Sandusky County Comprehensive Plan by gjmpzlaezgx

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									 Putting It All Together




   Sandusky County Comprehensive Plan
         for Children and Youth
          July 2007 – June 2009


                  Commiissiioned by::
                   Comm ss oned by
   Sandusky Countty Famiilly and Chiilldren Fiirstt Counciill
   Sandusky Coun y Fam y and Ch dren F rs Counc

                     Develloped by::
                     Deve oped by
The Sandusky Countty Comprehensiive Pllanniing Commiittttee
The Sandusky Coun y Comprehens ve P ann ng Comm ee

                          May 2007
                          May 2007

                                                     Pg. 1   10/26/2011
                                                2


                         Table of Contents


Executive Summary                              Pages 3-5
Foreword                                            Page 6
Our Partners                                   Pages 7-8
Our Mission., Vision, and History             Pages 9-15
Our Model                                    Pages 16-18
Our Needs Assessment                         Pages 18-28
Our Resource Assessment and Gap Analysis     Pages 29-32
Our Plan                                     Pages 32-33
Contact Information                             Page 34
                                                                                 3


                        Executive Summary
County Family and Children First Councils (FCFC) are required to develop an
annual plan that identifies the local interagency efforts to increase child well-
being in the county. The Sandusky County efforts include FCFC and the
organization and structure of the Partnerships for Success planning process to
identify local priorities to increase child well-being.

Long Term Outcomes and Commitments:
The Sandusky County local priorities will focus on the three following long-
term commitments and outcomes: 1) Sandusky County Children Are Ready for
School, 2) Children and Youth Succeed in School, and 3) Children and Youth
Engage in Healthy Behaviors.

Intermediate Outcomes and Target Impact Areas:
To prepare children for school and ensure children and youth succeed in
school, Sandusky County will focus on the following target impact areas: 1)
Increase school success, 2) Decrease behaviors associated with mental illness,
and, 3) Decrease substance abuse for youth and parents/guardians.

To sustain the efforts for children and youth to engage in healthy behaviors,
Sandusky County will focus on the following target impact areas: 1) Decrease
youth substance abuse, 2) Decrease teen pregnancy, 3)Decrease teen
delinquency and, 4) Decrease teen violence.

Short Term Outcomes and Action Steps:
Success measure for children ready for school: Increase the percent of four year
olds eligible for fall kindergarten cognitively and socially prepared to attend
kindergarten.

Success measures for children and youth succeed in school include: 1) Increase
the percent of students passing achievement tests, 2) Increase the percent of
students who have a 95% attendance rate or better, 3) Increase the percent of
students entering 9th grade who graduate from high school and, 4) Increase the
passage rates for students with disabilities on Ohio’s achievement tests.

Success measures for children and youth engaging in healthy behaviors include:
1) Increase percent of youth who do not use tobacco, 2) Increase percent of
youth who do not drink alcohol, 3) Increase percent of youth who do not use
drugs or other illegal substances, 4) Decrease annual birth rate to teenagers, 5)
Increase the percent of teen mothers who receive first trimester prenatal care,
                                                                               4


6) Decrease low birth weight births to all mothers, 7) Decrease the percent of
teen mothers with medical risk factors during pregnancy, 8) Decrease the
percent of mothers who smoke during pregnancy, and 9) Decrease the percent
of court involved children and youth.

Strategy and Recommendations:

To work toward children being ready for school, Sandusky County will:
1)Utilize the Early Childhood Coordinating Committee to develop a local
professional development training strategy for preschool providers to enhance
Sandusky County’s early learning system. Identify strategies to increase
awareness of kindergarten readiness reading, literacy, communication skills, and
emotional-social development for pre-school operators and parents/guardians
2) Identify and support resources for parents/guardians to help them prepare
their children ages 0-5 years for school, and engage them in the governance of
Sandusky County’s early learning system; 3) Create a reliable financing system
for Help Me Grow and other best and promising practice early learning
services 4) Evaluate the effectiveness of the pilot implementation of the
parental support evidence based program, The Incredible Years 5) Establish
committee to build a baseline health/mental health status profile for children
ages 0-5 and 6-11 years using secondary data sources 6) Work with all the state
funded programs, and school districts in Sandusky County to identify Get It
Got It Go, Kindergarten Readiness and Literacy (KRA-L) data or its equivalent
to quantify and trend the kindergarten readiness for students entering school
each fall.

To work toward children and youth succeeding in school, Sandusky
County will: 1) Establish a pilot school/community group for the Fremont
school district and communication strategies for all county school districts, to
include school leadership, community agencies and services, and
parents/guardian who collectively identify issues and problem-solve, 2) Work
as a community to sustain and expand effective after-school programs for at-
risk students, 3)Establish a network of agencies and partners outside of the
juvenile court system for referrals to the Strengthening Families programs for
elementary and middle school youth and parents/guardians and, 4) Establish a
committee to research the feasibility of implementing the evidence based and
comprehensive strategies of Project Achieve.
                                                                               5



To work to sustain children and youth choosing healthy behaviors,
Sandusky County will: 1) continue to implement the LifeSkills substance
abuse prevention program in elementary and middle schools throughout
Sandusky County 2) continue and expand Communities Mobilizing Against Alcohol
strategies to promote a community norm that discourages under-aged drinking.
Conduct at least one seller/server training annually for liquor permit holders in
Sandusky County 3) continue Asset Development Teams in Sandusky County
schools 4) expand the referral base for Strengthening Families to include youth
outside of the juvenile court system 5)Sustain and enhance the implementation
of the evidence based teen pregnancy prevention curricula across the Sandusky
County school districts to include Safer Choices, Reducing the Risk, Making a
Difference, Postponing Sexual Involvement Series (PSI).


Our Stakeholders

    Sandusky County Community members who participated in the 2003
     Partnerships for Success Planning Process
    Sandusky County Parents
    Early Childhood Coordinating Committee
    Children’s Trust Fund Committee
    Clinical Committee/ABC Initiative
    The Sandusky County Prevention Partnership
    The Sandusky County Teen Pregnancy Prevention Advisory Group
    Health Partners of Sandusky County
    Sandusky County Family and Children First Council


This strategic planning process was facilitated by Kathy S. Silvestri, MPH,
Director of Health Planning at the Hospital Council of Northwest Ohio.
                                                                              6


Foreword
This 2007 Sandusky County Comprehensive Plan for Children and Youth is the
result of the long term support, commitment and dedication of our community
partners to work together in a positive fashion to improve the health and well
being of the citizens of Sandusky County. The information presented in this
plan is intended to expand on the work of various groups who have, in concert,
defined issues of risk to the health and well-being of children, youth and
families in Sandusky County. Based on original health assessment work by
Health Partners, the Family and Children First Council has been able to help
link groups collaboratively through a strong base of evidence and expand on
community efforts to reduce risk and increase protective factors. As a result of
this collaboration and a strong belief in the guiding principles of the Council,
community stakeholders have been able to write better grants, formulate strong
strategic plans and answer calls to action. The result is a community that
focuses on wellness, improving the general health status, increasing access to
services and serving unmet needs. Health and human service programs, health
care providers, government, managed care organizations and other groups and
individuals have gained a factual understanding of Sandusky County’s
behavioral risk issues. This latest strategic effort should help inspire the
community to work together to remove barriers to health improvement. It is
the Family and Children First Council’s wish that community groups will
continue to come forward to meet the challenges presented by this
Comprehensive Plan.

Sincerely,


Nancy Cochran                     Dave Pollick
FCFC Chair                        FCFC Comprehensive Planning Workgroup Chair

Sandusky County Family and Children First Council (FCFC)
                                                                             7


Our Partners
The Sandusky County Family and Children First Council (FCFC) wishes to
acknowledge the numerous contributions of the following partners and
stakeholders. Their continued commitment to the FCFC Vision and Mission
helps to make Sandusky County a unique and special place to live and work.

Sandusky County Family and Children First Council
Members
 Cindy Bilby, Director, Sandusky Co. Dept. of Job and Family Services
 Nancy Cochran, Executive Director, Mental Health & Recovery Services Bd.
  Of Seneca, Sandusky, Wyandot Counties
 Brad Culbert, Judge, Sandusky Co. Juvenile Court
 Cheryl Cotter, Superintendent, Sandusky Co. Bd. of MRDD
 Joyce Garvey, Representative, Early Childhood Coordinating Committee
 Loretta Gonzalez, Family Representative
 Sharon Hartenstein, Parole Officer, Ohio Dept. of Youth Services
 Linda Havens, Executive Director, United Way of Sandusky County
 Cate Knipp, Family Services Specialist, WSOS
 Kay Konwiczka, Family Representative
 Dawn Kroh, Site Director, Firelands Counseling & Recovery Services
 Dan Liskai, Commissioner, Sandusky County Commissioners
 Joe Liszak, CEO, Community Health Services
 Sharon Mader, Extension Agent, OSU Extention, Sandusky Co.
 Doug Picciuto, Superintendent, Sandusky Co. Educational Service Center
 Traci McCaudy, Superintendent, Fremont City Schools
 Dave Pollick, Health Commissioner, Sandusky Co. Health Department
 Nancy Sattler, Representative, Prevention Partnership, Dean, Terra
  Community College
 Karen Talbert, Family Representative
 Jim Weaver, Councilman, City of Fremont
 Dennis Wolf, Family Representative

Planning facilitation was provided by Kathy S. Silvestri, MPH, Director of
Health Planning for the Hospital Council of Northwest Ohio.
                                                                                                                                         8


Comprehensive Planning Workgroup Members
   Nancy Cochran, Mental Health and Recovery Services
   Beth Crawford, Help Me Grow, Health Department
   Jon Detwiler, Clyde-Green Springs Schools
   Brad Culbert, Juvenile Court
   Stacey Gibson, Prevention Partnership, Health Department
   Cathy Glassford, Sandusky County Family and Children First Council
   Loretta Gonzelez, Parent
   Sharon Hartenstein, Ohio Department of Youth Services
   Rebecca Holland, Health Department
   Cheryl Huss, Mental Health and Recovery Services Board
   Kathleen Nalley, Educational Service Center
   Cate Knipp, WSOS Community Action Commission
   Dawn Kroh, Firelands Counseling and Recovery Services
   Maggie Magoon, Ohio State University Extension/Juvenile Court
   Penny Moore, WSOS Community Action Commission
   Dave Pollick, Health Department
   Jayne Repp, Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
   Violetta Rhea, Educational Service Center, Fremont Schools
   Nancy Sattler, Terra Community College
   Laurie Selvey, Fremont Schools
   Wynn Schell, Wraparound, Sandusky County FCF Council
   Dennis Wolf, Parent

                                  Plan Development Table of Organization


                                                    Sandusky County Family and Children First Council



                                                                     Comprehensive
                                                              Strategic Planning Committee


                                        Community                                                        Council
                                         Partners                                                       Committees


             Community                                                                                                  Early Childhood
              Members                                                                                                Coordinating Committee


               Health                                                                                                  Clinical Committee/
              Partners                                                                                                    ABC Initiative


             Prevention                                                                                              Children’s Trust Fund
             Partnership                                                                                                  Committee


      Teen Pregnancy Prevention
           Advisory Group
                                                                               9


Sandusky County Family and Children First
Council Vision
Sandusky County is a place where all individuals and families are healthy in
mind, spirit and body, living in a safe, supportive community that provides
opportunities for successful learning, working, playing and living.


Partnerships for Success Mission
To embrace a collaborative and coordinated approach toward community
action to increase the number of children and youth who are ready for and
succeed in school and to decrease the number of children and youth who
engage in risky behaviors in Sandusky County.


Our History

What is Partnerships for Success?
Partnerships for Success (PFS) is a collaborative process whereby counties
develop a comprehensive plan for positive youth development.


Where Did PFS Originate?
PFS is an expansion of the federal Comprehensive Strategy program governed
by the U.S. Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Office. Twenty Ohio
counties, including Sandusky County completed the PFS process in 2003 and
2004.

How Did Sandusky County Become Involved in
PFS?
Sandusky County has a long-standing history of collaboration and planning
based on a continuous quality cycle of assessment, planning, implementation,
and evaluation. The 2001 Sandusky County Community Health Assessment,
commissioned by the Health Partners of Sandusky County, provided the
                                                                              10


quantitative data to begin the quality cycle. In the spring of 2003, Sandusky
County received a competitive State Incentive Grant from the Ohio
Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services to complete the
Partnerships for Success Planning Process. The completion of this planning
process resulted in the Sandusky County Strategic Plan completed in the fall of
2004. The three year plan outlined several key strategies to reduce teen
substance abuse, increase school success, and to reduce teen pregnancy. In
2005, Sandusky County was awarded a multi-year Drug-Free Communities
grant to fund youth substance abuse prevention and cessation strategies.
Sandusky County has received grant funding to implement youth tobacco use
prevention programming from the Ohio Tobacco Prevention Foundation
through the Northwest Ohio Strategic Alliance for Tobacco Control for each
of the last four years.

Did the 2004 Sandusky County Strategic Plan Lead
to Actions?
Since 2004, several agencies and partnerships have acted to implement the
strategies and strategic actions to increase the number of children and youth
who are ready for and succeed in school and to reduce the number of youth
who engage in risky behaviors as recommended in the plan including the
Sandusky County Prevention Partnership, the Sandusky County Teen
Pregnancy Prevention, the Access to Better Care Initiative, the Children’s Trust
Fund Committee (Child Abuse Prevention), and the Early Childhood
Coordinating Committee.

Strategy 1
Implement evidence-based programs that serve youth populations county-wide

Strategy 2
Implement programs that provide standardized messages from multiple sources.

Strategy 3
Implement programs that include pre and post test evaluation.

Strategy 4
Provide upper elementary and middle school programs.
                                                                             11


Strategic Actions Implemented by the Sandusky
County Prevention Partnership

Action 1: Implement Evidence-Based Programming
1.   LifeSkills has been implemented in Fremont Middle School and in
     Fremont and Bellevue City Elementary Schools.
2.   Strengthening Families has been implemented for Sandusky County families
     with children ages 12-17 years, and piloted for families with children
     ages 6-11.

Action 2: Implement Programs that Standardize
    Messages from Multiple Sources
1.   Communities Mobilizing Against Alcohol strategies were implemented.
     Seller/Server trainings are provided twice each year to liquor permit
     holders in Sandusky County.
2.   Collaborated with local schools to provide alcohol and drug free
     messages and activities to youth during Red Ribbon Week and Family
     Fest Celebrations.
4.   In 2005, the Prevention Partnership applied for and received a Drug
     Free Communities Grant to enhance community efforts to reduce teen
     substance abuse.

Action 3: Design Standardized Evaluation Strategies for
Youth Interventions
1.   The Partnerships for Success Academy provided a community training
     to help design standardized evaluation strategies for youth interventions
     based on the PfS Program Model.
2.   Prevention Partnership and other FCFC programs, such as LifeSkills and
     Strengthening Families are evaluated by pre and post-tests.

Strategic Actions Implemented by the Sandusky
County Teen Pregnancy Prevention
Action 1: Implement Evidence-Based Programming
1.   In 2005, a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Focus Group completed a
     strategic planning process which suggested updating sexual health and
     pregnancy prevention programming being implemented to evidence-
     based curriculums.
                                                                            12


2.   Several middle schools including Clyde, Bellevue Immaculate
     Conception, Gibsonburg and Fremont have completed the School Asset
     Team Project.
3.   The Safer Choices program began during the 2006-2007 school year in
     Clyde-Green Springs Middle School and High School.
4.   Postponing Sexual Involvement (PSI) continued at Green Springs and Lakota
     Elementary Schools and has also been implemented at St. Ann and St.
     Joseph Schools.
5.   Reducing the Risk will be offered to Sandusky County youth who are on
     probation through Juvenile Court; and components of Making a Difference
     will be provided at the Fremont Middle School.

Action 2: Design Standardized Evaluation Strategies for
Youth Interventions
1.   The Sandusky County Teen Prevention Program has contracted with a
     researcher from the University of Toledo for evaluation of the programs
     being implemented.

Strategic Actions Being Implemented by the
Sandusky County Access to Better Care (ABC)
Initiative

Action 1: Continue identifying and communicating best
and promising practice programs and interventions in
the targeted impact areas.
1.   The ABC Initiative has written a blueprint plan that addresses the
     ultimate goal of a continuum of care for behavioral health care services
     for children emphasizing evidence based strategies and evaluation to
     measure effectiveness. The continuum of care includes services to
     families with children birth through teenage years, and includes
     prevention, early intervention, and treatment.
2.   Existing, new, and competitive ABC funding sources have been utilized
     to implement: Multi-systemic Therapy (MST) for juvenile offenders,
     Strengthening Families previously untargeted youth, Wraparound Services
     for children with non-behavioral, academic, and behavioral health needs,
     Incredible Years, DECA programming, DINA school for pre schools,
     Early Childhood Mental Health consultation, and to assist with or to
     sustain many other proven strategies.
                                                                                       13


Action 2: Continue to assess the health behaviors of
    Sandusky County adults and youth.
In 2005, the Health Partners of Sandusky County commissioned a second
community health assessment to quantify the prevalence of key health risks and
risk behaviors. After a careful review and analysis of the results, Health
Partners have identified the following key issues and concerns for the
community:
                                 Health Partners
                            2005 Health Assessment
               Key Issues and Concerns for Youth and Adults

          2005 Adult Concerns                          2005 Youth Concerns

Cardiovascular Disease                       Weight Control Issues
 Morbidity and mortality rates correlated    Increasing youth obesity rates
   with rates of multiple risk factors        Increased number of youth at risk for
                                               being overweight
Adult Binge Drinking
                                             Under Aged Drinking
Women’s Health                                Increasing rates of 30 days use of alcohol
 Increasing breast cancer rates              Increasing rates of binge drinking
 Mammography screening rates lower
                                             Smoking Rates
Adult Rates of Depression and Suicide         Decreasing since 2001 assessment
 Increasing rates                            Sustain current prevention efforts
Weight Control Issues                        Sexual Health
 Increasing numbers of overweight and        Early initiation of sexual activity
  obese adults                                Number of youth who are sexually active
 Correlation with risk factors for           Number of youth who have participated
  cardiovascular diseases                       in oral sex
Diabetes                                     Suicide Ideation Rates for Middle and
 Rates are higher than Ohio and U.S.        High School Students
 African Americans and Hispanics at risk


Reducing underage drinking and smoking are being addressed in the plan by
the Prevention Partnership. Reducing teen sexual activity and teen pregnancy
are being addressed by the Sandusky County Teen Pregnancy Prevention.
Reducing youth suicide ideation and suicide rates are being addressed by the
Access to Better Care Initiative and the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Seneca,
Sandusky, and Wyandot Counties.
                                                                               14


Strategic Actions Implemented by the Sandusky
County Children’s Trust Fund Committee

Action 1: Implement Promising Practice Programming
1. A 14-session curriculum, including topics that address risk and protective
   factors is taught to high risk youth, including Clyde and Educational Service
   Center Alternative School Students.
2. In-home visits are provided to Help Me Grow parents and their children.
   Home visitors provide parents with information on child development,
   nutrition, health, mental health, and discipline on home visits. Attachment
   is encouraged by providing activities through the PIPE (Partners in
   Parenting Education) curriculum that builds and strengthens the parent and
   child relationship.

Action 2: Implement Programs that Standardize
     Messages from Multiple Sources
1. Family Fun events are provided which include relationship building
   activities, information on parenting, child abuse and neglect prevention, and
   referral information.
2. An annual community wide child abuse prevention event is planned in April.
3. “Parenting tips” are displayed on billboards during Child Abuse Prevention
   month in April, during Parents Week in September, and throughout the year
   that relate to other issues including teen substance abuse prevention and
   teen pregnancy prevention.

Action 3: Design Standardized Evaluation Strategies for
Interventions
1. Strategies are evaluated by pre and post tests.

Strategic Actions Implemented by the Early
Childhood Coordinating Committee

Action 1: Implement Promising Practice Programming
   1. Strategies are based on scientific evidence which strongly suggests that a
      child’s success is significantly determined by the quality of nurturing in
      the first three years of life. Help Me Grow provides important
      information on prenatal and infant care and development, positive
                                                                                15


   parenting, safety, and abuse prevention. In addition, Help Me Grow
   provides an array of direct services into a seamless, accessible, family-
   friendly system administered locally by county-based organizations.
   Transition to preschool services is also provided to families as their children
   near their third birthday.

Action 2: Design Standardized Evaluation Strategies for
Interventions
1. Help Me Grow and other early childhood services are evaluated using the
   HOME inventory and other pre and post survey tools. Family satisfaction
   surveys also are used to obtain input from families and as an additional tool
   to access service quality.
                                                                               16


Putting It All Together

Ohio Family and Children First County FCFC Annual
Planning Guidance

Effective August 2006, House Bill 289 increased accountability for state and
local family and children first councils. One section of the bill requires county
councils to develop an annual plan that identifies the local interagency efforts
to increase child well-being in the county. The Sandusky County efforts
include the county Family & Children First Council (FCFC) and the
organization and structure of the Partnerships for Success planning process to
identify local priorities to increase child well-being. The Sandusky County local
priorities will focus on one or more of the six commitments to child well-being:

1.    Expectant parents and newborns thrive.
2.    Infants and toddlers thrive.
3.    Children are ready for school.
4.    Children and youth succeed in school.
5.    Youth choose healthy behaviors.
6.    Youth successfully transition into adulthood.

The progress of meeting the local priorities will be monitored with measurable
indicators identified by the Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning Group
and Family and Children First Council. The indicators will be reported on an
annual basis to the county’s board of county commissioners and the Ohio
Family and Children First Cabinet Council. The first annual plan must be
submitted by July 1, 2007 as a biennial plan for FY 08 and 09.

Sandusky County Family and Children First Council
Annual Plan

The Sandusky County Family and Children First Council (FCFC) annual plan
incorporates the multi-agency efforts initiated by the 2004 Sandusky County
Strategic Plan. The Partnerships for Success Planning Process will identify
local priorities to increase child well-being, outcome measures, and strategic
actions which can be communicated to the community as one, comprehensive
strategic plan for the County.
                                                                              17


Our Planning Model
The Ohio Family and Children First Council Annual Planning Guidance was
used to determine the Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning Committee
meeting agendas, timelines, and objectives. The annual planning guidance:

 Introduces the Six Commitments to Increase Child Well-Being as the broad,
  long-term goals that if addressed, lead to significant improvement in the
  physical and mental health and development of Sandusky County children
  and youth.
 Identifies local priorities (referred to as targeted impact areas in the
  Partnerships for Success planning process) which are the intermediate goals
  that focus on key community issues such as substance abuse or teen
  pregnancy.
 Utilizes measurable indicators to track progress and trends over time toward
  meeting the long-term and intermediate goals.
 Identifies short term goals that include key risk and/or protective factors
  and individual and community assets that contribute to or directly impact
  the priority areas.
 Includes success measures to monitor progress toward short-term goals.
 Identifies strategies to address priority areas and short-term goals.

Beginning in January 2007, the Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning
Committee met seven times (7) and completed the following planning steps:

1.    Community Needs Assessment including:
        Data collection (quantitative and qualitative)
        Selecting priority intermediate outcomes/targeted impacts
        Selecting measurable indicators
        Identifying key risk/protective factors and/or assets (short-term
          goals)
2.    Resource Assessment including:
       Creating an inventory of current programs, services, and activities in
         the community that are specifically related to the selected priorities
         and associated short-term goals.
3.    Gap Analysis including:
       Identifying any gaps in the continuum of care for the populations
         most at risk
       Identifying any systems issues that need to be addressed
                                                                             18


4.    Selecting Strategies to impact a priority area based on one
      or more of the following:
       Enhancing existing efforts
       Implementing new programs or services
       Building infrastructure
       Implementing evidence based practices
       Feasibility of implementation
5.    Determining Action Steps

Our Needs Assessment
The Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning Committee began its work by
conducting a needs assessment for the purpose of defining targets for change
within the community. Quantitative data was collected for each of the Six
Commitments for Child Well-Being from multiple sources including state and
local agencies. The data were supplemented with public opinion gathered from
county school official interviews and the planning committee members which
included information from parents and consumers of services. Data sources
included:

 Sandusky County Health Assessments (2001 and 2005)
 2004 Sandusky County Partnerships for Success Strategic Plan and Results
  for 2004-2006
 Key Informants (2007)
 Ohio Department of Health, Data Warehouse (2003-2005)
 Sandusky County Health Department (WIC Data) (2006)
 Sandusky County Juvenile Court (2005-2006)
 University of Virginia, Crime Statistics Lab
 Fremont City Schools KRA-L Data (2006 and 2007)
 Ohio Department of Education (2004-2006)
 Sandusky County Job and Family Services (2006)
 WSOS Annual Report (2006)
 Children’s Defense Fund (2004)
 Children’s Hunger Alliance (2005)
 Sandusky County Teen Pregnancy Prevention (2005-2006)
                                                                                19


During the needs assessment, several key community issues that impact child
well-being were reviewed and discussed including teen pregnancy rates that
seem static, increasing rates of alcohol use by under-aged youth, adult alcohol
use and abuse, a recent trend of increasing numbers of children less than
prepared to enter kindergarten based on screenings conducted by the Fremont
City Schools, county high school graduation rates below the state average, and
disparities in state achievement test scores by grade, classroom subject, and by
race and ethnicity.


Our Needs Assessment Results

Commitments of Focus
After careful consideration, The Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning
Committee has determined that the community should focus on Commitment
3-Sandusky County Children Are Ready for School and Commitment 4-
Children and Youth Succeed in School.

In 2004, The Sandusky County Partnerships for Success planning process
identified challenges for the Lakota, Bellevue, and Fremont City schools which
still exist in the areas of state achievement test scores and other school
indicators. The 2005-2006 Ohio Department of Education School Report
Cards indicate that Fremont City Schools remains the most diverse school
district in the county with just under 69% of the students White, 13.5%
Hispanic, 9% African American, and 8% multi-racial. Fremont also has the
largest percentage of economically disadvantaged students as well at 45%
followed by Lakota with 33%, Gibsonburg at 27% and Bellevue at 26%.
Bellevue School District has the highest percentage of students with disabilities
at 21%, followed closely by Lakota at 19%, and Fremont and Clyde-Green
Springs at nearly 15% each.
                                                                                                                                                   20


                 Student Profiles by School District 2005-2006

          100


           80


           60
Percent




           40


           20


            0
                   African          White          Hispanic        Multi-Racial        Economically     Limited English   Students with
                  American                                                            Disadvantaged                        Disabilities




          Clyde- Green Springs              Fremont             Gibsonburg                    Lakota          Woodmore                 Bellevue

           Source: Ohio Department of Education


           Being the largest and most diverse school district in the county presents
           Fremont City Schools with many challenges including a graduation rate that is
           slightly higher than similar school districts and the state standard of 85%, yet it
           is the lowest in the county.

                               Graduation Rates 2005-2006

                       100           98.9                                                                                              99



                                                     94.4                                                          95 95.1                  94.7
                                            94.1
                        95                                     93.3                          92.7
                                                                                                      92.1
                Rate




                        90                                              88.2
                                                                                   87.4


                        85


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                                                              School District                                                    Similar District
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  Large differences in math and reading proficiency scores exist for African
  American students in the Fremont City schools and math scores are also low
  for the Hispanic and multi-racial students of the district.


                  Fremont Students Proficient or Above AYP
                    Goals for Reading and Mathematics by
                           Race/Ethnicity 2005-2006

          100
                        78.7                                                                                                                 76.9
           80                         69.9                                                                 71.7

                                                                  60.8                                               60.7                           60.4

           60
Percent




                                                                              40.2
           40


           20


             0
                         White                            African American                             Hispanic                            Multi-Racial



                                                                Reading                                Mathematics



  For 2005-2006, all of the Sandusky County School districts obtained the 95%
  student attendance rate (Please note: some figures were rounded up to the nearest whole number).
               Attendance Rates 2005-2006

                 96                                                                                                                 95.9
                                                                                                                  95.8
                                                                                                                         95.6
                                                                                                       95.5
                                    95.4                 95.4

                                                                                     95.1 95.1
          Rate




                             95
                 95
                                           94.7                   94.7


                                                                            94.3



                 94
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                                       Be                  F re                   S                 so             o   od
                                                                             en              Gi
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                                                                           re
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                                                                Cl                                                       2005-2006
                                                        School District                                                  Similar District
                                                                                                                                                       22


The academic yearly proficiency test scores of Sandusky County
students with disabilities are consistently low with math scores being
especially challenging.

       Percent of Students with Disabilities Proficient
           or Above AYP Goals for Reading and
                  Mathematics 2005-2006


                     100

                      80                         68.4
                                65.4
                                                                                                                                    60
           Percent




                                       56.9
                      60                                                                                      51.9
                                                          44.6     42.4                     43
                                                                                                                                         35.6
                      40                                                      29.7               33

                      20

                       0
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                                                                               en                    ib                W
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                                                                       -G                                                                Reading
                                                                    de
                                                                 ly
                                                             C
                                                                                                                                         Mathematics


Commitment to Sustain
The Committee also determined that Commitment 5-Children and Youth
Engage in Health Behaviors must also be emphasized so that the existing
prevention programming and strategies to reduce teen pregnancy, reduce teen
substance abuse, and to decrease behaviors associated with mental illness are
sustained and evaluated for effectiveness.

Since the 2001 Sandusky County Community Health Assessment was
completed and recommendations from the 2004 Partnerships for Success
Strategic Plan have been implemented, the youth smoking rate has significantly
declined and the teen pregnancy rates have stabilized, yet the rates of youth
who are sexually active and who have participated in oral sex are concerns.
The 2005 Sandusky County Health Assessment has identified that alcohol use
for youth has increased since 2001.
                                                                                   23


Intermediate Goals
The Commitments to Child Well-being are long term goals that will take time
to achieve. To determine intermediate goals, the Planning Committee assigned
each of the Partnerships for Success Targeted Impacts to one or more of the
Six Commitments to Child Well-Being. PfS asserts that targeted impacts are
areas that directly affect positive youth development. In the 2004 Sandusky
County PfS Report to the Community, the top ranked targeted impact areas
were:
            Reduce Youth Substance Abuse
            Increase School Success
            Reduce Teen Pregnancy
Since that time, The Planning Committee identified the need to associate the
following targeted impact areas with the focus commitments of child well-
being assigning the following correlations:


Commitment to Child Well-Being            Associated Targeted Impact Area
(Long-Term Goal)                          (Intermediate Goal)
Sandusky County Children Are Ready for       Increase School Success
School                                       Decrease Behaviors Associated with
                                              Mental Illness
Sandusky County Children and Youth           Decrease Substance Abuse for Youth
Succeed in School                             and Parents/Guardians
Sandusky County Youth Engage in Healthy      Decrease Youth Substance Abuse
Behaviors                                    Decrease Teen Pregnancy
                                             Decrease Teen Delinquency
                                             Decrease Teen Violence

Indicators to Monitor
Indicators provide measures of progress achieved over time and comparisons
of actual program/strategy outcomes of the strategies and actions implemented
with those that were expected. The Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning
Committee has selected the following indicators by commitment:
                                                                                       24


Sandusky County Children are Ready for School
 Percent of 4 year-olds eligible for fall kindergarten cognitively and socially
  prepared to attend kindergarten
KRA-L Average scores                      Fall 2005                     Fall 2006

Bellevue                                                19.37                       21.97
Clyde Green Springs                                     21.14                       19.60
Fremont                                                  17.8                       17.13
Gibsonburg                                              22.64                       18.90
Lakota                                                  10.06                       19.16
Woodmoore                                               19.90                       20.10


Sandusky County Children and Youth Succeed in School
   Percent of students passing achievement tests.
   Percent of students who have a 95% attendance rate or better.
   Percent of students entering 9th grade who graduate from high school.
   Passage rates for students with disabilities on Ohio’s achievement tests.


Sandusky County Children and Youth Engage In
Healthy Behaviors
   Percent of youth who do not use tobacco.
   Percent of youth who do not drink alcohol.
   Percent of youth who do not use drugs or other illegal substances.
   Annual birth rate to teenagers.
   Percent of teen mothers who receive first trimester prenatal care
   Low birth weight births to all mothers
   Percent of teen mothers with medical risk factors during pregnancy
   Percent of mothers who smoked during pregnancy
   Number of court involved children and youth.

    Sandusky County Children and Youth Engage in Healthy Behaviors
     Court Involved Youth - Sandusky County Juvenile Court statistics
     2001
     446* youth with delinquency offenses (903 total offenses)
     107* youth with status offenses (118 total offenses)
     15* youth with traffic (drug/alcohol) offenses (17 total offenses)
     *81 of those youth have a combination of delinquency, status and/or
     traffic (d/a) offenses
     2005
     470* youth with delinquency offenses (917 total offenses)
     111* youth with status offenses (122 total offenses)
     8* youth with traffic (drug/alcohol) offenses (8 total offenses)
     *61 of those youth have both delinquency and status offenses
                                                                                            25


Indicator                                             Sandusky           Seneca   Ohio     U.S.
                                                      2005     2001      2005     2005     2005
% of youth who did not use tobacco in the past 30     81%      73%       83%      76%      77%
days
% of youth who did not drink alcohol in the past 30   56%       64%      65%      58%      57%
days
% of youth who did not use marijuana in the past 30   82%       83%      89%      79%      80%
days
Annual birth rate to teens 15-17*                     19.7               18.2     19.3
Annual birthrate to teens 10-19*                      19.1               19.2     19.6
% of mothers receiving 1st trimester prenatal care              52.4%    N/A      70.6%
(15-17)
% of mothers receiving 1st trimester prenatal care              70.7%             79.2%
(18-19)                                                         (2002)            (2002)
Teen mothers with medical risk factors during                   52.4     43.5     43.5
pregnancy (15-17)**
Teen mothers with medical risk factors during                   45.3     38.5
pregnancy (18-19)
% of mothers who smoked during pregnancy              19.5%              21.6%    17.4%
% of youth who have participated in oral sex          48%       N/A      N/A      N/A      N/A
Age of initiation of sexual activity                  39%
                                                      (by age
                                                      14)
% of 9-12th grade youth who have had sexual           44%       38%      31%      48%      47%
intercourse
Suicide deaths per 100,000 population (15-24 years)             16.3     18.4     9.4
                                                                (2000-
                                                                2002)
         *Teen birth rate per 1,000 live births
         **Rate per 1000 births


         Short-Term Goals and Success Measures
         The final task of the Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning Committee
         was to identify short-term goals that if achieved would lead to a desired change
         in the intermediate and long-term goals identified. The PfS planning process
         emphasizes conditions that can lead to a desired change in an intermediate goal.
         These conditions are referred to as risk, protective factors and assets (RPA’s).
         Risk factors are behaviors that youth and adults may engage in that are
         responsible for increasing the chances that violence, crime, or substance abuse
         will occur. Examples include the availability of drugs in a neighborhood, a
         family history of problem behaviors, or academic failure in school. Protective
         factors are behaviors and circumstances that buffer the effects of exposure to
                                                                              26


risk. Community models against violence and crime and substance abuse are
key examples of protective factors. Assets are positive experiences,
opportunities, and personal qualities that enhance positive outcomes for
children and adolescents. The Search Institute has identified 40 Developmental
Assets of healthy development that include family support, commitment to
learning, positive values, and empowerment.

The Sandusky County Comprehensive Planning Committee has determined
that the protective factors identified during the 2004 Sandusky County
Partnerships for Success planning process should continue to be emphasized.
These protective factors include:

   1.   Adult monitoring and/or supervision
   2.   Significant attachment to pro-social adult
   3.   Consistent, age-appropriate discipline
   4.   Friends do not engage in problem behavior
   5.   Increase in jobs with a family wage
   6.   Family and peers have attitude of disapproval toward problem behavior
   7.   Parent-Teacher cooperation
   8.   Family members value education
   9.   Student commitment to school

Due to the focus on increasing school success, the Committee has identified
one additional protective factor which should be emphasized by the
community which is:
   10. Specialized instruction for at-risk students
                                                                                         27


         Protective Factors by the Numbers

         During the 2005 Sandusky County Community Health Assessment youth ages
         12-18 years were asked a series of questions for the first time that assessed the
         youth perceptions of substance use and misuse. The following tables
         summarize the results.

                                  Degree of Disapproval of Use by Adults
How do you think your parent(s) or           Would     Would      Disapprove    Strongly
guardian(s) would feel about you:            Approve   Not Care   Some          Disapprove
Smoking 3-5 cigarettes per week                 1%        2%           11%            86%

Smoking one or more packs of cigarettes
                                                1%        1%           4%             94%
per day

Drinking beer, wine, or hard liquor nearly
                                                1%        3%           11%            85%
every day

Trying marijuana once or twice in your
                                                1%        5%           19%            75%
lifetime

Using marijuana once a month or more            1%        2%           6%             91%

Using pain medications once or twice in
                                                2%        4%           13%            81%
your lifetime

Using pain medications once a month or
                                                1%        1%           7%             91%
more

Use methamphetamines once or twice in
                                                1%        1%           8%             90%
your lifetime

Use methamphetamines once a month or
                                                2%        0%           2%             96%
more

Using other drugs like cocaine or heroin
                                                1%        1%           10%            88%
once to twice in your lifetime

Use other drugs like cocaine or heroin
                                                1%        1%           3%             95%
once a month or more
                                                                                                                                   28


                           Perception of Disapproval of Use by Peers
How many of your closest friends do you                          None of            A Few of                   Most of     All of Them
think have:                                                      Them               Them                       Them
Used tobacco during the past 30 days                                 41%                    43%                  12%             4%

Used marijuana during the past 30 days                               54%                    33%                  10%             3%

Been drunk during the past 30 days                                   37%                    38%                  20%             5%

Had some kind of alcoholic drink during the past 30
                                                                     33%                    35%                  24%             8%
days

Used methamphetamines during the past 30 days                        90%                     9%                   1%             0%

Used other drugs such as cocaine or heroin during
                                                                     84%                    13%                   2%             1%
the past 30 days

Used pain medication during the past 30 days                         80%                    15%                   4%             1%



Who would approve of you:                        No One                 My Closest                My                   My Brother/ Sister
                                                                        Friends                   Teachers
Smoking                                                75%                      19%                       1%                  8%

Drinking alcohol                                       56%                      36%                       3%                  15%

Using marijuana                                        77%                      19%                       1%                  7%

Using methamphetamines                                 95%                       3%                       1%                  1%

Using other drugs                                      94%                       4%                       1%                  1%

Using pain medications                                 88%                       8%                       1%                  2%
                                Percentages may not equal 100% as students could choose more than one answer
                                                                                 29


Our Resource Assessment and Gaps Analysis
The purpose of the resource assessment is to create a profile of current
programs, services and activities in Sandusky County that are related to the
areas of focus. A resource inventory was compiled that identified the specific
program/strategy/service, the responsible agency, populations served,
continuum of care (prevention, early intervention, treatment), and evidence of
effectiveness. One limitation of the resource assessment is that due to time
constraints, the list of programs and services should not be considered all
inclusive.

The gaps analysis begins by reviewing the results of the needs and resource
assessments. The purpose is to identify any gaps and issues that may impede
the commitments to child well-being.

Resource Information Sources
 2006 resource inventories from several Sandusky County school districts
  and agencies
 The 2004 Sandusky County Partnerships for Success Strategic Plan
 The 2006 Sandusky County Partnerships for Success Progress Report
 The 2006 Sandusky County Health Department Teen Pregnancy Prevention
  Annual Progress Report
 2005 Sandusky County Access to Better Care Initiative Children’s
  Behavioral Health Transformation Voluntary Blueprint Plan

Our Results
Long-Term Goal: Children Are Ready for School
1.    There are a limited number of programs and services available to
      children ages 0-3 and 3-5 years which promote kindergarten readiness.
2.    These programs and services are evaluated for effectiveness.

Gaps Identified

1.    There is a limited amount of county-level data available
      for children ages 0-5 and 6-11 years.
2.    Programs and services are needed to help Sandusky County parents
      prepare their children for kindergarten, especially for parents of children
      who are not participating in a pre-school program.
                                                                                30


3.   The Department of Education Content Standards for Early Childhood(0
     to 5) and School Age Content Standards are not well known to
     parents/guardian or the community.
4.   Sandusky County would benefit from a coordinated strategy which
     includes churches, schools, businesses, and agencies which promote
     positive parenting, a commitment to education, and community
     involvement in children’s lives.
5.   There is limited information among families, early childhood
     providers and the community about new state-wide initiatives, (i.e.
     "Step up to Quality”, ELI Early Learning Initiative).
6.   There is limited local access to professional development and resources
     to allow early childhood providers to participate in state- wide initiatives.
7.   There is limited access to mental health professional development and
     programs that address the mental health issues of young children and
     their families.

Long-Term Goal: Children and Youth Succeed in School
1.   Once children enter school, there are a wide variety of programs and
     services offered within the Sandusky County school districts which
     include but are not limited to:
      Tutoring and academic assistance programs
      Counseling services
      Special education classes and services
      Conflict resolution and mediation programs and strategies
      School discipline strategies
      Parental involvement and parent engagement
2.   Collectively, the group of programs and services address
     the three levels of the continuum of care (prevention, early
     intervention, treatment).
3.   The majority of programs are offered to both elementary and middle-
     school youth.
4.   These school-based programs are evaluated for effectiveness.

Gaps Identified

1.   The programs/services are not consistently implemented
     across all Sandusky County school districts.
2.   A limited number of programs and services are offered to high school
     youth.
                                                                             31


3.   Improvements are needed in involvement by parents/guardians of K-12
     children and youth in the areas of participation in school conferences
     and daily school preparation efforts.
4.   The programs and services that promote and/or facilitate
     parent/guardian involvement and engagement are limited and some are
     in the early stages of implementation and evaluation.
5.   The referrals to the Strengthening Families program should come from
     multiple sources and should include families and youth both involved
     and not yet involved the juvenile court system.
6.   Alternatives to traditional school for at-risk students.
7.   Resources and classes to assist parents of K-12 youth.
8.   Sandusky County would benefit from a coordinated strategy which
     includes churches, schools, businesses, and agencies which promote
     positive parenting, a commitment to education, and community
     involvement in children’s lives.


Long-Term Goal: Children and Youth Engage in
Healthy Behaviors
1.   Several best (evidence based) and promising practices programs are
     being implemented in Sandusky County to address youth risk behaviors
     including:
      LifeSkills for elementary and middle school youth
      Strengthening Families for elementary, middle and high school youth
         and parents/guardians
      Search Institute Asset Development Teams
      Wraparound / Service Coordination
      Multi-systemic Therapy (MST)
      Safer Choices, Reducing the Risk, Making a Difference, Postponing Sexual
         Involvement Series (PSI)
      Youth mentoring programs
      Genesis after school program for youth involved in juvenile court
2.   The collective group of programs and services address the three levels of
     the continuum of care (prevention, early intervention, treatment).
3.   Most of the programs are being offered to both elementary and middle
     school youth.
4.   A majority of programs are evaluated for effectiveness.
                                                                             32


Gaps Identified

1.   The programs/services are not consistently implemented
     across all Sandusky County school districts.
2.   Some of the programs/services are currently only
     available for youth involved in the juvenile court system.
3.   The mentoring program may face sustainability issues in the future.

Our Plan
To work toward the focus commitment that Sandusky County children
are ready for school:

1.   Utilize the Early Childhood Coordinating Committee to develop a local
     professional development training strategy for preschool providers to
     enhance Sandusky County’s early learning system. Identify strategies to
     increase awareness of kindergarten readiness reading, literacy,
     communication skills, and emotional-social development for pre-school
     operators and parents/guardians.
2.   Identify and support resources for parents/guardians to help them
     prepare their children ages 0-5 years for school, and engage them in the
     governance of Sandusky County’s early learning system.
3.   Create a reliable financing system for Help Me Grow and other best and
     promising practice early learning services.
4.   Evaluate the effectiveness of the pilot implementation of the parental
     support evidence based program, The Incredible Years.
5.   Establish committee to build a baseline health/mental health status
     profile for children ages 0-5 and 6-11 years using secondary data sources.
     Research existing national and state parent/guardian surveying methods
     and instruments to gather additional county-level health/mental health
     status information for children ages 0-11 years.
6.   Work with all the state funded programs, and school districts in
     Sandusky County to identify Get It Got It Go, KRA-L data or its
     equivalent to quantify and trend the kindergarten readiness for students
     entering school each fall.
                                                                               33


To work toward the focus commitment that Sandusky County children
and youth succeed in school:

1.   Establish a school/community communications strategy for each school
     district. Pilot a school/community group for Fremont school district
     that meets regularly to include school leadership, community agencies
     and services, and parents/guardian who collectively identify issues and
     problem-solve.
     Objectives:
     a.      Link student and school needs with existing services.
     b.      Establish an e-mail list service to maintain communication
             between meetings.
     c.      Increase access to services for at-risk students and
             parents/guardians.
     d.      Identify strategies to increase parent/guardian involvement in
             schools (i.e. to increase attendance at parent/teacher conferences,
             promote daily school preparation).
2.   Work as a community to sustain and expand effective after-school
     programs for at-risk students.
3.   Establish a network of agencies and partners outside of the juvenile
     court system for referrals to the Strengthening Families programs for
     elementary and middle school youth and parents/guardians.
4.   Establish a committee to research the feasibility of implementing the
     evidence based and comprehensive strategies of Project Achieve.

To work to sustain the commitment that Sandusky County children and
youth choose healthy behaviors:

1.   Continue to implement the LifeSkills substance abuse prevention
     program in elementary and middle schools throughout Sandusky County.
2.   Continue and expand Communities Mobilizing Against Alcohol strategies to
     promote a community norm that discourages under-aged drinking.
     Conduct at least one seller/server training annually for liquor permit
     holders in Sandusky County.
3.   Continue Asset Development Teams in Sandusky County schools.
4.   Expand the referral base for Strengthening Families to include youth
     outside of the juvenile court system.
5.   Sustain and enhance the implementation of the evidence based teen
     pregnancy prevention curricula across the Sandusky County school
     districts to include Safer Choices, Reducing the Risk, Making a Difference,
     Postponing Sexual Involvement Series (PSI)
                                                                         34


Contact Us
For more information about any of the agencies, programs, and services
described in this report, please contact:

Cathy Glassford, PfS Coordinator and FCFC Director
Sandusky County Family and Children First Council
1001 Castalia Road
Fremont, OH 43420
419-332-9296, ext. 188
Fax: 419-332-9571
E-mail: fcfc@sanduskycountydjfs.org

								
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