and              of the 1990s. Studies will evaluate liberalism as both a
interpretation. Required for majors; open to minors.          descriptive and prescriptive theory. Lecture/discussion
Usually taken during junior year. Prerequisite: Permission    format. (Same as Political Science 379.) 3 sem. hrs.
of department. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                              PHIL 364 Philosophy of Law
PHIL 357 Nietzsche                                            Alternative ways of conceiving of law. Such legal concepts
Devoted to analysis and understanding of some of the          as right and strict liability. Such problems as nature of
main philosophical themes and writing of Friedrich            judicial decision-making process, tension between crime
Nietzsche (1844-1900), such as: critique of Western           control and due process, rationale of legal punishment,
morality and religion; affirmation of creativity and life of   insanity defense. Prerequisite: One previous philosophy
this world; eternal recurrence of all things, and diagnosis   course. 3 sem. hrs.
of modern nihilism and suggestions as to how it might
be overcome. Close reading of a number of texts by            PHIL 365 Action, Responsibility and Free Will
Nietzsche. Lecture/discussion format. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/PHYSICS • 153



Examination of a core philosophical puzzle-can               Dual-Degree (3-2) Engineering Program
responsible action be both free and determined?–in           In cooperation with selected engineering schools, the
writings of classical and contemporary philosophers.         University offers the opportunity for students interested
Seminar format, with multiple written and oral critiques,    in engineering careers to earn two bachelor’s degrees in
term paper, midterm and final exams. 3 sem hrs.               five years, one from the University of Richmond and
                                                             another from a cooperating engineering school. Called
PHIL 370 Philosophy of Mind
                                                             the 3-2 Engineering Program, a student spends three years
Critical examination of fundamental questions in
                                                             at Richmond, completing all of the general education
the philosophy of mind such as: How can we tell if
                                                             requirements, almost all of the requirements for a major
something has a mind or is capable of thinking? What
                                                             in physics, plus selected other courses. The student spends
is the mind? What is thought? Consciousness? Do
                                                             the remaining two years at the engineering school. The
machines or non-human animals have minds? What is
                                                             George Washington University School of Engineering
the relationship between the mental and the physical?
                                                             and Applied Science is a participant. Additional schools
Between thought and action? Prerequisite: One previous
                                                             of engineering may develop agreements with Richmond.
philosophy class. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                             The Physics Department’s Pre-Engineering Advisor can
PHIL 375 Ethics and Practical Reasoning                      provide information about participating programs and
Seminar devoted to a survey of basic issues about            requirements.
the nature of practical reason. We also will consider
                                                             The Physics Major
associated issues about intentional action, persons, the
good, moral demands, and the normativity of ethics. 3        For the Bachelor of Arts degree:
sem. hrs.                                                       Required:
                                                                A. Twenty-eight semester hours in physics courses
PHIL 380 Topics Seminar: Issues                                     approved by the department including:
Selected topics in philosophy arranged by issues. Recent            • PHYS 101-102 or 131-132
topics: The Emotions; Science, Pseudoscience and the                • PHYS 205
Paranormal; Intermediate Logic; Ethics, Human and                   • PHYS 221
Nonhuman. May be repeated for credit when topic                     • PHYS 397-398
differs. 2-4 sem. hrs.                                              • PHYS 497-498
PHIL 386 Honors Seminar                                         B. MATH 212 Calculus II or MATH 232 Scientific
Seminar for honors students on topic selected mutually              Calculus II
by instructor and those enrolled. Prerequisite: Permission      C. Fifteen semester hours in courses outside of
of department. 4 sem. hrs.                                          physics approved by the department
                                                                This degree is offered primarily for students who
PHIL 390 Independent Study
                                                             wish to prepare for interdisciplinary or medical sciences
Faculty member directs student’s reading and study.
                                                             studies, or to earn a cultural degree.
Prerequisite: Permission of department. 2-4 sem. hrs.
                                                             For the Bachelor of Science degree:
PHIL 395 Honors Thesis                                          Required:
Supervised completion of research thesis begun and              A. The following Physics courses:
approved in Majors’ Seminar. 3-4 sem. hrs.                         • PHYS 205
                                                                   • PHYS 301
PHYSICS                                                            • PHYS 303
Department of Physics                                              • PHYS 305
                                                                   • PHYS 308
Cornelius Beausang, Chair
                                                                   • PHYS 397-398
Professor Gilfoyle
                                                                   • PHYS 401-402
Associate Professor Beausang
                                                                   • PHYS 497-498
Assistant Professors Bunn, Fetea, Lipan, Trawick
                                                                   • Three semester hours of experimental work
Director of Physics Laboratory Nebel
                                                                     including Physics 221
Manager of Laboratories Wimbush
                                                                B. CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry: Structure,
                                                                    Dynamics and Synthesis
                                                                C. MATH 245 Linear Algebra
                                                                D. Seven semester hours in courses outside physics
                                                                    approved by the department
154 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



The Interdisciplinary Physics Major for the               the subject matter depending on the student’s intended
Bachelor of Science Degree                                major. Each of these courses fulfills the natural science
Note: Students cannot major in both Physics and           fields-of-study requirement for general education.
Interdisciplinary Physics                                 For students intending to major in the natural or
   Required: Thirty-nine semester hours                   mathematical sciences, Physics 131-132 and Physics 101-
   A. The following courses in Physics and Mathematics:   102 are the recommended options.
       • PHYS 101                                         COURSES
       • PHYS 132                                         PHYS 101 General Physics 1
       • PHYS 205                                         First semester of a sequence in general physics.
       • PHYS 221                                         Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, light
       • PHYS 301                                         and modern physics are covered in the two-semester
       • PHYS 397-398                                     sequence. Includes laboratory. Note: Physics 101 not
       • PHYS 497-498                                     a prerequisite to 102. A student may not receive credit
       • MATH 211-212                                     for both Physics 131 and 101. Prerequisites: Algebra and
       • Nine additional semester hours in physics at     trigonometry. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNP)
         the 200 level or above.
   B. One of the concentrations described below. All      PHYS 102 General Physics 2
       concentrations require 15-16 additional semester   Second semester of a sequence in general physics.
       hours beyond those listed above.                   Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, light
   1. Biology Concentration: 16 semester hours            and modern physics are covered in the two-semester
       • BIOL 201                                         sequence. Includes laboratory. Note: A student may
       • CHEM 141                                         receive credit for only one of the following courses: 102,
       • Eight additional semester hours in Biology       132, 133, 134. Prerequisites: Algebra and trigonometry.
   2. Biochemistry Concentration: 16 semester hours       4 sem. hrs. (FSNP)
       • CHEM 141
       • CHEM 205-206                                     PHYS 121 Astrophysics
       • BIOL/CHEM 326                                    Celestial motions, stellar structure, cosmology and
   3. Chemistry Concentration: 16 semester hours          related problems including appropriate concepts of
       • CHEM 141                                         elementary physics. Not among the recommended
       • CHEM 309-310                                     options for science or math majors. Includes laboratory.
       • Four additional semester hours in Chemistry      4 sem. hrs. (FSNP)
   4. Computer Science Concentration: 15 semester hours   PHYS 125 Elements of Physics
       • CMSC 150 or CMSC 155                             Principles and applications of physics. Topics selected
       • CMSC 221                                         from mechanics, sound, light, electricity, magnetism,
       • Eight additional semester hours in Computer      heat and modern physics. Not among the recommended
         Science                                          options for science or math majors. Includes laboratory.
   5. Engineering Concentration: 15 semester hours        4 sem. hrs. (FSNP)
       of Engineering courses. This concentration is
       intended for students participating in the 3-2     PHYS 131 General Physics with Calculus 1
       engineering program. The required hours will       First semester of a calculus-based introductory sequence.
       be earned at another institution.                  Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity and
   6. Mathematics Concentration: 15 semester hours        light are covered in the two-semester sequence. Includes
       • MATH 235                                         laboratory. A student may not receive credit for both Physics
       • MATH 245                                         131 and 101. Prerequisite: Math 211 or 231 (may be
       • MATH 312                                         taken concurrently). Physics 131 is prerequisite to 132
       • Six additional semester hours in Mathematics     unless permission is granted by instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
         at the 300 level or above                        (FSNP)

The Physics Minor                                         PHYS 132 General Physics with Calculus 2
Seventeen semester hours in physics courses, including    Second semester of a calculus-based introductory
at least nine semester hours in courses numbered above    sequence. Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism,
200, excluding 397-398 and 497-498.                       electricity, and light are covered in the two-semester
                                                          sequence. Includes laboratory. Note: A student may
Note: The beginning courses in Physics (101, 102, 121,    receive credit for only one of the following courses: 102,
123, 125, 131, and 132) offer different approaches to     132, 133, 134. Prerequisites: Math 212 or 232 (may be
                                                    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/PHYSICS • 155



taken concurrently) and Physics 131 or permission of          PHYS 303 Mechanics
instructor. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNP)                                Mathematical analysis of physical laws pertaining to
                                                              dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Introduction
PHYS 133 Atomic and Sub-Atomic Physics                        to moving coordinate systems and Lagrange’s and
Second semester of a calculus-based introductory              Hamilton’s methods. Prerequisite: Physics 301 or
sequence with emphasis on physics of atoms, molecules,        permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
nuclei and quarks. Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism,
electricity and light are covered in the two-semester         PHYS 305-306 Electricity and Magnetism
sequence. Includes laboratory. Note: A student may            Electrostatic fields and potentials, dielectrics,
receive credit for only one of the following courses: 102,    magnetic fields and potentials. Maxwell’s equations,
132, 133, 134. Prerequisites: Math 212 or 232 (may be         electromagnetic waves. Prerequisite: Physics 301 or
taken concurrently) and Physics 131 or permission of          permission of department. Physics 305 is prerequisite
instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                                       to 306. 3-3 sem. hrs.
PHYS 134 Biological Physics                                   PHYS 308 Statistical Mechanics
Second semester sequence of a two-semester calculus-          Statistical methods applied to description of physical
based course that includes laboratory, aimed at students      systems. Statistical calculation of thermodynamic
interested in the biological sciences, premedicine, earth     quantities, laws of thermodynamics, statistical
and environmental sciences. Mechanics, heat, sound,           distributions and classical and quantum statistics of
magnetism, electricity and light are covered in the           ideal gases. Prerequisite: Physics 301 or permission of
two-semester sequence. Note: A student may receive            department. (Same as Chemistry 308.) 3 sem. hrs.
credit for only one of the following courses: 102, 132,
133, 134. Prerequisites: Math 212 or 232 (may be              PHYS 321 Advanced Laboratory
taken concurrently) and Physics 131 or permission of          Application of fundamental experimental techniques
instructor. 4 sem. hrs.                                       to advanced physics problems from mechanics,
                                                              electromagnetism and thermal, modern, atomic,
PHYS 205 Introduction to Modern Physics                       nuclear and particle physics. Three to six laboratory
Introduction to topics in 20th-century physics including      hours a week. Prerequisite: Physics 221 or permission of
special relativity, quantum mechanics, and statistical        department. 1-2 sem. hrs.
physics. Prerequisite: Physics 132 or permission of
department. 3 sem. hrs.                                       PHYS 381-382 Research
                                                              Six hours a week of laboratory or independent study.
PHYS 215 Computational Methods in Physics                     PHYS 381 may be repeated for credit a maximum of
Project-oriented: applying computers to solution of           three times. PHYS 382 may not be repeated for credit.
problems in physical sciences. Prerequisites: Physics         Prerequisite: Permission of department. 2-2 sem. hrs.
132 and some familiarity with at least one higher-level
computer language. 3 sem. hrs.                                PHYS 397-398 Junior Seminar
                                                              Required of all third-year physics majors. Does not
PHYS 216-217 Electronics                                      count in hours required for minor. 1-1 sem. hrs.
Laboratory course in basic electronics and
instrumentation for science majors. Study of dc and           PHYS 401-402 Quantum Mechanics
ac circuits, diodes, rectifiers, transistors, operational      Wave mechanics and quantization; Schroedinger
amplifiers, binary logic, Boolean algebra, digital circuits,   equation for variety of potentials; hydrogen atom in
analog-digital conversion, transducers and computer           detail; perturbation methods. (Same as Chemistry 401-
interfacing. Prerequisite: Physics 101-102 or 132. Physics    402.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 310 or Physics 301 or
216 is a prerequisite to Physics 217. 4-4 sem. hrs.           permission of department. Physics 401 is prerequisite
                                                              to 402. 3-3 sem. hrs.
PHYS 221 Intermediate Laboratory
Experiments in classical and modern physics                   PHYS 404 Theoretical Physics
emphasizing independent work. Six laboratory hours a          Application of mathematics to selected topics in physics.
week. Prerequisite: Physics 101-102 or 132. 4 sem. hrs.       Prerequisite: Physics 301 or permission of department.
                                                              3 sem. hrs.
PHYS 301 Mathematical Methods in Physics
Selected mathematical topics needed for upper-level           PHYS 479 Special Topics
work in physics. Topics taken from vector calculus,           Topics include Particle and Nuclear Physics, Solid State,
matrices, calculus of variations, orthogonal functions        Modern Optics, Relativity, Field Theory. Prerequisite:
and complex analysis. Prerequisite: Physics 132 or            Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
permission of department. 3 sem. hrs.
156 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



PHYS 497-498 Senior Seminar                                   PLSC 250 Introduction to International Relations
Required of all senior physics majors. Does not count in      Framework for analyzing contemporary international
hours required for minor. 1-1 sem. hrs.                       system: goals of nation-states and other actors; how
                                                              such actors attempt to achieve their goals; and some
POLITICAL SCIENCE                                             forces that help or hinder attainment of goals. 3 sem.
Department of Political Science                               hrs. (FSSA)
Daniel Palazzolo, Chair                                       PLSC 260 Introduction to Public Policy
Professors Carapico, Palazzolo, E. West, Whelan               Contemporary social and economic problems in
Associate Professors Kandeh, Simpson, Wang                    America, public policies adopted or proposed to deal
Assistant Professors Erkulwater, Labonte, Mayes, Roof,        with them, and ways of analyzing those problems and
Sznajder                                                      policies. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)

The Political Science Major                                   PLSC 279 Special Topics
Note: The grade point average of the coursework in            May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite:
political science comprising the major, including Math        Varies depending on topic. 1-3 sem. hrs.
119 (or its equivalent) and other required courses, must
                                                              PLSC 290 Mock Trial
be 2.00 or above with no course grade below C- (1.7).
                                                              Designed for those students who choose to participate
    Thirty semester hours in Political Science, at least 21
                                                              in intercollegiate mock trail activities. Graded on a pass/
of which must be at the 300 level or above, including:
                                                              fail basis. One credit per semester may be earned, but
     • Political Science 220
                                                              no more than two credits will be awarded. Credits do
     • Political Science 372 or 373 or 374
                                                              not count toward completion of the major or minor.
     • Political Science 400
                                                              Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. 1 sem. hr.
     • Two of the following: Political Science 240, 250,
       260                                                    PLSC 303 Metropolitan Problems and Politics
     • One of the following: Political Science 311, 312,      Analysis of and practical involvement with major
       315                                                    issues affecting metropolitan governments. Prerequisite:
     • Four electives to bring the total hours in Political   Political Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem.
       Science to 30 hours                                    hrs.
    In addition to the 30 hours in Political Science,
Mathematics 119 (preferred) or Business Statistics 201        PLSC 304 Virginia Government and Politics
and 301, or Psychology 200, or equivalent is required as      Virginia government at state, county, municipal
a prerequisite for Political Science 372, 373 or 374.         and special district levels. Emphasis on legislative,
    The major must include a minimum of 18 semester           executive and judicial organization; state politics and
hours of University of Richmond Political Science             intergovernmental relations. Prerequisite: Political
courses. No more than six hours credit toward the major       Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
can be given for courses offered by other departments or      PLSC 310 Statesmanship
schools at the University.                                    (See Leadership Studies 378.) 3 sem. hrs.
    The department recommends additional coursework
in political science and related fields beyond that            PLSC 311 Political Theory: Plato to Locke
specified for the major. Study abroad and internships          Enduring basic issues in political theory studied through
also are encouraged. Students who have an interest in         writings of Western civilization’s great philosophers. 3
attending law or graduate school should consult with          sem. hrs.
the department chair about undergraduate courses that
                                                              PLSC 312 Modern Political Theory
they should consider taking.
                                                              Ideas of major political philosophers of late 18th, 19th,
COURSES                                                       and 20th centuries, such as Rousseau, Burke, Hegel,
PLSC 220 Introduction to American Government                  Marx, J.S. Millae and Tocqueville. 3 sem. hrs.
Basic roles, structures and functions of American
                                                              PLSC 315 American Political Theory
political institutions and introduction to American
                                                              Political thought in America from colonial times to
political process. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                              present with an emphasis on issues relating to liberty,
PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics                 equality, federalism, community and national purpose.
Concepts, approaches, classifications and models useful        3 sem. hrs.
in comparing political structures and processes. Political
                                                              PLSC 316 Reason, Rhetoric and Leadership
systems characteristic of countries with different cultures
                                                              (See Leadership Studies 379) 3 sem. hrs.
and levels of economic development. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA)
                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/POLITICAL SCIENCE • 157



PLSC 320 Power, Space and Territory: Geographies                 PLSC 330 Creation of the American Republic
of Political Change.                                             (See Leadership Studies 308.) 3 sem. hrs.
(See Geography 320; same as International Studies
320.) 3 sem. hrs.                                                PLSC 331 Constitutional Law
                                                                 Role of United States Supreme Court in American
PLSC 321 Interest Groups and Social Movements                    politics studied through examination of landmark
A broad look at the role of organized interests - both           constitutional decisions pertaining to distribution of
social movements and interest groups - in American               governmental powers. Prerequisite: Political Science 220
politics and political science. Examines the place of            or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
interest groups in democratic theory, how groups and
social movements are started and maintained, and their           PLSC 333 Civil Rights/Liberties
role in politics including their impact on elections and         Analysis of contemporary legal status and interpretation
the public policy-making process. Looks at a number of           of constitutional rights and liberties. Emphasis on
organized interests including the civil rights movement,         landmark Supreme Court decisions involving various
organized labor, business and Christian conservatives.           provisions of the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth
Prerequisite: Political Science 220. 3 sem. hrs.                 Amendment. Prerequisite: Political Science 220 or
                                                                 permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 322 Public Opinion and Public Policy
Examines relationship between public opinion and                 PLSC 336 American Constitutional History
public policy by identifying democratic values, public           Background, adoption and development of the
preferences and interactions between elected officials            Constitution, with emphasis on role of Supreme Court
and people they govern. Prerequisite: Political Science          and judicial review in American history and on changing
220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                     interpretations of key provisions in the Constitution.
                                                                 Prerequisites: Political Science 220 or History 120 or
PLSC 323 Money, Politics and Prisons                             121. 3 sem. hrs.
The connections between the economy, politics and the
prison system in the United States are important for             PLSC 337 The American Legal System
understanding concepts of justice in a democracy. This           Analysis of structure, processes and personnel of American
course explores links between privatization of prisons,          legal system. Emphasis on decision making of private
political incentives and theories of justice. Prerequisite:      parties, judges, juries and attorneys in context of civil
Political Science 220. 3 sem. hrs.                               litigation and criminal prosecution. Prerequisite: Political
                                                                 Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 325 Racial Politics
Comparative examination of the history, problems and             PLSC 340 Islam in Politics
political role of minority groups in the U.S. Prerequisite:      Broadly comparative survey of contemporary Islamist
Political Science 220. 3 sem. hrs.                               political parties, ideologies and legal philosophies in
                                                                 Asia, Africa, Europe and America. Prerequisite: Political
PLSC 326 Legislative Process                                     Science 240 or International Studies 290. 3 sem. hrs.
Organization and functions of American Congress.
Prerequisite: Political Science 220 or permission of             PLSC 341 Great Britain, France and Germany
instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                                          Geographical and historical settings, political cultures,
                                                                 political parties and elections, executives, legislatures,
PLSC 327 The American Presidency                                 bureaucracies and legal systems in three major Western
Political leadership in American political system from           European countries. Comparisons of public policies and
perspective of chief executive. Particular attention to          responses to challenges of welfare state. Prerequisites:
expansion and use of presidential power. Prerequisite:           Political Science 220 and 240 or permission of instructor.
Political Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.   3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 328 American National Government                            PLSC 342 Russia and the Newly Independent States
Research seminar on national policy-making process. For          Recent developments in the former Soviet Union.
advanced Political Science students. Prerequisite: Political     Ethnic, cultural, religious and economic diversity;
Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.             political institutions, parties and elections; and current
                                                                 leaders. Prerequisite: Political Science 240 or permission
PLSC 329 Campaigns and Elections                                 of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
Analysis of institutions and process of American electoral
system and behavior of American electorate. Prerequisite:
Political Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem.
hrs.
158 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



PLSC 343 Politics of Asia                                          PLSC 350 American Foreign Policy
Study of historical, cultural and social forces shaping            Analyzes the traditions, processes, substance and goals
contemporary politics of Asia. Comparative survey of               of American foreign policy, in addition to exploring
major political systems and critical examination of key            national security and defense policy, foreign economic
issues. Attempts to link Asian Studies with mainstream             policy, international diplomacy and foreign policy ethics.
political science. Prerequisite: Political Science 240 or          Prerequisite: Political Science 220 or 250 or permission
permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                              of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 344 Europe Today                                              PLSC 352 International Law and Organization
Political, social, ethnic and economic developments in             Development, processes and functions of contemporary
Western Europe since WWII. Formation of European                   international law and organization. Emphasis on conflict
institutions such as European Union, Council of Europe             management, promotion of economic and social welfare,
and NATO. Cooperation and conflict among European                   and development of community. Prerequisite: Political
states, parties and interest groups. Prerequisite: Political       Science 250 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
Science 240 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                   PLSC 355 Middle East Security
PLSC 345 Politics of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan                   International relations of West Asia and Northeast Africa
Study of contemporary political history of China; analysis         with emphasis on issues related to war, peace and power.
of political systems of the People’s Republic of China,            Prerequisite: Political Science 250. 3 sem. hrs.
the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the
Republic of China on Taiwan; and discussion of key                 PLSC 356 International Political Economy
political, economic and military issues. Prerequisite: Political   Politics, processes and institutions underlying
Science 240 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.               contemporary global economic interdependence,
                                                                   with special focus on international trade, finance
PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism                            and assistance; alternative theoretical models for
Comparative examination of politicization of race,                 understanding these events, processes and institutions.
ethnicity, religion and caste in contemporary world.               Prerequisite: Political Science 250 or permission of
Prerequisite: Political Science 220, 240, 250 or International     instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
Studies 290 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                                   PLSC 357 International Relations of East Asia
PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations                            Study of interactions among the major powers in
Comparative analysis of political, social and economic             the Asia-Pacific region during and after the Cold
development or modernization of nations in Africa,                 War. Examines crucial country cases and thematic
Asia and Latin America. Topics include influence of                 issues (with focus on identity, security, and economic
ideology, revolution and reform, national integration,             interdependence) by drawing perspectives from
neo-imperialism and dependency, and economic growth                dominant international relations theories (e.g., realism,
and equality. Prerequisite: Political Science 240 or 250 or        neorealism, liberal-idealism, liberal institutionalism,
permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                              Marxism, and constructivism). Prerequisite: Political
                                                                   Science 240 or 250. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 348 Politics of Africa
Comparative study of state formation, nation-building,             PLSC 358 The United States and the Pacific Rim
political economy, social structure/movements, selected            Study of changing U.S. role in the Asia-Pacific region;
regions and countries in Africa. Prerequisite: Political           U.S. relations with the major powers in the region;
Science 240 or 250 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.        and salient regional and bilateral political, security and
                                                                   economic issues. 3 sem. hrs.
PLSC 349 Politics of Latin America and the
Caribbean                                                          PLSC 360 International Development Policy
Influence of historical, social and cultural forces on              Assistance policies of wealthy nations and multilateral
contemporary politics of Latin America and the Caribbean.          organizations, development policies and problems
Effects of social structure and underdevelopment on                of poor or underdeveloped nations, and dynamics
processes of democratization, institution building,                of economic, political, environmental and cultural
national integration and economic development. Case                transactions. Prerequisite: Political Science 250 or
studies of selected countries illustrate major themes and          permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
issues explored. Prerequisite: Political Science 240 or 250
or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                           PLSC 361 The Politics of Social Welfare
                                                                   Development and adequacy of programs addressing
                                                                   needs of “the poor” in the U.S. Insights into why some
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/POLITICAL SCIENCE • 159



programs fail and others succeed. Prerequisite: Political      PLSC 390 Independent Study
Science 220 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs.           Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. 1-3 sem.
                                                               hrs.
PLSC 362 Environmental Law and Policy
Examines legal aspects, both regulations and case law, of      PLSC 393 Seminar
environmental policy. Central issues are whether legal         Selected topics of special interest to advanced students.
responses (1) effectively address the needs of the parties     3 sem. hrs.
most affected; (2) properly weigh such facts as economic
efficiency, protection of nonhuman species, and the             PLSC 395 Legislative Internship
possibility of unintended consequences; and (3) are            Combines weekly seminar on the state legislative process
diluted by the political process. (Same as Environmental       with work as assistant to a state legislator, government
Studies 362.) Prerequisite: Political Science 260 or           agency, interest group or press during session of the
Environmental Studies 201. 3 sem. hrs.                         Virginia General Assembly. Prerequisites: Political
                                                               Science 220 and permission of instructor. 6 sem. hrs.
PLSC 365 U.S. Healthcare Policy and Politics
Examination of political and economic evolution of the         PLSC 400 Senior Seminar
American healthcare system: doctors, hospitals, managed        Reading and research focusing on important topics in
care, Medicare, Medicaid, health insurance, public             Political Science. Both topics and instructors change
health, epidemiology, mental health, pediatric health,         from semester to semester. Prerequisites: Senior status
tort reform and psychopharmacology, among other                and completion of 21 hours in Political Science,
topics. Includes comparative analysis of other countries’      including 372, 373, or 374. 3 sem. hrs.
healthcare systems. Prerequisite: Political Science 260 or
permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs.                      PSYCHOLOGY
                                                               Department of Psychology
PLSC 372 Methods for Public Opinion Research
Core topics related to research methodology with a             Scott Allison, Chair
specific focus on survey methodology and introduction to        Professors Allison, Kinsley, Li, Newcomb
a wider range of methods for ascertaining public opinion.      Associate Professors Bagwell, Berry, Sholley
Prerequisites: Political Science 220 and Mathematics           Assistant Professors Abrams, Bukach, Crawford
119, or Business Statistics 301 or Psychology 200 with a       Clinical Assistant Professors Churchill, LeViness, Stott
grade of C- or better. 4 sem. hrs.                             The Department of Psychology offers a rigorous,
                                                               hierarchically organized curriculum that combines the
PLSC 373 Methods for Public Policy Research                    highest expectations of achievement with a nurturing
Core topics related to research methodology with a             environment rich in opportunities for intellectual
specific focus on policy analysis and program evaluation,       stimulation and personal commitment. Our central
including various methodological techniques utilized           mission is to provide an academic setting for students to
for the quantitative and qualitative assessment of public      become skilled, adaptable and highly accomplished—
policy. Prerequisites: Political Science 220 or 260 and        to excel in the best graduate and professional schools
Mathematics 119, Business Statistics 301 or Psychology         or in the most competitive entry-level employment
200 with a grade of C- or better. 4 sem. hrs.                  opportunities. We prepare students to lead productive
PLSC 374 Methods for Cross-National Research                   lives characterized by a lifetime of learning, leadership
Core topics related to research methodology with a             and service. We seek to offer our students a distinctive
specific focus on issues and techniques in the collection,      experience—a love of learning and involvement with
interpretation, comparison and modeling of cross-              the academic community—that is brought together
national and cross-cultural data. Prerequisites: Political     by a unique interaction between the quality of our
Science 240 or 250 and Mathematics 119 or Business             student experience and the dedication of our faculty to
Statistics 301 or Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or         excellence in scholarship and teaching. The department
better. 4 sem. hrs.                                            does its best to educate and train its students to reach
                                                               their potential.
PLSC 379 Selected Topics                                           The Psychology faculty share in the vision that
Examples include Comparative Public Policy, Deficits            education is as much of an activity as it is a body of
and Public Interest, Political Terrorism, and Leadership       knowledge. As professional educators, we embrace
and Women’s Movements. May be repeated for credit              pedagogical strategies that place special emphases on the
when topic varies. 1-4 sem. hrs.                               following principles: the scientific method; intellectual
PLSC 388 Individual Internship                                 challenge and complexity; familiarity with primary
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair. 1-6 sem. hrs.   source materials; interactive and collaborative learning;
160 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



critical and analytical thinking; the utilization of current   psychology. No more than three semester hours of
technologies; professional ethics; excellent oral and          internship or six semester hours of Psychology 361 may
written expression and communication; respect for, and         be applied to the major.
understanding of, varied perspectives and individual
differences; psychology’s unique position within               The Senior Capstone Experience
the liberal arts; and finally, involvement in the local         The Psychology Department’s Senior Capstone
intellectual and cultural communities. These curricular        Experience is intended to provide psychology majors
emphases reflect our educational goals and aspirations.         with an intensive and integrative experience in
They represent directions for fostering, challenging           psychology to culminate their undergraduate careers.
and strengthening our students’ intellectual curiosity.            Students pursuing either the Bachelor of Arts or the
Moreover, they pervade all levels of our undergraduate         Bachelor of Science degree must choose one of three
curriculum, from our introductory course to our most           Senior Capstone options:
advanced courses, and through the collaborative research           Option 1: Advanced Seminar. One course in the
pursuits of our students and faculty.                          Psychology 433-449 series to be taken during the fall or
                                                               spring semester of the student’s senior year.
The Psychology Major                                               Option 2: Senior Research and Advanced Seminar.
Note: The grade point average of the department-               One course in the Psychology 433-449 series to be taken
specific and related-area coursework comprising the             during the fall or spring semester of the student’s senior
major or minor must be no less than 2.00 with no               year, and collaboration with a faculty member on a year-
course grade below C- (1.7).                                   long senior research project.
For the Bachelor of Arts degree:                                   Option 3: Senior Honors Research and two Advanced
Thirty-five semester hours in psychology including:             Seminars. One course in the Psychology 433-449 series
    • Psychology 100                                           to be taken during the fall semester of the student’s
    • Psychology 200                                           senior year, a second course from this series to be taken
    • Psychology 299                                           during spring of the senior year, and collaboration with
    • One methods and analyses course and corequisite          a faculty member on a year-long senior Honors research
      in the 310-328 series                                    project.
    • One methods and analyses course and corequisite          Related Fields
      in the 330-348 series                                    Interdisciplinary Concentration in Neuroscience for
    • One course in the 433-449 series                         Biology and Psychology Majors: see section titled
    • Psychology elective hours sufficient to bring total       Interdisciplinary Concentrations
      hours in Psychology to 35
                                                               Interdisciplinary Major in Cognitive Science
For the Bachelor of Science degree:
Thirty-five semester hours in psychology, including:            The Psychology Minor
    • Psychology 100                                           Note: The grade point average of the department-specific
    • Psychology 200                                           and related-area coursework comprising the major or
    • Psychology 299                                           minor must be no less than 2.00 with no course grade
    • One methods and analyses course and corequisite          below C- (1.7).
      in the 310-328 series                                       Twenty-four semester hours in psychology
    • One methods and analyses course and corequisite          including:
      in the 330-348 series                                         • Psychology 100
    • Two courses in the 433-449 series                             • Psychology 200
    • Psychology elective hours sufficient to bring total            • Psychology 299
      hours in Psychology to 35                                     • One methods and analyses course and corequisite
   Seventeen semester hours in related areas, consisting of:          in the 310-328 series
    • Math 211-212 or Math 231-232                                  • One methods and analyses course and corequisite
    • Either Mathematics 235, 245, or 312 or                          in the 330-348 series
      Computer Science 150 or 155
    • Either Biology 201 or Chemistry 141 or Physics           Study Abroad
      101-102 or Physics 131-132                               Psychology majors are encouraged to take advantage
                                                               of study abroad. The key to successful integration of
And for all degrees:                                           a study abroad experience with a psychology major is
No more than four semester hours of Psychology 299             early and careful planning with the student’s advisor and
may be applied to the 35 semester hours required in            department chair. In most cases students will want to
                                                               have their final three semesters on campus. Therefore,
                                                SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: CURRICULA/PSYCHOLOGY • 161



if a student anticipates participating in a study abroad       PSYC 313 Social Psychology
program, the best times to be away are the sophomore           Critical overview of current theory and research in social
year, the first semester of the junior year, or during a        psychology, with emphasis on conceptual and empirical
summer.                                                        work on social cognition, social influence, affective
                                                               processes, attraction, altruism, aggression and group
COURSES                                                        dynamics. Prerequisite: Psychology 200 with a grade of
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychological Science                 C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.
Scientific exploration of human behavior, with emphasis
on scientific and technological skills involved in the          PSYC 314 Social Psychology: Methods and Analyses
process of conducting psychological research. Three            Intensive laboratory experience focusing on
lecture and two laboratory hours a week. 4 sem. hrs.           methodological, computing and statistical skills
(FSSA)                                                         indigenous to experimental social psychology.
                                                               Corequisite: Psychology 313. 3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses
Introduction to research methods and statistical               PSYC 315 Adult Development
procedures in psychological science. Emphasis on               Critical examination of research, theory and methods of
mastering fundamental scientific and technological              cognitive processes associated with adulthood and aging,
skills associated with literature review, research design,     including thinking, learning, intelligence, memory,
experimental manipulation, data collection, data               problem solving, creativity and wisdom. Prerequisite:
analysis, data graphics, data interpretation and scientific     Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.
writing. Five lecture and two laboratory hours a week.
                                                               PSYC 316 Adult Development: Methods and
Note: To be eligible for enrollment in 300-level and 400-
                                                               Analyses
level psychology courses, students must pass Psychology
                                                               Intensive coverage of experimental and statistical
200 with a grade of C- (1.7) or better. Prerequisite:
                                                               methods used to study cognitive processes in adulthood.
Psychology 100. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               Extensive use of computers to design and analyze
PSYC 249 Special Topics                                        research pertinent to cognitive aging. Corequisite:
Special course offerings to explore specific directions         Psychology 315. 3 sem. hrs.
within subdiscipline of psychology. May be taken more
                                                               PSYC 317 Applied Social Psychology: Theory and
than once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite:
                                                               Research
Stated when course is offered. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                               Critical overview of theory and research in a behavioral
PSYC 299 Integrated Topics                                     or social subdiscipline of psychology. Prerequisite:
Special course offerings that provide an integrative           Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.
perspective of psychological theories, issues and research
                                                               PSYC 318 Applied Social Psychology: Methods and
across two or more disciplinary (or subdisciplinary)
                                                               Analyses
contexts. Prerequisite: Psychology 100. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               Methodology and analytic procedures used in
PSYC 300 History and Systems of Psychology                     psychological research with in-depth application to
History of psychology and of major schools of thought          a behavioral or social subdiscipline of psychology.
and their viewpoints. Recommended for majors who               Corequisite: Psychology 317. 3 sem. hrs.
are planning to attend graduate school in psychology.
                                                               PSYC 319 Psychopathology: Theory and Research
Prerequisite: Psychology 299. 4 sem. hrs.
                                                               Critical examination of research and theory in
PSYC 311 Child Development                                     psychopathology and behavior disorders including the
Critical examination of research and theory on developmental   phenomenology, etiology, assessment and treatment
changes and processes from prenatal through preadolescent      of major forms of psychological disorders. Emphasis
periods. Emphasis on theoretical and empirical work on         on an integrative approach incorporating clinical,
historical foundations, behavior genetics, attachment,         developmental, biological and sociocultural perspectives.
development of perception, cognition, language and social      Prerequisite: Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better.
contexts and relationships. Prerequisite: Psychology 200       3 sem. hrs.
with a grade of C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.
                                                               PSYC 320 Psychopathology: Methods and Analyses
PSYC 312 Child Development: Methods and Analyses               Intensive laboratory experience focused on conceptual,
Intensive laboratory experience focusing on conceptual,        methodological and analytical skills used in clinical
methodological and analytical skills employed in               psychology and investigation of psychopathology and
investigation of child development. Corequisite:               behavior disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 317. 3 sem.
Psychology 311. 3 sem. hrs.                                    hrs.
162 • THE UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND



PSYC 321 The Psychology of Organizations                     dynamic, open-ended qualities of the healthy, normal
Critical Examination of major theoretical orientations       self and on the construction of self-identity, especially in
and methodological approaches that bridge the fields of       relationship to one’s sense of meaning in life. 3 sem. hrs.
social psychology and organizational behavior. Topics
include information processing, decision making, social      PSYC 351 Religion and Psychology
influence, leadership and group dynamics. 3 sem. hrs.         For millennia, religion and psychology have addressed
                                                             issues pertaining to the nature and functioning of the
PSYC 322 The Psychology of Organizations:                    human soul (anima) or mind (psyche). Will explore some
Methods and Analyses                                         of the intertwined history of religion and psychology,
Intensive laboratory experience focusing on                  including some of the religious underpinnings of
methodological, statistical and computing skills             modern psychology, as well as the psychological
associated with theory and research on the psychology        foundations of religious experience, doctrine, ritual and
of organizations. 3 sem. hrs.                                belief. Emphasis will be placed upon the psychology of
                                                             religions. (Same as Religion 364.) 3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 331 Behavioral Neuroscience
Biological and physiological processes involved in           PSYC 359 Special Topics
central and peripheral regulation of animal and human        Special course offerings to explore specific direction
behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 200 with a grade of       within subdisciplinary area of psychology. May be taken
C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.                                    for credit more than once when topics vary. Prerequisite:
                                                             Stated when course is offered. 3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 332 Behavioral Neuroscience: Methods and
Analyses                                                     PSYC 361 Independent Research
Intensive experience with techniques and approaches          Individual research conducted in collaboration with
used in design, execution and analysis of research in        faculty. Note: No more than six semester hours
behavioral neuroscience. Corequisite: Psychology 331.        may count toward a Psychology major. Prerequisites:
3 sem. hrs.                                                  Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better and
                                                             permission of supervising instructor. 1-3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 333 Cognitive Science
Critical examination of interdisciplinary studies of         PSYC 388 Individual Internship
knowledge representation, information processing             Supervised independent work in field situation designed
and learning with theories and methods drawn from            to give student applied experience after completion
psychology, computer science, linguistics, philosophy        of appropriate coursework in subarea of Psychology.
and neuroscience. Prerequisite: Psychology 200 with a        Prerequisite: Course from the Psychology series 250-299
grade of C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.                           appropriate to the internship setting. 1-3 sem. hrs.
PSYC 334 Cognitive Science: Methods and Analyses             PSYC 399 Junior Thesis
Intensive experience with techniques used in computer        Critical overview of major developments in history and
simulation, experimental program design, and data            philosophy of science, with specific focus on philosophy,
processing and analysis in interdisciplinary study of        history and current status of psychological science.
cognition. Corequisite: Psychology 333. 3 sem. hrs.          Emphasis placed on developing individual research
                                                             proposals for senior honors research. Prerequisites:
PSYC 335 Cognition: The Psychology of Information            Minimum overall grade point average of 3.30 and
Critically examines attention, memory (both conscious        permission of instructor. 4 sem. hrs.
and unconscious), learning, categorization, problem
solving, decision making and design, and aims to apply       PSYC 433 Multivariate Statistics
these topics to life in the information age. Prerequisite:   Multiple variable research design and applied
Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better. 3 sem. hrs.     multivariate analyses, including multiple regression,
                                                             factor analysis and multivariate analysis of variance.
PSYC 336 Cognition: The Psychology of                        Prerequisite: Psychology 200 with a grade of C- or better.
Information: Methods and Analyses                            4 sem. hrs.
Intensive laboratory experience using the methodology
and analytic approaches of cognitive psychology to           PSYC 435 Advanced Personality and Social
conduct original research. Corequisite: Psychology 335.      Psychology
3 sem. hrs.                                                  Critical examination of theory and research associated