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T277 Parents Guide v3

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T277 Parents Guide v3 Powered By Docstoc
					Troop
277
Parent’s
Guide
                                      2009
This document is intended to provide an introduction to Troop 277
operations for Webelos and their parents who are interested in joining   Boys Scouts of
Troop 277 and as an on-going guide to all members of Troop 277 to use
throughout the Scouting year.
                                                                         America
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3
   Boy Scouts of America Mission Statement ............................................................................................... 3
   What is it all about? .................................................................................................................................. 3
ORGANIZATION ............................................................................................................................................. 6
   Chartered Organization (Sponsor) ............................................................................................................ 6
   Troop 277 .................................................................................................................................................. 6
   Calendar .................................................................................................................................................... 8
   Website ..................................................................................................................................................... 9
   Troop Adult Leaders.................................................................................................................................. 9
   The Troop and its Youth Leaders ............................................................................................................ 10
ADVANCEMENT........................................................................................................................................... 14
   Advancement through First Class ........................................................................................................... 14
   Advancement from First Class to Eagle .................................................................................................. 14
   Merit Badges ........................................................................................................................................... 15
   Scoutmaster Conferences ....................................................................................................................... 15
   Board of Review ...................................................................................................................................... 15
   Court of Honor ........................................................................................................................................ 15
ADMINSTRATION ........................................................................................................................................ 16
   Re-chartering and Fees ........................................................................................................................... 16
   Disciplinary Actions ................................................................................................................................. 16
   Annual Registration Fees ........................................................................................................................ 16
   Fees for Outings / Activities .................................................................................................................... 16
   Fundraising .............................................................................................................................................. 17
UNIFORM .................................................................................................................................................... 18
   Troop 277 Uniform Standards ................................................................................................................ 18
   Class “A” .................................................................................................................................................. 18
   Class “B” .................................................................................................................................................. 18
… AND FINALLY............................................................................................................................................ 19
                     All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind
                     are convinced that the fate of empires depends upon the
                                       education of youth.
                                                                                             ---- Aristotle


INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Boys Scouts of America! By becoming a parent of a Boy Scout, you are setting your son
out on the grand adventure of Scouting. This is tremendously important and rewarding endeavor that
you will be able to share with him.

What is it all about? What are you expected to do? What does it cost? We have prepared this booklet
to answer these questions.

The following pages describe the organization of a Troop and the advancement pattern that each boy
will follow. Reading this will help you understand how your boy can progress though the ranks with
your help. It will help you understand how you can help and what the various adult volunteers are doing
to help the Troop.


Boy Scouts of America Mission Statement
It is the mission of the Boy Scouts of America to serve others by helping to instill values in young people,
and in other ways to prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full
potential. The values we strive to instill are based on those found in the Boy Scout Oath and Law.


What is it all about?
There are three aims to Scouting:
     Aim I – To foster citizenship
     Aim II – To build character
     Aim III – To develop fitness
These three aims are the bedrock of the American Scouting movement and they represent the long-
term outcomes we want for every boy.

The Boy Scout Oath or Promise can be broken down to represent the Aims of Scouting in the following
way:

Participating Citizenship…
On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law
Used broadly, citizenship means the boys relationship to others. He comes to learn of his obligations to
other people, to the society in which he lives, and to the government that presides over that society.
Moral Strength of Character…
To help other people at all times
This defines the boy’s persona: his personal qualities, his values, and his outlook.

Physical, Mental & Emotional Fitness…
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight
Physical Fitness includes a well balanced and healthy body; Mental Fitness includes the ability to think
and solve problems and Emotional Fitness includes self-control, courage and self-respect.

The Methods of Scouting are designed to accomplish these Aims:

Advancement: Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps to overcome them
through the advancement process. The scout plans his advancement and progress at his own pace as he
masters each challenge. More is discussed about Advancement later in this guide.

Adult Association: Boys learn from the examples set by their adult leaders. Troop leadership may be
male or female. Association with adults of high character is encouraged at this stage of a young man’s
development.

Personal Growth: As Scouts plan their activity, and progress toward their goals, they experience
personal growth. The good turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Scouting.
Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do good turns for others.

Ideals: The Ideals of Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, and Slogan. The Scout
measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve.

Patrols: The Patrol method gives Scouts an experience in group living and participating in citizenship. It
places a certain amount of responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The
patrol method allows Scouts to act in small groups where they can easily relate to each other. These
small groups determine Troop activities through their patrol leaders.

Outdoors: Boy Scouting is designed to take place in the outdoors. It is in the outdoors that Scouts share
responsibilities and learn to live with each other. It is here where the skills and activities practiced at
Troop meetings come alive. More is discussed about the outdoor program later in this guide.

Leadership Development: Boy Scouting encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every
Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations.
Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership roles of others and guides
him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

Uniform: The uniform makes the Scout Troop visible as a force of good and creates a positive youth
image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that
shows each Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Scout
identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. More is discussed about the
uniform later in this guide.
                     Scout Law                                               Scout Oath
                     A Scout is:
                    Trustworthy
                        Loyal
                      Helpful                               On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty
                      Friendly                              to God and my country and to obey the Scout
                     Courteous                             Law; To help other people at all times; To keep
                        Kind                               myself physically strong, mentally awake, and
                     Obedient                                             morally straight.
                      Cheerful
                       Thrifty
                       Brave
                       Clean
                     Reverent



                    Scout Motto                                            Scout Slogan
                    Be Prepared                                        Do a Good Turn Daily


Since 1910, these principals have been taught in an atmosphere of recreation and fun which allows
young people to develop self-confidence, leadership, and moral character. More and more men, trained
as Scouts, are taking their places in today’s world as responsible adult leaders. Men, who earned badges
as Scouts, sit on the Supreme Court and the chambers of Congress. Others hold important offices in our
government, business and industry. Most of the members of the congress were Scouts. All of the
astronauts who walked on the moon are Eagle Scouts.

The Boy Scouts of America is the largest youth oriented organization in the United States. More than
7.5 million boys and leaders are currently registered in the Boy Scouts of America.

Unlike Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting is a youth-led organization. The boys learn how to organize and lead
the Troop. After training, and with supervision from the adult leaders, the boys run the show.

The boys in the Troop will be working towards their 1st class and then Eagle Ranks. As they travel on
their trail to Eagle they will not only learn how to lead a team to a goal, but they will actually lead teams
of Scouts in a number of situations. Many Eagle Scouts put this accomplishment on the résumés and as
a result find they are often considered favorably in obtaining acceptance into college or the work force.
ORGANIZATION

Troop 277 is a participating member of the Osceola District of the North Florida Council, Boy Scouts of
America. The Troops organization consists of a Chartered Organization, the Troop, the Troop
Committee, and the Troop’s parents.

Chartered Organization (Sponsor)
Every Troop belongs to an organization. The Chartered Organization for Troop 277 is Christ Episcopal
Church. The Chartered Organization shares our objectives for the boys and insures that there is
adequate, trained leadership. A Chartered Organization Representative acts as a liaison between the
Troop and Christ Episcopal Church.


Troop 277


Troop Meeting Schedule: Troop 277 holds is meetings weekly at Christ Episcopal Church, with the
exception of the third Monday of the month which precedes the monthly campout. This meeting is held
at Daybreak Pavilion on the campus of St. Francis in the Field. Meetings start promptly at 7:00pm and
run for 75 minutes, ending at 8:15pm.


Content of Troop Meetings: Meetings are held: a) to provide leadership opportunities for boys, b) to
plan outings and other Troop activities, c) to enjoy lively games and competition, d) to provide
experiences toward advancement and merit badge attainment, e) to feature occasional outside
speakers on a variety of subjects of interest to boys, and f) to reinforce the principals of Scouting.
Ceremonies also play an integral part of meetings.
Sample Meeting Agenda:
                           Activity &
                                                                         Description                         Leader
                           Duration
                          Pre-Opening             Attendance Sign in                                        SPL
                          6:45                    Sit by Patrol                                             Assign
                          Opening            Flag Ceremony                                                   SPL
                          7:00- 7:10         Scout Law / Scout Oath
                          Announcements           Attendance Policy
                          7:10-7:20                      o 1 meeting /mo & 3 camp-outs/yr
                                                  Poinsettia – Margo Cleary – report out
                                                  Kristy Kimball as camping coordinator
                                                  Den Chief Recognition
                                                  Class “B” shirt design presentation and Vote
                                                  Upcoming Calendar
                                                         o Saturday Troop Shoot
                                                                  7:30am Publix Rotary
                                                                  $5/lunch $13/25 shotgun shells
                                                         o Jan 10 – recruiting and First Class Advancement
                                                         o Tallahassee
                                                         o Ski Trip
                                                         o Sebastian Inlet
                                                         o High Adventure Paddle
                          Skills Instruction  Jan 10 Webelos Recruiting                                     SPL
                          7:20 – 7:40
                          Patrol Meeting     HOLIDAY PARTY                                                   SPL
                          7:40 – 8:10        White Elephant Gift Exchange
                          SM Minute                                                                          SM
                          8:10-8:11
                          Closing            Outdoor Code                                                    SPL
                          8:12-8:15
                          Post Meeting




General Behavior Guidelines: The guidelines for the acceptable behavior of a Scout are contained in the
Scout Oath and Law. Fighting, hitting, harassing, or in any way causing harm or subjecting a Scout to
harm is out of character with Scouting and is prohibited. Each Scout in Troop 277 has a responsibility to
respect and protect Christ Episcopal Church property as well as the property of the Troop, and his fellow
Scouts. Any damage or loss incurred will be the responsibility of those who caused it. National Scout
policy prohibits alcohol and/or drug use by anyone at any Troop activity.

Outings: Outings include a wide range of activities which typically contribute to earning associated
merit badges. At the end of each school year, the boy leaders of the Troop meet to create a calendar of
activities for the following year. The boys vote to rank listed, proposed alternatives. Within the last
year, there has been a new focus on incorporating some high adventure outings into the calendar as
well, especially backcountry backpacking and paddle trips. Typical day trips include sailing, skeet/trap
shooting and deep sea fishing. We will also do a two-day overnight ski trip. Troop 277 also conducts
traditional camping outings for skills development, especially for the first year Scouts. With some
exceptions, we strive to minimize drive time.

The monthly cycle of meetings starts with a PLC (Patrol Leaders Council) meeting. This meeting
establishes a theme for the month, building upon the schedule outing type. The next two to three
meetings incorporate skills development on that theme, with the goal of earning a merit badge. The
Monday before an outing is the deadline for commitment or reservations for an outing. Money is
collected for that trip, and then dispersed to each Patrol for the purchase of food.

Service Projects: The Troop’s expectation is for all boys to help whenever they are needed or called
upon: not just to complete the service obligation for rank advancement, but whenever possible to: help
our charter organization (Christ Church), help Eagle Candidates with their projects, and similarly to be
helpful as consistent with the spirit of Scouting. Recently, we have conducted yard clean-up at The
Mission House in Jacksonville Beach.

Outdoor Activity Guidelines: Outdoor experiences are essential elements of Scouting. Experiences in
the outdoors help to teach self-reliance by utilizing and developing skills. Boys learn to accommodate
group needs as well as to eventually provide group leadership. The Scout will not be pushed beyond his
capability. The Troop is organized so that older Scouts and trained adults will provide instruction and
support as new experiences are encountered. Electronics of any sort are not permitted on campouts
and will be confiscated and returned to the boy’s parents. Exceptions, such as “in car use” only, are
sometimes made for ventures that require longer drive times.

High Adventure / Venture Patrol: Philmont, Boundary Waters, and Sea Base trips can be once in a
lifetime experiences. Reservations require planning, often up to 18 months in advance. Troop 277 has
several veterans of these trips, and seeks opportunities, usually through North Florida Council to
participate in these trips.

Calendar
As this time, Troop 277 uses a shared Google Calendar. Access is by invitation only; an email address is
required. This email address is then incorporated in the Troop email distribution list.
http://www.google.com/calendar/render

A summary of 2009’s calendar is provided to as an example of Troop 277 activities

                                         HOLIDAY BREAK
           Monday, January 05, 2009       Troop Meeting            Plan Web Open House
           Monday, January 12, 2009       PLC
           Monday, January 19, 2009       Troop Meeting            Plan Campout
          Saturday, January 24, 2009      Campout                  Tallahassee / Citizen MBs
           Monday, January 26, 2009       PLC
          Monday, February 02, 2009       Troop Meeting            Plan COH
          Monday, February 09, 2009       Court of Honor           Court of Honor
         Saturday, February 14, 2009      SKI TRIP                 Maggie Valley, NC
          Monday, February 16, 2009       PLC
          Monday, February 23, 2009       Cross Over               CROSS OVER
            Monday, March 02, 2009        Troop Meeting
            Monday, March 09, 2009        Troop Meeting
            Monday, March 16, 2009        Troop Meeting
           Saturday, March 21, 2009       Campout                  Sebastian Inlet
            Monday, March 23, 2009        PLC
            Monday, March 30, 2009        Troop Meeting
              Monday, April 06, 2009      Troop Meeting
              Monday, April 13, 2009      Troop Meeting
             Saturday, April 18, 2009     Campout                  High Adventure Paddle
              Monday, April 20, 2009      PLC
Website
Current information is posted on our Troop Website at www.troop277bsa.org including links to the
calendar, upcoming events, scouting resources and pictures from past outings.

Troop Adult Leaders
The Scoutmaster: The Scoutmaster is the adult leader responsible for the image and program of the
Troop. He or she and the Assistant Scoutmasters work directly with the Scouts. The importance of the
Scoutmaster’s job is the fact that the quality of his guidance will affect every youth in the Troop. The
Scoutmaster may be male or female. Scoutmaster duties include:

       Train and guide boy leaders
       Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys
       Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting
       Meet regularly with the Senior Patrol Council
       Attend all Troop meetings or, when necessary, arrange for a qualified substitute
       Attend Troop Committee Meetings
       Conduct periodic parent’s sessions to share the program and encourage their participation
       Conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all rank advancements
       Provide a recruiting plan for new members and see that they are promptly registered.
       Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups so that they have a real part in Troop
        operations
       Supervise Troop elections for POR (Position of Responsibility) and OA (Order of the Arrow)
       Make it possible for each Scout to experience at least 10 days and nights of camping each year
       Participate in Council and District events
       Build a strong program by using proven method presented in Scouting literature
       Conduct all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies of the
        chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America

Assistant Scoutmasters: To fulfill his or her obligations to the Troop, the Scoutmaster, with the
assistance of the Troop Committee, recruits Assistant Scoutmasters to help operate the Troop. Each
assistant Scoutmaster is assigned specific program duties and reports to the Scoutmaster. They also
provide the required two-deep leadership standards set by the Boy Scouts of America. An Assistant
Scoutmaster may be 18 years old, but at least one in each Troop, and on each outing, must be at least
21 or older. Specific roles commonly assigned to Assistant Scoutmasters include:
     Assistant Scoutmaster – New Scouts
     Assistant Scoutmaster – Venture
     Assistant Scoutmaster – Advancement
     Assistant Scoutmaster – Outdoor Activities / Camping Director
The Troop and its Youth Leaders
Patrols: The Troop is made of Patrols. A Patrol is a grouping of six to eight boys who work together.
Within the larger community of the Troop, the Patrol is the Scout’s family circle. The Patrol, often made
up of obeys of similar ages and experience levels, helps its members develop a sense of pride and
identity. The boys assign the jobs to be done and share in the satisfaction of accepting and fulfilling
group responsibilities. The Patrol Leaders, with the Senior Patrol Leader as their head, form the Patrol
Leaders Council which plans the activities and runs the Troop meetings.

The New Scout Patrol is composed of new members who have not yet mastered the basic skills of
Scouting. The new Scout Patrol(s) is led by an Assistant Scoutmaster and Troop Guides (older, more
experienced Scouts).

Experienced Scout Patrols (Shark, Cobra, Wolf) are formed with older more experienced Scouts, and are
led by an elected Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader.

Junior Leader Positions of Responsibility
     Senior Patrol Leader: this is the top junior leader in the Troop. He leads the Patrol Leader’s
        Council and in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other join leaders and assigns
        specific responsibilities as needed.
     Assistant Senior Patrol Leader – fills in for the Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. He is also
        responsible for training and giving direction to the quartermaster, Scribe, Troop Historian,
        Librarian, and Instructors.
     Troop Historian – collects and maintain Troop memorabilia and information on former Troop
        members.
     Librarian – keeps Troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor
        list available for use by Troop members.
     Chaplain’s Aide – assist in Troop religious services and promotes religious emblems program.
     Junior Assistant Scoutmaster – a Scout of at least 16 years of age who supervises and supports
        other boy leaders as assigned.
     Patrol Leader – gives leadership to members of his patrol and represents them in the Patrol
        Leader’s Council.
     Assistant Patrol Leader – fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence
     Troop Guide – advisor and guide to the new Scout Patrol
     Den Chief – works with a Cub Scout den as a guide
     Quartermaster – responsible for Troop supplies and equipment
     Scribe – the Troop Secretary, commonly responsible for keeping notes during PLC meetings
     Webmaster – keeps information on website current

Troop Elections: Elections for Senior Patrol Leader are held twice each school year – for the first and
second halves; the term lasts six months. Candidates for Senior Patrol Leader must have previous
leadership experience (i.e. Patrol Leader or Assistant Patrol Leader). Patrol-level positions have less
strict guidelines.

Patrol Leaders Council (PLC): The Patrol Leader’s Council, not the adult leaders, is responsible for
planning and conducting the Troop’s activities. The council is composed of the following voting
members: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, other Scouts designated
by the Scoutmaster, such as Troop Guides, Instructor and Scribe.

The PLC plans the annual calendar of events. The Troop’s yearly plan is approved and potentially
modified for feasibility by the Troop Committee. At monthly PLC meetings, the PLC plans the weekly
Troop meetings leading up to the monthly outing, assigning resources to support the theme for that
outing and addresses other items of business necessary for the operation of the Troop.

Order of the Arrow Elections: The Order of the Arrow (OA) is a national brotherhood of Scout campers.
It is based on brotherhood and cheerful service to fellowmen. Troop members are nominated and
elected to membership by fellow Scouts in their own Troops. They must meet certain entry
qualifications that are established by the Order of the Arrow. Each Troop may hold an election once a
year under the supervision of the Council’s Lodge. All Scouts First Class and above, with 15 or more
night camping (including six consecutive night long-term camping) in the last 24 months are eligible
nominees. Fifty percent of the Troop must be present for the election, and the nominees must receive
at least fifty percent of the votes cast that night. There is a provision for recommending adults for
induction as members to support the youth. Adults must meet the same camping requirements as the
boys. All registered adults may vote.
Troop Committee: The Troop Committee is the Troop’s Board of Directors and supports the Troop
program. The Troop Committee functions as an administration and support organization for the Troop.
The Troop Committee takes care of the non-program issues surrounding the Troop operation. For
example, newsletters, Troop fundraisers, membership drives and Pack coordination, activity permits and
coordination, advancement records, procurement and maintenance of Troop equipment.

                                                               Committee Chair
                                                                 John Strom
                Scout Master
                                                                Bill Sopchak
                Bud Relihan
                                                                   (Acting)




        Camping                            Advancement       Board of Review
                                                                                     Treasurer
       Coordinator                          Coordinator        Coordinator
                                                                                   Deb Bruchette
      Kristy Kimball                      DeJean Melancon       Ann HIll
                             2nd
                         Steve Viviano




                                                                Everette Street
                                            Merit Badge         Mike Peaks         Fund Raiser
                                            Councilors                             Margo Cleary
         Life to Eagle
          Keith Perry



                                              Dr. M. Picco   Court of Honor       Charter Org Rep
                                              Greg Greer      Coordination          John Strom
         New Scouts
                                              Gary Flower
         Mac Holley
                                              Jeff Davis

                         Asst New Scout
                           Greg Greer

                                                              Suzanne Holley
                                           Service Project    Kim Flower          Registrar / Med
                                             Coordinator                                Book
                                            Judge Flower                           Kristy Kimball


       High Adventure
       Dave Zapala ?




              Field Operations                                 Base Operations




The Troop Committee meets in the form of monthly Adult Leader meetings. These meetings are open
and all parents are encouraged to attend. The Troop Committee does the following:
     Ensures that quality adult leadership is recruited and trained. In case the Scoutmaster is absent,
         a qualified assistant Scoutmaster is assigned. If the Scoutmaster is unable to serve, a
         replacement is recruited.
     Provides adequate meeting facilities
     Advises the Scoutmaster on policies related to Boy Scouting and the chartered organization
     Supports leaders in carrying out the program
     Is responsible for finances, adequate funds, and disbursements in line with the approved budge
         plan.
     Obtains, maintains, and property cares for Troop property
     Ensures the Troop has an outdoor program (minimum 10 days and nights per year)
     Serves on boards of review and Courts of Honor
     Supports the Scoutmaster in working with individual boys and problems that may affect the
         overall troop program
       Provides for the special needs and assistance some boys may require
       Helps with the Friends of Scouting campaign
       Assists the Scoutmaster with handling Scout’s behavioral problems

Key Committee Positions Include the following:
     Chairman
     Treasurer
     Advancement Coordinator
     Fund Raising Chairman
     Court of Honor Coordinator
     Board of Review member
     Merit Badge Councilors

Troop Parents: The role of parents in Troop 277 is to be supportive of the Troop’s efforts and to provide
the atmosphere Scouts needs to excel. Parents must:
     Read their Scout’s handbook and understand the purpose and methods of Scouting
     Actively follow their Scouts’ progress ( or lack thereof ) and offer encouragement when needed
     Show support to both the individual Scout and the Troop by attending all Troop Courts of Honor
     Assist as requires in all Troop fund-raisers and other such activities. All such assistance lowers
       the cost of the program we offer to the Scouts and therefore lowers each family’s financial
       outlay for their Scout(s).
     Be aware of the Troop program and annual calendar
     Volunteer for adult leader positions, Troop Committee, or other opportunities to help your son.

Parents of boys in Troop have a long-standing tradition of willing helpfulness when needed. Ours is a
growing, highly active troop and all efforts on behalf of our sons are done by volunteer helpers – you
and me!!! Therefore, we ask that all parents plan to do their part to help the Troop function. The Troop
Committee Chairman is the person to contact to offer you services.
ADVANCEMENT

There are many definition of advancement, but the Scouting definition may well be, simply, “The art of
meeting a challenge”. For that is exactly what the Boy Scout advancement program asks the boys to do.
The Boy Scout advancement program provides a ladder of skills that a Scout climbs at his own pace. As
he acquires these skills he moves up through a series of ranks, for which he is awarded badges:
Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle. The higher he climbs the more challenging his
tasks – and the more rewarding. Achievements include:
     Learning skills that qualify for Scouting’s more rugged and exciting outdoor challenges
     Developing body and mind, growing self-confidence, and helping younger Scouts climb the
         advancement ladder
     Discovering how it feels to go further – in so many ways – than he ever thought he could.

Boy Scout Advancement … A Four Step Process

    1. The Boy Scout Learns: A Scout learns by doing. As he learns, he grows in ability to do his part as
       a member of the patrol and the Troop. As he develops knowledge and skills, he is asked to
       teach others. In this way, he begins to develop leadership.
    2. The Boy Scout is Tested: The Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters, or a member of this Troop
       that is First Class or higher may test a Scout on requirements
    3. The Boy Scout is Reviewed: After a Scout has completed all requirements for rank, he has a
       Board of Review. For Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and Eagle Palms, members
       of the Troop Committee conduct the review. Members of the district advancement committee
       conduct the Eagle Board of Review.
    4. The Boy is Recognized: When the Board of Review has certified a boy’s advancement, he
       deserves to receive recognition as soon as possible. This should be done at a ceremony at the
       next Troop meeting. The certificate for his next rank will be presented to him at the next Troop
       Court of Honor.


Advancement through First Class
From the time the Scout enters the Troop through the time he earns advancement to First Class, he is
learning basic scouting skills to enable him to camp, hike, swim, cook, tie knots, administer first aid, and
perform other tasks in the outdoors and to work as a member of a team. With those first steps the
Scout begins to build themselves physically, mentally, and morally. He will start to live with the Scout
Oath and Law. Soon he will learn the symbolism in the Scout badge; he will learn that there are three
points of the trefoil which stand for the three parts of the Scout Oath: Duty to God and Country, duty to
other people, and duty to yourself. The goal of this Troop is for the Scout to achieve the rank of First
class within his first year in the Troop. This is a sign that the Scout has mastered the fundamental of
scouting and can begin to start the long process of learning to lead others, refining the learned skills and
learning additional skills.


Advancement from First Class to Eagle
From the achievement of First Class though Eagle, the Scout will be demonstrating leadership,
performing service projects, earning merit badges and using the skills learned while achieving the rank
of First Class. The next ranks he will earn are Star and Life. These ranks are harder to obtain than the
earlier ranks, but are also more interesting for the older Scouts. Upon completion of all the requirement
for Star and Life the Scout will be eligible to work for Eagle. The original principals, the Scout Oat and
Law now have fuller meaning for the Scout and their understanding of them is much greater. The final
steps toward Eagle are filled with leadership experiences.

Details for advancement are contained in the Boy Scout Handbook, which every Scout should obtain as
soon as possible after joining the Troop. Take a look at Chapter 1. This short chapter has an
advancement summary through First Class.

Merit Badges
The goal of the merit badge program is to expand a Scouts’ area of interest and to encourage the Scout
to meet and work with adults in a chosen subject. Merit badges are earned by a Scout working with a
registered merit badge counselor. The Scout contacts the counselor to arrange for time and places to
meet with the counselor. When the Scout completes the work on the merit badge the counselor will
inform the Scoutmaster that the Scout has completed the requirement for that badge. Merit Badges
earned will be presented to the Scout during the Troops Court(s) of Honor.

All parents of Troop 277 are encouraged to become Merit Badge Counselors. The Troop owns a library
of all Merit Badge pamphlets which can be loaned to Scouts as they work on merit badges. Merit badge
worksheets are available online. Many of the Troop activities (outings and weekly meetings) will include
content toward Merit Badge achievement.

Scoutmaster Conferences
A Scoutmaster Conference is when the Scout meets with the Scoutmaster so he can make sure the Scout
knows all the information and has performed all the requirements for rank advancement. The
Scoutmaster or any Assistant Scoutmaster or Troop Guide can conduct interim conferences to access
and document progress toward rank at anytime. Typically, the Sunday morning of a camp-out is the
time when new skills learned are recorded in a Scouts handbook documenting progress toward rank. It
is the Scout’s responsibility to step forward with his handbook and request these conferences.

Board of Review
After completing the Scoutmaster Conference, the Scout should contact the Troop Chairman to schedule
a board of review. When a Scout has completed all the requirements for a rank, then appears before a
board of review composed of members of the Troop committee. The purpose of the review is not an
examination. Rather it is to determine the Scout’s attitude and acceptance of Scouting’s ideals; to
ensure that the requirements have been met for advancement, to discuss the Scout’s experiences in the
Troop and the Troop’s program, and to encourage him to keep working towards advancement.

Court of Honor
Troop 277 will conduct Courts of Honor at least twice each year. The Court of Honor recognizes all Scout
appointments, elections, awards, and advancements since the last Court of Honor. Adult recognition
may be presented prior to the opening of the Troop Court of Honor. It is the responsibility of the Patrol
Leader’s Council to plan and conduct the Troop Courts of Honor. The Troop Committee will support the
Courts of Honor as requested. The Courts of Honor are public ceremonies and are a chance for Scouts
to be publicly recognized. Parents and all other interested parties are encouraged to attend.
ADMINSTRATION


Re-chartering and Fees
The process of re-chartering is the annual collection of registration fees for the Scouts and Leaders. The
Troop also makes a formal visit to the charting organization to renew their commitment for the coming
year. The process of re-chartering the Troop must be completed by the end of December each calendar
year.


Disciplinary Actions
The Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters, and/or the Troop Committee shall have the authority and
discretion to contact parents and send home any boy who refuses to carry out the instruction of the
Scoutmaster or his designated representative, or who through his action endangers lives, causes
physical harm or damages property. In the event this occurs, the parents/guardians of the boy will be
required to make arrangements to take immediate custody of the boy. The Troop shall not be liable for
any costs involved; these will be solely the parent/ guardian’s responsibility.

Any actions, which might involve disciplinary action, will be dealt with in strict confidence. The Scout’s
parents should be fully informed of the issue. Because serious recurring behavioral problems may
require the Troop Committee’s involvement, the Scoutmaster will share discipline problem with the
Committee. Such problem should be addressed in a firm, fair manner with the goal to integrate the
youth into the Scouting program. Problems that may lead to a youth’s permanent removal from the
Troop should be handled by the Troop Committee and the Scoutmaster, and will involve the Scouts
parents or guardians. Together, the Troop Committee, parents, and Scoutmaster should work toward a
solution with the Troop’s best interest in mind. With regard to the above guidelines, the Committee
Chari is empowered to act on behalf of the Committee, so that disciplinary actions can be dealt with on
a timely basis. The parent of the Scout involved in a disciplinary action, who is the Scoutmaster, outing
leader involved, or the Committee Chair, shall defer to another Committee member for problem
resolution. Any disciplinary action will include conditions, if any, under which the Scout may return to
the Troop’s regular program.


Annual Registration Fees
How much does Boy Scouting cost? As little as possible, but nothing worthwhile is free. The annual fee
for each Scout in Troop 277 is: $55
     $10 for national BSA registration
     $2 insurance
     $31 for Troop membership (pays for badges, awards, and other expenses incurred by the Troop
        as a whole).
     $12 for Boys Life magazine


Fees for Outings / Activities
Individual activates may have associated fees. If so, the Scouts and parents will be notified. Typically,
these fees will be articulated in a camping “flyer” which will be distributed two weeks prior to the
campout. Information is also communicated via email.
Fundraising
Additional funds are raised by the boys through various fundraising activities. The Troop plans to do one
major fundraising project each year. Our fund-raiser will be designed so that a portion of the funds
raised by your son will be put into his individual account to defray scouting costs. Detailed on each
year’s fundraiser are reviewed at Adult Leader, PLC, and Troop meetings at conclusion.
UNIFORM

Troop 277 Uniform Standards
The Scout uniform helps to achieve the objectives of Scouting. The uniform by itself cannot make a
good Scout or a good Troop, but its use has been proven to improve both the Scout and the Troop
because it is a visible symbol of Scouting and unity. Within a month of joining the Troop, each Scout is
required to acquire and wear both Class “A” and Class “B” uniforms as dictated by the activity. There
are specific placement criteria for insignias, badges, and uniform appurtenances illustrated in the
Handbook. Additionally, Troop Leaders and Scout Shop staff is available to answer questions associated
with uniform assembly.


Class “A”
        Official BSA tan Scout shirt with all appropriate insignia
             o North Florida Council strip
             o Red shoulder loops
             o Patrol emblem
             o Troop number
        Troop neckerchief
        Neckerchief slide
        Official BSA pants / shorts
        Official BSA socks
NOTE:   Tennis shoes or hiking boots are okay; no open toed shoes; no sandals


Class “B”
Troop 277 is experimenting with a uniform (everyone wearing the same) Class “B” shirt. This will be our
uniform for weekly Troop meetings. For camp-outs, any BSA related T-shirt can be worn. Obviously,
without wearing a Class “A” shirt, there is no reason to wear a neckerchief, or slide. However, official
BSA pants/shorts and official BSA socks are required.



You can purchase uniforms and supplies locally at:
       North Florida Council Scout Shop                 and             Black Creek Outfitters
       521 S. Edgewood Ave.                                             10051 Skinner Lake Dr
       Jacksonville, FL 32205                                           Jacksonville, FL 32246
       (904) 388-0591                                                   (904) 645-7003
… AND FINALLY

You are joining a great organization that includes tens of thousands of adult leaders, interested parents,
and the BSA professional staff. Scouting is much more than enjoying the outdoors. The Troop teaches
leadership skills and community skills. Scouting also shows the boys how they can keep themselves
strong and healthy and make the most of school. With hard work and dedication, your son will be able
to serve as a leader in the Troop and advance in rank along the trail to Eagle.

Above and beyond anything else written in this package, the boys and us “big kids” are in Scouts to have
FUN!

				
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