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Delta-WorkforceReport-Jan2011

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 66

									Workforce Development Scan Results

            Prepared For:




                                   PREPARED BY:
                            CLARUS CORPORATION

                                   January 2011
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                                       January 2011


Table Of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................... 1
     Purpose ........................................................................................................................................... 2
     Major Findings And Recommendations.......................................................................................... 2

METHODOLOGY ................................................................................. 8
     Purpose ........................................................................................................................................... 9
     Research Questions ........................................................................................................................ 9
     Sampling Frame .............................................................................................................................. 9
     Reliability Estimation .................................................................................................................... 11
     Instrument Design......................................................................................................................... 11
     Data Collection .............................................................................................................................. 11
     Data Analysis ................................................................................................................................. 12
     Reporting....................................................................................................................................... 12

RESULTS .......................................................................................... 14
Recruiting Employees .................................................................................................................... 15
          Shortage Of Current Qualified Job Candidates ....................................................................... 15
          Shortage Of Future Qualified Job Candidates ........................................................................ 17
Training Needs And Delivery Preferences ................................................................................ 18
          Required CEUs......................................................................................................................... 18
          Current Training Provided....................................................................................................... 19
          Future Employee Training ....................................................................................................... 20
          Training Decisions ................................................................................................................... 22
          Preferred Location .................................................................................................................. 23
          Preferred Training Providers ................................................................................................... 24
          Preferred Format .................................................................................................................... 26
          Educational Opportunities Offered By Employers .................................................................. 27
Interaction With Delta College.................................................................................................... 29
          Usage Of Delta College. .......................................................................................................... 29
          Partnership Options. ............................................................................................................... 31
          Assessment Of Delta College Graduates ................................................................................ 32
Jobs Forecast ................................................................................................................................... 37
     National And Regional Jobs Forecast ............................................................................................ 37
        U.S. Jobs Forecast ................................................................................................................... 37
        Michigan Jobs Forecast ........................................................................................................... 40
        Saginaw Area Jobs Forecast .................................................................................................... 41
     Local Jobs Forecast ....................................................................................................................... 42
Business Characteristics................................................................................................................ 54


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                                                                    Page i
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                         January 2011

APPENDICES .................................................................................... 57
   Appendix A. Questionnaire .......................................................................................................... A-1
   Appendix B. Tabular Results By Location Of Employer ............................................................... B-1
   Appendix C. Detailed Verbatim Responses ................................................................................. C-1
   Appendix D. State And Regional Jobs Forecasts .......................................................................... D-1
   Appendix E. Occupational Program Sheets ................................................................................. E-1
   Appendix F. Headcount And Graduates By Program At Delta College ........................................ F-1




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                                                    Page ii
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011




                        Executive Summary




CLARUS Corporation                                          Page 1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                            January 2011

Purpose
Market conditions force employers to continue to change and update their technology as well as their
workers’ skills. As technology changes, employers are forced to either hire employees with new skill sets
or retrain current employees to remain competitive in today’s global environment. Much like the
employers, community colleges that are to remain successful in today’s market must be keenly in tune to
the changing needs of employers for employees and new skill sets. Delta College must continue to
examine their current programming for market currency and to ensure that their programming meets the
needs of local employers, as well as employers across the country in areas of high job demand. The
College must examine their current degree programs for relevance and make updates as needed and
explore new program opportunities, as well as examine discontinuation of the programming not needed
in today’s market. To complete the educational continuum, the College must also be sure that the training
programs exist to support the graduates in their continuing education needs and need for updates after
completion of a degree.

In an effort to determine how Delta College can best meet the current and future needs of the employers
in the service area, surveys were conducted with a stratified sample of employers in the Great Lakes Bay
Region (Bay, Midland, and Saginaw counties) representing the following industries: agriculture, forestry
and mining, contractors and construction, manufacturing, transportation, communications and facilities,
finance, insurance and real estate, business and personal services, health services, legal services,
education and social services, art and membership organizations, engineering, architecture and
accounting, household and miscellaneous services, and government. Telephone interviews were
conducted with 335 employers January 12 to 25, 2011, and personal interviews were conducted with 15 of
the employers in the service area. Interviews were also conducted with representatives from four
economic development groups, which were not counted in the employer total. This sample of employers
provided a reliability of 95 percent and tolerable error of ± 5.2 percent.


Major Findings And Recommendations
Overall, five areas were examined with respect to programming needs for employers in the Great Lakes
Bay Region. Those five areas included:
 Whether the employers believe there is a workforce in the market area that will meet their needs for
   qualified employees, and if not, what skill sets are they missing?
 What training programs will be needed in the future for current employees? How do employers want
   those training programs delivered to their employees?
 What interactions have employers had with Delta College, and how satisfied are the employers with
   those interactions?
 What are the future employee needs of businesses? How do those needs differ from the regional,
   state, and national job forecasts?
 How active are employers in providing educational opportunities for their employees?

The key findings from each of these areas will be outlined in this summary, as well as recommendations
for additional programming at Delta College for each area.

Qualified Applicant Pool
Compared to the Workforce Development Scan conducted in 2007 for Delta College, fewer employers
noted that there is a current shortage of qualified job candidates in the area. In 2007, 52 percent of the
employers in the region noted there was a shortage of qualified job candidates in the region. In 2011, only
37 percent of the employers noted there was a shortage of qualified applicants. But, for the employers
that noted a shortage of qualified applicants, the applicants are unable to pass a drug test, have trouble
passing a background check, do not have the basic skills needed (reading, writing, and math), do not have

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 2
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

the work ethic needed, nor do they have the technical skills needed – especially computer skills. The
employers noted that with layoffs and high unemployment levels over the last three years, it has been
easier obtaining employees with higher skill sets. But employers do expect that it will become more
difficult in the future to find qualified applicants. Fifty-nine percent of the employers noted they believe
that they will experience a shortage of qualified job applicants in the next three to five years. For example,
employers were extremely complimentary of the chemical process technician Fast Track program at
Delta College. But the employers are concerned that applicants in the future will lack the basic skills to
even enter the Fast Track program and succeed if they are missing foundational (basic) skills.

       Recommendation: Develop a workforce readiness program, modeled after the Fast Track
        program, concentrating on work ethics, foundational skills (reading, writing, and math), and
        computer skills. After successful completion of the workforce readiness Fast Track program, the
        student will be ready to enter a technical Fast Track program.

       Recommendation: Employers noted that computer skills are a key skill set missing for
        employees. Employees may be able to socially communicate on computers, but they are missing
        the ability to utilize programming like the Microsoft Office Suite, and especially Excel. Maintain
        the graduation requirement of competency in computer skills.

Training Needs And Delivery Preferences
More than half of the employers in 2011 require their employees to participate in continuing education as
a job requirement or as a licensing requirement to maintain employment. Health care and education are
major areas in which employees are required to obtain CEUs (continuing education units), but CEUs are
also required in insurance, finance, law, etc.

       Recommendation: Delta College should explore additional opportunities for providing CEUs
        for personnel in health care and education locally. Obtain the licensing lists from the state of
        Michigan in health care and determine the specific content areas for CEUs relevant for the Great
        Lakes Bay Region. Market the availability of CEUs using direct mail.

       Recommendation: Certifications add value to employees – for both the employer and the
        employee. Many industries are developing certifications that require participants to have
        bachelor’s degrees and experience in the field prior to working through the curriculum for the
        certification. An example is the Fraud Examiner Certification, which is a post-bachelor’s degree
        certificate. A program would be developed that would prepare the student, who has completed a
        bachelor’s degree in accounting, for the test for the Certified Fraud Examiner license. Many post-
        bachelor’s certifications are offered through national association accreditation. Delta College
        should explore certifications in health care and business to start the programming.

Ninety-five percent of the employers in 2007 provided training to their employees, and 91 percent of the
employers in 2011 provide training to their employees. While there has been little change in the areas that
employers are providing training to employees, the delivery methods used for providing that training has
changed greatly since 2007. The major areas in which employers were training in 2007 and are still very
likely to provide training in 2011 include management and supervision, interpersonal skills, computer
skills (specifically Excel), and technical skills training. More employers in 2011 are conducting training for
employees in management and supervision, interpersonal skills, and computers than they were in 2007.

The major change has been where and how the employers are delivering the training to their employees.
In 2007, employers were likely to offer training to their employees on-site at varying times of the day,
evening, and weekend. By 2011, employers are more likely to offer training during the day Monday to
Friday on-site. The major change from 2007 has been the delivery methods used for training. Sixty-two
percent of the employers are using employee self-directed training delivered online and via videos and 58
percent are using online training and webinars to provide training to employees. For management and

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 3
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

supervision training, employers still like to send employees off-site to an instructor-led seminar, but more
employers are using online training for the majority of their employees. Many employers are buying into
the “2,000 online training topics for $500 a year” and other companies are actually buying curriculum
development modules in which they have to develop content for online training programs for their
companies.

       Recommendation: The demand for management and supervision training is still high among
        the employers. Time is extremely important for employers – it is getting more difficult to remove
        employees from their work environment for training. Explore the development of a corporate
        management and supervision training course utilizing a hybrid model of delivery – fewer on-site
        meetings with online supplementation of course content.

       Recommendation: Corporate Services was built on a delivery model of on-site, instructor-led
        classes and has been very successful in previous years in delivering training using that model.
        However, it appears that the delivery model is moving to online self-directed training and
        webinar participation. Corporate Services should develop a series of management and
        supervision webinars to market to employers in the region. This will require e-mail marketing
        and a shift in delivery modality to online programming modules.

       Recommendation: Explore the development of a post-bachelor’s degree curriculum
        development certificate. For the human resources and education managers that are having to
        implement online learning programs, provide a certificate in curriculum development.

Interactions With Delta College
Employers are less likely to have sent employees to classes at Delta College today than they did in 2007.
In 2007, 48 percent of the employers had sent their employees to classes at Delta College, but only 24
percent sent employees to classes in 2011. Employers have had training budgets slashed and with the
increase in number and credibility of online offerings, fewer employers are sending employees to classes.
The employers who did send employees to classes at Delta College were very satisfied with the outcomes
– 92 percent were satisfied with the classes.

The decline in corporate training budgets and employee layoffs has also impacted the usage of Delta
College’s Corporate Services. In 2007, 29 percent of the employers in the region had used the services of
Corporate Services, but by 2011, only eight percent of the employers availed themselves of the offerings of
Corporate Services. But, although there has been a decline in usage, there has been an increase in
favorability with Corporate Services. In 2007, employers noted problems with the follow-through of
Corporate Services. But in 2011, employers were very complimentary of the new leadership of Corporate
Services and the new programming being offered, specifically the Fast Track program.

       Recommendation: Additional Fast Track programs should be developed at Delta College and
        targeted at the students who have the foundational skill sets to enter and succeed in a Fast Track
        program, potentially in mechanical engineering technology and manufacturing and industrial
        technology.

       Recommendation: Explore the application of cross-training in the technical academic
        curriculum. Employers are requiring cross-trained personnel in welding, pipefitting, and
        electrical. The shift has occurred from having individual specialists in each area to one cross-
        trained employee who can troubleshoot all areas. Corporate Services has been providing some
        cross-training for current employees. Explore a cross-trained academic associate degree program.

By 2011, more employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region reported they had hired graduates of Delta
College. In 2007, 32 percent of the employers noted they had used Delta College as a source of employees,
and by 2011, 42 percent of the employers reported they had hired a graduate of Delta College. And the

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 4
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

excellent news for Delta College is that two-thirds of the employers noted that the graduates of Delta
College had met their expectations for the job requirements and 30 percent exceeded their expectation.

Jobs Forecast And Programming Needs
A major question for Delta College is whether their current programming is market relevant and are there
new programs that the College should be developing. Multiple sources were examined in development of
a potential program list for Delta College to consider for development. National, state, and regional jobs
forecasts were examined. Local employer input was gathered through the survey of employers. Interviews
were conducted with local economic development agencies to examine future employment pushes by the
region. All of this information was synthesized with the current program offerings at the College.

Given that more than half of the occupations in the top 25 jobs forecasted for the nation and the state are
in health care, it is not a surprise that many of the occupations that Delta College should consider for
expansion are in health care as well. Based on the national, state, and regional jobs forecast, local
employer demand, and average hourly wages, the following new programs are recommended for
expansion at Delta College.

       Health Care
          o Occupational Therapy Assistants
          o Pharmacy Technicians
          o Certified Nursing Assistants and Direct Care Aides
                  Although the pay is very low for these positions, turnover is high, creating high
                    demand for employees. The CNA is an excellent entry point for those interested
                    in health care careers, and many younger students, even those in high school, are
                    earning their CNA to enable part-time employment while attending college, as
                    well as for students who may need additional foundation skills. Delta College
                    should consider adding this to the registered nursing ladder – CNA to LPN to RN.
          o Registered Nurses
                  Nationally as well as in Michigan, the move is on for registered nurses who work
                    in acute care settings to complete a BSN. Delta College needs to continue to
                    examine the options for their AND nurses to easily transfer to a BSN program. In
                    addition, there also appears to be a perception that RN students at Delta College
                    have to wait for two or three years to complete their clinical after completing their
                    general education courses, which may be hurting the reputation of the College.
          o Cardiovascular Technicians
          o Health Information Technology
                  Delta College is already working in a consortium to develop a Health Information
                    Technology program. Across the country, health care providers are still
                    discussing what specifically will be needed in health information technology. The
                    immediate need on the horizon as physician offices become larger and office staff
                    becomes more specialized is for Medical Coders and Insurance Specialists.
          o Dietician Technician
          o Massage Therapy
                  Enrollment trends for Delta College’s massage therapy certificate of achievement
                    and the massage therapy post associate degree certificate are very low for 2006 to
                    2010. The College should examine their current program with respect to the
                    competition, specifically the Flint School of Therapeutic Massage, on delivery and
                    program options and potentially this program could be housed in Continuing
                    Education.


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 5
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                           January 2011

            o Medical Assisting
                  There is an increased demand for medical assistants nationally and job postings
                     are seen in the Great Lakes Bay Region, but the enrollments in the medical
                     assisting program at Delta College have been low. The majority of the employers
                     want a Certified Medical Assistant (CMA), certified by the American Association
                     of Medical Assistants. The College should examine the delivery and outcome of
                     their current program.
            o Speech Pathology Aide

       Other Program Areas To Examine
           o Heavy Equipment Operators
           o Logistics
           o Auto Body Repair
           o Diesel Mechanics/ Heavy Equipment Repair
           o Broadband Technologist
           o GIS (Geographic Information Systems)

Educational Opportunities
Employers continue to support their employees’ attempts to gain education, especially if they do not have
to provide funding for the educational attainment. Sixty-seven percent of the employers will support
flexible schedules for employees to allow them to attend college classes. Employers are still providing
tuition reimbursement for employees – even though employers have been facing reduced budgets. In
2007, 49 percent of the employers provided tuition reimbursement for their employees and 45 percent
still provided the benefit in 2011. More employers are paying for continuing education units in 2011 – 42
percent of the employers will pay for CEUs for their employees compared to only 27 percent in 2007.
Only 27 percent of the employers will pay for books for their employees (no change since 2007).

       Recommendation: Market the feasibility of using employer tuition reimbursement to
        employees in the market for skill set upgrades at Delta College.

As seen in 2007, three-fourths of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region would like a summarized
copy of the results of the Workforce Development Scan. This provides Delta College a perfect opportunity
to provide feedback to the employers who responded to the survey, but apparently this was not done in
2007.

       Recommendation: The College should invite the employers to an “Employer Summit” at Delta
        College. They will be given a summarized copy of the results of the Workforce Development Scan.
        Prior to the “Employer Summit” the College needs to define how they will address some of the
        needs found in the survey. At the summit, the College can present a short program on the current
        services. The College needs to concentrate on providing solutions for the issues defined in the
        research.

Delta College’s Centers
Delta College has developed outreach centers at three locations in its service area – Midland Center in
Midland, the Planetarium in Bay City, and the Ricker Center in Buena Vista serving Saginaw. CLARUS
Corporation was asked to examine the roles of the centers in view of the research results from the
Workforce Development Scan and make suggestions for positioning of the Centers. The Planetarium has
a very unique market niche, and is very well-defined and known in the Bay City market as well as the
Great Lakes Bay Region. It is focused on serving the educational and community needs in Bay County.


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                    Page 6
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                            January 2011

The Midland Center is more focused on providing lifelong learning and has a niche in the Midland
market in that arena. The issue is the focus for the Ricker Center and the needs of the Saginaw market. As
one employer noted during the interviews, the potential employees in the Saginaw market do not have
the skills needed to even apply for the manufacturing jobs available in the Saginaw area. Residents in
Saginaw are lacking the foundational skills needed by the employers for future employment. It is
recommended that the College consider developing a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics) focus for the Center serving Saginaw. The focus would be on providing short-term
employment programming with a longer goal of improving the foundational skills to provide more
opportunity to participate in the occupations in science, health, and manufacturing for the future. A
potential move into downtown Saginaw would also make programming more accessible to the residents
of the City.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                     Page 7
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011




                               Methodology




CLARUS Corporation                                          Page 8
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

Purpose
Market conditions force employers to continue to change and update their technology as well as their
workers’ skills. As technology changes, employers are forced to either hire employees with new skill sets
or retrain current employees to remain competitive in today’s global environment. Much like the
employers, community colleges that are to remain successful in today’s market must be keenly in tune to
the changing needs of employers for employees and new skill sets. The local community college must
continue to examine their current programming for market currency and to ensure that their
programming meets the needs of local employers, as well as employers across the country in areas of high
job demand. The College must examine their current degree programs for relevance and make updates as
needed and explore new program opportunities, as well as examine discontinuation of the programming
not needed in today’s market. To complete the educational continuum, the College must also be sure that
the training programs exist to support the graduates in their continuing education needs and need for
updates after completion of a degree.

To determine how Delta College can best meet the current and future needs of the employers in the
service area, surveys were conducted with a stratified sample of employers in the service area. This report
outlines the methodology for the project and summarizes the major findings of the Workforce
Development Scan.


Research Questions
Specifically, the research questions for the survey of employers included:
 Whether the employers believe there is a workforce in the market area that will meet their needs for
   qualified employees, and if not, what skill sets are they missing?
 What training programs will be needed in the future for current employees? How do employers want
   those training programs delivered to their employees?
 What are the future employee needs of businesses? How do those needs differ from the regional,
   state, and national job forecasts?
 Have employers ever sent employees to classes at Delta College?
 How many employers have used Delta College’s Corporate Services and what is their satisfaction with
   those services?
 Have employers ever hired a graduate of Delta College and how do the employers rate the quality of
   those graduates?
 How active are employers in providing educational opportunities for their employees?


Sampling Frame
The population of interest for this business needs assessment was the employers located in the service
area of Delta College, specifically Bay, Midland, and Saginaw counties. In order to gain an adequate
representation of the employers in the service area, employers were stratified by SIC code for each county
in the sample frame. The sample frame is presented in Exhibit 1.

                        Exhibit 1. Sample Frame For Workforce Development Scan
                                                                 Total
             SIC                                                                       Sample      Calls
 County                            Description                 Number Of     Percent
            Code                                                                       Frame     Completed
                                                               Businesses
Bay        01-14     Agriculture, Forestry, And Mining                 142      1.4%         5            5
           15-17     Contractors And Construction                      339      3.2%        11           11


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 9
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                     January 2011

                                                           Total
             SIC                                                                Sample     Calls
County                          Description              Number Of    Percent
            Code                                                                Frame    Completed
                                                         Businesses
           20-39   Manufacturing                                209     2.0%        7           7
           40-49   Transportation, Communications, And          154     1.5%        5           5
                   Facilities
           60-67   Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate          321     3.1%       11          11
           70-79   Business And Personal Services               619     5.9%       21          21
           80      Health Services                              276     2.6%        9           9
           81      Legal Services                                62     0.6%        2           2
           82-83   Education And Social Services                235     2.2%        8           8
           84-86   Art And Membership Organizations             178     1.7%        6           6
           87      Engineering, Architecture, And                61     0.6%        2           2
                   Accounting
           88-89   Household & Miscellaneous Services            10     0.1%        0           0
           91-97   Government (Public Administration)           206     2.0%        7           7
           99      Non-Classifiable Establishments               47     0.4%        2           2
Subtotal                                                      2,859    27.3%       96          96
Midland    01-14   Agriculture, Forestry, And Mining             93     0.9%        3           3
           15-17   Contractors And Construction                 292     2.8%       10          10
           20-39   Manufacturing                                117     1.1%        4           4
           40-49   Transportation, Communications, And          107     1.0%        4           4
                   Facilities
           60-67   Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate          209     2.0%        7           7
           70-79   Business And Personal Services               483     4.6%       16          16
           80      Health Services                              220     2.1%        7           7
           81      Legal Services                                34     0.3%        1           1
           82-83   Education And Social Services                207     2.0%        7           7
           84-86   Art And Membership Organizations             133     1.3%        4           4
           87      Engineering, Architecture, And                95     0.9%        3           3
                   Accounting
           88-89   Household & Miscellaneous Services             9     0.1%        0           0
           91-97   Government (Public Administration)           129     1.2%        4           4
           99      Non-Classifiable Establishments               31     0.3%        1           1
Subtotal                                                      2,159    20.7%       71          71
Saginaw    01-14   Agriculture, Forestry, And Mining            269     2.6%        9           9
           15-17   Contractors And Construction                 642     6.1%       21          21
           20-39   Manufacturing                                370     3.5%       12          12
           40-49   Transportation, Communications, And          257     2.5%        9           9
                   Facilities
           60-67   Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate          566     5.4%       19          19
           70-79   Business And Personal Services             1,127    10.8%       38          38
           80      Health Services                              552     5.3%       18          18
           81      Legal Services                               142     1.4%        5           5
           82-83   Education And Social Services                528     5.1%       18          18
           84-86   Art And Membership Organizations             392     3.7%       13          13
           87      Engineering, Architecture, And               146     1.4%        5           5
                   Accounting
           88-89   Household & Miscellaneous Services            30     0.3%        1           1
           91-97   Government (Public Administration)           273     2.6%       10          10
           99      Non-Classifiable Establishments              143     1.4%        5           5


CLARUS Corporation                                                                            Page 10
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

                                                                 Total
             SIC                                                                       Sample      Calls
 County                            Description                 Number Of     Percent
            Code                                                                       Frame     Completed
                                                               Businesses
Subtotal                                                             5,437    52.0%        183         183
TOTAL                                                               10,455   100.0%        350         350

A list of employers was purchased from a company specializing in business lists for all employers within
Bay, Midland, and Saginaw counties. The list for the service area was then sorted by county, SIC code,
and then by employee size – from largest to smallest employers. Employers were then interviewed
starting with the largest employers and moving down the list until the quota was completed for each SIC
code within each county. This sample methodology assured Delta College of successfully completing
interviews with a cross-representation of the larger employers across the service area.


Reliability Estimation
The reliability estimation for the sample was based on the total number of businesses in the service area.
The sample of 350 businesses provided a reliability of 95 percent and tolerable error of ± 5.2 percent. In
other words, if 100 different samples of 350 businesses in the service area were chosen randomly, 95
times out of 100 the results obtained would vary no more than ± 5.2 percentage points from the results
that would be obtained if all of the employers in the service area were interviewed.


Instrument Design
On the basis of the data gained in the preliminary interviews on the campus of Delta College, a draft of a
telephone survey was developed and presented to the administrative team at Delta College. CLARUS
Corporation and Delta College reviewed this draft in detail for additions, deletions, and revisions. The
survey was based on a survey master that has been used to interview more than 22,000 businesses in the
last 15 years about their educational needs. The instrument basis has been found to provide extremely
reliable and valid results.

It was the responsibility of CLARUS Corporation to write and sequence the questions in such a way that
any respondent bias was minimized and the questions were technically correct. The final survey was
pretested to ensure that question wording and sequencing were structured as needed. A copy of the final
instrument is presented in Appendix A.


Data Collection
Telephone surveys were the primary method of data collection. Each telephone interview lasted
approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Employers were first called, told the purpose of the survey, and then
asked to set a time convenient for the interview. The interviewers then called the employers back at the
appointed time to complete the interview. Three hundred thirty-five telephone interviews were
conducted January 12 to 25, 2011 by CLARUS Corporation interviewers who have previous experience in
educational services interviewing with busy business owners and executives. Personal interviews were
conducted by key staff members of the CLARUS Corporation project team with 15 of the employers in the
service area. Interviews were also conducted with representatives from four economic development
groups which were not counted in the employer total. These in-depth interviews allowed for additional
information to be examined and the employers were selected specifically for these personal and in-depth
interviews by Delta College. CLARUS Corporation professional staff conducted these interviews in person
in the Great Lakes Bay Region in Michigan on January 19 and 20, 2011 and follow-up telephone
interviews were conducted on January 24 and 25, 2011.

The interviewers conducting the telephone interviews were subjected to rigorous hiring and training
procedures before making their first phone call. Before interviewing began, the interviewers went

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                    Page 11
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

through a thorough question-by-question briefing of the questionnaire. During actual interviewing, each
interviewer was monitored for one complete questionnaire and monitored randomly after that.


Data Analysis
After the data were collected, verification of the data began. The data were examined to ensure that
procedures were followed in data collection and checked for internal validity by cross-matching answers
per respondent. The data were then coded for processing and analysis. SPSS (Statistical Package for the
Social Sciences) was used to analyze the data and the data disks will be made available to Delta College
for additional subset analyses. In addition, Delta College now has a database, formatted in Excel, which
can be used for direct contact with businesses based on their stated needs.


Reporting
The results of the data are organized into a graphic and narrative report as well as detailed tabular results.
This report focuses on the most meaningful findings of the research. The format used has the results
summarized in a chart or graphic and pertinent comments below. To make reporting the results more
meaningful, the results will be reported by location of the employer – Bay, Midland, and Saginaw
counties. The number of surveys completed for each county and the individual reliability for each county
follows:

         Exhibit 2. Stratification Of Workforce Development Scan Results By Location Of Employer


                            Bay County
                               28%




                                                                           Saginaw
                                                                           County
                                                                             52%



                                 Midland
                                 County
                                  20%


  Bay County
       Comprised 27 percent of the sample with 96 interviews completed; reliability for this county is 95
        percent and the margin of error is + 10.0 percent.

  Midland County
       Comprised 20 percent of the sample with 71 interviews completed; reliability for this county is 95
        percent and the margin of error is + 11.6 percent.

  Saginaw County
       Comprised 52 percent of the sample with 183 interviews completed; reliability for this county is
        95 percent and the margin of error is + 7.2 percent.



CLARUS Corporation                                                                                       Page 12
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

The legends in the charts are titled “Bay” representing those employers in Bay County, “Midland”
                                                         Sa g naw
representing those employers in Midland County, and “Sagiinaw ” representing the employers in
Saginaw County. Differences between the groups will be reported where they exist. In addition, the
results from the 2007 Workforce Development Scan will be compared in the text to the comparable
responses in the current Workforce Development Scan. A complete set of tabular results by frequency
and percentage for each of the major classifications of this research is provided in Appendix B by location
of the employer. The tabular results should serve as reference materials and should be consulted before
important conclusions are made. Due to SPSS labeling specifications, some of the longer verbatim
responses are cut off in the tables. The complete text for those responses is presented in Appendix C.

The results of the Workforce Development Scan will be reported in the narrative text for the two groups
of employers. Differences between employers in the two counties will be reported where they exist. The
results from the individual interviews and the analyses of available data have been synthesized in a draft
set of findings that identifies the key unmet needs to which Delta College may respond, as well as
recommendations as to what that response might be.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                     Page 13
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011




                                       Results




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page 14
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                   January 2011


Recruiting Employees
                          Chart 1. Current Shortage Of Qualified Job Candidates
                                        By Location Of Employer


            Shortage of qualified job
                  candidates

          Applicants to my company
          have problems passing the
                  drug test

          Applicants have a problem
           passing the background
                    check

          Applicants to my company
           possess the basic skills
            needed to work here                                                                Bay
                                                                                               Midland
                   Communications                                                              Saginaw



                        Mathematics



            Reading comprehension


          Applicants to my company
          possess the work ethic to
                  work here

          Applicants to my company
           have the technical skills
            needed to work here

                                        0   10   20   30   40      50     60    70   80   90         100

                                                                Percent Agree



Shortage Of Current Qualified Job Candidates. Employers in the three counties (Bay, Midland,
and Saginaw) were asked whether they believe there is a shortage of qualified job candidates. Overall, 37
percent of employers noted there is a shortage of qualified job candidates in the area – 34 percent of the
employers in Bay County, 32 percent in Midland County, and 39 percent in Saginaw County (as seen in
Chart 1).

  In the 2007 Employer Survey, 52 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region noted there
  was a shortage of qualified job candidates from which to hire employees, primarily because the
  applicants were missing skills – work ethics, computers, customer service, communication,
  machining, and basic skills (reading, writing, and math). By 2011, with the high levels of
  unemployment in the region, only 37 percent of the employers noted there was a shortage of
  qualified applicants, even with the high unemployment rates.


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 15
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                              January 2011

For those employers who indicated a shortage of candidates, the employers were read a series of
statements regarding their job applicants and the reasons they noted a shortage of applicants. The results
are shown in Chart 1. The employers were asked to “Agree” or “Disagree” with each statement. Almost
one-fourth of the employers noted that the applicants to their companies have a problem passing the
drug test – 18 percent of the employers in Bay County and 26 percent of the employers in Midland and
Saginaw Counties. Thirty percent of the employers agreed that the applicants have a problem passing the
background check. Thirty-two percent of the employers in Bay County, 39 percent in Midland County,
and 26 percent in Saginaw County agreed that their applicants have a problem passing the background
check.

While 64 percent of the employers agreed that the applicants to their companies possess the basic skills
needed to work at the company, 35 percent disagreed and noted the applicants do not have the basic
skills needed. Forty-four percent of the employers in Bay County noted their applicants do not possess
the basic skills needed. The employers in Bay County noted 40 percent are missing skills in written
communication, 47 percent are missing skills in mathematics, and 53 percent are missing skills in
reading comprehension. Twenty-six percent of the employers in Midland County noted their applicants
are also missing basic skills – 83 percent are missing skills in written communications and mathematics
and 67 percent are missing skills in reading comprehension. One-third of the employers in Saginaw
County noted their applicants are also missing the basic skills needed for the job – 42 percent are missing
skills in written communications and one-third are missing skills in mathematics and reading
comprehension.

  In the 2007 Employer Scan, the employers in the region were also concerned that the applicants
  were missing basic skills – math, reading, and writing, as did 35 percent of the employers in the 2011
  Employer Scan.

Only 54 percent of the employers agreed that the applicants to their companies possess the work ethic
needed to work at their companies – that also means that 45 percent of the employers believe the current
applicants do not have the work ethic needed to work at the companies. The reasons the employers noted
that the applicants did not have the work ethic needed included no dedication to the job or the company,
poor attendance habits (showing up late, not coming in, not punctual), and a poor attitude about the job.

  Employers noted job applicants were missing work ethics in 2007, and work ethics were still
  problematic for the employers in 2011 with 45 percent of the employers in the region noting their
  current applicants do not have the work ethics needed.

Finally, the employers were asked whether the applicants had the technical skills to be employed. While
60 percent of the employers agreed that the applicants to their companies have the technical skills
needed to work in their companies, 40 percent disagreed. The technical skills reported as missing in the
applicants by 29 percent of the employers in Bay County included basic skills, common sense, computer
skills, mathematics, and mechanical skills. Fifty-two percent of the employers in Midland County
reported the following technical skills are missing in applicants: carpentry skills, computer skills,
mechanical/ engineering, and welding. Forty percent of the employers in Saginaw County also reported
that applicants did not have the technical skills needed, especially computer skills (23 percent), blueprint
reading, tool and die, math skills, automotive, and welding.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 16
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                      January 2011

                          Chart 2. Future Shortage Of Qualified Job Candidates
                                        By Location Of Employer


           Shortage of qualified job
           candidates in next 3 to 5
                    years

                                                                                                Bay
          Same reasons as current
                 shortage                                                                       Midland
                                                                                                Saginaw


        Other reasons than current
                 shortage

                                       0   10   20    30    40     50    60      70   80   90     100

                                                                 Percent Agree


Shortage Of Future Qualified Job Candidates. Next the employers in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw
counties were asked whether they believe there will be a shortage of qualified job candidates in the next
three to five years and the results are presented in Chart 2. Overall, 59 percent of employers noted they
believe that there will be a shortage of qualified applicants in the next three to five years. Seventy-one
percent of the employers in Bay County agreed that there will be a shortage, as did 61 percent of the
employers in Midland County, and 54 percent of the employers in Saginaw County.

Fifty-four percent of the employers in Bay County that forecast there will be a future shortage of qualified
job applicants believe it will be for the same reasons they noted they currently have a shortage – missing
basic skills, missing work ethic, and missing technical skills. Forty-six percent of the employers in Bay
County who believe there will be a future shortage of qualified applicants noted other reasons for the
shortage, specifically people are leaving the state, 90 percent of skilled trades employees will be retiring in
five years, young people are not staying in school, and the qualified people will have jobs.

While 29 percent of the employers in Midland County noted a shortage of qualified applicants in the next
three to five years will result from the same reasons as a current shortage of applicants (missing basic
skills, technical skills, and work ethic), 71 percent noted other reasons for the shortage. The other reasons
cited for the belief that there will be a shortage of applicants in the future included employees did not
make a job change in the economy, people are holding on to their current jobs, hard to find skilled
employees, no one wants to come to Michigan to work, kids coming out of high school going to college
and not working, are missing IT skills, and missing work ethic.

Finally, 46 percent of the employers in Saginaw County noted that the future shortage of qualified job
applicants was due to the same reasons employers were seeing a current shortage – missing technical and
basic skills and poor work ethic – but more than half (54 percent) noted other reasons for the future
shortage. The reasons cited for the future shortage are employees (Baby Boomers) will be retiring, cannot
compete with IT wages, applicants cannot pass driving or criminal checks, industry changing quickly and
requires more multi-skilled employees, people leaving the state for better job opportunities, too lazy, tool
makers needed, US education system not good today, and work ethic missing.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                            Page 17
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                 January 2011


Training Needs And Delivery Preferences
                        Chart 3. Continuing Education Required For Employees
                                       By Location Of Employer


                                                                                                Bay
       Continuing education
                                                                                                Midland
         (CEUs) required
                                                                                                Saginaw


                              0     10    20     30     40     50      60   70    80     90    100

                                                             Percent


Required CEUs. As seen in Chart 3, more than half (55 percent) of the employers in Bay, Midland, and
Saginaw counties require employees to participate in continuing education programs or obtain
continuing education units (CEUs) as a job requirement. Fifty-nine percent of the employers in Bay
County require employees to participate in annual continuing education classes. A major area that the
employers in Bay County require CEUs for their employees is health care (in which people require CEUs
to keep licenses) – certified nursing assistants, occupational therapists, registered nurses, dietetics,
emergency medical technicians, nurses’ aides, social work, and physical therapists. Other areas in Bay
County that employers require CEUs include criminal justice, accounting, personal training, attorneys,
health safety, environmental, insurance, food servers, lab training, liquor servers, mechanics, OSHA,
pastors, quality assurance, real estate, education (teachers, teacher’s aides, counselors), and truck drivers.

Fifty-six percent of the employers in Midland County require employees to participate in annual
continuing education classes or obtain CEUs to keep licenses. Health care is a major area for CEUs for
registered nurses, case managers, therapists, certified nursing assistants, and licensed practical nurses, as
well as all health care employees that have to keep licenses current. Other areas in which annual
continuing education is required by employers in Midland County include food servers and liquor
servers, CPR and first aid, drivers, education (teachers - all areas), hazardous waste, electricians,
hospitality, contractors/ builders, surveyors, human resources, plumbing, pipefitters, carpenters, real
estate, safety, skilled trades, and social workers.

Fifty-three percent of the Saginaw County employers require employees to participate in continuing
education classes annually or to obtain CEUs. Health care led the list of required CEUs or classes and
almost all employees in health care are required to participate in CEUs annually, especially nurses.
Teachers are also another major group that are required to annually obtain CEUs. Other major areas in
which CEUs are required by the employers in Saginaw County include accounting, architecture,
contractors, financial planning, maintenance, human resources, electricians, EMTs and paramedics,
engineering, heavy equipment operators, criminal justice, insurance, attorneys, logistics, hazardous
materials, mechanics, religious leaders, pesticide application, real estate, safety, OSHA, liquor servers,
social work, and veterinary.

In Midland County the primary areas that the employers require CEUs include: food handlers, drivers -
CDL, forklift certification, nursing CEUs, lawyers, medical staff/ doctors/ nurses, realtors, TABC,
accounting, real estate, health care, education, engineering, firefighters, forklift, human resources,
insurance, and law enforcement. The primary areas in Saginaw County in which the employers require
CEUs for their employees include: drivers - CDL, TABC, cosmetology, appraisers, accounting,
engineering, insurance, information technology/ engineering, automotive, counseling, education,


CLARUS Corporation                                                                                        Page 18
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                           January 2011

electrical/ journeyman’s license, food handlers, funeral directors, human resources, insurance,
investment, nursing, police, fire, and real estate.

  In 2007, 35 percent of the employers surveyed required their employees to obtain CEUs (continuing
  education units) and by 2011, 55 percent of the employers required their employees to obtain CEUs.
  Since the retail and wholesale sectors were excluded from the 2011 survey, this may not reflect a true
  increase in employers requiring CEUs. In 2007, the major areas for obtaining CEUs included
  accounting, law, education, finance, management, medical, nursing, real estate, and safety. In 2011,
  the major areas for continuing education include health care, criminal justice, accounting, personal
  training, attorneys, health safety, environmental, insurance, food servers, lab training, liquor
  servers, mechanics, OSHA, pastors, quality assurance, real estate, education (teachers, teacher’s
  aides, counselors), and truck drivers.

                            Chart 4. Training Provided To Current Employees
                                        By Location Of Employer


                     Provide training to employees



                                         No budget



                Corporate does it all/ in-house only


                                                                                                         Bay
                           On-the-job training only                                                      Midland
                                                                                                         Saginaw


                             No need/ not required



                              No one to do training



                 Other reasons training not offered


                                                       0   10   20   30   40     50      60   70   80   90   100

                                                                               Percent



Current Training Provided. More than 88 percent of the employers in the three counties provide
training to their employees, as seen in Chart 4. Eighty-eight percent of the employers in Bay County
provide training to their employees. The 12 percent of Bay County employers who do not train their
employees noted they have no need or it is not required (36 percent), they have no budget (nine percent),
train on-the-job only (nine percent), or cited other reasons (45 percent) which include hire people already
trained or employees seek their own training.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                                 Page 19
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

Eighty-nine percent of the employers in Midland County train their employees. Only 11 percent of the
employers in Midland County do not provide training to their employees because they have no budget (25
percent), have no need/ not required (25 percent), corporate does it (12.5 percent), on-the-job training
only (12.5 percent), or employers have an association train employees or they train as they go.

Employers in Saginaw County are the most likely to train their employees – 92 percent of the employers
provide training to employees. For the eight percent of employers in Saginaw County that do not provide
training to their employees, their reasons for not offering training included use on-the-job training only
(29 percent), no budget (seven percent), corporate does it (seven percent), no need/ not required (seven
percent), and someone else does the training for the other employers (outside group, online, and unions
provide training).

  Ninety-one percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region provided training to their
  employees in 2011, compared to 95 percent of the employers in 2007. The major training programs
  that the employers provided to employees in 2007 included safety, computers, customer service,
  blueprint reading, food safety, lean manufacturing, quality, serve safe, supervision, and
  management.

                       Chart 5. Employee Training To Be Provided In The Next Year
                                       By Location Of Employer

            Management/
            Supervisory



       Interpersonal skills                                                            Bay

                                                                                       Midland

                                                                                       Saginaw
          Computer skills




          Techincal skills


                              0   10   20     30     40     50      60   70     80    90     100
                                                          Percent



Future Employee Training. Employers were asked if they had any formalized training planned for
their organizations in the next year and the results are presented in Chart 5. Employers were asked if they
planned to offer any training to employees in the next year in management or supervisory training and
almost half of the employers will offer training in the area to their employees.

Management/ Supervisory. Overall, 48 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region will
provide management and supervisory training to their employees in the next year. Forty-two percent of
the employers in Bay County plan to offer management/ supervisory training to their employees in the
next year. The primary topics to be included in the management training are leadership, management,
human resources, and supervision, and other topics which will be included are globalization impact,
mentoring, motivation, reasonable suspicion, team development, and time management. Sixty percent of
the employers in Midland County plan to provide management/ supervisory training to their employees
in the next year. The primary topics to be included in the management training for Midland County
employees are conflict management/ resolution, human resources, leadership, coaching, communication,

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                     Page 20
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

organization effectiveness, performance, interviewing, recruitment, supervision, and time management.
In Saginaw County, 46 percent of the employers will provide management/ supervisory training to their
employees in the next year and the primary topic for the employee training will be leadership, but other
topics will also be included and those include supervision, collaboration, communication, customer
services, difficult situations, delegation, flexible productivity, human resources, labor relations, sexual
harassment, lean manufacturing, organization, performance, personality, public relations, quality
control, staff management, and cognitive skills.

  More employers see a need for management/ supervisory training in 2011 than they did in 2007. In
  2007, 39 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region noted they needed or much needed
  management/ supervisory training for employees, and by 2011, 48 percent of the employers
  reported the same need.

Interpersonal Skills. Less than half (43 percent) of the employers in the three counties will provide
interpersonal skills training to their employees in the next year, as seen in Chart 5 – 51 percent in Bay
County, 46 percent in Midland County, and 40 percent in Saginaw County. The employers in Bay County
(51 percent) that will provide interpersonal skills training to their employees in the next year will include
the following major topics in the training: communications, customer services, dealing with difficult
people, and team building/ teamwork. Other topics to be included in the interpersonal skills training in
Bay County include behavioral, diversity, listening, motivation, people skills, and phone etiquette. Forty-
six percent of the employers in Midland County will provide interpersonal skills training to their
employees and the major topics to be included in that training are: conflict resolution and customer
service. Other topics the Midland County employers will include in interpersonal skills training are:
communication, effectiveness, emotional intelligence, management, problem solving, stress, and team
building. The employers in Saginaw County are the least likely to provide interpersonal skills training to
their employees – only 40 percent will provide training in the next year. The primary topics to be
included in the interpersonal skills training are communication, conflict resolution, diversity, people
skills, customer service, and teamwork/ team building. Other topics mentioned by the Saginaw
employers for inclusion in interpersonal skills training are community and teamwork, creative problem
solving, crisis prevention, speaking, human relations, social media, and time management.

  Employers expressed an increased need for interpersonal skills training for their employees in 2011 –
  43 percent of the employers will provide interpersonal skills training for their employees. In 2007, 32
  percent of the employers in the region reported that training on interpersonal skills was needed or
  much needed for their employees.

Computer Skills. As seen in Chart 5, 43 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region will
provide computer training to their employees in the next year – 46 percent of the employers in Bay
County, 48 percent in Midland County, and 40 percent in Saginaw County. In Bay County, Excel and
Microsoft Office lead the list for computer training for current employees in the next year, and there is a
training need in health care for electronic charting and electronic medical records as their systems
become fully automated. Other computer topics the Bay County employers will provide training for their
employees in the next year include accounting/ bookkeeping software, any new software programs, basic
computers, CAD, e-mail, logistics, networking, and vendor specific software (varies by company). The
employers in Midland County will also focus on Excel and Microsoft Office for computer training for their
current employees in the next year, as well as offer specific training in Access, basic computers, brochure
making, electronic medical records, InDesign, Internet, GPS (Global Positioning Software), SAP, web site,
and company specific software (typically provided by vendors). Training on Excel will be in highest
demand for the employers in Saginaw County. Other computer topics that the Saginaw County employers
will provide training for their employees include AUTOCAD, accounting software, basic computers,
modeling and design software, Plato, billing systems, Cyber lab, data analysis/ processing, electronic
controls, Internet e-commerce, Microsoft Office, ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning), databases,
interactive white boards, SAP, web site, and company specific computer programs.

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                       Page 21
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

  Even more employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region in 2011 will be providing computer training for
  their employees – 43 percent of the employers will provide computer training for their employees. In
  2007, 38 percent of the employers reported computer training was needed or much needed for their
  employees.

Technical Skills. Employers in Midland County are the most likely to provide technical skills training to
their employees in the next year – 35 percent – compared to 19 percent of the employers in Bay County
and 20 percent in Saginaw County. The technical areas that the employers in Midland County are most
likely to provide training to employees in the next year include math and safety, CDL, electrical, forklift,
insulation, maintenance, multimedia, surgery technology, carpentry, pipefitting, OSHA, plant operations,
programming (computer and PLC), plumbing, safety, CAD, skilled trades, surveying, and welding. In Bay
County, computer training leads the list for technical training to be conducted for employees next year.
Other technical training areas planned by the Bay County employers include HAZWOPER, first aid,
chemical processing, data entry and databases, electronic signatures, lean manufacturing, machine skills,
maintenance, telemetry, PLC (programmed logic controls), pipefitting, and welding. In Saginaw County,
the technical areas in which training is planned are as diverse as the employers. The technical training
planned by the Saginaw County employers are automotive, clinical, computer forensics, diesel electronic
controls, electrical, mechanical, CAD, estimating, safety, pumps and compressors, PLC (programmed
logic controls), robotics, IV/ catheter, and vending machine repair.

  In 2007, 27 percent of the employers noted they needed technical training for their employees,
  specifically in the areas of safety, CNC (computer numerical controls), blueprint reading, computers,
  lean manufacturing, and quality control. Twenty-two percent of the employers surveyed in the Great
  Lakes Bay Region in 2011 also noted they needed technical skills training for their employees.

                                  Chart 6. Source Of Training Program Decisions
                                             By Location Of Employer



       Local management



         Corporate office                                                               Bay
                                                                                        Midland
                                                                                        Saginaw
                     Both



      Neither - no training


                              0      10     20    30    40     50      60   70    80     90       100

                                                             Percent



Training Decisions. Local management is most likely to make the decisions about training for the
employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region. As seen in Chart 6, local management makes the training
decisions for 71 percent of the employers in Bay County, 64 percent of the employers in Midland County,
and 56 percent of the employers in Saginaw County. The corporate office will make training decisions for
13 percent of the employers in Bay County, 25 percent of the employers in Midland County, and for 22
percent of the employers in Saginaw County. For 13 percent of the employers in Bay County, 10 percent in
Midland County, and 20 percent in Saginaw County, the training decisions are made by both the local

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 22
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

management and the corporate office. No training is done by three percent of the employers in Bay and
Saginaw counties and two percent in Midland County.

                    Chart 7. Preferred Location For Training Programs Provided By
                              Outside Vendors By Location Of Employer



      On-site at place of
          business


       Monday to Friday
        (8am to 5pm)


      Nights (Monday to
           Friday)                                                                      Bay
                                                                                        Midland
              Weekends
              (Saturday/                                                                Saginaw
               Sunday)


                 Off-site



               Depends


                            0   10     20     30     40       50    60     70     80     90       100

                                                          Percent



Preferred Location. Employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region were asked if they preferred training
programs be offered at their place of business or off-site if they were using an outside training group to
provide training. As seen in Chart 7, the majority of the employers (53 percent) prefer that the classes be
offered at their place of business – it is more convenient for them and their employees. Fifty-three
percent of the employers in Bay County, 54 percent of the employers in Midland County, and 52 percent
of the employers in Saginaw County prefer to have training offered at their place of business.

For the employers who preferred training to be conducted on-site, they were also asked when they would
be most likely to provide that training. As seen in Chart 7, the majority of the employers would provide
training to their employees Monday to Friday from 8am to 5pm – 91 percent of the Bay County
employers, all of the Midland county employers, and 97 percent of the employers in Saginaw County.
Almost one-third of the employers are also likely to provide training to their employees in the evenings
during the week (Monday to Friday) – 31 percent of employers in Bay County, 32 percent of the Midland
County employers, and 26 percent of the Saginaw County employers. For the employers who are
operating 24/7, training is also provided on the weekends by 29 percent of the employers in Bay and
Midland counties, and 20 percent of the employers in Saginaw County.

The employers in Bay County are the most likely to prefer to take employees off-site to train – 28 percent
– compared to 16 percent of the employers in Midland County and 22 percent of the employers in
Saginaw County. When asked whether they preferred training to be conducted on-site or off-site, 19
percent of the employers in Bay County noted “it depends,” as did 30 percent of the employers in
Midland County and 26 percent in Saginaw County. The “it depends” answer generally was based on the

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 23
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                     January 2011

type of training to be provided. If the training was for a large number of people, then it would be more
cost-effective for the training to be held on-site. For smaller groups of people, for example managers,
sending them off-site to minimize interruptions and to professional venues would be desired. The
companies would be likely to send one or two employees off-site for specialized training and then the
employees would be expected to share the information with other employees in-house. Shop, technical,
or very specific machine or job training is typically done in-house and more academic topics may be
taught off-site or brought in-house to larger groups. For example, for online classes for a few people, it
will be done in-house, but if a computer class is being taught and there is not a computer lab available on-
site, that training would be conducted off-site. Where the training is conducted is generally determined
by the format of the class, the number of personnel involved, the space needs, and the equipment needed.

                                  Chart 8. Preferred Training Providers
                                        By Location Of Employer



                                 Only do in-house



                     Commercial training provider



                 Vendor/ equipment manufacturer

                                                                                                   Bay
           Employee self-directed training (online,                                                Midland
                        video, etc.)                                                               Saginaw


                          Online training/ webinar



                             College or university



                                             Other


                                                      0   10   20   30   40   50    60   70   80   90    100

                                                                          Percent


Preferred Training Providers. Less than one-fourth of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region
only do in-house training for their employees, as seen in Chart 8, and they tend to be moving to more
employee self-directed training utilizing online resources. Only 20 percent of the employers in Bay
County, 22 percent in Midland County, and 14 percent in Saginaw County only do training in-house.
Overall, a majority (62 percent) of the employers are likely to provide training to their employers using
self-directed methods such as online and video programming – 71 percent of the employers in Bay
County, 52 percent of the employers in Midland County, and 61 percent of the employers in Saginaw
County. Employers in the personal interviews noted that the online libraries for training were very cost-
effective, had extensive subject matter, and employees could do the training at their convenience.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                             Page 24
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                           January 2011

Online training or webinars are also utilized by 58 percent of the employers to provide training to their
employees. Sixty percent of the employers in Bay County, 52 percent in Midland County, and 59 percent
in Saginaw County are likely to provide training to employees using online training programs or
webinars. Vendors or equipment manufacturers are utilized for employee training by more than 40
percent of the employers – 44 percent of employers in Bay and Saginaw counties and 40 percent of the
Midland County employers. A commercial training provider is utilized for employee training by one-third
of the employers in Bay County, 43 percent of those in Midland County, and 44 percent in Saginaw
County. Thirty-one percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region are likely to use colleges or
universities to provide employee training – 34 percent of employers in Bay County, 36 percent in
Midland County, and 27 percent in Saginaw County.

Usage of other training providers was mentioned by almost 20 percent of the employers. The other
training providers mentioned by 20 percent of the Bay County employers included classroom instruction,
YMCA, Liquor Commission, Manufacturing Association, RV Tech School, safety meetings, Sheriff’s
Association, and state death certificate training. One-fourth of the employers in Midland County
mentioned other training providers, specifically conferences, apprenticeships, Consumer’s Energy,
conventions, Great Lakes Safety Training, Michigan Department of Health, Midland Computer Training,
and unions. The other training providers utilized by 16 percent of the employers in Saginaw County
include Michigan Bar Association, classroom instruction, FedEx University, conventions, Delta College,
Lutheran Church, Michigan Water Association, state certifications, Home Builders Association, unions,
and YMCA.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                  Page 25
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                    January 2011

                           Chart 9. Preferred Format For Training Programs
                                       By Location Of Employer



                             Online (CBT) training



                                        Webinars



       Seminars/ conferences (one-day or two-day)



                           College credit courses

                                                                                                  Bay
                        College noncredit courses                                                 Midland
                                                                                                  Saginaw

         College workforce development, contract
                         training


                                Hands-on training



                          Simulations (computer)



                                            Other


                                                     0   10   20   30   40   50    60   70   80   90    100

                                                                         Percent



Preferred Format. The majority (almost 90 percent) of the employers in the three counties are most
likely to use hands-on training with their employees, as seen in Chart 9. Ninety-three percent of the
employers in Bay County, 89 percent of the employers in Midland County, and 90 percent in Saginaw
County are likely to use hands-on training with their employees when training is needed – whether it is a
formal or informal process. Even though online training is becoming more prevalent among the
employers, three-fourths are still likely to use seminars or conferences for training employees. Seventy-
five percent of the employers in Bay County, 81 percent of the employers in Midland County, and 74
percent in Saginaw County are likely to use seminars and conferences as the method to deliver training to
their employees.

Online training is also popular with two-thirds of the employers – 67 percent of employers in Bay and
Saginaw counties and 62 percent of Midland County employers will provide employees training online
(computer-based training). Many of the employers are signed up with online training companies that can
provide hundreds of training topics to them online. Almost two-thirds of the employers (60 percent in
Bay County and 64 percent in Midland and Saginaw counties) will use webinars to provide training to
their employers. This has been an area that has seen tremendous growth in the last three years –
employers especially like the ability to interact and ask questions during the webinars, as well as the low

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                            Page 26
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                    January 2011

cost. Computer simulations are also gaining in popularity among the employers in the three counties.
Thirty-nine percent of the employers in Bay County, 30 percent of the employers in Midland County, and
37 percent in Saginaw County are using simulations, typically via computer, to train employees.

Less than half of the employers are turning to colleges to provide training for their employees – whether
credit or non-credit courses. Forty-one percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region are using
college credit courses to train employees – 42 percent of the employers in Bay County, 43 percent in
Midland County, and 39 percent in Saginaw County. Only 32 percent of the employers in the three
counties are likely to utilize non-credit college courses for training for their employees, regardless of their
location. Only 19 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region will utilize college workforce
development or contract training programs to provide training for their employees – 16 percent in Bay
County, 21 percent in Midland County, and 20 percent in Saginaw County.

Other training formats are being used by six percent of the Bay County and Saginaw employers and five
percent of the employers in Midland County. The employers in Bay County are also likely to use Delta
College interns, liquor law training, and Healthstream. In Midland County, the other training formats
utilized by employers include commercial vendor training and teleconferences. Saginaw County
employers are likely to use the American Mosquito Association, Builder Association, train the trainer, and
union-based training as other training formats.

                          Chart 10. Employer Support Of Employees' Education
                                       By Location Of Employer


            Tuition reimbursement for credit
                        classes


            Pay for books for credit classes


          Pay for non-credit training classes

                                                                                                  Bay
        Pay for CEUs (continuing education
                     classes)                                                                     Midland
                                                                                                  Saginaw
         Flexible schedule for employees to
               attend college classes

          Paid release time for employees to
                attend college classes

        College classes held on-site at your
                     business

                                                0   10   20   30   40     50      60   70   80   90   100

                                                                        Percent



Educational Opportunities Offered By Employers. Employers surveyed in the Great Lakes Bay
Region try to support the attempts of their employees to attain additional education and 45 percent
actually offer assistance to their employees through tuition assistance programs, as seen in Chart 10.
Employers in Bay County are more likely to support credit classes for employees and the employers in
Saginaw County are more likely to support the non-credit classes for employees, as seen in Chart 10.
Forty-nine percent of the employers in Bay County provide tuition reimbursement for credit classes for

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                          Page 27
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                            January 2011

their employees, as do 45 percent of the employers in Midland County and 43 percent of the employers in
Saginaw County. However, only 28 percent of the Bay County employers, 22 percent of the Midland
County employers, and 27 percent of the Saginaw County employers will pay for books for those credit
classes for their employees – which can be a major out-of-pocket expense for an employee.

Overall, 29 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region will pay for non-credit training
classes for their employees – 28 percent of the employers in Bay County, 27 percent in Midland County,
and 31 percent in Saginaw County. The employers in Saginaw County are much more likely to pay for
CEUs (continuing education units) for their employees (49 percent) than the employers in Bay County
(35 percent) and Midland County (34 percent).

Employers do try to be flexible for the employees who want to attend college classes. More than two-
thirds of the employers will provide flexible schedules (when possible) for employees who want to attend
college credit classes – 66 percent of the employers in Bay County and 68 percent in Midland and
Saginaw counties. However, very few of the employers will provide paid release time for employees to
attend college classes – only 11 percent (14 percent in Bay County, six percent in Midland County, and 12
percent in Saginaw County). Only seven percent of the employers have college classes held on-site at their
place of employment for employees to attain college degrees – many simply do not have enough
employees to make it feasible. Employers in Saginaw County are the most likely to have college classes
on-site (eight percent), compared to only five percent in Bay County and six percent in Midland County.

  Little has changed from 2007 to 2011 with respect to employers supporting their employees with
  respect to educational opportunities. In 2007, 49 percent of the employers provided tuition
  reimbursement for credit classes for their employers, as did 45 percent in 2011. Twenty-nine percent
  of the employers in 2011 paid for CEUs for their employees, as did 27 percent of the employers in
  2007. In 2007 and 2011, 27 percent of the employers picked up the cost of books for their employees.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                   Page 28
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                   January 2011


Interaction With Delta College
                    Chart 11. Usage Of Delta College As An Educational Or Training
                                 Resource By Location Of Employer


         Sent employees to classes at
                Delta College



            Employer paid for classes


                                                                                                 Bay
                Satisfied with classes                                                           Midland
                                                                                                 Saginaw

     Training for employees provided
       by Delta College's Corporate
                  Services


       Satisfied with training program


                                         0   10   20   30   40    50       60   70   80   90   100

                                                                 Percent


Usage Of Delta College. The employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region were asked if they had ever
used Delta College as an educational or training resource for the company’s employees and specifically
Corporate Services, and the results are seen in Chart 11. The employers are much more likely to have used
Delta College as an educational resource by sending employees to classes (24 percent) than they are a
training resource (eight percent), as seen in Chart 11.

Employers in Bay County are more likely to have sent employees to classes at Delta College – 31 percent –
than the employers in Midland County (20 percent) or Saginaw County (22 percent). Ninety-two percent
of the employers who sent their employees to classes at Delta College paid for the classes and 92 percent
were satisfied with the classes. In Bay County, of the 31 percent of the employers who sent employees to
classes at Delta College, 93 percent paid for the classes and 87 percent were satisfied with the classes. The
three percent of the employers in Bay County not satisfied with the classes noted instructor issues – the
instructor would cancel the class or just not show up. The Midland County employers (20 percent) that
sent employees to classes at Delta College also were likely to pay for the classes (86 percent) and 93
percent were satisfied with the classes – the seven percent that noted dissatisfaction indicated that the
class was not specific enough to their business. Twenty-two percent of the employers in Saginaw County
have sent their employees to classes at Delta College and paid for the classes (92 percent) and the
majority were satisfied (95 percent). The two percent who were dissatisfied noted they had problems that
instructor would not cancel or just not show up, satisfied with the class at the time but dissatisfied that
they did not apply, and wasn’t specific to our business.

  From 2007 to 2011, twice as many employers have sent employees to classes at Delta College – 24
  percent of the employers in the region sent employees to classes at Delta College in 2007 and 48
  percent of the employers sent employees to classes at the College in 2011.



CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 29
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                            January 2011

The employers who have not sent employees to classes at Delta College were asked their rationale for not
using the College. In Bay County, the majority of the employers (more than half) noted they simply had
not had any need to send employees to classes. Other employers in Bay County reported they do their
own training, class scheduling is a problem, employees go to college on their own, no budget, train in-
house, and they go on their own and get reimbursed. The rationale cited by 69 percent of the employers
in Midland County that have not sent employees to classes at Delta College mirrors that of the other
employers – 61 percent noted it is not needed – and others noted employees do it as an individual, no
budget, vendors do training, union trains, and Corporate Services trains. Sixty-four percent of the
employers in Saginaw County have never sent employees to classes at Delta College – they see no need
for it (more than half) – or they do not have the classes we need, do not know what is offered, use banking
school, employees decide, Master’s training needed, no budget, union trains, going to Saginaw Valley
State University, have apprenticeship program, and employees go on their own.

Only eight percent of the employers have used the services of Delta College’s Corporate Services – seven
percent of the employers in Bay County, 16 percent in Midland County, and five percent in Saginaw
County, or 27 employers out of 350 total employers surveyed, have used Corporate Services. Two major
reasons are cited by the employers for not using Corporate Services – they either have no need for
training (do in-house or someone else provides training) or they are simply unaware of the services
provided by Corporate Services. The employers (seven percent) in Bay County that have used Corporate
Services participated in varied trainings: math and measurements, extrusions, blueprint reading, Fast
Start Program, Microsoft Word, and cross-training of pipefitters, welders, and carpenters for millwright
work. All of the Bay County employers were satisfied with the training programs offered. In Midland
County, 16 percent of the employers have worked with Corporate Services to provide training in
management/ supervision, computers, project management, leadership, skilled trades, and welding, and
91 percent of the employers were satisfied while nine percent were not because they believed it was not
specific to their business. While only five percent of the employers in Saginaw County surveyed have used
Corporate Services to provide training, specifically in business certification, computers, Fast Start
program, four generations, geometric tolerances, leadership, lean manufacturing, and skilled trades, 100
percent are satisfied with the programming provided.

  Usage of Delta College’s Corporate Services by employers to develop training for employees has
  slipped from 2007 to 2011. In 2007, 29 percent of the employers reported they had training
  programs developed for their employees by Delta College, and only eight percent in 2011 reported
  using Corporate Services to provide training.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                    Page 30
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                  January 2011

                    Chart 12. Training Partnership Opportunities With Delta College
                                       By Location Of Employer


                             Loan equipment



                         Purchase equipment


                                                                                               Bay
             Pay contract fees for instruction                                                 Midland
                                                                                               Saginaw


      Participate in developing program - time



                    Start-up program - dollars


                                                 0   10   20   30   40   50    60   70   80   90     100

                                                                Percent Would Provide



Partnership Options. Employers were asked at what level they would be willing to partner with Delta
College to provide training for their employees or to create a new degree program that would benefit their
employees, and ultimately themselves as employers, and the results are shown in Chart 12. Given limited
resources, dollars and personnel, employers are least likely to provide funding and most likely to provide
personnel to participate in the partnership.

Employers in all three counties would be most likely to partner in developing training or a new program
area by giving their time – 48 percent in Bay County, 49 percent in Midland County, and 42 percent in
Saginaw County. Slightly more than one-fourth of the employers would be willing to pay the contract fees
for the instructor for a training program or degree program of interest to them – 30 percent of the
employers in Bay County and one-fourth of the employers in Midland and Saginaw counties. Only 17
percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region would loan equipment to start the program (21
percent of employers in Bay County, 20 percent in Midland County, and 15 percent in Saginaw County)
and even fewer (13 percent) would purchase equipment for the program developed (17 percent in Bay
County, 13 percent in Midland County, and 12 percent in Saginaw County). Few of the employers (13
percent) would be able to provide any start-up dollars to develop the training program or the degree
program, especially not the employers in Saginaw County (11 percent), but also not the employers in
Midland County (14 percent) or Bay County (15 percent). Overall, the employers in Saginaw County are
the least likely to participate in a partnership while the employers in Bay and Midland Counties are more
likely.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 31
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                   January 2011

                            Chart 13. Interaction With Delta College Graduate
                                         By Location Of Employer


                                                                                                 Bay
        Hired a Delta College
                                                                                                 Midland
              graduate
                                                                                                 Saginaw


                                0   10     20     30     40     50      60   70     80    90     100

                                                              Percent


Assessment Of Delta College Graduates. As seen in Chart 13, 42 percent of the employers in the
Great Lakes Bay Region have hired a graduate of Delta College – 47 percent of the employers in Bay
County, 39 percent of employers in Midland County, and 41 percent of employers in Saginaw County. The
employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region who have hired Delta College graduates were then asked to rate
the employees (most recent hires) on whether they “Exceeded,” “Met,” or “Fell Short” of the expectations
of the employers in three areas: basic skills, work ethics, and technical skills. The results of the ratings for
the employers by county are presented in the following charts – Charts 14 to 16. It should be noted that
for almost 20 percent of the employers across the three counties, they were unable to rate the graduates
of Delta College. For these employers, they knew that their companies had hired graduates, but the
respondents were not in a direct supervisory capacity over the Delta College graduates and did not feel
comfortable rating graduates without firsthand knowledge of their skill sets and work performance.

  By 2011, more employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region reported they had hired graduates of Delta
  College. In 2007, 32 percent of the employers noted they had used Delta College as a source of
  employees, and by 2011, 42 percent of the employers reported they had hired a graduate of Delta
  College.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 32
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                      January 2011

                              Chart 14. Ratings Of Delta College Graduates
                                        By Bay County Employers


                           BASIC SKILLS:
                       Written communication


                                 Mathematics


                     Reading comprehension


                              WORK ETHICS:
                              Dependability


                                    Motivation


                          Oral communication                                                       Exceeded
                                                                                                   Met

                           Time management                                                         Fell short



                             Trustworthiness


                           Interpersonal skills


                  TECHNICAL SKILLS:
          Analytical thinking/ problem solving


                    Computer software usage


                       Skills related to degree


                                                  0   10   20   30   40     50      60   70   80   90    100

                                                                          Percent



Bay County. In Bay County, the employers noted that almost 90 percent of the Delta College graduates
they had hired met or exceeded their expectations in basic skills, work ethics, and technical skills. The
basic skills area in which less than 10 percent of the employers in Bay County noted that the graduates
“fell short” was reading comprehension (three percent). When rating work ethics, the employers were
more likely to indicate a percentage of the graduates had fallen short of expectations. The work ethic
areas that the employers rated as falling short of expectations included: dependability (three percent),
motivation (three percent), oral communication (six percent), time management (11 percent),
trustworthiness (three percent), and interpersonal skills (three percent). In the area of technical skills, or
the degree skills areas, eight percent of the employers noted that the graduates fell short in analytical
thinking/ problem solving, and three percent believe they fell short in the skills related to their degree.

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                              Page 33
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                      January 2011

                              Chart 15. Ratings Of Delta College Graduates
                                     By Midland County Employers


                           BASIC SKILLS:
                       Written communication


                                 Mathematics


                      Reading comprehension


                              WORK ETHICS:
                              Dependability


                                    Motivation


                          Oral communication                                                       Exceeded
                                                                                                   Met

                            Time management                                                        Fell short



                              Trustworthiness


                           Interpersonal skills


                  TECHNICAL SKILLS:
          Analytical thinking/ problem solving


                    Computer software usage


                       Skills related to degree


                                                  0   10   20   30   40     50      60   70   80   90    100

                                                                          Percent



Midland County. In Midland County, the employers noted that 90 percent of the Delta College
graduates they had hired met or exceeded their expectations in basic skills, work ethics, and technical
skills. None of the employers in Midland County believe that the graduates “fell short” in any area of basic
skills. When rating work ethics, the employers were more likely to indicate a percentage of the graduates
had fallen short of expectations. The work ethic areas that the employers rated as falling short of
expectations included: dependability (four percent), motivation (four percent), oral communication (four
percent), time management (four percent), trustworthiness (four percent), and interpersonal skills (four
percent). In the area of technical skills, or the degree skills areas, four percent of the employers noted that
the graduates fell short in analytical thinking/ problem solving, and 10 percent believe they fell short in
computer software usage.

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                              Page 34
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                      January 2011

                              Chart 16. Ratings Of Delta College Graduates
                                     By Saginaw County Employers


                           BASIC SKILLS:
                       Written communication


                                 Mathematics


                     Reading comprehension


                              WORK ETHICS:
                              Dependability


                                    Motivation


                          Oral communication                                                       Exceeded
                                                                                                   Met

                           Time management                                                         Fell short



                             Trustworthiness


                           Interpersonal skills


                  TECHNICAL SKILLS:
          Analytical thinking/ problem solving


                    Computer software usage


                       Skills related to degree


                                                  0   10   20   30   40     50      60   70   80   90    100

                                                                          Percent



Saginaw County. In Saginaw County, employers were most likely to provide the highest rating for the
graduates – more than 94 percent of the employers noted that the Delta College graduates they had hired
met or exceeded their expectations in basic skills, work ethics, and technical skills. Two percent of the
employers in Saginaw County noted that the basic skills areas where the graduates “fell short” were
written communication and reading comprehension. When rating work ethics, the employers were more
likely to indicate a percentage of the graduates had fallen short of expectations. The work ethic areas that
the employers rated as falling short of expectations included: dependability (four percent), motivation
(six percent), oral communication (two percent), and trustworthiness (two percent). In the area of
technical skills, or the degree skills areas, six percent of the employers noted that the graduates fell short



CLARUS Corporation                                                                                              Page 35
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

in analytical thinking/ problem solving, and two percent believed they fell short in the skills related to
their degree.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                       Page 36
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                     January 2011


Jobs Forecast
National And Regional Jobs Forecast
U.S. Jobs Forecast. The national jobs forecast will also impact the local job outlooks and health care
reigns supreme in the jobs forecast from 2008 to 2018. Of the top 25 fastest growing occupations in the
United States forecasted for growth from 2008 to 2018, health care occupations are expected to make up
almost half, the largest proportion of any occupational group – specifically biomedical engineers, home
health aides, personal and home care aides, physician assistants, physical therapist aides, dental
hygienists, dental assistants, medical assistants, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapist
aides, and pharmacy technicians. As an occupational group, three of the fastest growing 25 occupations in
the United States for the next decade are computer occupations – network systems and data
communications analysts, computer software engineers (applications), and computer software engineers
(systems software). With the increase in handheld communication devices, the need continues to remain
strong for software application developers. Other occupations making up the top 25 fastest growth
occupations in the United States include financial examiners, medical scientists (except epidemiologists),
skin care specialists, biochemists and biophysicists, athletic trainers, veterinary technologists and
technicians, veterinarians, self-enrichment education teachers, compliance officers (except agriculture,
construction, health and safety, and transportation), environmental engineers, and survey researchers.
The percent change for these occupations, the number of new jobs, average wages, and education and
training needed for the occupations with the fastest growth in the United States are presented in the
following chart.


Occupations With The Fastest Growth In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                                  Number
                                                                     of
                                                                  new jobs
                                                   Percent            (in       Wages (May 2008        Education/training
Occupations                                        change         thousands)       median)                 category
Biomedical engineers                                         72          11.6           $ 77,400 Bachelor's degree
Network systems and data communications analysts             53         155.8             71,100 Bachelor's degree
Home health aides                                            50         460.9             20,460 Short-term on-the-job training
Personal and home care aides                                 46         375.8             19,180 Short-term on-the-job training
Financial examiners                                          41          11.1             70,930 Bachelor's degree
Medical scientists, except epidemiologists                   40          44.2             72,590 Doctoral degree
Physician assistants                                         39          29.2             81,230 Master's degree
                                                                                                   Postsecondary vocational
Skin care specialists                                        38          14.7             28,730
                                                                                                   award
Biochemists and biophysicists                                37           8.7             82,840 Doctoral degree
Athletic trainers                                            37           6.0             39,640 Bachelor's degree
Physical therapist aides                                     36          16.7             23,760 Short-term on-the-job training
Dental hygienists                                            36          62.9             66,570 Associate degree
Veterinary technologists and technicians                     36          28.5             28,900 Associate degree
                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Dental assistants                                            36         105.6             32,380
                                                                                                   training
Computer software engineers, applications                    34         175.1             85,430 Bachelor's degree
                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Medical assistants                                           34         163.9             28,300
                                                                                                   training
Physical therapist assistants                                33          21.2             46,140 Associate degree
Veterinarians                                                33          19.7             79,050 First professional degree
                                                                                                   Work experience in a related
Self-enrichment education teachers                           32          81.3             35,720
                                                                                                   occupation



CLARUS Corporation                                                                                                                Page 37
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                            January 2011


Occupations With The Fastest Growth In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                                         Number
                                                                            of
                                                                         new jobs
                                                          Percent            (in        Wages (May 2008        Education/training
Occupations                                               change         thousands)        median)                 category
Compliance officers, except agriculture, construction,
                                                                    31           80.8              48,890 Long-term on-the-job training
health and safety, and transportation
SOURCE: BLS Occupational Employment Statistics and Division of Occupational Outlook


The occupations with the largest numerical increase in jobs in the United States from 2008 to 2018 cover
a wider range of occupational categories than do the occupations with the fastest growth rates, but the
majority of the jobs will be in the retail and service industries. Occupations in the food industry included
in the top 25 jobs with the largest numerical increase in jobs over the next decade include waiters and
waitresses; combined food preparation and serving workers (including fast food); and counter
attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop workers. Office and office support personnel are in
demand across industries, specifically customer service representatives; office clerks (general); stock
clerks and order fillers; first-line supervisors/ managers of office and administrative support workers;
receptionists and information clerks; general and operations managers; accountants and auditors;
bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks; first-line supervisors/ managers of retail sales workers;
and executive secretaries and administrative assistants. Health care occupations are also included in the
top 25 occupations in the United States, ranging from high pay positions to low pay positions. The health
care occupations expected to have the largest numerical increase from 2008 to 2018 include registered
nurses; home health aides; personal and home care aides; and nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants.
Other occupations with large increases for 2008 to 2018 include cashiers (except gaming); retail
salespersons; laborers and freight, stock, and material movers (hand); elementary school teachers (except
special education); truck drivers (heavy and tractor-trailer); janitors and cleaners (except maids and
housekeeping cleaners); child care workers; sales representatives; and wholesale and manufacturing
(except technical and scientific products). The percent change for these occupations, the number of new
jobs, average wages, and education and training needed for the occupations with the fastest growth in the
United States are presented in the following chart.


Occupations With The Largest Numerical Growth In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                   Number
                                                      of
                                                   new jobs
                                                      (in        Percent        Wages (May 2008
Occupations                                       thousands)     change            median)             Education/training category
Registered nurses                                        581.5             22              $ 62,450 Associate degree
Home health aides                                        460.9             50               20,460 Short-term on-the-job training
Customer service representatives                         399.5             18               29,860 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Combined food preparation and serving
                                                         394.3             15               16,430 Short-term on-the-job training
workers, including fast food
Personal and home care aides                             375.8             46               19,180 Short-term on-the-job training
Retail salespersons                                      374.7              8               20,510 Short-term on-the-job training
Office clerks, general                                   358.7             12               25,320 Short-term on-the-job training
Accountants and auditors                                 279.4             22               59,430 Bachelor's degree
Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants                 276.0             19               23,850 Postsecondary vocational award
Postsecondary teachers                                   256.9             15               58,830 Doctoral degree
Construction laborers                                    255.9             20               28,520 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Elementary school teachers, except special
                                                         244.2             16               49,330 Bachelor's degree
education
Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer                 232.9             13               37,270 Short-term on-the-job training
Landscaping and groundskeeping workers                   217.1             18               23,150 Short-term on-the-job training



CLARUS Corporation                                                                                                                        Page 38
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                                   January 2011


Occupations With The Largest Numerical Growth In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                   Number
                                                      of
                                                   new jobs
                                                      (in          Percent        Wages (May 2008
Occupations                                       thousands)       change            median)               Education/training category
Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks               212.4             10                32,510 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Executive secretaries and administrative                                                                Work experience in a related
                                                           204.4             13                40,030
assistants                                                                                              occupation
                                                                                                        Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work
Management analysts                                        178.3             24                73,570
                                                                                                        experience
Computer software engineers, applications                  175.1             34                85,430 Bachelor's degree
Receptionists and information clerks                       172.9             15                24,550 Short-term on-the-job training
Carpenters                                                 165.4             13                38,940 Long-term on-the-job training
SOURCE: BLS Occupational Employment Statistics and Division of Occupational Outlook


Occupations With The Fastest Decline. Declining occupational employment stems from falling
industry employment, technological advances, changes in business practices, and other factors. For
example, technological developments and the continued movement of textile production abroad are
expected to contribute to a decline of 71,500 sewing machine operators over the projection period (see
below). Fifteen of the 20 occupations with the largest numerical decreases are either production
occupations or office and administrative support occupations, both of which are adversely affected by
increasing plant and factory automation or the implementation of office technology, reducing the need
for workers in those occupations. The difference between the office and administrative support
occupations that are expected to experience the largest declines and those which are expected to see the
largest increases is the extent to which job functions can be easily automated or performed by other
workers. For instance, the duties of executive secretaries and administrative assistants involve a great
deal of personal interaction that cannot be automated, whereas the duties of file clerks – adding, locating,
and removing business records – can be automated or performed by other workers.


Occupations With The Fastest Decline In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                                           Number of jobs         Wages
                                                               Percent         lost             (May 2008             Education/training
Occupation                                                     change        (in thousands)      median)                  category
Textile bleaching and dyeing machine operators and                                                                 Moderate-term on-the-job
                                                                     -45                -7.2            $ 23,680
tenders                                                                                                            training
Textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine                                                                 Moderate-term on-the-job
                                                                     -41               -14.2             23,970
setters, operators, and tenders                                                                                    training
Textile knitting and weaving machine setters, operators,                                                           Long-term on-the-job
                                                                     -39               -11.5             25,400
and tenders                                                                                                        training
                                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Shoe machine operators and tenders                                   -35                -1.7             25,090
                                                                                                                   training
Extruding and forming machine setters, operators, and                                                              Moderate-term on-the-job
                                                                     -34                -4.8             31,160
tenders, synthetic and glass fibers                                                                                training
                                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Sewing machine operators                                             -34               -71.5             19,870
                                                                                                                   training
                                                                                                                   Postsecondary vocational
Semiconductor processors                                             -32               -10.0             32,230
                                                                                                                   award
                                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Textile cutting machine setters, operators, and tenders              -31                -6.0             22,620
                                                                                                                   training
Postal Service mail sorters, processors, and processing                                                            Short-term on-the-job
                                                                     -30               -54.5             50,020
machine operators                                                                                                  training
                                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Fabric menders, except garment                                       -30                -0.3             28,470
                                                                                                                   training
                                                                                                                   Moderate-term on-the-job
Wellhead pumpers                                                     -28                -5.3             37,860
                                                                                                                   training




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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                                      January 2011


Occupations With The Fastest Decline In The United States, 2008-2018
                                                                       Number of jobs      Wages
                                                           Percent         lost          (May 2008        Education/training
Occupation                                                 change      (in thousands)     median)             category
                                                                                                       Long-term on-the-job
Fabric and apparel patternmakers                                 -27              -2.2        37,760
                                                                                                       training
Drilling and boring machine tool setters, operators, and                                               Moderate-term on-the-job
                                                                 -27              -8.9        30,850
tenders, metal and plastic                                                                             training
Lathe and turning machine tool setters, operators, and                                                 Moderate-term on-the-job
                                                                 -27             -14.9        32,940
tenders, metal and plastic                                                                             training
                                                                                                       Short-term on-the-job
Order clerks                                                     -26             -64.2        27,990
                                                                                                       training
                                                                                                       Short-term on-the-job
Coil winders, tapers, and finishers                              -25              -5.6        27,730
                                                                                                       training
                                                                                                       Short-term on-the-job
Photographic processing machine operators                        -24             -12.5        20,360
                                                                                                       training
                                                                                                       Short-term on-the-job
File clerks                                                      -23             -49.6        23,800
                                                                                                       training
                                                                                                       Moderate-term on-the-job
Derrick operators, oil and gas                                   -23              -5.8        41,920
                                                                                                       training
                                                                                                       Postsecondary vocational
Desktop publishers                                               -23              -5.9        36,600
                                                                                                       award
SOURCE: BLS Occupational Employment Statistics and Division of Occupational Outlook



Michigan Jobs Forecast. Of the top 25 fastest growing occupations in Michigan from 2008 to 2018,
as found nationally, health care occupations are in high demand and account for a major portion of the
jobs forecasted to grow the fastest during the forecast period. The health care jobs in Michigan expected
to grow the fastest include physical therapist aides, physician assistants, physical therapist assistants,
occupational therapist assistants, occupational therapist aides, physical therapists, medical assistants,
pharmacy technicians, occupational therapists, and dental hygienists. Many of the occupations in the 25
fastest growing occupations in Michigan will rely on STEM (science, technology, and mathematics)
education – medical scientists (except epidemiologists), forensic science technicians, biochemists and
biophysicists, computer software engineers (applications), cartographers and photogrammetrists, and
computer software engineers (systems software). Other fastest growing occupations in Michigan from
2008 to 2018 include financial examiners, personal financial advisors, fitness trainers and aerobics
instructors, compliance officers (except agriculture, construction, health and safety, and transportation),
museum technicians and conservators, and tree trimmers and pruners.

The occupations forecasted to provide the largest number of jobs in Michigan from 2008 to 2018 also
mirror the occupations in the national forecast with a few exceptions. The occupations that will employ
the largest number of people in the state and provide the largest job availability in numbers of jobs each
year are in hospitality or service and are primarily entry-level positions. A majority of the forecasted jobs
barely provide a living wage for the employees and require little or no education or training. The
occupations expected to provide a majority of the largest number of jobs available in Michigan for the
length of the forecast in the retail and service industries include retail salespersons; cashiers; waiters and
waitresses; customer service representatives; combined food preparation and serving workers (including
fast food); home health aides; janitors and cleaners (except maids and housekeeping cleaner); child care
workers; stock clerks and order fillers; nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants; food preparation
workers; and counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop. Those occupations in the
top 25 highest numerical demand with good salaries include registered nurses, truck drivers (heavy and
tractor-trailer), accountants and auditors, business operations specialists (all other), elementary school
teachers (except special education), sales representatives, and general and operations managers. Other
occupations rounding out the top 25 in Michigan with the largest numerical increases are office clerks
(general); laborers and freight, stock, and material movers (hand); wholesale and manufacturing (except
technical and scientific products); first-line supervisors/ managers of retail sales workers; receptionists

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

and information clerks; teacher assistants; and bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks. (For
detailed Michigan jobs forecast see Appendix D.)

Saginaw Area Jobs Forecast. Health care comprises a majority of the fastest growing occupations in
the Saginaw Area jobs forecast from 2006 to 2016. Those health care occupations include physical
therapist aides, physical therapist assistants, home health aides, physical therapists, medical assistants,
pharmacy technicians, social and human service assistants, physician assistants, radiation therapists,
respiratory therapists, occupational therapist assistants, skin care specialists, surgical technologists,
cardiovascular technologists and technicians, registered nurses, occupational therapists, and health
educators. Job demands in education are also expected to comprise some of the fastest growing
occupations from 2006 to 2016, especially those in literacy – vocational education teachers
(postsecondary); adult literacy, remedial education, and GED teachers and instructors; and interpreters
and translators. Other occupations in the top 25 fastest growing in the Saginaw Area from 2006 to 2016
include network systems and data communications analysts, industrial engineering technicians, pest
control workers, community and social service specialists (all other), and security and fire alarm systems
installers.

The occupations with the highest numerical openings in the Saginaw Area for the period of the forecast
(2006 to 2016) mirror the occupations forecasted for Michigan, especially those in retail sales and food
service. The retail and service occupations which will provide the most jobs in the Saginaw Area from
2006 to 2016 are retail salespersons; cashiers; waiters and waitresses; customer service representatives;
janitors and cleaners (except maids and housekeeping cleaners); counter attendants, cafeteria, food
concession, and coffee shop; combined food preparation and serving workers (including fast food);
laborers, and freight, stock, and material movers (hand); maids and housekeeping cleaners; nursing
aides, orderlies, and attendants; food preparation workers; home health aides; child care workers; and
stock clerks and order fillers. Other occupations which will be in high demand and provide the largest
number of occupations in the Saginaw Area include registered nurses; office clerks (general); first-line
supervisors/ managers of retail sales workers; truck drivers (heavy and tractor-trailer); bookkeeping,
accounting, and auditing clerks; sales representatives, wholesale, and manufacturing (except technical
and scientific products), machinists; industrial engineers; accountants and auditors; tellers; and
elementary school teachers (except special education). (For detailed Saginaw Area jobs forecast see
Appendix D.)




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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                              January 2011

Local Jobs Forecast
Recognizing it is difficult for employers to forecast their workforce in the next few years due to uncertain
economic conditions and unseen catastrophic events, employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region were
asked to think about which jobs they anticipated having vacancies in the next two years – for both new
hires and replacements due to turnover or retirements. For each job they noted they would have
vacancies in the next two years, the employers were asked to share how many employees would be
needed, whether the positions would be a result of business growth or expansion, replacing retired
workers, or replacing a worker that left, the average hourly rate aid for the position, the average age of
current employees, and the average age of the employees at retirement in the position. (For detailed jobs
forecast by county and industry, please see Appendix B.)

                   Chart 17. Jobs Forecasted For Future Hires By Location Of Employer
                                                                            Average
                                              Number         Average                       Average
                                                                              Age
                       County                Employees        Hourly                        Age At
                                                                            Current
                                              Needed          Wage                        Retirement
                                                                           Employees
       Bay County                                     843        $15.59            34             57
       Midland County                               1,740        $16.73             34            50
       Saginaw County                               1,497        $14.27             33            60
       TOTAL                                        4,080        $15.25             34            57

Jobs Forecasted By County. As seen in Chart 17, the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region
reported they would be hiring 4,080 employees over the next two years. The average hourly wage for the
4,080 jobs forecasted for the region is $15.25, with 34 being the current age of the employees and the
average age of employees at retirement is 57 years of age. Twenty-one percent of the jobs forecasted in the
region will be in Bay County with an average wage of $15.59 per hour, or 843 jobs. The average age of the
current employees in the jobs in Bay County is 34 years of age and the average age at retirement for the
positions is 57 years. The employers in Midland County forecasted that they will be hiring 1,740
employees in the next two years, or 43 percent of the total employees forecasted for the vacancies over the
next two years. The average hourly wage for the jobs forecasted by the Midland County employers is the
highest of the three counties, $16.73 per hour. The current employees of Midland County employers are
34 years of age with the earliest anticipated retirement age at 50. Saginaw County employers account for
37 percent of the jobs forecasted as needed over the next two years. The average hourly rate paid for the
jobs needed in Saginaw County is the lowest in the region, $14.27 per hour, and while the current
employees are the youngest at 33 years of age, they will be the oldest at retirement – 60 years of age. (For
a complete list of the occupations forecasted as needed by county, please see Appendix E.)

            Chart 18. Jobs Forecasted For Future Hires By Industry In Great Lakes Bay Region
                                               Number         Average      Average Age      Average
                     Industry                 Employees        Hourly        Current         Age At
                                               Needed          Wage         Employees      Retirement
       Agriculture, Mining, & Forestry                  65        $10.02             28            51
       Contractors & Construction                     426         $21.65             36            44
       Manufacturing                                1,093         $20.04             35            51
       Transportation, Communications, &
                                                      230         $20.12             37            62
       Utilities
       Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate              150         $13.17             33            61
       Business & Personal Services                 1,034         $10.08             30            60
       Health Services                                568         $19.41             38            59

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

                                               Number        Average      Average Age     Average
                     Industry                 Employees       Hourly        Current        Age At
                                               Needed         Wage         Employees     Retirement
       Legal Services                                  18       $18.05              38            62
       Education & Social Services                   136        $14.97              30            61
       Art & Membership Organizations                  63       $12.90              35            61
       Engineering, Architecture, &
                                                     104        $16.08              35            63
       Accounting
       Government                                      86       $16.70              33            56
       Non-Classified                                107        $12.38              36            63
       TOTAL                                        4,080       $15.25              34            57

Jobs Forecasted By Industry. Delta College serves the Great Lakes Bay Region, comprised of
employers in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw counties in Michigan, and must examine the occupations
needed by employers across the region. Chart 18 presents the number of employees forecasted as needed
for vacancies over the next two years, the average hourly wage paid by industry, the average age of the
current employees, and the average age at retirement for those employees by industry. The major
occupations cited as needed by industry are detailed below, and the entire list of jobs forecasted by
industry are found in Appendix B. Manufacturing, business and personal services, and health care
account for more than two-thirds of the jobs forecasted for the next two years.

Agriculture, Mining, And Forestry. Three major occupations were cited as needed by the
employers in agriculture, mining, and forestry in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Laborer is the major
occupation in demand by the agricultural employers, specifically for laborers for general farm work,
landscape work, and snow removal. The 34 laborer jobs cited as needed only pay $8.00 to $9.00 per hour
as an average wage and no education is required for the laborers. Employers in the market also cited a
need for 17 kennel workers, workers who assist in kennel facilities and care for dogs and cats. However,
the kennel workers are also a low paying position, earning only $7.50 per hour on average.

Veterinary technicians and assistants were also noted as an occupation in demand in the Great Lakes Bay
Region, but the average hourly wage reported for the veterinary technicians and assistants range from
$8.00 per hour to $20.00 per hour. It should be noted that many veterinarians will use veterinary
assistants at a low average hourly wage and potentially will pay veterinary technicians a premium. This
program generally has a potential student draw for enrollments but it must be ascertained that employers
in the market area are willing to pay a higher than minimum wage hourly rate for the graduates of the
program.

Other occupations noted as needed by the employers in agriculture, mining, and forestry in the Great
Lakes Bay Region included animal caregiving, clerical/ office/ secretarial, lawn and tree tech, and kennel
manager.

Contractors And Construction. Many of the occupations forecasted as needed over the next two
years in construction will pay a living wage and require technical or vocational training. The employers in
the Great Lakes Bay Region reported a need for 72 construction laborers to construction foremen,
earning an average of $12.00 an hour for laborers and up to $22 per hour for foremen. With an increase
in the construction laborers and foremen also comes a demand for heavy equipment operators. Fifty-
three positions were cited as needed by the contractors for heavy equipment operators in the next two
years, paying an average of $24.00 to $44.00 per hour. The employers forecasted a need for 50
pipefitters in the next two years, paying an average wage of $20.00 per hour. Welders are also in demand
over the next 24 months – 40 welders are forecasted as needed and they will earn an average annual
wage of $31.00 per hour.


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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

Other occupations cited by the employers as in demand over the next two years will still pay a higher than
minimum wage, but less than the wages seen for the occupations most in demand. The employers noted
they will need 30 field installers for insulation, paying an average annual wage of $14.00. Roofers will
also be in demand over the next two years, earning from $12.50 an hour to $24.00 an hour. Carpenters
will also be needed by the employers in construction – 17 positions were noted as needed for the next two
years, paying an average annual wage of $16.00 per hour. Customer service reps will also be needed to
support the growth in construction – 15 customer service representatives for electric and data cabling will
be required by the employers and they will earn an average hourly rate of $12.00. The highest paying
positions in demand for contractors and construction employers are for operators of asphalt mills – those
individuals earn an average of $44.00 per hour.

Other occupations mentioned as needed in the next two years by the employers in the Great Lakes Bay
Region are architectural intern, bookkeeper, city treasurer, clerical/ office/ secretarial, construction -
project management, construction administration, director of marketing, director of purchasing, drivers -
truck/ CDL, electricians, emergency shelter assistants (domestic abuse), field installation of machinery,
general contracting trades people, iron workers, logistics manager, masons, painters, product manager
(roofing), production positions (roofing), project management (machinery mover/ heavy hauler), quality
assurance lab technicians (roofing), refrigeration service technicians, retail, sales managers, service tech
area for pool installing, shop fabricators, site manager, someone to monitor network, survey/ layout
people (contracting), and technical support (electrical and data cabling).

Manufacturing. Overall, manufacturing occupations will be most in demand, with 27 percent of the
jobs forecasted being needed in manufacturing, paying an average hourly wage of $20.04. Even though
the current age of the employees is 35 years of age, the average age of retirement for these positions is 51,
younger than the majority of the occupations forecasted as needed. In the individual interviews, the
employers noted that many of the manufacturing jobs in the plants call for physical activity, and after the
age of 50, the jobs become very strenuous for the employees, thus leading to an earlier retirement age
than seen in previous industries. Supply chain management and schedulers in supply chain management
are anticipated to provide the highest number of positions in the Great Lakes Bay Region in
manufacturing. A new company, rapidly expanding, is forecasting that over the next two years, 700
employees will be needed in supply chain management, but they were unable to provide an average
hourly wage for the new hires. The demand for chemical process technicians remains high (85 positions
needed in the next two years) – and employers noted that they are concerned as the economy recovers
and more people return to work, their pool of qualified job candidates will evaporate. The average hourly
rate for the chemical process technicians is $24 to $27 per hour. The employers anticipate 60 concrete
crew leader and laborer positions will need to be filled over the next two years, even though an average
wage for these positions is unknown.

Across industries, there is a demand for pipefitters/ welders, with the companies indicating 45 positions
would need to be filled over the next two years and the positions would earn an average hourly wage of
$28 per hour. Machinists are also in demand, with 40 positions forecasted over the next two years,
earning an average hourly wage of $12.00 (primarily in the aerospace industry). Manufacturers must sell
their products and 35 sales positions will be needed in manufacturing (average hourly wage of $19) over
the next two years. Engineering positions, both chemical and mechanical, will be in demand by the
employers in the region over the next two years – 22 engineers are needed and they will be paid an
average annual wage of $34 per hour. Manufacturers will also require welders due to vacancies in the
next two years – ten welders will be needed and they will earn an average of $17 per hour.

Occupations which were also noted as needed over the next two years, but not high in numbers of jobs
needed, included brake press operation, CAD designer, CNC operators, construction managers, customer
service reps (screen printing), data integrity, extrusion operations (injection molding), graphic designers,
instrument and electrical trades, IT computer techs (newspaper), laborers - steel, lathe operators,
logistics/ rail fleet, maintenance (injection molding), manufacturing/ quality, newspaper pressman,

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                              January 2011

operators/ manufacturing (automotive parts), process tech (injection molding), programmers
(machining/ metal fabrication/ engineering), skilled assembly, and skilled trade workforce/ pipefitter/
welding instrumentation.

Transportation, Communications, And Utilities. Engineers are in high demand in the Great
Lakes Bay Region. The employers in transportation, communications, and utilities reported a high
demand for engineers, and they also noted that it is becoming much more difficult to recruit engineers to
the Great Lakes Bay Region. One hundred engineers were reported as needed but no average annual or
hourly wage was provided. Drivers with CDLs (commercial driver’s licenses) are also in high demand
among the transportation employers in the region. The employers noted that they will need 48 drivers
over the next two years, and the drivers will earn an average of $35.50 per hour. Based on the wage cited,
it is likely that these drivers will be hauling hazardous materials, which pays a much higher wage than the
drivers who transport non-hazardous materials. Thirty-four positions were noted as needed in the next
two years for employees in automotive production, especially those in the skilled trades, but no average
hourly wage was provided.

The occupations also noted as needed over the next 24 months by the employers in transportation,
communications, and utilities include account executives, billing (trucking), central office techs
(communications), clerical/ office/ secretarial, construction - project manager, data entry (trucking),
installers who can pull low-voltage cabling and handle radio, IT (trucking), manager in the water
department, marketing coordinator, photographer, reporter, sales - inside, sales, sports talent, and
tradesmen (new building construction).

Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate. Financial institutions account for the majority of the
occupations cited as needed for the employers in finance, insurance, and real estate. The financial
institutions reported they will need 25 tellers over the next two years, earning an average hourly wage of
$9.00 to $11.00, and they will need 11 personal bankers, earning slightly more at $10.00 to $13.46 per
hour. Sales people will be needed by the employers in finance, insurance, and real estate – 37 positions
will need to be filled over the next two years paying an average of $12.02 an hour. The information
technology positions that the employers in insurance will need will be the highest paid among the most
needed positions – the 15 information technology positions cited as needed will be paid an average hourly
wage of $24.04.

Although the employers in the region will not need a large number of employees, other occupations that
will be needed over the next two years include accounting, accounting operations, apartment leasing
agent, business development, business services, clerical/ office/ secretarial, community managers, credit
analyst, customer service reps (insurance), financial advisors, financial analysts, insurance - service work,
insurance selling, insurance underwriter, investments, loan specialist, maintenance (apartments),
maintenance (facilities management services), outside content contract (insurance), property
maintenance/ custodial, realtors, risk management (manager), staffing (wealth management), and
technical (insurance).

Business And Personal Services. One-fourth of the jobs forecasted by the employers in the Great
Lakes Bay Region will be in the area of business and personal services – but the overall wages are much
lower than for an industry such as manufacturing. Overall, 1,034 occupations are forecasted as needed in
the business and personal services industry and those positions will pay an average hourly wage of
$10.00. Turnover, not retirement, is typically the reason noted for needing new positions – the current
average age of the employees is 30 years of age and most retirements occur at age 60. Almost 10 percent
of the business and personal service positions forecasted as needed will be in food service – 103 wait staff
positions will be needed in food service, paying anywhere from $3.83 per hour to $10.00, excluding tips.
Sixty workers will be needed to assist at golf courses in the region, from working in the club house, to
scheduling tee times, to driving drink carts, and these workers will earn an average hourly wage of $7.40.
Kitchen staff are also needed by the employers in the region – the employers noted that 30 food service

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

positions in the kitchen will be in demand for the next two years, paying an average hourly wage of
$10.00.

Although typically thought of as a health occupation, blood banks are classified as a business service and
those employers noted that 25 phlebotomists are needed over the next two years, earning an average
hourly rate of $10. Bar servers and bartenders will be in demand over the next two years – employers
noted the need for 20 bar employees, but they will only be paid an average of $7.25 per hour, excluding
tips. Automotive mechanics are also in demand in the Great Lakes Bay Region for the next two years.
Based on vacancies, employers will need at least 14 automotive mechanics who earn a living wage of $18
per hour. Security guards are also in demand in the market area, with employers noting that 10 guards
will be needed, but they were unable to note the average hourly wage earned by the security guards.

Employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region also noted that they will need employees for the following
occupations: accounts management, auto body technicians - entry-level, bowling center management,
bowling mechanics, business intelligence associates, career mentor, carpet care, childcare, cleaners,
clerical/ office/ secretarial, clerks/ ride attendants/ cashiers, community education director, concession/
usher/ box office person, counter help, custodians, custodians/ janitorial, customer service reps
(bowling), customer service reps (collateral recovery), customer service reps (dry cleaning), customer
service reps (printing), customer service reps (recreational vehicle), customer service/ front desk (country
club), development director (YWCA), direct support professional/ home health aides, drivers -
commercial, drivers, engineers - chemical, engineers - mechanical, floor care, funeral home greeters,
health club, hospitality management, hotel breakfast attendant, hotel front desk clerk, housekeepers, IT
software programmers, lab assistants (phlebotomy), laborers - general, laborers, laundry, library degrees,
machine technician, machinist programming, machinists/ machine craft sites, maintenance (hotel),
management (car wash), massage therapists, mechanics/ bowling machines, membership director
(YWCA), nail technicians, night auditor, part-time variety (YMCA), personal trainer, Photoshop/ artistic
design/ web site, porters, pressing position (dry cleaning), production/ general laborers doing
inspections/ bagging, program directors (YWCA), qualified light road service tech, restaurant front,
restaurant management, RV technician, sales, security, security guards, senior program director, service
staff, skin care technician, stylists, ticket booking agent, ticket takers, welders, and window washing.

Health Services. Employees in health services occupations are forecasted to continue to be in high
demand over the next two years in the Great Lakes Bay Region, due to turnover in lower skill and lower
pay positions and a continued demand for health care services due to the aging population. Two of the
lowest paying occupations in health care will be in the highest demand for the next two years – CNAs and
direct care aides. The employers noted that they will need 161 certified nursing aides (earning an average
hourly wage of $9.83), and 130 direct care aides (earning $8.50 per hour) over the next two years due to
turnover. Registered nurses will also continue to be in high demand, especially if those nurses who are
eligible for retirement begin to do so as the economy improves. The employers forecasted that 148
registered nurses will be needed over the next two years, and they will earn on average $23.29 per hour.
The registered nurses will be in demand across the health care spectrum. Fifteen activity aides were
forecasted as needed by the employers over the next two years, primarily employed in skilled care
facilities, but they will only earn an average hourly wage of $10.00. Therapists will be needed by the
health care employers in the Great Lakes Bay region. The employers will need 15 physical therapists over
the next 24 months, earning an average hourly wage of $35.33, and seven occupational therapists earning
$27.00 per hour. Six surgical technologists were reported as needed over the next two years.

Other health care occupations which will be in demand in the next 24 months include case managers
(mental health), casual and temp/ access specialist (health care), CAT scan technician (health care),
clerical/ office/ secretarial, clinical laboratory scientist (health care), education coordinators, emergency
services, food service worker, hotel guest assistant, lab techs (health care), maintenance (assisted living),
mammographers, marketing, medical assistant, nursing - LPN, nursing assistant, outpatient therapists,


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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                 January 2011

pharmacists, psychiatrist, respiratory therapists, speech language pathologists, speech therapists, supply
technician (health care), transportation/ bus drivers, and x-ray techs.

Legal Services. The only occupations that the employers in legal services reported as in high demand
over the next two years are legal assistants and legal secretaries. Eleven legal assistants and secretaries
were reported as needed by the legal employers. These occupations will pay $14.21 to $19.75 per hour on
average. The legal services employers also reported a need for associate attorneys, attorneys, and clerks
(law).

Education And Social Services. As expected, teachers are most in demand among the employers in
education and social services. Forty teachers are cited as needed over the next two years in the Great
Lakes Bay Region. The teachers will be paid $11.65 to $18.91 per hour on average. To support the
teachers, the educational employers noted that five teacher paraprofessionals will be needed, but they will
only earn $9.00 per hour on average, only half what some of the teachers will earn. Accountants were
also one of the highest demand occupations for the education and social service employers in the region.
Twenty-five accountants will be needed over the next 24 months and they will earn an average hourly
wage of $21.63. Given the growth in senior citizen programs, 15 program aides will be needed to assist
with senior services, but these will be low pay positions, only earning $7.75 an hour on average.

Additional occupations required by the employers in education and social services include career
management, case workers (workforce development), chief financial officer, class instructor (not
teacher), clerical/ office/ secretarial, finance students, food service - cafeteria worker, IT (accounting),
librarians, library support staff, occupational therapists, physical therapists, school principal, speech
language pathologists, speech therapists, and youth care workers.

Art And Membership Organizations. The majority of the occupations needed by the art and
membership organizations will be clerical and office positions – 12 clerical positions are needed for the
next two years, paying an average hourly wage of $12.50. Other occupations that will be needed over the
next 24 months for the art and membership organizations include bookkeeper/ accounting, custodians,
daycare aide, director of programming, education coordinators, educator - lead, educators/ naturalists,
food service - kitchen staff, food service - servers, musician, nursery care workers, nursery caregiver,
phlebotomists, priest, supervisors, supervisory management, teachers - lead, teachers, and tour guides.

Engineering, Architecture, And Accounting. Sales personnel are in most demand among the
employers in engineering, architecture, and accounting for the next two years. The sales personnel will
earn on average $19.23 per hour. Automotive technicians are also in demand for the next two years, and
they will earn an average hourly wage of $17.00. Engineers are also in demand, earning $23.00 per hour,
and employers noted they will need 11 engineers over the next 24 months, and 10 expediters (engineers)
will also be needed who will earn $18.00 per hour.

Other occupations which the employers will need in the next two years include 1040 preparers,
bookkeeper, clerical/ office/ secretarial, CNC operators, electronic techs, mechanic techs, qualified
administrative staff (automotive dealer), security consultants, and surveyors.

Government. Infantrymen, firefighters, and police officers are in highest demand among government
occupations in the Great Lakes Bay Region over the next two years. The employers noted that 20
infantrymen will be needed over the next two years. Employers will also need 10 firefighters, which will
be paid an average hourly rate of $8.79 and eight police officers will be needed, earning almost twice per
hour that of the firefighters at $17.31 per hour. Additional occupations that will be required by the
government employers in the next 24 months that are not in high demand include biology assistant,
clerical/ office/ secretarial, corrections officer, custodians/ janitorial cleaners, drivers - bus/ part-time/
handi-bus, electricians, engineers/ construction/ road/ bridges, environmental analyst, key management
positions, lab techs (wastewater treatment), nursing - RN, operators (wastewater), plant mechanics, plant

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                         Page 47
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                              January 2011

operators, refuse/ garbage collectors, source reduction/ engineering assistants, surveyors, and water
plant operators.

                         Chart 19. New Jobs Forecasted By Location Of Employer
                                                             Number         Average
                                    County                  Employees        Hourly
                                                             Needed          Wage
                      Bay                                            79         $13.31
                      Midland                                       129         $15.00
                      Saginaw                                       112         $20.65
                      TOTAL                                         320         $18.04

New Jobs Forecasted By County. Employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region were asked if they
anticipated, in the next two years, having any brand new jobs that they will be hiring for – jobs that are
currently not part of their workforce. As seen in Chart 19, the employers in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw
counties identified new occupations that will employ 320 employees in the next two years. In Bay County,
79 employees will be needed for new jobs and the average hourly wage paid for the new jobs will be
$13.31. One hundred twenty-nine of the employees needed for new jobs will be in Midland County, and
those positions will pay an average of $15.00 per hour. The highest pay for the new jobs will be in
Saginaw County. Employers in Saginaw County will employ 112 employees in new positions in the next
two years, and those positions will pay an average of $20.65 per hour.

                  Chart 20. New Jobs Forecasted By Industry In Great Lakes Bay Region
                                                                 Number          Average
                                   Industry                     Employees         Hourly
                                                                 Needed           Wage
                 Contractors & Construction                                60       $20.60
                 Manufacturing                                             70       $20.25
                 Transportation, Communications, &
                                                                            4            $N/A
                 Utilities
                 Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate                          2            N/A
                 Business & Personal Services                              15         $9.36
                 Health Services                                          130       $40.00
                 Education & Social Services                                9       $21.95
                 Art & Membership Organizations                            27       $16.83
                 Engineering, Architecture, & Accounting                    1       $18.00
                 Government                                                 1       $16.00
                 TOTAL                                                    320       $18.04

New Jobs Forecasted By Industry. Chart 20 presents the number of employees forecasted as
needed for new jobs over the next two years and the average hourly wage paid by industry. The major
occupations cited as needed by industry are detailed below, and the entire list of jobs forecasted by
industry are found in Appendix B. Health services, manufacturing, and contractors and construction will
account for the majority of the new jobs forecasted for the next two years.

Contractors And Construction. The major new jobs forecasted by the contractors and construction
employers will require a vocational certificate. Forty new jobs will be developed in refrigeration, requiring
a vocational certificate, and paying an average hourly rate of $31.00. New jobs are also being created in
wind and solar, paying $25.00 per hour, and they too will require a vocational certificate. Other new jobs

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                              January 2011

being created by contractors and construction employers include administration (electrical and data
cabling), extra staff in emergency shelters (domestic violence), marketing, selling carpet/ tile/ wood, and
wood recycling.

Manufacturing. The majority of the new jobs being created by manufacturers will require a vocational
certificate or a high school diploma/ GED. Sixty of the new positions forecasted as needed by the
manufacturers are solar assembly positions, paying $15.00 per hour, and requiring only a high school
diploma or a GED. Machinists will also be a new job for some of the manufacturers, and those positions
will require a bachelor’s degree or a vocational certificate and will pay $15.00 to $31.25, depending on the
level of education required. Other new jobs forecasted by the manufacturing employers include outside
sales, shop foreman, social networking, and swing position (bottling plant).

Transportation, Communications, And Utilities. Employers in transportation, communication,
and utilities will require the highest educational levels for the new positions forecasted for the next two
years. The two new positions forecasted by the employers include multimedia news manager and web
producer, but no hourly wages were provided for the positions.

Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate. New information technology positions in finance, insurance,
and real estate will require a bachelor’s degree, as will the assistant branch manager for banks. No hourly
wages were provided for these positions.

Business And Personal Services. The majority of the new jobs forecasted for the next two years by
the business and personal services employers will require little education. The employers who noted that
golf assistants are new jobs for the future will require an associate degree for the assistants, but the
assistants will only earn $12.00 per hour. Employers also noted that laundry positions will be new jobs
for the future which will require no education and only pay an average of $8.00 per hour. Sales positions
are also considered new positions for the employers in business and personal services, requiring a high
school diploma or GED, and paying an average of $11.00 per hour. Other occupations which the
employers noted will be new jobs include biller (RV), providing YMCA services for county, hostess,
maintenance, and service writer.

Health Services. The majority of the new jobs forecasted by the health services employers will be direct
care workers – 100 employees will be needed by the employers, requiring only a high school diploma or a
GED. While direct care workers assist in caring for individuals, 24 of the new positions for the future will
be chore providers, or those individuals who assist individuals to remain in their home by providing
home services, or doing chores like cooking and cleaning. The chore providers will also only require a
high school diploma or a GED for employment. The employers also noted a need for two nurse
practitioners and those positions will pay $40.00 per hour. Information technology positions, especially
those focusing on telehealth, will be new positions in demand for the future by the health care employers,
but they are only requiring a high school diploma or GED for employment. Other positions forecasted as
new jobs by the employers in health services include HR assistant and community involvement liaison.

Education And Social Services. The majority of the new positions forecasted by the employers in
education and social services will require bachelor’s degrees or graduate degrees. The positions that
employers are forecasting as new positions and their average hourly wage that will require a bachelor’s
degree include administrative staff (church/ school) ($20.00 per hour), social worker ($32.00), special
education ($12.00), technology (wage unknown), and web design ($20.00). The curriculum coaches will
require a graduate degree and will pay an average hourly rate of $33.65 per hour, as will the student life
coordinator in education, which will only pay $18.00 per hour.

Art And Membership Organizations. The majority of the new jobs forecasted by the art and
membership organizations will only require a high school diploma or a GED – 20 mentor positions are
being forecasted as new positions. Other positions listed as new jobs for the future and the education

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                     Page 49
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                   January 2011

required for the positions include associate pastors (graduate degree), custodians (no education
required), financial secretary (bachelor’s), and maintenance (no education required).

Engineering, Architecture, And Accounting. The only job forecasted as a new job by the
employers in engineering, architecture, and accounting were geographic information system positions,
requiring a vocational certificate and paying an average hourly wage of $18.00.

Government. An associate degree will be required for the new positions being created in health care –
electronic medical records – and the employers will pay an average of $16.00 per hour for these
positions.

                        Chart 21. Employee Needs For Potential New Delta College Programs
                                   By Employers In The Great Lakes Bay Region
                                    Number Employers Citing Need                 Average
                                                                   # Employees
          Program Areas                                                           Hourly    Education Preferred
                                     Bay       Midland   Saginaw      Needed
                                                                                  Wage
 Applied Politics (Certificate)            3         0         1            12     $14.81   Bachelor’s (67%)/
                                                                                            Associate (33%)
 Auto Body Repair                          2         2         5            13    $14.50    Certificate (100%)
 Broadband Technologist                    7         3        18            36    $16.77    Certificate (7%)/
                                                                                            Associate (46%)
 Caregiver                                 6         6        11           219    $10.67    Certificate (61%)/
                                                                                            Associate 17%/
                                                                                            High School (17%)
 Culinary Arts                             1         6         4            24    $12.50    Certificate (27%)/
                                                                                            Associate (46%)
 Diesel Mechanic/ Diesel Repair            8         5         8            22    $17.10    Certificate (17%)/
 (Heavy Equipment/ Marine                                                                   Associate (14%)
 Diesel)
 Dietician Technician                      5         0         6            14    $20.00    Associate (54%)
 Farming Management/                       0         0         0             0      N/A     N/A
 Agriculture Management
 GIS (Geographic Information               5         3         7            14    $17.00    Associate (47%)/
 Systems)                                                                                   Certificate (13%)
 Golf/ Turf Management                     3         2         2            13    $13.13    Certificate (43%)/
                                                                                            Associate (29%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (14%)
 Health Information Technology             5         3         9            18    $14.21    Certificate (18%)/
                                                                                            Associate (35%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (18%)
 Hospitality Management                    4         4         7            21    $15.84    High School (27%)/
                                                                                            Certificate (20%)/
                                                                                            Associate (40%)
 Insurance Specialist                      5         1        15            59    $14.31    Associate (57%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (19%)
 Logistics                                 6         4        10           127    $18.95    Associate (25%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (20%)
 Massage Therapy                           2         0         5            11    $40.00    Certificate (86%)
 Medical Assistant                         1         1         4             5       DK     Associate (33%)
 Medical Lab Technician                    1         1         6             7    $13.66    Certificate (25%)/
                                                                                            Associate (25%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (25%
 Occupational Therapy Assistant            4         2         6            14    $35.00    Associate (17%)/
                                                                                            Bachelor’s (17%)/


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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

                                  Number Employers Citing Need                 Average
                                                                 # Employees
         Program Areas                                                          Hourly   Education Preferred
                                  Bay       Midland   Saginaw       Needed
                                                                                Wage
                                                                                         Master’s (17%)
 Optician Associate/ Optical            0         0          0             0       N/A   N/A
 Assistant
 Pet Groomer                            0         0          0             0      N/A    N/A
 Small Engine Repair Technician         1         1          5            20    $18.08   High School (18%)/
                                                                                         Certificate (29%)/
                                                                                         Associate (57%)
 Speech Pathology Assistant             5         1          4            12    $30.68   Associate (20%)/
                                                                                         Bachelor’s (40%)/
                                                                                         Master’s (20%)
 Sterile Processing                   0           1          4             2       DK    Certificate (20%)
 Veterinary Assistant                 0           2          4             8     $9.40   Certificate (20%)
 TOTAL                               74          48        141           671     15.41

Potential New Programs. Delta College has been considering the development of new program areas
to add to their broad curriculum. In any new program assessment, it is imperative to determine future
employer need for graduates of the new curriculum areas. Delta College provided CLARUS Corporation a
list of 24 potential new program areas to be tested for relevancy among the employers in the survey. Each
new program area was matched to the appropriate industry classification, and the employers in that
industry classification were asked whether they foresaw a need for employees with a certificate or
associate degree in the program areas under consideration. If the employers responded that they would
in fact need employees in the program area, they were then asked the number of employees needed in the
area, the average hourly rate paid, and the education required for the position.

Chart 21 notes for each program area investigated the number of employers citing a need for employees
in that program area, the number of employees needed, the average hourly wage paid, and the education
preferred. The program areas that experienced the highest demand for employees in the Great Lakes Bay
Region included:

       Caregiver: Twenty-three employers reported a need for 219 caregivers, which would earn an
        average hourly rate of $10.67, and the majority (61 percent) would require a certificate for
        employment.

       Insurance Specialist: Twenty-one employers in the region cited a need for 59 insurance
        specialists; 57 percent of the positions would require an associate degree and 19 percent a
        bachelor’s degree, and the specialists would earn an average hourly rate of $14.31.

       Logistics: One hundred twenty-seven logistic positions, earning $18.95 per hour, were reported
        as needed by 20 employers in the region, and the positions would require an associate degree (25
        percent) or a bachelor’s degree (20 percent).

The program areas which Delta College should consider for future development based on the education
required, the number of employers requiring employees, and the average hourly wage for graduates of
the program areas include:

       Massage Therapy: Although only seven employers noted a need for 11 employees in massage
        therapy, the majority of the graduates of massage therapy programs become self-employed and
        are not necessarily employed by an established business. Nationally this program is in high
        demand from students, who only need a certificate to complete the program, and can earn up to
        $40.00 an hour.


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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011

      Occupational Therapy Assistant: Nationally, there is high demand for occupational therapy
       assistants (OTAs). In the Great Lakes Bay Region, twelve employers noted a need for 14 OTAs,
       who earn an average of $35 per hour. Currently, Macomb Community College and Wayne County
       Community College have OTA programs which result in an Associate of Applied Science.

      Speech Pathology Assistant: Ten employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region noted the need for 12
       speech pathology assistants that earn an average of $30.68 per hour. An associate degree is
       required for the program.

      Dietician Technician: Dietician technicians, who work with dieticians in planning and
       implementing nutritional programs and services in facilities such as hospitals and schools, are
       forecasted to increase as more congregate care facilities are built; for example, skilled nursing
       facilities and assisted living facilities. Only 11 of the employers in the region forecasted a need for
       14 employees, who would require an associate degree, but who would earn up to $20.00 per hour.

      Diesel Mechanic/ Diesel Repair (Heavy Equipment/ Marine Diesel): Twenty-one employers
       noted a need for diesel mechanics, resulting in 22 potential jobs. These positions would require
       an associate degree and pay an average of $17.10 an hour. As the need for heavy equipment
       operators increases, so should demand for heavy equipment mechanics.

      GIS (Geographic Information Systems): Geographic information systems positions will pay an
       average of $17.00 per hour and require an associate degree. Fifteen employers in the region noted
       a need for 14 employees.

      Broadband Technologist: Twenty-eight employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region noted a need for
       36 broadband technologists. These positions would require an associate degree and earn an
       average wage of $16.77.

      Auto Body Repair: Only nine employers noted a need for auto body repair technicians, and those
       employers would hire 13 employees. A certificate is noted as the requirement for the program and
       the auto body repair technicians would earn $14.50 per hour on average. This may be a program
       that could be added as an option to the current automotive program at Delta College.

      Health Information Technology: Seventeen employers in the region noted a need for 18
       employees in health information technology, but were unclear what the required degree should
       be for the program – 18 percent noted a certificate was needed, 35 percent an associate degree, 18
       percent a bachelor’s degree, and the balance were unsure. The average hourly wage for the health
       information technologists was $14.21 per hour. While there is an increasing demand for medical
       coders, this degree area should be carefully examined with an advisory committee prior to
       committing to a program.

After reviewing the demand noted by the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region, the national jobs
forecast, and comparable programs across the country, it is recommended that the College not pursue
programming in the following areas due to low demand and low pay for positions noted:

      Small Engine Repair Technician: Only seven employers noted a need for employees in this
       program area – 20 positions that would pay $18.08 an hour and require an associate degree. The
       majority of the programs in this area across the country have been in decline.

      Hospitality Management: Fifteen employers in the region noted a need for a hospitality
       management program, and those employers would employ 21 people, earning an average wage of
       $15.84 an hour. Typically, the most successful hospitality programs at community colleges are in
       resort locations.

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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

      Applied Politics (Certificate): The majority of the employers in the region, four employers, who
       would hire 12 employees with a certificate in applied politics, expect them to complete a
       bachelor’s degree and would only pay them $14.81 per hour. The pay is too low for the expected
       degree.

      Medical Lab Technician: Medical lab technicians are generally an associate degree program that
       ladders into a clinical laboratory medical technologist, which requires a bachelor’s degree. Eight
       employers in the region noted a need for seven employees, earning only $13.66 an hour.
       Nationally, the average hourly rate for the technicians ranges from $17.00 to $18.00 per hour.
       The employers in the market may not be willing to pay for trained technicians.

      Golf/ Turf Management: Seven employers in the region noted a need for 13 employees who would
       earn an average of $13.13 an hour. Given the static nature of the number of golf courses, the
       demand is low and even with turnover, the demand may remain low; wages are also low for an
       associate degree.

      Culinary Arts: Eleven employers noted a need for 24 employees in culinary arts, but the associate
       degree graduates would only earn $12.50 an hour on average. As with the hospitality program,
       culinary programs generally flourish in a resort setting with high-end restaurants. Based on the
       wage quoted by the employers, the employees would not better themselves after earning an
       associate degree, and the program is very expensive for a start-up program.

      Veterinary Assistant: Only six employers would hire eight employees, paying them only $9.40
       after earning a certificate. While there are many successful veterinary technician programs, they
       are most likely to flourish in markets where the veterinarians will pay a premium for a certificate
       or associate degree graduate. It appears that the employers are not willing to pay a higher wage
       for a graduate in the program.

      Farming Management/ Agriculture Management, Optician Associate/ Optical Assistant, Sterile
       Processing, and Pet Groomer: Little or no employer demand for these program areas. Pet
       groomer may provide an opportunity to develop a non-credit certificate for a community
       education market.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                    Page 53
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                               January 2011


Business Characteristics
The 350 employers represented in the survey account for 55,409 employees (see Chart 22). The
employers in Bay County employ 10,155 employees, employers in Midland County employ 13,716
employees, and the employers in Saginaw County employ 31,538 employees.

  By excluding the retail and wholesale sectors, the number of employees has declined from the 2007
  survey results to the 2011 surveys results. In 2007, the 354 employers surveyed accounted for 96,086
  full-time employees.

          Chart 22. Current And Predicted Employment Characteristics By Location Of Employer
                                                             Bay          Midland       Saginaw
         Current Number of Employees                          10,155         13,716        31,538
         Percent Forecasting Increase In Employees               29.2          38.0          31.1
              Net Increase In Employees (Number)                 273            694         1,312
         Percent Forecasting Decrease In Employees               11.5            4.2           3.3
              Net Decrease In Employees (Number)                 113             42            68

Of the 350 employers in the survey, the predictions for future employment were very positive, as seen in
Chart 22. Twenty-nine percent of the employers in Bay County, 38 percent in Midland County, and 31
percent of the employers in Saginaw County are anticipating increasing employment in the next year and
that would add an additional 2,279 full-time employees.

While the outlook is extremely positive for the Great Lakes Bay Region, there are still employers
struggling to maintain their workforce. As seen in Chart 22, 11.5 percent of the employers in Bay County
are forecasting a reduction in the number of their current employees, or a decrease of 113 jobs in the next
year. Only four percent of the employers in Midland County and three percent in Saginaw County
anticipate a decrease in full-time employment, which would deduct 42 employees from the Midland
County labor pool and 68 from the Saginaw County workforce pool.

  In 2007, 23 percent of the employers expected their number of employees to increase and only two
  percent expected a decline in number of employees in 2007. By 2011, 32 percent of the employers are
  anticipating an increase in the number of total employees. However, during the last four years,
  many employers either lost employees or did not increase their employee base due to economic
  conditions.

                 Chart 23. Summary Of Business Characteristics By Location Of Employer
                                                             Bay         Midland       Saginaw
           Business Type
                Sole Proprietorship                              6.3           8.5           9.3
                Partnership                                      2.1           2.8           1.1
                Corporation                                     57.3          54.9          55.7
                     Privately owned                            70.9          61.5          70.6
                     Publicly held                              12.7          20.5          13.7
                     Limited Liability Corporation (LLC)        16.4           7.7          10.8
                     Other                                       0.0           2.6           2.0
                Government                                      19.8          11.3          14.2
                Nonprofit                                       12.5          21.1          18.0


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Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                                January 2011

                                                             Bay         Midland      Saginaw
           Group SIC Code
                 Agriculture, Forestry, and Mining               5.2           4.2           4.9
                 Contractor and Construction                    11.5          14.1          11.5
                 Manufacturing                                   7.3           5.6           6.6
                 Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate            11.5           9.9          10.4
                 Business and Personal Services                 21.9          22.5          20.8
                 Health Services                                 9.4           9.9           9.8
                 Legal Services                                  2.1           1.4           2.7
                 Education and Social Services                   8.3           9.9           9.8
                 Art and Membership Organizations                6.3           5.6           7.1
                 Engineering, Architecture, and                  2.1
                                                                                4.2           2.7
                    Accounting
                 Household and Miscellaneous Services              0.0          0.0           0.5
                 Government (Public Administration)                7.3          5.6           5.5
                 Non-Classifiable Establishments                   2.1          1.4           2.7
           Interested in contact from Delta College
           about their educational and training                 41.7          38.0          50.8
           opportunities
           Desire Copy Of Survey Results                        59.4          74.6          77.0

Business Classifications. More than half of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region are
organized as corporations – 57 percent of the employers in Bay and Saginaw counties and 55 percent in
Midland County – as seen in Chart 23. Seventy-one percent of the corporations in Bay County are
privately held, as are 61 percent of the employers in Midland County and 71 percent in Saginaw County.
The corporations in Midland County are most likely to be publically held (20 percent), compared to only
14 percent in Saginaw County and 13 percent in Bay County. Limited liability corporations (LLCs) are
most popular in Bay County with 16 percent of the corporations being LLCs, compared to eight percent in
Midland County and 11 percent in Saginaw County. Less than 10 percent of the employers are organized
as sole proprietors – six percent in Bay County, eight percent in Midland County, and nine percent in
Saginaw County – and less than three percent are organized as partnerships in any of the counties.
Twenty percent of the employers in Bay County are government entities, as are 11 percent of the
employers in Midland County and 14 percent in Saginaw County. Twenty percent of the employers in
Midland County are nonprofit organizations, compared to 18 percent of the employers in Saginaw County
and 12 percent in Bay County.

  Private corporate ownership has increased from 2007 to 2011 among the Great Lakes Bay Region
  employers. In 2011, 56 percent of the employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region were organized as
  corporations, with 69 percent of the corporations being privately held. In comparison, 60 percent of
  the employers in 2007 were corporations with 59 percent privately held.

Each employer’s SIC (Standard Industrial Classification) Code was noted on the survey to ensure that a
representative sample was actually obtained, excluding the wholesale and retail sectors from the survey.
As found in Chart 23, the sample is representative of the number of employers and the types of employers
across the three counties with the exclusion of the retail and wholesale sectors.

The employers in Bay County by SIC Code representation included in the survey consist of business and
personal services (22 percent), finance, insurance, and real estate (11 percent), contractors and
construction (11 percent), health services (nine percent), education and social services (eight percent),
manufacturing (seven percent), government (seven percent), art and membership organizations (six
percent), agriculture, forestry, and mining (five percent), legal services (two percent), and engineering,
architecture, and accounting (two percent).

CLARUS Corporation                                                                                      Page 55
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College                                             January 2011

The employers in Midland County by percentage of SIC Code representation include business and
personal services (22 percent), contractors and construction (14 percent), finance, insurance, and real
estate (10 percent), health services (10 percent), education and social services (10 percent),
manufacturing (six percent), government (six percent), art and membership organizations (six percent),
agriculture, forestry, and mining (four percent), engineering, architecture, and accounting (four percent),
and legal services (one percent).

In Saginaw County, the employers by percentage of SIC Code representation include business and
personal services (21 percent), contractors and construction (12 percent), finance, insurance, and real
estate (10 percent), health services (10 percent), education and social services (10 percent),
manufacturing (seven percent), art and membership organizations (seven percent), government (six
percent), agriculture, forestry, and mining (five percent), engineering, architecture, and accounting (three
percent), and legal services (three percent).

Overall, 46 percent of the employers surveyed would like to be contacted by Delta College and provided
information about their educational and training opportunities – 42 percent of the employers in Bay
County, 38 percent in Midland County, and 51 percent in Saginaw County. The employers would also like
feedback on the survey results – 59 percent of the employers in Bay County, 75 percent in Midland
County, and 77 percent in Saginaw County would like a summarized copy of the survey results. This
provides a perfect opportunity to provide feedback to the employers who responded to the survey.

  In 2007, 80 percent of the employers who responded to the survey wanted feedback and a copy of
  the results presented to them, and in 2011, 72 percent of the employers want a summarized copy. The
  majority of the employers are interested in the overall results.




CLARUS Corporation                                                                                     Page 56
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011




                                 Appendices




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page 57
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix A. Questionnaire




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page A-1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix B. Tabular Results By Location Of
Employer




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page B-1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix C. Detailed Verbatim Responses




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page C-1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix D. State And Regional Jobs Forecasts




CLARUS Corporation                                        Page D-1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix E. Occupational Program Sheets




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page E-1
Workforce Development Scan Results For Delta College   January 2011


Appendix F. Headcount And Graduates By Program
At Delta College




CLARUS Corporation                                         Page F-1

								
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