Oglala Lakota College by gjmpzlaezgx

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									Oglala Lakota College
   Rebuilding the Lakota Nation through Education
 Wounspe Ihuniyan Hci Lakota Oyate Kin Akta Wicakagapi Kte lo




    2011-2013 CATALOG
Oglala Lakota College                              He Sapa College Center
Piya Wiconi                             127 Knollwood Dr., Rapid City, SD 57709
Box 490, Kyle, SD 57752                                                342-1513
455-6000                                                         FAX 342-8547
FAX 455-2787

Oglala Lakota College Nursing Program         Pejuta Haka College Center
Box 861, Pine Ridge, SD 57770                          Box 370, Kyle, SD 57752
867-5856                                                              455-2450
FAX 867-5724                                                     FAX 455-2671


Eagle Nest College Center               Pine Ridge Village College Center
Box 476, Wanblee, SD 57577                      Box 1052, Pine Ridge, SD 57770
462-6274                                                              867-5893
FAX 462-6105                                                     FAX 867-1241

East Wakpamni College Center                         Oglala College Center
Box 612, Batesland, SD 57716                          Box 19, Oglala, SD 57764
288-1834                                                              867-5780
FAX 288-1828                                                    FAX 867-1243

LaCreek College Center                     Wounded Knee College Center
Box 629, Martin, SD 57551                        Box 230, Manderson, SD 57756
685-6407                                                             867-5352
FAX 685-6887                                                    FAX 867-1245

Pahin Sinte College Center                Cheyenne River College Center
Box 220, Porcupine, SD 57772                P.O. Box 100, Eagle Butte, SD 57625
867-5404                                                               964-8011
FAX 867-1242                                                     FAX 964-8012

Pass Creek College Center
Box 630, Allen, SD 57714
455-2757
FAX 455-2428
Board of Trustees

Representatives of the Oglala Sioux Tribe
Richard Red Owl           Tribal President's Representative
Jackie Rowland            Tribal Education Committee Representative


                                                            South Dakota
Representatives Elected by Districts
Dennis Brewer             Pine Ridge Village
Pete Red Willow           Eagle Nest
Bennett Sierra            East Wakpamni
Newton Cummings           LaCreek
Rhonda Two Eagle          Pahin Sinte
Vacant                    Pass Creek
Denise Red Owl            Pejuta Haka
Warren Cross              White Clay
John Her Many Horses      Wounded Knee
Aloysios Wounded Head Student Representative
Gerald One Feather        Council of Elders



       Pine Ridge Indian Reservation




                                                            District College Centers




                                               -1-
                           FALL 2011 CALENDAR
Support Staff Return                                                           July 18th
Department Chairs Return                                                     August 1st
Faculty Return                                                              August 15th
Registration                                                      August 15-August 19th
Course Cancellation Meeting                                                 August 23rd
ADD or DROP                                                     August 29-September 9th
Graduate Studies Orientation (EB-8/24, RC-8/25, PW-8/26)                 August 24-26th
Classes Begin (Sunday classes begin September 4th)                          August 29th
Last Week to Drop 100%                                                th
                                                           September 5 to September 9th
Labor Day (Office Closed, Classes Meet)                                   September 5th
Native American Day (Office Closed, No Classes)                            October 10th
Departmental Advising                                         October 17-November 18th
Veteran’s Day Holiday (Office Closed, Classes Meet)                      November 11th
Thanksgiving Day Holiday (Office Closed)                    November 24-November 25th
Holistic Scoring                                                          December 2nd
Classes End                                                               December 9th
Make-up Week                                                          December 12-16th
Final Grades due                                                         December 16th
Department Chairs/Faculty Christmas Holiday                     December 19-January 6th
Support Staff Christmas Vacation                                      December 24-27th
New Year’s Holiday for Support Staff                            December 31-January 2nd


                        SPRING 2012 CALENDAR
Support Staff Return                                                           January 3rd
Chairs/Faculty Return                                                          January 5th
Registration                                                               January 9-13th
Course Cancellation Meeting                                                   January 17th
ADD or DROP                                                              January 16-27th
Martin Luther King Day (Offices Closed)                                       January 16th
General Construction Spring session                                          January 17th
Classes Begin (Sunday classes begin January 30)                              January 23rd
Last Week to Drop 100%                                       January 30th to February 3rd
President’s Day (Offices Closed)                                            February 20th
Spring Break (No classes)                                                March 26th-30th
AIHEC 2010 (Rapid City, SD)                                              March 24th-27th
Easter Holiday (Good Friday)                                                      April 6th
Registration for General Construction Summer session                        April 18-22nd
Application to Graduate Program Due                                             April 27th
General Construction Spring Session Ends                                          May 4th
General Construction Summer Session Begins                                       May 14th
Regular Classes End Sunday                                                       May 13th
Faculty’s Last Day                                                               May 18th
Make-up Period                                                               May 14-18th
Grades Due                                                                       May 18th
Memorial Day (Offices Closed)                                                    May 28th
Last Day for Chairs                                                               June 1st
Graduation/Pow-wow                                                           June 15-17th
Last Day for Support Staff                                                       June 15th
General Construction Summer Session Ends                                      August 10th




                                                  -2-
                                    Table of Contents
                                                                                                 Page
        Board of Trustees                                                                           1
        Reservation Maps                                                                            1
        Calendar                                                                                    2
        Table of Contents                                                                           3
        Mission and Purposes                                                                        4
        President's Message                                                                         5
        College History/Accreditation                                                             6-7
        Facilities                                                                                  7
        Governance                                                                                  8
        Policies and Procedures                                                                  9-10
        Assessment Philosophy                                                                      10
        Registrar                                                                               11-16
        Financial Aid                                                                           17-20
        Business Office                                                                         21-22
        Instructional Division                                                                  23-31
        Learning Resource Center/Archives                                                          32
        Agriculture & Natural Resource Department                                                  34
        Foundational Studies Department                                                         35-36
        Community/Continuing Education Department                                                  37
        Student Support Services                                                                   38
        Applied Science and Technology Department                                               39-55
        Business Department                                                                     56-60
        Education/Early Childhood Department                                                    61-85
        Humanities & Social Science Department                                                  86-93
        Lakota Studies Department                                                              94-101
        Department of Math and Science                                                        102-114
        Nursing Department                                                                    115-119
        Department of Social Work                                                             120-125
        Graduate Programs                                                                     126-142
        Course Descriptions                                                                   143-210
        District Staff/Faculty List                                                           211-216




THE CATALOG
    The catalog is designed as a guide to the programs, policies, and procedures of Oglala Lakota College.
The student or community member has the responsibility of becoming knowledgeable about the requirements
and behavior expected of people who utilize the college.

    The Oglala Lakota College catalog opens with an introduction which includes the Board of Trustees,
maps of South Dakota, the Pine Ridge Reservation and the locations of the district college centers, Mission
and Philosophy of the college, a note from the President, and general information about the history of Oglala
Lakota College.

    Subsequent sections of the catalog cover instructional programs, policies and procedures, community
and student services, district centers, and course descriptions.

    While providing information to students about the curricula and policies of Oglala Lakota College, the
provisions of this catalog are not intended to be a contract between the college and the student. Oglala Lakota
College reserves the right to withdraw or change any provision or requirement at any time.

                                                   -3-
                         VISION, MISSION AND PURPOSES
        WOLAKOLKICIYAPI: Learning Lakota ways of life in community

         Oglala Lakota College is chartered by the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Its mission is to provide educational
opportunities that enhance Lakota life. These opportunities include community services, certificates, GED,
Associate, bachelor, and graduate degrees. Oglala Lakota College provides a framework of excellence for
student knowledge, skills, and values towards piya wiconi - a new beginning for harmony in fulfillment of
aspirations and dreams. Oglala Lakota College is committed to continuous improvement and is creating
Oglala Lakota University through outstanding teaching research, community service and assessment.


                                                 -Tribal-

    *   provides the Lakota with outstanding graduates.
    *   promotes the study and practice of sovereignty.
    *   works with tribal entities toward building our nation.
    *   supports graduates in achieving meaningful work and healthy lifestyles.

                                                -Cultural-

    *   utilizes Lakota cultural values in all learning framework.
    *   celebrates Lakota culture including sacred songs and ceremonies.
    *   researches, studies and disseminates Lakota language, culture and philosophy.
    *   provides leadership to maintain and revitalize Lakota culture in a diverse and
        changing environment.

                                               -Academic-

    *   encourages high student learning expectations through active and collaborative
        learning frameworks, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences,
        research and a supportive campus environment.
    *   practices open enrollment and supports student success towards graduation.
    *   provides knowledge, skills and values for self-fulfillment, civic involvement, and
        making a living in a diverse world.
    *   works with other institutions and agencies to further College interests.

                                              -Community-

    *   supports local communities in development and in working with their educational
        systems.
    *   engages people as active, productive members of their tiospaye, communities and
        global networks.
    *   offers frameworks for leadership development in the context of communities and
        organizations.
    *   provides lifelong learning through continuing education and community activities.




                                                   -4-
                                    PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

         From its inception in 1971, our college's mission has been to provide the educational credentials to
our students so that they could compete for employment opportunities on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
As a result of having a college on the reservation, Lakota people are now employed in teaching, nursing, human
services, business, computer, and vocational educational positions on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

         Oglala Lakota College was one of the first tribally controlled colleges in the United States. The
concept of a tribally controlled college is that it be sanctioned by an Indian tribe; its governing body be made
up of tribal members; and meet the needs of reservation people in their pursuit of higher education.

        From its initial status as a community college, Oglala Lakota College has grown to now offer
Baccalaureate degrees and a Master's degree in Lakota Leadership with an emphasis in Educational
Administration along with certificates and A.A. degrees. This last semester saw a large increase in enrollment
from 1,400-1,800 students to 1,800 students with a full-time equivalency of 1,000 students per semester.

        Oglala Lakota College is a North Central Accredited college and was approved by the Higher
Learning Commission, and its credits transfer to any college depending on each institution's particular method
of how it accepts transfer credit.

        The Board of Trustees, local boards, administration, and instructors offer their support in your efforts
to advance yourself through higher education.

                                   Thomas Shortbull, President
                              Diane Winters, Assistant to the President
                                 Christine Janis, Personnel Director
                        Ruth Cedar Face, EAP/Coordinator of Support Services
                               Marilyn Pourier, Development Director
                                 Cathy Ferguson, Gifts Coordinator
                                  Wanda Reddy, Data Entry Clerk
                                  Mary Tobacco, Athletic Director
                                Alan Brunsch, Maintenance Director

                                                      -5-
                      COLLEGE HISTORY/ACCREDITATION

         Since the creation of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Oglala leaders have pressed the federal
government to meet the educational obligations it promised in treaties and agreements. With the advent of
efforts to extend tribal sovereignty by American Indians throughout the United States came a recognition by
Lakotas that control of education is also the control of its destiny. On March 4, 1971, the Oglala Sioux Tribal
Council exercised its sovereignty by chartering the Lakota Higher Education Center. This marked the
commencement of a vision's realization which continues to evolve in the history of the Oglala Lakota.

         During its non-accredited years, the college entered into agreements with Black Hills State College,
University of South Dakota, University of Colorado to "borrow" their accreditation for various associate
degree programs. Students were taught on the reservation by faculty chosen by the college, but approved by
the state institutions, who taught the same courses as offered in South Dakota's colleges. It was a complicated
system but it met the needs of students.

        The college awarded its first associate degrees in 1974. In 1978, the name of the college was changed
to Oglala Sioux Community College to reflect its status as community college.

         In 1979, Oglala Sioux Community College became a candidate for North Central Association
accreditation. The college settled into its dispersed, decentralized campus system which features college
centers in each of the nine reservation districts.

        In 1980, the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council allowed the college to occupy its present administrative
center. Piya Wiconi is the most visible symbol of the college but the district centers are where the mission
is being fulfilled.

        When accreditation was granted in 1983, the degree offerings were a Bachelor's degree in Elementary
Education and Associate Degrees in Education, Human Services, General Studies, Nursing, Lakota Studies,
Business and Vocation fields. In subsequent accreditations by North Central in 1987, 1992, and 1994, the
college has expanded its Bachelor Degrees in Lakota Studies, Human Services, and Applied Sciences, and
a Master's Degree in Tribal Leadership.

          At the 1983 annual retreat, OSCC underwent another name change to Oglala Lakota College to reflect
its status as a four year degree granting institution and to replace the word Sioux with Lakota. Since Sioux
is not a word in our language, the proper word to describe our people is Lakota.

         Oglala Lakota College is governed by a 13 member Board of Trustees with membership coming from
nine reservation districts, one designee from the Oglala Tribal Council, one designee from the OST President,
one Council of Elders, and a student representative.

         As a result of the most recent comprehensive accreditation review in March of 1998, NCA granted
continuing accreditation for all existing degrees, the Masters degree in Lakota Leadership/Management, and
an added Masters Degree emphasis in Educational Administration. NCA also removed distance and site
limitations.

        Oglala Lakota College stands ready to meet the education challenges of the 21st Century and will
continue to assume a vital role in the development of the reservation's resources, its people, and the land.




                                                      -6-
        Oglala Lakota College has been accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
since June 20, 1983. This accreditation has been continued and expanded in scope with each subsequent
comprehensive visit.

         The most recent comprehensive visit took place in March 2003, by the Higher Learning Commission,
a commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400,
Chicago, Il 60602-2504, telephone number 312-263-0456 or 800-621-7440, FAX 312-263-7462. The college
offers accredited degree programs and certificates. The programs in Elementary Education and in Nursing
are fully approved by the State of South Dakota. Graduates of the elementary education program are certified
by the South Dakota Division of Education, and graduates of the nursing program are permitted to sit for the
National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX) to become Registered Nurses. Bachelor of Social Work
was accredited in Spring of 2010.


                                            FACILITIES
PIYA WICONI (located 6 miles southwest of Kyle)

Administration Building: President, Vice Presidents, Business Office, Faculty, Financial Aid, Registrar,
Community/Continuing Education, Maintenance Offices

Woksape Tipi: Learning Resource Center/Archives, Faculty Offices, Studio.

Vocational Ed. Building: Agriculture Ed. Office, Applied Science Dept., Headstart Office.

Math & Science Building: Math & Science Faculty, GIS labs, Dirt & Water Labs, Chemistry Lab,
Native Science Field Center, SEMAA-AEL Classroom, Meeting rooms

Historial Center: Historical photographs and artwork displays that chronicles the history of the Oglala
Lakota from the early 1800's through the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. Graduates Studies and
Lakota Studies Departments

Multi-Purpose Building:      Athletics Department, Lakota 1st School

District Centers: (located in the nine major reservation towns-see map)
Offices for Center Directors, Tutors, Counselors, Classrooms
Most classes are held at these centers.

He Sapa College Center: (located in Rapid City)
Offices of Center Director and Counselor, Classrooms
Most classes are held at this center.

Nursing Building: (located in Pine Ridge Village)
Offices of Nursing Program faculty and staff, classrooms
Classes also held at Pine Ridge Hospital and off reservation hospitals.

Cheyenne River College Center: (located in Eagle Butte)
Extension college center with offices for Center Director, staff, and classrooms.

Community Facilities: Because of the size of the District Centers, classes are also held in local schools,
churches, and other buildings. The cooperation and support of the entire reservation community has been
a major factor in OLC's success.
                                                     -7-
                                             GOVERNANCE

An Overview of the Structure:

     The Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye as the all College Senate is one element in the governance of Oglala Lakota
College. Governance consists of the Board of Trustees, the President, the Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye, the local
District College Center Boards and the Student Government Organizations.
     The Board of Trustees is the only governing body which can make policy for the College. Nine board
members are elected from the districts, two members represent the Oglala Sioux Tribe which are designees
of the President, and OST Council, also one Student Representative from the Student Senate. The Board does
receive many recommendations from many sources, and the above process provides an orderly means for all
college inquiries and constituents to channel policy recommendations to the Board of Trustees.
      Although only the BOT can make policy decisions, they have shared responsibilities with constituent
organizations in its desire to assure influence and participation by students, staff, the president and local
communities.
      The District College Center Boards have delegated authority from the BOT as their actions pertain to
the district college centers. There are nine (9) District College Center Boards: Eagle Nest, East Wakpamni,
LaCreek, Pahin Sinte, Pass Creek, Pejuta Haka, Pine Ridge Village, Oglala, and Wounded Knee. Each of these
centers make programmatic and personnel recommendations to the Board of Trustees. District Boards can
approve community and other activities for their respective districts.
     The President of Oglala Lakota College is the chief administrator for the college. The line and supervisory
staff of the college implement BOT policy, make policy recommendations and develop procedures for
implementing Board policy. The administrative structure follows a delineated table of organization for
providing governance and operational decisions to the President who is responsible to the BOT. The
organization of the college includes the Division of Instructional Affairs, the Division of Student and
Community Services, the Institutional Development and Research Office and the Office of Fiscal Manage-
ment.
     The student governments are elected at the district level and represent the students from each district.
Student input into the governance of the college flows through the District College Center Boards. Student
representation is included in the Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye.

                                PIYA WICONI OKOLAKICIYE

A Rationale:

     The Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye provides the internal means by which all staff and students are assured that
their ideas and efforts will be considered. Individuals are elected to PWO as representatives of their
constituency, not because of their position in the table of organization or their relationship to the district boards
and district student governments.
     Institutions of higher education are unique organizations in that they are made up of several distinctive
constituencies. Each of these constituencies is served by the college and they have important knowledge to
contribute to the service provided by the college. Oglala Lakota College recognizes the need for input from
each constituency in the determination of policy and procedures for the entire college.
      The college constituencies are: The Board of Trustees, Administration, Districts, Students, and the
Faculty and Staff. The Oglala Sioux Tribe is represented through their constituencies. Prior to the creation
of PWO, input from each of the college constituencies worked its way up through the levels of the college
structure. The PWO was created to assure participation in the governance of the college by members who did
not have direct access. This organization within the college is specifically for students, instructors, and staff.
It provides a forum for addressing college-wide concerns and making consensus policy and procedure
recommendations to the President and on to the Board of Trustees.

                                                         -8-
Standing Committees:

     Standing committees are the primary working subdivision of PWO and transact business assigned by
either PWO or the President of the college. Committees of the college include: Instructional Affairs,
Institutional Development, Student Services, Activities Committee, and Assessment Committee.

                                POLICIES & PROCEDURES

     Oglala Lakota College is unique. The college is planned and operated to meet the specific needs of the
people on the reservation. This means an emphasis on Lakota culture and content as much as possible and it
means a variety of programs to meet students needs from the very basic of beginning reading to study skills
and high school equivalency, tutoring and testing, to college programs transferable to most colleges and
college programs designed to put people to work upon completion of certificates. There are also workshops
on specialized subjects ranging from horseshoeing to women's rights to Indian law. Finally, there are cultural
events such as movies, film festivals, nationally known guest speakers on Indian literature, art and history and
our own arts and crafts shows.
      We feel OLC is an exciting and stimulating environment in which to teach and learn and we hope you
will pick up this enthusiasm yourself, examine it critically, and then pitch in to make the college even better
for your having been there.

                                      STUDENT INFORMATION

     Students at Oglala Lakota College have the right to the highest quality education possible and to fair and
just treatment by all departments of the college. The college is obligated to provide students with the best
possible environment, instruction, curriculum and resources to attain a college education. However, the
responsibility for the quality of learning is that of the student. A quality education happens when learning
interaction is balanced by students and staff.

      In the event of a perceived unfair ruling made against a student the college has established grievance
policy and procedures for fair and equitable resolution of the problem. The grievance policy and procedures
are detailed in the OLC Student Handbook.

                                    DRUG-FREE ENVIRONMENT


     Oglala Lakota College requires a drug-free work environment. All employees and students are required
to comply with this policy. This policy is published in the Student and Faculty Handbooks. Discipline
measures may be necessary for violations of this policy. Individuals found in violation will be referred to
the appropriate professionals and officials. The College will maintain an employee support program and
student assistance program to assist individuals who may be experiencing problems.

                               GUN-FREE/WEAPON-FREE CAMPUS

    Oglala Lakota College will adhere to a Gun-Free/Weapon-Free campus policy. All dangerous weapons,
(dangerous weapons are defined as any firearm, knife, or device, instruments, materials, or substances,
whether animate or inanimate which is calculated to inflict death or serious bodily harm) are banned from the
Oglala Lakota College campus and properties. Weapons brought onto or carried on Oglala Lakota College
property must have prior approval and conform to the safety regulations identified in the procedures below.
Weapons carried by authorized law enforcement agents or used in military activities are exempt.

                                                      -9-
                                      ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

    Academic dishonesty is the taking of an examination or the preparation of papers for credit wherein the
student knowingly represents the work of another as his/her own; and/or knowingly breaks stated examination
rules. A student may be expelled and barred from further classes upon proof in a hearing of academic
dishonestly.

                                       STUDENT MISCONDUCT

1. Misconduct refers to any actual or threatened physical violence, gross disorderly conduct, interruption of
   classes or college business, repeated verbal abuse or harassment, vandalism to OLC college premises,
   coming to college classes or college premises under the influence of alcohol or drugs, failure to
   properly supervise the student's children at the college premises, and any other student conduct
   that cause a disruption in college classes or the transaction of college business.

2. A student may be barred or expelled from further classes as well as dropped from classes either for
   misconduct toward a College staff member, community member, another student, or a board member
   when this misconduct stems from College business or on college premises.

3. A student may also be barred or expelled for student misconduct occurring on the college premises or
   when occurring with college classes or events.

                                 ASSESSMENT PHILOSOPHY

     We, the community of Oglala Lakota College assert the following three specific and integral purposes for
institutional assessment:

1. to improve student learning
2. to document learning
3. to satisfy external agency requirements

     We base the foundation of OLC's assessment program on a formative philosophy in that all evaluative
information derived from assessment activities are directly applied by programs, faculty, staff, and adminis-
tration to improve the appropriate area of the college. A secondary objective of assessment activities is to make
public evaluative information so that decision-makers and potential consumers may judge the worth or merit
of OLC in relation to important criteria.

    We can only achieve success in learning through a continual, comprehensive assessment of student and
organizational performance using multiple assessment methods. In addition, we must conduct periodic
reviews of policies, goals, and methods of assessment to ensure quality information. All efforts are driven
by Oglala Lakota College's responsibility to improve and enhance the performance of our students, staff, and
faculty.

     Oglala Lakota College affirms that assessment is a process independent of decisions concerning personnel
matters, such as retention, rehire, or dismissal. We will not use assessment outcomes for such purposes and
all effort will be made to safeguard against the use of assessment results for matters related to these areas.

    The complete document, "Institutional Outcomes Assessment Strategy" can be obtained by contacting the
Director of Research and Institutional Assessment or by downloading the document from the OLC web-site
under the Research & Assessment Department.

                                                     -10-
                                    REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

                                      Leslie R. Mesteth, Registrar
                                  Whisper Catches, Assistant Registrar
                                  Kacena One Horn, Assistant Registrar
                                                    File Clerk


The primary purpose of the Registrar’s Office is to provide service. Through our service we not only derive
satisfaction, but students have a right to expect this from us.
Counselors are available at each college center to assist students in tutoring, attendance, academic, personal
and financial aid counseling. Counselors may also refer students to other resources if they are unable to assist
students in their needs.

The college is interested in the welfare of its students. The personal contact of students with each district
college center counselor begins within the community, during registration and throughout the year.
Students should work closely with their local college center counselor. An academic advisor is also available
for each student during registration and by appointment.

ACCREDITATION

Oglala Lakota College (OLC) Courses are accredited by the North Central Association of Schools and
Colleges, Higher Learning Commission. The BS in Elementary Education is accredited by the South Dakota
Division of Education. The ADN in Nursing is accredited by the South Dakota Board of Nursing.

COLLEGE ADMISSION POLICY

All applicants seeking admissions to Oglala Lakota College must send each of the items listed below
BEFORE you will be admitted:

1. Complete Admission Application stating what degree/major you will be pursuing.
2. Furnish a copy of your high school transcript, or certificate of high school equivalency (GED Diploma)
   MANDATORY. A student with a Bachelor’s Degree or higher will be required to submit documentation
   verifying the degree awarded.
3. Transfer students must have official college transcripts sent.
4. Verification of Tribal Enrollment if the student is a tribal member of a Federally Recognized Tribe.
5. You will then receive an ID/Password to register online at http://exweb.olc.edu/ics , please see your
   counselor for more information and to ensure that you have done placement tests.

Any student falsifying information is subject to being dropped from all classes.

EARLY ENTRY PROGRAM

Oglala Lakota College provides opportunity for high school students to achieve college credit under a
specific criteria called early entry. This program is offered to junior and senior high school students who
would like to enroll into college courses up to six credit hours a semester. They must have a written statement
from their high school Principal or Counselor stating they are prepared for College level work, approve the
student’s enrollment at OLC, and have a G.P.A. of 2.0 or above. An official transcript from the high school
must be submitted with the statement.


                                                     -11-
ACADEMIC ADVISING

Academic advising is primarily the responsibility of the faculty and is an on-going process throughout the
student’s academic enrollment. Academic advising will be available for students when they need or wish
it rather than merely when the College requires it. This means that advising opportunities shall be available
to students throughout the academic year at regular, reasonable intervals.
Students with more than thirty hours should contact the chairperson of their major department to see who their
advisor is to review status sheets and career plans. See OLC website www.olc.com under Academic
Departments for contact information including phone numbers and email addresses. Faculty members
assigned to advisees must make every effort to contact students with more than 91 hours (i.e. in person, phone
or email) in order to deliver accurate class scheduling to meet graduation requirements. A plan of study will
be made with the students and a copy placed in the student’s official file at the student’s “Home Center” to
ensure communication between faculty and district staff.

Tutoring in English and Math is provided by Student Support Services and Foundational Studies and should
be requested at the District Center by any student having problems meeting course requirements. Help with
study skills can also be requested. A college prep course, CoSu 103, is now part of our CORE requirements
and must be taken within the first two semesters.

STATUS SHEETS

Once a student enters a degree area, the student must obtain a status sheet/degree audit for that degree program
from their official record on the Exweb Jenzabar website by going to advisor tab and degree audit, please
review this with your counselor or academic advisor to ensure that it is correct. When thirty (30) hours have
been completed, a student must review his/her progress with the department chairperson. This status sheet/
degree audit should always be consulted when making course requests and signing up for classes. (If a student
fails to maintain continuing enrollment for one (1) semester, that student will come back in on the current
status sheet.) All students in the education degree department move to the new status sheet, if any changes
occur, due to state requirements.

STUDENT COURSE LOAD

During the Fall and Spring semesters, 12 credit hours per semester is considered a full-time course load.
Students may enroll for up to 18 credit hours per semester. In special cases, upon approval of the Department
Chairpersons, this maximum load may be increased. During the summer semester, six credit hours is
considered a full-time course load. In all cases, a half-time load is one-half a normal full-time load.

HOURS OF RESIDENCE

A minimum of thirty resident hours must be earned from Oglala Lakota College for consideration of awarding
an associate degree or a bachelors degree. To receive an associate degree from OLC, 11 semester hours of
the last 24 must be earned during the last year. To earn a bachelors degree from OLC, the last semester credit
hours must be earned from OLC.

ENROLLMENT LIMITS

Oglala Lakota College reserves the right to cancel any class which does not have an enrollment of eight or
more students. The college will make every effort to offer courses requested and in a sequence which permits
most students to obtain a degree in a two of four year cycle. To avoid class cancellations, each student should
meet regularly with the district counselor in order to plan schedules for each semester.


                                                     -12-
Class size at Oglala Lakota College is limited to 30 students. If need exceeds 30 students, the same
course will be offered the next semester. Only 25 students can be registered for R&W 083 and R&W
093.

ATTENDANCE

Students are required to attend class regularly. Students will submit a certification of attendance form signed
by each of their instructors to the financial aid office by the end of the sixth week of classes. If a student
wishes to be excused from a class, it is the student’s responsibility to clear the absence with the instructor.
At that time the student must arrange for a make-up assignment. A student may be dropped from a course
after three consecutive absences and will be dropped by the Registrar after five total absences. There are
NO reinstatements and NO exceptions for students who are dropped for five absences.

DROP/ADD PROCEDURE

During registration and the first week of classes, a student may change their enrollment by the following
procedure. Log on the Jenzabar website exweb.olc.edu/ics using your username and password that you
acquire from the Registrar’s Office or your “Home Center” counselor. Courses may be added or dropped
during the first week of the semester. If a student discontinues a subject and fails to follow the prescribed
procedure for dropping a course, it may be recorded on his/her permanent record as an “F”. It is the student’s
responsibility to verify that their online schedule shows that the course is officially dropped. If a student
fails to attend the first two weeks of class without notification to the instructor, the instructor will drop the
student at the end of the second week of class. If a class is dropped after the second week, the student will
be liable for the total cost of the tuition.

INCOMPLETES

An incomplete grade is given only when the instructor feels that special circumstances warrant it. In addition
to the faculty providing all information necessary to determine an appropriate grade for the student,
instructor, and Department Chairperson must sign a contract. Unless stated in the contract, all incomplete
grades must be made up within one calendar year.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

Graduating with an Associate of Arts or Bachelors degree from OLC requires twice as many grade points as
credit hours attempted (A cumulative GPA of 2.0). Grade points are as follows:
    A-4 grade points            F-0 grade points                        W-not applicable
    B-3 grade points            I-not application                       AU-not applicable
    C-2 grade points            NP-No Progress, not applicable
    D-1 grade point             SP-Satifactory Progress, not applicable
(Note! Some programs of study require a higher GPA above 2.0)

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS

Freshmen students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 1.50 up to 30 credit hours completed. Thereafter, the
student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00. This is consistent with the minimum graduation
requirements at Oglala Lakota College.




                                                      -13-
TRANSFER STUDENTS

Transfer students will be responsible for maintaining a GPA of 2.00, if their transfer total applied and Oglala
Lakota College credits equal more than 30 semester hours. They will be responsible for a GPA of 1.50, if the
total applied credits equal less than 30 hours. All credits are not transferable to every education institution.

DEGREE OR CURRICULUM CHANGES

When a student changes degree objectives, he/she will be subject to the maximum time frame of the new
degree without regard to time spent pursuing the previous degree. The student must realize that federal
financial aid will be calculated according to the original time frame.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent Study courses will be approved if the student meets the guidelines. The student must be in the
last semester of an Associate or Bachelor Degree program and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. All
Independent Studies must be recommended by the District Center Director and approved by the Department
Chairperson, instructor, and student. No more than six (6) credit hours per semester may be taken by
Independent Study. It must be understood that some courses cannot be taken by Independent Study. All
Independent Study contracts will not be processed unless turned into the Registrar’s Office with appropriate
signatures by the 6th working day after classes begin. Only full-time instructors are to teach independent
study courses.

TRANSCRIPT REQUEST

Any student requiring a transcript must put their request in writing to the Registrar’s Office. Any student
requesting a transcript needs a complete file (High School Transcripts, GED Certificate, Degree of Indian
Blood, no outstanding bills to OLC). The initial request will cost $5.00 and when multiple copies are needed
each additional copy will cost $2.00. Requests may take 2-3 business days to process, if a student needs them
faxed that same day it shall cost an additional $2.00. Requests shall be kept on file for one (1) academic year
due to limited filing space.

APPLICATIONS FOR GRADUATION

It is the responsibility of the student to complete an application form for graduation and forward to the
Registrar with the non-refundable graduation fee of $10.00. The district counselor and/or advisor will make
every effort to assist the student in this process. Applications must be received two semesters prior to the
semester in which the student will complete the requirements for a degree. (Normally, at Fall registration).
All students must have a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of a 2.00 to graduate.
Note: If a student fails to complete the requirements for graduation by June 1st in the spring semester in which
he/she applies, the student must reapply for graduation.

REGISTRATION FOR STUDENTS WITH MORE THAN SIXTY HOURS

Students with 60 or more credit hours should know that only the courses for their AA Degree may transfer
to another institution four year program.




                                                      -14-
ACADEMIC PROBATION/SUSPENSION POLICY AND PROCEDURE

PROBATION POLICY
Any student who does not earn a grade point average of 2.0 (1.5 for students with 30 hours or less) in any
semester enrolled or any student who has dropped all of their credit hours in the past semester will be placed
on academic probation.

PROBATION PROCEDURE

    1. A student on Academic Probation can enroll for 12 or more credit hours but to be removed from
       Academic Probation a student must satisfactorily complete at least six credit hours with a grade point
       average of 2.0 (1.5 for students with 30 hours or less).
    2. If a student does not satisfactorily complete the six credit hours per semester while on probation, they
       will be suspended for one full semester. (Suspension #1)
    3. The Registrar shall initiate probationary proceedings by informing the student and district center
       staff in writing (where the student has claimed to be his/her “Home Center”).
    4. The decision shall be binding and final for all courses offered by Oglala Lakota College.
    5. The Registrar shall maintain an updated list of all students on probationary status.

SUSPENSION POLICY
If a student does not earn a grade point average of 2.0 (1.5 for students with 30 hours or less) while on
probation, the student will be suspended for one full semester. This means the student can not enroll for one
semester. (Suspension #1)

Students will remove themselves from Suspension #1 by first sitting out for one semester, then by enrolling
for only three (3) hours and earning a grade point average of 2.0 (1.5 for students with 30 hours or less).

SUSPENSION PROCEDURE
Students placed on academic suspension will be allowed to return after sitting out for one semester on a
conditional basis.

1. Should the student on suspension #1 fail to successfully complete the six hours during academic suspension #1, they
   shall be barred from enrollment for 1 year. This will be Suspension #2.
   a. The Registrar shall ordinarily initiate suspension #2 proceedings by informing the district board and center
        staff where the student has claimed his/her “Home Center”, of the student’s academic record and request a
        review of their status.
   b. The student can appeal the Suspension #2 decision to their district board. The District Board shall schedule
        a hearing and notify the student in writing to give a written or oral justification of their poor record and reasons
        why they expect a better record in the future.
   c. The District Board shall only allow students back into Oglala Lakota College with documented extenuating
        circumstances, i.e.: health/medical issues, death of an immediate family member, other family issues, etc.
   d. The District Board shall notify the Registrar and the student in writing of their decision. The decision shall
        be binding and final for all courses offered by Oglala Lakota College.
        1. If the District Board’s decision is to place the student on academic suspension #2, the student will not be
             allowed to enroll for the next 1 year from the last semester enrolled.
        2. If the District Board’s decision is in favor of the student to reenroll, the student will be placed on academic
             suspension #1 once again.

              This means the student must sit out for one semester and will remove themselves from academic
              suspension #1 by enrolling for only three (3) hours and earning a grade point average of 2.0 (1.5 for
              students with 30 hours or less) or better in any one semester after sitting out.


                                                           -15-
2. If the student does not complete the three (3) hours with the required grade point average, the student will not be
   allowed to have another hearing and will be automatically barred from all further enrollment at Oglala Lakota
   College for the next 2 years from the last semester enrolled.

3. After completing Suspension #2 students shall be allowed to enroll at Oglala Lakota College with out being on
   probation or suspension and will be required to take placement tests again if they have not completed the Core Math
   or English requirement and shall come in on the new status sheet for their declared major.

4. The Registrar shall maintain and update a list of the status of all students on academic suspension.

Note: The President will appoint a committee to provide all hearings for the students placed on Academic Suspension
#2 from the Rapid City Extension and Cheyenne River Extension Centers.

ELECTRONIC INFORMATION RESOURCES ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY

Information resources offer access to computers and people throughout the world. Students and staff will
have access to electronic mail, college libraries, information, news, research institutions, software, discus-
sion groups, and much more. All users should be aware that the inappropriate use of electronic information
resources could be a violation of local, state, and federal laws.
Oglala Lakota College will make every effort to protect students and teachers from any misuse or abuses as
a result of their experiences with an information service. By accessing Oglala Lakota College’s network,
you have entered into a legally binding contract by signing your registration card. The full Acceptable Use
Policy is located in the Student Handbook and all students are agreeing to read the handbook and its
provisions when the registration card is signed.

DISTANCE LEARNING: DEFINITIONS OF ON-LINE COURSES

1.     Full-Online Faculty Instructed Course
      A Full-Online Faculty Instructed course will be accessed during the semester via the Internet. These
      courses make sole use of Internet technology to facilitate student access to class materials and to
      support intra-class communication. Online Faculty Instructed courses do not require any face-to-face
      meetings; however, they may have weekly requirements in the online environment.
2.    Full-Online Self-Paced Course (Independent Study)
      A Full-Online Self-Paced course will be accessed during the semester via the Internet. These courses
      make sole use of Internet technology to facilitate student access to class materials. Online Self-Paced
      courses do not require any face-to-face meetings or student to student interaction; however, they may
      have weekly requirements in the on-line environment.
3.    Online-Enhanced Course
      An Online-Enhanced course uses Internet technology to facilitate student access to class materials and
      support intra-class communication. These courses require classroom attendance throughout the
      semester during the scheduled class meeting times. It is very important that students attend the first
      scheduled class to receive these requirements.
Students who wish to register for number 1) or 2) above must have junior or senior class standing, and be
generally computer literate including knowledge of Microsoft word, the independent study requires a mini-
mum grade point average of 3.0. Exceptions pertaining to 1) and 2) must be approved by VP for Instruction.




                                                        -16-
                                                 FINANCIAL AID
                                Billi K. Hornbeck, Student Services Coordinator
                                     Cindy Iron Cloud, Financial Aid Officer
                                  Faith Moves Camp, Financial Aid Assistant


MISSION STATEMENT:

    To help those students who need assistance to further their education. Priority will be given to those people
with the greatest need. Aid is administered in accordance with the applicable laws of the United States regulations
and policies of the Board of Trustees and the Oglala Lakota College, regulations of the college stated in the Oglala
Lakota College catalog and the policies and procedures in this manual.

     Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) should be completed as soon as possible once it is available
in the Spring. The application may be filed by going to fafsa.ed.gov.

     Financial Aid is available at Oglala Lakota College in the form of Grants, Employment, and Scholarships. Due
to the limited amount of funds available through these aid programs, full-time (12 credit hours or more) students
with high need will be given priority.

Classification of Students. Freshman students (up to 30 hours attempted) must maintain a cumulative GPA of
1.50. Thereafter, the student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00. This is consistent with the graduation
requirements at Oglala Lakota College.

                                                           GRANTS

Pell Grant Entitlement Program. Students must have filed the Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA) on file. This is a
federal program that offers assistance to any eligible student who needs it to attend a post secondary educational institution. The
value of the award may vary from $319.00 to $5,550.00, depending on the amount of assistance reasonably available from the
family. This award helps eligible students work toward an undergraduate degree. Once a student has earned a first Bachelors
Degree, they are no longer eligible to receive PELL.

OST Higher Education Grant. Presently administered by the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Students must file the OST Higher
Education Grants application. Students must also have a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Pell Grant
Application, on file before a needs analysis can be completed and submitted to Higher Education.

FSEOG. The Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant Program provides grants to undergraduate students who demonstrate a
financial need. The average award to a student is $400.00 per semester.
Federal Work Study. Students employed under the Federal Work Study (FWS) Program can work a maximum of twenty hours
a week, depending on the amount of the award. Students will be compensated at an hourly rate of $7.50 per hour. The average
award is $1,500.00 per student per semester, but varies based on need.
     Eligibility of Student:
     A. Preference to students with greatest aid eligibility, who have indicated on their FAFSA that they are
     interested in work.
     B. At least half time students (except during the summer session).
     C. U.S. Citizen, permanent resident, or in the United States for other than a temporary purpose.
     D. Not in Default/or owe a refund to any Title IV programs.
     E. At least two work-study student will be hired in each district college center.
     F. Assignment of FWS to district centers is contingent on satisfactory compliance by the center
           in developing job descriptions, recruitment, supervision and evaluation.

                                                     SCHOLARSHIPS

     The Student Services Committee reviews and approves all institutional scholarship at OLC. Only complete applications
submitted online will be considered for selection. The web site is www.collegefund.org where a students fills out the personal
information, lists all extra curricular activities, volunteer work, honors, distinctions and a personal essay. The student then




                                                             -17-
contacts the college center staff to take a digital photo. All students must apply for the PELL grant to be considered for any
scholarship even if the student is not eligible for PELL.

Richtmyer Scholarship: In 1980, Dr. Robert Richtmyer presented Oglala Lakota College with a gift in memory of his late
wife, Jane. Scholarship amounts vary depending on the amount of interest earned from the Richtmyer Endowment fund during
the year. Students must present evidence of creative ability in Native American arts and crafts.
 Crazy Horse Book Scholarship: Students must be of Lakota ancestry, must be in good standing academically, demonstrates a
need and must submit a letter stating their educational goals.
Wilms Scholarship: Established for the purpose of financially assisting "young Indian males" to achieve a college education.
This award is also based on the interest accrued from the Wilms Scholarship Endowment fund per academic year. Criteria to be
considered will be: academics, school and community activities, leadership, potential for completing college and financial need.
$500.00 will be awarded per student, in good standings, per semester. Males to be considered must be 35 years or younger.
McAlpine Scholarship: This scholarship is open to Indians and non-Indians. The applicant must be an incoming freshman
student; enrolled full-time; and an essay of her/his dream, vision, or something that pertains to achieving her/his goals.
Fund Exchange Scholarship: Applicants must be an enrolled member of a Federally-recognized tribe, must be a potential
graduate for the current academic year, have an unmet need for financial assistance, be enrolled in a least 6 credit hours, have
demonstrated academic achievement and have a cumulative semester GPA of 2.0 or better.
Edith Kooyumjian: Applicant must be an O.S.T. member, enrolled in at least 6 hours, 23 years of age or older, an
undergraduate student, a need to support a family, and a financial need.
Davis: This is for students with a Voc-Ed major, enrolled member of a Federally recognized tribe and a full-time student.
Lawlor: This scholarship is for students with a Lakota Studies Major, full-time enrollment, an Oglala Sioux Tribal member and
an unmet financial need.
Long Wolf Memorial: This is for two undergraduate students who have demonstrated potential and sincere desire to perform
college level academic work. Must be a member of federally recognized tribe, at least part-time enrollment, and demonstrate
financial need.
American Indian College Fund: This is not a single scholarship, but is a number of scholarships we receive from the AICF
with their own criteria and change every semester. Selections are to be decided by the Scholarship Committee.
Board of Trustees Scholarship: This scholarship has many different criterions scholarships are awarded to students with
Perfect Attendance, Outstanding Community Involvement, A well written essay, and by Dept.: Applied Science, Humanities &
Social Sciences, Education, Social Work, Lakota Studies, Agriculture, Math & Science, & Nursing.

FINANCIAL AID REQUIREMENTS
All students must be aware of the following when applying for financial aid:

A. The student must apply for all financial aid in a timely manner to determine if he/she will receive Financial Aid
to help pay for his/her educational costs. The general rule is if you plan to attend OLC, your financial aid
application should be completed the semester prior to registering for classes.
B. Selected students must verify the information reported on the FAFSA. If a tax return was filed, a copy of your
tax forms and verification worksheet must be in the students file in the Financial Aid Office.
C. Students must not be in default on a federal student loan or owe any type of federal student aid repayment.
D. All applications should include Oglala Lakota College school code, which is 014659. Students who need
financial aid, are urged to contact the local District College center staff or the Financial Aid Office for general
information. All Federal Financial aid funding regulations state that a student receiving Federal Financial Aid must
maintain satisfactory progress.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY
In order to qualify and receive Federal Student Aid, the U.S. Department of Education requires that students
maintain satisfactory academic progress in a program of study that leads to a degree or certificate program.

Federal Student Aid includes Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG),
Federal Work-Study, and Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Grant (LEAP). Also, other agencies
including tribal and scholarship programs may require students to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress for their
aid programs.

The academic record of all students will be monitored at the end of each term to ensure compliance with the
requirements specified below. Therefore, even the academic record of those who have not received Federal Student
Aid in the past will impact future eligibility. Failure to meet the following standards will result in financial aid
ineligibility for Federal Student Aid.




                                                               -18-
Satisfactory academic progress has both a qualitative and quantitative measure to monitor a student’s progress
toward a degree or certificate:
1) Qualitative Requirement: Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average.
    a) Freshman (1-30 attempted credit hours) – 1.50
    b) Sophomore (31-60 attempted credit hours) – 2.00
    c) Junior (61-90 attempted credit hours) – 2.00
    d) Senior (91 or more attempted credit hours) – 2.00
2) Quantitative Requirements:
The students must demonstrate their pace of progression through their program of study. The pace is measured at
the end of each term. The students must satisfactorily complete 67% of their courses in which the student has
attempted overall.

Examples:

9 hours completed                    = 75%                                         9         = 75%
12 hours attempted                                                                 12


6 hours completed                    = 50%                                         15        = 62.5%
12 hours attempted                                                                 24


12 hours completed                   = 100%                                        27        =75%
12 hours attempted                                                                 36

“Satisfactory Completion” means earning a passing grade of A, B, C, D, or P. Grades of I, W, or F are not
considered passing grades.

If a student withdraws during the first two weeks of the term, it is not considered credit hours attempted. All courses
withdrawn from the third week of the term to the end will be counted as credit hours attempted.
Incomplete grades are considered credit hours attempted.
* Please see the Credit Hour Maximum Policy for the required completion rate to receive a degree at OLC.

Remedial Courses
Remedial courses will not be counted towards the students’ overall pace of progression or the cumulative hours
attempted.

Repeats
Courses that are failed or withdrawn from, then repeated are considered in the hours attempted. Title IV funding can
only pay a student one time for repeating a course that the student has passed. In accordance with Title IV (PELL,
FSEOG, FWS) regulations, test out courses will not be paid by Title IV aid.

Review
Following each term the Grade Point Average and number of credits attempted and completed for each Financial
Aid recipient will be reviewed.

Financial Aid Warning
    If a Financial Aid recipient fails to satisfy the Satisfactory Progress Rule in a particular term, the recipient will
    be given a Financial Aid Warning during the succeeding term of enrollment. Students are still eligible to
    receive Financial Aid during the warning period, but they must satisfactorily complete 67% of their overall
    enrollment with a cumulative Grade Point Average of: 1.50 for Freshman and 2.0 for Sophomores, Juniors and
    Seniors.

Non-Satisfactory Academic Progress
    If a Financial Aid recipient fails to comply during the warning period. The Student will not be eligible for any
   type of aid.




                                                           -19-
Appeal of Financial Aid Non-Satisfactory Academic Progress
1. A student may appeal Non-Satisfactory Progress by completing the Financial Aid Appeal Form and attach
   supporting documents to the Financial Aid Office by mid-term of the term during which the student is not
   eligible for financial aid.
   a. Reasons why he/she did not achieve minimum academic requirements which should include any type of
        unusual circumstances they may have been experiencing at the time.
        Unusual Circumstances that will be considered but not limited to are: illness, death in the family, injury,
        casualty losses due to weather (hurricane, tornado, mud slides, ground subsidence and other natural
        disasters), fire, theft, acts of God, or terrorism.
   b. An explanation of what has changed that will allow the student to make Satisfactory Academic Progress at
        the end of the next term.
   c. The appeal request will include an academic plan showing how the student will make SAP and the student
        must make academic progress under the plan at the end of the next term.
   d. Students may have multiple appeals – but must be for different reasons.
2. An appeal Committee will review the appeal and determine whether the Financial aid appeal is justified. The
   student will be advised in writing of the decision of his/her appeal no later than five days after receipt of such
   appeal.
   a. If the student can demonstrate that they can make Satisfactory Academic Progress in one term and the
        appeal is approved they will be placed on Financial Aid Probation for one term.
   b. If the student cannot demonstrate that they can make Satisfactory Academic Progress in one term and the
        appeal is approved, they will be required to submit an academic plan. This plan has to show how they are
        going to get back on track in a reasonable time. The plan will demonstrate the students map to graduation.
   c. If the student’s appeal is not approved, the student will not be eligible for financial aid.
3. A student wishing to appeal the decision of the Appeal Committee may do so in writing to the Student Services
   Committee. The student must state exactly what he/she disagrees with and furnish additional pertinent data.
4. The Student Service Committee will consider any proper appeal it receives at the next regularly scheduled
   meeting and indicate in writing its decision to the student by the end of the term during which the student is not
   eligible for financial aid.

CREDIT HOUR MAXIMUMS
     The U.S. Department of Education has established a limit on the number of credit hours a student can attempt
and still remain eligible for Federal student Aid. This limit is based on 150% of the credit hours needed to complete
the degree for which the student is pursing.
This will allow for curriculum changes, repeats, and enrichment course work that may be required for the field of
degree.
     This includes all attempted Oglala Lakota College courses as well as all transfer credit hours. In addition, this
includes all semesters at Oglala Lakota College with or without financial assistance.
     Academic Progress toward the degree/certificate program will be measured at the end of each semester. The
student will receive an update, as to the amount of financial aid left, with the satisfactory progress letter at the end of
each semester.
     If at any time, it becomes mathematically impossible for a student to complete their program with the number of
credits left in their 150% timeframe – the student is no longer making Satisfactory Academic Progress and not
eligible for Title IV aid.
     The student will then request in writing, a reset in attempted hours to reflect their current major.
Change in Major
     Students wishing to change their major plan should notify the Registrar’s office in writing, who will then notify
the Financial Aid office so that a determination of eligibility for the new program of study can be made.
Determination shall be based on credits attempted and earned that can transferred into the new major.
     The Financial Aid Student academic Progress will be reset with a change of major up to 3 times in a student’s
academic career at Oglala Lakota College.
Transfer Credits
     Transfer credits earned at another institution that are accepted at Oglala Lakota College toward the
degree/certificate a student is currently pursuing shall be used in computing the total credits attempted and earned.

Once a student earns a Bachelors Degree, they are no longer eligible for a Federal PELL Grant.




                                                            -20-
                                              BUSINESS OFFICE
                                    Arlene Quist, Vice President for Business
                                            Eric Christensen, Controller
                                          Maria Albers, Office Manager
                                     Myreen Iron Cloud, Bookstore Manager
                            Colleen Sitting Bear, Grants/Contracts Compliance Officer
                                          Holly Provost, Payroll Officer
                                       Gwen Young Bear, Accounting Clerk
                                                 Vacant, Secretary
                                    Desirae Charging Crow, Accounts Payable
                                        Tiffany Tibbitts, Accounts Payable
                                           Vanessa Ferguson, Bookstore
                                             Randi Hunter, Bookstore
                                         Melissa Rooks, Student Accounts
                                         Kathy Montes, Student Accounts

                                                           BOOKS

    Students who have completed the financial aid process and have been determined eligible and have
enough financial aid may be allowed to charge their books. All others must pay for their books and
supplies when they receive them. All previous accounts must be settled prior to the purchase of books for
the current semester.
    Books will be available at the district centers only on assigned days during the one week before classes
begin and/or the first week of class. Students who do not get their books during this time period will have
to pick up their books at the OLC Bookstore.
    Students should call the bookstore with questions regarding returns and exchanges.

                                         TUITION AND FEES
A. Tuition
   1. Undergraduate tuition at Oglala Lakota College is $80.00 per credit hour for students whose
       attendance results in “per pupil funding”.*
   2. Undergraduate tuition at Oglala Lakota College for any student whose attendance does not result in
       “per pupil funding” is $98.00 per credit hour.*
   3. Graduate tuition at Oglala Lakota College is $115 per credit hour.
*Students who have their tribal enrollment documentation on file with Oglala Lakota College Registrar’s Office
before the end of the second week of classes, does result in “Per pupil funding” and will not be affected by the higher
tuition. Why is this documentation required? Simply, the College’s primary source of funding is a Public Law known
as the “Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act.” This law requires all who claim to be Native
American to provide proof that they are an enrolled member of a Federally-recognized tribe. Any student who does
not provide the Registrar’s Office with this information will not have the major portion of the cost of their education
reimbursed to the College. Tuition and fees only cover a small fraction of the actual cost of a student’s education.
B. Tuition Assistance
   1. Financial Assistance, scholarships and grants are available for those students who qualify.
   2. Refunds will be made according to the refund policy.
C. Withdrawal Refund
   1. Students who withdraw voluntarily form Oglala Lakota College, after classes start, may be eligible
       for a refund of the tuition upon the approval of the Registrar and Financial Aid Officer. Refunds
       will be made in accordance with the following schedule:
       through the 2nd week........................................................................................100% refund.
       starting the 3rd week.............................................................................................0% refund.


                                                              -21-
D. Fees
   1. Registration fee is $40.00 per semester.
   2. Lab fees vary in courses.
   3. Technology fee is $8.00 per credit hour.
   4. These fees are non-refundable starting the 3rd week. Changes will incur should the student fail to
      drop within the 100% time.
E. Review of Tuition and Fees Schedule
   1. The Oglala Lakota College schedule of tuition will be reviewed annually.

                                       STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE

   It is the policy of Oglala Lakota College to collect a pro-rated activity fee based on enrollment per
semester.
                        12 + credits   $50.00
                        9-11 credits   $40.00
                        6-8 credits    $30.00
                        1-5 credits    $20.00

                                            AUTHORIZATION

    The Oglala Lakota College, specifically the Student Accounts Office, shall have the authority to collect
the activity fees.

                      TUITION, FEES, AND TEXTBOOK BILL COLLECTION

      The Student Accounts at Oglala Lakota College will have the authority to make collections on all
outstanding tuition, fees, and book bills. The Vice President for Business shall place a hold at the OLC
Registrar’s Office on all grades, transcripts, and diplomas of students who have outstanding tuition, fees,
book bills or any other outstanding bills until such debts are fully paid. All current semester students having
outstanding debts will be contacted by the Student Accounts Office by mid-term or before any Financial
Aid is released and be asked to sign an agreement allowing collections from current year financial aid.
     Students may access their statement by going to the OLC website (www.olc.edu), Distance Learning
Tools, Teams (Jenzabar). Enter your ID and PIN. Your PIN can be obtained from your counselor. Under
my profile click my accounts. Your statements are listed here. Your counselor can assist you. The student
is responsible for the student bill even if a third party or program may be paying the bill. Financial Aid will
be applied to the student bill unless third party payment has been received. If financial aid is applied and
the third party makes payment at a later date, the financial aid applied will be paid to the student.
      All students should file a financial aid application to determine eligibility for other scholarships. OLC
staff will collect tuition, fees, or book costs or develop a payment plan for students to pay all costs before
the end of the semester for which the student is enrolling.

                         COMPUTER ACCOUNT AND NETWORK POLICY

     Oglala Lakota College provides network access, including internet to students and staff to promote
educational excellence. Network access provides resource sharing, innovation and communication to the
Pine Ridge Reservation. Network users are responsible for their actions in accessing available resources.
The user is responsible for making sure any information received does not contain pornographic material,
inappropriate information, inappropriate language, or files that are potentially dangerous to the integrity of
the hardware/software within school premises. Use of any information obtained via the network is at the
user’s own risk. Oglala Lakota College makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for
the network facilities it is providing. Users must complete the User’s Request Form to use college computers.

                                                     -22-
                                    INSTRUCTIONAL DIVISION

                            Dr. Gerald Giraud, Vice President for Instruction
                    Lenora Hudson, Director of Institutional Assessment & Research
                    Jonalynn Clifford, Assistant to the Vice President for Instruction
                                    Wallace White Dress, Secretary
                     Matilda Montileaux-Ruff, Lakota Language Institute Director
                   Darlene Last Horse, Lakota Language Institute Assistant to Director

    The Instructional Division supervises all degrees and courses which grant college credit. These degrees
and courses are offered through the academic departments.

                          OGLALA LAKOTA COLLEGE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

    DEGREE                                                                                  DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE

Master of Arts:
    Lakota Leadership/Management                                                                             Graduate Studies
      Secondary/Middle/Elementary Educational Administration Emphasis                                        Graduate Studies
Bachelor of Arts:
    Lakota Studies                                                                                             Lakota Studies
    English & Communication                                                                      Humanities & Social Science
    Early Childhood                                                                                                 Education
    Social Science                                                                               Humanities & Social Science
Bachelor of Science:
    Business Administration                                                                                          Business
    K-8 Elementary Education                                                                                        Education
    ACED Elementary/Special Education                                                                               Education
    Information Technology                                                                                    Math & Science
    K-12 Lakota Studies Education                                                                              Lakota Studies
    Natural Science                                                                                           Math & Science
    Natural Resource                                                                                          Math & Science
    Secondary Education Physical Science                                                                      Math & Science
    Social Work - BSW                                                                                            Social Work
Associate of Arts:
    Art                                                                                          Humanities & Social Science
    Early Childhood                                                                                                 Education
    Elementary Education                                                                                            Education
    Information Technology                                                                                    Math & Science
    Lakota Studies                                                                                             Lakota Studies
    Liberal Studies                                                                              Humanities & Social Science
    Life Science                                                                                              Math & Science
    Natural Resources                                                                                         Math & Science
    Nursing                                                                                                           Nursing
    Science, Engineering, & Math                                                                              Math & Science
    Tribal Law                                                                                                 Lakota Studies
Associate of Applied Science: Authomative Technology, Customer Service, General Construction,
    Electrical Tech., Plumbing, Heating, Vent. & Air Conditioning, Entrepreneurship, Office Software
    Applications, Office Technology, TV Production                                                            Applied Science
Additional Programs: Secondary Education Certification (Business, Lakota Studies) , Lakota Language Certification,
    One Year Certificates in all AAS degrees; General Construction, Electrical Technology, Carpentry, Heating,
    Ventilation, & Air Conditioning, TV Production, Customer Service, Distance Learning, Office Technology, Office Soft
    ware, Graduate Courses - offered through all departments. Education Endorsement certificates in Lakota Studies,
    Birth-Preschool, K-12 Special Education, K-12 Exceptional Education, Math, Biology, Earth Science.




                                                           -23-
                                  COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM:

     The course numbering system for OLC is designed to indicate the level of difficulty of courses offered
at the College.
     1. The prefixes indicate the subject area of a particular course. For example: Lak - Lakota Studies.
     2. The first number indicates the academic level of the course.
         0 - developmental courses                          4 - senior courses
         1 - freshman courses                               5-7 - master’s level courses
         2 - sophomore courses                              8-9 - doctoral level courses
         3 - junior courses
     3. The second number indicates the sequence of courses.
     4. The third number indicates the number of credits for the course. Zero (0) is used for courses which
have variable credit.
     5. L is the first letter of all Lakota Studies Department courses. The letters which follow indicate the
academic discipline. For example: LSoc indicates a Lakota Studies course which is also a sociology course.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

    All degree students are required to take certain courses in order to receive a degree. These requirements
are called General Area or CORE requirements. The CORE requirements are slightly different dependent
upon the type of degree being sought.
BA/BS CORE Requirements                                                                               Cr.

   Engl 103 Freshman English I                                                                      3
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                                                                     3
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                                                   3
   Math 134 Intermediate Algebra or above                                                           4
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing or Above                                                  3
   Science                                                                                          3
   Social Science                                                                                   3
   Humanities                                                                                       3
   Literature                                                                                       3
   Credits:                                                                                         28
AA CORE Requirements                                                                                Cr.

  Engl 103 Freshman English I                                                                       3
  Engl 113 Freshman English II                                                                      3
  SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                                                    3
  Humanities                                                                                        3
  Mathematics (103 or above)                                                                        3
  Science                                                                                           3
  Social Science                                                                                    3
  Credits:                                                                                          21
AAS CORE Requirements                                                                               Cr.

    Engl 103 Freshman English I                                                                     3
    CS 103 Ethics in the Workplace                                                                  3
    SpCm 103 Speech Communication or OEd 163 Business Communications I                              3
    Math 103, OMath 113 or TMath 123                                                                3
    OEd 103 Computer Basics                                                                         3
    Credits:                                                                                        15

                                                    -24-
    The core science requirement can be fulfilled from courses designated as:
    1. AnSc                                                           4. Phys
    2. Chem                                                           5. Bio
    3. PSc                                                            6. NaRs

    The humanities requirement can be fulfilled from courses designated as:
    1. Mus                                      3. Phil                 5. Thtr
    2. Art                                      4. Lit                  6. Hum
    Education methods classes will not meet the humanities requirement.

    The social science requirement can be fulfilled by courses designated as:
    1. Anth                                                             5. Pols
    2. Econ                                                             6. Psy
    3. Geog                                                             7. SoSc
    4. HISA

                                LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS

    As a tribally chartered college, OLC promotes the specific areas of Lakota history and culture as well as
the general area of Indian studies. Every graduate is required to complete several courses from the Lakota
Studies curriculum. In addition all courses at OLC reflect a Lakota perspective.

LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS BA/BS                                                                   CR.
  Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                                                         3
  Lak 233 Lakota Language II                                                                        3
  LSoc 103 Lakota Culture, LHist 203, or LHist 213                                                  3
  Lakota Electives                                                                                  6
  required:                                                                                         15
LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS AA
  Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                                                         3
  LSoc 103 Lakota Culture, LHist 203, or LHist 213                                                  3
  Electives (recommend Lakota Language II or higher)                                                3
  required:                                                                                         9
LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS AAS/CERTIFICATE
  Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                                                         3
  Electives                                                                                         3
                                                                                                    6

ATTENTION ALL NEW STUDENTS

Placement Tests and Developmental Courses Policy (70-300 - College Policy Manual)
All students will take placement tests in English, Reading, and Mathematics to determine their readiness
to register for college level courses.

Students whose skills require developmental work must register in the appropriate developmental course
(any or all of: Reading and Writing, and Mathematics).

A student may register for only a select set of college level courses until the student has passed all
appropriate developmental courses with a satisfactory grade. *See the accompanying flowchart for the
list of college level courses available for registration.


                                                    -25-
A student who cannot pass the developmental courses after having taken them twice will be referred to
other services and can not register for regular college courses.

Developmental courses do not count toward total credit hour requirements for graduation.

Attention: New Student Roadmap

    1. All new students (including transfer students) must fill out an admission form for the registrar.
       Then the student will be issued an ID number. The ID number will be used to register the student
       for classes.

    2. All new students (including transfer students without English or Reading credits) must complete
       the computerized Placement test. The results of these placement tests will determine which of
       the following courses the student will be required to take.

                        R&W 083          Basic English I
                        R&W 093          Basic English II
                        Engl 103         Freshman English I
                        Math 083         Basic Mathematics I
                        Math 093         Basic Mathematics II
                        Math 103         Elementary Algebra

    3. Students are required to take the course in which they place within 2 semesters or subject to
       retesting.

    4. Engl 103 Freshman English I is a college-level core requirement which all students must take for
       any degree program. This course is designed to improve reading, study skills and writing needed
       for college success.
       Math 103 is a required course for many Associate level degree programs. It is also the
       prerequisite course for Math 134 Intermediate Algebra, the minimum core mathematics
       requirement for Bac-calaureate programs.

    5. All new students must provide copies of their high school diploma or General Education
       Diploma (GED) and Degree of Indian Blood (DIB) to the registrar. Those students who are
       transferring from another institution must provide college transcripts as well as a diploma and
       DIB.

                          General Education Philosophy and Outcome Goals

    Wolakolkiciyapi, learning the Lakota way of life in community, and the general education core of Oglala
Lakota College provide opportunities for students to acquire and apply the skills and tools to demonstrate
and gain knowledge. Students will become effective life-long learners and healthy contributing members of
their diverse local and global communities.

   Oglala Lakota College is committed is to providing the opportunity for students to acquire the skills and
knowledge necessary to appreciate and understand:

    The historical and contemporary contexts of multi-cultural and cross-cultural diversity that shape human
societies, polities, cultures and their interrelatedness.



                                                   -26-
    The physical/natural world, as well as the scientific, mathematical and indigenous concepts, theories,
principles and resources, that help explain the world.

    The intellectual, cultural and artistic achievements of the Lakota and other cultures of the world.

    The principles of wellness for living a healthy life: physically, emotionally and spiritually.

    The impact of modern technology on our lives, societies and environments.

   The development of a personal value system, based on Lakota perspectives and globally-accepted
moral and ethical principles.

General Education Learning Outcome Goals

Goal 1. Students will have skills to acquire new knowledge (Reading, Listening, Research).

    As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:

    1. Identify facts, themes, suppositions and conclusions from the written and spoken expression of
       others.

    2. Identify needed information to address questions of interest, and locate needed information in
       printed, electronic and oral traditional resources.

Goal 2. Students will communicate effectively in writing and speaking.

    As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:

    1. Write clearly using standard English conventions in spelling, grammar, punctuation and word
       usage.

    2. Construct essays and research papers having effective organization and use of references
       relevant to an assigned or chosen topic.

    3. Present ideas, opinions or persuasive statements clearly and effectively in spoken form.

    4. Communicate basic ideas in spoken Lakota language.

Goal 3. Students will understand and apply mathematical principles and methods.

     As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:

    1. Use mathematical symbolism and mathematical structure to model and solve problems.

    2. Communicate in mathematical terms.

    3. Order and analyze quantitative information to make judgments of real
       world situations.




                                                     -27-
Goal 4. Students will utilize technology in learning, problem solving, and communication.

    As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:

    1. Produce documents using word processing software.

    2. Communicate with others via computers.

    3. Analyze numerical information using appropriate software.

    4. Locate needed information using computer platforms.

Goal 5. Students will understand the structures, possibilities and interrelatedness of diverse societies.

    As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

    1. Identify and explain basic concepts, terminology and theories of selected social science
       disciplines.

    2. Apply selected social science concepts and theories to contemporary issues.

    3. Identify, explain and apply Lakota concepts of community to contemporary issues.

Goal 6. Students will understand the fundamental principles of the natural sciences and Lakota
explanations of the natural world, and apply scientific methods of inquiry to investigate the natural
world.

    As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

    1. Gather and critically evaluate data using the scientific method.

    2. Identify and explain the basic concepts, terminology and theories of the selected natural
       sciences.

    3. Apply selected natural science concepts and theories to contemporary issues.

    4. Identify and explain Lakota perspectives of the natural world and apply this perspective to
       contemporary issues.

Goal 7. Students will understand and appreciate Lakota values and culture, and the diversity and
complexity of human experience.

    As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

    1. Identify and explain Lakota aesthetic, philosophical, ethical and/or spiritual views.

    2.   Identify and explain social or aesthetic values of different cultures.

    3. Identify and explain the contributions of Lakota culture to other cultures.



                                                     -28-
-29-
Core Competencies
There are some basic skills that are expected of anyone with a college degree. These competencies are
required to pursue any of the degree programs offered by Oglala Lakota College. It is expected that students
will devote the first several semesters of their college careers to acquiring these basic skills.

Reading and Writing
There are a number of courses which help you with the skills of reading and writing. See the section on
placement to determine where you should begin with these courses.
   - R&W 083                                                   - Engl 103
   - R&W 093                                                   - Engl 113

Speech
The ability to present and defend positions verbally is a basic skill. There is a course designed to develop these
skills.



Quantitative Reasoning and Computation
Basic mathematical skills are required in all fields. There are several courses dedicated to these skills. Most
degree programs require more than minimal competence in this area. See the section on placement to
determine where you should begin with these courses.
   -    Math 083                                                     - Math 103
   -    Math 093

Information Technology
In the modern world, some familiarity with information technology is necessary in every field. Courses in
this area include both basic ability to interact (keyboarding) and basic computer skills. There are placement
exams to determine the appropriate starting level for keyboarding.
    - OED 103                                                        - MIS 113

Physical Science
Some knowledge of basic biological and physical processes and how they are studied is essential to
living in modern society.
     - Bio 103                                                - AnSc 103
     - Bio 113                                                - NaRs 103
     - Phys 113                                               - PSc 103

Literature, Art, Music
College graduates are expected to have a basic familiarity with cultural and artistic expression. Familiarity
with the literature of other cultures is a good way to broaden one’s understanding of the richness of human
culture.
    - Lit                                                          - Mus
    - Art                                                          - Hum

Social Sciences
Knowledge of people, groups, and institutions is important both for relating to and interacting with others,
and for developing increased self understanding.
    - SoSc                                                       - Pols
    - Psy                                                        - HISA
    - Econ                                                       - Anth
    - Geog

                                                      -30-
Lakota Language and Culture
Oglala Lakota College is a Lakota institution, and a basic element of the mission of the college is preservation
and promotion of Lakota language and culture. Basic competencies and Lakota language and culture are
expected of all OLC graduates. For new students with competency in Lakota language, it is possible to obtain
credit by examination for some Lakota language courses.
   -    Lak 103                                                     - LSoc 103

                           Two year Core requirements status sheet road map

                                                                    Where
Core Requirements: (24 Credits)                                     Taken             Date             Grade

R&W 083 Basic English I                                             3______________________________

R&W 093 Basic English II                                            3______________________________

Engl 103    Freshman English I                                      3______________________________

Engl 113    Freshman English II                                     3______________________________

SpCm 103 Speech Communication                                       3______________________________

Math 083    Basic Mathematics I                                     3______________________________

Math 093    Basic Mathematics II                                    3______________________________

Math(100 level or above, see status sheet in your major)            3______________________________

Social Science Elective (See status sheet in your major)            3______________________________

Humanities Elective (See status sheet in your major)                3______________________________

Science Elective (See status sheet in your major)                   3______________________________

Lakota Studies Requirements: (15 Credits)

Lak 103     Lakota Language I                                       3______________________________

LSoc103 LHist 203 or LHist 213                                      3______________________________

Elective (recommend Lakota Language II or higher)                   3______________________________


ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT:

“All OLC students making progress toward the completion of a college degree are required to participate in
the college’s general education assessment as outlined by the Office of Assessment and Institutional
Research. Students participating in the assessment process can be confident that individual results are not
used to deny admission to a professional program at the college or prohibit a student from graduating.”




                                                     -31-
                                        Woksape Tipi
                                     Learning Resource Center
                                         ACADEMIC & PUBLIC
                                         Library/Archives
                                           http://library.olc.edu
                                              605-455-6069
                   LaVera Rose, MA, MLIS, Director, lrose@olc.edu; 455-6064
           Sharon Running Hawk, Assistant Director, srunninghawk@olc.edu; 455-6067
                     Agnes Gay, Assistant Archivist, agay@olc.edu; 455-6063
                       Michelle May, Cataloger, mmay@olc.edu; 455-6065
                R. Jeanne Janis, User Services Specialist, rjjanis@olc.edu; 455-6069
     Theresa Bettelyoun, Branch Library User Services Specialist; tbettelyoun@olc.edu; 455-6066


Woksape Tipi or “House of Wisdom” is the Learning Resource Center building located at Piya Wiconi in
the Medicine Root District. The main library serves twelve branch libraries located at the twelve college
centers, including the Nursing and Cheyenne River/Eagle Butte centers. In addition to being an academic
library we also serve as the public library for the Pine Ridge Reservation.

The library fosters intellectual growth by providing access to information and materials which support the
mission, goals, educational, and research needs of students, staff, faculty, administration, and community
users. The library collection contains, but is not limited to:

                 An extensive online collection of journals and books
                 Over 40,000 volumes of print materials
                 1600 nonprint items
                 118 print journals and newspapers
                 Special collections include:
                 o       An extensive “Lakota” print collection
                 o       A teacher resource collection, and, the
                 o       Wakanyeja (Children’s) Collection

Our staff works closely with students to develop fluency in the use and evaluation of information sources as
they conduct research and other intellectual investigations through classroom instruction and drop-in
reference assistance. We offer assistance in Information Literacy; web page evaluation; use of the library,
online catalog, and access to professional journals; and use of online resources.

Library service hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and Tuesdays 8:30am to 8:00pm.
We invite community members to use the library at the following College Centers: Eagle Nest, East
Wakpamni, Pahin Sinte, Pass Creek, Pejuta Haka, Pine Ridge Village, White Clay, and Wounded Knee. It
is important for the public to realize that the library serves the academic needs of OLC students and staff first.
Each center may have specific times when the public may use the facility in order to better serve the needs
of the college. We advise that you call ahead to your Center to make certain the library is open to the public
before visiting the College Center if you are not a student or staff member of the college.




                                                      -32-
Archival Holdings

Oglala Lakota College Archive is the official archival repository for the College. We also maintain an
extensive collection of Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) records. Additional holdings include special collections
acquired from various sources. Presently the Archive is divided into three collections:

           Special Collections, consisting of historical documents donated largely by individual member
            which collectively document the social history of the Oglala Lakota people
           Institutional records, consisting of the administrative records of OLC and some from the OST.
           Artifacts, consisting of objects such as drums, buffalo skins, pipes and headdresses

The Artifacts Collection is the smallest of the three. The Special Collection is a unique resource that covers
a wide chronological range and offers important perspectives of Lakota history including villages, churches,
public schools and political institutions. The Special Collection is arranged into seven sections: manuscripts,
microfilm, video, audio, photographs, maps/blueprints/posters, and rare books. The institutional records
comprise by far the largest collection in the archives, representing about 80% of the entire archival holdings.

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of the OLC Archive is to collect, preserve and provide access to research materials from
permanent records of Oglala Lakota College and the Oglala Sioux Tribe. The OLC Archive also collects,
preserves and makes accessible historical and cultural records of the Oglala Lakota people, the Lakota
Nation, and other Native peoples of this geographic region. Sources for these records include government
agencies, private foundations, the business community, other tribal organizations, and individuals.

Examples of the historical and cultural material in the OLC Archive include personal papers (e.g., diaries,
letters, manuscripts); oral and written histories; pamphlets and other printed material; publications of
organizations; meeting minutes; maps; family photographs; and official records of churches, businesses and
schools.

Access to the Archive

Research hours are from 9:00am to 4:00pm, Monday through Friday, preferably by appointment. The
Archivist will answer e-mail and phone requests. Most archival collections are not currently processed;
however, most are accessible to researchers.




                                                     -33-
                           Agriculture Extension Outreach

                                 Departmental Phone #: 605-455-6085
                            Leslie Rae Henry, Extension Outreach Director
                                          Email: lhenry@olc.edu
                       Masters of Science, Biology, South Dakota State University
                Member of Gold Key International Honor Society for Graduate Students
          Bachelors of Science, Animal Science, Iowa State University of Science & Technology
                              Theresa Lone Hill, Administrative Assistant
                                          Email: tloneh@olc.edu
                       Associate of Arts in General Studies, Oglala Lakota College
                                 Julie Goings, Agriculture Coordinator
                                         Email: jgoings@olc.edu
                      Masters of Arts, Administration, University of South Dakota
                 Masters of Arts, Educational Specialist Reading, University of Arizona



Vision Statement:

“The Agriculture Extension Outreach supports the growth of the Pine Ridge Reservation’s land base through
growth of human resources with research and community trainings for toward sustainable self-sufficiency
with respect for Oglala cultural values by facilitating workshops for farmers, ranchers and tribal community
members.”

Outreach Extension & Community Education:
I.     Agriculture & Extension Outreach is community bases education with continuing education or
       college credits available upon request to the program.

Curriculum content is presented in a workshop format. Special topic areas can be requested by the
community. Examples of workshop areas presented in the past.

1. Organic Gardening -                           4.    Agri-Business Management—
   a. Soil Management                                  a. Farm/Ranch Fiscal Management
   b. Vegetable Production                       5.    Other Areas of Community Ed. as Request
   c. Food Preservation                                a. Solar Energy
   d. Plant Health Management                          b. Water Resources Management
2. Animal Science                                      c. Wild Edible Plants
   a. Bison Management                                 d. Carbon Sequestration
   b. Beef Production                                  e. Human Nutrition Education
   c. Horse (Equine) Management                        f. Annual Farm/Ranch Day
   d. Animal Nutrition
3. Range Management
   a. Range Plant Identification




                                                      -34-
                    FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

                                           Vacant, Director
                                     Dianne Amiotte, M.A., Faculty
                                     Grady Brunsch, B.S., Faculty
                                      Sandra Byrd, B.S., Faculty
                                     Veronica Jones, B.S., Faculty




                                                                                                                 FOUNDATIONAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
                                     Thedna Zimiga, B.S., Faculty
                                     William Young, PhD, Faculty

VISION STATEMENT

To provide outstanding instruction, service and support to qualifying first year and returning students in the
areas of Basic Math, Reading and Writing within a context of best-practice and research-based methodology.

MISSION STATEMENT

Within the cultural context of Wolakolkiciyapi, Oglala Lakota College Foundational Studies students will
gain the academic skills and abilities necessary to successfully navigate a college career and increase their
odds of program and/or degree completion.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS, SERVICES AND COURSES:

Oglala Lakota College established a coordinated program of academics that involves the teaching of basic
skills courses in Math, Reading and Writing within the framework of current best-practices and research-
based models to substantially increase the odds of success for entering college freshman. The following are
some of the major goals for Foundational Studies.

Goal #1: Placement Testing/Placement within pre-college courses.
Foundational studies coordinates and provides supervision of Oglala Lakota College’s Placement Testing
and orientation of entering freshman and qualifying returning students. In cooperation with college center
directors and counselors, Foundational Studies instructors assist entering freshman in the creation of an
effective program of study.

Goal #2: Coordinated student advisement between all departments, centers and instructors.
Foundational Studies instructors coordinate with academic departments and college center staff to provide
enhanced focus on advisement, orientation, registration and access to any necessary learning supports.

Goal #3: Staff development for all developmental instructors with special emphasis on best-practices
for in-class assessment, use of adult learning theory, attaining learning outcomes and increasing student
retention.
The Foundational Studies Department provides and sponsors staff training and professional development to
assist the college in improving student learning outcomes and increasing student retention.




                                                    -35-
FOUNDATIONAL ACADEMIC COURSES

Basic English Levels I and II
Our philosophy of Basic English Levels I and II is to offer students a year-long continuous course to develop
writing and reading skills and insure success in future academic courses. All students who place into Basic
English will enter the Level I class. Students will be given a computer adaptive exit exam. Based on those
scores, class participation and demonstration of writing skill students with sufficient performance will be
recommended into English 103. Students who require additional instruction will be recommended for Basic
English Level II.

RW 083 Basic English I
This beginning developmental English course is designed to offer students an opportunity to improve their
reading and writing skills. The emphasis of this course is on sentence and paragraph development including
identifying basic grammatical structures. Students completing this course will understand basic English
grammar and have the confidence to apply these skills to their own writing. Additional course materials
provide strategies and support for reading skills development including comprehension, critical thinking, and
vocabulary development. Students must successfully complete this class prior to entering Basic English
Level II.

RW 093 Basic English II
Basic English II is a continuation of Basic English I and offers a review of basic grammar and sentence
development. Students will do extensive writing and editing of their own work progressing from the sentence,
to the paragraph and to the full essay. Students will gain confidence in utilizing beginning strategies for
planning, executing and development of an essay. Additional course materials will provide ongoing strategies
and support for reading skills, comprehension, critical thinking, and vocabulary development. Students must
successfully complete a national computer adaptive test in order to pass on to English 103.* Basic English I
is a prerequisite for this class.

Math 083 Basic Mathematics I
This course is intended for those students who need a review of the basic computational skills as indicated by
a computer adaptive placement test or a nationally recognized placement test. Topics include the four math
fact families with whole numbers, decimals and fractions, equations, problem-solving etc. All math skills are
taught using an individualized approach that provides student the opportunity to complete Basic Math I at an
accelerated pace. Students are encouraged to participate in available Learning Labs.

Math 093 Basic Mathematics II
Prerequisite: An acceptable score on a computer adaptive placement test recognized national placement test
or a passing grade based on a mastery of skills from Math 083. This course provides a review of more
advanced computational and pre-algebra skills. Topics include ratio/percent, measurement, unit conversions,
introduction to algebra and geometry. Students are encouraged to participate in available Learning Labs.




                                                    -36-
          COMMUNITY/CONTINUING EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                                   Susan Heathershaw, Coordinator
                               Sylva Hollow Horn, Assistant Coordinator

     The Community/Continuing Education Department began as the Adult Education department in 1973.
The major component of the department was GED testing. In the years that followed the department grew to
include community education, life coping skill workshops, adult basic education and GED tutoring. The
name of the department was changed from Adult education to Community/ Continuing education. This was
translated into Lakota Language as “Tiospaye Iciyohikeya Wounspe”, which means community and continuing
education, which serves in the spirit of the mission and purposes of the College.
     Community education is a philosophical concept that serves the entire reservation community by providing
for all of the educational needs of its community members. It uses the local resources to serve as the catalyst
for bringing community efforts to bear on their needs. In addition to the effort to develop a positive sense of
community, improve community living, and develop the community process toward the goal of self-
actualization.
     The Community/Continuing Education Department offers a program responsive to the needs of the people
of the Pine Ridge Reservation. The department tutors are responsible for preparing students for taking the
GED tests. The instruction provided for the student is on an individualized basis and set up to meet the
individual needs of the student. Tutoring is provided at the local college centers. The majority Community/
Continuing Education Department tutors are bilingual and live in the community they serve. The department
offers lifelong learning through life coping skills workshops, and continuing education.
     Career counseling is another feature of the department. Each student completes a Career Occupational
Preference System interest inventory. This inventory assists the students in the selection of a career, and
allows them the opportunity to pursue this career choice.
Major components of the department are:
I.      Adult Basic Education Skills Tutoring in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and mathematics.
II. GED Tutoring in high school subjects of writing, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and
        science.
III. GED Testing Services is provided with authority from Washington, D.C.
V.      Life Coping Skills Workshops are short courses in many areas such as; consumer economics, job
        skills, law and government, Lakota culture and health.
VI. Career Counseling and Job Seeking Skills
VII. Family Literacy
            STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES (TRIO PROGRAM)
             Milton Fineran, Program Director-Piya Wiconi Campus

The current SSS program began at Oglala Lakota College in the summer of 1993. Serving 170
eligible students, the program has expanded and built upon its past success to serve 200 students per
year. The project has received notification for its fifth funding cycle which will take us to 2016.
Funded to serve First Generation and Low Income students with academic need, the staff, Peer
Mentors and Tutors will work cooperatively with all District Centers to provide assistance to program
participants who can benefit from the following services:

Peer Mentoring: We provide freshmen and newer OLC students with Peers who can assist them
with meeting the expectations of a College environment. The Peer Mentors are successful students
who have learned to overcome obstacles while maintaining full-time status. They assist the staff with
academic workshops, meet with freshmen on a “student to student” basis and provide tutoring to the
newer students.
Tutoring: We provide Tutors for students who are underprepared and need help with courses they
find difficult. We call this “Supplemental Instruction” as the Tutoring is tied directly to the class
requirements.
Academic Enrichment: Through advising, counseling, mentoring, skill building workshops and
other activities for the program participants, the staff and student workers foster an environment
that instills “resilience” and long term goal completion in student participants.

All SSS staff is alumni of Oglala Lakota College. Students are required to maintain contact with
program staff throughout their enrollment in college. Students who wish to receive services should
complete an application during enrollment in the fall semester. Those placing in 083, 093 and students
with learning disabilities are especially encouraged to seek program enrollment. For more information
go the OLC homepage. Please contact the SSS Counselor who serves your Center or you can also
email mfineran@olc.edu or call 455-6027.




                                                 -38-
                           APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
                                      Director, Doug Noyes
                             Administrative Assistant, Faith Pourier
                                Automotive Technology, Joe Kirk
                              Automotive Technology, Stanley Janis
                         Customer Service Instructor, Paul Cedar Face
                                 Electrical Instructor, Art Balcom
                        General Construction Lead Instructor, Lyle Wilson
              General Construction Instructors, Leonard Lone Hill and Marlin Fineran
                          Office Technology Instructor, Crystal Paulson




                                                                                                                    APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
The Applied Science Department offers the following certificates, degrees and programs-

Certificate of Competence

A college credential for students who have successfully completed designated short-term credit or non-credit
courses which provide them with job upgrading or entry-level skills. The issuance of a Certificate of Competence
requires that the student’s work be evaluated and determined to be satisfactory. The student must earn a GPA
of 2.00 or better for all courses required in the Certificate. College Bound/Work Ready-this Certificate is
necessary for admission into any of the Applied Science Certificate or Degree programs.
Student must complete (or test out):
       Basic English (RW 093)
       Basic Math (Math 093)
       A computer class (Oed 103 or MIS 113)
       Ethics in the Workplace (CS 103).

Certificate of Achievement

A college credential for students who have successfully completed designated medium-term Career and
Technical-Professional Education credit course sequences which provide them with entry-level skills or job
upgrading. The credit hours necessary to earn this Certificate shall be at least 30 credit hours. The certificate
is earned after completion of the first two semesters of the corresponding Associate of Applied Science
Degrees requirements. The issuance of a Certificate of Achievement requires that the student must earn a
GPA or 2.00 or better for all courses required in the Certificate.

Certificates of Achievement are offered for;

                 Customer Service

                 General Construction

                 Office Technology




                                                      -39-
Associate of Applied Science Degrees
        The A.A.S. degree is a technical education and career-training program, designed to provide students
with hands-on experience in a variety of tasks and duties found in the world of business and government.
These programs are not designed to facilitate the complete transfer of credits earned toward a higher academic
degree. (A.A.S. programs are only offered if, and when, Vocational funding is available. Please contact the
Applied Science Department to see if the particular program of interest is currently funded. Vocational
degree programs are subject to change without notice, depending on community needs and availability of
funding.)

A.A.S. Degrees:

    A. Automotive Technology                               D. General Construction

    B. Customer Service                                    E. Office Technology


    C. Electrical Technology

                           APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT MISSION

To continuously improve all programs to provide all students with competitive human, technical and
conceptual skills to participate in the improvement of their communities and quality of life.
When completing the program the student will be able to;
Automotive Program
        1. Demonstrate professionalism and related soft skills.
        2. Apply theory of vehicle operating systems.
        3. Diagnose vehicle operating systems.
        4. Repair vehicle operating systems.
        5. Interpret service information.
        6. Exhibit safety practices and procedures.
Customer Service Program
        1. Select and apply technology to meet business objectives..
        2. Demonstrate professional appearance and behavior in a business environment.
        3. Demonstrate interpersonal skills.
        4. Apply bookkeeping and mathematical processes.
        5. Apply critical thinking in a business environment.
        6. Articulate the economic, financial, social, legal and cultural forces affecting the business
             environment.
Electrical Program
        1. Exhibit proper safety techniques and procedures.
        2. Classify the use of common electrical materials.
        3. Analyze blueprints and isometric drawings.
        4. Demonstrate proper techniques and procedures for installation of electrical systems.
        5. Perform skillfully the installation of light fixtures, outlets, and household equipment.
        6. Apply knowledge of model electrical code rules and regulations.
General Construction Program
       1. Exhibit problem solving, creativity, and resourcefulness.
       2. Exhibit safety practices and procedures.
       3. Demonstrate framing skills.

                                                    -40-
        4. Apply interior finish techniques.
        5. Perform exterior finish applications.
        6. Perform estimating/print reading functions.
Office Technology Program
        1. Demonstrate professional business communication.
        2. Utilize computer and other technology for general office applications..
        3. Exhibit ethical behavior in the office setting.
        4. Apply bookkeeping and record keeping procedures.
        5. Perform administrative responsibilities (i.e. appointment scheduling, telephone procedures) to
            provide optimal services to the customer and employer.
        6. Apply critical thinking skills.
        7. Explain social behaviors and interactions between individuals, groups and institutions.
        8. Demonstrate organizational skills.
Office Software Applications
        1. Demonstrate professional business communication.
        2. Use Microsoft operating system including basic commends, retrieval and filing in directories.
        3. Exhibit ethical behavior in the office setting.
        4. Produce properly formatted and constructed documents in Microsoft Word, Excel and Power
            Point.
        5. Create and publish booklets, pamphlets and brochures.
        6. Develop a data base that will sort, store and retrieve information.
        7. Load, delete, install and uninstall programs from micro computers
        8. Apply critical thinking skills.




                                                    -41-
                         APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
         Associates of Applied Science in AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY


PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
SEMESTER ONE: (12 credits)                                    Taken         Date       Grade
Auto 101 Automotive Electrical Systems and Electronics. _______ ________                  _____
 The first of four semesters begins with the student getting an overall picture of the program.
Topics include Safety, Communications, Basic Shop Procedures, Service Information, Tools and
Equipment, and Basic Vehicle Maintenance. Using state of the art computer based instruction
 modules the students will begin learning automotive electronics. The areas of study includes:




                                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
Introduction to Electronics, Semi-Conductors, Transistors, Circuits and Troubleshooting.

SEMESTER TWO: (12 credits)                                     Taken        Date       Grade
Auto 102* Basic and Advanced Brakes, Drum and Discs _______                ________      _____
Student will be able to use a drum/disc brake trainer, which will be a two wheel model. This
trainer will be part of a brake system program to present the live operation and study hydraulic
brake systems. A Delco/Bosh ABS/TCS system trainer will used to present “real world”
operation and study of antilock brake/traction control systems.


SEMESTER THREE: (12 credits)                                    Taken       Date       Grade
Auto 201* Engine Performance, Emissions and Ignitions _______           ______         _____
Student will learn how to use training boards to perform troubleshooting and engine control
fundamentals, engine control diagnostic fundamentals, engine control system troubleshooting,
and injector/ fuel pump systems.


SEMESTER FOUR: (15 credits)                                     Taken        Date       Grade
Auto 202* Basic and Advanced Steering and Suspensions            ______      ______      ______
In this course students will study and gain knowledge of the following: Steering, Suspension Service
and Repair including steering system design, Steering gear and linkage (manual and power),
rack-and-pinion, steering columns, front and rear suspension designs, electrical suspension
 control systems, wheel bearing and spindle design, wheel and tire assembly service, wheel
alignment diagnosis and adjustment. Students will have hands on training and testing.
    Engl 103* Freshman English I                          3 _____________________________
    SPCM 103 Speech Communications                        3 _____________________________
    Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
    OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
    CMath 153 Consumer Math                               3 _____________________________
     Lakota Studies Core requirements                     3 _____________________________
                                                          3 _____________________________



                                                   -42-
                         APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
         ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CUSTOMER SERVICE
                            Status Sheet


1. CORE (18 credits)                                         Where Taken         Date       Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                           3 _____________________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II OR                       3 _____________________________
   Engl 143     Writing in the Professions
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                          3 _____________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR




                                                                                              2011-2013 Catalog
   OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
   CMath 153 Consumer Math                                3 _____________________________
   Humanities or Social Science Elective                  3 _____________________________
   OEd 103      Computer Basics                           3 _____________________________


2. LAKOTA STUDIES (6 credits)
   Lak 103      Lakota Language I (or higher)             3______________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History I                            3______________________________


3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)
   CS 103       Ethics in the Workplace                   3______________________________
   CS 113       Introduction to Customer Service          3______________________________
   BAd 143      Personal Finance                          3______________________________
   OTech 283 Keeping Financial Records                    3______________________________
   CS 133       Hospitality & Tourism                     3______________________________
   MIS 113      Applied Information Processing            3______________________________
   OEd 153      Professional Development                  3______________________________
   CS 223       Current Issues in Customer Service        3______________________________
   CS 273*      Customer Service Internship               3______________________________


4. FREE ELECTIVES (6 Credits must be at 200 Level or higher)

   1. _______      ________________________               3 ______________________________
   2. _______      ________________________               3 ______________________________
   3. _______      ________________________               3 ______________________________
                                                          Total Credits: 60
                                                   -43-
                           APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
          ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CUSTOMER SERVICE

                                  Suggested Educational Plan

PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate

 Course           Title                                  Semester Hours
First Semester 15 Credits
   Engl 103    Freshman English                                 3
   Math        Any 100 Level Math Class                         3
   CS 113      Introduction to Customer Service                 3
   LAK 103     Lakota Language I                                3
   OEd 153     Professional Development                         3

Second Semester 15 Credits
   English     Choice of two                                    3
   BAd 143     Personal Finance                                 3
   MIS 113     Applied Information Processing                   3
   CS 133      Hospitality & Tourism                            3
   Humanities or Social Science Elective                        3


Third Semester 15 Credits
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                                3
   CS 223      Current Issues in Customer Service               3
   OTech 283 Keeping Financial Records                          3
   LSoc 103    Lakota Culture                                   3
   Professional Elective                                        3


Fourth Semester    12 Credits
   CS 273      Customer Service Internship                      3
   Elective                                                     3
   Elective                                                     3
   Elective                                                     3

                                                    Total Credit 57

                                                  -44-
                       APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
     ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
                        Vocational Degree

1. CORE (15 credits)                                    Where Taken         Date       Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                       3 _____________________________
   TMath 123 Construction Trades Math                 3 _____________________________
             (or equivalent)
   CS 103     Ethics in the Workplace                3 _____________________________
   OEd 103    Computer Basics                        3 _____________________________




                                                                                         2011-2013 Catalog
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                     3 _____________________________


2. LAKOTA STUDIES (6 credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I (or higher)          3 _____________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History I                        3 ______________________________

3. TRADES CORE (18 credits)
   Trds 103   Occupational Safety                    3 ______________________________
   Elec 103   Electrical Fundamentals                3 ______________________________
   CAR 103    Carpentry Theory                       3 ______________________________
   Plmb 103   Introduction to Plumbing               3 ______________________________
   CAR 113    Basic Drafting                         3 _______________________________
   Trds 133   Residential Print Reading              3 _______________________________


4. ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION (28 credits)
   Elec 113   Electrical Blue Prints                 3 _______________________________
   Elec 123   NEC® Codes                             3 _______________________________
   Elec 133* Motors                                  3 _______________________________
   Elec 223   Electrical Maintenance                 3 _______________________________
   CAR 114    On-site Construction I                 4 _______________________________
   CAR 124* On-site Construction II                  4 _______________________________
   CAR 214* On-site Construction III                 4 _______________________________
   CAR 224* On-site Construction IV                  4 _______________________________
                                                     Total Credits: 67



                                              -45-
                          APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
     ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
                                           Vocational Degree


                                     Suggested Educational Plan
PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate

First Semester     16 Credits

 Engl 103        Freshman English I                            3
 TMath 123       Construction Trade Math                       3
 Trds 103        Occupational Safety                           3
 LAK 103         Lakota Language I                             3
 CAR 114         On-Site Construction I                        4

Second Semester 16 Credits

 SpCm 103        Speech Communication                          3
 CAR 103         Carpentry Theory                              3
 CAR 113         Basic Drafting                                3
 Elec 103        Electrical Fundamentals                       3
 CAR 124         On-Site Construction II                       4


Third Semester      16 Credits

 LSoc 103        Lakota Culture                                3
 Trds 133        Residential Print Reading                     3
 Plmb 103        Introduction to Plumbing                      3
 CAR 203         Carpentry Theory II                           3
 CAR 214         On-Site Construction III                      4


Fourth Semester 16 Credits

 Elec 123        NEC® Codes                                    3
 Elec 223        Electrical Maintenance                        3
 Elec 133        Motors                                        3
 Elec 113        Electrical Blue Prints                        3
 CAR 224         On-Site Construction IV                       4



                                                Total Credits: 64




                                                 -46-
                       APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
     ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN GENERAL CONSTRUCTION
                        Vocational Degree

1. CORE (15 credits)                                     Where Taken         Date        Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                       3 _____________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                      3 _____________________________
   CS 103     Ethics in the Workplace                 3 _____________________________
   TMath 123 Construction Trades Math                 3 _____________________________
   OEd 103    Computer Basics                         3 _____________________________




                                                                                          2011-2013 Catalog
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (6 credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I (or higher)           3 ______________________________
   LSoc 103   Lakota Culture OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History I                        3 ______________________________

3. TRADES CORE (18 credits)
   Trds 103   Occupational Safety                     3 ______________________________
   Elec 103   Electrical Fundamentals                 3 ______________________________
   CAR 103    Carpentry Theory                        3 ______________________________
   Plmb 103   Introduction to Plumbing                3 ______________________________
   CAR 113    Basic Drafting                          3 ______________________________
   Trds 133   Residential Print Reading               3 ______________________________


4. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION SPECIALIZATION (30 Credits)
   Trds 163   Concrete Basics                         3 _____________________________
   CAR 203 Carpentry Theory II                        3 _____________________________
   HV 103     Intro Heat/Vent./A.C.                   3 _____________________________
   CAR 232    Res. & Light Comm. Bldg. Codes          2 _____________________________
   Trds 213   Residential Estimating                  3 _____________________________
   CAR 114    On-site Construction I                  4 _____________________________
   CAR 124* On-site Construction II                   4 _____________________________
   CAR 214* On-site Construction III                  4 _____________________________
   CAR 224* On-site Construction IV                   4 _____________________________


                                                      Total Credits: 69
                                               -47-
                      APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
     ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN GENERAL CONSTRUCTION


                                  Suggested Educational Plan
PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
First Semester      16 Credits

       Engl 103        Freshman English                 3
       TMath 123       Construction Trades Math         3
       Trds 103        Occupational Safety              3
       LAK 103         Lakota Language I                3
       CAR 114         On-Site Construction I           4

Second Semester 16 Credits
      SpCm 103    Speech Communication                  3
       CAR 103         Carpentry Theory I               3
       CAR 113         Basic Drafting                   3
       Elec 103        Electrical Fundamentals          3
       CAR 124         On-Site Construction II          4

Third Semester 16 credits
      Plmb 103    Introduction to Plumbing              3
      CAR 203     Carpentry Theory II                   3
      Trds 163    Concrete Basics                       3
      LSoc 103    Lakota Culture                        3
      CAR 214     On-Site Construction III              4

Fourth Semester 15 credits
      HV 113        Intro to HVAC                       3
      Trds 133      Residential Print Reading           3
      CAR 232       Res. & Light Comm. Bldg Codes       2
      Trds 213      Residential Estimating              3
      CAR 224       On-Site Construction IV             4

Total Credits: 63




                                                 -48-
                         APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
          ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OFFICE TECHNOLOGY
                           (Vocational Degree)

1. CORE (18 credits)                                          Where Taken      Date    Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                           3______________________________
     Engl 113*   Freshman English II OR
     Engl 142    Writing in the Professions               3______________________________
     SpCm 103 Speech Communication                        3______________________________
     Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
     OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR




                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
     CMath 153 Consumer Math                              3______________________________
     Humanities or Social Science Elective                3______________________________
     OEd 103     Computer Basics                          3______________________________


2.   LAKOTA STUDIES (6 credits)
     Lak 103     Lakota Language I (or higher)            3______________________________
     LSoc 103    Lakota Culture OR
     LHist 203* Lakota History I                          3______________________________


3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (42 credits) _____________________________
   CS 103  Ethics in the Workplace    3______________________________
     MIS 113     Applied Information Processing           3______________________________
     OEd 123* Word Processing I                           3______________________________
     OEd 133     Records Management                       3______________________________
     MIS 143* Introduction to Spreadsheet                 3______________________________
     OEd 153     Professional Development                 3______________________________
     OEd 173* Dictation/Transcription                     3______________________________
     OTech 283 Keeping Financial Records                  3______________________________
     OTech 293 Record Keeping Application Software        3______________________________
     OEd 243* Office Management, Security & Safety 3______________________________
     OEd 253* Word Processing II                          3______________________________
     Free Electives (1 must be a 200 level or higher)     3______________________________
     Free Elective                                        3______________________________
     OTech 213* Office Technology Internship              3______________________________

Student may take OTech 213 Office Technology Internship anytime during the last two semesters—
recommended over Christmas Vacation or between last semester classes & graduation.
Total Credits: 66
                                                   -49-
                     APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
        ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OFFICE TECHNOLOGY
                                    (Vocational Degree)

                                   Suggested Educational Plan


PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
First Semester   15 Credits

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                           3
   Math 113 Elementary Algebra or                         3
             alternative
   Lak 103   Lakota Language I                            3
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                          3
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                 3
Second Semester 15 Credits


   Engl 113Freshman English II                            3
   OEd 123 Word Processing I                              3
   OEd 133 Records Management                             3
   LSoc 103Lakota Culture or LHist 203                    3
           Lakota History
   OEd 153 Professional Development                       3
Third Semester    15 Credits

   Social Science Elective                                3
   OEd 253 Word Processing II                             3
   OTech 283 Keeping Financial Records                    3
   OEd 243 Office Mgmt, Security & Safety                 3
   OEd 143 Introduction to Spreadsheets                   3
 Fourth Semester 15 Credits

   OTech 293 Record Keeping Software                      3
   OEd 173 Dictation/Transcription                        3
   Elective                                               3
   Elective                                               3
   OTech 273 Office Technology Internship                 3


Student may take OTech 213 Office Technology Internship anytime during the last two semesters—
recommended over Christmas Vacation or between last semester classes & graduation.

Total Credits: 66 (Total includes OEd 103 and CS 103)



                                             -50-
                         APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
           ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OFFICE SOFTWARE
                             APPLICATIONS
                           (Vocational Degree)

1. CORE (15 credits)                                            Where Taken Date      Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                          3_______________________________
   CS 103    Ethics in the Workplace                     3_______________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                         3_______________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
   OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
   CMath 153 Consumer Math                               3 ____________________________




                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
   OEd 103 Computer Basics                               3 ____________________________

2.   LAKOTA       STUDIES (6 credits)
     Lak 103      Lakota Language I (or higher)          3_______________________________
     LSoc 103     Lakota Culture OR
     LHist 203*   Lakota History I                       3_______________________________

3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)
   Humanities or Social Science Elective      3_______________________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II OR
   Engl 142 Writing in the Professions        3_______________________________
   IT 103     Theory of Computational Devices 3_______________________________
   MIS 113    Applied Information Processing  3_______________________________
   OEd 123* Word Processing I                 3_______________________________
   MIS 143* Introduction to Spreadsheet       3_______________________________
   IT 153*    Survey of Operating Systems     3_______________________________
   OEd 153 Professional Development           3_______________________________
   MIS 243* Data Base Applications and Design 3_______________________________
   IT 273*    Information Systems Mgmt.       3_______________________________


4. PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE (9 credits)
   Choose three courses
   (from IT, MIS, OEd, BAD)
   _______ ___________________________                   3_______________________________
     _______      ___________________________            3_______________________________
     _______      ___________________________            3_______________________________




                                                         Total Credits: 60



                                                  -51-
                     APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
          ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OFFICE SOFTWARE
                           APPLICATIONS
                                     (Vocational Degree)

                                  Suggested Educational Plan


PROGRAM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
First Semester   15 Credits

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                            3
   Math 113 Elementary Algebra or                          3
             alternative
   Lak 103   Lakota Language I                             3
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                           3
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                  3
Second Semester 15 Credits


   Engl 113Freshman English II                             3
   OEd 123 Word Processing I                               3
   IT 103  Theory of Computational Devices                 3
   LSoc 103Lakota Culture or LHist 203                     3
           Lakota History
   OEd 153 Professional Development                        3
Third Semester    15 Credits

   Social Science Elective                                 3
   MIS 143* Introduction to Spreadsheet                    3
   IT 153*     Survey of Operating Systems                 3
   MIS 193 Fundamentals of Computer Publishing             3
   Elective                                                3
 Fourth Semester 12 Credits

   MIS 243* Data Base Applications and Design              3
   IT 273*  Business Information Systems Mngt              3
   Elective                                                3
   Elective                                                3



Total Credits: 63 (Total includes OEd 103 and CS 103)




                                             -52-
                       APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
               ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE IN CUSTOMER SERVICE
                       (VOCATIONAL CERTIFICATE)

1. CORE (12 credits)                                     where taken        date   grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                         3 ______________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
   OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
   CMath 153*Consumer Math                              3 ______________________________
   OEd 103    Computer Basics                           3 ______________________________




                                                                                           2011-2013 Catalog
   CS 103     Ethics in the Workplace                   3 ______________________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (6 credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I (or higher)             3 ______________________________
   LSoc 103   Lakota Culture OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History I                          3 ______________________________
3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (9 credits)
   CS 113     Introduction to Customer Service          3 ______________________________
   CS 133     Hospitality & Tourism                     3 ______________________________
   BAd 143    Personal Finance                          3 ____________________________


                                                        Total Credits: 27




                                                 -53-
                       APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
              ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE IN GENERAL CONSTRUCTION
                             Vocational Degree


1. CORE (12 credits)                                 Where Taken   Date   Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                      3 _____________________________
   TMath 123 Construction Trade Math                 3 _____________________________
   OEd 103     Computer Basics                       3 ___________________________
   CS 103      Ethics in the Workplace               3 ___________________________




                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (3 credits)
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I (or higher) OR      3 _____________________________
   LSoc 103    Lakota Culture OR
   L Hist 203* Lakota History I       3 _____________________________
3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS: (20 credits)
   Trds 103    Occupational Safety                   3 _____________________________
   Plmb 103    Introduction to Plumbing or
   Elec 103    Electrical Fundamentals or
   HV 103      Intro Heat/Vent/A.C.                  3 ___________________________
   CAR 113     Basic Drafting                        3 _____________________________
   Trds 133    Residential Print Reading             3 _____________________________
   CAR 114     On-site Construction I                4 _____________________________
   CAR 124     On-site Construction II               4 _____________________________




                                              -54-
                     APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
              ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE IN OFFICE TECHNOLOGY
                           (Vocational Degree)

1. CORE (15 Credits)                                   Where Taken    Date Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                        3 ____________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II OR Engl 143            3 ____________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
   OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
   CMath 153* Consumer Math                            3 ____________________________
   OEd 103 Computer Basics                             3 ____________________________
   CS 103    Ethics in the Workplace                   3 ____________________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (3 Credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language OR




                                                                                         2011-2013 Catalog
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture; OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History l                         3 ____________________________
3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing 3 ____________________________
   OEd 123* Word Processing I             3 ____________________________
   OEd 133 Records Management             3 ____________________________
   OEd 153    Professional Development                 3 ____________________________
                                                       Total Credits: 30

                      APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
     ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE IN OFFICE SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS
                       (Vocational Degree)

1. CORE (15 credits)                                       Where Taken Date     Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                         3 __________________________
   CS 103    Ethics in the Workplace                   3 _____________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                       3 _____________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra (or higher); OR
   OMath 113 Occupational Math; OR
   CMath 153 Consumer Math                             3 _____________________________
   OEd 103 Computer Basics                             3 _____________________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (3 Credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language OR
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture; OR
   LHist 203* Lakota History l                         3 _____________________________
3. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)
   MIS 113    Applied Information Processing           3 _____________________________
   OEd 123*   Word Processing I                        3 _____________________________
   IT 103     Theory of Computational Devices          3 _____________________________
   OEd 153    Professional Development                 3 _____________________________
                                                       Total Credits: 30
                                                -55-
                                                      BUSINESS DEPARTMENT

                                                Loretta Broberg, Ph.D., Department Chair, Faculty
                                                        Ahmed Al-Asfour, M.B.A., Faculty
                                                           Bill Okrepkie, M.S., Faculty
                                                           Dana Jones, M.B.A., Faculty
                                                          Julie Johnson, M.B.A., Faculty
                                                           Pam Houston, B.S., Faculty
                                                          Shawn Reinhart, B.S., Faculty
                                                      Joanne White Thunder, ED.D., Faculty


                      VISION STATEMENT
BUSINESS DEPARTMENT




                      Individuals are able to reach their maximum potential and are prepared to lead full and productive lives in
                      the 21st Century through an education at Oglala Lakota College Business Department that ensures:
                              Education excellence, equity, and high expectations for every individual;

                              A highly effective instructor in every classroom;

                              A supportive learning environment; and

                              Partnerships among educators, parents, family, business, and the community that support high
                              academic achievement and opportunity for all individuals.
                      MISSION STATEMENT

                      Oglala Lakota College Business Department will provide the breadth of business education necessary for
                      individuals to be successful within their communities while maintaining wolakolkiciyapi.

                              Ensure that high expectations are maintained for all students;
                              Develop a long-term vision and maintain an ongoing five-year plan to ensure the steady progress
                              of all students to reach their full potential; and

                              Build support for higher education on the Pine Ridge Reservation through regular communication
                              with the educators, parents, family, business and the community.

                              Build business relationships with entities on the Pine Ridge Reservation.
                      BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

                              This is a four-year degree in Business Administration with a choice of one of four areas of
                      specialization: Management, Accounting, Tribal Management or Entrepreneurship. Each degree provides a
                      foundation of general business knowledge and skills, as well as specialized preparation for those who want to
                      pursue a career in government, tribal programs or in private business.




                                                                          -56-
Bachelors of Science in Business Administration Goals/Objectives

1.     Goals
The undergraduate degree in Business Administration requires knowledge and awareness of the following:

Students will:
        Integrate a critical understanding of a significant portion of the field of business.

        Apply business communication skills to write and present in a professional business environment.

        Summarize an understanding of important concepts and methods in business.

        Integrate a mastery of higher-order objectives (i.e. problem solving skills) in the business
        discipline.

        Examine skills that will be useful to functioning as a business professional.

        Demonstrate diverse and global perspective of issues impacting the business environment.

        Formulate a plan to exercise and assume social responsibilities locally to globally while
        maintaining wolakolkiciyapi.

        Assess and make sound ethical decisions in relation to the business environment.

2.      Objectives
Students will demonstrate the ability and skill to:

        Evaluate the major functional areas of business including:
            o Ability to prepare, read, analyze and communicate financial information
            o Ability to use financial information in managerial decisions
            o Understanding of the duties of a manager: planning, organizing, directing and controlling
            o Ability to use the marketing mix to successfully perform in the environment of marketing
            o Understanding of the fundamental legal concepts and their application to the business
                 community
            o Basic knowledge of the use of information technology in managing organizations
            o Ability to apply modern scientific and mathematical methods to management problems
            o Ability to coordinate the knowledge learned in program core course in the formulation and
                 administration of sound business policy using case analysis and discussion
        Determine and demonstrate well developed written and oral communication skills
        Ability to evaluate current technology to critical and creatively solve business issues
        Demonstrate strong analytic and critical thinking skills
        Ability to integrate ethical decision models
        Ability to construct both quantitative and qualitative analysis of business problems
        Ability to write opinions based on analysis
        Ability to formulate conclusions with evidence
        Demonstrate a well-rounded education that enables the student to conduct themselves as
        responsible professionals and citizens who are aware of ethical issues and societal needs and
        problems

                                                      -57-
Option A – Management
       Ability to evaluate and apply the Human Resource function in a business environment with regard
       to recruitment, selection, training and development, discipline, termination and personnel laws
       Demonstrate small business understanding by successfully completing a business plan.
       Ability to evaluate behavior approach management with an emphasis on the understanding,
       prediction and control of human behavior in the organizational setting

Option B – Accounting
       Recommend the appropriate managerial and business issues critical to analyzing accounting data
       and other information used for identifying and assessing opportunities and risks, developing
       organizational plans, allocating resources, and accomplishing objectives
       Recommend relevant accounting principles and standards to specific business activities and
       workplace situations

Option C – Tribal Management
       Recommend and apply behavior approach management with an emphasis on the understanding,
       prediction and control of human behavior in the organizational setting
       Ability to select and apply for and manage a grant
       Integrate principles of management and personnel supervision in relation to Tribal programs.
       Validate and apply solving personnel problems, writing program objectives, effective planning,
       manage budgets, provide direction and evaluation of a Tribal program

Option D – Entrepreneurship
       Construct a business plan integrating reservation issues, licensing, tribal laws and codes
       Formulate a human resource, leadership and financial plan in relation to a small business
       Assemble a report in relation to the marketing research conducted for a business
       Determine individual leadership techniques to best suit a small business




                                                  -58-
                               BUSINESS DEPARTMENT
           BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


                                                       where
1. CORE (28 credits)                                   taken date    grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                        3____________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                       3____________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                      3 ____________________
   Math 154* College Algebra                           4______________________
   MIS 113     Applied Information Processing          3____________________
   Econ 203* Principles of Microeconomics              3____________________




                                                                                 2011-2013 Catalog
   Humanities Elective                                 3____________________
   Literature Elective                                 3____________________
   Science Elective                                    3____________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES (15 credits)
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                       3____________________
   Lak 233* Lakota Language II                         3____________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                             3____________________
   Lakota Studies Elective                             3____________________
   Lakota Studies Elective                             3____________________
3. BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS (45 credits)
   Acct 103* Accounting I.I                            3____________________
   Acct 203* Accounting I.II                           3 ___________________
   Acct 213* Accounting II                             3 ___________________
   BAd 133* Introduction to Business                   3____________________
   BAd 143* Personal Finance                           3 ___________________
   BAd 243* Business Law                               3 ___________________
   BAd 253* Principles of Management                   3 ___________________
   BAd 263* Principles of Marketing                    3___________________
   BAd 333* Business Communications                    3___________________
   BAd 343* Decision Support Systems                   3___________________
   BAd 363* Business Finance                           3___________________
   BAd 383* Business Ethics & Social Responsibility    3___________________
   BAd 453* Seminar in Strategic Management            3___________________
   Econ 213* Principles of Macroeconomics              3__________________
   SoSc 313* Statistics for Social Sciences            3__________________




                                                -59-
4. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (Choose One Option) (15 Credits)
   OPTION A – Specialization in MANAGEMENT
   BAd 303* Human Resource Management                      3 ___________________
   BAd 313* Organizational Theory & Behavior               3____________________
   BAd 423* Organizing/Operating a Small Business          3 ___________________
   BAd 443*     Problems in Business                       3___________________
   Acct 473* Managerial Accounting                         3____________________
   OPTION B – Specialization in ACCOUNTING (15 Credits)
   Acct 253* Accounting Information Systems                3___________________
   Acct 303* Intermediate Accounting                       3___________________
   Acct 343* Government/Non Profit Accounting              3___________________




                                                                                               2011-2013 Catalog
   Acct 453* Auditing                                      3___________________
   Acct 473* Managerial Accounting                         3___________________
   OPTION C – Specialization in TRIBAL MANAGEMENT (15 Credits)
   BAd 313* Organizational Theory & Behavior               3___________________
   BAd 373* Grants Proposal Writing & Management           3___________________
   BAd 463* Tribal Planning & Administration               3___________________
   Econ 333* Economic Issues on the Reservation            3___________________
   LPol 313* Indian Law                                    3___________________
   OPTION D – Specialization in ENTREPRENEURSHIP (15 Credits)
   BAd 413* Reservation Entrepreneurial Operations         3___________________
   BAd 423* Organizing/Operating a Small Business          3___________________
   BAd 473* Marketing Research                             3___________________
   BAd 483* Leadership                                     3___________________
   LPol 313* Indian Law                                    3___________________
5. GENERAL ELECTIVES (18 Credits)
   300-level or higher                                     3_____________________
   300-level or higher                                     3_____________________
   300-level or higher                                     3_____________________
   300-level or higher**                                   3_____________________
   300-level or higher**                                   3_____________________
   300-level or higher**                                    3_____________________
**Recommended electives should be selected from your area of specialization (minimum of 9 hours)
                                                            Total: 121 Credits
Note: A grade of “C” or better is required in business core and professional requirements.




                                                 -60-
                 Education/Early Childhood Department




                                                                                                                   EDUCATION/EARLY CHILDHOOD DEPARTMENT
                              Tom Raymond, M.Ed., Dean of Education
                           Lucy Bull Bear, Education Department Secretary
                     Darleen Bear Killer, B.S. El. Ed., Early Childhood Coordinator
                      Dorraine Benson, M.Ed., Wounspe Kili Grant Coordinator
                                   Shannon Amiotte, Ed.D., Faculty
                                 Lynnea Bouhenguel, M.Ed., Faculty
                                      Art Fisher, M.Ed., Faculty
                                    Richard Jones, M.Ed., Faculty

MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS

Early Childhood Mission Statement: We believe that community change must incorporate all members of
society, starting with our very youngest. To this end we provide high quality teaching, training, and support
teachers, caregivers, parents, and grandparents of young children in keeping with the college’s vision of
Wolakolkiciyapi (Learning Lakota Ways of Life in Community).

Teacher Preparation Vision Statement: To graduate highly qualified professional, motivated, and reflective
teachers who possess and teach/practice Wolakolkiciyapi in a multicultural, changing world. The professional
teacher education program views Wolakolkiciyapi as reflection and conduct of the Lakota Virtues as a means
of improving self and others.

Teacher Preparation Mission Statement: Graduates from our programs will be proficient as competent
reflective teachers of content, theory, and application with an emphasis on (Lakota Virtues) character education
while emphasizing community empowerment through reflection of traditional Lakota perspectives.

TRAINING, DEGREES, CERTIFICATIONS & ENDORSEMENTS:

Child Development Associate (CDA) Training Program: The CDA training offers, mentoring and advising
to prepare candidates for the national CDA assessment process which is conducted by the Council for
Professional Recognition of Washington DC. Our trainers follow the South Dakota CDA curriculum which
is recognized and honored by the Council for Professional Recognition. The CDA program requires candidates
to complete 135 clock hours of training which exceeds the Council’s required 120 clock hours of training.
Upon receiving the CDA credential candidates can transfer twelve credit hours toward an AA Degree in Early
Childhood (see AA ECH status sheet). Completion of the CDA also meets the South Dakota Department of
Education requirements for an endorsement in Early Childhood for state certified teachers. The cost for the
full CDA training is $1,500 which includes the CDA packet and assessment fee.

Associate of Arts Degree in Early Childhood: This degree offers early childhood professionals an additional
level of training and preparation beyond the Child Development Associate (CDA) level. The A.A. in Early
Childhood meets the requirements for the Birth – Pre-K Education Endorsement on an existing South Dakota
Teacher’s License and will satisfy requirements for Level 5 of the South Dakota Pathways for Professional
Development. This program meets the US Department of Education requirements for Head Start programs
where by the year 2011 all Head Start employees have completed an AA Degree. The Associate of Arts
Degree in Early Childhood Education tracks into a B.A. in Early Childhood.



                                                     -61-
Bachelor of Arts Degree in Early Childhood: This degree offers Early Childhood Professionals an
additional level of training and preparation beyond the associate degree level. The B.A. in Early Childhood
will meet the new Head Start requirements for teacher training where by the year 2013 all Head Start
teachers will have acquired their Bachelors Degree in ECH or its equivalent. The B.A. also satisfies
requirements for Level 6 of the South Dakota Pathways for Professional Development. This degree was
developed based on the National Association for the Education for Young Children (NAEYC) initial licensure
standards for teacher preparation programs. This program offers two options: a program of study designed
to meet Head Start requirements (Head Start Emphasis) and a program of study designed to obtain SD State
Teacher Certification in addition to fulfilling Head Start requirements. Students pursuing the SD Teacher
Certification degree should be aware that they must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program before
they enroll in professional coursework. Acceptance to the Teacher Education Program is part of ECH 243
Early Childhood Specialty Internship. In addition, candidates seeking teacher certification will need to pass
the designated Early Childhood Education Praxis II assessments to obtain state certification.

Associate of Arts Degree in Elementary Education: This degree serves as a stepping stone to the Bachelor
of Science Degree in Elementary Education. The Associate of Arts Degree satisfies the federal mandates in
No Child Left Behind for elementary school paraprofessionals who are required to obtain AA degree or 60
college credit hours. The program introduces candidates to the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support
Consortium (INTASC) standards. Teacher candidates interested in furthering their educational options by
pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Education will need to apply for acceptance to the Teacher Education
Program before they can enroll in the professional level education courses. Acceptance to the Teacher
Education Program is part of Ed. 283 Foundations of Education.

Bachelor of Science Degree K-8 Elementary Education: Completion of this degree will provide the candidate
with the training to teach grades K-8 with Middle Level endorsements. The program is aligned to the Interstate
New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards that were adopted by the SD Board
of Education as the SD Teacher Competencies. Candidates will need to pass the state teacher assessments
(Praxis II) to obtain state certification. Students pursuing this degree should be aware that they must be
admitted to the Teacher Education Program before they enroll in professional coursework. Acceptance to the
Teacher Education Program is part of Ed. 283 Foundations of Education.

Bachelor of Science Degree in K-12 Lakota Studies: This degree, in cooperation with the Lakota Studies
Department, will give graduates the South Dakota Indian Studies credential that will allow them to teach
related subjects in K-12 Education. The program is aligned to the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and
Support Consortium (INTASC) standards that were adopted by the SD Board of Education as the SD Teacher
Competencies. Candidates will need to pass the state teacher pedagogy assessment (Praxis II) to obtain state
certification. Students pursuing this degree should be aware that they must be admitted to the Teacher
Education Program before they enroll in professional coursework. Acceptance to the Teacher Education
Program is part of Ed. 283 Foundations of Education.

Bachelor of Physical Science Degree: This degree is in conjunction with the Math and Science Department
and leads to a Bachelor of Science Degree in 7-12 Secondary Education. It provides students with a strong
background in Mathematics, Physics, Earth Science, and Chemistry. The program is aligned to the Interstate
New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards that were adopted by the SD Board
of Education as the SD Teacher Competencies. Candidates will need to pass the state teacher assessments
(Praxis II) to obtain state certification. Students pursuing this degree should be aware that they must be
admitted to the Teacher Education Program before they enroll in professional coursework. Acceptance to
the Teacher Education Program is part of Ed. 283 Foundations of Education.




                                                    -62-
Exceptional Education Endorsement in K-8 or 7-12: This endorsement requires South Dakota state
teacher certification and three years of general classroom teaching experience, or special education
certification and one year of special education teaching experience. Candidates may choose to seek a K-8,
7-12 or K-12 endorsement. Coursework is offered at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The
program is aligned to the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) standards. Candidates will need to pass
the state teacher assessments (Praxis II) to obtain state certification.

Birth through Preschool Special Education Endorsement: This program is for certified teachers interested
in adding a Preschool Special Education Endorsement on their South Dakota state teacher licensure. The
program is aligned to the Child Development Associate (CDA), National Association for the Education of
Young Children (NAEYC), and Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) standards. This endorsement requires
both coursework completion and a passing score on the designated birth through early childhood and special
education state licensure (Praxis II) examinations.

K-12 Indian Studies Endorsement: This program is available for certified teachers to add the South Dakota
state Indian Studies Endorsement to their teacher certification. By completing this program teachers will be
able to teach related subjects in a K-12 education program. No state licensure examination is required of the
South Dakota Indian Studies Endorsement, although the coursework is required for this added endorsement.

7-12 Mathematics, Biology or Earth Science Endorsements: In order attain a Mathematics, Biology and/
or Earth Science endorsement teachers must hold a valid South Dakota State teacher certification and pass a
specific Praxis exam in the content area as indicated by the state for added teacher endorsements. Oglala
Lakota College recommends that teachers who wish to prepare to take the individual Praxis II exams in
Mathematics, Biology and/or Earth Science to enroll in the desired coursework leading to a state endorsement
within the content area.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL EDUCATION MAJORS

All applicants for South Dakota Teacher Certification must submit verification of passing scores on the
Praxis II exams for each content/area authorization and for the pedagogy exam that most closely matches the
applicant’s preparation. For more information about registration for the Praxis Exams please visit the
Educational Testing Service (ETS) site at http://www.ets.org/praxis. For more information regarding SD
Teacher Certification please visit the SD Department of Education website at http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/teachercert.

                              OGLALA LAKOTA COLLEGE
                   EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOUR DIRECTIONAL MODEL

Wiyohpiyata (West): General Education Admission/Entrance Requirements

Wiyohpiyata meaning the cardinal direction of West, is represented by the color black. The cycle begins in
the west and continues clockwise. This direction is also known as the Wakinyan Oyate meaning Thunder
Nation who teaches us that we must be courageous to overcome obstacles and difficulties in life (Moves
Camp and Two Dogs, et. al., 2003). Candidates are required to demonstrate Wohitika, meaning courage and
bravery, as well as Woksape, meaning wisdom. Entering candidates must endure and balance day to day
obstacles of a family, geographical location, financial, and personal responsibilities. The completion of the
necessary core requirements relies on courage and wisdom to meet entrance and admission requirements for
both the Education department teacher preparation and graduate studies education administration. Therefore,
this is the starting point and the first stage of the candidate’s journey.




                                                     -63-
Early Childhood Entrance Requirements:
           Complete application for admission into the ECH Program (Contact Ed. Dept. or access
           application form on Ed. Dept. Website) and submit;
           o Letter requesting acceptance to ECH Program (send to Dean of Education);
           o Three letters of recommendation;
           o Your ECH 203 Professional Resource File for department review;
           o A copy of your CDA Professional Resource File for review if you have completed your
               CDA;
           o A copy of assessment results of OLC’s required general education requirements. (if already
               completed an AA Degree)
       Completion of Lakota Cultural required coursework (15 credit hours);
       Receive an Associate of Arts Degree in ECH or completed of ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty
       Internship (includes passing background check);
       Received a score of 60% or better during the interview for acceptance to OLC’s ECH/Education
       Department Team;
       Maintain a GPA 2.6 or better

Teacher Preparation Entrance Requirements:
       Complete application for admission into the teacher training program (Contact Ed. Dept or access
       application form on Ed. Dept. Website);
           o Letter requesting acceptance to the teacher preparation program for department review (send
               to Dean of Education);
           o Three letters of recommendation;
           o Electronic portfolio (including Sophomore Experience Journal) for review;
           o A copy of assessment results of OLC’s required general education requirements. (if already
               completed an AA Degree)
       Completion of Lakota Culture required coursework (15 credit hours);
       Received an Associate of Arts Degree in Elementary Education or have completed Ed 283 Foundations
       of Education;
       Received a score of 60% or better during the interview for acceptance with OLC’s Education
       Department Team;
       Maintained a GPA of 2.6 or better

Waziyata (North) - Professional Core Requirements:

Waziyata, the cardinal direction of the North, is represented by the color red. This direction is also known as
the Tatanka Oyate meaning Buffalo Nation who brings us the laws, beliefs, and teachings. These teachings
provide the basis for Lakota identity and importance of living a good, productive life (Moves Camp and Two
Dogs, et. al., 2003). Within the profession, candidates need a solid theoretical base for understanding of laws,
beliefs, and teachings to become proficient within their field of study. Candidates are required to demonstrate
Wowacin Tanka meaning patience and fortitude, as well as Woonspe meaning lessons during this stage.

Early Childhood Program and Teacher Preparation Program Advisory Review:

        Completion of professional core requirements with a GPA of 2.6 or better;
        A grade of “C” or better in all professional requirements;
        Review of electronic portfolio; and
        Praxis II Content Knowledge Examination in area of study.




                                                     -64-
Wiyohinyanpata (East) - Professional Requirements:

Wiyohinyanpata, the cardinal direction East, is represented by the color yellow. This direction is also knows
as the Hehaka Oyate, or Elk Nation who possess Woksape meaning wisdom encompassing survival skills, a
sense of destiny, and vision for the future. These teachings are to be modeled by Ikce Wicasa meaning the
common man (Moves Camp and Two Dogs, et al, 2003). This is the third stage fulfilling the professional
requirements were candidates depend upon survival skills, which include the constructs of appropriate vision
for self, the educational community of learners and the community; then begin to demonstrate professional
wisdom within their profession.

Admission to Early Childhood Practicum Requirements:

        Completed all or most methods courses (must have approval from the Dean of Education to complete
        course requirements while student teaching);
        Passing score on Praxis II content knowledge examination in ECH;
        Register for Praxis II pedagogy examination in ECH (PLT);
        Maintained a GPA of 2.6 or better;
        Received a ‘C’ or better grade in all professional core coursework;
        Review of electronic portfolio by your department advisor;
        Submit verification of background check;
        Written permission of acceptance to the ECH practicum (which includes the following sent to the
        Dean of Education one semester prior to student teaching):
                        Letter requesting acceptance to the ECH Practicum completed a semester prior to
                        student teaching;
                        A letter of recommendation/acceptance to practicum written by the program
                        administrator of desired program of practicum;
                        Letter(s) of support from the mentor teacher(s) within your professional area from
                        the desired program of practicum.

Elementary/Secondary Student Teaching Internship Requirements:

        Completed all or most methods courses (must have approval from the Dean of Education to complete
        course requirements while student teaching);
        Passing score on Praxis II content knowledge examination in applicable area(s);
        Registration for Praxis II K-6 or 7-12 pedagogy examination (PLT);
        Maintained a GPA of 2.6 or better;
        Received a ‘C’ or better grade in all professional core coursework;
        Review of academic portfolio by your department advisor;
        Written permission of acceptance to Student Teaching (which includes the following sent to the Dean
        of Education one semester prior to student teaching):
                         Letter requesting acceptance to Student Teaching;
                         A letter of recommendation to student teach written by the school administrator of
                         desired school of student teaching experience;
                         Letter(s) of support from the mentor teacher(s) within your professional area from
                         the desired school of practicum. Kindergarten-8th Grade teacher candidates will need
                         two letters of recommendation, one from a lower elementary teacher and one from
                         an upper elementary teacher. Secondary teacher candidates will need a letter of
                         recommendation from main secondary supportive teacher he or she will work under.




                                                    -65-
Itokagata (South) - Internship/Infield Experience/Induction:

Itokagata, South, is represented by the color white. This direction is also known as the Wamakaskan Sitomni
or the Animal Nation. The Animal Nation teaches us how to live and work together living in harmony with
Unci Maka (Grandmother Earth). These teachings provide the basis preparing our journey back realizing
our origins and creation as well as appreciations (Moves Camp and Two Dogs, et al, 2003). This is the
fourth stage of the educational journey where the candidate will complete their internship and/or infield
experiences. This stage also marks their first year within the profession. Candidates are required to demonstrate
Wacante Ognaka, meaning compassion, and generosity. Effective educational leaders demonstrate compassion
and generosity through the delivery and giving their knowledge, skills, and ability to the educational community
and local community.

Early Childhood Program Teacher Preparation Exit:

         Completion of Academic Portfolio for department review;
         Received a ‘C’ or better grade for the practicum experience;
         Verification of satisfactory completion of the Praxis II Principals of Learning and Teaching
         Examination within certification area with a passing score as set by the South Dakota Department of
         Education;
         Exit interview with Education Department Faculty and/or School Officials;
         Completion of Program Evaluation.

Teacher Preparation Program Exit:

         Completion of academic portfolio for department review;
         Received a ‘C’ or better grade for the student teaching experience;
         Verification of satisfactory completion of the Praxis II Principals of Learning and Teaching
         Examination within certification area with a passing score as set by the South Dakota Department of
         Education;
         Exit interview with Education Department Faculty and/or School Officials;
         Completion of Program Evaluation.


                              OGLALA LAKOTA COLLEGE
                      EDUCATION DEPARTMENT PROGRAM STANDARDS

        Education coursework is aligned to State approved national standards for new teachers. These
standards include the: Child Development Associate (CDA), National Association for the Education of Young
Children (NAEYC), Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC), and Council
for Exceptional Children (CEC) standards.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE COMPETENCY STANDARDS


    I.       To establish and maintain a safe, healthy learning environment.
                 1. Safe: Candidate provides a safe environment to prevent and reduce injuries.
                 2. Healthy: Candidate promotes good health and nutrition and provides an environment that
                     contributes to the prevention of illness.



                                                      -66-
          3. Learning Environment: Candidate uses space, relationships, materials, and routines as
             resources for constructing an interesting, secure, and enjoyable environment that
             encourages play, exploration, and learning.

II.    To advance physical and intellectual competence.
          4. Physical: Candidate provides a variety of equipment, activities, and opportunities to promote
              the physical development of children.
          5. Cognitive: Candidate provides activities and opportunities that encourage curiosity,
              exploration, and problem solving appropriate to the development levels and learning
              styles of children.
          6. Communication: Candidate actively communicates with children and provides
              opportunities and support for children to understand, acquire, and use verbal and nonverbal
              means of communicating thoughts and feelings.
          7. Creative: Candidate provides opportunities that stimulate children to play with sound,
              rhythm, language, materials, space and ideas in individual ways and to express their
              creative abilities.

III.   To support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance.
          8. Self: Candidate provides physical and emotional security for each child and helps each
             child to know, accept and take pride in himself or herself and to develop a sense of
             independence.
          9. Social: Candidate helps each child feel accepted in the group, helps children learn to
             communicate and get along with others, and encourages feelings of empathy and mutual
             respect among children and adults.
          10. Guidance: Candidate provides a supportive environment in which children can begin to
             learn and practice appropriate and acceptable behaviors as individuals and as a group.

IV.    To establish positive and productive relationships with families.
          11. Families: Candidate maintains an open, friendly, and cooperative relationship with
             each child’s family, encourages their involvement in the program, and supports the
             child’s relationship with his or her family.


V.     To ensure a well-run purposeful program responsiveness to participant needs.
          12. Program Management: Candidate is a manager who uses all available resources
             to ensure an effective operation. The candidate is a competent organizer, planner,
             record keeper, communicator, and a cooperative co-worker.


VI.    To maintain commitment to professionalism.
          13. Professionalism: Candidate makes decisions based on knowledge of early
             childhood theories and practices. Candidate promotes quality in child care services.
             Candidate takes advantage of opportunities to improve competence, both for
             personal and professional growth and for the benefit of children and families.




                                              -67-
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN


Standard 1. Promoting Child Development and Learning
Candidates use their understanding of young children’s characteristics and needs, and of multiple interacting
influences on children’s development and learning, to create environments that are healthy, respectful,
supportive, and challenging for all children.

Standard 2. Building Family and Community Relationships
Candidates know about, understand, and value the importance and complex characteristics of children’s
families and communities. They use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that
support and empower families, and to involve all families in their children’s development and learning.

Standard 3. Observing, Documenting, and Assessing to Support Young Children and Families
Candidates know about and understand the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment. They know about and use
systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in
partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence children’s development and learning.

Standard 4. Teaching and Learning
Candidates integrate their understanding of and relationships with children and families; their understanding
of developmentally effective approaches to teaching and learning; and their knowledge of academic disciplines
to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for all children.
       Sub-Standard 4a. Connecting with children and families: Candidates know, understand, and use
                         positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation for their work
                         with young children.
       Sub-Standard 4b. Using developmentally effective approaches: Candidates know, understand, and
                         use a wide array of effective approaches, strategies, and tools to positively influence
                         children’s development and learning.
       Sub-Standard 4c. Understanding content knowledge in early education: Candidates understand the
                         importance of each content area in young children’s learning. They know the essential
                         concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas including academic subjects
                         and can identify resources to deepen their understanding.
       Sub-Standard 4d. Building meaningful curriculum: Candidates use their own knowledge and other
                         resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum
                         that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for all young
                         children.

Standard 5. Becoming a Professional
Candidates identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession. They know and
use ethical guidelines and other professional standards related to early childhood practice. They are continuous,
collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on their work,
making informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources. They are informed advocates
for sound educational practices and policies.

SOUTH DAKOTA TEACHER COMPETENCIES
ARSD Teacher Preparation 24:53:04:06

The candidate meets the professional standards of the INTASC Model Standards for Beginning Teacher
Licensing and Development as modified for approved programs in South Dakota.


                                                      -68-
STANDARD 1: CONTENT PEDAGOGY
The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline he or she
teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for
students.

STANDARD 2: STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
The teacher understands how children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support
a child’s intellectual, social, and personal development.

STANDARD 3: DIVERSE LEARNERS
The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional
opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

STANDARD 4: MULTIPLE INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of
critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills in students.

STANDARD 5: MOTIVATION & MANAGEMENT
The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning
environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation

STANDARD 6: COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGY
The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster
active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

STANDARD 7: PLANNING
The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum
goals.

STANDARD 8: ASSESSMENT
The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the
continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of students.

STANDARD 9: REFLECTIVE PRACTICE / PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The teacher evaluates continually the effects of the teacher’s choices and actions on others, including students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community. The teacher actively seeks out opportunities to
grow professionally.

STANDARD 10: SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the community to
support student learning and well-being.

COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN STANDARDS

1. Foundations
Special educators understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on philosophies, evidence-
based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and human issues
that have historically influenced and continue to influence the field of special education and the education and
treatment of individuals with exceptional needs both in school and society. Special educators understand how these
influence professional practice, including assessment, instructional planning, implementation, and program
evaluation. Special educators understand how issues of human diversity can impact families, cultures, and schools,

                                                      -69-
and how these complex human issues can interact with issues in the delivery of special education services. They
understand the relationships of organizations of special education to the organizations and functions of schools,
school systems, and other agencies. Special educators use this knowledge as a ground upon which to construct their
own personal understandings and philosophies of special education.

2. Development and Characteristics of Learners
Special educators know and demonstrate respect for their students first as unique human beings. Special educators
understand the similarities and differences in human development and the characteristics between and among
individuals with and without exceptional learning needs (ELN). Moreover, special educators understand how
exceptional conditions can interact with the domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond
to the varying abilities and behaviors of individuals with ELN. Special educators understand how the experiences of
individuals with ELN can impact families, as well as the individual’s ability to learn, interact socially, and live as
fulfilled contributing members of the community.

3. Individual Learning Differences
Special educators understand the effects that an exceptional condition can have on an individual’s learning in
school and throughout life. Special educators understand that the beliefs, traditions, and values across and within
cultures can affect relationships among and between students, their families, and the school community. Moreover,
special educators are active and resourceful in seeking to understand how primary language, culture, and familial
backgrounds interact with the individual’s exceptional condition to impact the individual’s academic and social
abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. The understanding of these learning differences and their
possible interactions provides the foundation upon which special educators individualize instruction to provide
meaningful and challenging learning for individuals with ELN.

4. Instructional Strategies
Special educators possess a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize instruction for
individuals with ELN. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instructional strategies to promote positive
learning results in general and special curricula and to appropriately modify learning environments for individuals
with ELN. They enhance the learning of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills of individuals
with ELN, and increase their self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem. Moreover,
special educators emphasize the development, maintenance, and generalization of knowledge and skills across
environments, settings, and the life span.

5. Learning Environments and Social Interactions
Special educators actively create learning environments for individuals with ELN that foster cultural understanding,
safety and emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and active engagement of individuals with ELN. In
addition, special educators foster environments in which diversity is valued and individuals are taught to live
harmoniously and productively in a culturally diverse world. Special educators shape environments to encourage
the independence, self-motivation, self-direction, personal empowerment, and self-advocacy of individuals with
ELN. Special educators help their general education colleagues integrate individuals with ELN in general education
environments and engage them in meaningful learning activities and interactions. Special educators use direct
motivational and instructional interventions with individuals with ELN to teach them to respond effectively to
current expectations. When necessary, special educators can safely intervene with individuals with ELN in crisis.
Special educators coordinate all these efforts and provide guidance and direction to paraeducators and others, such
as classroom volunteers and tutors.

6. Language
Special educators understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in which exceptional conditions
can interact with an individual’s experience with and use of language. Special educators use individualized strategies
to enhance language development and teach communication skills to individuals with ELN. Special educators are
familiar with augmentative, alternative, and assistive technologies to support and enhance communication of
individuals with exceptional needs. Special educators match their communication methods to an individual’s language
proficiency and cultural and linguistic differences. Special educators provide effective language models and they use
communication strategies and resources to facilitate understanding of subject matter for individuals with ELN whose
primary language is not English.


                                                        -70-
7. Instructional Planning
Individualized decision-making and instruction is at the center of special education practice. Special educators
develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general and special education curricula. In
addition, special educators systematically translate these individualized plans into carefully selected shorter-range
goals and objectives taking into consideration an individual’s abilities and needs, the learning environment, and a
myriad of cultural and linguistic factors. Individualized instructional plans emphasize explicit modeling and efficient
guided practice to assure acquisition and fluency through maintenance and generalization. Understanding of these
factors as well as the implications of an individual’s exceptional condition, guides the special educator’s selection,
adaptation, and creation of materials, and the use of powerful instructional variables. Instructional plans are modified
based on ongoing analysis of the individual’s learning progress. Moreover, special educators facilitate this instructional
planning in a collaborative context including the individuals with exceptionalities, families, professional colleagues,
and personnel from other agencies as appropriate. Special educators also develop a variety of individualized transition
plans, such as transitions from preschool to elementary school and from secondary settings to a variety of postsecondary
work and learning contexts. Special educators are comfortable using appropriate technologies to support instructional
planning and individualized instruction.

8. Assessment
Assessment is integral to the decision-making and teaching of special educators and special educators use multiple
types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions. Special educators use the results of assessments
to help identify exceptional learning needs and to develop and implement individualized instructional programs, as
well as to adjust instruction in response to ongoing learning progress. Special educators understand the legal policies
and ethical principles of measurement and assessment related to referral, eligibility, program planning, instruction,
and placement for individuals with ELN, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
Special educators understand measurement theory and practices for addressing issues of validity, reliability, norms,
bias, and interpretation of assessment results. In addition, special educators understand the appropriate use and
limitations of various types of assessments. Special educators collaborate with families and other colleagues to
assure nonbiased, meaningful assessments and decision making. Special educators conduct formal and informal
assessments of behavior, learning, achievement, and environments to design learning experiences that support the
growth and development of individuals with ELN. Special educators use assessment information to identify supports
and adaptations required for individuals with ELN to access the general curriculum and to participate in school,
system, and statewide assessment programs. Special educators regularly monitor the progress of individuals with
ELN in general and special curricula. Special educators use appropriate technologies to support their assessments.

9. Professional and Ethical Practice
Special educators are guided by the profession’s ethical and professional practice standards. Special educators practice
in multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and developmental ranges. Their practice requires ongoing
attention to legal matters along with serious professional and ethical considerations. Special educators engage in
professional activities and participate in learning communities that benefit individuals with ELN, their families,
colleagues, and their own professional growth. Special educators view themselves as lifelong learners and regularly
reflect on and adjust their practice. Special educators are aware of how their own and others’ attitudes, behaviors,
and ways of communicating can influence their practice. Special educators understand that culture and language
can interact with exceptionalities, and are sensitive to the many aspects of diversity of individuals with ELN and
their families. Special educators actively plan and engage in activities that foster their professional growth and keep
them current with evidence-based best practices. Special educators know their own limits of practice and practice
within them.

10. Collaboration
Special educators routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, and
personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. This collaboration assures that the needs of
individuals with ELN are addressed throughout schooling. Moreover, special educators embrace their special role as
advocate for individuals with ELN. Special educators promote and advocate the learning and well-being of individuals
with ELN across a wide range of settings and a range of different learning experiences. Special educators are viewed
as specialists by a myriad of people who actively seek their collaboration to effectively include and teach individuals
with ELN. Special educators are a resource to their colleagues in understanding the laws and policies relevant to
individuals with ELN. Special educators use collaboration to facilitate the successful transitions of individuals with
ELN across settings and services.

                                                          -71-
                                  EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
 EARLY CHILDHOOD CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE (CDA) TRAINING

The CDA training is set-up to include 135 contact hours and a practicum that follows a semester plan. CDA
training is typically completed within one year this includes the 135 contact hours, 480 practicum hours and
the completion of the national CDA assessment. Forms are available in the Education Department Office or
in district college centers. Submission of CDA Enrollment Form indicates your intent to participate in and
complete the CDA training requirements. Before candidates become enrolled in the training below a background
check is required. Candidates must pass the background check before acceptance into the CDA training
program. Applications for the CDA training and the background check can be obtained from Oglala Lakota
College’s Education Department.

CDA I. (Semester I Content Covers ECH 203, ECH 223)                        Contact Hours      Date Completed Grade



        Orientation to CDA and the EC Profession                              (24)
        Programs for Young Children                                 (15)
        Child Development and Planning                                        (45)

                                                                              Final Grade =   __________    ______

CDA II. (Semester II Content Covers ECH 213, ECH 223, ECH 243)


        Health, Safety and Nutrition                                          (15)
        Guidance of Young Children                                            (17)
        Partnerships with Parents                                             (15)
        Practicum                                                             (480)

                                                                              Final Grade =   __________    ______

CDA III.


        CDA National Assessment Certification                                 Final Grade =   __________    ______
        (It is the candidate’s responsibility to submit their CDA
        Certification to the Education Department requesting the
        CDA credential to apply to college credit hours)
                                                                            Total Credit Hours = 12 towards ECH
                                                                            Degree upon completion of CDA
                                                                            Certification




                                                          -72-
                         EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                          EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                 BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                  ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                             HEAD START EMPHASIS
                              HEAD START EMPHASIS

 I. CORE REQUIREMENTS (24 CREDIT HOURS)                               where taken date grade
      SpCm REQUIREMENTS (27 CREDIT HOURS)
I. CORE 103 Speech Communication                                     where date grade
                                                                     3______________________
      Engl 103* Freshman English I
     SpCm103* Speech Communication                                  3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
     Engl 103* Freshman English I II
      Engl 113* Freshman English                                    3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
      Art 113* School Arts & Crafts
     Engl 153* Freshman English II                                  3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
     Art 153* School Arts & Crafts
      Math 103* Elementary Algebra                                  3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
      Psy 103* General Psychology
     Math103 Elementary Algebra                                     3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
      Bio 113 General Psychology
     Psy 103      People and the Environment                        3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
     MIS 113 People and the Environment
     Bio 113      Applied Information Processing                    3______________________
                                                                     3______________________
     MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                         3______________________
     LAKOTA Introduction CREDIT HOURS)
 II. Lit 203* STUDIES (9 to Literature                              3______________________




                                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
      Lak 103 Lakota Language I                                      3______________________
                  Lakota (15 CREDIT HOURS)
      Lsoc 103 STUDIESCulture
II. LAKOTA                                                           3______________________
      Lakota Elective _____________________
     Lak 103     Lakota Language I                                   3______________________
                                                                    3______________________
     Lak 233* Lakota Language II                                    3______________________
      EARLY Lakota Culture
 III.LSoc 103 CHILDHOOD CORE (27 CREDIT HOURS) 3______________________
 NOTE: This degree tracks into our B.A. Programs. A ‘C’ or better grade must be received in all AA Early
     Lakota      Elective _____________________                     3______________________
      Childhood courses listed in section 3 of this status sheet.
     Lakota      Elective _____________________                     3______________________
     ED 213* Child Growth & Development                            3______________________
III. EARLY CHILDHOOD CORE (51 CREDIT HOURS)
     ECH 203* Introduction to Early Childhood Education           Recommended: complete above core first.
                                                                   3______________________
    NOTE: All Early Childhood Core Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or better grade.
     ED 203* Indian Studies for Education                          3______________________
     ECH 213 Planning & Administrating ECH Programs                3______________________
     ECH 223 Child Growth & Development
    ED 213     Materials & Techniques I for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K 3______________________
                                                                   3______________________
     ECH 233 Curriculum to Self-Awareness Education
    ECH 203 Introduction forEarly Childhood & Ind. Dev.           3______________________
                                                                   3______________________
     ECH 253 Indian Studies and Education Involvement in ECH 3______________________
    ED 203     Parental, Staff for Community                       3______________________
     EXED 313 Intro. to & Administrating ECH Programs
    ECH 213 Planning Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology           3______________________
                                                                   3______________________
    ECH 223 Materials & Techniques I for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K 3______________________
     ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty Internship                  3______________________
    ECH 233 Curriculum for Self-Awareness & Ind. Dev.             3______________________
 IV.ECH 253 Parental, Staff and Community Involvement
     FREE ELECTIVES (6 CREDIT HOURS)                              3______________________
    EXED 313 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology
     Elective  __________________________________                 3______________________
                                                                   3______________________
    ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty Internship
     Elective  __________________________________                 3______________________
                                                                   3______________________
    ECH 323 Materials & Techniques II for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K 3______________________
    EDECH 423 Methods of Tchg. ECH Numeracy/Elem Math 3______________________
    EDECH 413 Methods of Tchg ECH Literacy/Elem Reading 3______________________
    ECH 363 Family Literacy                                       3 ______________________
    ECH 383 Methods of Assessing Young Children                   3______________________
    ED 463    Human Relations/Cultural Diversity                  3______________________
    ECH 496 Practicum/Internship in Early Childhood Ed.           6______________________

IV. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIALIZATION (18-24 CREDIT HOURS) YOU MUST
COMPLETE AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS: (For ECH Electives at least 3
hours must be at 300-level or above.) NOTE: All Early Childhood specialization Coursework must be completed
with a ‘C’ or better grade.

    INFANT-TODDLER OPTION *Ages 0-3 (18 CREDIT HOURS)                          where date grade
    ECH 403 Social-Emotional Growth & Socialization                         3______________________
    ECH 413 Group Care                                                      3______________________
                                                     -73-
-74-
                                EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                 BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                            HEAD START EMPHASIS


I. CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 CREDIT HOURS)                              where date grade
   SpCm 103* Speech Communication                                   3______________________
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                                     3______________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                                    3______________________
   Art 153* School Arts & Crafts                                    3______________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra                                     3______________________
   Psy 103   General Psychology                                     3______________________
   Bio 113   People and the Environment                             3______________________




                                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                           3______________________
   Lit 203*  Introduction to Literature                             3______________________

II. LAKOTA STUDIES (15 CREDIT HOURS)
    Lak 103  Lakota Language I                                      3______________________
    Lak233* Lakota Language II                                      3______________________
    LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                         3______________________
    Lakota   Elective _____________________                         3______________________
    Lakota   Elective _____________________                         3______________________

III. EARLY CHILDHOOD CORE (51 CREDIT HOURS)                       Recommended: complete above core first.
    NOTE: All Early Childhood Core Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or better grade.

    ED 213   Child Growth & Development                             3______________________
    ECH 203 Introduction to Early Childhood Education               3______________________
    ED 203   Indian Studies for Education                           3______________________
    ECH 213 Planning & Administrating ECH Programs                  3______________________
    ECH 223 Materials & Techniques I for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K       3______________________
    ECH 233 Curriculum for Self-Awareness & Ind. Dev.               3______________________
    ECH 253 Parental, Staff and Community Involvement               3______________________
    EXED 313 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology           3______________________
    ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty Internship                    3______________________
    ECH 323 Materials & Techniques II for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K      3______________________
    EDECH 423 Methods of Tchg. ECH Numeracy/Elem Math               3______________________
    EDECH 413 Methods of Tchg ECH Literacy/Elem Reading             3______________________
    ECH 363 Family Literacy                                         3 ______________________
    ECH 383 Methods of Assessing Young Children                     3______________________
    ED 463   Human Relations/Cultural Diversity                     3______________________
    ECH 496 Practicum/Internship in Early Childhood Ed.             6______________________

IV. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIALIZATION (18-24 CREDIT HOURS) YOU MUST
COMPLETE AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS: (For ECH Electives at least 3
hours must be at 300-level or above.) NOTE: All Early Childhood specialization Coursework must be completed
with a ‘C’ or better grade.

    INFANT-TODDLER OPTION *Ages 0-3 (18 CREDIT HOURS)                          where date grade
    ECH 403 Social-Emotional Growth & Socialization                         3______________________
    ECH 413 Group Care                                                      3______________________
                                                     -75-
   ECH 423 Learning and Development                            3______________________
   EDECH 463 Methods of Health & Physical Education            3______________________
   ECH      Elective__________________________                 3______________________
   ECH      Elective__________________________                 3______________________

   PRESCHOOL OPTION *Ages 3-6 (18 CREDIT HOURS)
   EDECH 403 Methods of Music and Art for ECH/Elem. Teachers   3______________________
   EDECH 433 Methods of Tchg. ECH/Elementary Science           3______________________
   EDECH 453 Methods of Tchg. ECH/Elementary Social Studies    3______________________
   EDECH 463 Methods of Tchg. Health & Physical Ed.            3______________________
   ECH or ED Elective__________________________                3____________________
   ECH or ED Elective__________________________                3____________________




                                                                                     2011-2013 Catalog
   BIRTH-PRESCHOOL OPTION *Ages 0-6 (24 CREDIT HOURS)       where date grade
   ECH 403 Social-Emotional Growth & Socialization             3______________________
   ECH 413 Group Care                                          3______________________
   ECH 423 Learning and Development                            3______________________
   EDECH 403 Methods of Music and Art for ECH/Elem. Teachers 3______________________
   EDECH 433 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Science        3______________________
   EDECH 453 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Social Studies 3______________________
   EDECH 463 Methods of Health & Physical Education            3______________________
   ECH       Elective__________________________                3______________________


Total Credit Hours Required
    Infant-Toddler or Preschool Option                         111 Credit Hours
    Birth-Preschool Option                                     117 Credit Hours




                                            -76-
                             EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
              ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                 (INFANT, TODDLER & PRESCHOOL PROGRAM)

I. CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 CREDIT HOURS)                            where date grade

   SpCm 103     Speech Communication                              3______________________
   Engl 103     Freshman English I                                3______________________
   Engl 113     Freshman English II                               3______________________
   Art 153      School Arts & Crafts                              3______________________
   Math 103     Elementary Algebra                                3______________________
   Psy 103      General Psychology                                3______________________
   Bio 113      People and the Environment                        3______________________
   MIS 113      Applied Information Processing                    3______________________




                                                                                                    2011-2013 Catalog
   Lit 203      Introduction to Literature                        3______________________

II. LAKOTA STUDIES (9 CREDIT HOURS)

    Lak 103    Lakota Language I                                  3______________________
    Lak 233    Lakota Language II                                 3______________________
    Lakota Elective _____________________                         3______________________


III. EARLY CHILDHOOD CORE (37 CREDIT HOURS)
NOTE: This degree tracks into our B.A. Program in Early Childhood Education for SD Teacher
Certification. A ‘C’ or better grade must be received in all AA Early Childhood courses listed in
section 3 of this status sheet.

    ED 213      Child Growth & Development                        3______________________
    ECH 203     Introduction to Early Childhood Education         3______________________
    ED 203      Indian Studies for Education                      3______________________
    SCI 204     Integrated Science for the Elementary Teacher I   4 _____________________
    ECH 213     Planning & Administrating ECH Programs            3______________________
    ECH 223     Materials & Techniques I for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K 3______________________
    Math 223    Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I             3______________________
    ECH 233     Curriculum for Self-Awareness & Ind. Dev.         3______________________
    ECH 253     Parental, Staff and Community Involvement in ECH 3______________________
    ED 303      Reading Children’s Literature                     3______________________
    EXED 313    Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology      3______________________
    ECH 243     Early Childhood Specialty Internship              3______________________


                                                                  Total = 73 Credit Hours




                                                  -77-
                            EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
              BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                  SD TEACHER CERTIFICATION EMPHASIS


I. CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 CREDIT HOURS)                            where   date   grade

   SpCm 103    Speech Communication                             3______________________
   Engl 103    Freshman English I                               3______________________
   Engl 113    Freshman English II                              3______________________
   Art 153     School Arts & Crafts                             3______________________
   Math 103    Elementary Algebra                               3______________________
   Psy 103     General Psychology                               3______________________




                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
   Bio 113     People and the Environment                       3______________________
   MIS 113     Applied Information Processing                   3______________________
   Lit 203     Introduction to Literature                       3______________________

II. LAKOTA STUDIES (15 CREDIT HOURS)

   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                                3______________________
   Lak 233     Lakota Language II                               3______________________
   LSoc 103    Lakota Culture                                   3______________________
   Lakota      Elective _____________________                   3______________________
   Lakota      Elective _____________________                   3______________________

III. EARLY CHILDHOOD CORE (67 CREDIT HOURS) Recommended: complete above
     core first.NOTE: All Early Childhood Core Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or
     better grade w/an overall 2.6 GPA per SD DOE Teacher Certification Requirements.

   ED 213   Child Growth & Development                          3______________________
   ECH 203 Introduction to Early Childhood Education            3______________________
   ED 203   Indian Studies for Education                        3______________________
   SCI 204  Integrated Science for the Elementary Teacher I     4 ______________________
   ECH 213 Planning & Administrating ECH Programs               3______________________
   ECH 223 Materials & Techniques I for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K    3______________________
   Math 223 Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher I            3______________________
   ECH 233 Curriculum for Self-Awareness & Ind. Dev.            3______________________
   ECH 253 Parental, Staff and Community Involvement            3______________________
   ED 303   Reading Children’s Literature                       3______________________
   EXED 313 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology        3______________________
   ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty Internship                 3______________________
   ECH 323 Materials & Techniques II for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K   3______________________
   EDECH 423 Methods of Tchg. ECH Numeracy/Elem Math            3______________________
   EDECH 413 Methods of Tchg. ECH Literacy/Elem Reading         3______________________
   ECH 383 Methods of Assessing Young Children                  3______________________
   ED 463   Human Relations/Cultural Diversity                  3______________________
   ED 483   Technology/Curriculum Development                   3______________________
   ED 473   Student Teaching Seminar                            3______________________
   ED 489   Student Teaching                                    9______________________



                                                -78-
IV. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIALIZATION (21 CREDIT HOURS)
    YOU MUST COMPLETE AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS:
    (ECH/ED Electives must be at 300-level or above.) NOTE: All Early Childhood specialization
    Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or better grade w/an overall 2.6 GPA per SD DOE
    Teacher Certification Requirements.


    BIRTH-PRESCHOOL/INFANT-TODDLER OPTION (18 CREDIT HOURS)              where date grade
    ECH 363 Family Literacy                                              3_____________________
    ECH 403 Social-Emotional Growth & Socialization                      3_____________________
    ECH 413 Group Care                                                   3_____________________
    ECH 423 Early Learning and Development                               3_____________________
    EDECH 463 Methods of Health & Physical Education                     3_____________________
    ECH       Elective__________________________                         3_____________________
    ECH       Elective__________________________                         3_____________________




                                                                                                2011-2013 Catalog
* Candidates must achieve a passing score on the following Praxis II assessments for State
    certification: PLT: Early Childhood (0521) and Education of Young Children (0021)
    BIRTH-AGE EIGHT OPTION (18 CREDIT HOURS)
    EDECH 403 Methods of Music and Art for ECH/Elem. Teachers            3_____________________
    EDECH 433 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Science                 3___________________
    ED 443 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elem Lang Arts                        3___________________
    EDECH 453 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Social Studies 3_____________________
    EDECH 463 Methods of Teaching Health & Physical Ed.                  3_____________________
    ECH or ED Elective__________________________                         3_____________________
    ECH or ED Elective__________________________                         3_____________________


* Candidates must achieve a passing score on the following Praxis II assessments for State
    certification: PLT: Early Childhood (0521) and Education of Young Children (0021)


                                      Total Credit Hours Required
                         Birth-Preschool OR Birth-Age Eight Option           130 Credit Hours




                                                   -79-
          ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION


1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (39 credit hours)                           Where Date      Grade
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                              3_______________________
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                                3_______________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                               3_______________________
   Math 103 Elementary Algebra                                3_______________________
   Psy 103    General Psychology                              3_______________________
   Bio 113    People and the Environment                      3_______________________
   Hum 213 Music and Culture                                  3_______________________
   Pols 103 American Government                               3_______________________
   Geog 213 World Geography                                   3_______________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                     3_______________________
   Hisa 203/213 American History I or II                      3_______________________




                                                                                               2011-2013 Catalog
   Engl 323 Creative Writing                                  3_______________________
   Lit 203    Introduction to Literature                      3_______________________

2. LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS (9 credit hours)
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                3_______________________
   Lak 233     Lakota Language II               3_______________________
   Lakota Elective_________________________     3_______________________

3. AA LEVEL ELEMENTARY EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (22 credit hours)
   NOTE: This degree tracks into our B.S. Degree in Elementary Education. A ‘C’ or better
   grade must be received in all AA Elementary Education courses listed in section 3 of this
   status sheet.
   ED 283       Foundations of Education w/soph. exp.           3_______________________
   ED 203       Indian Studies for Education                    3_______________________
   Sci 204      Integrated Science for the Elementary Teacher I 4_______________________
   ED 213       Child Growth & Development                      3_______________________
   Math 223 Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher I            3_______________________
   EXED 313 Intro. to Except. Ed., Characteristics & Etiology 3_______________________
   ED 303       Reading Children’s Literature                   3_______________________

                                                              TOTAL = 70 CREDIT HOURS




                                                -80-
                              EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
     BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN K-8 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

1.   CORE REQUIREMENTS (39 credit hours)                           where date grade
     SpCm 103       Speech Communication                         3_________________________
     Engl 103       Freshman English I                           3_________________________
     Engl 113       Freshman English II                          3_________________________
     Psy 103        General Psychology                           3_________________________
     Pols 103       American Government                          3_________________________
     Math 103       Elementary Algebra                           3_________________________
     MIS 113        Applied Information Processing               3_________________________
     Bio 113        People and the Environment                   3_________________________
     Geog 213       World Geography                              3_________________________




                                                                                                  2011-2013 Catalog
     Hum 213        Music and Culture                            3_________________________
     Hisa 203/213 American History I or II                       3_________________________
     Engl 323       Creative Writing                             3_________________________
     Lit 203        Introduction to Literature                   3_________________________
     NOTE: Recommended: Core requirements of 39 credit hours should be completed before
     professional core.
2.   LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS (15 credit hours)
     Lak 103        Lakota Language I                            3_________________________
     Lak 233        Lakota Language II                           3_________________________
     LSoc 103       Lakota Culture                               3_________________________
     Lakota Elective_________________________                    3_________________________
     Lakota Elective_________________________                    3_________________________
3.   PROFESSIONAL CORE REQUIREMENTS (41 credit hours) Recommended: complete
     above core first. NOTE: All Professional Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or better
     grade w/an overall 2.6 GPA per SD DOE Teacher Certification Requirements.
     ED 283         Foundations of Education w/sophomore exper.  3_________________________
     ED 203         Indian Studies for Education                 3_________________________
     ED 213         Child Growth & Development                   3_________________________
     ED 303         Reading Children’s Literature                3_________________________
     ED 313         Educational Psychology                       3_________________________
     ED 323         Middle School/High School Concepts           3_________________________
     EXED 313       Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology 3_________________________
     Sci 204        Integrated Science for Elementary Teacher I  4_________________________
     Sci 214        Integrated Science for Elementary Teacher II 4_________________________
     Math 223       Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher I     3_________________________
     Math 233       Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher II    3_________________________
     Math 243       Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher III   3_________________________
     ED 483         Technology/Curriculum Development            3 _________________________
4.   PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (36 credit hours) Recommended: Sec. 3 complete
     before beginning Sec. 4.
     EDECH 403 Methods of Music and Art for ECH/Elem.Tchrs. 3_______________________
     EDECH 413 Methods of Teaching ECH Literacy/Elem. Reading 3______________________
     EDECH 423 Methods of Teaching ECH Numeracy/Elem. Math 3_______________________
     EDECH 433 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Science 3_______________________
     ED 443         Methods of Teaching Elementary Language Arts 3_______________________
     EDECH 453 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Social Studies 3____________________
     EDECH 463 Methods of Health & Physical Education            3_______________________
     ED 463         Human Relations & Cultural Diversity         3_______________________
     NOTE: Coursework should be complete before enrollment in Ed 473 and Ed 489.
     ED 473         Student Teaching Seminar                     3_______________________
     ED 489         Student Teaching                             9_______________________
                                                                 TOTAL = 131 CREDIT HOURS


                                                  -81-
                           EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
      BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN K-12 LAKOTA STUDIES EDUCATION

1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (36 credits)                              Where Taken Date Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                               3 ________________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                              3 ________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                             3 ________________________
   Math 103 Elementary Algebra                                3 ________________________
   Psy 103* General Psychology                                3 ________________________
   Bio 113* People and the Environment                        3 ________________________
   Hum 203* Music and Culture                                 3 ________________________
   Pols 103* American Government                              3 ________________________




                                                                                           2011-2013 Catalog
   Geog 213* World Geography                                  3 ________________________
   MIS 113    Applied Information Processing                  3 ________________________
   Hist 203/213* American History I OR II                     3 ________________________
   Lit 203*   Introduction to Literature                      3 ________________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES CORE REQUIREMENTS (42 credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                               3 ________________________
   Lak 233* Lakota Language II                                3 ________________________
   Lak 323* Lakota Language III                               3 ________________________
   Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                                3 ________________________
   Lak 313* Introduction to Lakota Sociolinguistics           3 ________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                    3 ________________________
   LSoc 313* Lakota Thought and Philosophy                    3 ________________________
   LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Art I                          3 ________________________
   LLit 103   Lakota Oral Literature                          3 ________________________
   LLit 213* American Indian Literature                       3 ________________________
   LHist 203/213* Lakota History I OR II                      3 ________________________
   LHist 323* Seminar in Contemporary Indian Issues           3 ________________________
   LPol 223* Lakota Tribal Laws, Treaties, Government         3 ________________________
   LPsy 323* Native American Psychology                       3 ________________________
3. EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)
   Ed 203*    Indian Education                                3 ________________________
   Math 323* Math for Elementary Teachers I                   3 ________________________
   Ed 283*    Foundations of Education w/soph experience      3 ________________________
   Ed 213*    Child Growth and Development                    3 ________________________
   Ed 313*    Educational Psychology                          3 ________________________
   Ed 323*    Middle School Concepts                          3 ________________________
   Ed 483*    Technology/Curriculum Development for Tchrs. 3__________ _____________
   ScEd 443* Reading in the Content Area                      3 ________________________
   ExEd 313* Intro. to Except. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology 3 ________________________
4. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)
   Ed 463*    Human Relations or Cultural Diversity           3 ________________________
   Ed 443*    Methods of Teaching Elementary Lang. Arts       3 ________________________
   EDECH 453*Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3 ________________________
   LkEd 453* Methods of Teaching K-12 Lakota Studies          3 ________________________
   LkEd 433* Methods of Teaching the Lakota Language          3 ________________________
   LkEd 473* Student Teaching Seminar                         3 ________________________
   LkEd 489* Student Teaching/Practicum in Indian Studies 9 ________________________
                                                              TOTAL:      132 CREDITS

                                             -82-
                               EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE SECONDARY EDUCATION
                         PHYSICAL SCIENCE DEGREE
1.   CORE REQUIREMENTS (24 credit hours)                                where date grade
     Engl 103    Freshman English I                                  3________________________
     Engl 113    Freshman English II                                 3________________________
     SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                  3________________________
     Psy 103     General Psychology                                  3________________________
     Lit 203     Introduction to Literature                          3________________________
     Math 163 Trigonometry                                           3________________________
     Bio 103     Human Biology                                       3________________________
     Humanities Elective___________________                          3________________________
2.   LAKOTA STUDIES (15 credit hours)
     Lak 103     Lakota Language I                                   3________________________
     Lak 233     Lakota Language II                                  3________________________
     LSoc 103    Lakota Culture                                      3________________________
     Lak Elective___________________                                 3________________________
     Lak Elective___________________                                 3________________________
3.   PROFESSIONAL CORE REQUIREMENTS (15 credit hours)
     Recommended: Sec. 1 & 2 complete before beginning Sec. 3. NOTE: All Professional Coursework must be
     completed with a ‘C’ or better grade w/an overall 2.6 GPA per SD DOE Teacher Certification Requirements.
     ED 283      Foundations of Education w/soph. exp.               3________________________




                                                                                                      2011-2013 Catalog
     ED 203      Indian Studies for Education                        3________________________
     ED 313      Educational Psychology                              3________________________
     EXED 313 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology           3________________________
     ED 323      Middle School/High School Concepts                  3________________________
4.   MATHEMATICS PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (4 credit hours)
     Math 194 Calculus I                                             4________________________
5.   PHYSICAL SCIENCE PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (44 credit hours)
     Geol 133    Environmental Geology                               3________________________
     Phys 113    Survey of Physics                                   3________________________
     Phys 214    Physics I                                           4________________________
     Chem 233 General Chemistry I                                    3________________________
     Chem 231 Experimental General Chemistry Lab I                   1________________________
     Chem 243 General Chemistry II                                   3________________________
     Chem 241 Experimental General Chemistry Lab II                  1________________________
     Phys 253    Astronomy                                           3________________________
     Chem 323 Environmental Chemistry                                3________________________
     Chem 353 Organic Chemistry for Educators I                      3________________________
     Chem 351 Organic Chemistry for Educators Lab I                  1________________________
     Chem 363 Organic Chemistry for Educators II                     3________________________
     Chem 361 Organic Chemistry for Educators Lab II                 1________________________
     Phys 324    Physics II for Educators                            4________________________
     Phys 321    Physics II Lab for Educators                        1________________________
     Phys 434    Modern Physics                                      4________________________
     NSci 483    Renewable Energy Technologies                       3________________________
6.   PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (27 credit hours) Recommended: Sec. 1-5 complete before sec. 6.
     ScEd 443 Reading in the Content Area                            3_________________________
     ED 463      Human Relations & Cultural Diversity                3_________________________
     ED 483      Technology/Curriculum Development                   3_________________________
     ScEd 403 Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics              3_________________________
     ScEd 413 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science                  3_________________________
     NOTE: The following courses are to be taken after completion of all other coursework.
     Ed 473      Student Teaching Seminar                            3________________________
     Ed 489      Student Teaching                                    9________________________
                                                                     TOTAL = 129 CREDIT HOURS
                                                    -83-
                                 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                       K-12 SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT

All Special Education Coursework must be completed with a ‘C’ or better grade w/an overall 2.6 GPA per SD DOE teacher
certification requirements. Graduate level students must complete each course with a “B” or better grade and must
maintain a 3.0 GPA for the program of study as per OLC Graduate Studies policy.

                                                                                    where      when       grade

ExEd 313/513 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology                       3 ________________________
ExEd 323/523 Assessment and Practical Applications                              3 ________________________
ExEd 333/533 IEP/IFSP Program and Curriculum Development                        3 ______________________
ExEd 303/603 Special Education Law                                              3 ______________________
ExEd 433/633 Diagnostic Teaching                                                3 ______________________
ExEd 443/643 Strategies for Low Incident Disabilities                           3 ______________________
ExEd 453/653 Classroom Management                                               3 ______________________
ExEd 473/673 Transitions and Community Resources                                3 ______________________
ExEd 493/496/793/796 Special Education Practicum                                 3-6 _____________________

                                                                       TOTAL = 27 – 30 CREDIT HOURS

Note: This endorsement requires 24 semester credits in special education coursework; a three-semester
hour practicum at each level of endorsement; a passing score on the designated special education state
licensure examination; and one year of general classroom teaching or special education paraprofessional
experience, or special education certification and one year of special education teaching experience.



                                EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
       BIRTH THROUGH PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT

Coursework from Core and Professional Core                                 where     when     grade
Ed 213        Child Growth & Development                                       3 ___________________________
ExEd 313/513 Intro. to Ex. Ed./Characteristics & Etiology                        3 ________________________
Early Childhood Coursework
ECH 203       Introduction to Early Childhood Education                         3 ________________________
ECH 223       Materials & Techniques I                                          3 ________________________
ECH 233       Curriculum for Self-Awareness & Ind. Dev.                         3 ________________________
Exceptional Education Coursework
ExEd 323/523 Assessment and Practical Applications                              3 ________________________
ExEd 303/603 Special Education Law                                              3 ________________________
ExEd 433/633 Diagnostic Teaching                                                3 ________________________
ExEd 443/643 Strategies for Low Incident Disabilities                           3 ________________________
ExEd 493/793 Special Education Practicum                                        3 ________________________

                                                                        Total Hours Endorsement = 30 Hours

Note: This endorsement requires completion of coursework, a three-semester hour practicum specific
to birth through preschool special education, and a passing score on the designated birth through
early childhood and special education state licensure examinations.

                                                       -84-
                               EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
                            ENDORSEMENT IN INDIAN STUDIES

Coursework from Core and Professional Core                         where     when     grade
    Ed 213      Child Growth & Development                         3 ________________________
Indian Studies Core Coursework
    Lak 103     Lakota Language I                                  3   ________________________
    LSoc 103    Lakota Culture                                     3   ________________________
    Lak 233     Lakota Language II                                 3   ________________________
    LHist 203 Lakota History                                       3   ________________________
    LLit 213    American Indian Literature                         3   ________________________
Indian Studies Professional Requirements
    LkEd 453 Methods of Teaching K-12 Lakota Studies               3 ________________________
    LkEd 413 Practicum in Indian Studies                           3 ________________________

                                                                   Total Hours = 24
Note: The practicum experience must include two levels from elementary, middle, and secondary levels.


                                EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
   ENDORSEMENT IN MATHEMATICS, BIOLOGY, AND OR EARTH SCIENCE STUDIES

The following endorsements can be added to a teaching certificate. Oglala Lakota College recommends
teachers that wish to prepare to take the individual Praxis exams in Mathematics, Biology and/or Earth
Science to enroll in the desired coursework leading to a state endorsement within the content area. The
courses below can also apply to renewing a teaching certificate.
Mathematics Endorsement
Math   123      Introduction to Statistics                         3 ____________________________
Math   214      Calculus II                                        4 ____________________________
Math   224      Calculus III                                       4 ____________________________
Math   333      Matrix Theory and Linear Algebra                   3 ____________________________
Math   324      Geometry for Teachers                              4 ____________________________
                                                                   TOTAL = 19 CREDIT HOURS
Biology Endorsement
Bio 154        Introduction Biology I                              4 ____________________________
Bio 164        Introduction Biology II                             4 ____________________________
Bio 223        Ecology                                             3 ____________________________
Bio 303        Field Ecology                                       3 ____________________________
Sci 273        Scientific Literature and Writing                   3 ____________________________
Bio 463        Conservation Biology                                3 ____________________________
                                                                   TOTAL = 20 CREDIT HOURS
Earth Science Endorsement
NSci 253       Hydrology                                           3 ____________________________
NSci 363       Fluvial Processes                                   3 ____________________________
GIS 213        Introduction to GIS/GPS                             3 ____________________________
Geol 153       Historical Geology                                  3 ____________________________
Geol 183       Physical Geology                                    3 ____________________________
                                                                   TOTAL = 15 CREDIT HOURS
Praxis II State Licensure Exams
0061 7-12 Mathematics Education (Note: The oo61 will also allow secondary teachers to teach math at the
middle school level without needing to take the 0069 Middle School Math test.)
0235 7-12 Science Education – Biology
0571 7-12 Science Education – Earth Science


                                                    -85-
                                                         HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

                                                                                     Department Chairs
                                                          Kim Bettelyoun-He Crow, M.A. - Composition, Literature, Communication
                                                                   Anthony Fresquez, M.A. - Communication, Composition
                                                                                     Humanities Faculty
                                                                     Kiri Punipuao Close, Ph.D. - Literature, Composition
                                                                      Gerald Cournoyer, M.A., M.F.A. – Art, Humanities
                                                               Judith Graham, M.S. - Literature, Composition, Communication
                                                                    Gary Jones, M.S., M.A. - Communication, Composition
                                                                           Martin Red Bear, M.A. - Art, Humanities
                                                                      Jean Reeves, M.S. – Composition, Communication
                                                                                             Vacant
                                                                                             Vacant
                                                                                    Social Science Faculty
                                                            Susanne Auer, M.A. – Anthropology, Indigenous Studies, Psychology
                                                                             Kirk E. Costion, Ph.D. – Archaeology
                                                           Lilias Jones Jarding, Ph.D. - Environmental Studies and Political Science
                                                                                             Vacant

                                           Department Philosophy

                                           The Humanities and Social Science (HSS) Department offers programs of study with courses in art,
                                           communications, English, literature, history, and social sciences. The breadth of offerings reflects the
                                           commitment of the faculty to challenge students to develop an interdisciplinary comprehension of a complex,
                                           diverse, and rapidly changing world. HSS degrees offer comprehensive educational opportunities encouraging
                                           students to develop an informed view of the world and the ability to critically analyze their view while
                                           actively participating responsibly in the world. An Oglala perspective is facilitated in all curricula and programs.

                                           Department Goals
                                           The Humanities and Social Science Department, as expressed in art, communications, English, literature,
                                           history, social sciences, and knowledge of people, groups and institutions, has adopted the following goals:
                                                    Provide and monitor quality post-secondary academic teaching and learning emphasizing an
                                                    Oglala cultural perspective as it relates to global diversity;
                                                    Offer students learning opportunities to acquire knowledge and skills for personal and professional
                                                    development;
                                                    Prepare graduates for life and career success and for leadership roles in their families, tribe, and
                                                    the global community.

                                           Department Student Learning Objectives
                                           Humanities and Social Science graduates will be able to
                                                 identify, define, and solve problems (Critical Thinking)
                                                 locate and evaluate information using current technology.(Research and Writing)
                                                 communicate with accuracy and clarity (Speaking, Writing, and Art)
                                                 read, comprehend, retain, and apply information responsibly (Reading and Writing)
                                                 demonstrate skills for leadership and participation in Oglala culture and philosophy within the
                                                 larger context of a diverse tribal and global society (Wolakolkiciyapi)


                                                                                                  -86-
AA in Fine Art

With an Associate degree in Art, students will have a solid foundation to pursue a Bachelor Degree in a Fine
Arts program. Students who attain an Associate degree in Art will be challenged in class to develop new art
vocabulary and techniques.

Art Degree Outcomes
All Art graduates will be able to:
        enhance art techniques offered that include drawing objectives, perspective, and composition
        be able to analyze, comprehend, and assess criteria learned and articulate a clear presentation of
        the material taught
        define a global art experience by developing individual, theoretical interpretation of art, art
        history, and the philosophy of other cultures.

BA in English and Communication Studies (with or without Lakota Studies Minor)

Students pursuing a BA in English and Communication Studies will experience the richness of literature and
language, develop their abilities for analytical and creative thinking, and build their written and oral
communication skills. The scope of study the degree affords will help students broaden and deepen their
knowledge of world cultures, religions, histories, and economies. These exposures will help them interpret
their own histories and cultures.

English and Communication Studies Degree Outcomes
All English and Communication Studies graduates will be able to:
        think critically and practice information retrieval skills regardless of their area of specialization
        organize information and express thoughts using various writing strategies as measured by the
        departmental writing rubric
        distinguish various literary devices and genres by identifying items on the departmental literary
        rubric
        demonstrate their mastery of the various communication complexities by following standardized
        rules, guidelines, and credible evaluation instruments/criteria.

BA in Social Science (with or without Lakota Studies Minor)

Students pursuing a BA in Social Science will be challenged to develop ways of seeing and thinking about the
world that go beyond everyday applications. They will be exposed to a wide range of theories about how the
world works and about how it has come to be as it is today. They will experience the diversity of world
cultures, economies, and histories from the viewpoint of the social sciences, including anthropology, geography,
history, political science, psychology and sociology, . They will experience the power of education to transform
individuals – including themselves - and the world.

Social Science Degree Outcomes
Students who complete the BA in Social Science will be able to
        demonstrate leadership qualities in their communities
        use social science perspectives to interpret, analyze, and evaluate societal and individual issues
        design and complete small social science research projects
        express interpretations of their own biases and of the diversity of human experience
        formulate a chart of organizational processes and interactions and their influence in the
        community.



                                                     -87-
       HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT
                BA IN ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES

I. Core (27 credits)                                           Where Taken    Date    Grade
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                                 3_________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                                3_________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                               3_________________________
   Math 103 Elementary Algebra                                 3_________________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                      3_________________________
   Lit 203     Introduction to Literature                      3_________________________
   Humanities Elective                                         3_________________________
   Science Elective                                            3_________________________
   Social Science Elective                                     3_________________________




                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
II. Lakota Studies Core (15 credits)
    Lak 103     Lakota Language I                              3_________________________
    Lak 233     Lakota Language II                             3_________________________
    LSoc 103, LHist 203, or LHist 213                          3_________________________
    Lakota Elective                                            3_________________________
    Lakota Elective                                            3_________________________

III. Professional Requirements (39 credits)
     Hum 203 Intro to Phil and Critical Thinking               3_________________________
     Engl 283 Advanced Composition I                           3_________________________
     Engl 233 The Joy of Writing                               3_________________________
     Lit 243    Minority Literature                            3_________________________
     Lit 223    American Literature to 1865                    3_________________________
     SpCm 223 Multicultural Communication                      3_________________________
     SpCm 233 Elements of Human Comm. Skills                   3_________________________

English and Communication Electives: Choose 18 upper division credits from the following
English, Literature, or Speech Communication courses offered by the Humanities and Social
Sciences Department:

   Engl 303, 323, 333, 343, 413, 423, 453, 483, 493, and 490
   SpCm 333, 413, 433, and 490
   Lit 323, 333, 343, 403, 423, 433, 490
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________
   _____________________________________                       3_________________________




                                                   -88-
V. Free Electives (30 credits) – Students are encouraged to pursue personal interests and
   take courses in that area.
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________
   _____________________________________                 3_________________________

Total: 111 credit hours including a minimum of 18 at 300 level or above




                                                                                              2011-2013 Catalog
Lakota Studies Minor (Section II above PLUS the following two courses) Students can also choose
to pursue a minor in Lakota Studies by taking Lak 323 and 423 in place of two elective classes.
    Lak 323* Lakota Language III                               3_________________________
    Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                                3_________________________




                                                -89-
         HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
 BA IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (WITH OR WITHOUT LAKOTA STUDIES MINOR)

I. Core (27 credits)                                             Where Taken Date Grade
     Engl 103 Freshman English I                                 3________________________
     Engl 113 Freshman English II                                3________________________
     SpCm 103 Speech Communications                              3________________________
     Math 103 Elementary Algebra (or higher)                     3________________________
     MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                      3________________________
     SoSc 103 Introduction to Social Science                     3________________________
     Lit 203     Introduction to Literature                      3________________________
     Hum Elec Art or Hum prefix                                  3________________________
     Science Elective                                            3________________________
II. Lakota Studies Core (15 credits)




                                                                                           2011-2013 Catalog
     Lak 103     Lakota Language I                               3________________________
     Lak 233     Lakota Language II                              3________________________
     LSoc 103, LHist 203 or LHist 213                            3________________________
     Lakota Studies Elective                                     3________________________
     Lakota Studies Elective                                     3________________________
III. Social Science Major – (C grade minimum in each course)
     A. Social Science Core – 21 credits
     Geog 213 World Regional Geography                           3 ________________________
     History (American or World History)                         3 ________________________
     Pols 203 American Government                                3________________________
     Psy 103     General Psychology                              3________________________
     SoSc 313 Statistics for Social Science                      3________________________
     SoSc 333 Social Science Theory                              3________________________
     SoSc 433 Social Science Research
     OR SoSc 413 Internship                                      3________________________
     B. 18 upper division credits in Social Science (courses with ANTH, Geog, Hisa, Pols,
      Psy, or SoSc prefix)
              ANTH 413, 433, Geog 490, HISA 323, 490, Pols 323, 343, 423, 490, Psy 490,
              SoSc 353, 383, 463, 490
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
IV. Electives (30 credits)
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3_________________________
     _____________________________________                       3__________________________
     _____________________________________                       3__________________________
     _____________________________________                       3__________________________

                                               -90-
V. Lakota Studies Minor (6 credits in addition to Section II above)
   Students can choose to pursue a minor in Lakota Studies by replacing two electives (section IV) by
   one of the following options.

    Lak 323    Lakota Language III                              3__________________________
    Lak 423    Lakota Language IV                               3__________________________
    OR
    Lakota Studies Electives (6 upper division credits)         3__________________________
                                                                3__________________________


TOTAL: 111 credit hours including minimum of 36 at 300 level or above




                                                                                                  2011-2013 Catalog




                                                   -91-
         HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT
                                             AA IN FINE ART

I. Core Requirements (AA in ART Majors required to complete 21 credit hours from this Core Section I)
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                              3 ________________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                             3 ________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                            3 ________________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra                              3 ________________________
   Humanities (any Hum 200 level course or higher)           3 ________________________
   SoSci 103*Introduction to Social Science                  3 ________________________
   Science Elective                                          3 ________________________
   (Students seeking the AA in ART Degree are required to complete all of the above in Section I)




                                                                                                            2011-2013 Catalog
II. Lakota Studies (AA in ART Majors required to complete 9 credit hours from this Section II)
    Lak 103    Lakota Language I                             3 ________________________
    LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                  3 ________________________
    LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Arts I OR
    LArt 213 Plains Indian Design Composition                3 ________________________

III. Art Requirements (AA in ART Majors required to complete 27 credit hours from this Section III)
     Art 103 #Drawing I (Required for AA in ART Majors)          3 ________________________
     Art 203 *Drawing II (Required for AA in ART Majors)         3 ________________________
     Art 113 +#The Business of Art (Required for AA in ART Majors)3 _______________________
     Art 123 Two-Dimensional Design (Required for AA in ART Majors) 3 ____________________
     Art 213 *Figure Drawing                                     3 ________________________
     Art 223 #Painting I (Required for AA in ART Majors)         3 ________________________
     Art 233 Three-Dimensional Design                           3 ________________________
     Art 303 +#Art History I (Required for AA in ART Majors)     3 ________________________
     Art 313 *+#Art History II (Required for AA in ART Majors) 3 ________________________
     Art 323 *+Graduate Studio Project (Required for AA in AR    3 ________________________
(Non-AA in ART Majors may take Art History II without taking Art History I as a prerequisite.
Non-AA in ART Majors welcome to enroll in any Art class to fit their own status sheet toward
their non-AA in ART Major)

IV. Art Electives as Emphasis (AA in ART Majors required to complete 9 credit hours based on
their Emphasis area in this Section IV)
    Art 133 #Introduction to Watercolor                    3 ________________________
    Art 143 #Introduction to Oil Painting                  3 ________________________
    Art 173 #Introduction to Ceramics                      3 ________________________
    Art 153 #School Arts and Crafts                        3 ________________________
    Art 243 *Painting II                                   3 ________________________
    Art 273 *#Introduction to Sculpture                    3 ________________________
    Art 253 *+Graphic Arts Digital                         3 ________________________
    Art 263 *#Digital Photography                          3 ________________________
    Art 283 *#Introduction to Printmaking                  3 ________________________
    (AA in ART Majors will choose Electives dependent upon their Status Sheet Emphasis: a)Teaching/Education,
or b)Two-Dimensional, c)Three-Dimensional, or d) Graphic Arts Digital. Non-AA in ART Majors welcomed to take
any Art class to fit their own status sheet toward their non-AA in ART Major and with the permission of course
instructor).                                                    Total: 66 credits
SYMBOLS’ KEY: *: Pre-requisite +: Pictel friendly course #: Open to Community for ‘Visiting’

                                                       -92-
                HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT
                                    AA IN LIBERAL STUDIES


I. Core (24 credits)                                                Where Taken    Date   Grade
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                                    3_________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                                   3_________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                 3_________________________
   Math (103 or above)                                            3_________________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                         3_________________________
   Humanities                                                     3_________________________
   Science Elective                                               3_________________________
   Social Science                                                 3_________________________




                                                                                                        2011-2013 Catalog
II. Lakota Studies Core (9 credits)
    Lak 103    Lakota Language I                                  3_________________________
    Any Lakota History or Culture Course                          3_________________________
    Lakota Studies Elective                                       3_________________________


III. Course Electives (27 credits) Students are required to declare a major at Bachelor level. (Note:
Students will not be approved to receive this degree more than once).
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        ____________________________________                      3_________________________
        _____________________________________                     3_________________________
        _____________________________________                     3_________________________

                                                          Total: 60 credit hours




                                                   -93-
                                                       LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT


                                            Karen Lone Hill, Chairperson, M.Ed. Adult Curriculum & Instruction
                                                   Wilmer Mesteth, Known Expertise in Lakota Studies
                                               Charles White Buffalo, M.A. Lakota Leadership/Management
                                                              Verine White, M.S. Education
                                                                     Patrick Lee, J.D.
                                                         Marcell Bull Bear, B.S. Human Services
                                                         Corey Yellow Boy, B.A. Lakota Studies
LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT




                                             Matthew Uses the Knife, B.A. Studio Art (Cheyenne River Center)

                                     The Lakota Studies Department offers four degrees and a Lakota Language Certificate. The department
                            also provides the focus for the entire college in maintaining a Lakota perspective. All students are required to
                            take courses offered by the Lakota Studies Department in order to increase their knowledge of Lakota heritage
                            and to prepare themselves for contributing to the continuation of the Lakota Oyate traditions and values. The
                            department provides assistance to other departments, offers community workshops/forums, assists in the
                            maintenance of materials relevant to tribal history and culture, and serves to help maintain the Lakota language.

                                    Courses within the Lakota Studies Department range across disciplines. They are taught according
                            to accepted standards within the disciplines of art, music, language, literature, history, political science,
                            psychology, sociology, science, and religion.

                            LAKOTA STUDIES PHILOSOPHY AND OUTCOMES

                            Philosophy Statement

                                     The Lakota Studies Department will provide a safe learning environment that stimulates students to
                            reach their highest potential through a relevant teaching model that reflects diverse Lakota ideology in language,
                            values, kinship, community, worldview, etc. for a better understanding of Lakota life and culture as an
                            ongoing dynamic process.

                            Lakota Studies Outcomes/Goals

                            Goal A: Students will have a clear understanding of the Lakota worldview and philosophy.
                                   As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:
                               1. Identify, explain, and apply concepts of Lakota ceremonies.
                               2. Apply respect for the interrelatedness of all things in this world.
                               3. Identify, explain, and apply Lakota kinship concepts in everyday situations.
                               4. Identify and apply concepts of mental and physical wellness.
                            Goal B: Student will gain an understanding of him/herself.
                                   As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:
                               1. Identify and explain his/her being.
                               2. Identify, explain, and apply his/her place within the tiwahe (family).
                               3. Identify, explain, and apply his/her place within the oyate (nation).
                               4. Identify, explain, and apply the oyate (nation’s) place within makasitomniya (the world).




                                                                                  -94-
Goal C: Students will gain knowledge of and communicate effectively in speaking and writing the Lakota
language.
         As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:
    1. Communicate basic ideas in written and spoken Lakota language.
    2. Communicate complex ideas in written and spoken Lakota language.
    3. Identify, explain, and apply skills in Lakota language teaching methodology.
    4. Identify, explain, and apply knowledge of Lakota language evolution.
Goal D: Students will have an understanding of tribal history and implications of sovereignty.
         As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:
    1. Identify and explain Lakota treaties with the United States.
    2. Identify and explain the implications of sovereignty and apply to contemporary situations.
    3. Identify and explain the concepts of traditional government.
    4. Identify and explain the concepts of the IRA government.
Goal E: Students will gain an understanding of Lakota arts, music, dance, literature, and traditional
healing.
         As a result of taking courses related to this goal, students will:
    1. Identify and explain the history of Lakota arts.
    2. Identify, explain, and apply traditional and contemporary Lakota music and dance.
    3. Identify, explain, and apply Lakota oral literature into contemporary situations.
    4. Identify, explain, and apply Lakota traditional plants, foods, and herbs for mental and physical
         wellness.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN LAKOTA STUDIES

        The B.A. in Lakota Studies offers emphasis areas in Lakota Language, Indian Law, Lakota Culture
or Lakota Arts. This degree is designed for the person who would like to become a researcher or teacher in
these specialized areas. It is also appropriate for archivists, park interpreters, and lawyers.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN K-12 LAKOTA STUDIES EDUCATION

         The B.S. in Lakota Studies Education is a K-12 teaching degree designed to meet the needs of those
individuals and Lakota teachers who wish to teach the Lakota language, culture, history, arts, and literature
in the elementary and secondary schools. This is a South Dakota state certified teaching degree, so students
must meet state, as well as OLC Education Department requirements. All education majors must maintain a
cumulative GPA of 2.6 in order to be eligible for state teacher certification. See also Education Department.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LAKOTA STUDIES

         The A.A. in Lakota Studies combines an emphasis on Lakota culture with the necessary enhancement
of knowledge to prepare students to act as transmitters of Lakota history and culture for tribal programs and
schools.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN TRIBAL LAW

        The A.A. in Tribal Law is designed to prepare tribal members to serve as trained tribal court advocates
and prosecutors.

LAKOTA LANGUAGE CERTIFICATE

        The Lakota language certificate is a South Dakota state certified program that prepares students to
teach the Lakota language at various grade levels using effective methods and techniques.

                                                    -95-
                        LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT
                BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN LAKOTA STUDIES


1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)                          Where Taken   Date Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                           3_______________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                          3_______________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                         3_______________________
   Math 123 Introduction to Statistics or higher          3_______________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                 3_______________________
   Social Science Elective________                        3_______________________
   Humanities Elective________                            3_______________________
   Literature Elective________                            3_______________________




                                                                                      2011-2013 Catalog
   Science Elective________                               3_______________________

2. LAKOTA STUDIES REQUIREMENTS (15 credits)

   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                           3_______________________
   Lak 233*   Lakota language II                          3_______________________
   Lak 323*   Lakota Language III                         3_______________________
   Lak 423*   Lakota Language IV                          3_______________________
   LHist 203* Lakota History I____
              OR
   LHist 213* Lakota History II____                       3_______________________

3. PROFESSIONAL CORE REQUIREMENTS (18 credits)

   LArt 203* Indian Art History                           3_______________________
   LLit 213* American Indian Literature____
              OR
   LLit 313* Contemporary Indian Literature____           3_______________________
   LPsy 323* Native American Psychology                   3_______________________
   LHist 323* Seminar in American Indian Issues           3_______________________
   LSoc 303* American Indian Women                        3_______________________
   Lak 283/483*Internship in Lakota Studies               3_______________________

4. EMPHASIS AREAS (18 credits) Select (1) ONE Area

   A. LAKOTA LANGUAGE (18 credits)
   Engl 303* Grammar and Linguistics                      3_______________________
   Lak 413* Lakota Public Speaking                        3_______________________
   Lak 303* Lakota Grammar                                3_______________________
   Lak 313* Introduction to Lakota Sociolinguistics       3_______________________
   LkEd 433* Methods of Teaching the Lakota Language      3_______________________
   Lak 443* Lakota Language Assessment                    3_______________________
   B. TRIBAL LAW (18 credits)
   LPols 223* Tribal Laws, Treaties, Government           3_______________________
   LPols 313* Indian Law                                  3_______________________
   LLaw 203* Contract Law                                 3_______________________
   LLaw 213* Legal Research & Writing                     3_______________________
                                                   -96-
   LLaw 303* Criminal Law & Procedures____
             OR
   LLaw 313* Civil Law & Procedures____               3_______________________
   LLaw 323* Family Law                               3_______________________
   C. LAKOTA CULTURE (18 credits)
   LLit 103 Lakota Oral Literature                    3_______________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                            3_______________________
   LSoc 313* Lakota Thought and Philosophy            3_______________________
   LSci 203* Traditional Plants, Foods, and Herbs     3_______________________
   LSci 303* Lakota and the Environment               3_______________________
   LThe 443* Comparative Studies in Lakota Religion   3_______________________
   D. LAKOTA ARTS (18 credits)
   LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Art I                  3_______________________
   LArt 113* Traditional Lakota Art II                3_______________________




                                                                                 2011-2013 Catalog
   LArt 213* Plains Indian Design Composition         3_______________________
   LMus 203* Lakota Dance Styles                      3_______________________
   LMus 303* Lakota Music Composition                 3_______________________
   LArt 313* Lakota Artifact & Regalia Reproduction   3_______________________

5. FREE ELECTIVES (34 credits)

   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    3_______________________
   _______________________________________________    4_______________________

                                                      TOTAL:   112 CREDITS




                                            -97-
                      LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT
      BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN K-12 LAKOTA STUDIES EDUCATION

1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (36 credits)                             Where Taken  Date Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                             3_______________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                            3_______________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                           3_______________________
   Math 103 Elementary Algebra                              3_______________________
   Psy 103* General Psychology                              3_______________________
   Bio 113* People and the Environment                      3_______________________
   Mus 203* Music and Culture                               3_______________________
   Pols 103* American Government                            3_______________________
   Geog 213* World Geography                                3_______________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing                   3_______________________




                                                                                        2011-2013 Catalog
   Hist 203/213* American History I OR II                   3_______________________
   Lit 203*   Introduction to Literature                    3_______________________
2. LAKOTA STUDIES CORE REQUIREMENTS (42 credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                             3_______________________
   Lak 233* Lakota Language II                              3_______________________
   Lak 323* Lakota Language III                             3_______________________
   Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                              3_______________________
   Lak 313* Introduction to Lakota Sociolinguistics         3_______________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                  3_______________________
   LSoc 313* Lakota Thought and Philosophy                  3_______________________
   LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Art I                        3_______________________
   LLit 103 Lakota Oral Literature                          3_______________________
   LLit 213* American Indian Literature                     3_______________________
   LHist 203/213* Lakota History I OR II                    3_______________________
   LHist 323* Seminar in Contemporary Indian Issues         3_______________________
   LPol 223* Lakota Tribal Laws, Treaties, Government       3_______________________
   LPsy 323* Native American Psychology                     3_______________________
3. EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)
   Ed 203*    Indian Education                              3_______________________
   Math 323* Math for Elementary Teachers I                 3 ______________________
   Ed 283*    Foundations of Education w/soph experience    3_______________________
   Ed 213*    Child Growth and Development                  3_______________________
   Ed 313*    Educational Psychology                        3_______________________
   Ed 323*    Middle School Concepts                        3_______________________
   Ed 483*    Technology/Curriculum Development for Tchrs. 3_______________________
   ScEd 443* Reading in the Content Area                    3_______________________
   ExEd 313* Introduction to Exceptional Education          3_______________________
4. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)
   Ed 463*    Human Relations or Cultural Diversity         3_______________________
   Ed 443*    Methods of Teaching Elementary Lang. Arts     3_______________________
   Ed 453*    Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3_______________________
   LkEd 453* Methods of Teaching K-12 Lakota Studies        3_______________________
   LkEd 433* Methods of Teaching the Lakota Language        3_______________________
   LkEd 473* Student Teaching Seminar                       3_______________________
   LkEd 419*Student Teaching/Practicum in Indian Studies     9_____________________
                                                            TOTAL: 132 CREDITS


                                            -98-
                       LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT
                    ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LAKOTA STUDIES


1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (21 credits)                       Where Taken   Date   Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                         3_______________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                        3_______________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                       3_______________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra                         3_______________________
   Science Elective____________                         3_______________________
   Social Science Elective____________                  3_______________________
   Humanities Elective____________                      3_______________________




                                                                                     2011-2013 Catalog
2. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (24 credits)

   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                         3_______________________
   Lak 233*   Lakota Language II                        3_______________________
   LHist 203* Lakota History I                          3_______________________
   LSoc 103   Lakota Culture___
              OR
   LHist 213* Lakota History II___                      3_______________________
   LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Art I                    3_______________________
   LLit 103 Lakota Oral Literature___
              OR
   LLit 313* Lakota Thought and Philosophy___           3_______________________
   LPol 223* Lakota Tribal Laws. Treaties, Government   3_______________________
   Lak 283/483*Lakota Studies Internship                3_______________________

3. FREE ELECTIVES (15 credits)

   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________

                                                        TOTAL:    60 CREDITS




                                              -99-
                       LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT
                 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN TRIBAL LAW


1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (21 credits)                        Where Taken Date Grade

   Engl 103* Freshman English I                         3_______________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                        3_______________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                       3_______________________
   Math 103* Elementary Algebra                         3_______________________
   Science Elective________                             3_______________________
   Social Science Elective________                      3_______________________
   Humanities Elective________                          3_______________________




                                                                                   2011-2013 Catalog
2. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (30 credits)

   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                         3_______________________
   Lak 233* Lakota Language II                          3_______________________
   LHist 203* Lakota History I______
              OR
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture______                        3_______________________
   LHist 213* Lakota History II                         3_______________________
   LPol 223* Lakota Tribal Laws, Treaties, Government   3_______________________
   LPol 313* Indian Law                                 3_______________________
   LLaw 203* Contract Law                               3_______________________
   LLaw 213* Legal Research and Writing                 3_______________________
   LLaw 303* Criminal Law and Procedures_____
              OR
   LLaw 313* Civil Law and Procedures_____              3_______________________
   LLaw 323* Family Law                                 3_______________________

3. FREE ELECTIVES (9 credits)

   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________
   _____________________________________________        3_______________________

                                                        TOTAL:   60 CREDITS




                                             -100-
                         LAKOTA STUDIES DEPARTMENT
                            LAKOTA LANGUAGE CERTIFICATE


                                                                  Where Taken     Date   Grade




                                                                                                 2011-2013 Catalog
    Lak 103   Lakota Language I                                 3_______________________

    Lak 233* Lakota Language II                                 3_______________________

    Lak 323* Lakota Language III                                3_______________________

    Lak 423* Lakota Language IV                                 3_______________________

    Lak 313* Introduction to Lakota Sociolinguistics            3_______________________

    LkEd 433* Methods of Teaching the Lakota Language           3_______________________


Persons who demonstrate oral proficiency and literacy in the Lakota language may test out of
the Lakota language requirements (Lak 103, Lak 233, Lak 323, and Lak 423).




                                                 -101-
                                                       DEPARTMENT OF MATH and SCIENCE
                                                                  Hannan LaGarry, Ph.D.(Co-Chair)
                                                                   C. Jason Tinant, M.S. (Co-Chair)
                                                                       A.J. Silva, Ph.D.(Faculty)
                                                                    Deig Sandoval, Ph.D.(Faculty)
                                                                  Albrecht Schwalm, Ph.D. (Faculty)
                                                                     Ida Red Bear, M.S. (Faculty)
                                                                Merle “Misty” Brave, M.A. (Faculty)
DEPARTMENT OF MATH AND SCIENCE




                                                                   Alessandra Higa, M.S. (Faculty)
                                                                    Michel Melvin, M.S. (Faculty)
                                                                      Jim Dudek, M.A. (Faculty)
                                                              Christine Stagnetto-Zwieg, M.S. (Faculty)
                                                          TawaDucheneaux (Archivist and Media Manager)
                                                         Helene Gaddie (Native Science Field Center Director)
                                                         Michelle Salvatore (SEMAA Outreach Coordinator)
                                                              James Sanovia (GIS Laboratory Manager)
                                                               Alicia Provost (Administrative Assistant)


                                 Oglala Lakota College has become a regional leader in Environmental Science. Recent graduates of the
                                 baccalaureate program have entered careers with tribal agencies or entered graduate school. The renovation
                                 of the Oglala Lakota College Center for Science and Technology (OLCST) has allowed faculty to further
                                 expand strong undergraduate research and internship programs. The OLCST hosts state of the art laboratories
                                 for analytical chemistry, GIS remote sensing, and conservation biology. At OLC, science is not just taught in
                                 a classroom setting. We incorporate extensive field experience with an emphasis on hands-on learning.
                                 Students have excellent opportunities to engage in research projects as part of their undergraduate experience
                                 with the OLC Math and Science Department.

                                 Departmental Philosophy

                                 The land is sacred and must be managed wisely and effectively. Lakota perspective is a vital component of
                                 our natural science and natural resources programs. Our mission is to provide Natural Science and Natural
                                 Resources learning opportunities incorporating traditional Lakota values that will provide our students with
                                 a foundation for success in a graduate program or in an environmental career.

                                 Departmental Goals and Objectives:
                                 Tribal: Provide curriculum and academic experiences that infuse new knowledge to our stakeholders and to
                                 create new training opportunities for existing professionals in math and science.

                                 Community: Offer formal and informal learning opportunities for students and community members to
                                 positively influence their beliefs regarding science and math.

                                 Cultural: Create an environment that supports, encourages, and respects Lakota values in all aspects of our
                                 academic, research, and outreach efforts.

                                 Academic: Establish a foundation of academic excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and
                                 Mathematics.



                                                                                    -102-
-103-
+established with the College of Engineering at the South Dakota State University (SDSU) and the South
Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT). The initiative is referred to as the OLC/SDSU/SDSMT
PEEC (OSSPEEC). The project will establish collaborative offerings of gateway and bottleneck courses
that occur in the first two years of engineering curricula coupled with on-reservation hands-on laboratory and
service learning experiences on the PRR that will increase Native American student retention in pre-engineering
programs on the Reservation and engineering programs across South Dakota. A major result of this project
will be the establishment of a complete two-year pre-engineering curriculum at OLC, which will enable our
students to enter any four-year undergraduate engineering program at the junior level.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE, LIFE SCIENCE
Health issues are a major concern on the Pine Ridge reservation. Students in Life Science are encouraged to
explore the connections between health-related issues and the environment and complete Baccalaureate and
graduate degrees in the areas of biology, physiology, biochemistry, or medicine.

Assessment:
The Math and Science department assesses student learning using a variety of assessment tools. These include:
      Classroom assignments and hands-on laboratories
      Nationally and college normed exams (i.e. CAAP, departmental math exams)
      Guided research and technical internships
      A capstone research paper, presentation, or service learning project report


                              INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY VISION
Information Technology Department graduates will demonstrate mastery of information technology and network
administration using technologies and best practices that are foundational and applied industry wide.

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology is a four-year degree that offers the opportunity for
personal and career advancement in the IT field. This field has experienced a shortage of IT professionals
over that past several years and the Pine Ridge Reservation is no exception. The Bachelor of Science Degree
in Information Technology will give students the necessary background and experience in one of two options.
Information Technology Network Administration Option area specializes in networking, support, and
maintenance to prepare the student for a career as an IT Systems Engineer.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology provides its recipients with personal and career
advancement in the IT field. IT has a shortage of qualified professionals both on and off of the Pine Ridge
reservation. The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology has two options: a graduate of the Information
Technology Option will present specialized knowledge of networking, support, and maintenance, which are
needed for a career as an IT Systems Engineer.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
The Associate of Arts in Information Technology provides its recipients with knowledge and skills to become
a successful IT professional. The AA in Information Technology is designed so that students can matriculate
into a Bachelor of Science degree program at OLC or another four-year institution, as well as to advance
student employment opportunities.




                                                    -104-
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
The Information Technology Department is committed to the attainment of our vision. Assessment of student
learning outcomes and skills is mission critical. We currently evaluate the student learning outcomes in our
baccalaureate degree and our service to OLC General Education.
Graduates of the Information Technology program are expected to:
        demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to provide maintenance and support for computer
        hardware in a networked and stand-alone environment.
        demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to set up and design a network using a wide range
        of logical and physical topologies and network media.
        demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to install and maintain Network and Client
        operating systems, including Windows Server and Unix.
        demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and troubleshoot network problems
        given a hypothetical or real LAN or WAN situation.
        demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to secure networks and data
A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 in the major is required for successful completion of the
Information Technology Degree.

        Oglala Lakota College Center for Science and Technology (OLCST)
                              Dr. Deig Sandoval, Laboratory Manager
                             James Sanovia, GIS Laboratory Manager
                                 Dr. Albrecht Schwalm, Geochemist
                             Dr. Hannan LaGarry, Collections Curator
                     Alessandra Higa, Curation and Collection Facilities Manager

The National Science Foundation has provided OLC with funding to build and equip the laboratories of the
Oglala Lakota College Center for Science and Technology. At present our facilities include analytical chemical
laboratories, an earth science laboratory, a microbiology laboratory, a GIS remote sensing laboratory, a
necropsy laboratory, and curation facilities. Our analytical laboratories include the following analytical
instrumentation: atomic absorption graphite furnace, atomic absorption flame spectrometer, gas chromatograph
mass spectrometer, ion chromatograph, benchtop x-ray fluorescence analyzer, and x-ray diffraction analyzer.
Our microbiology laboratory has received EPA certification for total coliform and E. colidetection in water
samples. The GIS remote sensing laboratory has been a center for academic, research and community outreach
programs. The GIS remote sensing has an extensive collection of geospatial imagery as well as the latest
versions of ArcGIS and ERDAS IMAGINE. Our necropsy laboratory and curation facilities are available to
prepare and house vertebrate specimens, invertebrates, a botanical collection, and soil geological and
paleontological samples from the Pine Ridge reservation. We also have instrumentation available for field
use including a GeoProbe®, handheld x-ray fluorescence analyzer, LIDAR camera, and portable visible and
near-infrared spectrometer. This instrumentation is used to enhance chemistry, earth science, and conservation
biology courses, reservation-based research projects, and research collaboration with other colleges and
universities. Math and science students are encouraged to become involved with ongoing research projects
as student interns.




                                                   -105-
                     DEPARTMENT OF MATH AND SCIENCE
                        ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LIFE SCIENCES


1. Core Requirements (21 Credits):                                Where Taken Date Grade
   Bio 103    Human Biology                                       3 _________________________
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                                    3 _________________________
   Engl 113   Freshman English II                                 3 _________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                                 3 _________________________
   Math 163 Trigonometry                                          3 _________________________
   Psy 103    General Psychology                                  3 _________________________
   Humanities Elective                                            3 _________________________




                                                                                                    2011-2013 Catalog
2. Lakota Studies Requirements (9 Credits):
   Lak 103   Lakota Language I                                    3 _________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture                                        3 _________________________
   Lak       Lakota Elective                                      3 _________________________

3. Math and     Science Requirements** (32 Credits):
   Math 194     Calculus I                                        4 _________________________
   Phys 214     Physics I*                                        4 _________________________
   Bio 153      Biology I                                         3 _________________________
   Bio 151      Biology I Lab                                     1 _________________________
   Bio 163      Biology II                                        3 _________________________
   Bio 161      Biology II Lab                                    1 _________________________
   Chem 233     General Chemistry I*                              3 _________________________
   Chem 231     General Chemistry Lab I                           1 _________________________
   Chem 243     General Chemistry II                              3 _________________________
   Chem 241     General Chemistry Lab II                          1 _________________________
   Chem 253     Organic Chemistry I                               3 _________________________
   Chem 251     Organic Chemistry Lab I                           1 _________________________
   Chem 263     Organic Chemistry II                              3 _________________________
   Chem 261     Organic Chemistry Lab II                          1 _________________________

                                                                Total Credits     62

*Students must either pass an entrance exam for these courses or pass 100-level preparatory courses with
a “C” or better. See catalog descriptions. Entrance exams are available from Math and Science
Department members during the week of registration.
**The following courses are typically offered in the fall semesters: Calculus I, Intro. Biology I, General
Chemistry I & Lab and Organic Chemistry II & Lab. The following courses are typically offered in the
spring semesters: Survey of Physics, Trigonometry, Physics I, Intro. Biology II, General Chemistry II &
Lab and Organic Chemistry II & Lab.




                                                  -106-
                 DEPARTMENT OF MATH AND SCIENCE
   ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND MATH (SEM)


1. Core Requirements: (18 Credits)                          Where Taken    Date   Grade
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                              3 ________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                             3 ________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                           3 ________________________
   Math 163 Trigonometry                                    3 ________________________
            Social Science Elective                         3 ________________________
            Humanities Elective                             3 ________________________

2. Lakota Studies Requirements: (9 Credits)




                                                                                             2011-2013 Catalog
   Lak 103   Lakota Language I                              3 ________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture or LHist 203, LHist 213          3 ________________________
             Lakota Elective                                3 ________________________

3. Math and   Science Requirements***: (25 Credits)
   Math 194   Calculus I                                    4 ________________________
   Math 214   Calculus II                                   4 ________________________
   Math 224   Calculus III                                  4 ________________________
   Phys 214   Physics I*                                    4 ________________________
   Phys 223   Physics II                                    3 ________________________
   Phys 221   Physics II Lab                                1 ________________________
   Chem 233   General Chemistry I*                          3 ________________________
   Chem 231   General Chemistry Lab I                       1 ________________________
   Chem 243   General Chemistry II                          3 ________________________
   Chem 241   General Chemistry Lab II                      1 ________________________

                                                              Total Credits   52

4a. Endorsement Track 1 – Civil Engineering Emphasis**
    Engr 101 Introduction to Engineering I                 1 ________________________
    Engr 111 Introduction to Engineering II                1 ________________________
    Engr 133 Engineering Graphics and Computer Aided Drawing 3 _______________________
    Engr 141 Geology for Engineers Laboratory              1 ________________________
    Engr 143 Geology for Engineers                         3 ________________________
    Engr 202 Construction Materials                        3 ________________________
    Engr 201 Construction Materials Laboratory             3 ________________________
    Engr 213 Elementary Surveying                          3 ________________________
    Engr 211 Elementary Surveying Laboratory               3 ________________________
    Engr 223 Principals of Environmental Science           3 ________________________
    Engr 243 Statics                                       3 ________________________
    Engr 253 Mechanics of Materials                        3 ________________________
    Chem 253 Organic Chemistry I                           3 ________________________

                                                     Total Credits for CE Endorsement   33




                                            -107-
4b. Endorsement Track 2 – Geological Engineering Emphasis***
    Engr 101 Introduction to Engineering I               1 ________________________
    Engr 111 Introduction to Engineering II              1 ________________________
    Engr 133 Engineering Graphics and Computer Aided Drawing 3 _______________________
    Engr 143 Geology for Engineers                       3 ________________________
    Engr 141 Geology for Engineers Laboratory            1 ________________________
    Engr 213 Elementary Surveying                        3 ________________________
    Engr 211 Elementary Surveying Laboratory             3 ________________________
    Engr 243 Statics                                     3 ________________________
    Engr 253 Mechanics of Materials                      3 ________________________
    GIS 213 Introduction to GIS                          3 ________________________
    GIS 313 Applications of GIS                          3 ________________________

                                                       Total Credits for CE Endorsement          27




                                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
*Students must either pass an entrance exam for these courses or pass 100-level preparatory courses
with a “C” or better. See catalog descriptions. Entrance exams are available from Math and Science
Department members during the week of registration.

** Designed to meet the entrance requirements for the first two years of the Civil Engineering
program at South Dakota State University (SDSU) and at South Dakota School of Mines and
Technology (SDSMT). As the course requirements are slightly different for each program, the Math,
Science, and Technology Department Chair may waive some of the listed courses.

*** Designed to meet the entrance requirements for the first two years of the Geological Engineering
program at SDSMT.




                                                  -108-
                   DEPARTMENT OF MATH AND SCIENCE
                  BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL SCIENCE


1. Core Requirements: (27 Credits Total)                  Where Taken     Date   Grade
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                            3_________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                           3_________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                         3_________________________
   Math 163 Trigonometry                                  3_________________________
   MIS 113      Applied Information Processing            3_________________________
   100 level science elective**                           3_________________________
   Social Science Elective                                3_________________________
   Humanities Elective                                    3_________________________
   Literature Elective                                    3_________________________




                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
2. Lakota Studies (15 Credits):
   Lak 103   Lakota Language I                            3_________________________
   Lak 233   Lakota Language II                           3_________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture (or LHist 203)                 3_________________________
   LSci 203 Traditional Plants, Herbs, and Foods          3_________________________
   Lak       Lakota Elective                              3_________________________

3. Natural Science Requirements (32 Credits)
   Math 123 Introduction to Statistics                    3_________________________
   Bio 153    Biology I                                   3_________________________
   Bio 151    Biology I Lab                               1_________________________
   Phys 113 Survey of Physics                             3_________________________
   Chem 233 General Chemistry I *                         3_________________________
   Chem 231 General Chemistry I Lab                       1_________________________
   Geol 143 Physical Geology                              3_________________________
   NSci 253 Hydrology                                     3_________________________
   GIS 213    Introduction to GIS                         3_________________________
   Bio 223    Ecology                                     3_________________________
   Sci 273    Scientific Literature and Writing           3_________________________
   GIS 313    Applications of GIS                         3_________________________

Conservation Biology Emphasis Area Professional Requirements: (32 Credits)
   Bio 163    Biology II                                 3_________________________
   Bio 161    Biology II Lab                             1_________________________
   Rang 103 Botany of the Northern Plains                3_________________________
   Chem 243 General Chemistry II                         3_________________________
   Chem 241 General Chemistry II Lab                     1_________________________
   Bio 303    Field Ecology                              3_________________________
   NSci 393 Research Methods                             3_________________________
   Bio 413    Mammalogy                                  3_________________________
   Biol 453 Advanced Ecology                             3_________________________
   Biol 463 Evolution                                    3_________________________
   Bio 463    Conservation Biology                       3_________________________
   NSci 493 Research                                     3_________________________



                                                  -109-
Conservation    Biology Electives (Minimum of 15 Credits)
   NSci 373     Watershed Assessment Techniques           3 _______________________
   NaRs 323     Natural Resource Measurements             3 _______________________
   Math 194     Calculus I                                4 _______________________
   Biol 413     Animal Behavior                           3 _______________________
   Math 483     Multivariate Statistics                   3 _______________________
   NSci 473     Wetlands                                  3 _______________________
   NSci 303     Integrated Environmental Science          3 _______________________
   NSci 323     Principals of Environmental Science       3 _______________________
   Sci 393      Special Topics (needs approval)           3 _______________________
   Sci 493      Special Topics (needs approval)           3 _______________________
                Ornithology
                Herpetology
                                                          Total Credits 121




                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
Earth Science   Emphasis Area Professional Requirements   (31 Credits)
   Geol 153     Historical Geology                         3 _______________________
   Chem 243     General Chemistry II                       3 _______________________
   Chem 241     General Chemistry II Lab                   1 _______________________
   Geol 213     Soils                                      3 _______________________
   NSci 323     Principals of Environmental Science        3 _______________________
   Chem 323     Environmental Chemistry                    3 _______________________
   NSci 363     Fluvial Morphology                         3 _______________________
   NSci 373     Watershed Assessment Techniques            3 _______________________
   NSci 393     Research Methods                           3 _______________________
   NSci 463     Groundwater                                3 _______________________
   NSci 493     Research                                   3 _______________________

Electives (Minimum of 16 Credits)
    Math 194 Calculus I                                   4 _______________________
    Engr 213/211 Elementary Surveying / Laboratory        4 _______________________
    GIS 323    Remote Sensing                             3 _______________________
    NSci 303 Integrated Environmental Science             3 _______________________
    Geol 303 Soils II                                     3 _______________________
   NSci 473 Wetlands                                      3 _______________________
   Chem 423 Laboratory Equipment                          3 _______________________
   Math 483 Multivariate Statistics                       3 _______________________
   Nsci 483 Paleontology                                  3 _______________________
   Sci 393     Special Topics (needs approval)            3 _______________________
   Sci 493     Special Topics (needs approval)            3 _______________________
                   Air Pollution
                   Renewable Energy
                   Waste Management
                   Archeology
                                                          Total Credits 121




                                               -110-
Agriculture and Natural Resources Emphasis Area Professional Requirements (31 Credits)
   AnSc 103 Animal Science                            3 _________________________
   Rang 103 Botany of the Northern Plains             3 _________________________
   Bio 163    Biology II                              3 _________________________
   Bio 161    Biology II Lab                          1 _________________________
   PSc 303    Forage and Crop Production              3 _________________________
   Bio 303    Field Ecology                           3 _________________________
   Geol 213 Soils                                     3 _________________________

   NSci 393    Research Methods                                3 _________________________
   Bio 443     Range Ecology                                   3 _________________________
   NSci 493    Research                                        3 _________________________
   NaRs 403    Introduction to Tourism                         3 _________________________




                                                                                                2011-2013 Catalog
Electives (Minimum of 16 Credits)
   NSci 363 Fluvial Processes and Stream Morphology            3 _________________________
   NSci 373 Watershed Assessment Techniques                    3 _________________________
   NaRs 323 Natural Resource Measurements                      3 _________________________
   Math 194 Calculus I                                         4 _________________________
   Geol 303 Soils II                                           3 _________________________
   Biol 413   Animal Behavior                                  3 _________________________
   Math 483 Multivariate Statistics                            3 _________________________
   NSci 473 Wetlands                                           3 _________________________
   NSci 303 Integrated Environmental Science                   3 _________________________
   NSci 323 Principals of Environmental Science                3 _________________________
   Biol 453   Advanced Ecology                                 3 _________________________
   Bio 463     Conservation Biology                            3 _________________________
   AnSc 403 Beef Science                                       3 _________________________
   AnSc 413 Equine (Horse) Science                             3 _________________________
   Sci 393    Special Topics (needs approval)                  3 _________________________
   Sci 493    Special Topics (needs approval)                  3 _________________________
   NaRs 233 Bison Science                                      3 _________________________
   AgEc 263 Farm and Ranch Management                          3 _________________________
   Engr 213/211 Elementary Surveying / Laboratory              4 _________________________

                                                               Total Credits 121


*Students must either pass an entrance exam for these courses or pass 100-level preparatory courses
with a “C” or better. See catalog descriptions. Entrance exams are available from Math and Science
Department members during the week of registration.

** Science electives include:
Bio 103 Human Biology                          Bio 133 People and the Environment
Chem 103 Survey of Chemistry                   NaRs 113 Watershed Principals
NaRs 123 Forest Principals                     NaRs 133 Dendrology
Geol 143 Historical Geology                    NaRs 143 Introduction to Natural Resources
Rang 103 Botany of the Great Plains            Rang 113 Range Principals




                                                -111-
                    MATH AND SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


1. Core Requirements: (28 Credit Hours)               Where Taken Date     Grade
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                      3 _________________________
   Engl 113 Freshman English II                     3 _________________________
   MIS 113 Applied Information Processing           3 _________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                   3 _________________________
   Math 154* College Algebra (or above)             4 _________________________
   __________Science Elective                       3 _________________________
   __________Literature Elective                    3 _________________________
   Psy 103   General Psychology                     3 _________________________
   _________ Humanities Elective                    3 _________________________




                                                                                  2011-2013 Catalog
2. Lakota Studies Requirements: (15 Credit Hours)
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                    3 _________________________
   Lak 233* Lakota Language II                      3 _________________________
   Lsoc 103 Lakota Culture
   (or LHist 203 Lakota History I)                  3 _________________________
   __________Lakota Studies Elective                3 _________________________
   __________Lakota Studies Elective                3 _________________________

3. IT Core Requirements (28 Credit Hours)
   Sci 113* Technical Writing                       3 _________________________
   IT 153*   Survey of Operating Systems            3 _________________________
   IT 203*   Programming                            3 _________________________
   IT 224*   PC Design and Assembly                 4 _________________________
   IT 243*   Introduction to Networks               3 _________________________
   Math 263* Discrete Structures                    3 _________________________
   IT 273*   Business Information Sys Management    3 _________________________
   IT 290a   Internship in Information Technology   1 _________________________
   IT 290b   Internship in Information Technology   1 _________________________
   IT 494*   Capstone Project                       4 _________________________

4. Program Electives (Select 15 Credit Hours)
   IT 103    Theory of Computational Devices        3 _________________________
   GIS 213   Introduction to GIS                    3 _________________________
   GIS 323   Remote Sensing                         3 _________________________
   Math 194* Calculus I                             4 _________________________
   Bad 253   Principles of Management               3 _________________________
   Bad 343* Decision Support Systems                3 _________________________
   IT 303*   Introduction to UNIX                   3 _________________________
   IT 313*   UNIX Shell Programming                 3 _________________________
   IT 353*   Internet Technologies                  3 _________________________
   IT 383*   Current Topics in Information Tech     3 _________________________
   IT 393*   Implementing and Admin Mail Servers    3 _________________________
   IT 443*   Advanced UNIX                          3 _________________________
   IT 402*   Cert. Cram Session in Curr. Tech. #1   2 _________________________
   IT 412*   Cert. Cram Session in Curr. Tech. #2   2 _________________________
   IT 422*   Cert. Cram Session in Curr. Tech. #3   2 _________________________
                                            -112-
    IT 432*  Cert. Cram Session in Curr. Tech. #4               2 __________________________
    IT 442*  Cert. Cram Session in Curr. Tech. #5               2 __________________________
    ________ MIS or IT Elective                                 3 __________________________


Option One – Information Technology Network Administration (Select 39 Credit Hours)

    IT 134* A+ Certification                                    4 __________________________
    IT 253* Supporting Workstations                             3 __________________________
    IT 323* Command Line Interface                              3 __________________________
    IT 333* Network Administration                              3 __________________________
    IT 343* Application Software TnT                            3 __________________________
    IT 363* Implementing and Adm Web Servers                    3 __________________________
    IT 373* Web Design Fundamentals                             3 __________________________
    IT 404* Network Protocols                                   4 __________________________
    IT 423* Supporting Network Operating Systems                3 __________________________
    IT 453* Network Security                                    3 __________________________




                                                                                                   2011-2013 Catalog
    IT 474* Network Analysis                                    4 __________________________
    ________ MIS/ITS or IT Elective                             3 __________________________
    ________ MIS/ITS or IT Elective                             3 __________________________


Option Two – Information Technology Security (Select 39 Credit Hours)
   Option Two is currently in review with updates to be revealed in appendix on the departmental
website.

                                                                125 Credit Hours Total




                                                 -113-
                    MATH AND SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
            ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


1. Core Requirements: (22 credit hours)                 Where Taken     Date Grade
   Engl 103* Freshman English I                         3 ________________________
   Engl 113* Freshman English II                        3 ________________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communication                        3 ________________________
   Math 154* College Algebra                            4 ________________________
   Science Elective                                     3 ________________________
   Humanities Elective                                  3 ________________________
   Psy 103    General Psychology                        3 ________________________

2. Lakota Studies Requirements (9 credit hours)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                         3 ________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture (or LHist 203)               3 ________________________




                                                                                     2011-2013 Catalog
   Lakota Studies Elective                              3 ________________________

3. IT Professional Requirements (34 credit hours)
   Sci 113*   Technical Writing                         3 ________________________
   IT 103     Theory of Computational Devices           3 ________________________
   IT 153*    Survey of Operating Systems               3 ________________________
   IT 203*    Programming                               3 ________________________
   IT 224*    PC Design & Assembly                      4 ________________________
   IT 243*    Introduction to Networks                  3 ________________________
   Math 263* Discrete Structures                        3 ________________________
   IT 273*    Business Information Systems Management   3 ________________________
   IT 290a* Internship in Information Technology        1 ________________________
   IT 290b* Internship in Information Technology        1 ________________________
   IT 134*    A+ Certification                          4 ________________________
   IT 253*    Supporting Workstations                   3 ________________________

                                                        65 credit hours total




                                           -114-
                                   NURSING DEPARTMENT

                              Joan Nelson, MSN, RN, Chairperson/Faculty
                              Deb Tobacco, MA, Assistant to the Director
                                   Michelle Bruns, MSN, RN, Faculty
                                  Sharon Cordova, MSN, RN, Faculty
                                Wendolyn Jacobson, MSN, RN, Faculty
                               Linda DeLong, BA, RN Part-Time Faculty
                                Christy Lone Elk, Secretary-Receptionist


Since 1986, the Department of Nursing, Oglala Lakota College, has served residents of the Pine Ridge and
Rosebud Reservations and rural border communities in South Dakota and Nebraska. The program’s curriculum
is congruent with traditional Lakota values which focus on the individual and families in promoting, maintaining




                                                                                                                   NURSING DEPARTMENT
and restoring balance and well-being, and is accomplished within the Lakota cultural framework of Woksape-
wisdom, Woohitika- courage, Wowahola-respect and Wacatognaka-generosity.

Graduates of the program receive an Associate of Arts (AA) degree in Nursing and are eligible to write the
National Council of Licensing Examination (NCLEX). Passing the exam will result in licensure as a registered
nurse (RN).

Nursing courses are currently offered in Pine Ridge where the department has a new state-of-the-art facility
with classrooms, offices, library, computer lab and nursing skills laboratory. The program has a new dormitory
building with accommodations for 12 students from outlying districts and the Rosebud and Cheyenne River
Reservations. Many of the pre-nursing courses required for entry into the program can be taken at the
student’s district college center. Basic skills courses are offered which enable students to improve reading,
math, English and science skills before applying to the Nursing Program. Clinical practice sites may include;
Pine Ridge I.H.S. Hospital units and outlying clinics, the VA and Fall River Hospitals, Hot Springs, Bennett
County Nursing Home, Martin, Chadron Community Hospital Chadron, NE, Rapid City Regional Hospital
as well as community agencies on the reservation, including Head Start facilities. Two vehicles are available
for transportation of students and faculty to some clinical facilities and educational opportunities.

A student may enroll in basic and pre-nursing courses at OLC at any time and declare nursing as a major.
However, students must complete pre-requisites before applying to the Nursing Program; upon acceptance
into the program, student can only then enroll in nursing coursework. Nursing faculty are assigned to specific
district college centers and should be used by pre-nursing students to ensure a timely advancement through
the pre-nursing curriculum. The number of students who can be admitted into the nursing program is limited.
Students who have met the pre-admission criteria must apply by January 31st for admission into the nursing
program to start the following fall semester. Students are admitted once a year, fall semester.

A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for successful completion of the nursing program.
The grading system for the program is different from the rest of the college with higher requirements for each
letter grade. Requirement for graduation with an Associate of Arts Degree in Nursing must be completed
within four years of being accepted into the Nursing Program.




                                                    -115-
Admission: Pre-Requisite Courses

To apply for admission the student must have completed the following courses, or their equivalent, with a
“C” or better and have an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher.
    Engl 103 Freshman English I
    Engl 113 Freshman English II
    Psy 103     General Psychology
    SpCm 103 Speech Communication
    Math 134 Intermediate Algebra
    Hlth 101 Medical Terminology
    Chem 111 Chemistry of Health Science Lab
    Chem 114 Chemistry for Health Science
    Bio 224     Human Anatomy (must be completed within four years of starting the nursing program)

The required science courses (Chem.111/114, Bio 224,234, 204) will utilize the nursing department’s grading
system for declared nursing students.

It is recommended that the following science courses be taken with the first year nursing courses after
admission:

    Bio 234     Human Physiology ( if transferred in must be within previous 4 years).
    Bio 204     Basic Microbiology

The following Lakota courses must be completed before graduation, preferably before beginning nursing
courses:

    Lak 103     Lakota Language I
    LSoc 103 Lakota Culture OR
    LHist 203 Lakota History
    Lakota elective 3 credits

Certified Nursing Assistant (C.N.A.) licensure or successful completion of OLC Nursing Department Nursing
Assistant course (75 hours) is required before the start of the first semester in the Nursing Program.

Academic Skills Evaluation
Prior to being considered as a candidate for admission, the student must take an assessment examination.
This assessment is an important indicator or whether or not the student has the requisite skills to succeed in
the nursing curriculum. After a complete application and admission fee has been received, the candidate will
be notified of testing dates.

Application Procedure
Students will be selected for admission to the Nursing Program only once a year to begin in the fall semester.
The application procedure involves submission of:
    a. Application form fully completed
    b. Three letters of reference, using nursing department reference form, from non-relatives or friends;
        employers, teachers/instructors preferred.
    c. Certificate of Degree of Indian blood/tribal enrollment if applying to OLC for the first time.
    d. Official high school transcript or GED if not already on file.
    e. Official college transcripts from all colleges, universities, or post-secondary schools attended unless
        already on file at OLC Registrar’s Office.


                                                   -116-
    f.  Type Essay (five paragraphs of 100 to 150 words each) developing the answers to: why you have
        chosen nursing as a career, life events that contributed to your decision to be a nurse, people who
        influenced you, what types of nursing interest you, and what you hope to do with your nursing
        degree. Include the four Lakota values of Respect, Wisdom, Courage, and Generosity in any way
        you can in your essay as you relate them to aspects of nursing.
    g. Application fee ( pays for back-ground check and testing)
    h. Pre-admission testing
    i. Satisfactory criminal background check received before starting clinical experience.
    j. Proof of Certified Nursing Assistant licensure or successful completion of OLC Nursing Department
        C.N.A. course.
Selection Criteria
Students who have completed all pre-requisites will be selected according to the following criteria:
    a. G.P.A. of 2.5 or higher
    b. Tribal enrollment priority as follows:
                        1. Enrolled members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe who are veterans;
                        2. Enrolled members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe;
                        3. Enrolled members of other Lakota Tribes who are veterans
                        4. Enrolled members of other Lakota Tribes (Rosebud and Cheyenne River priority)
                        5. Other enrolled Tribal members
    c. Reference letters, personal interview and an essay assist the faculty to evaluate the personal
        characteristics desired in health professionals and those that are reflective of Lakota values, including
        the ability to work with people, potential for leadership, reliability, and communication skills. The
        interview is set up during the month of April.
    d. When in the judgment of the Nursing Department Admission Committee the program can accommodate
        additional students, non-Native applicants who meet all stated requirement will be selected according
        to the following criteria;
                        1. Students committed to remaining in the services areas as evidence by
                              a) living in the service area for more than 5 years thus demonstrating permanent
                                   residence and/or
                              b) having permanent family ties in the community.

After assessing the above criteria, the Admission Committee will consider the applicants’ academic standing
(GPA), results of pre-admission testing, character strengths and weaknesses, and background check, any
one of which might lead to provisional acceptance or denial of admission
The number of students admitted for each fall semester will not exceed the available faculty or clinical
laboratory resources and will be determined prior to convening the Admissions Committee. Selection of
students and alternates for fall semester will usually be made by the end of May with notifications going out
during June.

Nursing Department Terminal Program Outcomes;
Upon graduation the student will be able to:
1. Apply knowledge of the nursing process and critical thinking as a framework for clinical decision making.
2. Demonstrate cultural competency and caring behaviors for the purpose of providing culturally appropriate
   nursing care to diverse populations.
3. Incorporate professional/legal/ethical accountability into practice, embracing the values of the profession
   and assuming the various nursing roles of life-long learner, teacher, client advocate, leader/manager, and
   care provider.
4. Utilize evidence-based practice and technology to provide safe competent, holistic nursing to clients
   across the life span.
5. Communicate and collaborate with client, family, healthcare and interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic
   health care and promotion/disease prevention.

                                                     -117-
Pre-Nursing Course Sequencing Schedule
Fall Semester                      Spring Semester
Engl 103         3 hrs.            Engl 113        3 hrs.
SpCom. 103       3 hrs.            Math 134        4 hrs.pre-req for Chem 111/114
                 6 hrs             Psy 103         3 hrs
                                                   10 hrs.
Fall Semester                      Spring Semester
Chem 111/114     5 hrs             Bio 224         4 hrs.
Lak Lang 103     3 hrs.            LHis or LSoc    3 hrs.
Hlth 101         1 hr.             Lakota elective 3 hrs.
                 9 hrs.                            10 hrs.

Formal Admission to Nursing Department- Nursing Course Sequencing Schedule

Fall Semester                       Spring Semester
Nurs. 218         8 hrs.            Nurs. 224       4 hrs.
Bio 234           4 hrs.            Nurs. 226       6 hrs.
                  12 hrs            Bio 204         4 hrs.
                                                    14 hrs.

Fall Semester                       Spring Semester
Nurs. 312         2 hrs.            Nurs. 322       2 hrs
Nurs 313          3 hrs.            Nurs. 324       4 hrs.
Nurs 317          7 hrs.            Nurs. 328       8 hrs.
                  12 hrs.                           14 hrs.




                                            -118-
                               NURSING DEPARTMENT
                               Associate of Arts in Nursing

1. Core Requirements (16 credits)                          Where     Date   Grade
   Engl 103    Freshman English I                         3 ____________________
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                         3 ______________________
   Math 134    Intermediate Algebra                       4 ______________________
   Engl 113    Freshman English II                        3 ______________________
   Psy 103     General Psychology                         3 ______________________


2. Lakota Studies Requirements (9 credits)




                                                                                     2011-2013 Catalog
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                          3 ______________________
   Lak 103     Lakota Culture or LHist. 203               3 ______________________
   Elective Lakota Course                                 3 ______________________


3. Science Course Requirements (18 credits)
   Chem 111 Chemistry for Health Sciences Lab             1 ______________________
   Chem 114 Chemistry for Health Science                  4 ______________________
   Bio 224     Human Anatomy                              4 ______________________
   Bio 234     Human Physiology                           4 ______________________
   Bio 204     Basic Microbiology                         4 ______________________
    Hlth 101   Medical Terminology                        1 ______________________


4. Nursing Courses (44 credits)
   Nurs 218    Foundations of Holistic Nursing            8 ______________________
   Nurs 224    Holistic Mental Health Nursing             4 ______________________
   Nurs 226    Holistic Maternal Child Nursing            6 ______________________
   Nurs 312    Pharmacology for Nusring I                 2 ____________________
   Nurs 313    Prof. and Transcultural Nursing            3 ______________________
   Nurs 317    Holistic Adult Health Nursing I            7 ______________________
   Nurs 322    Pharmacology for Nursing II                2 ____________________
   Nurs 324    Nursing Capstone                           4 ____________________
   Nurs 328    Holistic Adult Health Nursing II           8 ______________________




                                                  -119-
                                                      DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK
                                                                         Degrees offered:
                                                                 Bachelors in Social Work (BSW)
                                           Associate of Arts (AA) with an emphasis in Chemical Dependency Counseling

                                                         Jeffrey J Olson, MSW, Ph.D., Chairperson
                                                      Kathryn Kidd, MSW, PhD, Practicum Coordinator
                                                              Josie Chase, MSW, PhD, Faculty
                                                              Devona Lone Wolf, MA, Faculty
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK




                            Vision Statement

                                     In line with the OLC vision, the Department of Social Work seeks to educate students to be part of
                            social change processes that more equitably distribute scarce economic and social resources as part of making
                            life better for members of the Oglala Lakota Tribe on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

                            Mission Statement

                                     The Department of Social Work’s mission is to facilitate students to develop the necessary ethics,
                            skills and knowledge to (1) enter beginning social work practice, and (2) over time move into leadership roles
                            within tribal, state, and federal organizations that focus on the health and well-being of the Lakota people.

                            BSW Program Competencies

                                Graduates of the BSW program are expected to:

                                    1. Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly

                                    2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

                                    3.   Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

                                    4. Engage diversity and difference in practice

                                    5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

                                    6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research

                                    7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment

                                    8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective
                                       social work services.

                                    9. Respond to contexts that shape practice

                                    10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and
                                        communities.



                                                                               -120-
Degrees Offered
Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)
Associate of Arts in Chemical Dependency Counseling (AACD)

                                       Application Procedure - BSW
Tracking and Advanced Majors

       Initially, students who declare social work as a major are designated as Tracking Majors. IN the
weeks prior to completing the Introduction to Social Work course during the spring semester of a student’s
sophomore year, the student must apply for admission to Advanced Major in order to continue taking Social
Work courses.

Application for Advanced Major

Social work students must meet the following criteria to be accepted as an Advanced Major.
1. Students must earn a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 on all OLC course work as well as
   all course work completed at other academic institutions.
2. Students must earn a grade of C or higher in SOWK 203.
3. Students must adhere to the NASW Code of Ethics.
4. Students cannot exhibit behavior that will infringe on the student’s present or future ability to fulfill
   professional responsibilities as a social work professional.
5. Students cannot have documented instances of academic dishonesty on their records.
6. See section on criminal convictions in BSW Handbook at the department website.

        The student should begin working with his or her advisor during advising week to complete the
application for advanced major during the spring semester while enrolled in Sowk 203. During the advising
appointment, the advisor will review the application, compute the student’s college career grade point average,
and sign the application if appropriate. Qualified students should submit the application for Advanced Major
to the BSW Program Director no later than the middle of the spring semester in which Sowk 203 is being
taken.

         The BSW Committee, composed of Social Work faculty, will review all Advanced Major applications
at the end of the spring semester in which the applications are submitted. After the applications have been
reviewed, the BSW Coordinator will notify students in writing whether or not they have been accepted as an
Advanced Major.

         If a student is denied admission and wishes to continue in the major, the student and her/his advisor
will develop a plan to address the BSW Committee’s concerns. The Committee may also resolve that a
student may not re-apply for Advanced Major based on violations of the criteria outlined above. In this
event, the student should consult with his/her advisor about other majors.

        The social work major is offered as a sequence of courses that take two years to complete. A full-
time student takes a Methods course in each of the four semesters of the junior and senior year. HBSE I & II
are taken in the junior year. The social work elective is taken in the spring of the junior year. Social welfare
and social work history is taken in the fall of the junior year. Introduction to Research and Evaluation is
taken during the fall of the senior year. The Research Project is conduced in the spring of the senior year.
The practicum is taken in both fall and spring semesters of the senior year.

         Part-time programs of study can easily be constructed. Contact Jeff Olson, the department chair for
the particulars of part-time completion of the BSW.
         Advanced Major Application - http://www.olc.edu/~jolson/socialwork/ADMajApp.doc

                                                    -121-
                        DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK
                         BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK (BSW)
                    99 CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION
                    (All courses must be passed with a C or better)

A. Core (27 Credits)                                       Where taken Date Grade

   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                          3______________________
   Engl 103 Freshman English I                             3______________________
   Engl 113   Freshman English II                          3______________________
   Humanities Any Art, Music, Philosophy                   3______________________
   Literature Any Literature course                        3______________________
   Math 103   Elementary Algebra (or higher)               3______________________




                                                                                       2011-2013 Catalog
   Computing IT 103 or MIS 113                             3______________________
   Biol 103   Human Biology                                3______________________
   Sosc 103   Introduction to Social Science               3______________________


B. Lakota Studies Core (15 Credits)
   Lak 103    Lakota Language I                            3______________________
   Lak 233    Lakota Language II                           3______________________
   LSoc 103   Lakota Culture (or Lhist 203)                3______________________
   Elective   (Suggest Lpol 223)                           3______________________
   Elective   (Suggest Native Am Psych)                    3______________________


C. Social Work General Studies Requirements (16 Credits)
   Sowk 203 Foundations of Social Work                     3______________________
   Psy 103    General Psychology                           3______________________
   Quantitative Statistics (Sosc 313 or Math 123)or Math 134 3______________________
   Free Elective 300 or 400 (Non-Lakota Studies)           3______________________
   Free Elective 300 or 400 (Non-Lakota Studies)           3______________________



D. Social Work Advanced Major Requirements (42 Credits)
   Sowk 303 Social Welfare and Social Work History      3______________________
            Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203
   Sowk 333 Human Behavior in the Soc Environ I            3______________________
            Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203
   Sowk 343 Human Behavior in the Soc Environ II           3______________________
              Prereqs: Sowk 333

                                               -122-
Sowk 313 Social Work Methods I                        3______________________
         Prereqs: OLC Core, Sowk 203
Sowk 323 Social Work Methods II                       3______________________
         Prereqs: Sowk 313
Sowk 413 Social Work Methods III                      3______________________
         Prereq: Sowk 323
Sowk 423 Social Work Methods IV                       3______________________
         Prereq: Sowk 413
Sowk 403 Introduction to Research                     3______________________
         Prereq: Sowk 343 & Math 123, 134 or Sosc 313
Sowk 443 Research Project                             3_______________________




                                                                                   2011-2013 Catalog
         Prereq: Sowk 403
Sowk 433 Social Work Elective                         3______________________
         Prereq: Sowk 203 or Instructor Permission
Sowk 406 Social Work Practicum I                      6______________________
         Prereq: Concurrent with, or after Sowk 413
Sowk 416 Social Work Practicum II                        6______________________
         Prereq: Sowk 406, and concurrent with or after Sowk 423




                                         -123-
                  Associate of Arts in Chemical Dependency
.
Chemical Dependency Program Mission

         The mission of the OLC AA in Chemical Dependency is to provide the knowledge needed to address
the issues related to substance abuse as a Level I CD Counselor. The curriculum provides the courses to meet
the state requirements needed for the academic track for CCDC level I set by the state of South Dakota.

http://tinyurl.com/28ogg3r - State of South Dakota Certification Standards Manual for CD Professionals

Chemical Dependency Program Goals

        1.      Provide opportunity to earn an Associate of Arts in Chemical Dependency Counseling
        2.      Provide people working in the field who wish to upgrade their skills the opportunity to
                take courses that can lead to certification as a Chemical Dependency Counselor.
        3.      Because it is not necessary to apply to the program, it provides anyone who is interested
                in learning more about alcohol and drug abuse to enroll in the courses.
        4.      Provide workshops as requested by the community
        5.      Provide specific courses as requested by Tribal Programs


Chemical Dependency Associate of Arts Program Outcomes

        Students completing this degree should be able to:

        1.      Know the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and other psychoactive
                drugs.
        2.      Utilize a variety of social and counseling skills to function effectively as chemical
                dependency counselors in a variety of settings.
        3.      Demonstrate the ability to effectively educate and lead chemical dependency treatment
                groups.
        4.      Demonstrate ability to manage case management tasks and priorities.
        5.      Express themselves professionally, both verbally and in writing, to a variety of audiences
                including clients, other professionals and external monitoring agencies.
        6.      Conduct themselves professionally and ethically as chemical dependency counselors.
        7.      Employ cultural sensitivity and awareness when working with persons from diverse
                populations.




                                                   -124-
                         DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK
    CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING; ASSOCIATE OF ARTS (A.A.)

A. Core (24 credits)
   SpCm 103 Speech Communications                          3 __________________________
   Engl 103    Freshman English I                          3 __________________________
   Engl 113    Freshman English II                         3 __________________________
   Math 103    Elementary Algebra                          3 __________________________
   Humanities Elective (HUM, ART, MUS)                     3 __________________________
   Science (Bio 103 recommended)                           3 __________________________
   SoSc 103    Intro to Social Science                     3 __________________________
   MIS 113     Applied Information Processing              3 __________________________




                                                                                                 2011-2013 Catalog
B. Lakota Studies Core (9 credits)
   Lak 103     Lakota Language I                           3 __________________________
   LSoc 103 Lakota Culture (or LHist 203)                  3 __________________________
   Elective (suggest LPol 223 or LPol 313)                 3 __________________________

C. Social Science Requirements (6 credits, C or better required)
   Psy 103    General Psychology                           3 __________________________
   Any History (HISA) course                               3 __________________________

D. Professional Requirements (9 credits, C or better required)
   Sowk 203 Foundations of Social Work                     3 __________________________
   CD 213      Specialty Internship I                      3 __________________________
   CD 223      Native American Substance Abuse             3 __________________________

E. Certified Chemical Dependency Counselor I (CCDC I) (15 credits with Grade C or better)
   The following courses meet the academic requirements for CCDC level I set by the state of South
   Dakota. 2000 hours or 1 year work experience under a level II or III counselor are required in
   addition to this coursework to be eligible for taking the counselor I examination.

   CD 103      Introduction to Alcoholism                  3 __________________________
   CD 113      Introduction to Drug Abuse                  3 __________________________
   CD 233      Foundations of Individual Counseling        3 __________________________
   CD 313      Ethical & Legal Issue for CD Professionals 3 __________________________
   CD 343      Methods of Group Counseling                 3 __________________________
                                                           Total Credits:              63


                                                -125-
                                                      GRADUATE STUDIES DEPARTMENT

                                                                             Staff
                                                            Dawn Tobacco-Frank, PhD, Director/Chair
                                                                Andrew Thompson, Ed D, Faculty
                                                          Gloria Eastman, MA, Administrative Assistant
                                                         Diana Cournoyer, M.Ed., Ed Admin. Coordinator

                                  LakM Graduate Advisory Board:                       LMEA Graduate Advisory Board:
GRADUATE STUDIES DEPARTMENT




                                  Gerald One Feather                                  Art Fisher
                                  Marie Randall                                       Lynda Hunter
                                   Robert Two Crow                                    Robert Cook
                                  Alex White Plume                                    Robert Two Crow
                                  (Graduate Student Representative)                   (Graduate Student Representative)



                              Graduate Program Authorization

                              Tribal leaders who determined an educated Lakota Oyate was necessary to assist the tribe in realizing operation
                              of its own affairs founded Oglala Lakota College in 1970. Further, the elders envisioned a tribal college was
                              paradoxically the way to preserve the Lakota language and culture. Therefore, the Oglala Sioux Tribe chartered
                              Oglala Lakota College in March 1971. As part of its operation Oglala Lakota College designed and developed
                              a graduate program entitled Managers as Warriors from 1990-1992 and implemented the program in 1993.
                              The Board of Trustees (BOT) created the Graduate Studies Department on April 1995 meeting the increased
                              demand for graduate courses and degrees sustaining the current graduate program Master of Arts degree in
                              Lakota Leadership and Management. In 1998, North Central Accreditation Association granted approval for
                              the Education Administration component of the degree.

                              Degrees Authorized

                              Oglala Lakota College is authorized to grant the following degrees: Associate of Arts (1983), Bachelor of
                              Arts (1983) and Master of Arts (1993). South Dakota State Department of Education and Cultural Affairs
                              approved teacher education program(s) (Oglala Lakota College, Self Study Report, North Central Association
                              of Colleges & Schools Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, March 16-18, 1998) and Educational
                              Administration emphasis Master of Arts level (South Dakota State Board of Education, March 20, 2000)

                              Accreditation and Affiliations

                              Education Administration is an approved Principal program and under the authority of the State of South
                              Dakota. Education Administration adopted the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC)
                              professional standards. Teacher education is a member of Teacher Education Accreditation Council and
                              South Dakota Association of Colleges of Teacher Education. South Dakota State Board of Nursing and the
                              National League of Nursing approved nursing program. Affiliations of the nursing programs, University of
                              South Dakota Nursing Program, Salish Kootenai, Sisseton-Wahpeton Nursing Program, Indian Health Service
                              Pine Ridge and Rosebud, Rapid City Regional Hospital, Gordon Memorial Hospital, Veterans Administration
                              Hospital, and Chadron Community Hospital.




                                                                                 -126-
Governance
The policy making body of the graduate program is the Graduate Policy and Review Committee. Graduate
Policy and Review Committee is chaired by Director of Graduate Studies, composed of Vice President for
Instructional Affairs, academic department chairpersons, faculty with earned doctorates, and members of the
graduate faculty. A recommendation for degree requirements and curriculum originate within each department,
reviewed by the Graduate Advisory Boards, moves to the Graduate Policy and Review Committee, is subject
to review by the Graduate Faculty, Vice President for Instructional Affairs, requires action by the President
of Oglala Lakota College, and the Board of Trustees.

Master of Arts Degree in Lakota Leadership/Management

Philosophy
The belief of the degree program (s) is dedicated to the reality that Lakota leaders and managers must have a
foundation in Lakota beliefs, values, thought, and philosophy. Specifically, the curriculum is guided by the
principle that traditional Lakota beliefs recognized a leader as someone who works for, with and among the
people, rather than above them, someone who lives for the people and takes action that is for the people rather
than for personal and material gain.

Vision
The vision of the Graduate Program is Wolakota within professionals as they continue in their training to
become leaders and managers; Lakota leaders who will live, preserve, and continue the Lakota way of life for
coming generations.

Mission Statement
Graduate Program is committed to the belief that the leaders and managers, who will take the Lakota into the
21st century, must have a foundation in; Lakota language, spirituality, belief, values, thought and philosophy.
Delivery of the curriculum is guided by the principle that Lakota leaders work for, with, and among the
people, rather than for personal or material gain. The rigor of the program will be a source of pride for
dedicated professionals. Our graduate candidates strive to demonstrate Wolakota, excellence and confidence
as they translate theory into quality practice.

Purpose of Graduate Program
The purpose of the Graduate Program at Oglala Lakota College is to develop individual management and
leadership skills that are harmonious with Lakota values. Further, the knowledge base of the graduate program
is designed to produce candidates with expanded intellectual application, independence in reading and research,
using critical thinking skills in decision making, and ability to design and implement change through strategic
planning.

The Goal: To graduate leaders who are sage managers/leaders in the Lakota community.

Graduate Program (s) Broad Objective: Overview
Oglala Lakota College’s graduate programs of study are designed to expand understanding of contemporary
society through a full application of the Lakota culture and its world relationships; to increase knowledge in
a particular area; to challenge values and philosophy; to encourage independent research, and implementation
through dissemination; to develop and refine communication skills; to foster reflective thinking processes; to
provide intellectual stimulation and a foundation for continued study.




                                                    -127-
-128-
                       Graduate Studies Four Directional Model


The Oglala Lakota College, incorporating Lakota values and symbols in its efforts to maintain and strengthen
Lakota culture, has adopted a symbol that could be called the Four Directional Conceptual Framework
Model which includes programs in both the Education Department and the Graduate Studies Department.

Wounspe na oitancan un wolakolkiciyapi meaning learning Lakota ways of life in community through education
and leadership is the philosophy for the Four Directional Conceptual Framework Model incorporating Oyate
Ikce Tatuye Topakiya Wocicala Hena Wopasi, meaning measuring knowledge of the four directions to capture
the capstone experiences for the program. The Four Directional Conceptual Framework model demonstrates
the unique organization of the overall institutional structure of shared leadership and shared vision of the
Oglala Lakota College correlating with the programs.

The Four Direction Model, also known as the Lakota Mental Health Model, was developed from Bear Shield
et al, (2000) who utilized cultural indicators to measure human development. These indicators assist in
determining the disposition of the individual and their capabilities of acquiring appropriate knowledge, decision
making, and responsibility. The four dimensions of measurement include: 1) Wiyohpeyata meaning cardinal
direction west, 2) Waziyata meaning cardinal direction of north, 3) Wiyohinyanpata meaning cardinal direction
of east, 4) Itokagata cardinal direction south). All four directions correspond equally to the four stages of
growth, which include spiritual, physical, intellectual, and emotional components of development. These
stages balance an individual. Therefore, the Four Directional Conceptual Framework Model is grounded in
the Lakota world view and cannot be separate from the intellectual component of human development. This
world view is utilized in this Four Directional Conceptual Framework Model which demonstrates educational
excellence and high standards within the program (s).

WIYOHPIYATA (West) - Admission/Entrance Requirements

Wiyohpiyata meaning the cardinal direction of west is represented by the color black. The cycle begins in the
west and continues clockwise. This direction is also known as the Wakinyan Oyate meaning Thunder Nation
who teaches us that we must be courageous to overcome obstacles and difficulties in life (Bear Shield, et al,
2000). Graduate students are required to demonstrate Wowacin Tanka meaning fortitude, Wohitika meaning
courage and bravery, as well as Woksape meaning wisdom. Entering graduate students must endure and
balance day-to-day obstacles of a family, geographical location, financial and personal responsibilities. The
completion of the necessary core requirements for Graduate Studies Program(s) require fortitude, courage
and wisdom. Therefore, this is the starting point and the first stage of the entering graduate students’ educational
journey toward becoming a “Masters Candidate” and program completion.

Admission/Entrance Requirements

The Oglala Lakota College Graduate Studies program will take applications one time per year for fall entering
students in both degree programs. Applications are due the last Friday in April, the spring semester before
anticipated fall entry. Late applications will be reviewed for the next academic year. Graduate student applicants
must attend Graduate Studies orientation prior to beginning plan of study.

To make preadmission status requires students to complete the graduate application and attach official college
transcripts specifying the date the undergraduate degree was conferred. Students who wish to be admitted to
a graduate degree program must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, pay the $15.00
application fee, and submit the necessary documents listed below defined by the graduate program (s). Official
documents must be sent directly to the Graduate Studies Department: Attention Graduate Studies Admissions,
P.O. Box 490, Kyle, SD 57752.
                                                      -129-
Lakota Leadership and Management:

        1.      Must have a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.
        2.      Must have a 2.5 GPA with 3.0 in undergraduate major field.
        3.      Must have a 3.0 GPA in all undergraduate Language Arts course work.
        4.      Degree of Indian blood or required lineage form (if applicable).
        5.      Resume
        6.      Provide three reference letters describing the following;
                a.      Define why you would be an excellent candidate in the Lakota Leadership and
                        Management Graduate Program distinguishing your Lakota Leadership
                        disposition, and ethics.
                b.      Elaborating on your civic engagement with community.
                Two writing samples demonstrating the use of APA writing style.
                a.      Autobiography highlighting life experience supporting yourself as an excellent
                        candidate as a Lakota Leader in Lakota Leadership and Management. What
                        experiences shape your decision to become a Lakota Leader?
                b.      Philosophy/Vision of leadership emphasizing civic engagement regarding current
                        issues in native communities serving native populations.
        8.      Participate in Graduate Studies Orientation.
        9.      Complete disposition rating survey.

Lakota Leadership and Management: Education Administration

        1.   A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.
        2.   A 2.5 GPA with 3.0 in undergraduate major field.
        3.   A 3.0 GPA in all undergraduate Language Arts course work.
        4.   Degree of Indian blood or required lineage form (if applicable)
        5.   Resume
        6.   Valid copy of current teaching certificate in elementary or secondary education.
        7.   Three reference letters identifying the following;
                 a. Define why you would be an excellent candidate in the Lakota Leadership and
                     Management Graduate Program distinguishing your Lakota Leadership disposition,
                     and ethics.
                 b. Verify your 3 years teaching experience as a certified teacher.
                 c. Verify additional educational experiences within an education system.
                 d. Elaborating on your civic engagement with community.
         8. Two writing samples using APA writing style.
                 c. Autobiography highlighting life experience supporting yourself as an excellent
                     candidate as an Education Lakota Leader in Lakota Leadership and Management.
                     What experiences shape your decision to become a Lakota Leader in Education
                     Administration?
                 d. Philosophy/Vision of educational leadership emphasizing civic engagement regarding
                     current issues in native communities serving native populations.
         9. Participate in Graduate Studies Program Orientation
         10. Participate in Portfolio seminar.
         11. Complete disposition rating survey
Students must meet graduate expectations for admission in writing, reference letters, and meeting degree
requirements. Students who do not meet writing expectations or meets with weaknesses must successfully
complete the LakM 503 Introduction to Graduate School seminar and resubmit writing samples when reapplying
for admission. Writing samples must meet Graduate program expectations before entrance into the core
courses.

                                                  -130-
Students may enroll in graduate core courses LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533 after they have made
application for graduate study and are accepted into the Oglala Lakota College Graduate Program (s) as
preadmission status. Students will not be considered for enrollment into any of the core courses as a degree
seeking student until all documents listed above are received. The student file will be considered incomplete.


Lakota Leadership/Management Core course descriptions

Students must successfully complete the core courses: LakM 513, LakM533 and LakM 603 and meet
Candidacy requirements as defined by each Graduate Program (s) in order to become a “Master Candidate”
in the specified degree to enter into the Waziyata, the direction of the North. Course work is to be taken
sequentially.

LakM 603        Wowapi Woecun Na Wounspe Wankatuyahci Glustanpi Kte Kin Hena
                (Research, Writing, and Statistics for Graduate Work)

This course is designed for new graduate students. The purpose of the course is to provide students an
introduction to graduate study developing specific writing skills and a knowledge base needed to be successful
in the graduate program, i.e. Formulating the question, developing hypothesis, developing a project model,
reviewing literature, data collection, technical writing using APA style, and adapting research to appropriate
audiences. This course will emphasize Lakota values of honesty, courage, and fortitude. Lakota language
will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. 3 graduate credits

LakM 513        Lakota Woitancan Na Wokicanye Kin Un Oegleyapikte
                (Lakota Foundations for Leadership/Management)

This course is the introductory course to the graduate program. Students will explore Lakota philosophy and
theology, the foundation of Lakota leadership/management. Students will examine Lakota leadership and
management strategies by studying contemporary and historical Lakota leaders and managers’ strategies,
thereby developing their management strategies to address the unique environment of the reservation. Lakota
values emphasized in this course: respect, generosity, and humility. Lakota language will be spoken as much
as possible during class hours. 3 graduate credits

LakM 533        Tiospaye
                (Lakota Social Organization)

This course is an in-depth analysis of Lakota political, economic, religious system, and a strong emphasis on
interpreting the relationships between various aspects of Lakota social organization and Lakota leadership
and management practices. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of respect and humility. Lakota
language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. 3 graduate credits

WAZIYATA (North) – Candidacy/Professional Core Requirements

Waziyata, the cardinal direction of the north is represented by the color red. This direction is also known as
the Tatanka Oyate meaning Buffalo Nation who brings us the laws, beliefs, and teachings. These teachings
provide the basis for Lakota identity and importance of living a good, productive life (Bear Shield, et al,
2000). Within the profession, students need a solid theoretical base for understanding of laws, beliefs, and
teaching in order to transition as a “Master Candidate”. These skills are needed to become proficient within
their field of study. Candidates are required to demonstrate Wowacin Tanka meaning patience and fortitude
as well as Woonspe meaning lessons during this stage.


                                                   -131-
Graduate students must complete candidacy application and meet Graduate degree requirements, 30 days
following the successful completion of the core courses: LakM 513, 533, and 603 to become a Master
Candidate in their chosen degree area. When students are considered a Master Candidate within their degree,
they can proceed toward completion of their professional core requirements. Candidates must maintain
candidacy status throughout their program.

Candidacy requirements of Lakota Leadership/Management Degree:

The following documents are needed to apply candidacy and maintain Master Candidate status within the
Lakota Leadership/Management program plan of study.

        1.      Submit candidacy application.
        2.      Complete disposition rating survey.
        3.      Submit OLC IRB approved training certificate (National Institute on Health [NIH] one
                line training at http://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php.
        4.      Successfully complete the core courses LakM 513, 533, & 603 with a B or better.
        5.      Maintain the following degree requirements of Lakota Leadership and Management;
                a. Have and maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher for program of graduate study.
                b. Successfully complete courses with a B or better.
                c. Participate in student assessment for Lakota Leadership and Management.
                d. Complete program requirements within five years of entrance.
                e. Complete capstone option 1: LakM 596 or option 2: LakM 613A and LakM 613B
                    two years after the completion of 30 credit hours of the required core and professional
                    courses.
                f. Participate in graduate seminars.

Candidacy requirements of Educational Administration Emphasis

The following documents are needed to apply candidacy and maintain Master Candidate status within the
Lakota Leadership/Management: Education Administration program plan of study:
        1. Submit candidacy application.
        2. Complete disposition rating survey.
        3. Submit OLC IRB approved training certificate (National Institutes of Health [NIH] on-line
           training at http://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php.
        4. Successfully complete the core courses LakM 513, 533, & 603 with a B or better.
        5. Re-submit copy of current teaching certification.
        6. Complete appropriate indicators in Comprehensive Portfolio as scheduled.
        7. Meet requirements for the Elementary Principal or Secondary Principal certification;
                a. Elementary Principal
                      i. A bachelor’s or master’s educational degree from a college or university
                         approved for teacher education as defined in §24:53:04 inclusive.
                      ii.Three years of verified teaching experience at the elementary level on a valid
                         elementary teachers certification or another endorsement which includes
                         elementary grades.
                      iii. Internship specific to job responsibilities of the k-8.
                b.     Secondary Principal
                      i. A bachelor’s or master’s educational degree from a college or university approved
                         for teacher education as defined in §24:53:04 inclusive.
                      ii.Three years of verified teaching experience at the secondary level on a valid
                         secondary teacher certificate or another endorsement, which includes secondary
                         grades.

                                                  -132-
                       iii.       The completion of an approved program for secondary principals at an
                                  accredited college or university.
                       iv.        Internship specific to job responsibilities of the 9-12.

        6.       Maintain the following degree requirements of Education Administration:
                 a. Have and maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher for program of graduate study.
                 b. Successfully complete courses with a B or better.
                 c. Attend and participate in portfolio and graduate seminars.
                 d. Must maintain current valid teaching certification to remain in candidacy status.
                 e. Complete portfolio indicators and upload artifacts as indicators of success in program
                    and transition.
                 f. Must meet expectations or exceed expectations of the Comprehensive Portfolio to
                    ensure ELCC standards are met.
                 g. Complete Capstone/Internship experience LMEA 796 two years after the completion
                    of 30 credit hours of the required core and professional courses.
                 h. Complete program requirements within five years of entrance.

                WIYOHINYANPATA (East) - Professional Requirements

Wiyohinyanpata, the cardinal direction east is represented by the color yellow. This direction is also known
as the Hehaka Oyate, or Elk Nation who possess Woksape meaning wisdom encompassing survival skills, a
sense of destiny, and vision for the future. These teachings are to be modeled by Ikce Wicasa meaning the
common man (Bear Shield, et al, 2000).This is the third stage fulfilling the professional requirements as
Master Candidate. Candidates depend upon survival skills, which include the constructs of appropriate vision
for self, the educational community of learners and the community; then begin to demonstrate professional
wisdom within their profession.

Lakota Leadership/Management professional course descriptions

LakM 523         Lakota Woitancan Na Wowasi Icicakagapikte
                 (Lakota Leadership and Professional Development)

This course is designed for candidates to examine values, belief system, and life style to gain an understanding
of and to determine their leadership style. Candidates will analyze leadership to determine the impact they
have on society. Finally, Candidates will study leadership styles and develop strategic plan(s) for professional
development. The course will emphasize Lakota values: respect, courage, humility, and generosity. The
Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513,
LakM 533
3 graduate credits

LakM 543         Lakota Woitancan Un Woglaka Unspe Iciciyapikte
                 (Lakota Leadership Communication Skills)

This course is designed to furnish candidates an awareness of, to gain knowledge of, and to practice listening
skills, Lakota oratory, and appropriate methods of expression of Lakota values. It will examine and explore
non-defensive and non-offensive speaking styles, oral advocacy, and working within conflict situations. Further
an in-depth study of skills in decision making, self-expression, consensus building techniques and strategies
of negotiation. Finally, a comparison and contrast of combative communication styles of communication
with the Lakota style of communication. This course will emphasize the Lakota value of respect The
Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513,
LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

                                                    -133-
LakM 553         Wowasake Na Tiospaye Wounspe
                 (Power and Community)

The principle objectives of this course are to assess how historical processes associated with European
expansion and colonization have affected the culture and social organization of indigenous peoples, and to
discuss ways of using assessment to form action for change. Further, study into the effects of the market
system, of missionizing, of integration into the capitalist world system, and of colonization, on community
life. Final study will include an examination of past and ongoing resistance and struggle of indigenous and
oppressed people in North and South America to protect their communities, preserve their cultures, and to
achieve self-determination. The course will emphasize the Lakota values of respect, humility and courage.
The Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM
513, LakM 533.
3 graduate credits

LakM 563         Tiyospaye Okolakiciye Wounspe
                 (Community Organizing)

Course content is a critical examination of the process of organizing communities and achieving community
change. The course will emphasizes Lakota values: respect and courage. The Lakota language will be spoken
as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LakM 573         Maza Ska Okicanye Wounspe
                 (Financial Management)

A course designed to develop understanding of and the ability to monitor financial management systems.
Focus: Budgets and business management accounting for nonprofit and profit organizations, audit analysis
and spreadsheets and Indian School Equalization Program (ISEP). The course will emphasize Lakota values
of respect and honesty. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite:
LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LakM 583         Lakota Tamakoce Un Wokicanye Na Woanwanyanke Wounspe
                 (Lakota Environment Management and Protection)

This course is designed for candidates to examine global, political economic and ideological forces that
underlie the environmental crises. It is further designed for candidates to compare the Lakota view of the
relationship of human beings to nature with those of other cultures. Finally, strategies and tactics that can be
implemented to protect the environment will be explored. This course emphasizes Lakota values of respect
and courage. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM
603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LakM 593         Lakota Kin Iyecinka Igloayapi Kta Un Hecel Eglepli kte Wounspe
                 (Establishing Lakota Sovereignty)

This course is designed for candidates to examine the constraints and the possibilities permitted under the
current federal-Indian relationship. They will learn the development and implementation process of asserting
and exercising tribal rights to make decisions as a society with the full attributes of a sovereign nation
including recognition by other governments. Course will include a review of past and current activities of
tribal involvement at the international level. This course emphasizes Lakota values of respect and courage.
Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513,
LakM 533. 3 graduate credits


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Educational Administration professional course descriptions

The courses LakM 513, 533, and 603 are core requirements to Educational Administration emphasis. Course
work is to be taken sequentially.

LMEA 703         Wowapi Wounspe Itancan
                 (Instructional Supervision)

This course is designed for candidates to examine values, belief system, and life style to gain understanding
of and to determine their leadership style. Candidates will analyze leadership styles to determine the impact
they have on society and schools. Candidates will study and understand the role of administrators in general
supervision of educational programs. Finally, candidates will study leadership styles and develop strategic
plan(s) for professional development. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of wisdom, courage,
respect, generosity, fortitude and humility. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class
hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LMEA 713         Wayawapi Itancan – School Administration
                 713 (E) Kucila (Elementary); 713 (M) Eyokogna (Middle); 713(S) Wakatuya (Secondary)

This course is designed to furnish candidates an awareness of, gain knowledge of, and practice listening
skills. It will examine and explore non-defensive and non-offensive speaking styles, oral advocacy, and
working within conflict situations. Further, an in-depth study of skills in decision-making, self-expression,
consensus building techniques and strategies of negotiation, and a comparison and contrast of combative
communication styles of communication. Finally, a study of problems and practices in organizing and
administering school programs and how communication is the knowledge base for success. Candidates will
enroll for level of administration for which they are seeking endorsement. This course will emphasize the
Lakota values of wisdom, courage, respect, generosity, fortitude and humility. Lakota language will be spoken
as much as possible during class hours. LMEA 713-(E) elementary, LMEA 713-(M) middle school, LMEA
713-(S) secondary. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LMEA 723         Woksape
                 (Counseling Theories and Socio-culture Foundations)

A study assessing how historical processes associated with European expansion and colonization affected
culture and social organization of indigenous peoples. Specifically, effects of the market system, missionizing,
integration into the capitalist world system, and colonization. Finally, a study of current counseling theories,
emphasizing counseling relationships and intervention strategies, focuses on counseling methods for schools,
agency and college counselors. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of patience, fortitude and
wisdom. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603,
LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LMEA 733         Oyate Wicoun
                 (Fundamentals of Curriculum Development)

This course is designed to focus on school curriculum through an examination of principles and practices
essential to developing and administering curricular programs, including knowledge and understanding of
measurability, scope and sequence taxonomy, program designs, and fit between a planned program and an
implemented one. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of wisdom, courage, respect, generosity,
fortitude and humility. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite:
LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits


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LMEA 743         Mazaska Wounspe Okicanye
                 (School Finance)

A course designed to develop understanding and the ability to monitor financial management systems. Focus:
Budgets and business management accounting for nonprofit, audit analysis and spreadsheets, Indian School
Equalization Program (ISEP), public school finance, management of plant, equipment, insurance,
transportation, and food services. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of honesty, fortitude and
wisdom. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603,
LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

Education Administration Electives (six hours of electives from the following):

LakM 583         Lakota Tamakoce Un Wokicanye Na Woawanyanke Wounspe
                 (Lakota Environment Management and Protection)

This course is designed for candidates to examine global, political, economic, and ideological forces that
underlie the environmental crises. It is further designed for candidates to compare the Lakota view of the
relationship of human beings to nature with those of other cultures. Finally, strategies and tactics that can be
implemented to protect the environment will be explored. This course emphasizes Lakota values of respect
and courage. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM
603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LakM 593         Lakota Kin Iyecinka Igloayapi Kta Un Hecel Eglepli kte Wounspe
                 (Establishing Lakota Sovereignty)

This course is designed for candidates to examine the constraints and the possibilities permitted under the
current federal-Indian relationship. They will learn the development and implementation process of asserting
and exercising tribal rights to make decisions as a society with the full attributes of a sovereign nation
including recognition by other governments. Course will include a review of past and current activities of
tribal involvement at the international level. This course emphasizes Lakota values of respect and courage.
Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513,
LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LMEA 603         Owayawa Ta Woupe
                 (School Law)

Principles of law applicable to practical problems of school organization and administration. Study of
organizational structure and administrative procedures at the federal, state, and local government level used
in education/special education service delivery systems. This course will emphasize the Lakota values of
wisdom and honesty. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite:
LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits

LMEA 753         Nagi Wounspe Wakatuya
                 (Advanced Educational Psychology)

Learning process with special emphasis on human abilities, early and contemporary learning theories with
applications to selected developments in teaching and persistent problems and issues in education. This
course will emphasize the Lakota values. Lakota language will be spoken as much as possible during class
hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate credits



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LMEA 763         Wopasi Wounspe
                 (Statistics)

An introductory yet comprehensive survey of elementary statistical analysis in educational research. Computer-
oriented. This course will emphasize Lakota values of honesty courage and fortitude. Lakota language will
be spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533. 3 graduate
credits

LMEA 773         Wopasi Woecun
                 (Survey Design)

A course designed to prepare graduate candidates in social context of question asking and designing
questionnaires from start to finish. This course will emphasize the Lakota values. Lakota language will be
spoken as much as possible during class hours. Prerequisite: LakM 603, LakM 513, LakM 533.
3 graduate credits

               ITOKAGATA (South) Capstone experience
     Community Action Project and School Community Action Project/
                       Internship and Induction

Itokagata, the cardinal direction for south is represented by the color white. This direction is also known as
the Wamakaskan Sitomni or the Animal Nation. The Animal Nation teaches us how to live and work together
living in harmony with Unci Maka (Grandmother Earth). These teachings strengthen our understanding of
the world and create a solid foundation in preparing the candidates for their educational journey. Candidates
recognize their origins and demonstrate their appreciations (Bear Shield et al, 2000). This is the fourth stage
of the educational journey where the candidate will begin their first year within the profession. Candidates
are required to demonstrate Wacante Ognaka meaning compassion and generosity. Effective Lakota leaders
demonstrate compassion and generosity through the delivery and giving of their knowledge, skills, and ability
to the educational and local communities.

Lakota Leadership and Management Capstone experience

The Lakota Leadership and Management degree has two options within the capstone experience. The
Community Action Project (CAP) is a year long six-credit hour course this is the first option referred to as
Option one. The second option referred to as Option two. Option two consist of two three-credit hour courses
titled Community Development and Sustainability I & II. Candidates must select an option when applying
for candidacy in the degree programs.

Option 1:        Community Action Project (CAP)

During the spring semester preceding enrollment for the final 6 credit hours of the professional courses:
LakM 596 Community Action Project (CAP), the Graduate Studies program will provide a mandatory CAP/
SCAP seminar to prepare candidates prior to registering for LakM 596. Candidates can refer to the Graduate
Studies Handbook for full CAP requirements.

LakM 596         Tiospaye Ecel Waecunpi kta Wounspe
                 (Community Action Project)

Community Action Project is original research designed collaboratively by candidate and faculty advisor.
Results of research are presentation and adherence to the process of research and writing. The process: topic
selection, proposal submission, project development, project documentation (technical paper), and APA writing
                                                    -137-
style. Note: only those candidates who have completed 30 hours of the program may register for this course.
Prerequisite: All core and professional core requirements 30 credit hours.
6 graduate credits

Option 2:       Community Development and Sustainability I & II

The Graduate Studies Department created a non-thesis option as an alternative to the community action
project within the Lakota Leadership and Management Degree.

Option two is a capstone educational experience in applied management for the Master of Arts in Lakota
Leadership and Management degree. Graduate Candidates will apply the selected leadership and management
skills in the public and private sector, tribal and non tribal governmental and social structures, social or
enterprise operations in the development, management, and ongoing evaluation of programs.

These two courses are designed to provide an opportunity for the graduate candidate to demonstrate the
Lakota Leadership and Management skills and concepts through a Wolakota perspective. This course is an
immersive leadership experience encouraging the graduate candidate to use discretion in decision making,
analysis, and evaluation beyond the exercise of routine tasks with the mentorship of faculty and community
leaders.

LakM 613A                Community Development and Sustainability I

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management Candidates from a tribal treaty context
focusing on community development and sustainability. This course offers lectures, student collaboration and
inquiry based learning from a Wolakota perspective. Master’s candidates will gain a comprehensive
understanding of public and private programs, and strategies; administrative tools and data analysis
methodologies. Master’s candidates will develop a conceptual framework for a tribal or community private/
public program or enterprise such as a human service program or community development organization.
Candidates are required to demonstrate Woksape meaning Wisdom and Wacante Ognaka meaning holding
people in their heart through compassion and generosity when developing their conceptual framework.
Prerequisite: Lakota Leadership and management Core LakM 603, LakM 533, LakM 513 Professional
Core LakM 523, LakM 553, LakM 563, LakM 573, LakM 593. (Excluding LakM 583, LakM 543).
3 graduate credits

LakM 613B                Community Development and Sustainability II

This course is designed for Lakota Leadership and Management Candidates from a tribal treaty context
focusing on community development and sustainability. This course is for candidates who have completed a
conceptual framework in Community Development and Sustainability I. Candidates will identify similar
programs and best practices, to evaluate and critique from a Wolakota perspective. Candidates will be required
to demonstrate Lakota leadership through presentation and implementation of findings. Candidates are required
to demonstrate Wacante Ognaka meaning holding people in their heart through compassion and generosity.
Effective Lakota Leaders demonstrate compassion and generosity through the delivery and giving of their
knowledge, skills and ability to the educational and local communities. Prerequisite: LakM 613, A Community
Development and Sustainability I. 3 graduate credits




                                                   -138-
Education Administration Capstone experience

School Community Action project (SCAP)/internship and Induction

During the spring semester preceding enrollment for the final 6 credit hours of the professional course:
LMEA 796 School Community Action Project (SCAP), the Graduate Studies program will provide a mandatory
CAP/SCAP seminar to prepare candidates prior to registering for LMEA 796 and preparing for the 120 hour
internship. Candidates can refer to the Graduate Studies Handbook for full SCAP and internship requirements.

LMEA 796         Wayawa Tiyospaye Woecun Wicokan
                 (School Community Action Project/Internship)

School Community Action Project (SCAP) is original research designed collaboratively by candidate and
faculty advisor. Results of research are presentation and implementation of project. The process: topic selection,
proposal submission, project development, project documentation (technical paper), and a semester of internship
that culminates an implementation of School Community Action Project (SCAP). Internship is on-the-job
experience while implementing SCAP, under the supervision of Graduate Department program staff. Internship
is part of the School Community Action Project (SCAP) course. Internship is designed to take place over a
period of two (2) semesters serving under a licensed principal at elementary, middle, or secondary level.
Candidates are required to have completed thirty (30) hours of their program before applying for Internship.
Candidates can be placed in any accredited South Dakota school and schools in other states having reciprocity
with South Dakota. Director of Graduate Programs and faculty of LMEA 796 will supervise candidates
serving an internship. Note: only those candidates who have completed 30 hours of the program may register
for this course. Prerequisite: All core and professional core requirements 30 credit hours. 6 graduate credits

Internship

Education Administration Candidates are required to complete 120 hours of principal internship over a
period of two (2) consecutive semesters serving under a licensed principal at the elementary, middle, or
secondary level. Internship must include all job responsibilities of the principalship at the age/grade span for
which candidate intends to seek authorization. Internship placement, mentor and calendar must be approved
by the Director of Graduate Studies one semester prior to enrollment in LMEA 796. Experiences must meet
ELCC standards. See graduate handbook for internship process and assessment.

Induction

Candidates within the graduate program will be provided induction services for their first year as a leader
including mentoring, coaching, access, periodic assessment. Induction services for graduates during their
first year as school administrators include mentoring, coaching and remediation, periodic assessment. See
graduate handbook for induction procedures, requirements, and assessment. All supervisors of 1st year and
5th year principals will be asked to participate in an employer performance survey.




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-140-
                       GRADUATE STUDIES DEPARTMENT
       MASTER OF ARTS IN LAKOTA LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
Core
LakM 603*       Wowapi Woecun Na Wounspe Wankatuyahci Glustanpi Kte Kin
                Hena (Research, writing and statistics for graduate work.)              3 hrs.

LakM 513*       Lakota Woitancan Na Wokicanye Kin In Oegleyapikte
                (Lakota Foundations for leadership and management)                      3 hrs.

LakM 533*       Tiospaye
                (Lakota Social Organizations)                                           3 hrs.

Professional
LakM 523        Lakota Woitancan Na Wowasake Icicakagapikte
                (Lakota Leadership & professional development)                          3 hrs.




                                                                                                     2011-2013 Catalog
LakM 543        Lakota Woitancan Un Woglaka Unspe Iciciyapikte
                (Lakota leadership communication skills)                                3 hrs.

LakM 553        Wowasake Na Tiospaye Wounspe
                (Power and Community)                                                   3 hrs.

LakM 563        Tiospaye Okalakiciye Wounspe
                (Community Organizing)                                                  3 hrs.

LakM 573        Maza Ska Okicanye Wounspe
                (Financial Management Administration)                                   3 hrs.

LakM 583        Lakota Tamakoce Un Wokicanye Na Woawanyanke Wounspe
                (Lakota Environmental management and protection)                        3 hrs.

LakM 593        Lakota Kin Iyecinka Igloayapi Kta Un Hecel Eglepikte Wounspe
                (Establishing Lakota Sovereignty)                                       3 hrs.

Capstone experiences options – Students will choose one option when applying for candidacy in this
degree program. Option one (1) is year long, option two (2) is two semesters.

Option one

LakM 596**      Tiyospaye Ecel Waecunpi Kta Wounspe                                     6 hrs.
                (Community Action Project)

Option two

LakM 613A       Community Development and Sustainability I                              3hrs.

LakM 613B       Community Development and Sustainability II                              3hrs.
                                                                        Total          36 hrs.
*Core required courses. These courses to be successfully completed prior to enrollment in other LakM
courses.
**LakM 596 and LakM 613A and B to be taken after 30 hours of successfully completing coursework.
                                                 -141-
                     GRADUATE STUDIES DEPARTMENT
      MASTER OF ARTS IN LAKOTA LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
             EMPHASIS IN EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION

Core
LakM 603        Wowapi Woecun Na Wounspe Wankatuyahci Glustanpi Kte Kin
                Hena (Research, writing and statistics for graduate work)              3 hrs.

LakM 513        Lakota Woitancan Na Wokicanye Kin Oeglayapikte
                (Lakota Foundations for leadership and management)                     3 hrs.

LakM 533       Tiospaye
               (Lakota Social Organization)                                            3 hrs.
Professional Required
LMEA 703       Wowapi Wounspe Itancan
               (Instructional Design)                                                  3 hrs.




                                                                                                2011-2013 Catalog
LMEA 713        Wayawapi Itancan – (School Administration)
                Kucila (Elementary), Eyokogna (Middle), Wakatuya (Secondary) 3 hrs.

LMEA 723        Woksape
                (Counseling Theories and socio-culture foundations)                    3 hrs.

LMEA 733        Oyate Wicoun
                (Fundamentals of Curriculum Development)                               3 hrs.

LMEA 743        Mazaska Wounspe Okicanye
                (School Finance)                                                       3 hrs.
Electives (2)
LakM 583        Lakota Tamakoce Un Wokicanye Na Woanwanyanke Wounspe
                (Lakota Environment Management and Protection)                         3 hrs.

LakM 593        Lakota Kin Iyecinka Igloayapi Kta Un Hecel Eglepikte Wounspe
                (Establishing Lakota Sovereignty)                                      3 hrs.

LMEA 603        Owayawa Ta Wounspe
                (School Law)                                                           3 hrs.

LMEA 753        Nagi Wounspe Wakatuya
                (Advanced Educational Psychology)                                      3 hrs.

LMEA 763        Wopasi Wounspe
                (Statistics)                                                           3 hrs.

LMEA 773        Wopasi Woecun
                (Survey Design)                                                        3 hrs.
SCAP

LMEA 796        Wayawa Tiospaye Woecun Wicokan
                (School Community Action Project and Internship)                       6 hrs.
                                                                      Total           36 hrs.
                                                 -142-
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AgEc 263 Farm and Ranch Management
Farm and ranch business from view point of continuous profit and efficiency. Basic principles of farm
management, applied to selection and combination of enterprises, level of production, size of business, labor
efficiency and machinery efficiency. Types of farming, tenure and leasing, risk, prices, credit and starting
farming, ranching business and production records, their analysis and use in budgeting and planning future
operations.
3 credits

AnSc 103 Animal Science
Adaption, breeding, feeding, marketing classification, selection of market and breeding types of beef cattle,
horses, sheep, swine and poultry, introduction to bison management within the ecological balance of natural
resources available to a producer.
3 credits

AnSc 403 Beef Science
Feeding, breeding, health, diseases and managements principles of beef cattle production under farm and
ranch operations. Prerequisite: AnSc 103
3 credits

AnSc 413 Equine Science (Horse)
Equine industry, breeds selection, from to function, care and management, soundness, health, reproduction,
and feeding. Prerequisite: AnSc 103
3 credits

ANTH 213/413 Tribal Societies in Today’s World
Prerequisites: Engl 113; 400-level: SoSc 103.
This course introduces students to different indigenous/tribal peoples throughout the world. It provides insight
into their cultural backgrounds, social and political struggles, and the strategies they have applied to improve
their situation. Recent developments at the level of international law are also discussed.
This course can be taken at the 200 or 400 level. When taken at the 200 level, it is expected that the student
will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400 level implies a mastery senior level course with extensive
work expected.
3 credits

ANTH 233/433 Introduction to Archaeology
Prerequisites: Engl 103; 400-level: SoSc 103.
This course is an introduction and overview of the field of archaeology and how ancient societies may be
studied using their material remains. Topics covered include domestication, social inequalities, states and
empires, ancient writing, and ethics. By the end of this course, students will be able to identify and evaluate
different types of archaeological data.
3 credits

Art 103 Drawing I
This is a course designed for beginning students in Art. Class content includes basic principles of drawing
objects, perspective, and composition.
3 credits



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Art 113 The Business of Art
This course is an exploration of the tools and strategies required for pursuing and managing a career in the
visual arts.
3 credits

Art 123 Two-Dimensional Design
This is a problem solving course which addresses the tangible principles and elements of design. Focus is put
on tools, materials, and processes for students to explore basic elements such as point, line, plane, volume,
space, and pattern. Design applications in all the visual disciplines are studied.
3 credits

Art 133 Introduction to Watercolor
This course introduces the techniques of watercolor painting.
3 credits

Art 143 Introduction to Oil Painting
This course is designed for students who wish to explore introductory techniques of oil painting.
3 credits

Art 153 School Arts and Crafts
This course is designed to give future teachers practical arts and crafts experience and to develop an
understanding of art education in relation to the growth and development of children. The course will also
provide practice in two- and three-dimensional arts utilizing paints, crayons, ink, color markers, etc., along
with practice in classroom crafts (mobiles, papier-mâché, etc.).
3 credits

Art 173 Introduction to Ceramics
This course is a study of the forms, methods, materials, and the characteristics of ceramics. Basic hand
building techniques are explored in addition to contemporary concepts.
3 credits

Art 203 Drawing II
This course is designed for the art student who will advance in drawing with an emphasis on studio production
relevant to both basic elements and mastery of drawing principles.
3 credits

Art 213 Figure Drawing
This art course guides the student through a detailed examination and analysis of the human skeleton including
the interrelationship and relative proportion of each bone. Students explore the nature and function of each
set of muscles and learn how the skeleton and musculature is made apparent on the surface of the body.
3 credits

Art 223 Painting I
This course is designed for students who wish to explore introductory element techniques of acrylic painting.
3 credits

Art 233 Three-Dimensional Design
This is a problem solving course which addresses the tangible principles and elements of three-dimensional
design. Using a variety of materials and processes, students explore basic elements such as volume, mass,
weight, light, gravity, and basic structure.
3 credits

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Art 243 Painting II
This course is designed for the art student who will advance in acrylic painting with an emphasis on studio
production relevant to both basic elements and mastery of principles.
3 credits

Art 253 Graphic Arts Digital
This course is designed for the art student to learn basic technological graphic design software applications
such as Adobe PhotoShop, Mac iMovie, iPod Applications, Adobe Illustrator amongst others.
3 credits

Art 263 Digital Photography
This course is designed for students who would like to learn basic techniques with the digital camera and
many of its built in devices.
3 credits

Art 273 Introduction to Sculpture
This course is an introduction to sculptural tools, materials, and processes. Students will experience both the
additive and the subtractive processes using materials such as wood, clay, and plaster.
3 credits

Art 283 Introduction to Printmaking
This course is designed as a basic introduction to printmaking with linoleum, wood, copper, screen printing,
and other such materials.
3 credits

Art 303 Art History I: Global Prehistory to European Pre-Renaissance
This art course surveys the aesthetic historical expression throughout the following global cultures and
artistic paradigms: Prehistoric, African, Mesopotamia, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Jewish, Islam, Hindu,
Byzantine and Christianity, Pacific Islands, Native American, Mesoamerican/Pre-Colombian, European
Medieval, European Renaissance, Japan, Korea, China, Buddhist. The class is designed to chronologically
cover global Prehistory up to Pre-Renaissance eras. 3 credits

Art 313 Art History II: European Renaissance to Contemporary Internationalism
This art course surveys the aesthetic historical expression throughout the following global cultures and
artistic paradigms: European Renaissance, African, Islam, Hindu, Christianity, Pacific Islands, Native
American, Post-Colombian, Japan, Korea, China, Buddhist, Global Abstract, Native American Modernism,
Indigenous Self-Determination era, etc. The class is designed to chronologically cover global art sensibilities
beginning with the European Renaissance up to the present Contemporary Internationalism.
3 credits

Art 323 Graduate Studio Project
This course is for graduating Associate of Art students. Students are required to produce specified studio
works for exit exhibition and permanent gallery upon completion of program study for the AA. 3 credits

Art 290/490 Special Topics in Art
This course emphasizes selected topics in Art. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated for
credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that the
student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.



                                                    -145-
ACCT 103 Principles of Accounting I.I
Prerequisite: Math 103, MIS 113 or concurrent registration
An introduction to accounting where emphasis will be placed on the accounting cycle and double-entry
accounting. 3 credits

ACCT 203 Principles of Accounting I.II
Prerequisite: ACCT 103
An introductory course in the accounting cycle, including accounting concepts and principles used to analyze
and record transactions in a business environment. The study and preparation of payroll and applicable laws
and regulations will be studied. Transactions are focused on basic accounting systems, advanced accounting
systems, cash and receivables.
3 credits

ACCT 213 Principles of Accounting II
Prerequisite: ACCT 203
A continuation of Accounting 203 that examines accounting principles and concepts applicable to inventories,
fixed assets, liabilities, and corporate organization, bonds payable, statements of cash flow, and financial
statement analysis.
3 credits

ACCT 253 AIS-Accounting Information Systems
Prerequisite: ACCT 103
An accounting course that provides experience with computer based application software programs.
3 credits

ACCT 303 Intermediate Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCT 213
A more in depth study of accounting concepts and principles with emphasis on accounting for income statement
and statement of cash flows, income measurement, balance sheet, and value of money.
3 credits

ACCT 343 Governments/Non Profit Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCT 213
The Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting course is an examination of the basic accounting concepts and
practices used in governmental and non-profit agencies. The student will gain a thorough understanding of
the financial activities of non-profit and governmental agencies, budgetary accounting, and reporting
procedures. 3 credits

ACCT 453 Auditing
Prerequisite: ACCT 213
A study of audit procedures including professional standards, professional ethics, legal liability, audit evidence,
planning the audit, and internal controls.
3 credits

ACCT 473 Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCT 213
This course focuses on decision-making in organizations, where the decisions involve the generation, analysis,
or use of financial information. The major topics in this course include the use of accounting in making
alternative choice decisions, the development and use of product cost information, and the use of accounting
information for managerial planning and control. Throughout the course, a managerial viewpoint is stressed.
3 credits

                                                      -146-
ACCT 496 Accounting Internship
Prerequisite: Department Chair Approval
Student will observe and experience business operations in the field of accounting, while completing a hands-
on administrative/low-level managerial internship at a local business or organization of their choosing subject
to the Academic Advisor approval. Students will maintain a weekly log of activities and keep a written
journal describing their experiences, what they have learned and do a self evaluation. Students will work for
180 hours in the work place.
6 credits

Auto 101 Automotive Electrical Systems and Electronics
Prerequisite: Collegebound/Workready Certificate
The first of four semesters begins with the student getting an overall picture of the program. Topics include
Safety, Communications, Basic Shop Procedures, Service Information, Tools and Equipment, and Basic
Vehicle Maintenance. Using state of the art computer based instruction modules the students will begin
learning automotive electronics. The areas of study includes: Introduction to Electronics, Semi-Conductors,
Transistors, Circuits and Troubleshooting.
12 credits

Auto 102 Automotive Technology –Basic and Advanced Brakes, Drum and Disc
Prerequisite: Auto 101
Student will be able to use a drum/disc brake trainer, which will be a two wheel model. This trainer will be
part of a brake system program to present the live operation and study hydraulic brake systems. A Delco/
Bosh ABS/TCS system trainer will used to present “real world” operation and study of antilock brake/
traction control systems.
12 credits

Auto 201 Automotive Engine Performance, Emissions and Ignitions
Prerequisite: Auto 102
Student will learn how to use training boards to perform troubleshooting and engine control fundamentals,
engine control diagnostic fundamentals, engine control system troubleshooting, and injector/ fuel pump systems.
12 credits


Auto 202 Automotive Basic and Advanced Steering and Suspensions
Prerequisite: Auto 201
In this course students will study and gain knowledge of the following: Steering, Suspension Service and
Repair including steering system design, Steering gear and linkage (manual and power), rack-and-pinion,
steering columns, front and rear suspension designs, electrical suspension control systems, wheel bearing and
spindle design, wheel and tire assembly service, wheel alignment diagnosis and adjustment. Students will
have hands on training and testing.
15 credits

BAd 133 Introduction to Business
Prerequisite: Engl 103, Math 103 or concurrent registration
This course is a comprehensive, updated introduction to all key business functions: management, marketing,
accounting, finance and information technology. Core topics highlighted within these functional areas
include ethics and social responsibility, small business concerns, different forms of business ownership and
operations of small businesses. The course is structured around the main components of a business plan
from introduction to executive summary.
3 credits


                                                    -147-
BAd 143 Personal Finance
Prerequisite: Engl 103 and Math 103
This course is designed to teach students how to manage their own personal budget, achieve good credit,
understand various types of insurance and understand investment practices and how to plan for retirement.
3 credits

BAd 243 Business Law
Prerequisite: BAd 133
An introductory course of the principles of law as they apply to citizens and businesses. The course will
include an understanding of the court system at the local, state and national level. Students will gain an
understanding of contract law, their rights and responsibilities as citizens, utilization of financial transaction,
employment and agency relationships and the understanding of the regulations governing different types of
business organizations.
3 credits

BAd 253 Principles of Management
Prerequisite: BAd 133
This course provides an in-depth exposure to the practice of management in modern business. Topics include:
the management functions of planning, decision-making, organizing & staffing, communicating, motivating
& leading, and evaluating & controlling; the various styles and characteristics of successful managers; and
management challenges facing today’s firms.
 3 credits

BAd 263 Principle of Marketing
Prerequisites: BAd 133
An overview of the field of modern marketing, with detailed emphasis on: the marketing concept; strategic
marketing – with environmental scanning and internal audits; social responsibility and ethics in marketing;
marketing research & information systems; consumer behavior & organizational markets; products, the
product life-cycle, product management, branding-packaging-labeling; the marketing of services & service
quality.
3 credits

BAd 290/293 Sophomore Special Topics in Business
Prerequisite: BAd 133
Studies in various special business topics at the sophomore level, courses are offered as student and/or
community interest indicates and appropriate instructors are available. Course content may change from
semester to semester; thus the class may be taken more than one time, when different topics are offered.
Course credit offered may vary, depending upon the particular subject matter and content.
credit – variable.

BAd 303 Human Resource Management
Prerequisites: BAd 253
This course covers the principles and techniques of human resource management including legislation affecting
employers today. It also covers the human resource functions of procurement, organization, development,
compensation, integration, management and separation.
3 credits




                                                      -148-
BAd 313 Organizational Theory & Behavior
Prerequisite: BAd 133
This course is a behavior approach to management with emphasis on the understanding, prediction, and
control of human behavior in the organization setting. Topics include individual behavior, interpersonal and
group behavior, environmental adaptation and organizational effectiveness.
3 credits

BAd 333 Business Communications
Prerequisite: BAd 133
This course covers modern practices in the preparing, planning, writing and dictating all types of business
letters and reports that are commonly required in business operations.
3 Credits

BAd 343 Decision Support Systems
Prerequisites: SoSc 313, MIS 113, and Math 154
Stresses role of the manager and the strategic use of technology in business.
3 credits

BAd 363 Business Finance
Prerequisites: Math 154 and Acct 213
This course provides an introduction to business finance with an emphasis on the use of information from the
three basic financial statements to do ratio analysis, financial forecasting, and calculate the degree of business
leverage. In addition, working capital & cash management, short-term financing, the time value of money
concept, the cost of capital, and various valuation methods are discussed.
3 credits

BAd 373 Grants Proposal Writing & Management
Prerequisites: Acct 213 and BAd 133
This course provides “hands-on” instruction in developing a team to address a need, write a comprehensive
Grant request proposal, and find appropriate sources of funding. Student teams will actually research, write
and present a complete mock-Grant Proposal as the culminating class exercise.
3 credits

BAd 383 Business Ethics & Social Responsibility
Prerequisites: BAd 253 and BAd 313
This is a study of ethics and social responsibility as they relate to issues, conflicts, decision-making, and
program development in business today. The impact of business activities on: stockholders, employees,
communities, the environment, and society in general are discussed in detail.
3 credits

BAd 413 Reservation Entrepreneurial Operations
Prerequisite: BAd 133
This course will provide students with knowledge on land status issues common to the area, business financing
and special circumstances as they apply to the reservation, Tribal tax laws, Tribal Business Licenses, Tribal
Uniform Commercial Code, and Marketing on/off the Reservation. This course is specific to the Pine Ridge
Reservation.
3 credits




                                                     -149-
BAd 423 Organizing & Operating a Small Business
Prerequisites: Senior Standing in Business Program Hours
This course identifies the key issues and requirements involved in the start-up, financing and operation of a
small for-profit business. Coursework culminates in the writing and presentation of a mock-Business Plan,
detailing a fictional firm of the student’s choice that is suitable for soliciting financing.
3 credits

BAd 443 Problems in Business
Prerequisites: Senior Standing Senior Standing in Business Program Hours
Important issues and problems in business today are reviewed during the first-half of the semester, students
then proceed to guided independent research in an area of personal interest to them, culminating in the writing
and presentation of a significant Research Paper on the selected business issue.
3 credits

BAd 453 Seminar in Strategic Management
Prerequisites: Senior Standing in Business Program Hours
This is the capstone course for graduating seniors in Business Administration, studying the role of top managers’
in developing and implementing an organization’s strategies. Extensive student participation and presentations
occur in the seminar format, with the case study method used to analyze strategic theory and actual business
applications.
3 credits

BAd 463 Tribal Planning & Administration
Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Business Program Hours
This is an applied course in the principles of management and personnel supervision, as they relate to Tribal
programs. Emphasis is on: understanding and solving personnel problems, writing program objectives,
defining activities to be done, effective planning, the direction & evaluation of a Tribal program, managing
budgets, and studying the interrelationship between various programs and Tribal governments.
3 credits

BAd 473 Marketing Research
Prerequisite: BAd 263 and Math 154
Introduces students to the planning, collection, and analysis of data relevant to marketing decision making,
the understanding and communication of the results.
3 credits

BAd 483 Leadership
Prerequisite: Bad 253 and BAd 313
Taking a college course on leadership with not make you a leader, that’s not how it happens. Studying leaders
and leadership will help you develop the qualities and traits that do. Students in this course will learn the
traits, styles and different types of leaders. Attention will be paid to self leadership, one on one leadership,
team leadership and organizational leadership. The different skills for effective leadership will be studied.
3 credits

BAd 490/493 Senior Special topics in Business
Prerequisite: Department Chair & Instructor Approval
Studies in various special business topics at the senior level, courses are offered as student and/or community
interest indicates and appropriate instructors are available. Course content may change from semester to
semester; thus the class may be taken more than one time, when different topics are offered. Course credit
offered may vary, depending upon the particular subject matter and content.
credit – variable.

                                                     -150-
BAd 496 Business Internship
Prerequisite: Department Chair approval
Student will observe and experience business operations in a variety of functional areas, while completing a
hands-on administrative/low-level managerial internship at a local business or organization of their choosing
subject to the Academic Advisor approval. Students will maintain a weekly log of activities and keep a
written journal describing their experiences, what they have learned and do a self evaluation. Students will
work for 180 hours in the work place.
6 credits

Bio 103 Human Biology
This course provides and introduction to human biology, including the evolution, natural history, and ecology
of humans. Emphasis is placed on what the biological sciences have to say about maintaining human health.
Native American views of health are also discussed.
3 credits

Bio 113 People and the Environment
This course focuses on the role of people in ecosystems and the global effects of their alterations of those
ecosystems. The influence of European and Native American cultures on people’s activities in the ecosystem
will be discussed. Alternatives for human survival and the well-being and sustainability of the biosphere will
be explored. Prerequisites: Engl 113 and SpCm 103 (“C” or better)
3 credits

Bio 153 Biology
This course begins with the basic chemistry of life and proceeds through cell structure and function to animal
embryology, plant life cycles, hormonally and environmentally influenced growth processes, and plant and
animal anatomy and physiology. Prerequisites: Engl 113 and SpCm 103 (“C” or better)
3 credits

Bio 151 Biology I Lab
This laboratory covers the use of the microscope and other elementary laboratory equipment. Students will
conduct experiments that demonstrate principles discussed in lecture. Slides of structures and organisms, as
well as preserved specimens, will be used to illustrate comparative morphology and function in plants and
animals. Prerequisites: Engl 113 and SpCm 103 (“C” or better) 1 credit

Bio 163 Biology II
This course emphasizes ecological and evolutionary concepts, including classification, natural history, genetics,
plant and animal diversity, and behavioral ecology. Prerequisites: Engl 113 and SpCm 103 (“C” or better) 3
credits

Bio 161 Biology II Lab
This laboratory allows students to conduct experiments that demonstrate principles covered in lecture.
Dissections of representative invertebrate and vertebrate organisms will be used to illustrate the comparative
anatomy within the animal kingdom. Prerequisites: Engl 113 and SpCm 103 (“C” or better) 1 credit

Bio 204 Basic Microbiology
Prerequisite: Bio 154, Chem 113 (or above)
A survey course of bacteriology and immunology for allied health students. Emphasis is on bacterial anatomy,
physiology and genetics; immune response and medical applications. The laboratory demonstrates common
clinical procedures involved in the isolation and identification of the bacteria. (3,2)
4 credits


                                                     -151-
Bio 223 Ecology
Prerequisite: Bio 164 and Chem 103 (or above), both completed with a grade of “C” or better, or permission
of instructor.
The study of the interrelationship of living organisms and the environment. Topics include interactions at the
population, community, and ecosystem levels; the study of energy flow, and nutrient cycling within these
systems. Included also is the study of the geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric processes involved in the
maintenance of life on earth, with emphasis on the importance of human actins to promote sustainability and
health of natural processes.
3 credits

Bio 224 Human Anatomy
Systematic study of gross anatomy and normal homeostasis functions of the human body. Systems studies
include the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. The laboratory is used to demonstrate these concepts
through dissection and physiological experiments and demonstrations. Prerequisite: A 100-level biology course,
Engl 113. Chem 114 / Chem 111 at least concurrently.
4 credits

Bio 234 Human Physiology
A continuation of Bio 224. Systems studied will include cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary,
reproductive and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: Bio 224 completed with a grade of “C” or better. 4 credits

Bio 303 Field Ecology
Prerequisite: Bio 153, Bio 163, Math 123, with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of instructor.
This is a field course surveying the basic research methods used in sampling, and describing characteristics
of plant and animal populations and communities. Emphasis will be placed on grassland, forest, wetland,
and riparian systems in Southwest South Dakota.
3 credits

Biol 413 Animal Behavior
Prerequisites: Bio 223, Math 123, or permission of the instructor
This course will present a biological perspective on the behavior of organisms from invertebrates through
humans. Environmental and innate components of behavior will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on
social systems and the understanding of human behavior through comparative analyses with related social
vertebrate species.
3 Credits

Bio 413 Mammalogy
This course includes study of the classification, evolution, distribution, identification, life histories, and
morphological, ecological, and behavioral adaptations of mammals. Emphasis is placed on species of the
Great Plains ecosystem. Prerequisite: Math 123, Bio 223 and Bio 303, all completed with a grade of “C” or
better.
3 credits

Bio 423 Ornithology
This course includes study of the classification, evolution, distribution, identification, life histories, and
morphological, ecological, and behavioral adaptations of birds. Emphasis is placed on species of the Great
Plains ecosystem. Prerequisite: Math 123, Bio 233, Bio 333, all completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits




                                                   -152-
Bio 443 Range Ecology (Co-listed as Rang 443)
Prerequisite: Bio 303, all completed with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of instructor.
A study of the dynamics and structure of range plants and animals upon each other, and the area on which
they are living including the effects of human-related activities. Special emphasis is given to the role of
herbivores on species composition and distribution of plant communities.
3 credits

Biol 453 Advanced Ecology
Prerequisites: Bio 223, Bio 303, Math 123, or permission of the instructor
This course will build on information presented in general ecology, focusing on the ecology of South Dakota,
with discussion of status and threats to those ecosystems. A research project will be undertaken in which the
student designs a study investigating some aspect of wildlife or ecosystem interactions. Research may involve
study of a local plant or animal population to better understand its ecological requirements or the investigation
of a habitat and the interactions of plant and animal populations in that ecosystem.
3 Credits

Biol 463 Evolution
Prerequisites: Bio 223, or permission of the instructor
This course will present the history of the development of the theory of natural selection and evolution as first
elucidated by Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace. The concurrent work of Mendel will be discussed as well
as more modern developments in areas of genetics, molecular biology, sociobiology, paleontology, and
anthropology.
3 Credits

Bio 463 Conservation Biology
Prerequisite: Math 123, and Bio 413, Bio 423 or Bio 443, all completed with a grade of “C” or better, or
permission of instructor. A study of the principles and practices associated with the maintenance of maximum
biodiversity and stability of ecosystems throughout the world. The importance of retaining genetic variability
in wild populations is examined.
3 credits

CAR 103 Carpentry Theory I
Prerequisite:    College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
This course deals with the study of the various tools and materials including “Green Construction” materials
used in construction and proceeds into the study of foundation systems and materials, floor systems, wall
systems and roof systems used in any type of residential construction. This course focuses on the rough in
stage of residential construction.
3 credits

CAR 203 Carpentry Theory II
Prerequisite:    CAR 103
This course completes the study of residential construction. It concentrates on the finishing of the interior,
exterior and attachments to the home.
3 credits

CAR 113 Basic Drafting
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
Students will gain experience in transferring abstract ideas to workable drawings. Simple block drawing
exercises will advance to residential home, and multi-plan drawings.
3 credits


                                                     -153-
CAR 123 AutoCAD
Prerequisite: CAR 113 Basic Drafting
This course presents a step-by-step format for learning AutoCAD fundamentals and practicing their
applications. This user-friendly textbook includes a special command reference box to guide users through
common ways to evoke commands and then practice their applications. Illustrated examples are shown
throughout the book and selected examples are also provided. Icons refer users to learning tools on the
Interactive CD-Rom that reinforce comprehension and provide more opportunities for practical Blue Print
Designs. 3 credits
NOTICE: This course does not fill the content, or meet the requirements of the Carpentry Theory II
course, which previously held this Course Number and is no longer used.

CAR 114 On-Site Construction I
Prerequisite:    College Bound/Work Ready Certificate.
Students will work in the OLC Construction Yard on a residential house or other assigned project to learn by
hands-on activities. Technical information is combined with practical applications in the specific areas of the
student’s degree area. Electrical students will primarily do the wiring; HVAC students will install the heating
and ventilation; and the General Construction Students will do primarily the framing, etc. (All students will
work in all phases of the general construction for additional experience.)
4 credits

CAR 124 On-Site Construction II
Prerequisite:    CAR 114
Continued construction of the residential home started with CAR 114. Emphasis for each student will be
toward their specific degree program through hands-on activities. Electrical students will primarily do the
wiring; HVAC students will install the heating and Ventilation; and the General Construction Students will do
primarily the framing, etc. (All students will work in all phases of the general construction for additional
experience.)
 4 credits

CAR 214 On-Site Construction III
Prerequisite:     CAR 124
This course is a continuation of CAR 124. Emphasis for each student will be toward their specific degree
program through hands-on activities. Electrical students will primarily do the wiring; HVAC students will
install the heating and Ventilation; and the General Construction Students will do primarily the framing, etc.
(All students will work in all phases of the general construction for additional experience.)
4 credits

CAR 232 Light Commercial & Residential Building Codes
Prerequisite:    None
This course provides authoritative requirements and recommendations compiled from the nation’s leading
professional associations, industry publications, and building code organizations. Coverage includes standards
for concrete, masonry, framing, finish carpentry and cabinetry, insulation, roofing, windows and doors,
drywall and ceramic tile, floor covering, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, and more.
2 credits

CD 103 Introduction to Alcoholism
This course introduces the study of alcoholism and the wide range of current approaches to treating and
preventing it. It surveys the symptoms and effects of alcohol and abuse and addiction and introduces leading
theoretical models of alcohol addiction. It affords students the opportunity to assess their learning in relation
the phenomena of alcohol abuse and addiction in their communities. Prerequisites: Engl 103 or higher. 3
credits

                                                     -154-
CD 113 Introduction to Drug Abuse
The material in this course will introduce you to the fascinating study of a wide range of mood-altering
chemicals, both legal and illegal. You will learn about the symptoms that drugs produce, and about their
effects on individuals. You will also explore various approaches to treating and preventing drug abuse and
will consider their applicability to the Lakota community.. Prerequisites: Engl 103 or higher. 3 credits.

CD 203 Family Counseling and Chemical Dependency
This course will engage you in the study of the effects of alcoholism and drug abuse on families. You
will consider the special needs of individual family members that alcoholism and drug abuse give rise
to and you will learn about methods for addressing those needs. You will learn about self-help techniques
for family members, about methods of family intervention, and about methods for helping the active
alcohol or drug abuser.
Prerequisites: PSY 103 and either CD 103 or CD 113 or instructor permission. 3 credits

CD 213 Internship
Internships afford students the opportunity to apply what they learn in coursework to an actual on-the-job
situation. Student interns learn first-hand what it is to work in the field of Chemical Dependency Counseling
by working 120 hours for a program that is actually providing services to the community. Students analyze
their internship experience in relation to personal goals, career goals, and their academic preparation.
Prerequisite: Sosc 103, Sowk 203, CD 103, 113, 233, 313. 3 credits

CD 223 Native American Substance Abuse
This course surveys the extent and the consequences of alcohol abuse among American Indians. The
causes of origins of the disease of Alcohol will be explored as well as the different theories of addictions.
In addition to the reservation experience the urban setting will be discussed. The prevention, treatment
and recovery for American Indian Alcoholics will be addressed. Prerequisite: CD 103 or CD 113 or
instructor permission. 3 credits.

CD 233 Foundations of Individual Counseling.
This course is designed to cover the skills, concepts, and issues of chemical dependency counseling of
individuals. The content provides students with knowledge of the counseling relationship, factors involved in
chemical dependency, understand diagnosis, assessment and treatment plans. In addition to examining traits
of an effective counselor, the student will work to develop and practice using a theory of counseling. Prereq:
CD 103, CD 113. 3 credits

CD 290 Special Topics in Chemical Dependency
Provides the student with the opportunity for in-depth study of a special interest area in the field of chemical
dependency. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

CD 313 Ethical and Legal Issues for Chemical Dependency Professionals
This course will explore the ethical and legal issues as they apply to Chemical Dependency Counseling.
These issues include: confidentiality, dual relationships, competency and referral, counselor values and conflicts,
legality and ethics, client welfare, establishing appropriate limits and boundaries in the client relationship,
informed consent, and other issues identified. Students will review the professional codes of ethics, values
underlying coded of ethics and will focus on the process of ethical decision making. Students will have the
opportunity to identify and discuss the ethical and legal issues frequently encountered by prevention and
treatment professionals.
Prerequisites: CD 103, CD 113. 3 credits




                                                      -155-
CD 343 Methods of Group Counseling
This course covers group leadership skills and various therapeutic techniques of group counseling
through lecture and practical application. It focuses particularly on learning about the dynamics of
group therapy as a helping and healing process. It covers theories that apply to groups and to addictions
work. It introduces related topics of research, ethics, planning, leadership styles, multicultural
considerations, and relevant Lakota practices.
 Prerequisites: CD 103, CD 113, CD 233. 3 credits

CD 403 Continuum of Care
This course will cover the relationship between intake, case management, discharge planning and clinical
record keeping. Students will learn how to implement plans used in addictions counseling, and about screening,
assessment and evaluation procedures. Students will develop an understanding of relapse, including its
relationship to the recovery process and the role of the counselor in relapse prevention. The course will cover
treatment services provided to Native Americans and to the Lakota in particular.
Prerequisites: CD 103, CD 113, CD 233, CD 313, CD 343, 3 credits

Chem 103 Survey of General Chemistry
An introduction to inorganic chemistry stressing basic concepts and the language of chemistry. Prerequisite:
Math 134
3 Credits

Chem 111 Chemistry for Health Sciences I Laboratory
Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in Chem 114
Reinforces, in a practical format, the concepts and ideas introduced in Chem 114. Topics will include, but
not be limited to, scientific concepts of weights and measures, gas law equations and calculations, solution
calculations (including molars and pH), percentage mathematics, and thermodynamic predictions and
calculations. 1 credit

Chem 114 Chemistry for the Health Sciences
Prerequisites: Math 134 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
Introduces the basic concepts of general and organic chemistry helpful for nursing students. Lecture topics
will include, but not be limited to Scientific Measurements, Chemical (Inorganic and Organic) Nomenclature,
Molar and Percentage Mathematics, Reactions, and a study of Solutions (including pH0 as well as discussions
of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. The instructional approach of Chem 114 will emphasize how
these differing chemical concepts affect the human body. Chem 114 does not satisfy the requirements for
Chem 233.
4 credits

Chem 233 General Chemistry I
An in-depth survey of inorganic chemistry. This course stresses the concepts and language of chemistry,
including periodic properties, reactions, mathematics and algebraic manipulation of existing formulas, physical
chemistry, and environmental issues dealing with the topic of atmospheric gases and surface groundwater.
Chem 231 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Math 154 or above, Chem 103 or an acceptable score on
the chemistry placement examination, all courses with a grade of “C” or better
3 credits

Chem 231 Experimental General Chemistry Lab I
The fundamentals of chemical laboratory techniques and practice, the behavior of chemical compounds and
quantitative measurements illustrating the laws of chemical combinations. Prerequisite: Must be taken
concurrently with Chem 233.
1 credit

                                                    -156-
Chem 243 General Chemistry II
An advanced study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include: in-depth mathematical formulas of chemistry and
their manipulation, acid-base chemistry, complex reactions and their prediction, thermodynamics, nuclear
chemistry, metallurgy, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Chem 241 must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisite: Chem 233 and Chem 231 both completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Chem 241 Experimental General Chemistry Lab II
Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with Chem 243, or permission of instructor.
Laboratory work will complement the topics covered in Chem 243.
1 credit

Chem 253 Organic Chemistry I
This is an introduction to organic chemistry. Topics will include nomenclature of aliphatic and basic aromatic
compounds and their derivatives, reaction predictions with industrial and environmental applications, chemical
properties and synthesis, and an introduction to biochemistry. Chem 251 must be taken concurrently.
Prerequisites: Chem 233 and Chem 231, both with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of instructor.
3 credits

Chem 251 Organic Chemistry Lab I
Laboratory work will complement the topics covered in Chem 253. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently
with Chem 253, or permission of instructor.
1 credit

Chem 263 Organic Chemistry II
Designed to be sequential with Chem 253, topics will include: chemistry of carbon compounds, isomerism,
an introduction to nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, and a further examination of certain
biochemistry principles such as the study of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, including their role in metabolic
reactions. Chem 261 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Chem 253 and Chem 251 both completed
with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Chem 261 Experimental Organic Chemistry Lab II
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Chem 263, or permission of instructor.
Laboratory work will complement the topics covered in Chem 263.
1 credit

Chem 323 Environmental Chemistry
Prerequisite: Chem 243 and Math 154, both completed with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of
instructor. A study of the chemical nature of air, water, and earth. Some of the specific topics will include
ozone layer, greenhouse effect, radioactivity, acid rain, nutrient cycles, and ecosystems.
3 credits

Chem 351 Organic Chemistry for Educators Lab I
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Chem 353, or permission of instructor.
Laboratory work will complement the topics covered in Chem 353. A methodology component is included.
1 credit




                                                      157-
Chem 353 Organic Chemistry for Educators I
Prerequisites: Chem 233 and Chem 231, both with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of instructor.
This is an introduction to organic chemistry. Topics will include nomenclature of aliphatic and basic aromatic
compounds and their derivatives, reaction predictions with industrial and environmental applications, chemical
properties and synthesis, and an introduction to biochemistry. Chem 351 must be taken concurrently. A
methodology component is included.
3 credits

Chem 361 Organic Chemistry for Educators Lab II
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Chem 363, or permission of instructor.
Laboratory work will complement the topics covered in Chem 263. A methodology component is included.
1 credit

Chem 363 Organic Chemistry for Educators II
Prerequisite: Chem 353 and Chem 351 both completed with a grade of “C” or better, or permission of
instructor. Designed to be sequential with Chem 353, topics will include: chemistry of carbon compounds,
isomerism, an introduction to nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, and a further examination
of certain biochemistry principles such as the study of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, including their role
in metabolic reactions. Chem 361 must be taken concurrently. A methodology component is included.
3 credits

Chem 423 Laboratory Equipment
This course gives students exposure to analytical laboratory equipment used in the environmental sciences.
Students will have opportunities to analyze soil, and water samples for contaminants using analytical
instrumentation at the Lakota Center for Science and Technology, which may include: mass-spectrometer
with gas chromatograph (GC-MS), ion chromatograph (IC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray florescence
(XRF), atomic absorption (AA) flame and/or furnace. Prerequisites: Phys 113, Chem 243, Chem 241, Math
154 all completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

CMath 153 Consumer Math
Prerequisite: Math 093
This course provides practical application of mathematics for an entrepreneurial operation and decision-
making support. Topics include: solving word problems; manipulating numbers, fractions, decimals and
percentages; discounts and mark-ups; calculating interest and depreciation; and other math computations
used in retail, economics and finance.
3 credits

CS 103 Ethics in the Workplace
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to teach the principles of customer expectations, ethics, and the general process of
handling and retaining customers. The student will become more aware of and recognize ethical issues at
home, at school, in the community, and in the workplace. This course will encourage the student to think
more clearly, critically, and logically about difficult ethical issues and questions and how to apply the right
concepts and decisions in the workplace.
3 credits




                                                    -158-
CS 113 Introduction to Customer Service
Prerequisite: None
This course provides an introduction to the concepts of offering superior customer service as well as the
challenges of it. The course will include a problem-solving model for challenging situations. The success of
any business is dependent upon customer satisfaction and loyalty.
3 credits

CS 133 Hospitality and Tourism
Prerequisite: None
The student will learn how hospitality, travel and tourism interrelate, how tourist destinations and hospitality
facilities are keys to the reasons people travel, how destinations are promoted and distributed, and what some
of the effects of the industry are on society.
3 credits

CS 163 Special Topics in Applied Science
Prerequisite: Department Director and Instructor Approval
Topics may be in various vocational areas. Courses are offered as student and/or community interest indicates
and appropriate instructors are available. Course content may change from semester to semester; thus the
class may be taken more than one time, when different topics are offered. Course credit offered may vary,
depending upon the particular subject matter and content.
3 credits

CS 223 Current issues in Customer Service
Prerequisite: None
Students will study all aspects of activities, responsibilities, accountabilities, and relationships involved
internally and externally in the customer service arena. The students will learn that the service industry is
very competitive and requires the superior customer service image if an enterprise is to be successful and how
an employee becomes that image.
3 credits

CS 273* Customer Service Internship
Prerequisite: Final Semester of Program or department approval.
This experience will be done in a customer service place of business. Ninety hours will be spent in a
customer service establishment under the supervision of a qualified employee of the business/ organization.
3 credits

Econ 203 Principles of Microeconomics
Prerequisite: Math 100-level (or higher)
This course is designed to give students an understanding of basic economic concepts, such as: supply and
demand, the operation of the price mechanism, substitute goods, economic trade-offs and opportunity cost,
which affect the activities of businesses and consumers in a capitalist market economy. Emphasis is also
given to the Mixed Economy, and how the student becomes part of it on, or off, the reservation.
3 credits

Econ 213 Principles of Macroeconomics
Prerequisite: Econ 203
This course is designed to give students an introduction to the principles underlying economic processes,
such as: the nature of the free enterprise system; income & consumptive spending; the money & banking
systems; national output, income and the gross national product; monetary & fiscal policy; and unemployment
& inflation as they relate to governmental decision-making and the national accounts.
3 credits

                                                     159-
Econ 333 Economic Issues on Reservations
Prerequisites: Econ 203 & 213
This course provides an understanding of the unique dynamics of Reservation Economies that affect the lives
of Native Americans. Topics include: the economic impact of treaties and their changing interpretation by
government; the effect of Federal Department, Agency and Program (such as: Agriculture, BIA, HUD, WIC
and Economic Empowerment Zones) activities on reservation economies, job opportunities, citizen attitudes,
etc. The roles of: education, Tribal government, the relevant State government, and other reservation-specific
issues will be discussed. 3 credits

ECH 203 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
This course provides an introduction to the field of early childhood education. The philosophies, goals, and
purposes of early childhood programs, as well as professional and staff development will be explored. This
course will also provide as introduction to the CDA (Child Development Associate) certification process,
portfolio, development, of professional resource files. Candidates will be required to complete a background
check.
3 credits

ECH 213 Planning and Administrating Early Childhood Programs
This course introduces the students to the steps involved in setting up a home or day care center with a
learning environment for the infant, toddler, and preschool child. This course considers issues of management,
administrative procedures, health, safety, use of physical space, and licensing regulations. The CDA functional
learning center requirements are also covered in the course.
3 credits

ECH 223 Materials & Techniques for Infant/Toddler/Pre-K Centers I
This course will help the student to develop culturally relevant materials for the enhancement of physical,
emotional, and intellectual growth for the infant, toddler, and preschool child. An introduction to a variety of
activities and media which can be used to foster creativity in young children with specific emphasis on art,
music, movement, drama, puppetry, and literature will be explored. Students will gain knowledge and expertise
in teaching techniques individually and developmentally appropriate for young children. CDA functional
area of physical, cognitive, communicative, and creativity are also considered.
3 credits

ECH 233 Curriculum for Self-Awareness and Individual Development
This course is designed to provide the students with the knowledge and skills necessary to promote the means
of building positive self concepts and individual strengths in the infant, toddler, and preschool child. Techniques
and materials that can be used within daycare canters, early childhood classrooms, and home centers which
will support social and emotional development while also providing positive guidance will be introduced. The
CDA functional areas of self, social, and guidance are covered in this course. Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH
203
3 credits

ECH 243 Early Childhood Specialty Internship
Students will work in an early childhood center, program, or agency; students will keep a journal and observation
log and meet with the center director daily. A state requirement for this course is also referred to as ‘Sophomore
Experience’. Students will also assist in planning daily activities with children. Student will be observed in
the classroom settings by their supervisor. Insight will be shared with other students in periodic seminar as
arranged with the college supervisor. Students are required to complete their applications for entry into the
teacher education program as part of course requirements. Pre-requisites: ECH 203, ECH 213, ECH 223
3 credits


                                                      -160-
ECH 253 Parental Staff and Community Involvement in Early Childhood
This course introduces the student to the importance of positive communication and the necessary techniques
for promoting good relationships between parents, family members, staff, and the community. Special emphasis
on strategies for providing an optimal environment for young children and resources for meeting problems
through cooperative and positive interaction. The CDA functional area of families is covered in this course.
Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 203
3 credits

ECH 303 Seminar in Early Childhood Development
This course is designed to provide the students current topics regarding the issues and problems confronting
the early childhood professional: curriculum planning, staff relations, ethics concerns, budget considerations,
and professional development. Education children with special needs (assessment, referral, and educational
development adaptations) is also covered. The functional areas and competencies of CDA are reviewed in the
course content. Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 203
3 credits

ECH 323 Materials & Techniques II for Infant, Toddler, & Pre-K Centers
This course will help the students to develop more culturally relevant techniques and materials for the
enhancement of physical, emotional, and intellectual growth of the infant, toddler, and preschool child. A
study of the basic concept, methods, and materials of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies
appropriate to young children will be investigated. We will also consider the importance of learning centers
and bulletin boards in the classroom. Exploring the concepts of play as the means for learning will also be
included. Planning daily and weekly schedules are also considered. Completion of ECH 223 is recommended
prior to taking this course. Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 203.
3 credits

ECH 333 Group Structures and Interaction in Early Childhood Education
This course extends a basic understanding of child development and interactions of young children by examining
development characteristics of infants, toddlers, and preschool children. Objective and subjective observations
by utilizing various informal procedures will be studies in classroom settings. Special emphasis on classroom
management and techniques will be discussed in depth. Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 203
3 credits

ECH 363 Family Literacy
This course in Family Literacy will address Reservation-wide concerns of school drop out rates, which are
consistently high, and literacy levels, which are consistently low, and particularly how these concerns apply
within the family structure and thus affect young children. This course will incorporate the community
literacy outreach efforts such as the BEAR (Be Excited About Reading) Project or books-in-a-bag as a
required service-learning project component. In Head Start, parent involvement, including the area of family
literacy, is a priority. What is learned and implemented through this course will strengthen the mandated
Head Start Performance Standards in the area of literacy. Prerequisites: Ed 213, ECH 203, ECH 253
3 credits

ECH 373 Resources and Research in Early Childhood Education
Students will examine current issues and trends pertaining to early childhood development. Students will
explore topics in early childhood education in planned observations and sequence which includes research,
field settings, visitations, and discussions. The latest in early childhood curriculums, technology, and other
innovative and creative techniques will be included. How to better network available resources will be addressed.
Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 203
3 credits


                                                     -161-
ECH 383 Methods of Assessing Young Children
In this course the student will learn the importance of observing, documenting and assessing young children.
The student will become confident in using both formal and informal assessments with young children and
become knowledgeable in utilizing assessment results and sharing these results with the child’s family and
other professionals to better meet the needs of the child. Pre-requisites: Ed 213, ECH 233, ECH 243
3 credits

ECH 403 Social-Emotional Growth and Socialization
This course utilizes Module I of the Program for Infant-Toddler Caregivers Curriculum. In this course the
student will learn concepts of early social-emotional growth and socialization in the context of group care,
with an emphasis on the development of a nurturing relationship between infant and caregiver. The importance
of responsive care giving, individualizing care through an understanding of infant temperament, support for
the critical role of family and culture, and stages of emotional development are also covered. Pre-requisites:
ED 213, ECH 223, ECH 233
3 credits

ECH 413 Group Care
This course Utilizes Module II of the program for Infant-Toddler Caregivers. In this course the student will
learn about the philosophical foundations of caring for Infants and Toddlers in groups as well as the special
issues of caring for infants in groups. This type of care is different from the care of one infant, e.g., in a
typical family or nanny situation, and from the group care of older children. The student will also learn how
to ensure that infants in professional group care thrive through having assigned to them one or a very few
consistent, caring adults to provide security, individualized attention, responsiveness, familiarity, and protection
in the context of a peaceful environment. Pre-requisites: ED 213, ECH 223, ECH 233, 3 credits

ECH 423 Early Learning and Development
This course utilizes Module II of the Program for Infant-Toddler Caregivers. In this course the students will
focus on the critical issues of brain development, communication and identity formation in prenatal babies,
infants and toddlers. The student will learn elements of care that support expecting parents, infants and
families. Areas of focus will include: caring relationships, health and safety, connections to family and culture,
family and community support, the importance of prenatal care and nutrition, and responsive, knowledgeable
caregivers. Pre-requisites: ED 213
3 credits

ECH 483 Ethics & Professionalism in Early Childhood Education
In this course the student will learn about the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct and how this is implemented
in the classroom and in one’s career in Early Childhood as well as how to use this code to help resolve
problems and ethical concerns. This course will also address how a student can become a contributor to the
Early Childhood field outside of the Early Childhood classroom, including becoming involved in advocacy
efforts on behalf of young children and families. Prerequisites: ED 213, ECH 223, ECH 233, 3 credits

ECH 496 Practicum in Early Childhood Education
In this course the student will learn real world applications of their college classroom learning experiences.
The student will spend at least 520 hours in local Early Childhood Classroom or Daycare. The first part of
the semester the student will assist the Classroom Teacher or Primary Caregiver. The end of the semester the
student will assume all responsibilities of the Classroom Teacher or Primary Caregiver. This course is taken
in the final semester before graduation.




                                                      -162-
ED 283 Foundations of Education with Sophomore Experience
Foundations of Education provides an introduction to the profession of teaching. A state requirement for this
course is also referred to as ‘Sophomore Experience’. This part of the course requires 15 hours of observation
in the field followed up by 15 hours of student journaling related to classroom observations and topics
covered in this course. Topics include the history and philosophy of education, structures and governance of
schools, professionalism, teacher effectiveness, and curriculum models. Students are required to complete
their applications for entry into the teacher education program as part of course requirements. Pre-requisites:
SpCm 103, Engl 113, Psy 103, Math 103
3 credits

ED 203 Indian Studies for Education
A history of American Indian schools and community and student relations is emphasized in this course.
Educational theory and background into traditional tribal education, church, federal, and public education
will be explored. Teaching methods based on integrating state content standards with Indian values and
culture are part of this course. The South Dakota Indian Studies Strands are addressed. Pre-requisites:
SpCm 103, Engl 113, Psy 103
3 credits

ED 213 Child Growth and Development
Child Growth and Development includes a broad focus on the biological, physical, social, emotional, and
intellectual growth and development of children from prenatal to adolescence. Child rearing and educational
practices of several different cultures, with an emphasis on Lakota practices will also be reviewed. Pre-
requisites: SpCm 103, Engl 113, Psy 103
3 credits

ED 303 Reading Children’s Literature
This course offers a presentation of the best literature available for children in a variety of media; books,
short films, video, audio books, and storytelling. Students study criteria for evaluating these media and ways
of using them in the early childhood, elementary and junior high classrooms. The text is supplemented with
bibliographies of Native American literature and Native American stories for children. Several approaches to
interacting with literature and media will be reviewed and discussed. Pre-requisites: SpCm 103, Engl 113,
Psy 103
3 credits

ED 313 Educational Psychology
Educational Psychology is concerned with understanding how children develop and learn through formal
(and informal) instruction in classroom settings. Students will examine physical, social and character
development, emotional and cognitive principles and developmental learning theories found in educational
settings. An understanding of intellectual differences, learning and problem-solving processes, self-esteem,
motivation and assessing learning will be investigated in this course. Pre-requisites: Ed 213
3 credits

ED 323 Middle School/High School Concepts
This course is an overview of educational programs and instructional strategies centered around developmental
issues related to social, emotional, physical and cognitive development of the middle and high school learner.
Students will examine middle school and high school program elements including constructive learning,
block scheduling, advisory teams, and interdisciplinary curricular teams. The South Dakota Teacher
Competencies will be included in this course. Pre-requisites: Ed 283, Acceptance in to Teacher Preparation
Program, MIS 113
3 credits


                                                    -163-
Ed 483/Ed 583 Technology/Curriculum Development for Teachers
This course is designed to provide participants with the knowledge, competencies and understandings to
apply technology-enhanced instructional strategies in the classroom. The course provides detailed practice in
using computer and Internet based technologies. In addition, students will design learning units that use the
Internet, multimedia and hypermedia tools to support the development of interpersonal, collaboration and
higher order thinking skills of PreK-12 learners. Extended studies will be required for those that enroll in this
course for graduate credit hours. Pre-requisites: Ed 203, ExEd 313, Ed 283, MIS 113
3 credits

EDECH 403 Methods of Music and Art for ECH/Elementary Teachers
Music and art are important components of a well-rounded education. Methods for music may include music
appreciation, understanding keys, notes, rhythm and measures as well as genres of music. Students will play
basic instruments like recorders, flutes and drums. Indian music will be emphasized. Art will include using
various mediums from crayolas to tempra and naturally occurring substances. Use of a ruler and compass for
art work to reinforce traditional designs will be included. Project art such as constructing dioramas and
models using various mediums will also be explored. There is a $40 fee for materials. Pre-requisites: ED
203, Ed 213, ExEd 313
3 credits

EDECH 413 Methods of Teaching ECH Literacy/Elementary Reading
This course will cover instructional strategies for reading, including whole language and phonics. The emphasis
of language development, phonemic awareness, the cueing system, word recognition strategies and reading
for comprehension will be addressed. Course emphasis will include the development and presentation of
lessons by students. These lessons will address character education and involve the skills and strategies of
reading based on the Common Core Standards or Early Learning Guidelines. Exploration of reading
assessment, Lakota literature and culture, behavioral management, community and parental involvement,
and differentiating instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners will be reinforced in this course. Pre-
requisites: Ed 203, Ed 213, ExEd 313
3 credits

EDECH 423 Methods of Teaching ECH Numeracy/Elementary Math
This course will provide students with a preview and utilization of various types of math manipulatives,
internet applications and other math instructional materials. They will learn different strategies for effective
pre-school through 8th grade instruction. Models of classroom management, student learning styles and
cooperative learning will also be explored. Inclusion strategies and parental/community involvement strategies
will also be reviewed. Students will develop lesson plans utilizing this information and present lessons to the
class that are designed around the Common Core Standards or Early Learning Guidelines for Mathematics.
Pre-requisites: Ed 203, Ed 213, ExEd 313
3 credits

EDECH 433 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Science
This course will provide the learner with information in the basic knowledge and skills of teaching pre-
school-through 8th grade science. In this course students will review science materials, resources, educational
technology, and computer software. Students will create and present formal and informal lessons designed
around the Early Literacy Guidelines or the South Dakota State Science Standards and the Common Core
Standards for Literacy in Science. Special attention will focus on assessment of science concepts, Lakota star
knowledge, differentiated instruction, and parental and community involvement. Pre-requisites: Ed 203, Ed
213, ExEd 313, Sci 214
3 credits



                                                     -164-
ED 443 Methods of Teaching Elementary Language Arts
This course will include the interrelationship between reading, writing, speaking and listening (the four
traditional Language Arts) and viewing and visually representing (two new language arts areas reflecting the
importance of visual literacy). Students will develop lesson plans and strategies that present language arts as
a whole and that address the Early Learning Guidelines or Common Core Standards for English Language
Arts. Specific attention will be given to assessing the Language Arts, Lakota culture, character education,
behavioral management, individualizing instruction, parental/community involvement, and service learning.
Pre-requisites: Ed 203, Ed 213, ExEd 313
3 credits

EDECH 453 Methods of Teaching ECH/Elementary Social Studies
This course will provide learners with experience in the effective planning and development of social studies
programs for children pre-school through 8th grade. It will address goals, objectives, curriculum, educational
technology and resource materials relevant to pre-school & elementary social studies. Lakota and other
indigenous peoples’ heritage will be examined. Students will explore various learning styles, classroom
management technique and parental involvement. In this course the learner will develop informal and formal
lesson plans designed around the South Dakota State Social Studies Standards and the Common Core Standards
for Literacy in History/Social Studies. Pre-requisites: Ed 203, Ed 213, ExEd 313, 3 credits

EDECH 463 Methods of Health and Physical Education
Students will learn and practice techniques and methods for integration of health, first aid, and physical
education into the early childhood and elementary educational settings. Students will also expand their
knowledge of health, hygiene, nutrition, communicable diseases, and environmental issues which affect the
health of our students and parents. Basic first aid, the assessment of illness or injury, and first aid treatment
or response to such will be included. Basic Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certification is a component
of this class. Pre-requisites: Ed 203, Ed 213, ExEd 313

ED 463 Human Relations/Cultural Diversity
This course will center on Native American and multicultural issues. Students will investigate different
social phenomena, processes, and outcomes, especially those dealing with social economic status, life styles,
history, reciprocal perceptions and interactions between different groups. Emphasis will be on recognizing
stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination. Students will discuss precepts of critical pedagogy and its impact
on the above. Woven into this course is the concept of Wolakota and character education. This course is
required for all South Dakota teachers. Pre-requisites: None. It is recommended that all professional core
coursework be completed prior to taking this course.
3 credits

ED 473 Student Teaching Seminar
The Seminar is intentionally aligned with ED 489 Student Teaching. The Seminar course provides opportunities
to share student teaching experiences and challenges with colleagues and college faculty members. Students
will receive instruction in resume writing, mock interviews, developing professional portfolios as well as
professional ethics. Students will review their understanding of course content and relate it to state standards,
develop teaching strategies and competencies. Additional emphasis will focus on classroom management,
strategies for working with at-risk students, and formal/informal assessment. Pre-requisites: Completion of
Professional Requirements, Acceptance into Student Teaching, Passing Score on Praxis II Content Area
Examination
3 credits




                                                     -165-
ED 489 Student Teaching
Students spend five days a week for a full semester in supervised practice in an approved preK-12 classroom
setting. Depending upon the level of certification sought, the student teaching experience will involve 16
weeks in an approved pre-school classroom or daycare setting, 8 weeks in a preschool classroom and 8 weeks
in K-2 classroom (including special education, if this certification is sought), 8 weeks in a lower elementary
classroom and 8 weeks in an upper elementary classroom, 8 weeks at the elementary level and 8 weeks at the
secondary level, or 16 weeks at the secondary level (7-12) split between certification areas. Student teachers
will fulfill the requirement of 40 hours per week in their assigned classrooms and will be expected to assume
total classroom responsibility for 80 hours (2 weeks) of planning and facilitation of the classrooms for each
experience. Teaching strategies and skills as well as competencies will be developed under the supervision
and guidance of a certified supportive teacher and a college supervisor. Pre-requisites: Completion of
Professional Requirements, Acceptance into Student Teaching, Passing Score on Praxis II Content Area
Examination
9 credits

Elec 103 Electrical Fundamentals
Prerequisite:    None
This is an introduction to basic wiring of switches, outlets, lights, and appliances in residential applications.
This course introduces the student to AC/DC electron theory, electron flow resistance, voltage, ohms law,
magnetism, inductance, and capacitance.
3 credits

Elec 113 Electrical Blue Prints
Prerequisites: None
Students will develop efficient and accurate print reading skills in the areas of electrical construction and
maintenance. Concepts of drawing, sketching, views, plans, schedules, and specifications will be studied and
then reinforced by actual print reading exercises that offer practice in the interpretation and analysis of
various prints in the residential, commercial and industrial fields. Students will benefit from exposure to
electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, and specialized communication symbology that will improve recognition
and understanding of other craft symbols likely to be encountered on the job.
3 Credits

Elec 123 NEC® Codes
Prerequisites: None
Print reading Based on 2008 National Electrical Code® is designed to enable the student to learn electrical
print reading and become familiar with applicable sections of the NEC®. Complete references to the book
are presented throughout the text. Trade Competency Tests are included at the end of each chapter to help
students check their understanding of the text material and the NEC®.
3 credits

Elec 133 Motors
Prerequisite: Trds 103
This course introduces motors from a magnet spinning in a magnetic field to three-phase adjustable speed
types and the basic methods of wiring and controlling them.
3 credits

Elec 223 Electrical Maintenance
Prerequisite:   None
This course investigates the problems of an electrical complex and the probabilities of failure and maintenance
methods to prevent them.
3 credits

                                                     -166-
Engl 103 Freshman English I
Prerequisite: R&W 093 or placement through testing.
This course helps students develop writing skills for use in personal, on the job, and college related writing
situations. The course uses Native American writings that emphasize cultural themes as models in many of
the assignments. Grammar review and essay writing are emphasized. Students taking this course will learn
how to develop a thesis that will then be developed into a proper sequential five paragraph essay. They will
learn how to utilize proper grammar to create narrative, cause and effect, descriptive, expository, and many
other types of essays.
3 credits

Engl 113 Freshman English II
Prerequisite: Engl 103 with “C” or better.
This course teaches students how to prepare an acceptable research paper. Students are first taught how to
focus their topic, brainstorm ideas, draft a thesis statement, and research their topic. Students are then
instructed how to use the computer, books, magazine articles, and other sources to support their topic. They
also learn how to introduce, paraphrase, and blend their cited material into their paper. The last aspects
covered are MLA and APA documentation.
3 credits

Engl 143 Writing in the Professions I
Prerequisite: Engl 103
This course provides students with skills needed to complete many technical writing tasks in their daily and
professional lives. Students will learn to utilize correct grammar to create products such as letters, memos,
resumes, CV’s, brochures, pamphlets, instructions, manuals, reports, and proposals.
3 credits

Engl 233 The Joy of Writing
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course is designed for students who want to develop their own personal writing style. It focuses on
improvement of sentence and paragraph structure, and allows students to critique their own work in order to
increase the accuracy, variety, and sophistication of sentences and paragraphs. Four areas of instruction are
covered: vocabulary, figurative language, grammar, and the comprehensive study of how to prepare a paper
so that it is understood and valued by all who read it. Students will learn how to choose words that are well
defined, as well as learn how to capture the imagination of the readers. They will also learn how to use
language that is descriptive and that will keep readers interested. Additionally, those who enroll will learn
how to write balanced, clear, coherent, and concise sentences.
3 credits

Engl 283 Advanced Composition I
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course helps students learn to write persuasive and argumentative papers. It will also help students
further develop researching, interviewing and reporting skills.
3 credits

Engl 303 Grammar and Linguistics
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course is a study of language usage and English grammar. Topics include a study of current approaches
to English grammar and language use. Relationships between English and Lakota language structures will be
discussed.
3 credits


                                                   -167-
Engl 323 Creative Writing
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course is designed to help students interested in the techniques of writing fiction, drama, music lyrics,
nonfiction articles, and poetry. Students taking this course will be encouraged to compose multiple drafts and
may submit completed manuscripts for publication. This course will include assistance in critiquing, developing
and structuring ideas, and creating original compositions.
3 credits

Engl 333 The Power of Story
Prerequisites: Engl 113
This course is for those who want to learn the basics of writing a vivid and engaging story. It covers the craft
of writing. Topics include character development, plot, setting, point of view, dialogue and self-editing.
Students will have the opportunity to work in a variety of genres.
3 credits

Engl 343 Writing in the Professions II
Prerequisite: Engl 113
This course focuses on developing strength in technical writing through extensive practice in composing
technical reports, manuals, proposals, and other documents. This course will guide students in achieving
voice, tone, style, and content in formatting, editing, and graphics.
3 credits

Engl 413 News Writing
Prerequisites: Engl 113.
This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge they need in order to engage
effectively in news gathering and news writing. Students will learn style rules and application, reporting
methods, and journalistic ethics.
3 credits

Engl 423 Advanced Creative Writing
Prerequisite: Engl 323.
This course provides students the opportunity to develop their interests and talents by engaging them intensely
in a particular genre of creative writing. Genres include the short story, the novel, and playwriting.
3 credits

Engl 453 Writing Family and Community History
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course provides students the opportunity to develop research and writing skills by writing family and
community histories. Students are expected to use primary and secondary sources from the library, archives,
and community.
3 credits

Engl 473 Scholarly Project
Prerequisites: Engl 113, Senior Standing
English and Communication Studies majors engaged in a scholarly project have opportunities to explore
various areas of interest. Students who are interested in doing a scholarly project are requested to contact
full-time faculty in the Humanities and Social Science Department. Instructor and student will collaborate in
organizing a scholarly project in the field-of-interest of the latter.
3 credits



                                                    -168-
Engl 483 Advanced Composition II
Prerequisite: Engl 223.
This course guides students toward more sophisticated and broad research strategies with stylistic choices
that are more varied and creative. By incorporating critical reading skills, this course instructs students to use
reading to negotiate the ideas of others, form their own opinions, and enlarge each student’s repertoires of
rhetorical strategies. This course will prepare students to communicate effectively, ethically, responsibly,
professionally, and will provide students with skills, strategies, and conceptual knowledge to help them address
a variety of communication tasks.
3 credits

Engl 290/490 Special Topics in English
This course emphasizes the study of selected topics in English composition and creative writing. Topics will
change each semester and may be repeated for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When
taken at the 200-level, it is expected that the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level
implies a mastery senior level course with extensive work expected.


Engr 101 Introduction to Engineering I
Students are introduced to the concept of being a professional and the ethics required of a professional
person through hands-on service learning projects to meet community needs, as well as reflection through
journaling. Prerequisite: Math 134.
1 credit

Engr 111 Introduction to Engineering II
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn how to solve engineering analysis and
design problems through community focused service learning. Students will develop computational skills,
sharpen communication skills, and be exposed to professional development in the form of team building,
technology tools, and project management. In addition, students will have the opportunity to learn from
professional engineers, scientists, and stakeholders through project-based interaction. Prerequisites: Math
154 or Engr 101. 1 credit

Engr 133 Engineering Graphics and Computer Aided Drawing
Students will learn to construct drawing documents using AutoCAD, the use of engineering, mechanical
and architectural scales, lettering practices, geometric construction (manually and AutoCAD), and the
ability to visualize in three dimensions. All work requires a “hands-on” approach. Prerequisite: Math 134.
3 credits

Engr 143 Geology for Engineers
Rock forming processes and identification, mass wasting, ground water, streams, and appropriate
geological engineering technologies through project based and hand-on learning. Emphasis is given to
engineering significance of processes and their resulting deposits in the study of geological processes
acting on the earth‘s surface. Prerequisite: Math 134.
3 credits

Engr 141 Geology for Engineers Lab
Field laboratory to accompany Engr 143 - Geology for Engineers. Rock forming processes and
identification, mass wasting, ground water, streams, and appropriate geological engineering technologies
through project based and hand-on learning. Emphasis is given to engineering significance of processes
and their resulting deposits in the study of geological processes acting on the earth‘s surface. Corequisite
with Engr 143. Prerequisite: Math 134.
1 credit

                                                     -169-
Engr 202 Construction Materials
Principles that govern physical and mechanical properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics,
bituminous materials, portland cement, aggregates, concrete, and timber. Laboratory exercises to
demonstrate basic principles and standard laboratory tests (ASTM Standards) of structural materials.
Computer-aided graphics and word processing are required for lab reports. Prerequisites: Chem 233, MIS
113. 2 credits

Engr 201 Construction Materials Lab
Basic structure of materials and their effects on material properties. Laboratory tests on materials (ASTM
Standards) to demonstrate basic principles of structural materials. Corequisites: Engr 202
Prerequisite: Chem 231
1 credit

Engr 213 Elementary Surveying
Care and operation of instruments, concepts of horizontal and vertical control; measurement of horizontal
distances, vertical angles and elevation differences, basic surveying computations and field practice.
Coverage includes the definition and analysis of errors of measurement. Additional topics include:
horizontal curves, traverse work and construction surveying. The course includes an introduction to the
concepts and applications of GPS and GIS to surveying practice. Corequisite course: Engr 201.
Prerequisites: Math 163, MIS 113
3 credits

Engr 211 Elementary Surveying Lab
Laboratory portion of Engr 213. Care and operation of instruments, concepts of horizontal and vertical
control; measurement of horizontal distances, vertical angles and elevation differences, basic surveying
computations and field practice. Coverage includes the definition and analysis of errors of measurement.
Additional topics include: horizontal curves, traverse work and construction surveying. The course
includes an introduction to the concepts and applications of GPS and GIS to surveying practice.
Corequisite course: Engr 213. Prerequisites: Math 163, MIS 113.
1 Credit

Engr 223 Principals of Environmental Science
Introduction to the basic principles of environmental management, environmental science and engineering.
The course will teach the fundamental physical, biological, and chemical principles of environmental
processes. The course will also explore the impact of humans and human activity on ecosystems in the
environment. This course is co-listed with NSci 323. Prerequisites: Chem 233.
3 credits

Engr 243 Statics
The study of the effects of external forces acting on stationary rigid bodies in equilibrium. Vector algebra
is used to study two and three-dimensional systems of forces. Trusses, frames and machines, shear and
moment in beams, friction, centroids, moments of inertia, and mass moments of inertia are discussed.
Prerequisites: Math 194
3 credits

Engr 253
Mechanics of Materials
Basic concepts of stress and strain that result from axial, transverse, and torsional loads on bodies loaded
within the elastic range. Shear and moment equations and diagrams, combined stresses, Mohr’s circle;
beam deflections; and column action and equations. Prerequisites: Engr 243
3 credits

                                                   -170-
ExEd 313/513 Introduction to Exceptional Education / Characteristics & Etiology
Students will study, in depth, the high incidence disabilities, their definitions, diagnosis and characteristics.
Legal obligations of IDEA, Sect. 504 and ADA will be introduced. Low incidence disabilities will also be
introduced. Emphasis will be given on determining disabilities, understanding the cognitive, social and emotional
difficulties and planning appropriate interventions. Researching journal articles for current information will
provide additional source material. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate
credit will complete all assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research
project (15-page research paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experience) related to one of
the disability categories of IDEA.
3 credits

ExEd 323/523 Assessment and Practical Applications
This course is a study in the selection, administration and interpretation of formal and informal test instruments.
Areas addressed include cognitive, communicative, affective and adaptive behavior skills. Students will become
familiar with assessment terms such as standard deviation, error of measurement, test reliability and validity.
Intelligence tests, achievement tests, behavioral inventories and adaptive behavior inventories will be examined
and administered and interpreted. Experience applying this data into written reports for MDT’s and IEP/
IFSP’s will also be addressed. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit
will complete all assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project
(15-page research paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experienced) related to evaluation as
part of eligibility determination or ongoing assessment measures to monitor progress and plan instruction.
3 credits

ExEd 333/533 IEP/IFSP Program and Curriculum Development
Students will be introduced to models and theories that are the basis for special education programs. This
course addresses skills in collaboration, team teaching, and techniques of inclusion. The student will develop
appropriate lesson plans based on PK-12 academic standards to design instructional programs which facilitate
individual achievement towards IEP/IFSP goals and objectives. Program development will include ways to
monitor not only student progress but the effectiveness of the program. The student will organize and maintain
all portions of the IEP/IFSP process including progress reports, timely written notices, and conducting meetings.
Students will utilize electronic file management systems to maintain IEP/IFSP records. Graduate Nature of
the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete all assignments required for
undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project (15-page research paper or a 5-page
reflective analysis of a field-based experienced) related to individualized education programs or family service
plans. 3 credits

ExEd 303/603 Special Education Law
This course will examine current laws pertaining to individuals who have disabilities. Students will gain an
understanding of the legal components and requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,
the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Family Education Rights
and Privacy Act. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete
all assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project (15-page
research paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experience) related to the impact of special
education law on the provision of services to children with exceptional needs. 3 credits

ExEd 433/633 Diagnostic Teaching
This course is designed to address the needs of children who have high incidence disabilities. Students will
use standard curriculum materials to devise appropriate adaptations to meet individual needs. Strategies
developed and implemented will be geared toward the high incidence disabilities. Students will gain experience
designing intervention programs that address motivational and curriculum concerns. Appropriate
communication and collaboration skills for coordinating delivery and evaluation of direct/indirect instruction

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of reading, math and language arts will be an area of emphasis. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students
taking this course for graduate credit will complete all assignments required for undergraduate credit and
complete a graduate level research project (15-page research paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-
based experience) related to instructional strategies for increasing student achievement. 3 credits

ExEd 443/643 Strategies for Low Incidence Disabilities
This course is designed to address the needs of children who have low incidence disabilities. Areas of emphasis
includes autism, TBI, orthopedic impairments and multi-handicapped. In addition to classroom-based
instruction, students will participate in field-based experiences to develop the knowledge and skills necessary
to implement programs appropriate for students with these types of disabilities. Students will be introduced
to the resources available in adaptive technologies. Collaboration and coordination with specialized services,
regular education, families and other agencies will be addressed. Service learning will be included as a part
of this class. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete all
assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project (15-page research
paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experience) related to instructional strategies for increasing
student achievement. 3 credits

ExEd 453/653 Classroom Management
Classroom management is key to successful learning. Theories and anecdotal stories will be examined in
determining successful classroom management techniques. Collecting, recording, graphing and analyzing
data to make appropriate interventions will be a major component of the course. The use of technology to
facilitate data collection will be considered. Opportunities to practice and apply these methods will be provided
through classroom observations. Building classroom community, character education and Wolakolkiciyapi
will be stressed. The goal is to provide the knowledge needed to build a safe and inclusive learning environment
for students. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete all
assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project (15-page research
paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experience) related to the critical role of classroom
management in student learning and achievement. 3 credits

ExEd 473/673 Transitions and Community Resources
This course prepares students to assist students with disabilities to transition into post-secondary learning,
the adult world of work and independent living. Collaboration with outside agencies and utilizing community
resources to assist students in progressing toward their life-goals is a major component of the course. Students
will gain the necessary knowledge to guide adolescents who have disabilities in gaining self-advocacy skills
and actively participating in their own transition planning. Service learning will also be a component of this
class. Graduate Nature of the Course: Students taking this course for graduate credit will complete all
assignments required for undergraduate credit and complete a graduate level research project (15-page research
paper or a 5-page reflective analysis of a field-based experience) related to successful transition from school
to adult life and services.
3 credits

ExEd 493/496/793/796 Special Education Practicum
A practicum experience is required for students seeking a birth-preschool, K-8, 7-12 or K-12 endorsement in
special education. A minimum of a three semester-hour special education practicum under the supervision of
a certified special education teacher and university supervisor at each level of endorsement is required.
Students will gradually assume responsibility for planning, instruction, evaluation, and classroom management
during the experience at each level of certification sought. In addition, students will complete a professional
portfolio demonstrating the knowledge and skills set forth by the Council for Exceptional Children’s
performance-based standards covering: foundations, development and characteristics of learners, individual
learning differences, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, communication,
instructional planning, assessment, professional and ethical practice, and collaboration. 3 – 6 credits

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Geog 213 World Regional Geography
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with a “C” or better.
This regional geography class focuses on globalization or the increasing interconnectedness of the nations of
the world. In addition to exploring the basic physical, political, and cultural geography of all of the world’s
regions, this course investigates important global issues such as the exploitation of natural resources, global
warming, population growth, the economic exploitation of third world nations, and the effect globalization
and modernization are having upon local traditional cultures.
3 credits

Geog 290/490 Special Topics in Geography
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course examines selected topics in geography. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated for
credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that the
student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.

Geol 143 Physical Geology
Rock forming processes and identification, mass wasting, ground water, streams, and appropriate
geological engineering technologies through project based and hand-on learning. Emphasis is given to
engineering significance of processes and their resulting deposits in the study of geological processes
acting on the earth‘s surface. This course is co-listed as Engr 143.
3 credits

Geol 153 Historical Geology
This course involves a survey of the geological history of planet Earth with special emphasis on the northern
Great Plains. Topics will include the rock cycle, stratigraphy, plate tectonics, evolution, and the fossil and
archeological records. Typically includes at least one field trip.
3 credits

Geol 213 Soils I
Introductory course in which students learn the basic structure, formation, and classification of soils, physical
and biological properties, management aspects including water, fertility, and erosion, and the role of soils in
the environment. Prerequsites: Geol 143 (“C” or better)
3 credits

Geol 303 Soils II
Course Description: This course focuses on the description, classification, and mapping of soils in western
South Dakota and the Pine Ridge Reservation. Includes field description and identification of soils and
paleosols from the Cenozoic rock record. Prerequisites: Geol 213 (“C” or better) 3 credits

GIS 213 Introduction to GIS
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are essential to the solution of many types of management, planning,
environmental, and applied research problems. This course is designed to provide dedicated students,
instructors/tribal members or teachers with a basic understanding of current mapping technology through
introducing students to principles and the application of geographic information systems, with emphasis on
GIS analysis techniques. Prerequisites: Math 134 and MIS 113 3 credits




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GIS 313/513 Applications of GIS
Prerequisite: GIS 213
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are essential to the solution of many types of management, planning,
environmental, and applied research problems. This course is designed to provide dedicated students,
instructors/tribal members or teachers with a basic understanding of raster manipulation, editing, and
geodatabases using ArcGIS. Prerequisites: GIS 213 3 credits

GIS 323 Remote Sensing
This challenging course rewards the student with an insight on classification methods of multi-spectral
data. Students will study current remote sensing systems, focusing in on the digital image processing
techniques utilized to analyze data collected by these systems. This course summarizes the physical
background of earth’s radiation interaction and provides detailed step-by-step instructions for using
satellites in earth resources applications. Lectures will review the specific airborne and spaceborne
systems, while lab assignments will cover the digital manipulation and analysis techniques employed by
today’s remote sensing technicians. Prerequisites: GIS 213
3 credits

HISA 203 American History I – to 1865
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course focuses on United States history up until the Civil War, while placing that nation within its
international context. It begins with a look at some American Indian groups immediately before European
contact and ends with the bloodiest war in U.S. history. This course examines not only traditional history—
politics, diplomacy, and wars—but also social, cultural, economic, and demographic patterns, trends, and
the everyday life of ordinary people. 3 credits

HISA 213 American History II – from 1865
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course focuses on United States history after the Civil War, while placing that nation within its international
context. It begins with a look at how the people of the United States began to recover from the bloodiest war
in U.S. history and ends with an examination of the United States’ place within the modern post-Cold War
world. This course examines not only traditional history—politics, diplomacy, and wars—but also social,
cultural, economic, and demographic patterns, trends, and the everyday life of ordinary people.
3 credits

HISA 233 Themes in World History I – to 1500
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with a “C” or better.
This course explores many of the most important developments in early human history, such as the emergence
of social inequalities, the domestication of plants and animals, and the growth of early urban settlements. In
addition, using a comparative perspective, this course explores the origins and development of many of the
most famous American, European, Asian, and African societies before AD 1500.
3 credits

HISA 243 Themes in World History II – from 1500
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with a “C” or better.
This course explores the most important historical events that have taken place throughout the world since
AD 1500 with a particular focus on the processes of colonization and imperialism. In an attempt to move
away from the traditional Eurocentric view of modern world history, this course also incorporates many case
studies told from the perspective of Asians, Africans, and Native Americas (from both North and South
America). By examining modern world history using such a dual perspective, this course demonstrates how
interactions between the colonizers and the colonized have shaped the modern world.
3 credits

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 HISA 323 American Indian History
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with “C” or better.
This course offers an in-depth study of American Indian history from the pre-Columbian era until today, with
a focus on indigenous nations within what is now the United States. This complex and fascinating history is
approached using a variety of media and sources. The course covers social, cultural, and demographic
trends, as well as political and diplomatic relationships.
3 credits

HISA 290/490 Special Topics in History
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course examines selected topics in history. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated for
credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that the
student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.

Hlth 101 Medical Terminology (online- Moodle).
This course is an introduction to medical terminology used in healthcare professions. The learner will apply
a word building system using word roots/combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes as well as abbreviations
and pathology terms to expand their knowledge of the language of health care. Learning is reinforced by the
use of flash cards, audio pronunciation CD, and interactive activities on DVD. 1 credit.

Hum 203 Introduction to Philosophy and Critical Thinking
Prerequisite: Engl 113
This course aims to provide an introduction to philosophical thinking in general rather than a full survey of
philosophical disciplines, their methods, doctrines, and leading ideas. The course will provide a preliminary
orientation about the notion of philosophical argument, its various forms and the ways arguments can be
analyzed.
3 credits

Hum 213 Music and Culture
Prerequisite: Engl 113
This course focuses on various musical styles and related cultural phenomena in relation to both western and
non-western worlds. Emphasis upon composers, musical trends, literature, elements of melody, rhythm,
form, and expression is made.
3 credits

Hum 243 Art Appreciation
Prerequisite: Engl 113
This course encourages students to be active participants in several different forms of art. In addition, the
course introduces the students to the necessary critical tools for analyzing art and heightens their awareness
of the historical context behind the ideas about western and non-western aesthetics.
3 credits

Hum 290/490 Special Topics in the Humanities
This course examines selected topics in the humanities. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated
for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that
the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.




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HV 103 Introduction to Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
Prerequisite:    College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
This course is designed to guide apprentices, entry-level technicians, and first-year students through their
first experiences in the HVACR Trade. It provides a solid and thorough introduction to the field. It is the
culmination of the efforts of industry leaders like the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA),
Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC), and Refrigeration Service Engineers Society
(RSES). It provides simple concepts that provide an overview of the world of HVACR and its main systems
and components. Coverage then progresses to increasingly complex procedures, such as maintenance and
inspection, installation and repair, and customer service and sales.
3 Credits

IT 103 Theory of Computational Devices
This is a survey course of today’s personal computers, networks, data, and other new technologies. Some of
the topics covered include algorithms, operating systems, data storage and manipulation, networking and the
Internet, software engineering and artificial intelligence. 3 Credit Hours

IT 134 A+ Certification
This course will prepare you to pass the A+ certification exams as required to become a computer service
technician. You are prepared for the A+ exam in areas like assembly and disassembly of PCs, diagnosing and
troubleshooting, basic networking, Windows and DOS. (3,2) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 103 Theory of Computational Devices

IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems
You will explore the differences between popular operating systems offered in today’s marketplace. Operating
Systems include, but not limited to Windows and UNIX. (2,2) 3 credits hours
Prerequisite: IT 103 Theory of Computational Devices

IT 203 Programming
You will be exposed to the fundamental concepts of problem solving and developing program logic using
tools and techniques of programming. Topics include algorithm development, diagramming and program
documentation and incorporating a programming language for hands-on application of programming concepts.
C++ will be from UNIX. (2,2) 3 credit hours
Prerequisites: It 103 Theory of Computational Devices, Math 154 College Algebra

IT 224 PC Design and Assembly
Participants will be able to identify essential components of a typical PC system and how they interact with
each other. By the end of the semester, participants will be able to construct a working PC system complete
with operating system. (2,4) 4 credit hours
Prerequisite: IT 134 A+ Certification

IT 243 Introduction to Networks
Physical and logical network topologies; transmission media and network access will be examined. Hardware
and software network configurations, operations and requirements will be discussed. Topics include
communication codes, transmission media encoding methods, the OSI model, network standards and protocols.
COpyright isues and ethics involved with computer operations will be discussed. 3 credits hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems




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IT 253 Supporting Workstations
Focuses on the skills necessary to install and manage a GUI workstation environment. The basic areas you
will cover include installation and configuration, architectural overview, user interface, memory management,
file I/O, network administration, communications and printing, disk utilities, troubleshooting, and multimedia.
Linux and Windows XX systems will be used. (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 134 A+ Certification

IT 273 Information Systems Management
A study of the Systems Development Life Cycle including problem investigation, determination of systems
requirements, selection of solutions, feasibility studies, cost projections and proposal writing for existing or
new systems. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: SCI 113 Technical Writing or Engl 103 Freshman English I

IT 290a, IT 290b Internship in Information Technology
This course will be offered each semester. It is designed to introduce you to the rigors of being an Information
Technology professional. You are expected to work 40 hours during the semester for each hour of credit. I
Credit Hour — up to 2 credits can be earned per semester.
Prerequisite: Freshman or Sophomore Status

IT 303 Introduction to UNIX
You will be given an introduction to UNIX operating system with specific reference to UNIX commands, the
Unix file structure, editors, and shell programming. Includes an introduction to system administration and
security. (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems

IT 313 Unix Shell Programming
UNIX is a versatile multi-user, multitasking operating system. UNIX has a structural software tool design
philosophy that is essential for producing reliable, maintainable, and portable programs. You will cover the
essential aspects of UNIX Shell programming such as the Bourne shell and shell scripts. In this class you
will learn to manage UNIX files and directories using the UNIX shell commands, work with shell variables,
metacharacters and regular expressions, use shell commands to redirect input, output and error messages,
and archive files in the background and write different types of shell scripts. (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems

IT 323 Command Line Interface
Command line concepts and syntax to perform directory hierarchy maintenance, I/O redirection, pipes, and
device and system maintenance using variables and switches are topics of the command line interface course.
The Disk Operating System (DOS) and UNIX dialects will be studied. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems

IT 333 Network Administration
This course will acquaint you to a network environment and to provide basic entry-level skills in network
administration. Hands-on exercises will allow you to become familiar with popular network operating system’s
management utilities including printing services, storage devices and setup of networking protocols.
(2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 243 Introduction to Networks, IT 253 Supporting Workstations




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IT 343 Application Software TnT
This course will help you to develop problem-solving tactics to help end users overcome difficulties with their
application program. Training aspects and how you can take a proactive approach for training end users on
application programs will be investigated. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: SCI 113 Technical Writing, IT 253 Supporting Workstations

IT 353 Internet Technologies
This course is aimed at giving you a comprehensive overview of Internet technologies. You will learn about
the history of the Internet, how to use a wide array of Internet technologies, Internet trends and current issues
relating to the Internet. Students will also learn the key skills required to create attractive, well-designed,
secure WEB sites that meet the goals of a business organization. (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 253 Supporting Workstations

IT 363 Implementing and Administrating Web Servers
In this course you will learn the fundamentals of designing, installing, configuring, maintaining and upgrading
your web site. Protocols presented include HTTP, HTTPS, FTP and SSH. Concepts covered include the use
of indexed pages, directory hierarchy, SSL Certificates, SSI designs (ASP, CGI, JSP, PHP) and Streaming
Media. Management of server logs, users and groups as they pertain to Web Servers will also be covered.
(2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 243 Introduction to Networking

IT 373 Web Design Fundamentals
This course will explore aspects of the design and creation of web sites including the initial planning, design,
implementation and publishing. With an emphasis on design, we will use web design tools such as HTML,
Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Photoshop Elements for the web will be covered. Copyright issues will also
be covered. Students will design and publish a personal web page as part of the course. There will be a
course web site with relevant URLs for that day’s topic. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 243 Introduction to Networking, IT 323 Command Line Interface

IT 383 Current Topics in Information Technology
Offers current topics from the area of Information Technology systems. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Junior Status

IT 393 Implementing and Administrating Mail Servers
In this course you will learn the fundamentals of designing, installing, configuring, maintaining and upgrading
your email site. Protocols that will be covered include SMTP, ESMTP, IMAP and POP3. Concepts covered
include the communications dialogs between MUA, MSA, MTA, MRA and MDA, the design of the MX
priority, antivirus and spam prevention techniques, email relays and mail encryption. Management of server
logs, users and groups as they pertain to Email Servers will also be covered.
(2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite IT 243 Introduction to Networking, IT 323 Command Line Interface

IT 404 Network Protocols
Focuses on TCP/IP using Microsoft Windows NT and UNIX. Topics include UNIX and Microsoft TCP/IP
addressing, subnet addressing, implementing IP routing, dynamic host configuration protocol, IP, IPX/SPX,
ATM address resolution, Net BIOS name resolution, Windows Internet name service, host name resolution,
connectivity, and troubleshooting. (3,2) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 243 Introduction to Networking, IT 323 Command Line Interface




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IT 414 Advanced NT
You will learn the installation and configuration of Windows NT Server and Workstation with an emphasis
on the management and administration of user hardware and software resources. Hands on application of
network administration principles on an operational NT Network is provided. (2,4) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems, IT 253 Supporting Workstations

IT 423 Supporting Network Operating Systems
Advanced network commands and utilities will be demonstrated to you to further supplement the skills
required by a network administrator. Directory structures, security, printing and network administration will
be covered. Troubleshooting methods and procedures will be discussed for workstations, servers and related
hardware, and printing systems. Hardware and software to aid with problem identification and resolution
will be discussed and demonstrated where possible. Network optimization and disaster recovery will be
covered as well as copyright issues and ethics involved with computer operations. (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 153 Survey of Operating Systems, IT 253 Supporting Workstations, IT 333 Network
Administration

IT 443 Advanced UNIX
This course is for users interested in becoming UNIX administrators. In this course we will identify the
hardware requirements for a UNIX system, the features of job control, the guidelines for managing disk
space usage, the benefits of networking, the features of Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP), the requirements for remote access, the features of Network Information Services (NIS) and the
features of Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). (2,2) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 303 Introduction to UNIX

IT 453 Network Security
Provides you with the essential concepts and methods for the network security. Topics covered include physical/
logical security and different methods of implementation, data encryption/decryption. There will be discussions
of commercial and open source products for firewall, proxy, cache and NAT.                                (2,2)
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 323 Command Line Interface, IT 333 Network Administration, IT 404 Network Protocols,
May be taken concurrent with IT 474

IT 474 Network Analysis
Provides you with the theory and methodologies for designing and analyzing network systems. Topics that
you will cover include techniques used by computer professionals to determine, document, and analyze the
network requirements; assessing the hardware/software needs of an organization. Emphasis will be on problem
solving and cost-analysis in a networking environment. (2,3) 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 323 Command Line Interface, IT 333 Network Administration, IT 404 Network Protocols,
May be taken concurrent with IT 453

IT 490a, IT 490b Internship in Information Technology
This course will be offered each semester. It is designed to introduce you to the rigors of being an Information
Technology professional. You are expected to work 40 hours during the semester for each hour of credit. I
Credit Hour — up to 2 credits can be earned per semester.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status

IT 402 Certification Cram Sessionin Current Technologies Test #1
This class will help you study for certifications in current technology. These include but not limited to:
operating systems, networking technologies, application software and communication technologies. (1,2) 2
Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status,

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IT 412 Certification Cram Session in Current Technologies Test #2
This class will help you study for certifications in current technology. These include but not limited to:
operating systems, networking technologies, application software and communication technologies. (1,2) 2
Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status

IT 422 Certification Cram Session in Current Technologies Test #3
This class will help you study for certifications in current technology. These include but not limited to:
operating systems, networking technologies, application software and communication technologies. (1,2) 2
Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status

IT 432 Certification Cram Session in Current Technologies Test #4
This class will help you study for certifications in current technology. These include but not limited to:
operating systems, networking technologies, application software and communication technologies. (1,2) 2
Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status

IT 442 Certification Cram Session in Current Technologies Test #5
This class will help you study for certifications in current technology. These include but not limited to:
operating systems, networking technologies, application software and communication technologies. (1,2) 2
Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status

IT 494 Capstone Project
This Capstone Project course develops an integrated understanding of the student’s overall program. It project
focuses on the best practices and techniques in Management Information Systems and Security. As a major
part of the Capstone course, students will be responsible for completing a Capstone project. This project
must be submitted to the Program Chair for approval prior to beginning the project. 4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Senior status

Lak 101 Lakota Language Seminar
This course is specifically designed for those students who understand the Lakota language, but who do not
actively use it daily. The Lakota language seminar will focus on everyday speaking and should be taken either
before or concurrently with Lak 103. It is not offered on a regular basis. 1 credits

Lak 103 Lakota Language I
This is a continuation of the introduction to the Lakota language. Emphasis will be placed on the Lakota
alphabet, kinship terms, numerical system and simple sentence structure. Added emphasis will be on everyday
language survival skills – speaking the language. Writing will be minimal. (Students who are proficient in
Lakota may challenge this course for credit.)
3 credits

Lak 233 Lakota Language II
This course is designed to continue teaching correct pronunciation, some fundamentals of Lakota grammar,
a mastery and increase of basic vocabulary and idiomatic expressions with additional emphasis on reading
and writing. Students will be expected to compose original short stories and retell. The emphasis will be on
verbal skills. Prerequisite: Lak 103 with a C or better.
3 credits



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Lak 303 Lakota Grammar
This course will examine the use of Lakota speech patterns of formal and informal speaking. The study will
focus on the parts of speech and their use in word order and meaning. Other related topics will also be
included. Prerequisites: Engl 303, Lak 423
3 credits

Lak 313 Introduction to Lakota Sociolinguistics
This course is designed to study the evolution of variations and differences that have occurred with Lakota
language usage since the pre-reservation period to the Present. It will also focus on the sociocultural factors
that have influenced the Lakota speaking styles. Prerequisites: Lak 423, Engl 303, or Chairperson Approval
3 credits

Lak 323 Lakota Language III
This course is designed to teach advanced grammar and Lakota literacy. Added emphasis will be on mastery
in the usage of honorifics in everyday situations. Verbal skills will be emphasized through storytelling and
literacy through composition. Prerequisites: Lak 103, Lak 233, Chairperson Approval
3 credits

Lak 413 Lakota Public Speaking
This course is an examination of the oratory of past and present notable Native American leaders in America
with a focus on the Lakota/Dakota communication styles. Prerequisites: Lak 423, SpCm 103

Lak 423 Lakota Language IV
This course is designed to continue teaching advanced grammar and Lakota literacy. The major emphasis
will be on the utilization of etiquettes of speech in everyday situations and Lakota literacy through writing a
term/research paper using the Lakota language. Prerequisites: Lak 103, Lak 233, Lak 323, Engl 113
3 credits

Lak 443 Lakota Language Assessment
This course is a comprehensive study of the essential principles of assessing second language learning with
an emphasis on the development of Lakota language proficiency and literacy assessment tools. Prerequisites:
Lak 423, Lak 313, Lak 433
3 credits

Lak 283/483 Internship in Lakota Studies
This course offers an on-site experience for students on the reservation or with an institution that deals with
Lakota knowledge. Students will work with cultural-religious leaders, tribal political leaders, educational
leaders, museum/archival persons, or any other persons as approved by the Lakota Studies Chairperson.
Prerequisites: Chairperson Approval and in the last semester of the AA or BA in Lakota Studies Degree
3 credits

Lak 293/493 Special Topics in Lakota Studies
This course offers a selected number of topics in Lakota Studies including the writing of local Lakota history,
Lakota language immersion sessions, and projects in Lakota arts, literature, oral history, and a variety of
other topics as requested by the communities. Prerequisites: Chairperson Approval
Variable credits

LArt 103 Traditional Lakota Art I
This course is designed as an introductory course in the crafts and artwork of the Lakota people. The Lakota
cultural crafts and techniques to be included are the designs, history of colors, and basic beading techniques.
3 credits

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LArt 113 Traditional Lakota Art II
This course is designed as an advanced course in beading techniques and a variety of Lakota and plains tribes
handicrafts. Course will include quillwork and dyes, utilizing natural paints and dyes in parfleche making,
and researching traditional and contemporary costume designs. Prerequisite: LArt 103 or Instructor Approval
3 credits

LArt 203 Indian Art History
This course will introduce the student to representative works ranging from traditional tribal art to contemporary
art, thus enhancing aesthetic appreciation and deepening understanding. Prerequisite: Engl 103
3 credits

LArt 213 Plains Indian Design Composition
This course is designed for the research and study of plains Indian design and development in two and three
dimensional art forms through skills techniques in the use of line, form, color, and intensity. Media use
includes tempera and oil.
Prerequisite: Engl 103

LArt 313 Lakota Artifact and Regalia Reproduction
This is an advanced course of study in the area of Lakota/Dakota artifact and regalia reproduction focusing
on the period of 1800 to 1923. Prerequisite: LArt 213
3 credits

LHist 203 Lakota History I
This course is an introduction to the Lakota historical development as relayed through oral history and tribal
beliefs. It is a general study of the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the Lakota people prior
to 1878. (This may apply towards the History Degree) Prerequisites: Engl 103, 3 credits

LHist 213 Lakota History II
This course is an in-depth study of the historical events, social life, cultural traditions, political structure,
leadership, and economic development of the Lakota nations and people from the beginnings of the reservation
period (1876/1878), during the beginning of the IRA period (1935) and continuing to the present. (Also
required for the History Degree) Prerequisites: Engl 113
3 credits

LHist 323 Seminar in Contemporary Indian Issues
This course is a study of contemporary Native American and Lakota historical development since 1940 with
an emphasis on active field research on the social, political, and economic aspects of reservation life. It
includes thorough examination of the Indian Reorganization Act, Termination, Civil Rights, Indian Religious
Freedom, and Self-Determination and their effects on contemporary life. Prerequisites: LHist 203 or LHist
213, LPol 223, Engl 113
3 credits

LHist 353 Lakota-U.S. Military Confrontations
This course is an in-depth study of the major military confrontations between the Lakota (Sioux) nation and
the U.S. military from the 1950’s through the 1890’s. Field work on battle sites will be conducted upon
completion of the necessary coursework. Prerequisites: LHist 203, LHist 213, LPol 223, Engl 113
3 credits




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Lit 203 Introduction to Literature
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a variety of literary styles or genres and to increase reading
and analytical skills necessary in the study of literature. A variety of literary genres will be studied including
poetry, drama, short fiction, and the novel. It is expected that the classic literary devices of plot, character,
setting, theme, etc. are taught in this course.
3 credits

Lit 223 American Literature to 1865
Prerequisites: Lit 203.
This survey explores the various efforts to establish a national literary tradition in the United States since the
colonial American era up to 1865. Indigenous, immigrant, slave, as well as settler perspectives are reviewed
and discussed. Various selected works of fiction, novels, plays, poetry, prose and short stories will be examined.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a variety of literary styles or genres and to increase reading
analytical skills necessary in the study of American Literature.
3 credits

Lit 233 American Literature since 1865
Prerequisite: Lit 203
As a chronological continuum of Lit 223, this survey course explores the various efforts to continue a
national literary tradition in the United States from the Civil War era through the twenty-first century. American
Indigenous, immigrant, settler, and slave perspectives are also included in this review. Selected works of
fiction, novels, plays, prose, and short stories will be examined.
3 credits

Lit 243 Minority Literature
Prerequisite: Lit 203
This class introduces the student to works of fiction, biographies, commentaries, films, videos, field trips,
etc., by and about minority writers. Teaching perspectives of minority writers through historical, social, and
cultural contexts will permit a better understanding of the oral and written traditions of minority peoples. The
course acquaints students with contemporary minority authors.
3 credits

Lit 323 World Literature to 1800
Prerequisite: Lit 203.
This survey includes an overview of literature from the inception of the written word to 1800. Students
develop a sympathetic understanding of other cultural backgrounds from the survey’s global spectrum. This
comparative representation begins with selections from ancient Eastern and Western societies and continues
through the end of the nineteenth century.
3 credits

Lit 333 World Literature since 1800
Prerequisite: Lit 203.
This survey includes an overview of literature from 1800 through the close of the twentieth century. Students
develop a sympathetic understanding of other cultural backgrounds from the survey’s global spectrum. This
comparative representation begins with selections from nineteenth century Eastern and Western societies and
continues through the end of the twentieth century with excerpts of modern literature from the Americas,
Asia, Europe, and the Global South.
3 credits



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Lit 343 Literature of Nature and the Environment
Prerequisite: Lit 203
The goal of this survey course is to introduce students to a variety of literary selections representative of each
genre (drama, fiction, nonfiction, poetry) reflecting a varied spectrum of views associated with naturalism
and environmentalism. The course readings provide students with a broad sampling of literature from the
past four centuries. 3 credits

Lit 403 British Literature I
Prerequisites: Lit 203
This survey explores various selected works of early British fiction, novels, plays, poetry, prose and short
stories from Beowulf through the 18th century. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a variety of
British literary authors and to increase reading analytical skills necessary in the study of British literature.
3 credits

Lit 423 Detective Fiction
Prerequisite: Lit 203.
Detective Fiction provides learners with opportunities to begin their exploration into the creatively deductive
world of mystery. As the semester progresses, it will acquaint them with the essential elements of fiction and
more specifically, the literary devices unique to the “subgenre” of the “whodunit.” Fourth year learners will
reflect their advanced level experience by initiating and maintaining an in-depth leadership function within
the class while asserting their opinions and supporting their positions with tertiary critical analyses.
3 credits

Lit 433 Literary Cinema
Prerequisite: Lit 203.
In its emphasis on the ability to discern qualitative storytelling in literature and cinema, this survey concentrates
on reinforcing students’ existing analytical literary skills. Students will critically assess the material while
reading the stories coupled with an analytical viewing of the films based on original literary works. Finally,
students will explore the adaptation process and will achieve a better understanding of it.
3 credits

Lit 290/490 Special Topics in Literature
Prerequisite: Engl 103.
This course examines selected topics in literature. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated for
credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that the
student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.

LkEd 433 Methods of Teaching the Lakota Language
Students will learn various methods for teaching the Lakota language for grades K- College. This course will
provide students with experiences using the Silent Way, Total Physical Response, and Immersion. They will
also learn elements of effective instruction and Lakota student learning styles. Activities will include the
development of lesson plans and the effective presentation of lessons. Prerequisites: Lak 423, Lak 313, Engl
113, Engl 303 or Chairperson Approval 3 credits

LkEd 453 Methods of Teaching Lakota Studies Across the Curriculum
Students will learn the various methods and teaching strategies necessary for integrating the Lakota language,
literature, history, and culture into K-12 curriculum. They will also learn elements of effective instruction
and Lakota student learning styles. Activities will include the development of lesson plans and effective
presentation of lessons. Prerequisites: General and Lakota Core Requirements
3 credits

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LkEd 473 Student Teaching Seminar in Lakota Studies
The seminar is aligned with LkEd 419 Student Teaching/ Practicum in Indian Studies. The seminar provides
opportunities to share student teaching experiences with colleagues and college faculty members. Students
will receive instruction in integrating technology, resume writing, mock interviews, developing professional
portfolios as well as character education.
Prerequisites: Completion of all Professional Core Requirements and Professional Requirements.
3 credits

LkEd 489 Student Teaching/Practicum in Indian Studies
Students spend five days a week for a full semester in supervised practice in an approved elementary classroom.
The student teaching experience will involve 8 weeks in a lower elementary classroom and an additional 8
weeks in an upper elementary classroom (or as arranged) under the guidance of certified supportive teachers.
Student teachers will fulfill the requirement of 40 hours per week in their assigned classrooms.
Prerequisites: Completion of all Professional Core Requirements and Professional Requirements.
9 credits

LLaw 203 Contract Law
Students will learn the elements of contracts, enforcement of contract law, the formation of a contract,
drafting a contract, discharge of legal obligations, assignments, and contract remedies. Prerequisite: Engl
103
3 credits

LLaw 213 Legal Research and Writing
Students will learn the basic tools of legal research and writing as used in state, federal and tribal courts. The
course includes a study of legal terminology, drafting of civil complaints, answers, pre-trial motions, briefs
and legal memoranda. Students will utilize Supreme Court opinions at the Tribal, Federal and State levels in
researching legal issues. Prerequisites: Engl 103
3 credits

LLaw 303 Criminal Law and Procedures
This course will focus on the criminal code of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and other criminal laws of other
jurisdictions. Students will learn the elements of offenses, the role of the tribal prosecutor and defense strategies.
Students will study the criminal process from arrest through arraignment, pretrial and post trial procedures.
Tribal, federal, and state criminal jurisdiction issues will be covered. Prerequisites: Engl 103
3 credits

LLaw 313 Civil Law and Procedures
This course will focus on the criminal code of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and other criminal laws of other
jurisdictions. Students will learn the elements of offenses, the role of the tribal prosecutor and defense strategies.
Students will study the criminal process from arrest through arraignment, pretrial and post trial procedures.
Tribal, federal, and state criminal jurisdiction issues will be covered. Prerequisite: LPol 223
3 credits

LLaw 323 Family Law
This course will examine the various legal and social issues involved in the practice of family law. Students
will study the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Juvenile Code of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Students will
receive instruction in client interviewing techniques for drafting of pleadings necessary in the area of divorce,
legal separation, adoption and child custody. Prerequisites: LPol 223, Engl 103
3 credits



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LLit 103 Lakota Oral Literature
This course is an analysis of Lakota oral history and literature, covering such areas as the creation of the
universe, the creation of living creatures and the Lakota people.
3 credits

LLit 213 American Indian Literature
This course is a critical survey on the history of written literature during the 19th and 20th centuries by and
about the American Indian from the western perspective. Prerequisites: LLit 103 and Engl 113
3 credits

LLit 313 Contemporary Indian Literature
This course will examine the literature of the short story, novel, poetry, film, and autobiography/ biographies
authored by contemporary American Indian writers. Prerequisites: Engl 113
3 credits

LMus 203 Lakota Dance Styles
This course is specifically designed for the study of Lakota/Dakota dance styles and forms. It covers the
evolution of Lakota/Dakota dance from traditional times to contemporary. Prerequisites: Engl 103, 3 credits

LMus 303 Lakota Music Composition
This course emphasizes the historical, cultural, and traditional aspects of the music known to the Lakota
people. Past and present music composition is included, along with the study of the musical instruments used
to accompany Lakota music. Prerequisites: LMus 203 or Instructor Approval. 3 credits

LPol 213 American Indian Political Systems
This course is a study of American Indian tribal political systems and tribal organizations for decision
making. Prerequisites: Engl 103.
3 credits

LPol 223 Lakota Tribal Law, Treaties, and Government
The concept of tribal sovereignty involving the relationship of tribal people to federal and state governments
through historical development of treaties, congressionsl acts, and court decisions. Prerequisite: Engl 103,
LHist 203 or Instructor Approval
3 credits

LPol 313 Indian Law
This course will involve an in-depth consideration of the special attributes to federal, state, and tribal laws as
they relate to Indian citizens both on and off the reservation. Prerequisites: Engl 113, LPol 223
3 credits

LPsy 323 Native American Psychology
This course is a study of Native American tribes dealing with a focus on human behavior, personality
development, individual differences, and reactions to western culture influences and environment. Prerequisites:
Engl 113, Psy 103, LSoc 103 or LHist 203
3 credits

LSoc 103 Lakota Culture
This course is a study of Lakota cultural development including a general study of customs, beliefs, rituals
and social patterns of the Lakota people.
3 credits


                                                     -186-
LSoc 223 Lakota Social Systems
This course examines and gives an understanding of Lakota society and social philosophies. The governmental
structure and morals are examined with cross-cultural values of contemporary society. Prerequisites: LSoc
103, Engl 103
3 credits

LSoc 303 American Indian Women
This course is designed to emphasize the qualities, attributes, expectations, and importance of American
Indian female etiquette with a focus on the female role. The aspects of nature to be studies in detail are the
spiritual, emotional, physical, and intellectual. Prerequisites: LSoc 103, Engl 113. 3 credits

LSoc 313 Lakota Thought and Philosophy
This course examines the customs, beliefs, and philosophical outlook of the Lakota person in relation to the
universe, to the supernatural, and to the relationship with all creation. Prerequisites: LSoc 103, Engl 113
3 credits

LSoc 403 The Culture of the American Indian
This course offers a general study of the past and present survival patterns of the American Indian in North
America. Prerequisites: LSoc 103, LHist 203, LHist 323
3 credits

LTh 443 Comparative Studies in Lakota Religion
This course is a comparative analysis of the contemporary diversity of Lakota religious practices on Lakota
reservations, including the early Christian denominations and their effects and tracing the traditional Lakota
religious practices from the pre-reservation period to the present. Prerequisites: Engl 113, LSoc 103, LSoc
313
3 credits

LSocM223 Lakota Cultural Resource Management – Archives Archaeology
This is a course designed as an introduction to preserving historical records, and the use of archival resources
with an emphasis on the role of the Oglala Lakota College archives. The content of the course will survey the
archives theory and methods which archivists use in collecting and processing historical and institutional
records. Lectures on archival theory, methods, and archaeological research methods and resources conducted
by professionals in the fields of archives and archaeology. Prerequisites: LHist 203, LSoc 103, Engl 113
3 credits

LSci 203 Traditional Plants, Foods, and Herbs
This course explores over thirty different herbs and plants that were used traditionally by Lakota households
for general health and healing purposes. Students will do local field studies and will be required to gather and
identify the different plants and learn the importance of them according to cultural beliefs, tradition, and
song. Prerequisites: 100 level Science course and Engl 113
3 credits

LSci 303 Lakota and the Environment
This course traces the evolution of the European and Native American cultures and their influence on the
ecosystem and their effects on the environment, and the transformation of a pre-industrial society into an
industrial society. It will examine the colonization efforts of the European culture on the Native American
culture and the effects industry has on the environment, land, wildlife, water, and the earth (Unci Maka).
Prerequisites: Bio 113, Engl 113
3 credits


                                                    -187-
Math 083 Basic Mathematics I
This course is intended for those students who need a review of basic computational skills as indicated by
the Math placement test. Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with whole
numbers, decimals, and fractions. Also covered are order of operations and problem solving. Prerequisite:
None
3 credits

Math 093 Basic Mathematics II
This course is intended for those students who need a review of more advanced computational skills as
indicated by the Math placement test. Topics include ratio/percent, measurement, unit conversion,
introduction to algebra and geometry. Prerequisite: An acceptable score on the math placement
examination or a grade of “pass” in Math 083.
3 credits

Math 103 Elementary Algebra
This course prepares students for Intermediate Algebra. Topics covered include the Real number system,
solving linear equations, formulas, graphing, exponents and polynomials. Prerequisite: An acceptable
score on the math placement examination or a grade of “pass” in Math 093.
3 credits

Math 123 Introduction to Statistics
Topics include samples and populations, distributions, descriptive statistics, probability and statistical
inference, experimental design, correlation and linear regression, and questionnaire methods. A lab portion
of the course will introduce students to the use of computer-based statistical programs to solve problems in
elementary statistics. Prerequisite: Math 134 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
4 credits

Math 134 Intermediate Algebra
This course prepares the student for College Algebra. Topics covered in this course are the basic rules of
algebra, properties of real numbers, order and absolute value, integer exponents, radicals and rational
exponents, polynomials and special products, factoring, the graphs of lines on the Cartesian plane and
fractional expressions. Prerequisite: Math 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or an acceptable score on the
mathematics placement examination.
4 credits

Math 154 College Algebra
Topics include functions and their graphs, including polynomial and rational functions, exponential and
logarithmic functions. Absolute value equations and inequalities; compounds inequalities; complex
numbers; systems of second degree equations and inequalities; conic sections; matrices and determinants
as well as mathematical induction and the Binomial Theorem are included. Prerequisite: Math 134 with a
grade of “C” or better, or an acceptable score on the mathematics placement examination.
4 credits

Math 163 Trigonometry
Topics include trigonometric functions of real numbers and their graphs; inverse trigonometric functions;
solutions of triangles and applications thereof; trigonometric identities and equations; polar coordinate
system, graphing in polar coordinates, complex numbers and DeMoivre’s Theorem. Prerequisite: Math
154 with a grade of “C” or better, or an acceptable score on the mathematics placement examination.
Math 154 may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor.
3 credits


                                                   -188-
Math 194 Calculus I
A study of plane analytic geometry, limits, derivatives of algebraic and elementary transcendental
functions, differentiation, anti-differentiation, and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions with
applications in each area. Prerequisites: Math 163 completed with a grade of “C” or better, or an
acceptable score on the calculus qualifying examination.
4 credits

Math 214 Calculus II
Continuation of Math 194 for transcendental functions, integration techniques, infinite series and
sequences, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.
Prerequisites: Math 194 completed with a grade of “C” or better, or an acceptable score on the calculus
qualifying examination.
4 credits

Math 223 Mathematics for Elementary Teacher I
This course utilizes an inquiry-based approach to gain understanding of mathematical concepts at the concrete,
representational and abstract levels. Topics include problem solving, sets, algebraic thinking, the study of
numeration systems, fundamental operations of arithmetic (properties and algorithms), and elementary number
theory. The processes of problem solving (representation, reasoning, making connections, and communication
of ideas) are emphasized throughout the course. Direct connections are made between course content and the
Common Core for Mathematics. Prerequisite: Math 103 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Math 224 Calculus III
A continuation of Math 214. Study includes polar coordinates, parametric equations, vector-valued
functions, functions of multiple variables, multiple integrals and line and surface integrals. Topics also
covered are level curves, gradients, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Prerequisite: Math 214, with a
grade of “C” or better.
4 credits

Math 233 Mathematics for Elementary Teacher II
This course utilizes an inquiry-based approach to gain understanding of mathematical concepts at the concrete,
representational and abstract levels. Topics include the extended number system (integers and rational numbers),
proportional reasoning, and probability and statistics. Problem solving, representation, reasoning, making
connections, and communication of ideas are emphasized throughout the course. Direct connections are
made between course content and the Common Core Standards for Mathematics. Completion of Math 223 is
recommended prior to taking this course. Prerequisite: Math 103 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Math 243 Mathematics for Elementary Teacher III
This course utilizes an inquiry-based approach to gain understanding of mathematical concepts at the concrete,
representational and abstract levels. Topics include properties of geometric shapes, transformational geometry,
coordinate geometry, and geometry as measurement. Problem solving, representation, reasoning, making
connections, and communication of ideas are emphasized throughout the course. Direct connections are
made between course content and the Common Core Standards for Mathematics. Completion of Math 233 is
recommended prior to taking this course. Prerequisite: Math 103 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits




                                                    -189-
Math 263 Discrete Structures
This course covers fundamental topics in data structures and discrete mathematics. The topics are
presented in an integrated manner that provides the discrete math foundations for data structures and
computing applications of discrete mathematics concepts. Topics covered include stacks, queues, linked
lists, trees, algorithms for searching and sorting, finite state automata, and concepts of computability and
decidability. Topics from discrete math include sets and various types of relations (functions, graphs, trees,
lattices), recursion and inductive proofs, Boolean logic, relational algebra, predicate calculus, series and
limits, and asymptotic behavior of searching and sorting algorithms. Programming exercises are assigned
throughout the course. Prerequisite: Math 154 completed with a grade of “C” or better, IT 203.
3 Credits

Math 324 Geometry for Educators
A formal approach to Euclidean Geometry involving points, lines, planes, basic constructions, polygons,
circles and three-dimensional figures. Logic, reasoning, direct and indirect proofs in two-column and
paragraph form will be integrated where appropriate. A methodology component is included.
Prerequisite: Math 163 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
4 credits

Math 323 Math for Elementary Teachers I
This course covers the first part of the mathematics content taught in elementary schools. This course -
along with Math 333 - is required for all bachelor degree education majors. Topics include problem
solving, sets and functions, the study of numeration systems, basic operations (properties and algorithms)
and whole numbers, integers and rational numbers; and elementary number theory. Prerequisite: Math
134 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Math 333 Math for Elementary Teachers II
This course covers the second part of the mathematics content taught in elementary schools. Topics
include probability and statistics, problem solving, measurement, properties of geometric shapes,
coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry. Prerequisite: Math 323 completed with a grade of
“C” or better.
3 credits

Math 343 Matrix Theory and Linear Algebra
Matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, vector algebra and geometry in Euclidean 3-
space, eigenvalues, eigenvectors. Vector spaces, subspaces, bases, and dimension. Linear transformations,
representation by matrices, nullity, rank, isomorphism. Prerequisite: Math 214 with a grade of “C” or
better.
3 credits

Math 483 Multivariate Statistics (replaces Advanced Statistics)
Course Description: This computer-assisted course explores the theory and application of multivariate
statistical techniques including but not limited to discriminate analysis, principle components analysis, cluster
analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance. It is helpful, but not required to be engaged in research that
has yielded data requiring statistical analysis. Math 123 (“C” or better).
3 credits

Math 290/490 Special Topics in Math
A study in selected topics in mathematics. Topics may change each semester and may be repeated for credit.
Credits may vary from one (1) to four (4) credits. When taken at the 200 level, it is expected that the student
will do sophomore level work. A 400 level implies a senior level course with extensive work expected.

                                                     -190-
MIS 113 Applied Information Processing
An applied course designed to meet the needs of today’s college students across the disciplines. Topics
include, but are not limited to: computers based training techniques and on-line testing, E-mails and attachments,
on-line conferences, delimited web-based research techniques, software applications, e-slides and web page
presentation/publishing tools, and report writing documentation.
3 Credit Hours

MIS 143 Introduction to Spreadsheets
This is a continuation of the study of spreadsheets emphasizing the advanced features of functions, macros
and business graphics. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 113 Applied Information Processing

MIS 213 Concepts of Database Management
An introduction to Data Base Management Systems (DBMS). Topics include but not limited to: relational
models, keys, functions, queries, reports and management of database systems. 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 113. Applied Information Processing

MIS 243 Data Based Applications and Design
A continuation of the study of database emphasizing data base concepts, design and management techniques.
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 113 Applied Information Processing

MIS 333 Database Development and Design I
The first of two courses uses and applied approach to learning MySQL, a database management (DBMS).
Topics include but not limited to: table creation, constraints, data manipulation and users.
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 243 Introduction to Netorking

MIS 343 E-Commerce Technology
This course provides the student an introduction to e-commerce technologies. Topics include but not limited
to: the on-line presence, data security, payment systems and legal/ethical issues.
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 333 Network Administration

MIS 374 Structured Query Language and Reporting
SQL and Reporting is a course designed to provide SQL mastery.
4 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 243 Introduction to Networking

MIS 413 Systems Analysis and Design
This course will provide the student acceptable approaches to system analysis, design and implementation.
Students will begin with systems analysis, determining system requirements, evaluating systems and designing
and implement a system.
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: IT 273 Business Information Systems Management

MIS 423 Database Development and Design II
The second of two courses uses an applied approach to learning MySQL, a database management system
(DBMS). Topics include but not limited to: sorts, joins, group functions, output and SQL.
3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: MIS 333 Network Administration

                                                     -191-
NaRs 113 Watershed Principles
This course covers watershed processes, characteristics and measurements, land use practices for proper
watershed management; analysis techniques. Hydroponic cycle and components, ownership and value of
water, organizations of water managers, water quality and quantity concepts relating to range, forests,
agriculture, mining and other land uses, data sources and analysis for decision making, conservation methods,
careers. 3 credits

NaRs 123 Forest Principles
Forests processes and characteristics; measurement and analysis techniques, forest uses and management
methods. This course covers basic silviculture, forest growth, harvest regulation in forest crop production,
ecologic, climatic, hydrologic processes and characteristics, tree growth processes and tree characteristics,
principles of measurements of trees, logs, growth and timber cruising, silviculture practices in thinning,
health control, and harvest cutting, forest management and harvesting for products. 3 credits

NaRs 133 Dendrology (Tree Identification)
This course covers identification and systematic classification of trees, tree descriptions and characteristics
useful in classification and identification.
3 credits

NaRs 233 Bison Science
This course covers bison and the relationship to the Lakota culture, and the natural environment of primarily
the Great Plains region. Students will gain an understanding of bison in regards to history, other wildlife,
range ecology, management, production and economics.
3 credits

NaRs 323 Natural Resource Measurements
Basic vocabulary, concepts, tools, procedures and report forms for measuring natural resources. Emphasis
is on concepts of sampling, degree of accuracy and on interpretation of data collected. Prerequisites: NaRs
103 & NaRs 143.       3 credits

NaRs 403 Introduction to Tourism
Introduction to the art, science, and business of attracting and transporting visitors to local natural resource
sites. Look at local accommodations and ways to graciously cater to their needs and wants. Explore what
makes tourism possible and how tourism can become an important factor in the wealth of any nation.
Prerequisites: NaRs 103 & NaRs 143
3 credits

NSci 253 Hydrology
This course introduces the hydrologic cycle and focuses on precipitation and surface flow. The following
topics will be covered and quantitative techniques applied to: precipitation, including causes, duration and
measurement; infiltration and soil-water processes; evapotranspiration; surface runoff; and flow systems,
including rivers, channels and impoundments. Basic concepts in fluid mechanics such as pressure, friction
and pressure head will also be addressed. Prerequisites: Math 154, Geol 143, completed with a grade of “C”
or better. 3 credits

NSci 303 Integrated Environmental Science
This course will cover an interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental sciences. The Western
science of ecology and earth sciences, traditional Lakota and other indigenous knowledge and perspectives
are examined. These topics are presented with consideration of the social, economic and political aspects of
environmental issues. Prerequisites: LSci 203 and Engl 113 with grades of “C” or better.
3 credits

                                                    -192-
NSci 323 Principals of Environmental Science
Introduction to the basic principles of environmental management, environmental science and engineering.
The course will teach the fundamental physical, biological, and chemical principles of environmental
processes. The course will also explore the impact of humans and human activity on ecosystems in the
environment. This course is co-listed with Engr 223. Prerequisites: Chem 233.
3 Credits

NSci 363 Fluvial Morphology
Fluvial processes incorporate information about river mechanics, geomorphology, hydraulics, and sedimentation
into classification system that is based on the morphological characteristics of rivers. Classification of river
systems gives insights into sustainable watershed use and channel stability. The Rosgen Stream Classification
System is a widely used method to evaluate stream potential, and to identify departures from steam potential.
Through monitoring the potential of a stream, environmental scientists can sustainable manage watersheds,
evaluate the effectiveness of river improvement projects, and assess changes in river condition. Prerequisites:
EnS 253, completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

NSci 373 Watershed Assessment Techniques
Running water habitats are rich and complex environments for biological study. Understanding how these
lotic ecosystems function requires an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating hydrology, water chemistry,
environmental engineering, and biology. This course will discuss habitat, life in running waters, energy and
nutrients, community patterns, and biodiversity. The focus of the class will be on fieldwork to apply these
concepts through recording and analyzing field data from reservation streams.
Prerequisites: Chem 233, NSci 363, all completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

NSci 393 Research Methods
This course introduces students to the fundamental practices of research, including, the scientific method,
research design, sampling, data analysis and interpretation, manuscript preparation, and professional
presentation. Participation in a closely mentored research project is preferred: may be taken concurrently
with NSci 493. Course Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
3 credits

NSci 413 Air Pollution
This course explores the causes of natural and anthropogenic causes of air pollution. Topics covered will
include the chemistry of air pollution, dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, and the effects of air
pollution on biota and the environment. An overview of laws and the regulations used to regulate emissions
from stationary as well has mobile sources will be presented. Indoor air pollution and noise pollution will be
discussed. Finally, the course will address the effects of pollution on the atmosphere itself. Prerequisite:
NSci 323 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

NSci 433 Waste Management
Waste management discusses the proper treatment and/or storage of solid waste, industrial and municipal
wastewater, and water quality issues in rivers and lakes. Students will use mass balance approaches and
other analytical techniques to find steady-state solutions to contamination, solid waste, and wastewater
problems. Prerequisites: NSci323 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits




                                                    -193-
NSci 463 Groundwater
This course involves a study of subsurface water quality and water flow. Topics will include migration of
water through the vadose zone, soil moisture, ground water recharge, flow through aquifers, methods of
measuring flow direction and velocity. Chemical interaction between the ground water aquifer and ground
water will be discussed, along with the factors effecting the rate of contaminate migration in ground water
and soils. A laboratory portion of the class may include the use of the Geoprobe® to drill and complete
monitoring wells. Prerequisite: Phys 113, NSci 253, and Geol 143, all completed with a grade of “C” or
better. 3 credits

NSci 473 Wetlands
This course covers the fundamental processes contributing to the unique nature of wetland ecosystems; as
well as the various functions and values associated with wetlands. This class focuses on the hydrologic,
geochemical, microbial processes, and the delineation of wetlands. Prerequisites: NSci363, NSci 323,
completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

NSci 483 Renewable Energy Technologies
This course will provide an introduction to renewable energy technologies, primarily solar photovoltaic,
wind power generation, efficient building design and materials, and passive solar heating. Renewable energy
system design and installation will be covered, including load analysis, system sizing and location, and
installation and monitoring. Stand-alone and grid- systems will be covered. Prerequisites: Completion of
Math 154 and Phys 113 with grades of “C” or better.
3 credits

NSci 443 Paleontology
In this course students will study the history and evolution of life on Earth as preserved in the fossil records
of invertebrates, vertebrates, and plants. Students will also be introduced to aspects of systematic anatomical
description, paleoecology, paleoclimatology, and taphonomy. Special emphasis will be placed on Cenozoic
fossil floras and faunas of western South Dakota and the Pine Ridge Reservation. Prerequisites: Geol 153
and Biol 463 (“C” or better).
3 credits

NSci 493 Research
This course consists of supervised research with a faculty mentor. Course requirements will vary depending
on the nature and stage of completion of the research. Research may consist of part of the faculty mentor’s
research, or an independent project. This course requires students to be internally motivated to succeed.
Prerequisites: NSci 393 (“C” or better)
3 credits

Nurs. 218 Foundations of Holistic Nursing
This course will introduce the student to concepts basic to the nursing profession and to the roles of the
associate degree nurse. The student will begin to utilize the nursing process as the means of providing basic
nursing care to meet the bio-psycho-cultural needs of the individual with emphasis on the healthy elderly.
Health promotion techniques as well as basic skills of health assessment and nursing care will be emphasized.
Sub concepts of critical thought, therapeutic communication, pharmacology, medication administration and
nutrition will be introduced. Lakota values of knowledge, respect, generosity and courage will be integrated
into theory and clinical expectations. Clinical experiences will be provided through the I.H.S. Outpatient
clinics and Acute Acre Unit, Cohen Residential home/visits to well elderly in the community, and the Bennett
County Nursing Home, Martin, SD.
Fall Semester Placement, 8 credits (6 theory credit hours, and 2 clinical credit hours ( at 3 to 1 ratio) for 90
clinical hours. Prerequisites: Requires formal admission to the nursing program. Co-requisites: Bio 234.

                                                    -194-
Nurs. 226 Holistic Maternal- Child Nursing.
This course will introduce the student to the psycho-social-cultural health of the individual from conception
through adolescence. Included are concepts of pregnancy, labor and delivery, post-partum, newborn, child
growth and development, health maintenance, and prevention from infancy through late adolescence within
the context of the family as a whole. Sub concepts include nutrition, communication, and pharmacology in
these populations. The student will further develop health assessment and nursing care skills for the female/
maternity/fetal/newborn and pediatric client. Common childhood illnesses and health imbalances will be
introduced. The student will expand skills in the use of the nursing process and critical thinking in meeting
maternal/child health care needs within the family system, well child and acute care settings. The maternal
child unit is viewed as a member of the tiwahe/tiospaye(family) as well as member of the tribe/society.
Lakota values of respect, courage, wisdom and generosity are integrated into the didactic and clinical
components. . Facilities utilized include I.H.S Hospital Pine Ridge.-Women’s Clinic, Maternity Unit, Well
Child Clinic, Head Start facilities on the Pine Ridge Reservation and Rapid City Regional Hospital- Pediatric
Unit.
Spring Semester Placement, 6 credits (4 theory credit hours, and 2 clinical credit hours (at 3:1 ratio) for 90
total clinical hours. Prerequisites: N. 218, Bio 234. Co-Requisites: N. 224, Micro 204.

Nurs. 224, Holistic Mental Health Nursing
This course focuses on the health restorative aspects of common mental health problems. The student will
continue to expand skill levels in the use of the nursing process by providing care in acute care and community
setting for individuals experiencing difficulty with behaviors and/or relationships. The student will further
develop therapeutic communication techniques and psycho-social assessments for these individuals. Facilities
utilized include I.H.S. Hospital, Pine Ridge, and community agencies.
Spring Placement: 4 credits (3 theory credit hours, and 1 clinical credit hour (3:1 ratio) for 45 total clinical
hours.
Prerequisites: N. 218, Bio 234 Co-requisites: N. 226 and Micro 204.

Nurs. 312 Pharmacology for Nursing I.
This course will be an introduction to drug therapy with the student of specific drug classifications using the
nursing process, with a focus on the general principles of pharmacology, therapeutic uses, toxicity, and
mechanisms of action for each class of drugs. The course is designed to closely follow the body systems and
corresponding health disorders covered in N. 317, offered in the fall semester.
Fall Placement: 2 theory hours of credit.
Prerequisites: N. 224,226 and Micro 204. Co-requisites N. 317 and N.313. (Or permission from Nursing
Chairperson and course instructor for non- nursing students.)

Nurs. 313. Professional and Trans-Cultural Nursing with Lakota Emphasis
This course will introduce the student to expanded trans-cultural nursing concepts, assessments, and the role
of culture in understanding and caring for clients of diverse backgrounds in health care settings. Various
cultures will be examined for their concepts of health and illness with special emphasis on providing health
care in the Lakota cultural context. The student will also be introduced to the concept of culture of professional
nursing, institutional norms, behaviors, and communication patterns that are critical to the student’s transition
into the health workplace. Student will gain further self awareness of their racial, ethnic, and cultural
backgrounds as a prerequisite for eliciting and responding to client’s needs. Cross-cultural communication
will be addressed to provide the student with skills to negotiate differences between clients and providers
around health and illness issues.
Fall Placement: 3 theory hours of credit
Prerequisites N. 224, N. 226, Micro 204. Co-requisites N. 312, N.317




                                                     -195-
Nurs. 317 Holistic Adult Health Nursing I.
This course will focus on nursing care and the application of the nursing process in the care of the adult
experiencing selected pathophysiological processes affecting body regulatory mechanisms. This course builds
upon basic nursing knowledge and skills established during the first year of the program. Opportunities to
apply theoretical concepts and perform nursing skills specific to adult clients are provided through faculty
guided learning experiences in acute health care settings. Clinical experiences will include home health/
hospice programs at Chadron Community Hospital, Chadron, Ne. and Bennett County Hospital, Martin,
SD, and acute care hospital setting at VA Medical Center, Hot Springs, SD.
Fall Placement: 7 credits (4 theory credit hours, 3 clinical hours at a 3:1 ration) 135 total clinical hours.
Prerequisites: N. 224, N. 226, Micro 204. Co-requisites: N. 312, N. 313.

Nurs. 322 Pharmacology for Nursing II
This course is a continuation of N. 312 and continues to present knowledge of specific drug classification
using the nursing process, with a focus on general principles of pharmacology, therapeutic uses, and mechanisms
of action for each class of drugs. This course is designed to closely follow the body systems and corresponding
health disorders covered in the N. 326 course.
Spring Placement: 2 credits (theory).
Prerequisites: N.312, N.317 Co-requisites: N. 326, N. 324. (Or with permission of Nursing Chairperson and
course instructor for non nursing students)

Nurs. 324- Nursing Capstone
This course is the culmination nursing practicum course which will begin mid-way during the last spring
semester and will allow the students the opportunity to demonstrate competencies with terminal program
outcomes and to refine their nursing care practice skills. Knowledge and skills from basic and general education,
science and nursing disciplines are integrated while implementing increasingly complex roles to deliver safe,
competent quality nursing care to individuals and groups in focused clinical settings. Student will collaborate
with faculty and a preceptor in a chosen care setting, planning, organizing, and evaluating a learning experience
and practicing professional nursing at the beginning nurse level. Within the seminar context, the student will
be expected to explore current literature and research utilized for health promotion and protection, health
restoration, maintenance and support.
Spring Placement: 4 credits (1 credit hour classroom synthesis seminar, 3 clinical hours at a 3:1 ration) total
clinical hours 135.
Prerequisites: N. 312, N. 313, N. 317. Co-requisites: N. 322 and N. 326

Nurs. 328 Holistic Adult Health Nursing II
Prerequistes: N. 312, 313, 317 Co-requisites: N. 322, N. 324
This course is a continuation of N. 317 and will continue to emphasize nursing care and application of the
nursing process in the care of the adult experiencing selected pathophysiological processes affecting body
regulatory systems. Students will expand their use of critical thinking and the nursing process by providing
nursing care, including nursing management skills to individuals in the hospital setting. Clinical experiences
will include an emergency room rotation, as well as acute care hospital settings. Facilities utilized will
include the Indian Health Service Hospital, Pine Ridge and may include Chadron Community Hospital,
Chadron, NE, Fall River Hospital, Hot Springs, and Rapid City Regional Hospital, South Dakota.
Spring Placement: 8 credits (6 theory credit hours, 2 clinical hours at a 3:1 ratio) 90 clinical hours during the
first half of the semester.

OEd 103 Computer Basics
Prerequisite: None
This course provides a working knowledge of the basics of computer use. Students will be introduced to the
basic workings of the computer, common software applications, basic Internet usage including sending and
receiving email, sending attachments, and will learn the keyboard. 3 credits

                                                     -196-
OEd 123 Word Processing I
Prerequisites: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate /MIS 113
This course provides opportunities for skill development in the electronic procedures of producing quality
business documents. Word Processing Software is used to develop the competencies of creating, formatting,
editing/revising and the printing of documents such as memos, letters, reports, tables, labels, envelopes, and
etc. Competencies in the areas of composing and proofreading documents, and producing effective
communication skills are the objectives of this course.
3 credits

OEd 133 Records Management
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
This course will apply alphabetic, geographic, numeric and subject filing procedures according to the rules
established by ARMA (American Records Management Association). Storage systems, file maintenance,
records control, and electronic filing are included in this course. Records Management is a part of all offices
nationwide.
3 credits

OEd 153 Professional Development
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
This course is designed to provide students with professional job skills and professional job seeking skills. A
“Professional Portfolio” will be compiled during this class. Items, to be included but not limited to, are:
resume, transcript, graded school assignments, achievements/honors, volunteer work certificates or projects,
scholarship letters, recommendation letters, and any other documents that will help the student become
successfully employed. Parliamentary Procedures, Robert’s Rules of Order, will also be studied.
3 credits

OEd 173* Dictation/Transcription
Prerequisite: OEd 123
This course provides fundamental instruction in the use of dictating/transcribing equipment in preparing
office letters, correspondence and meeting minutes. The course includes a review of spelling, rules of dictation,
rules of transcription and the mechanics of producing error free documentation at employable production
rates.
3 credits

OEd 243* Office Management, Security & Safety
Prerequisites: CS 103, Engl 103, MIS 113, OEd 153, and OEd 133 or with approval of Department
Director.
This course features modern practices and problems in the business office. Office safety, office/document
security, work ethics, problem-solving and decision-making tools, social responsibilities, organizational
structures, supervising, staffing, training, and office control through a systems analysis process are areas to
be studied.
3 credits

OEd 253* Word Processing II (General)
Prerequisite: OEd 123
This course develops the advanced application competencies of document composition. Improved productivity
in the most efficient, timesaving way of producing office documents using electronic equipment and templates,
proofreading/editing documents will be a major objective of this course. This course has an exit requirement
of 40 words-per-minute without error.
3 credits


                                                     -197-
OTech 273 Office Technology Internship
Prerequisite: Final semester of Program or department approval.
Students will work as a supervised office assistant in an office on or off the reservation in a tribal, government,
or private entity for ninety hours. A daily log of hours, activities performed, an overall report of the internship
experience, plus the normal signed documents required to take the internship work experience will be required.
3 credits

OTech 283 Keeping Financial Records (formerly: Entr 103)
Prerequisite: None
This course will give the student a thorough background in the basic record keeping skills used in business.
The skills presented will also serve as a sound background for employment in office jobs. Students will be
working with budgets, credit records, cash receipts, checking account records, petty cash records, retail
charge sales, accounts receivable and payable, payroll records, and etc. 3 credits

OTech 293 Record Keeping Application Software (formerly: Entr 123)
Prerequisite: OTech 283 or with approval of instructor or director.
Accounting software for small business and entrepreneurship will be introduced for business recordkeeping
and management. An example of this would be “Quick Books”. An introduction to a word processing
program and a spreadsheet program will be provided so that the student will be able to learn how to integrate
financial documents into letters or reports and how to import data from an existing spreadsheet to a bookkeeping
management program. 3 credits

OMath 113 Occupational Math
Prerequisite: None
This one-semester course helps students develop mathematical skills needed in the occupation that they are
seeking. It provides a comprehensive coverage of the basic computational skills and their applications. The
course is developed to meet not only the needs of the traditional post-secondary student, but also the needs of
the mature student whose mathematical proficiency may have declined during years away from formal
schooling. 3 credits

Phys 113 Survey of Physics
This course is designed to cover broad topics such as mechanics, states of matter, wave motion, electricity
and magnetism. Focus will be given to development of students critical thinking skills. Students will be
challenged to apply these skills to conceptual type situations as well as problems that require a fundamental
knowledge of college level algebra. Prerequisites: Math 163 completed with a grade of “C” or better.
3 credits

Phys 214 Physics I
The basic physic principles of Newton’s laws of motion and the conservation laws concerning momentum,
energy and angular momentum are applied to the linear and curvilinear motion of particles, simple harmonic
motion and the rotation of rigid bodies. An introduction to relativity and quantum concepts will also be
included. Prerequisites: Phys 113 completed with a “C” or better or an acceptable score on a Physics I
qualifying examination and prior/concurrent registration in Math 214.
4 credits

Phys 223 Physics II
This is a continuation of the basic physical principles covered in Physics I, which extends to magnetic fields,
and electric fields. Charged particles and electrical current are covered as well as basic DC and AC circuits.
Gaussian surfaces, resistance, capacitance, and magnetic induction are studied. Extensive calculus is used.
Prerequisite: Phys 214, completed with a grade of “C” or better, and at least concurrent registration in Math
224.     3 credits

                                                      -198-
Phys 221 Physics II Laboratory
Prerequisites: Physics 223 is to be taken concurrently.
A hands on introduction to physical phenomena. Experiments will be performed in kinematics, force,
freefall, projectile motion, friction, rotational motion, electrostatics and magnetic fields, simple ac/dc circuits,
and optics. The experiments supplement the work in Phys 214, and Phys 223. 1 credit

Physics 253 Astronomy
Covers topics in contemporary astronomy that explores the nature, methods, and limitations of scientific
inquiry to understand the structure and evolution of the Universe. This includes the history of astronomy,
motions of the night sky, the solar system, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisite: Phys 113
completed with a “C” or better.
3 credits

Physics 434 Modern Physics
Covers topics in thermodynamics (such as temperature, heat, laws of thermodynamics, and the kinetic theory
of gases) and modern physics (such as relativity; models of the atom; quantum mechanics; and atomic,
molecular, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics). Prerequisite: Physics 224 with a grade of ‘C’ or better.
4 credits

Phys 324 Physics II for Educators
Prerequisite: Phys 214, completed with a grade of “C” or better, and at least concurrent registration in Math
224, or permission of instructor.
This is a continuation of the basic physical principles covered in Physics I, which extends to magnetic fields,
and electric fields, light and optics. A methodology component is included. Extensive calculus is used. 4
credits

Phys 321 Physics for Educators Lab
Prerequisites: Physics 324 is to be taken concurrently.
A hands-on introduction to physical phenomena. Experiments will be performed in kinematics, force, freefall,
projectile motion, friction, rotational motion, electrostatics and magnetic fields, simple ac/dc circuits, and
optics. The experiments supplement the work in Phys 214, and Phys 323.
1 credit

Plmb 103 Introduction to Plumbing
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
This course is designed to help the students develop basic competencies. The course content will deliver the
practical, on-the-job information needed to meet the workforce training needs of the industry. The course
includes safety on the job, basic fixtures & appliances, piping and sewage disposal as well as math and
science concepts. This course will reflect the most current plumbing products, materials, and technology on
the market, including all-new coverage of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST).
3 Credits

PSc 233 Weed Science
Principles of chemical, mechanical and cultural methods of control; identification of weed plants and weed
seeds. Prerequisite: Range 103
3 credits

PSc 303 Crop and Forage Production
Emphasis on forage production, harvesting, storage, (alfalfa, silage, hay) range history, ecology, physiology
of the forage plants, some grazing management. Prerequisites: Rang 103
3 credits

                                                      -199-
Pols 203 American Government
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with “C” or better.
This course is a survey of the history, structure, and functioning of the United States federal government and
its agencies. Attention is focused on formal and informal influences, and on decision making at the national
level. Students will be asked to assess the subject matter in relation to their own lives and communities.
3 credits

Pols 323 International Politics
Prerequisite: Pols 203 or HISA 243 recommended.
This course focuses on international political systems and world politics. Topics include national ideologies,
forms of political organization, international law, imperialism, and contemporary world politics.
3 credits

Pols 343 Government Administration
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with “C” or better.
This course uses contemporary public administration literature, public management cases, and simulations
to introduce students to the theory and practice of administration of government programs. Students work in
teams to resolve issues and problems common to the public service environment.
3 credits

Pols 423 Environmental Policy and Politics
Prerequisite: Engl 113 with “C” or better.
This course examines how environmental policies are formed and implemented – or not implemented. Students
study the basic United States environmental policies and look at how these policies impact land and resources
on reservations, nationally, and globally. The emphasis is on providing students who will work in natural
resource areas the practical policy information they need to be successful professionals, particularly in
government agencies. Lakota land and resources issues receive special consideration.
3 credits

Pols 290/490 Special Topics in Political Science
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course examines selected topics in political science. Topics will change each semester and may be
repeated for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is
expected that the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level
course with extensive work expected.

Psy 103 General Psychology
Prerequisite: Engl 103.
This course introduces students to psychology, the study of human thought and behavior. While psychology
is most often associated with clinical issues (e.g. mental disorders and therapies), this makes up only a small
portion of the field. Other topics discussed include motivation and emotion, learning and memory, perception,
and how we are influenced by others.
3 credits

Psy 213 Developmental Psychology
Prerequisites: Engl 113, Psy 103.
This course surveys the processes of change throughout the individual human life-span, from conception to
death. It introduces various perspectives on human development from the fields of psychology, education,
and indigenous knowledge, and includes Lakota concepts. It examines methods used to study human
development, and explores special problems inherent in developmental research.
3 credits

                                                    -200-
 Psy 290/490 Special Topics in Psychology
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course examines selected topics in psychology. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated
for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that
the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.

Rang 103 Botany of the Northern Plains
Systematic study of plants, including their anatomy, classification, and nomenclature, with special emphasis
on species native to the northern Great Plains and the Pine Ridge Reservation.
Prerequisites: Bio 153/151 (“C” or better).
3 credits

Range 113 Range Principles
Application of range science principles to management of rangelands. Emphasizes range history, ecology
and physiology of range productivity and utilization; range inventory and analysis; systems of grazing
management and range improvement. Prerequisite: Range 103
3 credits (2 lab, 2 lecture)

Rang 443 Range Ecology
Description of the range ecosystems of the U.S. with a discussion of the major uses of each, and with a focus
on the Pine Ridge reservation. Discussion of management problems on private ranches and public lands.
The major range plants and animals of each region will be studied along with the ecology, forage value and
grazing responses of important range plant species.
3 credits

SCED 403 Methods for Teaching Secondary Mathematics
Topics from secondary mathematics presented from advanced standpoint and designed to meet the needs of
teachers. Topics will include mathemtical terminology, elements of number theory, problem solving, probability,
applications of mathematics. This course will provide students with experience in use of various types of
math manipulatives, computer programs and other math instructional materials. Students will learn the elements
of effective secondary instruction, different models of classroom management, learning styles and cooperative
learning. Lessons will be designed and based around the South Dakota Content Standards. Students with
special needs, inclusion strategies and parental/community involvement strategies will be reviewed. The
student will plan lessons utilizing this information and present lessons to the class
3 Credits

SCED 413 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science
Students will review contemporary science materials, resources, educational technology and computer software.
Process science, planning, safety and computer implementation are emphasized. Students will create and
present formal and informal lessons. Lessons will be designed and based around the South Dakota State
Content Standards. Special attention will focus on assessment of science, use of Lakota culture in lesson
plans, individualizing instruction and promoting character education - Wolakota. Other topics include
cooperative learning, lesson plan design and interdisciplinary teaching.
3 Credits




                                                    -201-
ScEd 443 Reading in the Content Area
Students must be able to read a variety of informational texts and produce written documents. This course
will introduce the tools necessary to integrate literacy strategies into content learning to help raise student
achievement in content area classes such as social studies, science and mathematics. Emphasis areas include
cultural and linguistic diversity, student motivation, formal and informal literacy assessment to guide instruction,
effective instructional methods and learning strategies, and informational technologies to foster literacy.
Course participants will develop lesson plans that model literacy integration across the curriculum that align
to the Common Core Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects.
Specific attention will be given to meeting the needs of Native American middle school and high school
students. Pre-requisites: Ed 313, ExEd 313, Ed 323
3 credits

SCI 113 Technical Writing and Communications
This class will cover the essentials of writing clear, concise proposals, reports, technical manuals, letters,
memos, bid specifications, websites and other Information Technology documents. The student will also
learn how to conduct a professional presentation. (This course DOES NOT satisfy the Engl 113 requirement
for non – Science, Math and Technology programs.) 3 Credit Hours
Prerequisite: Engl 103 Freshman English I

Sci 204 Integrated Science for the Elementary Teacher I
A course designed to acquaint the pre-service elementary teacher with the scientific method and basic processes
and concepts of science through the use of published articles in addition to the text. The latest scientific
discoveries and current thinking in science education will be discussed. A writing component will consist of
reacting to the assigned articles. A completed science fair project is required. Prerequisite: Math 134 and a
core science class.
4 credits

Sci 214 Integrated Science for the Elementary Teacher II
This course is a continuation of Sci 204 and will further stress the scientific method and basic processes of
science through the study of specific concepts of physical and biological sciences. A writing component will
consist of reacting to recent scientific and science education articles followed by class discussion. The
display of a science fair project is required. Prerequisite: Math 134 and a core science class.
4 credits

Sci 273 Scientific Literature and Writing
This course will have two foci: 1) reading and interpreting current scientific literature selected from a cross
section of mainstream journals, and (2) presentation, written and orally, of research results in accepted
scientific style. Research data will be either original student work or supplied by the instructor. Students will
write one technical manuscript suitable for submission to a refereed journal.
3 credits

Sci 393 Special Topics
Course Description: This course consists of a seminar in selected topics in science. Topics vary from semester
to semester to take advantage of the special expertise of a visiting scientist, or as an opportunity to train
students to meet special or pressing needs of the reservation community. This course may be taken twice as
Sci 393 and Sci 493. The 300-level prefix indicates junior-level work is expected. Course Prerequisites:
Permission of instructor
3 credits




                                                       202-
Sci 493 Special Topics
Course Description: This course consists of a seminar in selected topics in science. Topics vary from semester
to semester to take advantage of the special expertise of a visiting scientist, or as an opportunity to train
students to meet special or pressing needs of the reservation community. This course may be taken twice as
Sci 393 and Sci 493. The 400-level prefix indicates senior-level work is expected. Course Prerequisites:
Permission of instructor
3 credits

SoSc 103 Introduction to Social Science
Prerequisite: Engl 103 with “C” or better.
This course introduces students to the social science disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, history,
psychology, geography, economics, and political science. The curriculum covers the major methods and
theories that are used in attempting to explain the world that human beings have created. Subject matter
includes family, race, gender, globalization, poverty, and culture. Students are asked to assess the subject
matter in relation to their own life and community.
3 credits

SoSc 233/433 Social Science Research
Prerequisites: Engl 113, SoSc 103 or Econ 203.
This course introduces students to social science research methods. Students learn the basics of data gathering,
documentation, ethnographic fieldwork, research design, and qualitative/ quantitative methods. Course can
be taken at 200- or 400-level; social science majors are required to either take this class at the 400-level or
SoSc 413 Internship.
3 credits

SoSc 313 Statistics for Social Science
Prerequisite: Math 103.
This course covers basic statistical principles and techniques specifically utilized in the Social Sciences.
Topics include comparing numerical batches, chi-squared analyses, regression analyses, and sampling
procedures. By the end, students will be able to identify the types of quantitative datasets and analyses needed
to answer different research questions, design simple research projects, and communicate their results to
professional audiences.
3 credits

SoSc 333 Social Science Theory
Prerequisite: SoSc 103.
This course is an introduction to social theory - ideas and sets of ideas about “how the world works.” It
provides an overview of social theory from its infancy in the early works of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and
Max Weber to its more recent expression in the diverse contributions of thinkers like Michel Foucault,
Cornell West, and Edward Said. All of those thinkers, and those who have come after them, addressed themes
that have become central to the social sciences: power, conflict, war, social class, social change, agency,
structure, inequality, racism, gender relations, culture, religion, and many others.
3 credits

SoSc 353 Race and Ethnicity
Prerequisite: SoSc 103.
Students in this course critically analyze issues of race and ethnicity, a major historical and modern factor in
human interaction. Using a culturally relativistic perspective, students investigate theory and research related
to the interaction of ethnic and racial groups. Topics to be covered include power relations and stratification,
sources of prejudice and discrimination.
3 credits

                                                    -203-
SoSc 383 Social Policy
Prerequisites: Engl 113, SoSc 103.
This course focuses on the creation of social policy and on the research and analysis that support social
policy. Students develop practical skills for influencing and creating legislation at the tribal, state, and federal
levels as they study a variety of policies, including those that impact poverty, income inequality, race relations,
health care, employment, and the environment. There is an emphasis on the consideration of social policies as
they impact American Indians.
3 credits

SoSc 413 Internship
Prerequisites: SoSc 103, SoSc 333, AND instructor permission.
Internships grant students first-hand experience in what it means to be a social scientist. Students who are
interested in doing an internship are requested to contact full-time social science faculty. Instructor and
student collaborate in organizing an internship in the field-of-interest of the latter. Some possibilities are:
evaluating intervention programs, conducting surveys, working on campaigns, or conducting archaeological
fieldwork.
3 credits

SoSc 463 Development and Nation Building
Prerequisites: Engl 113, SoSc 103.
This course examines post-colonial societies and governments in a globalizing world, with a focus on the
historic, economic, and social forces that are involved when societies make the transition to locally-led
economic development and nation building activities. The challenges associated with creating social, economic,
and political opportunities are explored. While the focus is on nation building by indigenous societies of the
Americas, cases are also included from Africa and Asia.
3 credits

SoSc 290/490 Special Topics in the Social Sciences
Prerequisite: Engl 113.
This course examines selected topics in social science. Topics will change each semester and may be repeated
for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is expected that
the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level course with
extensive work expected.

Sowk 203 Foundations of Social Work
This course provides an overview of the profession of social work. A third of the course is spent learning the
OLC Generalist Model. Another third is spent in discussion of the various roles social workers perform. The
final third explores the centrality of professional values and ethics and teaches how to read a research article.
The course is designed for sophomores considering this major, and for students working for an AA in Chemical
Dependency. Particular emphasis is placed on asking what the practice of social work would look like within
the context of Lakota values, traditions and history. A core theme running through all content concerns the
role of values and ethics, both personal and professional.
Prerequisites: MIS 113, 3 credits.

Sowk 303 Social Welfare & Social Work History
This course seeks to add to generalist social work orientation by focusing on the connection between the
history of social work practice and social welfare policy and the issues that lead to policy formation. Social
workers need to possess knowledge and understanding of the development of social welfare policies in response
to social issues from the local tribal level to the federal level. To this end a major focus of the course is social
welfare history from the Poor Laws forward. A particular focus is health and social welfare policies affecting
the Lakota people.

                                                      -204-
Macrolevel social welfare policies have existed as long as people have collaborated to meet their social
needs. Social workers must grapple continually with the policy questions of “Who should get What? How?
When? Where? On what Basis and Why?” The role of professional values and ethics in policy formation is
explored in relation to all course content.

By the end of the course, students should understand that policies define the context within which social work
is practiced and affects all aspects of social work intervention from the smallest client system (micro practice)
to the largest (macro practice). Policies, for example, define who becomes clients, and how services are to be
delivered including when, where, why and how much. It is essential that social workers be knowledgeable
about this larger context for the practice of social work in order to become proficient in assisting those clients
who seek social work services. To this end students are asked to understand policy from within the OLC
Generalist Model.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 203, OLC Core, 3 credits

Sowk 333 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (HBSE I)
This first course in a two course sequence covers theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social
development through the OLC Generalist Model (OLCGM), with a focus on individuals and families. The
Human Behavior and the Social Environment sequence provides content about theories and knowledge of
human bio-psycho-social development and the range of social systems in which individuals live (families,
groups, organizations, communities, and institutions). Particular focus is given to the Lakota worldview and
its understanding of human development and social systems.

The sequence teaches students to evaluate theory and examine its application to client situations by identifying
what we, as humans, all have in common. Bio-psycho-social theories are critically examined using social
work values and ethics as examined through foundational relationships. Students consider interactions between
and among human biological, social, psychological, economic and cultural systems as they affect and are
affected by human behavior and the ways in which systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving
optimal health and well-being by experiencing his or her vision of Wo’Lakota (balance, peace and harmony).
The sequence addresses different people’s experiences, needs and beliefs, particularly as they relate to race,
ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical and mental ability, age and national
origin.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 203, OLC Core, 3 credits

Sowk 343 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (HBSE II)
This second course in a two course sequence covers theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social
development through the OLC Generalist Model (OLCGM), with a focus on adult development. The Human
Behavior and the Social Environment sequence provides content about theories and knowledge of human bio-
psycho-social development. Particular focus is given to the Lakota worldview and its understanding of human
development and social systems.

The sequence teaches students to understand human development and the forces at work that determine
individual, familial and community developmental trajectories.

The Human Behavior in the Social Environment sequence provides the framework for understanding human
development and motivation. It utilizes a traditional textbook from within the OLCGM. In particular,
course content is examined through the OLCGM practice theory with continuing reference to “how” unhealthy
developmental trajectories can be confronted using the OLCGM practice technique.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 333, 3 credits




                                                     -205-
Sowk 313 Methods I
Sowk 313, the first of the four methods courses, is an introduction to the common core of essential concepts,
skills, values, tasks, and activities important to generalist social work practice with individuals and families.
The course will introduce students to the generalist perspective of social work practice including the relationship-
building/problem-solving process within an ecosystems (person-in-environment) framework. Special emphasis
will be placed on assessment of biological, psychological, and socioeconomic factors (e.g., class, race, gender,
and sexual orientation) and how they interact with elements of the environment, and influence intervention.
This course also contains content stemming from Lakota values, beliefs and practices. This course contributes
to the foundation on which the BSW curriculum builds its generalist practice model. The sequence emphasizes
the strengths perspectives which promotes empowerment and social justice for marginalized individuals,
groups and communities.
 Pre-requisites: Sowk 203, OLC Core, 3 credits

Sowk 323 Methods II
This course is the second in a practice sequence that provides a conceptual framework for generalist social
work practice and introduces students to the knowledge, values and skills needed to work with task & treatment
groups. The sequence emphasizes the strengths perspective which empowers and promotes social justice for
marginalized individuals, groups, and communities.

Social Work 323 is designed to teach students the theory and skills necessary to effectively design, implement,
and evaluate task & treatment groups within the context of Lakota culture. This course frames task &
treatment group work within the OLC generalist model. While specific class activities and learning objectives
do not mention the emphasis on Lakota culture and its understandings of group process, this perspective is
infused throughout the curriculum. The question, “How would this work with different populations on the
reservation?” is an always present question.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 313, 3 credits

Sowk 413: Methods III
This course is the third in a practice sequence that provides a conceptual framework for generalist social
work practice and introduces students to the knowledge, values and skills needed to work with community
groups, organizations, communities, and the Lakota tribe. Introduction to the roles, tasks and functions of
the social welfare practitioner as well as theories and methods of assessment, intervention, and evaluation are
provided. The sequence emphasizes strengths and empowerment perspectives as laid out in the theory section
of the OLCGM.

The challenges facing the macro-practitioner in generalist practice are explored. Practice skills presented in
this course build on the OLCGM and content presented in HBSE II, which examined theories regarding
communities, organizations, and institutions. Issues regarding social and economic justice, the value of
diversity, and populations-at-risk unique to this region and the role of professional ethics are integrated
throughout the course. The student will learn the skills and knowledge necessary to enter beginning practice
in the role of change agent.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 323, 3 credits

Sowk 423: Methods IV
This course is the fourth and last in a practice sequence that provides a conceptual framework for generalist
social work practice and introduces students to the knowledge, values and skills needed to work with tribal
and other governments. Introduction to the roles, tasks and functions of the social welfare practitioner as
well as theories and methods of assessment, intervention, and evaluation are provided. The sequence emphasizes
strengths and empowerment perspectives.



                                                      -206-
Methods IV is a policy-practice course in which students learn how to engage in legislative advocacy, grant
writing, and to analyze government and tribal policies relevant to the health and welfare of the Lakota people.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 303 & 413, 3 credits

Sowk 403 Introduction to Research
This course provides the student with the foundations of social work research, preparing the student to
become an informed consumer of research. Emphasis is placed upon application: preparing the student to be
a consumer and producer of practice-based research, especially evaluation research. Students will learn the
design and planning of research, methodologies, and their applications. Both qualitative and quantitative
research methodologies will be examined. Ethics of research and cultural competence of research will be
emphasized. How tribal values relate to research, especially within the Lakota cultural framework, will be
explored.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 343 & Math 123 or Math 134 or Sosc 313; 3 credits

Sowk 443 Research Project
This is the second course in the two course research sequence and is offered in the spring semester of the
senior year. It provides students with the opportunity to work on a research project. The research project is
a group project arranged by the course instructor with an agency on the reservation or in Rapid City, and
involves conducting research (generally needs assessment or program evaluation) on a topic of interest to the
agency. Each student will assume leadership for one phase/segment of the research project; all students will
participate in all phases and activities. Student input into population to be studied will be obtained spring
semester of the preceding year; actual population/agency will be dependent upon agency availability and
interest.
Pre-requisite: Sowk 403, Introduction to Research, 3 credits

Sowk 406 & 416 Practicum I & II – 6 Credits each
This course represents the culmination of preparation for entry-level generalist social work practice. The
course consists of supervised practice of the social work knowledge, values and skills learned in the classroom.
Grading is Pass/Fail only.

The generalist practitioner operates within the ethical guidelines prescribed by the NASW Code of Ethics
and utilizes the six-step, relationship building/problem-solving process and person-in-environment framework
that make up the OLC generalist model.

During a supervised field experience students are expected to have opportunities to further integrate all
educational facets, as articulated in the objectives, for a beginning level of generalist social work practice,
with an emphasis on working with the Lakota people in systems of all sizes to promote, maintain and/or
restore well-being.       This course also emphasizes the professional attributes of the individual in
professional practice, e.g. self-awareness, oral and written skills, accuracy and precision, empathy and
genuineness, and organization and planning.

Students also participate in six hours per semester of seminar, which helps to integrate the field practicum
experience with the BSW classroom knowledge and which allows the exploration of additional knowledge.
In the field seminar, students will learn the principles of the logic model and its application to the field setting.
There are three papers associated with the two-semester field seminar.
Pre-requisites: Sowk 406 - Concurrent with, or after Sowk 413
Sowk 416 - Sowk 406 and concurrent with, or after Sowk 423, 3 credits




                                                       -207-
Sowk 433 Electives
The social work elective can change depending on interests of students and instructors. Currently this course
provides the necessary foundation for understanding the role of case management as it has been practiced
with Indigenous people, as it is being practiced on the reservation and state of South Dakota, and how it
might be practiced. It introduces the student to the traditional, Western perspective, moves to a strengths
understanding, explores the role of motivational interviewing in case management, and then develops
understanding of family group conferencing and circles of care as developed within Indigenous cultures.
Pre-requisites – Sowk 203 or Instructor Permission
3 credits

SpCm 103 Speech Communication
A course designed to provide students with speaking skills which will help them to express themselves more
effectively not only in their classes, but in community and district meetings, as members of community
groups and boards, in any other public speaking situation that may occur, and in their personal lives as well.
This course helps students develop confidence in themselves and improves their listening skills. Students
learn to analyze a situation, organize their thoughts, and learn how to make a positive impression on their
audience.
3 credits

SpCm 223 Multicultural Communication
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
This is a course in which students explore cultural self-awareness, other culture awareness, and the dynamics
that arise in interactions between the two. Students learn how to understand how communication processes
differ among cultures; how to identify challenges that arise from these differences in intercultural interactions
and learn ways to creatively address them. The student also learns how to acquire knowledge and develop
skills that increase intercultural competence.
3 credits

SpCm 233 Human Communication Skills
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
This course offers an opportunity to learn and apply, in daily life, practical principles of human communication
skills. Emphasis is placed on the skills of tactfulness in negotiation, diplomacy in dealing with others, poise,
courtesy and politeness, sensitivity and perception, as well as psychological, social, cultural, and linguistic
factors, which affect person-to-person interaction. This course is designed to help students improve their
communication in personal and professional contexts both from the Lakota and the non-native perspective.
3 credits

SpCm 313 Theatre and Drama :
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
Students enrolled in this course will experience several of the fundamentals of theatrical stage performance
that includes acting, speech and voice articulation, speech volume, critical readings of skits, some directing,
forms of line memorization, and stage marking. The class also allows opportunities for students to learn
historical, social, creative, and emotional contexts of several plays; to rehearse these works; and finally to
perform excerpts or short plays in front of each other in class. The course also requires students to perform
a semester’s end play for open community audiences to attend.
3 credits




                                                     -208-
SpCm 333 Interpersonal Communication
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
Interpersonal Communication is designed to increase your understanding and implementation of effective
interpersonal communication behaviors and skills. Basic verbal and nonverbal concepts affecting the
communication process between individuals in various interpersonal contexts will be examined. This course
requires you to participate in written and oral activities designed to develop and improve interpersonal skills
and the quality of your life.
3 credits

SpCm 413 Nonverbal Communication
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
This course is designed to increase the understanding of the sub-codes of nonverbal communication and how
they function with the verbal aspects of communication to create what is commonly thought of as a “messages.”
It focuses on these sub-codes in four contexts; culture, social, home, gender, and job. It includes the study of
nonverbal communication from both a psychological perspective and sociological perspective.
3 credits

SpCm 433 Advanced Human Communication Skills
Prerequisite SpCm 103
Students will learn how to create group presentations and how to prepare for questions that they may encounter.
The productivity of organizations depends on effective oral communication between people. This course
takes a developmental approach by combining theory, research and applications for improving interpersonal
and public effectiveness in organizations.
3 credits

SpCm 290/490 Selected Topics in Speech
Prerequisite: SpCm 103
This course examines selected topics in speech communications. Topics will change each semester and may
be repeated for credit. Credit may vary from one (1) to three (3) credits. When taken at the 200-level, it is
expected that the student will do enhanced sophomore level work. A 400-level implies a mastery senior level
course with extensive work expected.

TMath 123 Construction Trade Math
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
Trade Math will demonstrate the applications of math principles to the construction industry in the area of
actual building, estimating, and drafting. Some of the principles addressed are surface areas, volumes,
properties of spheres and circles, fractions and decimals, weight, and measures. The context will be bases on
realistic carpentry problems, including modern construction materials and practices.
3 credits

Trds 103 Occupational Safety
Prerequisite: College Bound/Work Ready Certificate
The students will learn about theories and concepts (causes and costs of accidents, ethics and safety, , Workers’
Compensation and OSHA Compliance); OSHA’s Construction Standard and Safety Practices; applications
on the job (program and policies, safety and hazard analysis, accident investigation, reporting and record
keeping, & emergency response plan); preventing violence in the workplace, stress, etc. The students will
have the opportunity to receive CPR Training and Certification.
3 credits




                                                     -209-
Trds 113 Introduction to Straw Bale Construction
Prerequisite: None
Students will learn the basic techniques used to build a structure using straw bales for insulation. They will
also learn all the elements involved in constructing a straw building and why it is so important to build it
weather and varmint proof using the correct procedures and products. They will learn the various types of
items used for flooring, roofs, etc. It is important to know how to construct load-bearing walls and foundations
for strength and durability.
3 credits

Trds 133 Residential Print Reading
Prerequisite: None
Print reading will address the need to accurately interpret technical drawings and transform them into actual
projects. Students will study the principles of architectural and structural details and measurements.
3 credits

Trds 163 Concrete Basics
Prerequisite: CAR 103 Carpentry Theory I
This class provides basic knowledge of concrete construction. Contents include organizing for quality, concrete
mixture designs, specifications, foundations, formwork, reinforcement and embedment’s in structures, joints
and reinforcement for slabs-on-ground, preparing for concreting, concrete placing and finishing, common
field problems, and safety.
3 credits

Trds 213 Residential Estimating
Prerequisite: None
This is an introduction course to residential estimating processes and to the steps involved in accurately
preparing a cost estimate. Students will learn how to price excavation and site work, concrete, carpentry,
masonry, plumbing, heating, and electrical work, as well as the general expenses and sub-trade work. Specifics
on how to prepare a bill of materials from takeoff, how to summarize and prepare a bid for a custom home,
assessing markup on an estimate, and how to review a bid before it is submitted to the client as well as
information on preparing estimates for remodeling jobs.
3 credits




                                                    -210-
DISTRICT STAFF         INSTRUCTIONAL                      Brunsch, Grady
                       FACULTY                            B.S. Elementary Education
                                                          Haskell Indian Nation University
CHEYENNE RIVER C.C.
Gladys Looking Horse   Al-Asfour, Ahmed
Laura Bagola           B.A. Business Administration       Bull Bear, Marcell
Jessica Dupris         New York Institute of Technology   B.S. Human Services
                       M.S. Business Administration       Oglala Lakota College
EAGLE NEST C.C.        New York Institute
Georgia Rooks                                             Byrd, Sandra
Wesley Hawkins                                            B.S. in Information Technology
                       Amiotte, Dianne
Phyllis Swift Hawk                                        B.S. in Elementary Education
                       B.S. Elementary Education
                       Oglala Lakota College              Oglala Lakota College
EAST WAKPAMNI C.C.
Phinet Red Owl         M.A Lakota Leadership & Mgmt.
Colleen Provost        Oglala Lakota College              Cedar Face, Paul
                                                          B.A. in Business Administration
LACREEK C.C.           Amiotte, Shannon                   Oglala Lakota College
Pearl Cottier          B.S Elem.Ed. & Sp.Ed.
Keeley Clausen         M.S. Curriculum & Instruction      Close, Kiri
Hope Conquering Bear                                      Ph.D. in Philosophy
                       Black Hills University
                                                          European Graduate School
PAHIN SINTE C.C.
Janice Richards        Aplan, Kathy
Jami Fast Wolf         B.S. Mass Communication            Cordova, Sharon
Alva Good Crow         University of South Dakota         B.S. in Nursing
                                                          Regis Univ.
PASS CREEK C.C.        Auer, Susanne                      M.S. in Nursing
Collette Ruff          M.S. Cultural Anthropology         Regis Univ.
Stephanie Kindle       University of Zurich
                                                          Costin, Kirk
PEJUTA HAKA C.C.                                          B.A. in Anthropology
Stephanie Sorbel       Bettelyoun, Kimberly
                       B.S. English                       Sunny Buffalo
Kenita Janis
Denise Harris          M.A. English                       M.A. in Anthropology
Francis Montileaux     Chadron State College              Ph.D. in Anthroplogy
                                                          University of Pittsburgh
PINE RIDGE C.C.        Bouhenguel, Lynnea
Shirley Brewer         M.S. Specializing in Montessori    Cournoyer, Gerald
Loretta Red Feather    Barry University, Miami Shores     M.F.A. Painting
Cassie Big Crow                                           University of Oklahoma
Bessie LeBeau                                             M.A.I.S. Interdisciplinary Studies
Chrysan Smallwood      Brave, Merle
                       B.A. Biology                       University of South Dakota
RAPID CITY EXTENSION   Colorado Women’s College           B.F.A. Studio Painting
Shirley Lewis          M.A. Middle/Junior H.S.            University of South Dakota
Madonna Wright         Univ. of Northern Colorado
Ginna Arguello                                            Dudek, Jim
Leatrice Wilson        Broberg, Loretta                   B.A. in Art
Becky Red Bow          B.A. Business Administration       Hastings
                       M.A. Business Administration       M.A. in Business Education
WHITE CLAY C.C.                                           Chadron State College
Donna Red Ear Horse    Chadron State College
Caroline Williams      Ph.D. Organization & Management
Sharlene Smallwood     Capella University                 Dunn, Laura
                                                          B.S. in Nursing
WOUNDED KNEE C.C.      Bruns, Michelle                    South Dakota State University
Elaine Gibbons         B.S. in Nursing                    M.S. in Nursing
Elizabeth Gibbons      South Dakota State Univ.           University of Pheonix
Vevina White Hawk      M.S. Nursing
                       South Dakota State University


                                     -211-
Fisher, Art                          Jarding, Lilias                   Lone Wolf, Devona
B.S. in Elementary Education         M.S. Public/Human Service Adm.    M.A. Education
Oglala Lakota College                Minnesota State University        Chadron State College
M.Ed.                                Ph.D. Political Science           B.S. Human Service
Oklahoma City University             Colorado State University         A.A. Human Service
                                                                       Oglala Lakota College
Fresquez, Anthony                    Johnson, Julie
B.A. Speech-Creighton Univ.          B.A. Accounting & Mgmt.           Melvin, Michel
M.A. Ed. Administration              M.S. Business Administration      B.A. Business Administration
Univ. of South Dakota                Chadron State College             Oglala Lakota College

Frank Dawn                           Jones, Gary                       Mesteth, Wilmer
Ph.D. in Biological Sciences         B.S. Speech/English               Known Expertise in Lak. Stds.
South Dakota State University        Univ. of South Dakota
M.A. Lakota Ldrshp & Mgmt            M.S. Sec. School Admin.           Nelson, Joan
B.S in Human Services                Northern State College            B.S. Nursing-Univ. of N.D.
A.A. S in Social Services & Csnlg    M.A. Speech                       M.S. Nursing - Univ. of Phoenix
Oglala Lakota College                Univ. of Nebraska at Kearney
                                                                       Noyes, Douglas
Giraud, Gerald                       Jones, Dana                       B.S. Interdis. Science
Ph.D. Philosophy, Psychological      M.S. Business Administration      M.S. Tech. Mgmt.
& Cultural Studies                   National American University      S. D. School of Mines & Tech.
M.A. Educational Psychology
Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln           Jones, Richards                   Okrepkie, William
B.S. Psychology, Sociology &         B.A. History/Education            M.S. Public Administration
Political Science                    Met. State College                University of Colorado
Regents College, N.Y.                M.S. Ed/L.D.
                                     Chadron State College             Olson, Jeffery
Graham, Judith                                                         Ph.D.Social Work
M.S. Language Arts                   Jones-New Holy, Veronica          Univ. of Washington. WA
Northeastern State Univ. OK          B.S. in Elementary Education      MSW Social Work
B.A. English                         Oglala Lakota College             B.A. in Liberal Arts
Univ. of Central Oklahoma                                              Raymond College Univ, of the
                                     LaGarry, Hannan                   Pacific, Stockton, CA
Henry, Leslie                        Ph.D. Geology
B.S. in Animal Science               University of Nebraska            Paulson, Crystal
Iowa State University                                                  B.S. Business Admin.
M.S. Candidate in Agricultural Ed.   Lee, Patrick                      Oglala Lakota College
Adult Voc. Ed. Emphasis              B.S. Education
University of Nebraska               Black Hills State College         Raymond, Thomas
                                     J.D. Ariz. Univ. Clg. Of Law      B.S in Elementary Education
Higa, Alessandra                     37 Grad. Hrs Business Ed.         University of South Dakota
M.S. in Biological Science           Northern Arizona Univ.            M.S. Elementary Education
Brazil                                                                 Black Hills State University
                                     Lindskov, Loris
Houston, Pam                         B.S. Education                    Reeves, Jean
B.S. Corporate & Public Finance      Nortnern State Teachers College   B.S. Elem. Ed. Chadron State
SiTanka College                      M.S. Administration               M.S. Elementary Education & Adm.
                                     Northern State University         Black Hills State University
Jacobson, Wendy
B.S. in Nursing                      Lone Hill, Karen                  Red Bear, Ida
Montana State Univ.                  B.S. Secondary Education          B.S. Math Education
M.S in Nursing SDSU                  Black Hills State College         Chadron State College
                                     M.A. Education-SDSU               M.S.T. in Mathematics
                                     Known Expertise in Lak. Stds.     University of Wyoming


                                                    -212-
Red Bear, Martin                      White Buffalo, Charles                Baak, Charlotte
B.A. Visual Arts and Ed.              M.A. Lakota Ldrship. & Mgmt.          B.S. Human Services
College of Santa Fe                   B.S. Lakota Studies                   Oglala Lakota College
M.A. Art Education                    Oglala Lakota College
University of New Mexico              Known Expertise in Lak. Studies       Bettelyoun, Gina
                                                                            A.A. in Elem. Ed./General Studies
Reinhard, Shawn                       White Thunder, Joanne                 B.S. in Elementary Education
B.S. Business Administration          E.D.D. Educational Administration     M.A. in Lakota Ldrshp. & Mgmt.
Oglala Lakota College                 University of South Dakota            Oglala Lakota College
                                      M.S. MIS
Rodin, Jenni                          University of South Dakota            Bowker, Beverly
A.B. Mathematics                      B.S. Business Administration          B.S. Elementary Education
Smith College, Northhampton, MA       Oglala Lakota College                 Black Hills State University
M.A. in Mathematics Education                                               M.A. Special Ed. K-12
Teachers College, Columbia Unv.       Zimiga, Thedna                        University of South Dakota
                                      A.A. General Studies/Sci.,Eng.,Math   Ph.D.Coursework/completedABD
Sandoval, Deig                        Oglala Lakota College
Ph.D. Chemistry                       B.S. Biology, Univ. of South Dakota   Boysen, Al
University of Arkansas                                                      B.A. English, Augustana College
                                      Trades Construction Program           M.S. English
Sarmiento, Christine                  Fineran, Marlin                       Univ. of South Dakota
M.S. Information Security             Lone Hill, Leonard                    Ph.D. Education
Capella University                    Wilson, Lyle                          Univ. of South Dakota
                                      Kirk, Joe
Silva, A.J.                           Balcom, Art                           Brown Bull, Darrell Jr.
Ph.D.                                                                       B.S. American Indians Studies
M.S. Hazardous Waste Mgmt.            ADJUNCT FACULTY                       B.A. Sc. Psychology
Idaho State Univ.                                                           University of Minnesota
B.S. Mining Engineering               Ahrens, Constance
SDSM&T                                B.S. Elementary Education             Bump, Brett
B.S. History Education                Sinte Gleska University               M.S. Arts & Humanities
Univ. of South Dakota                 M.A. Curriculum & Instruction         B.A. Speech
                                      South Dakota State Unversity          Chadron State College
Tinant, Jason
M.S. Civil & Environmental Engineer   Allard, Ivy                           Campbell, Jessica
SDSM&T                                B.S. Composite Business/Acctg.        M.S. Leadership in Literacy
                                      Black Hills State University          University of Sioux Falls
Thompson, Andrew                      MBA & MS Business                     B.S. in Elementary Education
B.A. Economics                        University of South Dakota            Northern State University
Univ. New Mexico College              Ph.D. Business Administration
M.B.A Financial Mgmt.                 North University                      Carlow, Michael
Robert O. Anderson Graduate                                                 Lakota Language Certificate
School of Management                  Arnold, Mary Jo                       B.S. Elementary Education
                                      B.A. English                          Oglala Lakota College
Uses the Knife, Matthew               Duchesne College of Sacred Heart
B.A. in Studio Arts                   M.S. Counseling & Human               Casey, Thomas
University of Min. at Morris          Resource Development                  B.A. Political Science
Known Expertise in Lakota Studies     South Dakota University               Univ. of Colorado
                                      Arguello, Louis                       M.S. in Sociology
White, Verine                         B.S. Interdisciplinary Sciences       Univ. of Colorado
B.S. Elementary Education             SDM&T
M.S. Education                                                              Chasing Hawk, Jerilyn
Black Hills State College             Attack Him-Dubray, Lolita             B.S. Business Administration
Known Expertise in Lak. Studies       A.A. General Studies                  Oglala Lakota College
                                      Oglala Lakota College
                                      Known Expertise in Lakota Studies

                                                    -213-
Clausen, Keeley                      Dupont, Didier                       Good Iron, Kathy
A.A. General Studies                 M.A. Philosophy                      A.A. Business Admin.
A.A. Lakota Studies                  Lille Univ. (France)                 Univ. of South Dakota
B.S. in Human Services                                                    B.S. Business Admin
Oglala Lakota College                Dutt, Jessica                        Oglala Lakota College
                                     B.S. Elementary Education
Clausen, Kim                         Northern State University            Green, Sharon
B.A. Geography                       M.A. Education/Ldrshp. in Reading    B.S. Political Science/Social Science
University of Wyoming                University of Sioux Falls            Black Hills State University
                                                                          M.Ed. Cnslg., Guid.& Person. Serv.
Clifford-Briggs, Ann Marie           Earring, Lynda                       South Dakota State University
B.S. Elementary Education &          M.S. Educational Administration
Journalism                           University of South Dakota           Haas, Cecilia
Oglala Lakota College                Ph.D. Educational Administration     B.S. Ed, Social Science
                                     University of South Dakota           M.S. Business Education
Clifford, Stormie                                                         Black Hills State University
B.S. Business Administration         Eastman, Gloria
Oglala Lakota College                A.A. General Studies                 Haas, John
                                     A.A. Accounting                      B.S. Industrical Education
Conroy, Cornell                      A.A. Lakota Studies                  Chadron State University
SD Teaching Certificate              B.S. Business Administration         M.A. Ed. Adm./Psy. & Guidance
Known Expertise in Lakota Studies    M.A. Lakota Leadership & Mgmt.       University of South Dakota
                                     Oglala Lakota College
Cuny, Lynette                                                             Han, Xiashong
B.S. in Business Education           Eisenbraun, Moncia                   M.A. Industrical Mgmt. Engineering
M.A. in Educational Admin.           B.S. Elementary Education            MSU
Oglala Lakota College                Black Hills State University
                                     M.S. Technology for Ed. & Training   Harris, Denise
Davies, Mary                         University of South Dakota           B.S. Business Administration
A. A. Chemical Dependency                                                 Oglala Lakota College
B.S. Human Services                  Ellis, Thalia
Oglala Lakota College                B.S. Human Services                  Harris, Sarah
                                     Oglala Lakota College                B.A. Criminal Justice
Delong, Clifford                     M.S. Counseling                      Dakota Wesleyan University
B.S. in Computer Science, Physics,   South Dakota State University        JD, University of South Dakota
Mathematics
Chadron State College                Farrington, Mary                     Hatfield, Heather
M.S. Tech. Systems Ed. Computers     B.A. History Education               B.S. Environmental Science
DSU                                  Colorado Women’s COllege             Oglala Lakota College
                                     M.A. College Administration          M.S. in Biological Sciences
Delong, Linda                        Columbia University                  South Dakota State University
B.S. Business Administration
A.A. Nursing                         Fisher, Cindy                        Hemingway, Cheryl
Oglala Lakota College                B.S. in Elementary Education         B.A. in Lakota Studies
                                     Oglala Lakota College                M.A. in Lakota Leadership & Mgmt.
Delores, Elaine                                                           Oglala Lakota College
A.A. General Studies                 Frye, Cedric
A.A. Elementary Education            B.S. Zoology                         Heriba, Adel
B.A. Elementary Education            Oklahoma State University            B.A. Petroleum Engineering
M.S. Lakota Leadership & Mgt.                                             Cairo Univ., Egypt
Oglala Lakota College                Gaddie, Helen                        M.A. Ph.D Geological Engineering
                                     A.A. in Nursing                      S.D. School of Mines & Tech
Dorer, Joseph                        B.S. in Natural Science
B.A. Music/Spanish                   Oglala Lakota College                High Horse, Bryant
Henderson State University                                                B.A. Human Services
M.A. Ethnomusicology                                                      Oglala Lakota College
Bethal University                                                         M.S. Counseling & Guidance, USD
                                                    -214-
Hornbeck, Billi                      Lloyd, Carmen                       Martin, Judy
B.S. Business Admin                  B.S. Continuing Studies             B.A. Elementary Education
Oglala Lakota College                Indiana University                  K-12 Education Degree
                                     MFA Creative Rdg. & Writing         A.A. Early Childhood
Hudson, Lenora                       Columbia College                    Oglala Lakota College
B.S. Interdisciplency Science        M.A. in Education Curriculum
South Dakota Sch. of Mines & Tech.   M.S. in Leadership                  Matejcik, Frank
M.S. in Socioilogy, English          University of Colorado              M.S. in Statistics
Minnesota State University                                               Western Michigan University
                                     Lockner, Linda                      M.S. in Mathematics
Iron Cloud, Richard                  M.S. in Education                   Bowling Green State University
M.A. Lak. Leadership & Mgmt.         Northern State Univ.                Ph.D. in Industrial English
Oglala Lakota College                B.A. of Arts                        Ohio State University
B.A. in Sociology & Hum. Serv.       Dakota Wesleyan Univ.
Ft. Lewis College                                                        Matejcik, Ruby
Emergining Leaders Fellowship        Long Fox, Bruce                     B.S. in Statistics
Program of North Carolina            B.A. English                        University of the Philippines
                                     M.B.A Business                      M.S. in Applied Statistics
Jacobs, Bobbie                       University of South Dakota          Bowling Green State University
B.S. Special Education
Black Hills State University         Long Fox, Paula                     May, Jennifer
B.S. Elementary Education            B.A. History                        B.A. in English
Oglala Lakota College                M.A. Education Admin.               University of South Dakota
MSW Elem. Ed., SpEd, ECH             M.A Counseling, Guidance and
Washington University                Personnel Services                  Mesteth, Leslie
                                     University of South Dakota          B.S. Business Administation
Jordon, Crystal                                                          Oglala Lakota College
B.A. Political Science               Longbrake, Faye
Columbia College                     B.S. Elementary Education           Montileaux, Matilda
J.D. Hofstra Univ. School of Law     Black Hills State University        A.A. in Elementary Education
MPH Health & Political Science       M.S. Elem. School Administration    B.S. in Elementary Education
Mailman School of Public Health      Black Hills State University        Oglala Lakota College
Columbia University
                                     Looking Horse, Kelly                Mousseaux, Misty
King, Cathy                          Known Expertise in Lakota Studies   B.S. Secondary Education
BSW Social Work                                                          Oglala Lakota College
MSW Social Work                      MacBride, Ben
Florida Atlantic University          B.S. in Physics                     Noles, David
                                     Universoty of New Hampshire         B.S. Education
Lee, Angel                           M.A. in Physics                     M.S. Education
B.S. in Biology                      University of California            University of Tennessee at Martin
Northern State University
                                     Mack, Thomas                        Overturff, Teresa
Lee, Candace                         B.S. History                        B.S. Art Education
B.S. Administrative Systems          Daktoa WEsleyan University          University of Cental Arkansas
Northern State University            M.A. History
M.S. Administrative Studies          University of South Dakota          Palezawsk, Jessie
University of South Dakota                                               B.S. Fine Arts
                                     Martin, David                       Black Hills State University
Lewis, Laura                         B.A. in History                     MFA
B.S. in Allied Health                Fort Lewis College                  University of North Dakota
University of South Dakota           M.S. in Mathematics
                                     University of Wyoming               Parks, Lila
Linda, Karlin                                                            B.S. Business Admin.
B.S. Physics                                                             Oglala Lakota College
South Dakota of Mines & Techn.
M.S. Material Science
                                                   -215-
Peterson, Madonna                   Sorensen, Jenifer                    Vogel, Tim
B.S. Business Admin.                B.S. in Biology                      B.S. Education
Oglala Lakota College               University of Wisconsin              Northern State College
                                    M.S. in Geological Engineering       M.S. Fine Arts
Phelps, Peggy                       Ph.D. in Geology & Geological Eng.   Mankato State Univ.
B.A. Sociology                      SD School of Mines & Technology
M.S. Education                                                           Watts, Keith
South Dakota State Univ.            Sorum, Patricia                      B.S. in Commerical Economics
                                    A.A. in Biblical Studies             South Dakota State University
Peterson, Doug                      North Central University
B.S. Education/History              M.A. in Pastroal Psy. & Counseling   Webb, Yvonna
Black Hills State University        Ashland Theological Seminary         B.S. Secondary Education
M.S. Curriculum & Instruction                                            Northern State University
Black Hills State University        Spider, Verola
                                    A.A. in General Studies              West, Anna
Randle, Ron                         A.A. in Human Services               B.A. Sociology/Psychology
B.S. Secondary Education            Oglala Lakota College                M.S. Counselor Education
Black Hills State University        Known Expertise in Lakota Studies    Northern State University
M.Ed Counseling
South Dakota State University       Starr, Edward                        White, Doris
                                    M.A. Lakota Leadership/Mgt.          B.S. Business Administration
Red Bear, Emmanuel                  Oglala Lakota College                Northern State University
Known Expertise in Lakota Studies   B.A. Business Admin.
                                    Oglala Lakota College                Wilson, Saunie
Red Elk, Dolly                                                           M.S. in Public Administration
Lakota Language Certificate         Swift Hawk, Phyllis                  University of South Dakota
Oglala Lakota College               A.A. General Studies
Known Expertise in Lakota Studies   B.A. in Lakota Studies               White Butterfly, Karen
                                    Oglala Lakota Studies                A.A. in General Studies
Richards, Janice                                                         A.A. in Social Work & Counseling
B.S. Human Services                 Ten Fingers, Ronald                  A.A. in Lakota Studies
Oglala Lakota College               Associate of Arts                    A.A. in Drug & Alcohol Abuse
                                    Bacone Jr. College                   B.A. in Sociology
Sanonia, James                      B.S. Elementary Education            B.S. in Human Services
B.S. Geological Engineering         Oglala Lakota College                Oglala Lakota College
South Dakota Sch.of Mines & Tech.   A.A. Elementary Education
                                    Oglala Lakota College                Yellow Hair, Warren
Schwarting, Lavon                                                        A.A. General Studies
B.S. Education                      Ten Fingers, Anthony                 A.A. Business Administration
Chadron State College               M.S. in Education                    Oglala Lakota College
Library Media Degree 2nd major      University of Guam                   Known Expertise in Lakota Studies
In Business/Office Education        M.S. in Public Health
M.A. K-12 Education                 Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa             Yellow Horse, Hopa
Sinte Gleska University             B.S. Human Services                  B.S. in Civil Engineering
                                    Oglala Lakota College                SD School of Mines & Technology
Silcott, Loma
B.S. Education                      Two Crow, Robert                     Young, Thersa
Valparaiso Univ.                    M.S. Elementary Admin.               B.S. Elementary Education
M.S. Guidance & Counseling          South Dakota State Univ.             University of South Dakota
Purdue University                   B.S. Elementary Education            M.S. Education
                                    Oglala Lakota College                Sinte Gleska University
Slama, Andrew
B.A. History & Pre-Med.             Tyon, Gene                           Zephier-Loafer, Marilyn Faye
Montana State University            B.S. in Human Services               B.S. K-12 Education
M.S. Biomedical Science             Oglala Lakota College                Oglala Lakota College
Chicago Medical School                                                   Known Expertise in Lakota Studies

                                                  -216-
    The Oglala Lakota College,
incorporating Lakota values and symbols in its efforts to maintain
and strengthen Lakota culture, has adopted a symbol that could
be called the Education Shield of the Oglala Division of the Teton
Nation. The shield incorporates the traditional Lakota values and
symbols with contemporary goals, objectives, and philosophy of
the Oglala Lakota College.

The peripheral feathers represent the districts of the Pine Ridge
Reservation. The four pipe feathers represent the sacred concept
of the four winds and the four virtues of bravery, generosity,
fortitude, and wisdom. Finally, and certainly not the least, is the
crossed sacred pipes in the center, used for healing and as an
instrument for peace.

Edwin Fills the Pipe



               Celebrating 40 Years




                       Oglala Lakota College
                           490 Piya Wiconi Road
                           Kyle, SD 57752-0490
                    (605) 455-6000/Fax (605) 455-2787
                    mpourier@olc.edu | www.olc.edu

								
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