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VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 21

									Media & Current Events


    presentation by Jim Kearney
News in the Media Age

“Politics will eventually be replaced by
  imagery” – Marshall McLuhan, 1968
What is News ?

“News-worthiness”          Guiding Principle

•   Timely?                • Fairness
•   Important ?
•   Proximate ?
•   Interesting ?
•   Economical to cover?
Editorial Judgments Shape News Coverage


Reporters and Editors should strive to be
   Fair
   Accurate
   Complete and
   True
(F.A.C.T.) when balancing editorial judgments
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
   Which news to prioritize?
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
   Which news to prioritize?
   Which information to include?
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
   Which news to prioritize?
   Which information to include?
   Placement of report?
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
   Which news to prioritize?
   Which information to include?
   Placement of report
   Selection of words
Editorial judgments
   Which news to report?
   Which news to prioritize?
   Which information to include?
   Placement of report
   Selection of words
   Selections of visuals, captions, sound bites
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
   Exact selection & context of quote
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
   Exact selection & context of quote
   Selection of “experts” and spokespeople
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
   Exact selection & context of quote
   Selection of “experts” and spokespeople
   Which background is worth reporting?
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
   Exact selection & context of quote
   Selection of “experts” and spokespeople
   Which background is worth reporting?
   Fair analysis vs. partisan spin
Editorial judgments
   Which newsmakers to quote?
   Exact selection & context of quote
   Selection of “experts” and spokespeople
   Which background is worth reporting?
   Fair analysis vs. partisan spin
   Is editorial opinion separated & labeled?
As media interact in news cycles...


         Some stories get amplified



          Some stories get distorted



             Some stories snowball
Media Events / “Superstories”
    Live coverage, Re-playable moments
    Sex, Scandal, Outrageous Acts
    Violence and Crime, Trials, Shock Value
    Continuing Drama or Build-up
    Pictures / Sound Bites or Incantations
    Celebrities, Telegenic Personalities
    Male vs. Female or Inter-group Conflicts
Tabloid Headlines Sell Papers!
Each medium “encodes” news differently

       TV: brief, visceral, face-to-face,
       real-time, instant global impact

      Papers: more facts, slower impact


       Radio: no faces or images; local

         Internet: timely, user-driven,
                   interactive
Which news & opinion do you trust?

								
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