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Enlightening minds. Enriching souls. Extending hands

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					Undergraduate Evening
CATA L O G 2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7



      Enlightening minds. Enriching souls. Extending hands.
                                        Undergraduate Evening
                                        C ATALOG 2006-2007




Admission 561.803.2000 or 1.888.Go.to.PBA             Street Address 901 South Flager Dr. | www.pba.edu
Switchboard 561.803.2000 Fax 561.803.2115             Mailing Address P.O. Box 24708 West Palm Beach FL 33416-4708




                              It is the policy of Palm Beach Atlantic University that no student shall be subjected to discrimina-
                              tion on the ground of race, color, religion, sex, national or ethnic origin, age, or handciapped or
                              veteran status in administration of its educational policies, admissionpolicies, scholarship and loan
                              programs, and athletic and other school administered programs. The University is authorized under
                              federal law to enroll non immigrant students.
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                                                                           N




                                                                                                  E
                                                                                                  S
                                                                             W
CAMPUS MAP
West Palm Beach, FL




1   Okeechobee Hall              10   Gregory Hall                 17   MacArthur Hall

2   DeSantis Family Chapel       11   Enrollment                   18   Johnson
                                      Services Center                   Residence Hall
3   Pembroke Hall/Residence
                                 12   Art Buildings                19   Sachs Administration Building
4   Oceanview Residence
    Hall/Dixie Garage            13   Flagler Towers               20   Hood American Free Enterprise
                                      Residence Hall                    Building
5   Baxter Residence Hall
                                 14   Lakeview                     21   Borbé Hall
6   Library/Theatre                   Residence Hall                    ¿ Safety & Security
    ê Warren Library/Fall 2006
                                 15   Health & Wellness Building   22   Weyenberg Residence Hall
7   Greene Complex
    for Sports & Recreation      16   Rinker School of Business    23   Lassiter Student Center
                                      Residence Hall                    Â Visitor Parking
8   Intramural Field
                                                                        ¢ Parking
9   Vera Lea Rinker Hall
Academic Calendar 2006-2007


EVENT                                                               FALL 2006

New Student check-in/orientation                                    AUGUST 22-23

All Student Open Check In                                           AUGUST 25

Classes Begin                                                       AUGUST 28

Add/Drop Period Ends and Last Day to Register                       SEPTEMBER 1

Deadline: Application for Fall Graduation                           SEPTEMBER 1

Labor Day (no classes, offices closed)                              SEPTEMBER 4

Web Registration for Spring and Summer semesters begins             NOVEMBER 6

Last day to withdraw from semester class without academic penalty   NOVEMBER 10

Thanksgiving                                                        NOVEMBER 23

Final Examinations                                                  DECEMBER 11-14

Fall Commencement                                                   DECEMBER 16


EVENT                                                               SPRING 2007

All student Check-In                                                JANUARY 4-5

Classes Begin                                                       JANUARY 8

Add/Drop Period Ends and Last Day to Register                       JANUARY 12

Deadline: Application for Spring/Summer Graduation                  JANUARY 12

Martin Luther King Day (no classes, offices closed)                 JANUARY 15

Spring Break (except for graduate counseling program)               MARCH 5-11

Web Registration for Fall semester begins                           MARCH 12

Last day to withdraw from semester class without academic penalty   MARCH 23

Good Friday Holiday (Offices Closed)                                APRIL 6

Honors Chapel                                                       APRIL 24

Final Examinations                                                  April 30 - May 3

Spring Commencement                                                 MAY 5


EVENT                                                               SUMMER 2007

Classes Begin                                                       MAY 9

Add/Drop Period Ends and Last Day to Register                       MAY 11

Memorial Day                                                        MAY 28

See Program Links for More Information                              JUNE

Independence Day Holiday (no classes, offices closed)               JULY 4
               Welcome &
6   Ch.1
              Introduction      GUIDING PRINCIPLES1
      Undergraduate 2006-2007   Palm Beach Atlantic University is a comprehensive Christian university
                                with a core emphasis in the liberal arts. Its purpose is to offer a curriculum of studies
                                and a program of student activities dedicated to the development of moral character,
                                the enrichment of spiritual lives, and the perpetuation of growth in Christian ideals.
                                Founded under the providence of God with the conviction that there is aneed for a
                                university in this community that will expand the minds, develop the moral character,
                                and enrich the spiritual lives of all the people who may come within the orbit of its
                                influence, Palm Beach Atlantic University shall stand as a witness for Jesus Christ,
                                expressed directly through its administration, faculty, and students.

                                To assure the perpetuation of these basic concepts of its founders, it is resolved
                                that all those who become associated with Palm Beach Atlantic as trustees, officers,
                                members of the faculty or of the staff, must believe in the divine inspiration of the
                                Bible, both the Old and New Testaments; that man was directly created by God;
                                that Jesus Christ was born of a virgin; that He is the Son of God, our Lord and
                                Savior; that He died for the sins of all men and thereafter arose from the grave; that
                                by repentance and the acceptance of and belief in Him, by the grace of God, the
                                individual is saved from eternal damnation and receives eternal life in the presence
                                of God; and it is further resolved that the ultimate teachings in the University shall
                                always be consistent with these principles. (These principles were adopted by the
                                University’s founders and they serve as the preamble to the PBA bylaws)

                                PALM BEACH ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY
                                STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
                                PBA is a Christian university, which equips students to lead fulfilling lives through
                                learning, leadership and service.

                                Vision

                                The vision for Palm Beach Atlantic University is to be a premier Christian university,
                                whose graduates are intellectually prepared, possess high moral character,
                                demonstrate outstanding citizenship, and are servant leaders in their communities,
                                the nation and the world.

                                Mission

                                The mission of Palm Beach Atlantic University is to prepare students for lifelong
                                learning and leadership by offering excellent undergraduate, graduate and
                                professional programs of study. The University is a private, independent university
                                dedicated to the intentional integration of Christian principles. As a community of
                                learners, the university provides students with a rigorous educational environment
                                with broad exposure to and experience in the arts and humanities, natural and social
                                                                sciences, Biblical studies and selected professions
                                                                that leads to intellectual, spiritual, and personal
                                                                character development.

                                                               Values

                                                               Accountability – We will be accountable for our words
                                                               and deeds to one another and to God.
                                                               Excellence – We will do everything with excellence, as
                                                               unto our Lord Jesus Christ.
                                                               1
                                                                These principles were adopted by the University’s founders and they serve
                                                               as the preamble to the University’s bylaws.
                                                                                                          Welcome &
                                                                                            Ch.1                             7
Integrity – We will be honest, open, and truthful in all our relationships.                              Introduction
Love – We will demonstrate love through our attitudes and selfless service to one
another.                                                                                    Palm Beach Atlantic University
Respect – We honor the worth of the individual by recognizing that each of us has
a right to be heard and that each contributes significantly to our community of
learners.
Unity – We will demonstrate to the world that we are a unified body of Christian
believers in all we do.

Elaboration

Committed to the discovery, preservation, and application of knowledge, the
University, through its undergraduate and graduate curricula, seeks to generate
broad exposure to and experience in the arts and humanities, natural and social
sciences, human resource development, and selected professions.

The University esteems quality and currency in learning by encouraging faculty
to conduct appropriate and meaningful professional activities and to utilize such
experience to enhance student advisement and relevant classroom instruction.

Recognizing that human intelligence is more useful when animated by divine
wisdom, the University seeks to complement its academic purpose with an emphasis
on the spiritual, physical, and social development of its students. Accordingly,
the University promotes a range of programs, services, and activities designed to
impart a vision of the worldwide Christian community, a call to ministry within that
community, and a sense of responsibility to equip ourselves and others for effective
service in a multicultural environment.

Believing also that freedom is an essential adjunct to the pursuit of spiritual and
intellectual truth; the University encourages knowledge and understanding of
democracy and the American heritage of private free enterprise.

Aspiring ultimately to prepare its students for service in a world of diverse cultures
experience, the University strives to model the community of faith by recognizing the
intrinsic value of all persons as created by God.

Approved by the Palm Beach Atlantic University Board of Trustees
December 9, 2005




HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY
Palm Beach Atlantic University was founded in 1968 as a coeducational Christian
liberal arts university. The University was named for its location in the Palm Beaches
and its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. The first classes were held in the fall of 1968
with 110 enrolled. PBA held its first graduation in the spring of 1972 and later that
year received initial accreditation from the regional accrediting association.
Classes were first held at 1101 South Olive Avenue in downtown West Palm Beach in
the former facilities of the First Baptist Church. During the ensuing years, the historic
auditorium building has served many different roles for the University. Today, the
building is undergoing renovation to serve as a portion of the Warren Library.
The University has a comprehensive campus master plan that incorporates
approximately 27 acres of land from the Intracoastal Waterway west along
Okeechobee Boulevard to Dixie Highway, south to Jefferson Street, and back east to
the waterway. The first building completed was the Lassiter Student Center, which
was occupied in 1983. In addition the University has purchased nearly 100 acres
just minutes from campus for the construction of an outdoor athletic complex.
               Welcome &
   Ch.1
              Introduction      Recent additions to the campus, completed between 2002 and 2006, are:

      Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 • Vera Lea Rinker Hall
                                   for the School of Music and Fine Arts, providing over 43,000 square feet of per-
                                   formance and educational space;

                                 • Oceanview Residence Hall, providing housing for 188 students;

                                 • Dixie Parking Garage, providing 526 parking spaces on 5 levels;

                                 • DeSantis Family Chapel, providing dedicated worship space for 400;

                                 • Lakeview Residence Hall, providing housing for 85 students; Gregory Hall for
                                   the Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy, providing over 40,000 square feet of
                                   research and educational space;

                                 • School of Nursing educational space on the first floor of Oceanview Hall;

                                 • Enlarged campus bookstore on the first floor of Oceanview Hall.

                                 • The first phase of construction on the Warren Library, with the second phase
                                   of construction, renovation of the historic octagonal building which served as the
                                   original PBA structure, scheduled for completion in 2007.

                                 • Orlando Campus opened, providing 6600 square feet of classroom and office
                                   space to Orlando programming.

                                The projected master plan also calls for the construction of several other buildings,
                                including a communication building, theatre, performing arts center, classrooms and
                                residence halls, and additional parking garages.

                                The University’s program has expanded significantly through the years. By the
                                mid 1980s the University was offering more than 20 major areas of study, and in
                                1988 the first graduate program was launched. In the late 1980s, the University
                                also initiated a special program for non-traditional students. This program offers a
                                Bachelor of Science in the Organizational Management through a curriculum offered
                                in special modules in the evening hours throughout all 12 months of the year. The
                                Supper Honors Program, a program for academically talented students, began in
                                the late 1980s. To be admitted to this program, which provides an interdisciplinary
                                approach to the study of Western civilization and is designed to encourage the
                                development of leadership skills, students must rank in the top 10 percent of the
                                nation according to national test scores.

                                The University is organized into schools: the School of Arts and Sciences, the
                                Marshall E. Rinker Sr. School of Business, the Catherine T. MacArthur School of
                                Leadership, the School of Education and Behavioral Studies, the School of Music
                                and Fine Arts, the School of Ministry, and the Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy.
                                In 2003, the School of Nursing and the School of Communications and Media were
                                established.

                                Over the years the University has experienced steady enrollment growth. The
                                University reached a 1,000 student population in 1985, a 1,500 student population
                                in 1990, and now has an enrollment of 3,200. Current plans call for continued
                                moderate growth. The University’s resources have also grown significantly during
                                these early years. The University faculty has grown to 148 full-time faculty
                                members and to more than 130 part-time faculty members. The full-time faculty
                                is well prepared and highly trained with degrees from major research universities
                                throughout the country. Approximately 80 percent of the University faculty has the
                                doctorate or highest degree available in their fields.
                                                                                                          Welcome &
                                                                                            Ch.1                             
The Library collections now include more than 110,000 volumes, significant                               Introduction
computer and online resources providing access to national and international
databases, and a variety of other technologies, which enhance educational support.          Palm Beach Atlantic University
The University has a high quality intranet called PalmNET, which links faculty,
administrative offices, student residence hall rooms, commuter students, and off
campus sites in a comprehensive computer network with a path to the information
superhighway. PalmNET provides access to e-mail, databases, libraries, the Internet,
the World Wide Web, and numerous other resources. In 2000, the University
became Florida’s first wireless campus.

The University’s endowment support has grown dramatically in the past decade
and, including funds functioning as endowments, the University now has one of the
largest university endowments in Florida on a per student basis.

Palm Beach Atlantic has three guiding principles that have formed the core of the
University’s total program. First, the University was founded by Baptist pastors
and lay persons with a very strong commitment to the central role of the teachings
of Christ in the affairs of the University. From its inception, the University has
welcomed students of all faiths. The general spiritual tone of the University is in the
historic Judeo-Christian tradition, guided by a commitment to the Lordship of Jesus
Christ and the authority of Scripture.

The Christian character of the University is evidenced in a faculty consisting of
committed Christians, a curriculum that incorporates Christian teachings throughout
all disciplines, a core of general education requirements that include the study of
Christian scriptures, and rules and regulations governing campus life that reflect
traditional Christian values. The University makes a concerted effort through many
different aspects of university life to encourage each student to grow in his or her
personal faith.

Second, the University was founded in the late 1960s at a time when many
American campuses were witnessing a breakdown in respect for the country, in
respect for our symbols of patriotism, and in respect for our American economic
system of free enterprise. In this milieu, the founders committed PBA to the task
of instilling in our students a love for country, traditional American values, and an
understanding of and appreciation for the free enterprise economic system. This
commitment is lived out through a general education course in the American free
enterprise system and through a variety of other curricular and student life initiatives.

Third, the University’s founders were committed to a unique requirement that
every student should be involved in community service. The original concept was
based on the Judeo-Christian teaching, stressed so much by Christ himself through
teachings and example, that a person should treat others as he or she would
want to be treated. Christ lived the life of a servant and showed us the way to give
of ourselves in service to others. The University called this program Workship, a
blending of the words “work” and “worship.” Through the years our students have
given more than one million hours of community service to a wide range of religious
and social service agencies throughout the Palm Beach area. Today, each student
at PBA is required during his or her undergraduate career to give 45 hours of
community service each academic year “to touch a hurting world.”

In addition to these guiding principles, the University has adopted a distinctively
Christian operating style that recognizes the importance of the individual as the key
element in the collective community. Granting each student significant individual
rights that are limited by corporate rights framed by the traditions of the institution,
the University operates as an extended family. Close personal interaction between
faculty and students encourages cooperative effort toward common goals. The
                Welcome &
10   Ch.1
               Introduction      University encourages students to seek their maximum potential during their college
                                 years and to be well prepared to make a significant positive contribution to society.
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 ACCREDITATION
                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
                                 the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur,
                                 Georgia 30033-4097; 404/679-4501) to award associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s
                                 degrees and a doctoral of pharmacy degree. Persons wishing to review documents
                                 related to PBA’s accreditation need contact the Office of the Provost 561/803-2051.

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University is an accredited institutional member of the National
                                 Association of Schools of Music, the International Assembly for Collegiate Business
                                 Education, and The American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. The School
                                 of Nursing is approved by the Florida Board of Nursing and is seeking national
                                 accreditation through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).
                                 The CCNE site visit is scheduled for November 2006. The Accreditation Council
                                 of Pharmacy Education (ACPE) granted the Palm Beach Atlantic Lloyd L. Gregory
                                 School of Pharmacy full accreditation status in June 2005.

                                 LOCATION
                                 Located on the tropical southeast coast of Florida, the University is in southern West
                                 Palm Beach. The University is easily accessible by highway (Interstate 95, Interstate
                                 75, and the Florida Turnpike)
                                 by air (Palm Beach International Airport)
                                 by rail (Amtrak)
                                 by bus (Greyhound)
                                 and by ship (Port of Palm Beach). The campus overlooks beautiful Lake Worth, the
                                 Intracoastal Waterway, and Palm Beach, with the Atlantic Ocean only minutes away.

                                 Students may enjoy the many cultural benefits of the famous South Florida winter
                                 season, such as Broadway plays, operas, concerts, and lectures by national and
                                 world leaders. The magnificent Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts,
                                 only a few blocks from the campus, brings world-renowned performers to Palm
                                 Beach County. Students also may use the facilities of the famed Norton Museum of
                                 Art, the Flagler Museum, the Society of the Four Arts, and the Science Museum and
                                 Planetarium of Palm Beach County.

                                 Sporting events are numerous in South Florida. The area’s many golf courses and
                                 tennis courts, as well as facilities for water skiing, surfing, sailing, and sport fishing,
                                 are easily accessible. Just 60 minutes away in Miami are the Miami Dolphins
                                 professional football team, the Florida Marlins professional baseball team, the Miami
                                 Heat professional basketball team, and the Florida Panthers professional hockey
                                 team. The University is, by car, three hours from Walt Disney World, EPCOT Center,
                                 Sea World, and Universal Studios and, by air, an hour from the Bahamas Islands.

                                 The Gulf Stream keeps the Palm Beaches warm in the winter and pleasant in the
                                 summer, providing a valuable “laboratory” for the oceanography, marine biology, and
                                 SCUBA-diving courses.

                                 CAMPUS FACILITIES
                                 The college community includes classroom, research, library, residence, food
                                 service, health care, recreation, theatrical, musical, and study facilities.
                                                                                                         Welcome &
                                                                                           Ch.1                             11
Borbé Hall contains offices for the School of Education and Behavioral Studies,                         Introduction
the School of Arts and Sciences, faculty in English, and Athletics and Campus
Recreation. In addition, the Center for Educational Innovation is housed there. The        Palm Beach Atlantic University
Department of Safety & Security is located in the northeast corner of the first floor.

Catherine T. MacArthur Hall houses classrooms, the science laboratories, and
offices for science and math faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences as well as
faculty in behavioral sciences.

Clifford and Mary Tolerton Hood American Free Enterprise Building houses PBA
Human Resources. Enrollment Services Center houses PBA Central, Academic
Records & Advisement, Student Financial Planning, and both Day and Evening &
Graduate Admissions as well as Data Central.

Greene Complex for Sports and Recreation houses a 1,750 seat arena/convocation
center, intramural gymnasium, handball and racquetball courts, indoor jogging
track, fitness center, human performance laboratory, aerobics room, training room,
classrooms, and snack bar.

Gregory Hall houses the Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy, providing over 40,000
square feet of research and educational space designed to accommodate three
hundred pharmacy students and requisite faculty.

Health and Wellness Center located on South Olive Ave nue, offers health services
including doctor visits, counseling, a staff nurse, and wellness programming. Athletic
Training offices are also housed in the building.

Okeechobee Hall houses classrooms, the administrative and faculty offices of the
Catherine T. MacArthur School of Leadership, and the School of Ministry.

Rinker School of Business Building contains classrooms, administrative offices, the
Master of Business Administration program, and faculty offices for all disciplines of
the Rinker School of Business, as well as some disciplines from the School of Arts
and Sciences.

Sachs Administration Building houses the major administrative offices of the
University including the offices of the President, the Provost (Academic Programs)
Business Affairs, and Development.

The Library provides a collection of more than 110,000 volumes that include books,
e-books, media, and periodicals. Periodical subscriptions include approximately
6000 titles received in paper and microform and accessed electronically through
research databases. Library users have access to the online library catalog (Voyager)
and numerous research databases through the Internet on campus or via a proxy
server for off-campus users. The service-oriented staff offers one-on-one reference
assistance in the library, by phone and via email. Librarians partner with faculty to
offer course-related instruction in research skills in the library’s Information Skills
Lab or in the traditional classroom. The PBA Library is a member of the Southeast
Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN)
a resource-sharing network of 135 academic and public libraries in South Florida.
The PBA University Library participates in the SEFLIN Virtual Library. Through
membership in OCLC, PBA Library offers access to the holdings of approximately
44,000 libraries in 86 countries, most of which are potentially available through the
Interlibrary Loan.

Vera Lea Rinker Hall houses the Department of Music. A 160-seat recital hall, a
large instrumental rehearsal hall, and administrative offices are contained on the first
                Welcome &
12   Ch.1
               Introduction      two floors. The upper floors house practice rooms, studios, classrooms, labs, and a
                                 large choral rehearsal hall.
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 William G. Lassiter, Jr. Student Center provides offices for the First Year Experience
                                 Program, Multicultural Services, Residence Life, Student Accountability, Student
                                 Activities, Student Leadership Development, and Vice President for Student
                                 Development and Student Activities. A cafeteria dining hall, mailroom, Commuter
                                 Recreation Lounge, Study/Game Room, conference room, and other amenities
                                 are housed within the center. The Weyenberg Center, located on the second floor,
                                 provides flexible space for numerous campus and community events.

                                 STUDENT SERVICES
                                 Automatic Deposit Machines (ADM)

                                 ADM Machines are located in the Lassiter Student Center, the Warren library, and
                                 the Greene Sports Complex. These machines can be utilized to place money on
                                 a student’s PBAccess Card, which can be used on Campus in the laundry room,
                                 vending machines, Campus Store, Common Ground Café, and select copiers and
                                 printers. The library ADM also issues cards (minimum deposit of $5 required) for
                                 use by patrons from the general public.

                                 Campus Bookstore

                                 The Campus Store, located on the first floor of the Oceanview Hall, is open year
                                 round. The store stocks the necessary course textbooks plus helpful reference
                                 materials, study aids, and general trade books. Buy back of textbooks is held the
                                 end of every term. Snacks, drinks, basic first aid supplies, and sundry items as
                                 well as clothing and emblematic articles are also on sale for the convenience of the
                                 students.

                                 The Campus Store accepts most major credit cards and provides a check cashing
                                 service ($25 per day) with a valid PBA ID. To learn more, please visit our web site
                                 at http://palmnet.pba.edu or call 561-803-2180. (See the Orlando Section for
                                 Campus Store service available to Orlando students)

                                 Student Success Center

                                 The Student Success Center is dedicated to providing assistance to all university
                                 students so that they may make the most of the college experience. The Student
                                 Success Center is the home of the First Year Experience, Career Services,
                                 Counseling Services, and Disability Services. Located on the second floor of the
                                 Lassiter Student Center, we operate Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm. Stop
                                 in during walk-in hours or schedule an appointment by calling 803-2063.

                                 Career Services

                                 Career Services provides assistance to all students and alumni in career planning,
                                 job placement and graduate school preparation. Career planning is a holistic process
                                 that involves a variety of programs and principles. Students are encouraged to seek
                                 God’s direction throughout their career and life planning process. Since this is an
                                 on-going process, students should begin their career exploration during their first
                                 year, beginning with evaluation/assessment and ending in their final year with the
                                 transition into the employment or graduate school arena. Career Services is located
                                 on the second floor of the Lassiter Student Center, in the Student Success Center.
                                 Appointments can be made by calling 561-803-2063.
                                                                                                      Welcome &
                                                                                        Ch.1                             13
Counseling Services                                                                                  Introduction
There are many reasons why students sometimes do not reach their full potential         Palm Beach Atlantic University
at a given time. Homesickness, relationship conflicts, anxiety, and depression
are common student experiences. We recognize everyone is in need of support,
direction, or wise counsel at one time or another. We have made confidential
counseling available in the Student Success Center by our University Counselor. The
University Counselor is to assess and assist students in obtaining the type of help
that best meets their need.

Disability Services

The University seeks to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
as well as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 by affording reasonable
accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities. Students who have
questions about their entitlement to benefits under these statutes should contact the
Student Success Center for an appointment with the Disability Service Coordinator.

Dining Services

Resident and commuter students can eat on-campus in the Fraser Dining Hall
and Common Ground Café in the Greene Complex for Sports & Recreation. Hot
breakfast, continental breakfast, lunch, dinner, weekend brunches, food-to-go,
Seattle’s Best Coffee, and late night meals and snacks are provided by Sodexho,
a national college food service company. A meal plan is required for students who
live in PBA residence halls. Commuter students can purchase a meal card. Catering
and theme meals are also offered for special events for students. Hours are posted
around campus.

Health and Wellness

The Health and Wellness Center offers medical and counseling services and
manages a low-cost college student health insurance plan for students. The staff is
responsible for gathering and maintaining state required health and immunization
records for all PBA students (which are required before a student is clear to attend
classes) and provides a variety of Health Education programs throughout the
academic year.

The Health and Wellness Center is located at 1218 South Olive Avenue (on the
corner of Olive and Acacia) and is open Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Nurse visits occur throughout the week for students needing referrals to local health
care providers. For more information or to make an appointment with one of our
health care providers, call 561-803-2576. For medical emergencies after hours,
please call Safety & Security at 561-803-2500.

Mailroom

The mailroom is located in the Lassiter Student Center. Hours of operation are
Monday - Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Mailroom personnel are available to assist you with UPS, Federal Express, Express
Mail, and Priority Mail services; and with the weighing and stamping of packages
and letters.
                Welcome &
14   Ch.1
               Introduction      PBA Central

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   PBA Central is located in the Enrollment Services Center. PBA Central provides
                                 a one-stop location for a variety of student needs and services. The PBA Central
                                 Student Service Representatives are available to assist students and parents with
                                 questions about student accounts, financial aid, academic advising, or general
                                 requests regarding the University. PBA Central Representatives are available to:

                                 (1) address inquiries involving payments, billings, and accounts;
                                 (2) notify students when federal loan checks or scholarships are available;
                                 (3) receive payment for student accounts;
                                 (4) credit student debit cards for campus wide purchases;
                                 (5) print schedules and transcripts;
                                 (6) provide information and forms concerning add-drop of classes, withdrawal from
                                     classes, transient study, and all other forms regarding academic requests; and
                                 (7) direct students to resources regarding advising and degree requirements. (See
                                     the Orlando Section for services available to Orlando students).


                                 Safety and Security

                                 Students, faculty, and administration all have an interest in preserving a safe and
                                 secure campus. The campus is patrolled by Department of Safety and Security
                                 officers, seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Campus safety officers work along with
                                 the West Palm Beach Police in the event of any criminal activity on campus. Campus
                                 safety officers are also authorized to report any misconduct of students to the
                                 appropriate departments. The Department of Safety and Security is located at the
                                 northeast corner of Borbé Hall. The Safety and Security office telephone number is
                                 561-803-2500. The following services are provided to the PBA community through
                                 the Department of Safety and Security:

                                  • Patrol Division (State Certified) 24 hr/7 days
                                  • Escort Services around the clock
                                  • Lost and Found
                                  • Operation ID
                                  • Victim Assistance
                                  • Parking Services
                                  • Community Education
                                  • Lock, Key, and Access Control Emergency Phones and Call Boxes
                                  • Hurricane/Emergency Preparedness
                                  • Fire Safety
                                  • OSHA/Safety
                                  • Liaison with Local, State and Federal Law Enforcement
                                  • Security Analysis and Action Program


                                 Student Accounts

                                 Student Accounts is located on the first floor of Sachs Hall. Office personnel are
                                 available to assist students and parents in:
                                                                                                         Welcome &
                                                                                           Ch.1                             15
(1) addressing detailed student billing inquiries;                                                      Introduction
(2) arranging for use of approved monthly payment plans; and
                                                                                           Palm Beach Atlantic University
(3) sending letters and answering questions regarding employer reimbursement
    programs.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY
This Catalog describes the undergraduate evening programs of Palm Beach Atlantic
University. In pursuing a degree, students must fulfill all curricular requirements,
including the general education requirements of the University as well as those
of the particular major and/or minor field(s) of study for undergraduate evening
students. In every instance, it is the student’s responsibility to be familiar with the
requirements.

General information about the University is detailed in this first chapter of this
Catalog. Information pertaining to the undergraduate admission requirements is
found in Chapter 2, and academic policies and requirements of the University follow
in Chapter 3. For a list of the University’s undergraduate majors offered to evening
program students, see Chapter 4. For information on day undergraduate programs,
see the PBA Undergraduate Day Catalog; for information on the University’s
graduate degree programs and information pertaining to graduate admission and
degree requirements, see the PBA Graduate and Pharmacy Catalog. (See the
Orlando section for academic programs available in Orlando)

NOTICE
The University reserves the right to change any policy, requirement, or fee, with or
without notice; to impose probation; and to require a student to withdraw at any
time. The provisions of the Catalog are not an irrevocable contract between the
student and the University.

Any admission to the University on the basis of false statements or documents is
void when the fraud is discovered, and the student is not entitled to any credit for
work which may have been done at the University. When a student is dismissed or
suspended from the University for fraud, there will be no refund of tuition and fees
paid. If a dismissed or suspended student has paid only a part of his or her fees, the
balance due the University will be collected.

There will be no refund of tuition, fees, charges, or any other payments made to the
University in the event the operation of the University is suspended at any time as a
result of an act of God, strike, riot, disruption, or any other cause beyond the control
of the University.

A copy of the current Catalog is on the PBA website and is available at PBA Central.

Annual Consumer Information Report

Annually, by September 1, Palm Beach Atlantic University prepares, publishes, and
distributes upon request to employees and currently enrolled students, as well as
to prospective employees and students, its Annual Consumer Information Report.
This report contains information required by the U.S. Department of Education of
schools participating in Title IV programs, such as general consumer information
(financial assistance, refund policies, etc.), the annual campus security report, drug-
free workplace information, drug and alcohol abuse prevention information, student
                Welcome &
16   Ch.1
               Introduction      and parental rights under FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act),
                                 various information related to PBA’s participation in athletic programs, availability of
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   employees to disseminate consumer information, etc. Information requirements are
                                 based upon the school’s specific Title IV program participation.

                                 Campus Security Report

                                 Annually, by September 1, Palm Beach Atlantic University prepares, publishes as
                                 part of its Annual Consumer Information Report, and distributes to both employees
                                 and currently enrolled students (as well as to prospective employees and students
                                 upon request) a security report containing:

                                 (1) statistical data on the occurrences of, as well as the number of arrests resulting
                                     from, certain criminal activities on campus and
                                 (2) current policy and procedure statements. This report is prepared by Campus
                                     Safety and Security.


                                 Drug-Free Campus

                                 In keeping with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools
                                 and Communities Act Amendment of 1989, the unlawful manufacture, distribution,
                                 possession, or use of a controlled substance is strictly prohibited within the bounds of
                                 the Palm Beach Atlantic University campus or any properties leased or controlled by
                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University as well as at any PBA-sponsored activities or events.

                                 Reasonable Accommodation Policy
                                 (Americans with Disabilities Act)

                                 The University seeks to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
                                 as well as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 by affording reasonable
                                 accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities. Students who have
                                 questions about their entitlement to benefits or who have grievances under these
                                 statutes should contact the First Year Experience Office, 2nd Floor of Lassiter Student
                                 Center, telephone 561.803.2063, for an appointment with the ADA Counselor.

                                 Sexual Harassment

                                 Sexual harassment is considered to be a serious breach of proper conduct. Engaging
                                 in sexual harassment of employees or students is a violation of Title VII, Section 703
                                 of the Civil Rights Act. Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances,
                                 requests for sexual favors, and other physical and expressive behavior of a sexual
                                 nature in which:

                                 (a) submission to such conduct becomes a term or condition of an individual’s
                                     employment or education,
                                 (b) submission to such conduct becomes a basis for academic or employment
                                     evaluation, or
                                 (c) the conduct creates a hostile or demeaning employment or educational
                                     environment.


                                 All students, staff, and faculty are responsible for helping to assure that the
                                 University is kept free of workplace harassment. Faculty or staff experiencing or
                                 witnessing workplace harassment should immediately notify the Director of Human
                                 Resources. If any faculty or staff member believes that he or she is being harassed
                                 by the Director of Human Resources, the complaint should be brought to the
                                                                                                     Welcome &
                                                                                       Ch.1                             17
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Students should immediately notify the                  Introduction
Student Development office if they are experiencing or witnessing harassment. If any
student believes that he or she is being harassed by a faculty or staff member, the    Palm Beach Atlantic University
complaint should be brought to the office of Human Resources.

Appropriate disciplinary action will be taken against anyone found to have violated
this policy. Persons reporting incidents of sexual harassment, assault, or violence
will be treated with care, concern, and confidentiality. Support, assistance, and
counseling are available.
              Admission &
1   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      ADMISSION AND FINANCIAL AID
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Admission

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University is committed to serving the learning needs of adult
                                 and non-traditional students by offering the opportunity to earn an Associate of
                                 Arts Degree or Bachelor Degree by attending classes in the evening with other
                                 adults. Some of the characteristics that define adulthood are age, employment,
                                 marital status, parenthood, military service, personal independence, and community
                                 service.

                                 PBA strives to maintain a student body which represents a broad variety of abilities,
                                 backgrounds, and career goals. All qualified men and women are welcome to apply
                                 without regard to race, color, age, sex, handicap, religion, or national or ethnic origin.

                                 The Evening and Graduate Admission Office is located in the Enrollment Services
                                 Center Annex. The Evening and Graduate Admission staff is available to meet
                                 with prospective students and help determine which program would fit your
                                 needs based on your educational goals, previous college coursework and work
                                 experience. Prospective students are welcome anytime; although appointments
                                 are advisable to ensure the best service possible. Schedule an appointment by
                                 calling 561.803.2000. (Contact the Orlando Campus for admission to the Orlando
                                 programs at 407.226.5955)

                                 New students may begin evening classes in the fall, spring or summer semesters.
                                 Students can be admitted unconditionally, conditionally, provisionally, or on
                                 probation. For details, contact the Evening and Graduate Admission Office.

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University offers the following evening undergraduate degrees:

                                  •   Associate of Arts in General Studies
                                  •   Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies
                                  •   Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management
                                  •   Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management online
                                  •   Bachelor of Arts in Ministry

                                 For detailed information about evening degree programs, see chapter 4: Programs
                                 of Study.

                                 Deadline for Completing Applications

                                 Applications for the evening programs are accepted throughout the year. Upon
                                 acceptance, a student should confirm his or her intention to enroll with a $100.00
                                 tuition deposit (to be deducted from the cost of tuition). Tuition deposits for evening
                                 programs are nonrefundable.

                                 Admission Requirements

                                 (1) A completed application and a non-refundable $25 application fee.
                                 (2) Official transcripts from all colleges previously attended.
                                 (3) Official High School transcripts or GED Test Scores for applicants with no prior
                                     college coursework.
                                 (4) An interview with an admission counselor.
                                 (5) Writing Skills Assessment administered by an Evening Admission Counselor.
                                                                                                   Admissions &
                                                                                         Ch.2                             1
Transfer Students                                                                                  Financial Aid
The Undergraduate Evening Programs are designed to apply previous accredited             Palm Beach Atlantic University
college coursework towards your degree at Palm Beach Atlantic University.

Transfer course work accepted for credit toward the degree must be completed at
an institution accredited as degree-granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting
commission at the time the course work was completed. Full credit will normally be
given for a course(s) transferred from such an institution if the student has earned a
grade of “C-” or better.

A student presenting transfer credit from an institution that was not accredited as
degree granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting commission at the time
the course work was completed may seek credit validation upon the successful
completion of 30 credit hours at PBA, i.e., 2.0 PBA cumulative GPA or higher. For
planning purposes, an unofficial evaluation of credit will be provided at the time of
enrollment. Only courses, which approximately parallel those of PBA and for which
a grade of “C” or better has been earned, will be considered. Upon the completion
of the residency requirement and satisfaction of the academic progress requirement,
the unofficial evaluation will be validated and the courses will transfer as noted on
the official evaluation. The student must submit written notification to the Office
of Academic Records & Advisement upon successful completion of the residency
requirement. Non-accredited coursework will not transfer to PBA.

Note: Telefaxed documents, both academic and financial, may be used during the
admission process; however, they are not a substitute for originals.

Articulation Agreement:

Evening Program Undergraduate Students in the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry

Any student completing an Associate of Arts degree from Florida’s Community
College System conferred after November, 1992, is guaranteed (1) junior standing
with the application of a minimum of 60 credit hours toward the baccalaureate
degree and (2) recognition of completion of the general education requirements,
excluding GBUS 2813 American Free Enterprise and GCIS 1103 Introduction to
Technology I

Evening Program Undergraduate Students in the Bachelor of Science in
Organizational Management

Any student completing an Associate of Arts degree from Florida’s Community
College System conferred after November, 1992, is guaranteed (1) junior standing
with the application of a minimum of 60 credit hours toward the baccalaureate
degree and (2) recognition of completion of the general education requirements,
excluding GBUS 2813 American Free Enterprise, GCIS 1103 Introduction to
Technology I, and GREL 1013 Exploring the Bible.

International Students

A prospective student who is not a citizen of the United States and is applying to
Palm Beach Atlantic University should make application at least four to six months
in advance of the desired date of entrance, submitting all required materials two to
three months prior to registration. International students must contact the office of
Evening and Graduate Admission.

In addition, the following documents are required by Bureau of Citizenship and
              Admission &
20   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      Immigration Services to be submitted in order that an I-20 may be issued for the
                                 student to enter the country:
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 (1) Financial statement assuming responsibility for annual costs.
                                 (2) Bank statement verifying adequate resources.
                                 (3) Completed VISA clearance form (if transferring from U.S. institution).


                                 International transcripts must be evaluated by Joseph Silny & Associates or World
                                 Education Services (WES), and an official report must be mailed to PBA in order that
                                 foreign credit can be evaluated for transfer.

                                 Non-degree Students

                                 Students may be admitted to PBA on a non-degree basis. An application for
                                 admission must be filed. A student is usually limited to nine hours of study. Should
                                 additional study be desired, full documentation must be received and all entrance
                                 requirements must be satisfied.

                                 Post-Baccalaureate Degree, Non-degree Students

                                 Students holding a baccalaureate degree may be admitted to PBA on a non-degree
                                 basis. An application for admission must be filed. A student is usually limited to
                                 nine hours of study. Should additional study be desired, full documentation must be
                                 received and all entrance requirements must be satisfied.

                                 FINANCIAL INFORMATION¹

                                 2006-2007 Average Cost of Attendance

                                 Main Campus Evening Undergraduate Program **

                                 Based on a two-semester academic year and full-time status


                                                    Tuition and Fees                                   $8,400

                                                  Books and Supplies                                   $1,000

                                                   Housing (average)                                   $5,250

                                                     Meals (average)                                   $5,250

                                                      Transportation                                   $1,500

                                                  Miscellaneous Costs                                  $2,200

                                                 *Total Annual Budget                                  $23,600

                                 *Dependent childcare expenses are calculated on an individual basis
                                 **See the Orlando section for Orlando tuition and fees.
                                                                                                     Admissions &
                                                                                           Ch.2                             21
2006-2007 Fee Schedule                                                                               Financial Aid
Tuition (per semester)                                                                     Palm Beach Atlantic University


          Full time (12-18 credit hours)                               $9,250

                                                                      $9,250
         Overload (Over 18 credit hours)
                                                               +$395 per hour over 18*
*Overload caused by music ensembles are refundable.


Part time (per credit)


                        1-6 hours                                $455 per credit hour

                         7 hours                                 $520 per credit hour

                         8 hours                                 $565 per credit hour

                         9 hours                                 $645 per credit hour

                        10 hours                                 $705 per credit hour

                        11 hours                                 $760 per credit hour

              Evening Undergraduate                              $315 per credit hour

                        Graduate                                 $395 per credit hour

                       Pharmacy                                 $11,450 per semester

          Dual Enrollment (High School)                            $120 per course

              Orlando Undergraduate                              $325 per credit hour

                  Orlando Graduate                               $350 per credit hour

                  *London Semester                             $8,330 +full tuition fees
*Subject to change based on currency exchange fluctuation.


Audit – The rate of tuition for auditing course work depends upon the total number of
credit hours (including audit hours) for which a student registers in a given semester.
If the student is part time, or if the total number of credit hours exceeds 18, then
tuition for audit is one half the applicable per-hour charge.


    Meal Plans (per semester)                     Meal Plan             (6.5%) Tax

      Plan 1 - 7/19 Meal Plan                         $1,695         meals tax $110.18

      Plan 2 - 7/15 Meal Plan                         $1,485         meals tax $96.52

      Plan 3 - 7/10 Meal Plan                         $1,315         meals tax $85.48

       Plan 4 - 7/6 Meal Plan                         $875           meals tax $56.88

   Plan 5 - 60 Block Meal Plan                        $835           meals tax $54.28

Regarding meal plans:

(1) Summer rates are prorated based on current fiscal year rates.
              Admission &
22   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      (2) A reduced number of meal plans are available in the summer.

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Other Fees (per semester)


                                                                Academic Transcript                                                    $10*

                                                               Access Fee (full-time)                                                  $120

                                           Access Fee (part-time, dual-enrollment & summer)                                             $90

                                                               Access Fee (Orlando)                                                     $75

                                                 Accident and Sickness Insurance (annual)                                              $650

                                                            Application Fee (Graduate)                                                  $40

                                                           Application Fee (Pharmacy)                                                   $55

                                                       Application Fee (Undergraduate)                                                  $25

                                                       Applied Dance (class instruction)                                                $45

                                                       Applied Music (class instruction)                                                $85

                                                  Applied Music (one half-hour per week)                                               $195

                                                    Applied Music (45 minutes per week)                                                $220

                                                      Applied Music (one hour per week)                                                $280

                                                    Applied Music (semi-private lessons)                                               $105

                                                                 Arts and Crafts Fee                                                    $65

                                                     Education Courses (listed in catalog)                                              $30

                                                                   Housing Deposit                                                     $200

                                                            Language Arts Course fee                                                    $25

                                               Music Practice Fee (applied music students)                                              $80

                                                Music Recital Fee (applied music students)                                              $85

                                                                On-Line Course Fee                                                     $120

                                                   PBAccess Card Replacement (ID card)                                                  $20

                                                                    Pharmacy Fee                                                        $88

                                       Professional Education Credit (per credit hour awarded)                                          $40

                                                              Science Laboratory Fee                                                    $50

                                                                  Student Teaching                                                      $30

                                                              Training Fee (athletics)                                                  $55

                                 *Transcript fee is waived for alumni and currently enrolled students.
                                 1
                                  Palm Beach Atlantic University reserves the right to change fees and other charges that the Board of Trustees
                                 considers to be in accord with sound management. Financial information for Orlando is in the Orlando section.
                                                                                                    Admissions &
                                                                                          Ch.2                             23
FINANCIAL POLICIES AND SERVICES                                                                     Financial Aid

Account Balances                                                                          Palm Beach Atlantic University


The student is responsible for payment of all charges to the student’s account each
semester. If the financial aid is pending at the time of payment, this could result in
an under or overpayment once the aid is finalized. The student will be responsible
for payment if a shortfall occurs. The University will issue a refund if an overpayment
results. Statements are mailed to the student approximately one month before the
beginning of each semester and monthly thereafter to reflect current activity.

The student’s balance is due prior to the start of each semester and must be paid
in order to complete the registration process. PBA offers two options for payment of
account balances: (1) the student may pay in full each semester or (2) the student
may enroll in an approved PBA payment plan that allows him/her to make monthly
payments. Check with either PBA Central or the Students Accounts Office for
information about payment plans. (Contact the Orlando campus for Orlando student
payment plans.) The student is responsible to review monthly statements to ensure
financial aid changes are addressed by changes in the payment plan set up at the
beginning of the semester.

Note: If the student has a delinquent student account or delinquent student loan
balance, the student will be denied diplomas, official grade reports/academic
transcripts, readmission, financial aid, etc.

Account (Student) Credit Balances

Refund checks representing student account credit balances are processed weekly.
Checks may be picked up at Student Accounts. Checks on hand for one week will
be mailed to the student (or the parent in the case of a PLUS loan) using the mailing
address on record. (Orlando students will pick up refund checks from the Orlando
Campus.)

Account Payment

 • Credit Card: MasterCard, VISA, Discover, or American Express is accepted
    either in person or by calling PBA Central at 561.803.2000 or 888.468.6722.
 • Personal check or money order: Make payable to Palm Beach Atlantic University
    and mail to PBA Central P.O. Box 24708, West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4708.
 • Wire Transfers: Contact PBA Central 561.8032000 or 888.468.6722 for
    instructions. E-Mail: PBACentral@PBA.edu.


Orlando students may pay accounts at the Orlando Campus by check or credit card.

Campus Purchases with PBAccess Card

Funds—by cash, check, credit card and/or approved financial aid—can be placed
on your PBAccess card for purchases or services in the Campus Store, Common
Grounds Café, Greene Complex for Sports and Recreation, Fraser Dining Hall,
vending machines, laundry facilities, etc. by contacting PBA Central or at the ADM
machines located on campus. This request must be completed in writing. (This
service is not available in Orlando.)
              Admission &
24   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      Check Cashing

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   The Campus Store will cash two-party checks—up to $25 per day—as long as the
                                 student account is in good standing and the student presents his or her validated
                                 PBAccess card. The student will lose check-cashing privileges for a minimum of one
                                 semester if two checks are returned for insufficient funds.

                                 Check-In

                                 At the beginning of each semester, ALL students are required to check-in to
                                 have their PBAccess cards (student identification cards) validated/scanned.
                                 This validation must occur before a student is eligible for campus services (class
                                 attendance, entrance to campus facilities, purchases, etc.). Students are required
                                 to produce their PBAccess cards upon request for security purposes. (Contact the
                                 Orlando campus for Orlando check-in procedures.)

                                 Check Return Fee

                                 Any check returned for insufficient funds will be charged back to the student’s
                                 account along with a $25 fee.

                                 Dropping a Course

                                 When a student drops an individual course before the last date of the drop/add
                                 period, (but does not withdraw from the University), the student receives a full
                                 refund of tuition for the course dropped. If the student withdraws from the course
                                 after the last date of the drop/add period, he or she is not entitled to a refund of
                                 tuition for that course.

                                 Financial Aid Awards

                                 First-time students who have applied for financial aid may expect to receive a
                                 financial aid award generally within two weeks of being accepted for admission.
                                 Returning students who have completed the registration process for fall and who
                                 have completed/submitted required financial aid applications/forms may expect to
                                 receive notification of financial aid eligibility by June 15.

                                 Each semester financial aid funds are applied to the student’s account upon
                                 verification of enrollment, receipt of required documentation, completion of the
                                 FAFSA and required certifications, and PBA’s receipt of funds from the funding
                                 source(s).

                                 Note: All awards are estimated and subject to change in response to information
                                 received (e.g., Student Aid Report verification documentation, changes in fund
                                 allocations, and/or receipt of additional aid by the Student Financial Planning Office).

                                 Health Insurance

                                 The school-endorsed accident and illness plan is effective from August 15, 2006
                                 through August 14, 2007 or from January 3, 2007 through August 14, 2007 for new
                                 spring enrollees.

                                 It is important to note that the school endorsed accident and illness policy is strongly
                                 recommended for all students. The school endorsed policy is the primary policy for
                                 PBA health services, therefore, it covers the cost of all physician visits through the
                                 Health and Wellness Center, with no out of pocket expenses. For all students not
                                 on the school endorsed policy, physician visits will result in out of pocket expense
                                                                                                   Admissions &
                                                                                         Ch.2                             25
or a charge to the student’s bill. The school endorsed policy is the only insurance                Financial Aid
recognized through the Health and Wellness Center. Copies of all bills are made
available to students for submission to their respective insurance companies. It         Palm Beach Atlantic University
is also strongly recommended that all international students, or those who have
extensive medical history, or those who do not have any other supplemental or
broad coverage health insurance, carefully review the additional coverage options
endorsed by the university. For more information regarding health services or the
school endorsed insurance plans, please contact the Health & Wellness Center
561.803.2576.

Note: Health insurance coverage is not mandatory for evening students but is
available upon written request. The request to obtain coverage must be submitted by
the end of the add-drop period.

Parking Permits

Vehicles parked in PBA designated parking areas must be registered with Campus
Safety & Security each academic year. If the student parks outside authorized areas,
the student will be ticketed, and the student account will be charged. Parking decals
may be obtained during check-in or from Campus Safety & Security year round.
Overnight parking permits for the parking garage are obtained at Safety & Security.
(Parking permits are not required for Orlando students.)

PBAccess Cards (Student Identification Cards)

All students are required to have a validated PBA student identification card. The
student card must be validated each semester after the student account balance
has been cleared. The card is required for access to campus facilities, check
cashing, and services in the library, sports complex, computer lab, dining hall, etc.
Students are required to produce their PBAccess cards upon request. Identification
cards, new or duplicate, are issued by Safety & Security, and there is a charge
for replacement cards. (Orlando students will receive student identification cards
approximately one month after enrolling.)

Note: If a card is lost or stolen, notify PBA Central or Safety & Security immediately
to have the card deactivated. (Lost Orlando cards should be reported to the Orlando
Campus at 407.226.5955.)

Personal Property Insurance

Palm Beach Atlantic University does not carry insurance on students’ personal
belongings (e.g., automobiles, computers, etc.) and is not responsible for loss or
damage from any cause. Students are advised to review their family’s homeowner’s
insurance policy to determine if personal belongings are insured while on PBA
property. If personal belongings are not insured, students may wish to obtain
personal coverage.

Special Circumstances

If the student thinks he or she has special circumstances that should be considered
in determining the student’s financial aid eligibility (e.g., loss of family income
or request for change in dependency status), contact the Financial Aid Office
561.803.2000. The student will be given information about the process and
documentation needed to have the student’s appeal reviewed by PBA’s Professional
Judgment Committee.
              Admission &
26   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      Student Loans

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   It is very important that the student remembers:

                                  • First-time borrowers at PBA are required to complete loan entrance counseling
                                     prior to the first disbursement of proceeds; and funds are posted after 30 days
                                     to the student account.
                                  • Loans generally have two equal disbursements per loan period.
                                  • Since federal regulations require that PBA complete certain verifications, the
                                     date the student’s lender disburses the student’s loan proceeds to PBA is
                                     usually not the same date the student account is credited
                                  • Generally, the student’s lender will retain up to 4% of the total loan amount for
                                     fees.
                                  • The student account statement will reflect loan proceeds credited to the
                                     student’s account within 30 days of the transaction. Borrowers (students or
                                     parents) receiving Stafford loan disbursements by EFT have 14 days from the
                                     time statements are sent to cancel loan disbursements. Students receiving loan
                                     disbursements via loan checks may cancel their loans by not endorsing the
                                     checks.


                                 Title IV Authorizations

                                 The student must provide signed authorization, as required by federal regulations,
                                 if the student requests that PBA apply the student’s federal financial aid to the
                                 student account balance for charges other than tuition and fees, room (residence
                                 hall or other PBA housing) and board. Acceptance of the financial aid award letter
                                 is verification of this authorization. This authorization form, as well as other required
                                 authorizations, is available in PBA Central or the Financial Aid Office.

                                 Tuition Deposit

                                 A mandatory $100 tuition deposit is required for all first-time students. This deposit
                                 holds the student’s registration and is applied toward the student’s tuition balance at
                                 the beginning of the student’s first semester.

                                 Tuition Reimbursement from Employers

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University will accept direct reimbursement from students’
                                 employers who pay 50% or more of the tuition and fees due. A statement signed
                                 by the employer verifying that the employer will be liable for the tuition must be
                                 submitted to the Student Accounts Office. The student whose employer pays less
                                 than 100%, will need to pay for the balance not paid directly to PBA by his or her
                                 employer or arrange for a loan or a payment plan for this portion prior to check-in.
                                 PBA automatically bills the employer as classes are completed. It is the student’s
                                 responsibility to monitor both the status of this employer-paid tuition benefit and
                                 the status of the student account balance. Any balance overdue by more than one
                                 semester is the student’s responsibility and becomes immediately due.

                                 Those students who are reimbursed directly by their employers will need to apply
                                 for loans or pay the net cost of their tuition and fees. These students may set up a
                                 payment plan with the outside service company the University uses to spread the
                                 payments out over the semester. The loan, payment, or payment arrangements must
                                 be in place before classes begin.

                                 Note: Student account charges and/or financial aid awards may be revised
                                                                                                      Admissions &
                                                                                            Ch.2                             27
throughout the semester if there is a change to enrollment and/or financial aid                       Financial Aid
eligibility. If revision to charges or aid takes place, the student is required to adjust
payment arrangements made at the beginning of the semester. Please call the                 Palm Beach Atlantic University
Student Accounts Office to inquire about these changes. (Orlando students should
contact the Orlando Campus.)

Withdrawal from the University

When a student withdraws from the University, the student forfeits his or her rights
and privileges as a student, including the use of all PBA facilities. Therefore, he or
she will be required to turn in their PBAccess card and key to Safety & Security or
PBA Central.

When a student withdraws from the University he or she must properly complete the
withdrawal process. An administrative fee of $100 will be charged and any housing
deposit paid will be forfeited. The last date of attendance is used to calculate any
applicable refund of allowable institutional charges, including tuition and fees and/or
room and board. Any refund will be determined by the University’s institutional
refund policy in compliance with the Federal Return to Title IV financial assistance
regulations. Funds may be required to be repaid to Federal programs. Calculations
for repayment will be in accordance with Federal regulations.

Undergraduate PBA Students:


                       First week of classes                                 90%

                     Second week of classes                                  75%

                      Third week of classes                                  50%

                     Fourth week of classes                                  25%

                      Fifth week of classes                               No refund

Withdrawal Information for Active Duty Students

PBA students called to active duty in the military reserves or the National Guard
of the United States after the beginning of a semester or summer session have
two options they may consider depending upon their personal situation, the time
remaining in the semester, and agreements which can be made with the dean’s
office of the school in determining their enrollment status with the University. The
student must provide a copy of their orders to PBA Central at the time of withdrawal.

(1) Students may withdraw from all courses in which they are enrolled as of
    the effective date of the orders to report to active duty. When this option is
    selected, a full credit of all tuition, fees, and admission deposits will be made to
    the students’ accounts. Students will receive a pro-rated credit of dining service
    and housing contract charges. Financial aid awards, which were credited to
    students’ accounts, will be used to cover dining or housing charges. Students
    receiving Title IV Federal Funds and state aid will follow the refund policies as
    provided by the agencies sponsoring the aid. These policies may result in the
    student being responsible for repayment of funds to the agencies. Students
    should consult with the Student Accounts Office and Financial Aid prior to
    selecting an option. (Orlando students should contact the Orlando offices.)
              Admission &
2   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      (2) Students may take a grade of incomplete in all courses. There will be no refund
                                     of tuition. The conditions for completing course work and receiving a regular
       Undergraduate 2006-2007       grade should be agreed to between the student, the appropriate dean of the
                                     school in which the student is enrolled, and the Provost. “Withdrawn-Active
                                     Duty” will appear on the student’s records and transcript. Upon separation
                                     from active duty, students may complete the course work without paying any
                                     additional tuition and fees. Students will receive a pro-rated credit of dining
                                     service and housing contract charges. The student’s financial aid will be applied
                                     to the account and the student will be fee liable for the semester’s charges.
                                     Payment arrangements will be made accordingly. Students receiving Title
                                     IV Federal Funds will follow the refund policies as provided by the agencies
                                     sponsoring the aid. These policies may result in the student being responsible
                                     for repayment of funds to the agencies. Students should consult with the
                                     Student Accounts Office and Student Financial Planning prior to selecting an
                                     option. (Orlando students should contact the Orlando Offices.)


                                 If administrative drops or withdrawal are processed, records and transcript will
                                 clearly state “Called to Active Duty.”

                                 Procedure

                                 Students recalled to active duty should notify PBA Central. Fax 561.803.2186,
                                 phone 561.803.2000, or e-mail PBACentral@PBA.edu. PBA Central and the Office
                                 of Academic Records and Advisement will coordinate with the student and Deans’
                                 offices to effect the desired option.

                                 Applicants to PBA who have accepted an offer of admission but who have not yet
                                 registered in a degree program will be permitted to enroll for the next appropriate
                                 semester following their discharge from active duty provided the school to which the
                                 student has been admitted receives adequate notice of the applicant’s intention to
                                 enroll. Application for readmission does not require an application fee. Any pre-paid
                                 admission deposits, tuition, room, or board charges will be refunded.

                                 This policy is applicable to all students registered at PBA. For further information,
                                 contact PBA Central 561.803.2000.

                                 —Adopted October 2001


                                 Campus Store Return Policy

                                 The PBA Campus Store return policy for textbooks purchased by individuals whose
                                 National Guard and Reserve Units have been activated is as follows:

                                 •   All textbooks that are in new condition and in their current edition and are being
                                     used for a course at PBA may be returned for full credit.
                                 •   All textbooks that are in used condition (having underlining, highlighting,
                                     inscribed name or other markings, or whose binding is cracked), and are in their
                                     current edition, and are being used for a course at PBA can be returned for
                                     one-half of their retail price.
                                 •   All textbooks, in resalable condition and in their current edition, that were used
                                     for a course at PBA when the student was activated for service but are no longer
                                     being used can be returned, but the amount of the refund will depend on the
                                     wholesale prices set by the used-book company contracted by the bookstore.
                                 •   All textbooks not in their current edition are non-refundable regardless of their
                                     condition.
                                                                                                    Admissions &
                                                                                          Ch.2                             2
Receipts in these cases are not required for refunds, but the individual must present               Financial Aid
Identification and proof of military service.
                                                                                          Palm Beach Atlantic University
Withdrawal at the University’s Request

Palm Beach Atlantic University may request withdrawal of a student. When a student
is required to withdraw from the University, the student forfeits his or her rights and
privileges as a student, including the use of all PBA facilities. The student will not
be entitled to any refund of tuition or fees, and any unpaid accounts are due and
payable at once.

Furthermore, if the student is required to withdraw at the University’s request
while living on campus, he or she will be required to move out of campus housing
immediately and turn in their PBAccess card and key to PBA Safety & Security or to
Residence Life.

Refund and Repayment Calculation for Title IV Funds

The Financial Aid Office will calculate the amount of the repayment or refund to the
financial assistance programs based on the Federal Return to Title IV guidelines.
Based on Federal regulations, the repayment or refund will be distributed to
programs in the following order: Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PLUS, Pell
Grant, FSEOG, other Title IV programs, and then any independently administered
scholarship or loan program.

Florida State Programs Refund Policy

Requirements of the Florida Office of Student Financial Assistance state that PBA
must return funds to the State in accordance with PBA’s institutional financial aid
refund policy.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Palm Beach Atlantic makes every effort to offer financial assistance through a variety
of programs (federal, state and institutional), to deserving students in, addition to
providing funds on the basis of demonstrated financial need in the form of grants,
work awards, and loans. Students must apply for need-based financial assistance
each year by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Assistance
(FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Financial assistance to help defray educational-related expenses, including tuition
and fees, books and supplies, housing, meals, transportation, personal items, health
insurance, international and other special programs of study, may be provided in the
form of scholarships and grants (gift monies that are not repaid) and self-help (loans
and work-study employment). Loans must be repaid, usually after 6 months of the
day the recipient has graduated, discontinued studies, or dropped below half-time.
Under the federal work-study program, students are provided employment. The
money earned must be used to defray expenses directly related to educational costs.

A student receiving aid at the time of admission may expect to continue receiving
assistance during subsequent years, provided: (a) the student makes satisfactory
academic progress as defined in this Catalog; (b) the need for aid continues; (c) the
student meets the specific requirements of the various scholarship/grant programs;
(d) the University continues to receive adequate federal and/or state aid funds;
and (e) the student files the proper applications. In the event the student fails to
maintain satisfactory academic progress and is denied such assistance, he or she
              Admission &
30   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      may reestablish student financial assistance by enrolling at his or her own expense
                                 and subsequently raising his or her PBA cumulative GPA* and/or meet the rate of
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   progress percentage (credit hours earned vs. credit hours attempted) to meet the
                                 required standard.

                                 *The PBA cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number
                                 of quality points earned by the total number of semester credit hours earned at PBA.

                                 Before an entering freshman, a transfer student, or a student who is seeking
                                 readmission may be considered for a financial assistance award, the University must
                                 first accept him or her for admission/readmission. All University transcripts must be
                                 received and evaluated by the University before a student will be considered for a
                                 financial assistance award.

                                 How to Apply for Need-Based Financial Assistance

                                 Each academic year, students must apply for need-based financial assistance
                                 (federal, state, or institutional) by completing the Free Application for Federal
                                 Student Aid/FAFSA or the Renewal FAFSA on or after January 1. Students may apply
                                 directly over the Internet by accessing the following website: www.fafsa.ed.gov, or
                                 complete a paper application (available from any high school or post-secondary
                                 school).

                                 Internet applications can be completed from any home computer with secure
                                 Internet access, or through Internet capable computers in many libraries and
                                 schools. The Financial Aid Office is committed to serving and guiding students
                                 through the process of applying for aid. Help in completing the financial aid forms is
                                 available from professional financial aid counselors located in PBA Central. Students
                                 are urged to complete and submit applications as early as January 1.

                                 Applications processed after March 1 will be given consideration to the extent of
                                 availability of funds.

                                 All required information should be submitted as soon as possible to be assured
                                 of full consideration for all available aid. Other documents may be required to
                                 complete the application process. These documents are available online at www.
                                 pba.edu. Both offices’ hours of operation are Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 6
                                 p.m. or Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To obtain information on financial aid, students are
                                 encouraged to visit the PBA website at: www.pba.edu, please link to the Financial
                                 Aid web page. Students can check on their status by calling during the specified
                                 hours at 561.803.2000. (Orlando students should contact the Orlando Campus for
                                 financial aid documents.)

                                 Florida residents are required to apply for the Florida Resident Access Grant. If
                                 awarded, the Florida Resident Access Grant is applied to the cost of tuition.

                                 All students are required to maintain good standing at PBA in order to receive
                                 institutional financial assistance the following year. Academic probation or
                                 suspension is cause for loss of institutional aid. Also, students should refer to PBA’s
                                 student handbook.

                                 FLORIDA STATE PROGRAMS

                                 Florida Resident Access Grant

                                 The Florida Resident Access Grant provides a tuition grant to Floridians enrolled in
                                                                                                  Admissions &
                                                                                        Ch.2                             31
private, accredited colleges in Florida. The grant is not based on need. The student              Financial Aid
is required to:
                                                                                        Palm Beach Atlantic University
(1) Be enrolled full time (minimum 12 credit hours per semester);
(2) Earn 12 credit hours for each fall or spring semester the award was received;
(3) Maintain satisfactory progress as defined by the State and PBA (generally, 2.0
    GPA);
(4) Have resided, for other than educational purposes, in the state of Florida for at
    least 12 months prior to registration in a Florida school, exclusive of temporary
    absences due to vacation or study abroad;
(5) Meet all other conditions as required by the Florida Legislature;
(6) Provide final academic transcripts by October 15 for fall semester award or
    February 15 for spring semester award;
(7) Each year the Florida Resident Access Grant application must be completed by
    October 1 for fall semester award or February 1 for spring semester award.


Florida Student Assistance Grant

The Florida Student Assistance Grant is a need-based program available to eligible
Florida residents who demonstrate financial need as evidenced by filing the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). In addition, the student must meet
all conditions as outlined in 1-6 above. Because funds are limited, students are
encouraged to apply (file the FAFSA) by May 15, 2006.

FEDERAL (TITLE IV) PROGRAMS

General Eligibility Requirements

Students applying for assistance from any federal program must file either the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid/FAFSA or the Renewal FAFSA on a yearly basis.
In addition, students must meet general eligibility requirements, some of which
include:

(1) U.S. citizenship or eligible non-citizen status;
(2) Enrollment in a degree-seeking program;
(3) Ability to benefit (being academically qualified);
(4) Having earned a high school diploma or the GED or having passed an
    independently administered exam approved by the Department of Education;
(5) Making satisfactory academic progress;
(6) Not being in default on a student loan or owing a grant overpayment;
(7) Having a valid Social Security Number;
() Being registered with the Selective Service, as required.


Students need not be full-time to be eligible for federal assistance; but must be at
least half time for federal student loans.

Federal Pell Grant

This federally funded grant is awarded to high-need students pursuing their first
baccalaureate degree. The amount of the award is pro-rated based on the student’s
expected family contribution, enrollment status (number of credit hours attempted),
              Admission &
32   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      and the number of semesters enrolled.

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Campus-Based Programs

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic administers federally funded, campus-based programs: the
                                 Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant and the Federal Work-Study
                                 Program. To be eligible to participate, PBA applies each year for funding, a portion
                                 of which must be matched by the University.

                                 Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
                                 (FSEOG)

                                 This grant is for undergraduate students who have exceptional financial need.
                                 FSEOG recipients must be eligible to receive the Pell Grant.

                                 Federal Work-Study (FWS)

                                 The Federal Work-Study program provides employment for students who have
                                 demonstrated financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay educational
                                 expenses. Job openings are available in various campus departments. Students may
                                 apply and interview for available positions. Students are generally employed five to
                                 fifteen hours per week. In addition, a number of positions are available off campus
                                 with non-profit agencies in the community. (When possible, priority is given to
                                 work-study eligible students wishing to be placed with one of these agencies.) The
                                 student’s need, class schedule, work skills, and academic progress are considered
                                 when offering work-study awards.

                                 Federal Stafford Loan Program

                                 Students apply for federally guaranteed Stafford Loans by submitting the FAFSA/
                                 Renewal FAFSA (the results of which determine what portion of the money borrowed
                                 is subsidized and/or unsubsidized) and the Federal Stafford Loan Application
                                 and a one-time Master Promissory Note. On subsidized (need-based) loans, the
                                 government pays the interest while the student is enrolled at least half time. The
                                 student is responsible for the interest that accrues on unsubsidized (non need-
                                 based) loans. The amount a student is able to borrow each year is determined by
                                 his or her academic level, the annual loan limits set by the government, and the
                                 period(s) of enrollment. Repayment begins six months after the student ceases to be
                                 enrolled at least half time.

                                 Loan Entrance Counseling Sessions

                                 Federal regulations require all students receiving a Federal Subsidized Stafford or
                                 Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan to participate in a loan entrance counseling
                                 session prior to receiving the first distribution of the loan. No Federal student loan
                                 can be disbursed until this requirement is met.

                                 A student accepting a loan award for the first time at PBA can complete the loan
                                 entrance requirement by accessing the PBA Student Financial Planning web
                                 page, at www.pba.edu and clicking on to the financial aid link, then to the loan
                                 entrance-counseling link. This will connect the student with an official loan entrance-
                                 counseling site, where the required information will be covered. The student will be
                                 asked to provide certain information, including reference addresses for the future
                                 use. Then the student will print a copy page to retain for his/her records. Students
                                 who prefer an alternative format, or who have questions about loans or the loan
                                 entrance counseling information/process may contact the Financial Aid Office.
                                 (Orlando students may contact the Orlando Campus.)
                                                                                                   Admissions &
                                                                                         Ch.2                             33
OTHER PROGRAMS                                                                                     Financial Aid

Veterans Benefits                                                                        Palm Beach Atlantic University


Veterans may qualify for educational assistance according to their length of military
service. Widows and children of veterans who died or were disabled as a result of
service, connected injury or disease may also be eligible for educational benefits.
Information may be obtained from the Veterans Administration or from PBA’s Office
of Academic Records and Advisement.

Veterans enrolled under the Federal GI Bills PL 358 and PL 634 receive their
allowances directly from the government and pay the fees and charges as do other
students.

WARNING: Students who drop or withdraw from a course may not be paid for the
course unless the circumstances for having to drop the course are considered to be
mitigating circumstances by the Veterans Administration, i.e., circumstances beyond
the control of the student.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Physically disabled students may be approved to receive financial assistance to
attend college for the purpose of vocational rehabilitation. Those who wish to consult
with a representative regarding vocational rehabilitation should contact their local
district office of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services.

Note: The Student Accounts Office coordinates the process.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND
ELIGIBILITY FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Any student who receives financial assistance at PBA of any type (federal, state,
institutional, or outside scholarships/grants) must demonstrate both qualitatively
and quantitatively the ability to do satisfactory academic work and to progress
measurably toward a degree. At the end of the spring semester of each academic
year, the Financial Aid Office evaluates the academic progress of each student
receiving financial assistance. This evaluation determines a student’s eligibility to
receive financial assistance in the next academic year.

In addition, at the end of both the fall and spring semesters, the Office of Academic
Records and Advisement reviews the qualitative academic progress of all degree-
seeking students to determine the eligibility for continued enrollment at PBA.

The satisfactory academic progress standards applicable to students receiving
federal assistance are equal to those standards applicable to students receiving only
institutional assistance. On the other hand, the standards applicable to students
receiving state awards are prescribed both by the individual states funding those
awards and by the institution.

In determining whether or not an undergraduate student is making satisfactory
academic progress in order to continue to receive financial assistance, the following
factors are considered: (1) the PBA cumulative GPA, (2) the percentage of credits
completed/earned vs. credits attempted at PBA, and, if applicable, (3) the sum of
the total credits transferred in plus the total credits attempted at PBA.
              Admission &
34   Ch.2
              Financial Aid      Associate of Arts Students

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   (1) The minimum PBA cumulative GPA requirement is 2.0
                                 (2) The minimum credit completion requirements are as follows: 0 - 24 credit hrs
                                     attempted at PBA 60% completed/earned at evaluation

                                     25-48 credit hrs attempted at PBA 75% completed/earned at evaluation
                                     48+ credit hrs attempted at PBA 85% completed/earned at evaluation


                                 Baccalaureate Students

                                 (1) The minimum PBA cumulative GPA requirement is 2.0
                                 (2) The minimum credit completion requirements are as follows: 0 - 24 credit hrs
                                     attempted at PBA 60% completed/earned at evaluation

                                     25-48 credit hrs attempted at PBA 65% completed/earned at evaluation
                                     49-72 credit hrs attempted at PBA 70% completed/earned at evaluation
                                     73-96 credit hrs attempted at PBA 75%completed/earned at evaluation
                                     97+ credit hrs attempted at PBA 80% completed/earned at evaluation


                                 A student remains eligible to receive federal financial assistance as long as he/she
                                 has not attempted more than 150% of his/her degree completion requirements.

                                 A course withdrawal, a course repetition, a course incomplete, and a noncredit
                                 course are counted in the total credits hours attempted; however, a remedial
                                 course for which no credit is awarded but that is successfully passed is counted as
                                 credit hours completed/earned for financial assistance eligibility purposes. Credit
                                 hours forgiven under PBA’s Academic Policy for bankruptcy will not count as hours
                                 attempted if the student granted bankruptcy earns a 2.0 GPA by the end of the
                                 academic year in which the bankruptcy was granted. However, federal student aid
                                 program regulations make no provision for the concept of academic bankruptcy. For
                                 financial aid purposes, PBA must always include courses applicable to a student’s
                                 satisfactory progress standards.

                                 Definition of completed/earned credit hour at PBA: If a student enrolls in a one
                                 credit hour course outside the major(s)/minor(s) field of study, the student must
                                 receive a passing grade of “A,” “B,” “C,” or “D,” to complete/earn the one credit
                                 hour attempted. To complete/earn the same one credit hour attempted within the
                                 major(s)/minor(s), the student must receive a grade of “A,” “B,” or “C.”

                                 Although a particular program of study may require a more stringent GPA standard
                                 for degree completion (for example, the School of Education requires a 2.75
                                 cumulative GPA with a 3.0 GPA in the major), all students who do not meet the
                                 minimum standard established for an individual program still are afforded the
                                 opportunity to complete degree requirements either by changing the major or by
                                 completing a baccalaureate degree in General Studies.

                                 Probationary Period

                                 Subsequent to a determination at the end of the spring semester that satisfactory
                                 academic progress has not been made, students will be placed automatically on
                                 probation for a period of one academic year. If at the end of the probationary period
                                 the student still does not meet the minimum academic requirements set forth in
                                 this policy, eligibility to receive financial assistance of any type is suspended. Under
                                                                                                    Admissions &
                                                                                          Ch.2                             35
either circumstance, probation or suspension, students receive notification in writing              Financial Aid
from the Financial Aid Office.
                                                                                          Palm Beach Atlantic University
A student who loses financial assistance due to a lack of satisfactory progress is
again eligible to receive financial assistance when he or she meets the minimum
requirements at the end of any subsequent academic year.

Appeal of Financial Assistance Suspension

A student who loses financial assistance due to lack of satisfactory academic
progress may submit a written appeal to the Financial Aid Committee. Under
extremely mitigating circumstances, such as the death of a close relative, serious
injury to the student, serious illness of the student, or other very special/extreme
circumstances, the Committee may grant an appeal. The appeal process involves
the following steps:

(1) The student submits to the Director of Financial Aida letter of appeal and a
    plan of corrective action to the Financial Aid Committee outlining the mitigating
    circumstances that caused the minimum academic requirements not to be met.
(2) The Director of Financial Aid will set up a meeting to counsel the student on
    the plan of corrective action and its impact on successful achievement of
    satisfactory academic progress in order to reinstate financial assistance.
(3) The Committee reviews the appeal and determines whether the appeal should
    be approved.
(4) At its discretion, the Committee may elect to approve an appeal for one
    semester at a time. For example, an appeal may be approved only for the fall
    semester, at the end of which the student may be required to submit another
    letter of appeal for further consideration.
(5) Upon Committee approval of an appeal, the Director of Financial Aid will
    determine those programs for which the student is eligible and will make a
    financial assistance award accordingly


Note: Being granted a probationary year or having an appeal approved due to non-
satisfactory academic progress does not override the minimum GPA and/or credit
hours earned requirement(s) of individual state, institutional, and other programs.

Enrollment Status Requirements

To receive institutional and most forms of state assistance, students must enroll full-
time. Full-time enrollment is not required to receive federal (Title IV) funds.

For financial assistance purposes, PBA has established the following enrollment
categories for undergraduate students:


           Full-time                     at least 12 credit hours per semester

      Three-quarter time                   11 - 9 credit hours per semester

           Half-time                       8 - 6 credit hours per semester

        Below half-time                    1 - 5 credit hours per semester
                 Academic
36   Ch.3
                   Policies      ACADEMIC POLICIES
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Associate of Arts Graduation Requirements

                                 IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO SEE THAT ALL GRADUATION
                                 REQUIREMENTS ARE MET.

                                 Associate of Arts in General Studies

                                 To receive the Associate of Arts in General Studies degree from Palm Beach Atlantic
                                 University, a student must meet the following requirements:

                                 (1) Completion of the General Studies requirements.
                                 (2) Completion of a minimum of 62 credit hours.
                                 (3) Completion of the last 50 credit hours at PBA.
                                 (4) Maintenance of a 2.00 cumulative grade point average. For specified courses
                                     within the approved program of study a grade of “C-” or higher must be earned.
                                 (5) Submission of an Application for Graduation to the Office of Academic Records
                                     and Advisement no later than the first add-drop period of the semester in which
                                     all degree requirements will be met. Priority is given to those students who file
                                     the Application for Graduation the semester BEFORE all degree requirements
                                     will be met.
                                 (6) Approval by the faculty for graduation.
                                 (7) Discharge of all financial obligations to the University
                                 () Applicants who apply for graduation and fail to meet the above requirements
                                     and deadlines will be deferred to a later semester.


                                 Regardless of academic achievement, a student on disciplinary probation may not
                                 graduate from PBA until the probation has been removed.

                                 Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies

                                 To receive the Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies from Palm
                                 Beach Atlantic University, a student must meet the following requirements:

                                 (1) Completion of the General Education requirements.
                                 (2) Completion of a minimum of 65 credit hours.
                                 (3) Completion of the last 53 credit hours at PBA
                                 (4) Maintenance of a 2.00 cumulative grade point average. For specified courses
                                     within the approved program of study, a grade of “C-”or higher must be earned.
                                 (5) Submission of an Application for Graduation to the Office of Academic Records
                                     and Advisement no later than the end of the first add-drop period of the
                                     semester in which all degree requirements will be met. Priority is given to those
                                     students who file the Application for Graduation the semester BEFORE all
                                     degree requirements will be met.
                                 (6) Approval by the faculty for graduation.
                                 (7) Discharge of all financial obligations to the University.
                                 () Applicants who apply for graduation and fail to meet the above requirements
                                     and deadlines will be deferred to a later semester.
                                 Regardless of academic achievement, a student on disciplinary probation may not
                                 graduate from PBA until the probation has been removed.
                                                                                                            Academic
                                                                                            Ch.3                             37
Baccalaureate Graduation Requirements                                                                         Policies
IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO SEE THAT ALL GRADUATION                               Palm Beach Atlantic University
REQUIREMENTS ARE MET.

To receive the Baccalaureate degree from Palm Beach Atlantic University, a student
must meet the following requirements:

(1) Completion of an approved program of study.
(2) Completion of the General Education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in
    Ministry or the Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management Degrees.
(3) Completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours including all major and
    concentration (as applicable) requirements.
(4) Completion of the last 33 credit hours at PBA.
(5) Completion of all major and concentration (as applicable) courses at PBA.
(6) Completion of a minimum of 42 credit hours in courses numbered 3000 or
    above.
(7) Maintenance of a 2.00 cumulative grade point average on all college
    coursework A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned for all courses in the
    approved program of study, inclusive of all major, concentration (as applicable),
    and specified allied course requirements.
() Submission of an Application for Graduation to the Office of Academic Records
    and Advisement no later than the end of the first add-drop period of the
    semester in which all degree requirements will be met. Priority is given to those
    students who file the Application for Graduation the semester BEFORE all
    degree requirements will be met.
() Approval by the faculty for graduation.
(10) Discharge of all financial obligations to the University.
(11) Applicants who apply for graduation and fail to meet the above requirements by
     the specified projected graduation date will be deferred to a later semester.
Regardless of academic achievement, a student on disciplinary probation may not
graduate from PBA until the probation has been removed.

Note: In no case is the completion of two or more majors or other degree
requirements in the course of completing the first bachelor’s degree to be confused
or equated with the completion of two degrees.

Commencement Participation

In order to participate in commencement, a student must have completed all
degree requirements prior to participating in commencement ceremonies and by
the deadline included in the Academic Calendar. Commencement ceremonies for
Palm Beach Atlantic University are held on the weekend immediately following final
examinations of the spring semester and the weekend immediately following final
examinations of the fall semester. It is expected that all candidates for graduation will
participate in commencement ceremonies.

Requirements for Obtaining a Second Bachelor’s Degree

A student who has received a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited
institution may complete a second baccalaureate degree from PBA. It is not
generally in the best interest of a student to complete a second bachelor’s degree.
When a student chooses to do so, the following information is pertinent:
                 Academic
3   Ch.3
                   Policies      (1) The student must earn at PBA a minimum of 36 credit hours beyond the first
                                     degree for the completion of the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry or a minimum of
       Undergraduate 2006-2007       33 credit hours beyond the first degree for the completion of the Bachelor of
                                     Science in Organizational Management.
                                 (2) The student must complete the specific requirements of the major declared
                                     including those within the department of instruction and any allied courses.
                                 (3) The student must complete any specialized general education requirements
                                     associated with the degree sought, including the following: Exploring the Bible
                                     (GREL 1013), Introduction to Technology I (GCIS 1103), and American Free
                                     Enterprise (GBUS 2813).
                                 (4) All of the major and concentration (as applicable) courses within the second
                                     baccalaureate degree program must be completed at PBA.
                                 (5) The last 36 credit hours of the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry degree program must
                                     be completed at PBA or the last 33 credit hours of the Bachelor of Science in
                                     Organizational Management degree program must be completed at PBA


                                 Graduates of PBA wishing to obtain a second bachelor’s degree must apply for
                                 readmission.

                                 Major and Concentration Requirements

                                 Major

                                 Students select one major. Specific requirements for majors are listed in the
                                 Programs of Study chapter for the school of instruction. Some schools offer
                                 concentrations. A student should consult this Catalog or faculty advisor regarding
                                 the viability of selecting a concentration. Students must declare the major(s) and
                                 concentration(s) selected no later than the beginning of the junior year. Courses in
                                 which grades below “C-” have been earned are not acceptable toward either a major
                                 or a concentration. Students changing majors must meet the requirements under the
                                 current catalog year.

                                 Concentrations for the Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management

                                 Concentrations in Human Resource Management, Organizational Behavior, and
                                 Entrepreneurship must include a minimum of 12 credit hours, as specified in the
                                 Programs of Study chapter of this Catalog.. A concentration in Early Childhood
                                 Education Care must include 18-21 credit hours, as specified in the Programs
                                 of Study chapter of this Catalog. Courses taken to meet the requirements for one
                                 concentration can not be used to meet the requirements for another concentration

                                 GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION
                                 Academic Honors

                                 Graduation Honors

                                 Associate of Arts in General Studies and Associate of Arts in Urban
                                 Christian Ministry Studies

                                 Students earning a grade point average of 3.75 to 4.00 are graduated with honors.
                                 The requisite GPAs apply to the cumulative PBA grade point average. A student in
                                 the Associate of Arts in General Studies must have earned a minimum of 50 credit
                                 hours at PBA. A student in the Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies
                                 must have earned a minimum of 53 credit hours at PBA.
                                                                                                        Academic
                                                                                        Ch.3                             3
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science                                                                  Policies
Students earning a grade point average of 3.75 to 3.88 are graduated cum laude;         Palm Beach Atlantic University
those earning a grade point average of 3.89 to 3.94 are graduated magna cum
laude; and those with a grade point average of 3.95 or above are graduated
summa cum laude. The requisite GPAs apply to the cumulative PBA grade point
average. A student in the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry or the Bachelor of Science in
Organizational Management degree programs must have earned a minimum of 39
GPA credit hours at PBA.

Note: Professional Education Credit is not counted toward the 39-hour residency
requirement.

Outstanding Graduate

To be eligible for an Outstanding Graduate Award, the student must have a minimum
3.5 GPA based on credits earned at PBA and meet the residency requirement for
the respective Bachelor’s degree programs outlined above.

Semester Honors

President’s List

At the end of each semester, the President’s List is published with the names of
undergraduate students who achieve a grade point average of 4.00 while earning a
minimum of 12 degree credit hours of coursework. Students who fail a course (F),
who have an incomplete grade (I), or who have a deferred grade (Y) are not eligible
for the President’s List.

Provost’s List

At the end of each semester, the Provost’s List is published with the names of
undergraduate students who achieve a 3.75 to 3.99 grade point average while
earning a minimum of 12 degree credit hours of coursework. Students who fail a
course (“F”), who have an incomplete grade (“I”), or who have a deferred grade
(“Y”) are not eligible for the Provost’s List.

Advising

An advisor is assigned to each student to assist in developing the degree plan for
the student’s academic program and to offer academic guidance. The Office of
Academic Records and Advisement directs the advising program.

Application for Graduation

Students are required to submit an Application for Graduation to the Office of
Academic Records and Advisement no later than the end of the first sub-term add-
drop period of the semester in which all degree requirements will be met. Priority
will be given to those students who file the Application for Graduation the semester
BEFORE all degree requirements will be met.

Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend all class meetings. A student that is absent from the
first class session will be dropped from the course. Students will be responsible for
the work missed due to an absence from any class period or any portion thereof.
The professor will determine the degree which the absence will affect the grade.
                 Academic
40   Ch.3
                   Policies      No student may miss more than 20% of the course and still remain in the course. A
                                 portion of the course grade is based on class participation/attendance. It should be
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   expected that any missed or late appearances to class would affect the grade given
                                 for class participation/attendance and will affect the final grade.

                                 Auditing Classes

                                 Qualified students who do not desire college credit may audit an undergraduate
                                 course with the consent of the professor and by paying the required audit fee.
                                 Auditing is permitted on a space-available basis. Students must register to audit a
                                 course by the add-drop deadline; changes from credit to audit after this deadline are
                                 not permitted. Under no circumstances will a student who has audited a course be
                                 permitted to take examinations or to pay the difference in tuition to receive credit for
                                 the course.

                                 Bankruptcy (Academic)

                                 Currently enrolled undergraduate students, who are able to demonstrate that
                                 extreme personal or financial difficulties contributed to poor academic performance
                                 and who want an opportunity for a fresh start, may apply for academic bankruptcy
                                 for coursework completed at PBA. Students may apply for one of two types of
                                 academic bankruptcy: (1) Deletion of all prior course credits and GPA or (2) Deletion
                                 of one semester of prior course credit and GPA.

                                 If academic bankruptcy is approved, all grades earned during the bankruptcy period
                                 will remain on the transcript with a notation that the student declared academic
                                 bankruptcy; however, credits attempted, credits earned, and quality points earned
                                 will not be included for this coursework. The appropriate form for requesting
                                 academic bankruptcy may be obtained in the Office of Academic Records and
                                 Advisement. Academic bankruptcy may be granted only once and is not reversible.

                                 Note: Many colleges, universities, and other institutions, such as medical, law, or
                                 graduate schools, may not honor another institution’s bankruptcy policy.

                                 Classification of Students

                                 Classification of degree-seeking, undergraduate students is determined by the
                                 number of semester credit hours earned. A student is considered a freshman upon
                                 entry into the University and is classified as a freshman until 30 semester hours
                                 of degree coursework is completed. A student is classified as a sophomore upon
                                 completion of 30 semester hours of degree credit; a junior upon completion of 60
                                 hours of degree credit; and a senior upon completion of 90 hours of degree credit.

                                 Confidentiality of Student Records

                                 The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, affords
                                 students certain rights with respect to their education records. Annually, Palm Beach
                                 Atlantic University informs students of these rights. A student’s rights are as follows:

                                 (1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days
                                 of the day the university receives a request for access. A student should submit to
                                 the Provost, Registrar, Dean of the appropriate school, or other appropriate official,
                                 written requests that identify the record(s) he/she wishes to inspect. The University
                                 official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and
                                 place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
                                 University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the
                                 student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
                                                                                                            Academic
                                                                                            Ch.3                             41
(2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that                                Policies
the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. A student may ask the university
to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. He/she should              Palm Beach Atlantic University
write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of
the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If
the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the
University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his/her
right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information
regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the
right to a hearing.

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information
contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA
authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure
without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.
A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative,
supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law
enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom
the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent);
a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official
committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another
school official in performing his/her tasks. A school official has a legitimate
educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to
fulfill his/her professional responsibilities. Upon request, the University discloses
education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student
seeks or intends to enroll.

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning
alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The
name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance
Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC,
20202-4605.

Course Numbering System

*0-0999           Developmental courses
1000-1999         Designed primarily for freshmen, but may be taken by all students.
2000-2999         Designed primarily for freshmen and sophomores, but may be
                  taken by all students.
3000-3999         Designed for juniors and seniors.
4000-4999         Designed for juniors and seniors

*Courses numbered below 1000 are taken as non-degree credit and will not count
toward meeting the minimum degree requirement of 120 credit hours.

Credit Hours

Credits earned for each course are expressed as semester hour credit. The number
of hours or credits earned will vary according to the specific course. Example: GENG
1103 is a writing course that carries three semester hours credit.

Directed Study

Under exceptional circumstances, an undergraduate student working individually
with a faculty member may complete a course by directed study. Consideration of
requests for directed study originates with the student and must be approved by
the faculty member involved, the Dean(s) of the School(s) and the Provost of the
                 Academic
42   Ch.3
                   Policies      University. Successful petitions must include a copy of the syllabus, which detail the
                                 regular meetings of the student with the faculty member (a minimum of three hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   weekly), a significant writing component, and evidence that the course provides
                                 substantially the same learning experience as the traditional offering.

                                 The following conditions apply: only two courses (6 hours) completed by directed
                                 study may apply toward a PBA degree, and a directed study may not be employed
                                 to repeat a course in which a student has already received a grade of “D” or “F” (at
                                 PBA or at any other college). A student must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher, and the
                                 course may not meet a general education requirement.

                                 Disclosure of Directory Information

                                 At its discretion the University may provide Directory Information in accordance
                                 with the provisions of the Act to include: student name, address, telephone number,
                                 electronic mail address, photograph, grade level, enrollment status, date and place
                                 of birth, major/ minor fields of study, dates of attendance, degrees and awards
                                 received, previous educational agency or institution attended by the student,
                                 participation in officially recognized activities and sports, and weight and height of
                                 members of athletic teams.

                                 A student may withhold Directory Information by notifying the Office of Academic
                                 Records and Advisement in writing within one week after the published beginning
                                 date for a given semester. Request for non-disclosure will be honored by the
                                 institution for only one academic year; therefore, authorization to withhold Directory
                                 Information must be filed annually. Palm Beach Atlantic University assumes that
                                 failure on the part of any student to specifically request the withholding of categories
                                 of Directory Information indicates individual approval for disclosure. Please consider
                                 very carefully the consequences of any decision by you to withhold any category
                                 of Directory Information. Should you decide to inform the institution not to release
                                 any or all of this information, any future requests for such information from non-
                                 institutional persons or organizations will be refused, except as provided for in the
                                 Act. The institution will honor your request to withhold this information but cannot
                                 assume responsibility to contact you for subsequent permission to release such
                                 information. Regardless of the effect upon you, the institution assumes no liability for
                                 honoring your instructions that such information be withheld.

                                 Dishonesty (Academic)

                                 The faculty and administration of the University regard academic dishonesty as
                                 an extremely serious academic offense. A policy has been adopted by the Council
                                 of Deans and the University Assembly to afford guidance to faculty dealing with
                                 instances of academic dishonesty.

                                 Definition of Academic Dishonesty

                                 Academic dishonesty is defined as the intentional misrepresentation of all or part
                                 of one’s work to deceive for personal gain, or assisting another to do the same.
                                 Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, fabrication,
                                 and submission of work, all or any part of which was developed in response to the
                                 assignment of another professor.

                                 Actions Resulting from Academic Dishonesty

                                 Since Academic Dishonesty is related to a student’s class work, the appropriate
                                 response is vested in the professor or an academic administrator, as follows:
                                                                                                       Academic
                                                                                       Ch.3                             43
(1) For academic dishonesty within a class: a failing grade on the work in progress;                     Policies
    for flagrant cheating after warning: a failing grade in the course.
(2) For academic dishonesty representing plagiarism on a paper or project              Palm Beach Atlantic University
    completed outside of class: a failing grade on the paper or project; repeated
    instances of plagiarism after warning: a failing grade in the class.
(3) For flagrant academic dishonesty: expulsion from the University by the Provost
    upon recommendation of the faculty member involved and a verification of the
    circumstances by the Dean(s) of the School(s) involved.


In any case of academic dishonesty, a student’s disagreement over a professor’s
handling of the incident will be regarded as an academic complaint and handled in
accordance with the procedures for academic complaints.

Electives

The student should carefully select electives that complement the desired major.
Electives may be chosen from any of the course offerings in the University provided
the required prerequisites have been met. Students should choose electives
consistent with the degree requirement that 42 hours must be in courses numbered
3000 or above.

Evaluation and Grading Policies

Transcripts

The official academic record for each student is maintained in the Office of
Academic Records and Advisement. A student has access to the record during
normal office hours. A student may receive copies of the transcript for personal use
or may request the transcript be mailed. Such requests must be made in person or
in writing. Copies for current students and graduate are free; copies for all others
are $10.00 each. A transcript will not be released if the student’s account with the
University is delinquent.

Grading Policy

Each faculty member has the responsibility and authority to establish his or her own
grading policy and to provide it, in print, with the course syllabus.

Grade Reports

Final: Within one week after the end of the academic semester, grades are available
in Web Registration for each student who has been enrolled that semester. At any
time, a hard copy of the grade report can be produced by the Office of Academic
Records and Advisement at the student’s request. Requests should be made in
writing or in person at PBA Central. To have grades mailed or delivered to any third
party, a Transcript Release form must be submitted to the Office of Academic
Records and Advisement.

At PBA, undergraduate grades are indicated by the following symbols:

   A      Represents the highest academic achievement and application of
          ability.

   B      Represents achievement of a high but second order.
                 Academic
44   Ch.3
                   Policies        C    Is the grade given to the student who shows average application of
                                        ability or attains an average achievement.
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                   D    Is the grade given to a student whose work is below average. A grade
                                        of “D” is not acceptable in the student’s major and/or concentration(s)
                                        courses and must be repeated for a satisfactory grade. A student may
                                        retake (at PBA) courses for which he or she has earned a grade of “D.”
                                        Only the higher grade will be computed in the GPA.

                                   F    Indicates failure. Students who officially withdraw from the University
                                        after the third class meeting of a course will be assigned a grade of “F”
                                        for each course. If an “F” is given as a final grade, the student must
                                        repeat the entire course.

                                   I    Incomplete-Indicates an unavoidable absence from a final examination
                                        or an excusable failure to complete assignments. The instructor
                                        submits an “I” form to OARA. When the student completes the course
                                        requirements, the instructor will change the “I” to the grade earned by
                                        the student. An “I” automatically becomes an “F” if it is not removed
                                        one month after the end of the semester or sub-term in which the
                                        incomplete was granted.

                                   W    Indicates that the student filed with the Office of Academic Records and
                                        Advisement the necessary forms for withdrawal before the beginning
                                        of the academic penalty period. The student’s last date of attendance
                                        must be on or before the published date for withdrawal

                                  P/F   Pass-Fail Credit. In a course graded on the pass-fail basis, the student’s
                                        grade shall be designated “pass” or “fail.” A grade of “P” or “F” is not
                                        included in the student’s grade point average.

                                   Y    Signifies that the grade has been deferred for one semester because
                                        the requirement was not competed satisfactorily. A grade of “Y” is
                                        not included in the student’s grade point average. A grade of “Y” may
                                        only be assigned to AENG 1103 Principles of Writing or GENG 1103
                                        Principles of Writing.


                                 Quality Points

                                   A    earns 4.00 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   A-   earns 3.67 quality points for each credit hour;

                                  B+    earns 3.33 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   B    earns 3.00 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   B-   earns 2.67 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   C+   earns 2.33 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   C    earns 2.00 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   C-   earns 1.67 quality points for each credit hour;

                                  D+    earns 1.33 quality points for each credit hour;

                                   D    earns 1.00 quality point for each credit hour;
                                                                                                         Academic
                                                                                         Ch.3                             45
                                                                                                           Policies
   D-        earns 0.67 quality points for each credit hour;

   F         earns 0.00 quality points for each credit hour;                             Palm Beach Atlantic University


Calculating the Grade Point Average (GPA)

A student’s grade point average may be calculated by:

(1) Multiplying the credit hours of each course by the quality points earned;
(2) Totaling all quality points earned; and
(3) Dividing the quality points by the number of credit hours earned.


Example:

(1) Credit                         Grade Points                Quality     (2) Total
  Hours
    3          x        A                4                       =              12

    2          x        B                3                       =              6

    3          x        C                2                       =              6

    4          x        B                3                       =              12

    12                                                                          36

(3) 36 total quality points divided by 12 total earned credit hours = 3.00 GPA

Failed Course Policy

Students are permitted to repeat a failed course in their major or concentration (as
applicable) only one time. If a student fails a course in their major or concentration
(as applicable) twice, they will not be permitted to enroll in the course again. Under
special circumstances, the Dean of the School and the Provost may grant an
exception to this policy.

First-Year Student Requirements

Meeting the Requirements in Writing and Technology

Associate of Arts in General Studies and Associate of Arts in Urban Christian
Ministry Studies

A student enrolled in the Associate of Arts in General Studies or the Associate
of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies degree programs must complete
Introduction to Technology I (ACIS 1103), Principles of Writing (AENG 1103), and
Intermediate Composition (AENG 1213) by the end of the first semester (or as soon
as possible thereafter if the student must repeat the course(s) due to failure to meet
the minimum required grade of “C-” in ACIS 1103, AENG 1103, and/or AENG 1213,
or if required, LGA 1093 Fundamentals of Writing). A student enrolled in LGA 1093
or AENG 1103 may not drop or withdraw from the course.
                 Academic
46   Ch.3
                   Policies      Bachelor of Arts in Ministry and Bachelor of Science in Organizational
                                 Management
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 A student enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry or the Bachelor of Science
                                 in Organizational Management degree programs must complete Introduction to
                                 Technology I (GCIS 1103), Principles of Writing (GENG 1103), and Intermediate
                                 Composition (GENG 1213) by the end of the first semester (or as soon as possible
                                 thereafter if the student must repeat the course(s) due to failure to meet the
                                 minimum required grade of “C-” in GCIS 1103, GENG 1103, and/or GENG 1213,
                                 or if required, LGA 1093 Fundamentals of Writing). The student must successfully
                                 complete the above required courses prior to enrolling in an Organizational
                                 Management or a Ministry course. A student enrolled in LGA 1093 or GENG 1103
                                 may not drop or withdraw from the course.

                                 Full-time Student

                                 An undergraduate student who carries a load of 12 semester hours is considered to
                                 be a full-time student. Fifteen semester credit hours are considered to be a normal
                                 class load. Permission from the Office of Academic Records and Advisement must
                                 be secured to register for more than 18 credit hours. Under normal circumstances a
                                 student may not take more than 21 hours in any one semester, inclusive of academic
                                 work completed both at PBA and at any other college or university in which the
                                 student may be enrolled concurrently.

                                 Good Standing (Academic)

                                 A student is in academic good standing only if his or her PBA cumulative grade point
                                 average (PBA GPA) is a 2.0 or higher. (See Probation/Suspension) A student must
                                 be in academic good standing in order to represent the University in extracurricular
                                 activities.

                                 Grade Forgiveness

                                 An undergraduate student who earns a “B” grade (B+, B, B-) or a “C” grade (C+,
                                 C, C-) in a course will not be permitted to repeat the course to raise the grade.
                                 A student who receives a grade lower than a “C-” will be permitted to repeat the
                                 course to raise the GPA by earning a higher grade. The repetition of any course
                                 must be accomplished by taking the same course at PBA. A Directed Study may not
                                 be employed to repeat a course for grade forgiveness. A student may not repeat a
                                 course after he or she has graduated.

                                 Grievance Policy (Academic Complaint)

                                 An academic complaint refers to the grievance a student may have concerning
                                 his or her final course grade. Students may not file an academic complaint for
                                 assignments or issues while the course is in progress. The following procedure
                                 should be followed in filing a grievance:

                                 (1) Once the course has ended and the student has received the final course grade,
                                 the student must take the grievance to the faculty member within the first two weeks
                                 of the first regular semester for students in the traditional semester format. Students
                                 in a sub-term course must take the matter to the faculty member within the first two
                                 weeks of the following sub-term. If the faculty member is no longer employed by
                                 the University, the student should go directly to the Dean of the School in which the
                                 professor taught.

                                 (2) The student may appeal the case to the Dean if conversation with the professor
                                                                                                          Academic
                                                                                          Ch.3                             47
in resolving the complaint proves to be unsatisfactory to the student. It is the                            Policies
student’s responsibility to show evidence to the Dean that the student contacted
the professor within the required two weeks time period. The Dean will review this        Palm Beach Atlantic University
information before continuing the investigation of the complaint. If the student does
not have evidence that he or she has met the two week time frame requirement,
the investigation will not continue and the grade issued will stand. If the student
has supplied the required documentations, the Dean is responsible for arranging
a conference during which he or she will meet with the student and the faculty
member and attempt to mediate a settlement. Prior to the Dean continuing the
investigation, the student must supply in writing the specific nature of the grievance.
Neither the student nor the faculty member will be allowed representation during
any phase of the grievance process. The Dean will keep a written record of the
proceedings, including the recommended solution—which is only a recommendation
and is not binding.

(3) If the complaint involves the Dean in a teaching role, the student must try to
resolve the issue with the Dean. The student has the same two week period in which
to initiate the grievance.

(4) If the Dean is unable to satisfactorily resolve the complaint, the case may be
appealed to the Council of Deans. Such appeal will be heard at the next regularly
scheduled meeting of the Council of Deans.

(5) The Council must be supplied copies of any materials submitted previously,
and either party may augment these materials as desired. All parties involved must
supply any written materials at least two weeks prior to the scheduled Council of
Deans meeting. The Council of Deans will not review any material submitted that
does not follow this guideline. Also, the Dean to whom the complaint was submitted
will provide a summary account of his or her conclusions and recommendations. The
Provost is responsible for gathering these materials and for making them available to
all parties (student, faculty member, and Dean) for review prior to being submitted to
the Council for deliberation.

(6) Both the student and the faculty member will be afforded the opportunity
to present their cases to the Council. Communication to the Council during its
deliberations is the responsibility of each party in the complaint. The presence of the
student and of the faculty member is only for fact-finding. Deliberations based upon
these presentations and the written records of the case are kept strictly confidential
and are open only to Council members.

(7) The Provost and any member of the Council who is a part to the complaint or
who feels that past experience or relationship with individuals involved prejudices an
objective review of the case are excluded from the case.

() The Council will communicate its findings in writing to the Provost within two
weeks of its deliberations. Copies of the findings are provided to both the student
and the faculty member.

() The Office of the Provost is responsible for enforcing the decision of the Council
of Deans. The conclusions and recommendations of the Council are binding upon
the faculty member(s) and the student(s) involved in the grievance.

Independent Project

An independent project is designated within the discipline and involves a student-
proposed project requiring supervised research and writing within his or her major.
Consideration of requests for an independent project originates with the student and
                 Academic
4   Ch.3
                   Policies      must be approved by the faculty member involved, the Dean(s) of the School(s),
                                 and the Provost of the University. Successful petitions must include a copy of the
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   syllabus and/or learning contract, which detail a significant research and writing
                                 component.

                                 Non-Traditional Credit

                                 For the student enrolled in one of the undergraduate evening adult programs, the
                                 aggregate of credit earned by examination and Professional Education Credit may
                                 not exceed 45 credit hours.

                                 Credit by Examination

                                 Advanced Placement of College Entrance Examination Board (AP)

                                 Students submitting a score of 3 or higher on an Advanced Placement test will
                                 be awarded credits equal to those of the course equivalent at PBA. The American
                                 Council on Education (ACE) recommendations will be followed.

                                 College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

                                 Students submitting a score of 50 or higher on CLEP exams will be awarded credit
                                 based on ACE recommendations. Note: Foreign language scores have higher
                                 requirements. Credit may be earned at any time before the student registers for the
                                 course for which credit is being sought, except that no CLEP credit may be earned
                                 during the student’s last 32 semester credit hours.

                                 International Baccalaureate (IB) Examinations

                                 Palm Beach Atlantic (to a maximum of 60 semester hours of combined AP and
                                 IB credit) grants course credit for International Baccalaureate proficiency. Credit
                                 awarded follows ACE guidelines.

                                 Professional Education Credit

                                 Professional Education Credit (PEC) may be awarded to students enrolled in
                                 the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry and the Bachelor of Science in Organizational
                                 Management degree programs. PEC credit may only be awarded for those activities
                                 completed prior to a students’ matriculation at Palm Beach Atlantic University. A
                                 maximum of 45 credits may be earned in this category.

                                 On Campus Degree Programs

                                 Within the first semester, a student seeking credit through non-traditional
                                 professional education credit must make application through his or her faculty
                                 advisor. All work and documentation for non-traditional credit must be completed no
                                 later than the end of the first semester that the student is enrolled.

                                 Online Degree Program

                                 Prior to admission into the Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management
                                 online degree program, a student seeking credit through non-traditional professional
                                 education credit must make application and complete all work and documentation
                                 for such credit.

                                 Specific guidelines may be obtained in the Offices of the Deans of the Schools
                                 of Leadership and Ministry. All PEC credit must be approved by the Professional
                                                                                                         Academic
                                                                                         Ch.3                             4
Education Credit Committee, the Dean of the student’s school, and the Office of                            Policies
Academic Records and Advisement. The student is notified in writing by the Office
of Academic Records and Advisement as to the outcome of the approval of PEC              Palm Beach Atlantic University
credits.

Professional Education Credit may be earned in the following categories:

Professional/Vocational/Technical Transfer Coursework

Transfer coursework accepted for credit toward the degree must be completed at an
institution accredited as degree-granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting
commission at the time the coursework was completed. Full credit will normally be
given for a course(s) transferred from such an institution if the student has earned a
grade of “C-” or better.

The student may be awarded credit for courses considered professional, vocational,
or technical in nature even though the course is not offered at PBA if the course is
determined to be relevant to the student’s degree program.

Professional Schools or Training

Professional schools and training credits are awarded in accordance with nationally
recognized credit recommendations of The American Council on Education (ACE).
The number of credit hours awarded is based on the published ACE guidelines. The
ACE Manual is on reserve in the University Library for student access or a student
may access the ACE guidelines at http://www.acenet.edu/NationalGuide. The
student is charged a fee of $40 per credit hour awarded.

Professional Case Study

The Professional Case Study is an experiential essay that includes academic
source citations related to a particular course of study offered at PBA. Students
may prepare a case study that describes college-level learning achieved through
professional-related experience. A proposal for preparing a case study must be
submitted to the student’s academic advisor prior to the preparation of the case
study. Case studies are read by a faculty reader assigned by the Dean of the
student’s school and then forwarded to the Professional Education Credit Committee
for review. The student is charged a fee of $40 per credit hour awarded. Case
studies earn elective credit hours and do not satisfy required courses in a program.

Probation, Suspension, Dismissal (Academic Discipline)

The record of each student may be reviewed by the Registrar at the end of each
semester or at any other time that such a review seems warranted. In order to avoid
academic discipline, a student must maintain a PBA cumulative grade point average
(PBA CGPA) of 2.0 or higher.

Academic Probation will result if a student does not meet the above requirements.
A student placed on academic probation must raise his or her PBA cumulative GPA
to meet these requirements and, thereby, remove the probationary status within the
next two semesters or be subject to Academic Suspension for one regular semester.
There will be no academic probation at the end of the first semester of the freshman
year. Each semester thereafter, the Office of Academic Records and Advisement
shall notify students if they are placed on probation.

Academic Suspension will result in temporary exclusion from the University for one
regular semester. The student must then reapply for admission through the Office
                 Academic
50   Ch.3
                   Policies      of Academic Records and Advisement. Any student suspended for poor scholarship
                                 and subsequently permitted to register shall be allowed a maximum of two
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   semesters on continued academic probation. Failure within this time to remove all
                                 cumulative quality-point deficiencies will subject the student to dismissal. Dismissal
                                 shall be regarded as permanent.

                                 Academic Dismissal/Expulsion is permanent exclusion from the University. A
                                 student who has been excluded from the University may not use PBA facilities.

                                 Readmission to the University

                                 A student who wishes to return to PBA and continue in the evening program for
                                 which they were last enrolled must file an Application for Readmission with the
                                 Office of Admission in the following cases:

                                 (1) After withdrawal from all courses in a semester;
                                 (2) after non-enrollment for at least one semester;
                                 (3) after suspension; or
                                 (4) after completion of a degree program.


                                 If the student has attended a college(s) since the last enrollment at PBA, an
                                 official transcript(s) must accompany the Application for Readmission. All college
                                 transcripts must be received and evaluated by the University before a student will
                                 be considered for a financial aid award. The student is notified in writing of approval
                                 or disapproval for readmission. A student who has a delinquent account with the
                                 University will not be approved for readmission until the Business Office has cleared
                                 the account. Further, readmission does not automatically restore financial aid. A
                                 student must re-apply for aid and confer with a financial aid counselor regarding his
                                 or her status.

                                 Students who drop out of the University for only one fall, spring, or summer semester
                                 may, upon their return, continue under the Catalog in effect at the time of their
                                 original matriculation. After an absence of two semesters, a student must return
                                 under the Catalog in effect at the time of his or her readmission.

                                 Students who have incomplete records at the beginning of the semester may be
                                 admitted on a provisional basis pending receipt by the University of all transcripts
                                 and/or other credentials. It is the applicant’s responsibility to have these documents
                                 supplied to the Office of Academic Records and Advisement. Until these documents
                                 are received, the applicant will not be allowed to register for classes for the following
                                 semester. No transcripts will be released.

                                 The University assumes no responsibility for the status of provisionally admitted
                                 students since the University has not been able to make a determination of eligibility.
                                 The University agrees to extend provisional admission based upon the applicant’s
                                 representation that he or she has the requisite qualifications for admission.

                                 Upon completion of the applicant’s file, if it should be determined that the applicant
                                 was not eligible to enroll, he or she will be withdrawn immediately.

                                 If the student is withdrawn for one of the aforementioned reasons, a refund of tuition,
                                 if any is due, will be determined in accordance with the existing policy as recorded in
                                 the current Catalog.
                                                                                                          Academic
                                                                                          Ch.3                             51
Registration and Changes in Registration                                                                    Policies
It is the responsibility of the student to register for classes and make any necessary    Palm Beach Atlantic University
schedule changes via Web Registration. An academic advisor or the staff in the
Office of Academic Records and Advisement are available to assist students.
Changes in registration may affect changes in financial aid awards.

Add/Drop is a change in a schedule that does not involve a complete withdrawal
from the University. A student enrolled in one of the evening programs may add
a sub-term course(s) prior to the first class meeting, but not after the first class
meeting. A student may drop a sub-term course(s) prior to the second class
meeting, but not after the second class meeting.

Due to the accelerated nature of the evening adult courses offered in the Bachelor
of Arts in Ministry and the Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management and
the need to ensure that each student obtains the essential information available only
in the first class meeting, a student must attend the first class meeting of a course
to be eligible to continue in a course. A student that does not attend the first class
meeting of a course will be dropped from the course.

No student shall be permitted to add or drop any course later than the published
add-drop date.

(1) If credit hours are increased, additional tuition and fees (if any) may be charged;
    if credit hours are reduced, tuition and fees may be appropriately adjusted by
    the Business Office. Financial Aid adjustments may result.
(2) Each change in a schedule is considered a separate transaction, and previous
    transactions will have no bearing on the calculation of charges.
(3) The last date for adding or dropping a course is specified in the academic
    calendar.


Courses Withdrawal is a change in a student’s schedule, after the add-drop period
that does not involve a complete withdrawal from university.

(1) A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty on or before
    the published withdrawal date set in the academic calendar. This action
    does not take precedence over the issuance of a grade related to academic
    dishonesty. A grade of “W” retains fee liability for the course and does not affect
    financial aid eligibility for the current semester. However future aid may be
    affected. The course remains on the transcript.
(2) If a student enrolled in the undergraduate evening adult program withdraws
    from a course after the third class meeting, a grade of “F” will be assigned.
(3) Withdrawn courses remain fee liable.


Student Identification Card (ID)

All students are required to have a validated student identification card prior to
attending classes. Identification cards must be obtained and validated by Safety &
Security.

Transient Credit (PBA Students)

After attending classes to Palm Beach Atlantic University, undergraduate students
are allowed to take a maximum of nine semester hours at another regionally
accredited educational institution(s). A course taken at PBA may not be retaken
                 Academic
52   Ch.3
                   Policies      at another institution. Students must have these courses approved by completing
                                 an Application for Transient Study. This form can be obtained at PBA Central.
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Permission must be received during the semester immediately preceding the term
                                 or semester in which the student will be enrolled elsewhere. Students enrolled in
                                 their major coursework are not eligible to take courses elsewhere. Grades earned in
                                 transient study count in the PBA cumulative GPA. Note: Students in the Associate of
                                 Arts in General Studies and the Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies
                                 degree programs are not allowed to take transient credit. See Transiet study policy
                                 addendum on page 100.

                                 Transfer Credit

                                 Associate of Arts in General Studies and Associate of Arts in Urban Christian
                                 Ministry Studies

                                 A maximum of 12 semester credit hours may be transferred and applied toward the
                                 degree requirements. The remainder of the coursework for degree completion must
                                 be earned at PBA.

                                 Credit will be awarded for a course(s) completed at an institution accredited as
                                 degree-granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting commission at the time the
                                 coursework was completed if the student earned a grade of “C-” or better. Grades
                                 for transferred courses do not count in the PBA cumulative GPA. Courses taken at
                                 non-accredited institutions are not transferable.

                                 A student presenting transfer credit from an institution that was not accredited as
                                 degree granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting commission at the time
                                 the coursework was completed may seek credit validation upon the successful
                                 completion of 30 credit hours at PBA, i.e., 2.0 PBA cumulative GPA or higher. For
                                 planning purposes, an unofficial evaluation of credit will be provided. Only courses,
                                 for which a grade of “C-” or better has been earned, will be considered. Upon the
                                 completion of the residency requirement and satisfaction of the academic progress
                                 requirement, the unofficial evaluation will be validated and the courses will transfer
                                 as noted on the official evaluation. The student must submit written notification to
                                 the Office of Academic Records and Advisement upon successful completion of the
                                 residency requirement.

                                 Bachelor of Arts in Ministry and Bachelor of Science in Organizational
                                 Management

                                 A student may not receive upper-level credit at PBA for a course completed
                                 elsewhere for lower-level credit.

                                 The number of transfer credits allowed will depend upon the standing of the
                                 institution(s) attended, the nature of the courses taken, and the grades earned.
                                 PBA declines to accept transfer credit of a grade lower than a “C-.” Exception: as
                                 provided for in The Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida Community
                                 College Articulation Manual.

                                 Any student completing an Associate in Arts degree from Florida’s Community
                                 College System conferred after November, 1992, is guaranteed (1) junior standing
                                 with the application of a minimum of 60 credit hours toward the baccalaureate
                                 degree and (2) recognition of completion of the general education requirements,
                                 excluding the following: Bachelor of Arts in Ministry - GBUS 2813 American Free
                                 Enterprise and GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I; Bachelor of Science in
                                 Organizational Management - GBUS 2813 American Free Enterprise, GCIS 1103
                                 Introduction to Technology I, and GREL 1013 Exploring the Bible.
                                                                                                            Academic
                                                                                            Ch.3                             53
Credit will be awarded for a course(s) completed at an institution accredited as                              Policies
degree-granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting commission at the time the
coursework was completed if the student earned a grade of “C-” or higher. Courses           Palm Beach Atlantic University
taken at non-accredited institutions are not transferable. Grades for transferred
courses do not count in the PBA cumulative GPA.

A student presenting transfer credit from an institution that was not accredited as
degree granting by a post-secondary regional accrediting commission at the time
the coursework was completed may seek credit validation upon the successful
completion of 30 credit hours at PBA, i.e., 2.0 PBA cumulative GPA or higher. For
planning purposes, an unofficial evaluation of credit will be provided. Only courses,
for which a grade of “C-” or better has been earned, will be considered. Upon the
completion of the residency requirement and satisfaction of the academic progress
requirement, the unofficial evaluation will be validated and the courses will transfer
as noted on the official evaluation. The student must submit written notification to
the Office of Academic Records and Advisement upon successful completion of the
residency requirement.

A maximum of 67 semester hours of credit may be transferred from all two-year or
community colleges. All major courses must be completed at PBA.

Transfer Students

PBA will accept as transfer students only those in good standing academically,
financially, and with satisfactory student life at the last college attended. Failure to
give full details about any previous college enrollment or other essential information
will result in denial of admission to or expulsion from PBA. NOTE: All college
transcripts must be received and evaluated by the University before a student will be
considered for a financial aid award.

Students who have incomplete records at the beginning of the semester will be
admitted on a provisional basis pending receipt by the University of all transcripts
and/or other credentials. It is the applicant’s responsibility to have these documents
supplied to the Office of Academic Records and Advisement. Until these documents
are received, the applicant will not be allowed to register for classes for the following
semester. No transcripts will be released.

The University assumes no responsibility for the status of provisionally admitted
students since the University has not been able to make a determination of
eligibility. The University grants provisional admission based upon the applicant’s
representation that he or she has the requisite qualifications for admission.

Upon completion of the applicant’s file for admission, if it should be determined that
the applicant was not eligible to enroll, he or she will be withdrawn immediately. If
the student is withdrawn for one of the aforementioned reasons, a refund of tuition, if
any is due, will be determined in accordance with the existing policy as recorded in
the current Catalog.

Withdrawal from the University

Official withdrawal from the University during a semester requires that the student:

(1) Obtain a Withdrawal from University form from the PBA website or submit a
    letter with official signature requesting withdrawal.
(2) Supply all necessary information on the Withdrawal from University form,
    including securing the required signatures.
                 Academic
54   Ch.3
                   Policies      (3) Submit the completed form and student identification card to PBA Central.

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   The date of withdrawal will be the last date of attendance in any enrolled course.
                                 Dropping all classes does not constitute an official withdrawal. The grade of “W” will
                                 be assigned to courses of students who last attend prior to the last date to withdraw
                                 from a class without academic penalty. If an undergraduate evening adult program
                                 student withdraws after the third class meeting a grade of “F” will be assigned to
                                 courses. This includes withdrawal due to suspension and/or expulsion.

                                 A student who completes a semester and does not register for the next semester is
                                 considered to be non-returning, not a withdrawal.
                                                                                                        Programs
                                                                                        Ch.4                             55
PROGRAMS OF STUDY                                                                                        of Study

Degrees                                                                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University

Palm Beach Atlantic University offers majors that lead to the master’s, bachelors,
and associate’s degrees. Evening program associate degree offerings include the As-
sociate of Arts in General Studies, and the Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Min-
istry Studies. Baccalaureate degree offerings include the Bachelor of Arts, and the
Bachelor of Science. Requirements for each major are described within this Catalog
under the section for the particular school in which the major is offered

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (UNDERGRADUATE)
Each student selects one major. Courses in which grades below “C-” have been
earned are not acceptable toward a major, concentration (as applicable), or speci-
fied general education courses.

Some departments offer concentrations. A student should consult the Catalog or his
or her faculty advisor regarding the viability of selecting a concentration.

Associate of Arts
General Studies
Urban Christian Ministry Studies

Bachelor of Arts
Ministry

Bachelor of Science
Organizational Management

CATHERINE T. MACARTHUR SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP
James A. Laub, Professor of Leadership, Dean
Joanne Eckler, Associate Professor of Education, Associate Dean

Professor Gordon Eisenman
Professor Art Johnson
Professor David R. Miller
Associate Professor Geneane Kelley-Miller
Associate Professor Nicholas V. Palmieri
Assistant Professor Dale Dan
Assistant Professor Denise Douglas-Brown
Assistant Professor James Kolacek
Assistant Professor Thomas Miller
Assistant Professor Carmela Nanton
Assistant Professor Pamela Payne
Assistant Professor J. Kris Pratt
Assistant Professor Pamela Sigafoose
Assistant Professor Linda M. Smith
Assistant Professor Tommy Weir
Instructor Carl Donner

MISSION AND PURPOSE STATEMENT
The Catherine T. MacArthur School of Leadership exists to serve adult learners,
providing an opportunity to earn Associate of Arts in General Studies, Bachelor
                  Programs
56   Ch.4
                   of Study      of Science in Organizational Management (on campus and online), and Master
                                 of Science in Organizational Leadership degrees within Palm Beach Atlantic
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   University’s Christian liberal arts tradition. This program is designed to meet the
                                 unique needs of working adults. Additionally, it provides the opportunity to integrate
                                 academic knowledge with personal and professional experience through the
                                 development of critical thinking skills and the use of experiential learning. The school
                                 promotes the development of management and leadership skills and Christian values
                                 through the integration of faith and learning to enable the student to serve more
                                 effectively in the workplace, family, community, and multicultural environments. The
                                 mission of the MacArthur School is to TEACH with a Christian Spirit, TRANSFORM
                                 the lives of adult students, and FOSTER lifelong learning.

                                 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN GENERAL STUDIES
                                 Introduction

                                 The Associate of Arts in General Studies degree program provides adult learners
                                 an opportunity to earn a two-year degree within Palm Beach Atlantic University’s
                                 Christian liberal arts tradition. The program is designed to meet the unique needs of
                                 working adults. It also provides an opportunity to integrate academic knowledge with
                                 professional and life experience. The degree program also promotes Christian values
                                 through the integration of faith and learning and the development of skills which can
                                 allow students to serve more effectively in the community, workplace, family, and
                                 multicultural environments.

                                 The overall goal of the AA program is to offer a comprehensive general studies cur-
                                 riculum that:

                                  • Affirms Christian values and beliefs and encourages personal spiritual
                                     development;
                                  • Encourages students to be critically reflective, self-directed, life-long learners;
                                  • Develops college-level written and oral communication skills;
                                  • Enables students to build a foundation of liberal arts courses that will prepare
                                     them for career advancement and further study;
                                  • Develops expertise in the use of technology for educational and professional
                                     purposes;
                                  • Empowers students to work effectively as individuals and team members in a
                                     multicultural environment.


                                 The Associate of Arts in the General Studies program is for adult students. Some
                                 of the characteristics that define adulthood are age, employment, marital status,
                                 parenthood, military service, personal independence, and community service.
                                 Rather than attending classes with recent high school graduates, AA students learn
                                 alongside others who have similar goals and interests. AA students may have already
                                 earned some college credit, which will be evaluated for transfer into the AA program.
                                 A maximum of 12 semester credit hours may be transferred and applied toward the
                                 degree requirements. The remainder of the coursework for degree completion must
                                 be earned at PBA.

                                 Students entering the AA program must provide either evidence of high school
                                 graduation or a GED, transcripts from all colleges attended, complete a writing skills
                                 assessment to be evaluated by a MacArthur School Writing Center Instructor, and
                                 be interviewed by an admissions counselor. Note: Based on the writing skills assess-
                                 ment, a student may be required to complete a pre-college course if test scores or
                                                                                                         Programs
                                                                                         Ch.4                             57
placement criteria indicate a need for skills development. A minimum grade of “C-”                        of Study
must be earned.
                                                                                         Palm Beach Atlantic University
Course Structure

The required curriculum is provided through four-hour evening class sessions twice
each week. The courses are seven weeks in length. Classes are designed for the
convenience of adult learners. Taught in seminar or workshop style, class content is
centered on a curriculum of general studies in the liberal arts. The courses are to be
taken in the sequence indicated in the degree plan.

Associate of Arts in General Studies 62 Credit Hours

Biblical Studies                                                                     6
AAA 2993       Organizational Ethics (Capstone Course)
AREL 1013      Exploring the Bible
Communication                                                                      21
AAA 1003       Skills for Professional Transition
ACIS 1103      Introduction to Technology I
ACIS 1203      Introduction to Technology II
ACOM 1203      Oral Communication
ACOM 2913      Organizational Communication
AENG 1103      Principles of Writing*
AENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
*Students may be required to complete a pre-college level course if test scores
or placement criteria indicate a need for skills development. A minimum grade of
“C-” is required.
Humanities & Social Science                                                        27
ABUS 2813      American Free Enterprise
AENG 2173      Foundations of British Literature
AENG 2513      Foundations of American Literature
AHIS 1313      Western Civilization I
AHIS 2413      Western Civilization II
AHUM 2313      Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)
APLS 1343      American Federal Government
APSY 2133      General Psychology
APSY 2533      Social Psychology
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE:                                                             6
AMAT 1803      Finite Mathematics
ASCI 1333      Introduction to Natural Science
ORIENTATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION:                                                  2
AAA 1001       Orientation AA General Studies
APHE 1091      Lifetime Fitness
                  Programs
5   Ch.4
                   of Study      BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ORGANIZATIONAL
                                 MANAGEMENT
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 Introduction

                                 The Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management (ORM) program provides
                                 adult learners an opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in management theory
                                 and practice within Palm Beach Atlantic University’s Christian liberal arts tradition.
                                 This program is designed to meet the unique needs of working adults. Additionally,
                                 it provides the opportunity to integrate academic knowledge with personal and
                                 professional experience through the development of critical thinking skills and the
                                 use of experiential learning. The degree program also promotes Christian values
                                 through the integration of faith and learning, and the development of managerial
                                 and leadership skills so that students can serve more effectively in the community,
                                 workplace, family, and multicultural environments.

                                 The overall goal of the Organizational Management program is to offer a quality,
                                 flexible degree-completion curriculum that:

                                  • Affirms Christian values and beliefs;
                                  • Equips students to utilize leadership, management, and human relations
                                    principles;
                                  • Develops written and oral communication skills;
                                  • Instills a commitment to be critically reflective, self-directed, life-long learners;
                                  • Promotes an appreciation of the multicultural environment in which students live
                                    and work;
                                  • Helps students better adapt to technological and cultural change; and
                                  • Empowers students to work effectively as individuals and as team members.


                                 The ORM program is for adults. Some of the characteristics that define adulthood
                                 are age, employment, marital status, parenthood, military service, personal
                                 independence, and community service. Rather than attending classes with recent
                                 high school graduates, ORM students learn alongside others who have similar goals
                                 and interests.

                                 Ideally, ORM students should have already earned an associate’s degree or at least
                                 60 semester hours of college-level credit. However, students with fewer credits may
                                 be admitted to the ORM program. All outstanding General Education courses must
                                 be completed prior to beginning the ORM major courses.

                                 Students entering the ORM program must provide either evidence of high school
                                 graduation or a GED, transcripts from all colleges attended, be interviewed by an
                                 ORM admissions counselor, and complete a writing skills assessment to be evaluated
                                 by a MacArthur School Writing Center Instructor. Note: Based on the writing skills
                                 assessment a student may be required to complete a pre-college course if test
                                 scores or placement indicates a need for skills development. A minimum grade of
                                 “C-” must be earned. A student that has already completed the two required writing
                                 courses prior to admission into the ORM program may be required to complete
                                 an additional writing course: ORM 3363 Expository Writing. This course would be
                                 applied toward the required electives for the degree. A minimum grade of “C-” must
                                 be earned.

                                 Regular admission will be offered to a student with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on all
                                 attempted hours. Probationary admission may be offered to a student with a GPA of
                                                                                                       Programs
                                                                                       Ch.4                             5
less than 2.0. An academic hold will be placed on the academic record of a student                      of Study
entering PBA with a GPA less than 2.0. A student on probationary status must earn
a minimum GPA of 2.0 during their first semester of enrollment at PBA. A student       Palm Beach Atlantic University
who fails in their first semester of enrollment to achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 will
be placed on academic suspension for one semester.

Course Structure

On Campus

The required curriculum is provided through four-hour, weekly evening class
sessions and/or weekend class sessions. The general education courses are seven
weeks in length and the major core courses are five weeks in length. The major
elective courses are five weeks in length with the exception of the Early Childhood
Education and Care courses which are seven weeks in length. Classes are designed
for the convenience of adult learners. Taught in seminar or workshop style, class
content is centered on organizational behavior, leadership, and interpersonal and
problem-solving techniques. The nine ORM major (CORE) courses must be taken
at PBA and must be completed in sequence.

Online

The required curriculum is provided through distance-learning class sessions with
ample opportunity for both synchronous and asynchronous communication between
faculty and fellow students. The general education courses offered are seven weeks
in length and the major courses are five weeks in length. Classes are designed for
the convenience of adult learners. The class content is centered on organizational
behavior, leadership, interpersonal, and problem-solving techniques. The nine ORM
major courses must be taken at PBA and must be completed in sequence.

Bachelor of Science – Major in Organizational Management
120 Credit Hours On Campus Program

Prerequisites for all courses:
GCIS 1103      Introduction to Technology I
GENG 1103      Principles of Writing
GENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
General Education Requirements                                                    41
All General Education courses must be completed prior to beginning the ORM
major courses (Electives and CORE) OR be registered for any outstanding General
Education course prior to beginning the ORM major courses (CORE and Electives).
Biblical Studies                                                                   3
GREL 1013      Exploring the Bible
Communication                                                                     12
GCIS 1103      Introduction to Technology I
GCOM 1203      Oral Communication
GENG 1103      *Principles of Writing
GENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
*Note: Student may be required to complete a pre-college course if test scores or
placement indicates a need for skills development.
Humanites & Social Science                                                        1
                  Programs
60   Ch.4
                   of Study      GBUS 2813     American Free Enterprise
                                 GENG 2XX3     Any 2000 level or above literature course
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 GHUM 2313     Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)
                                 Select one of the following GHIS courses:
                                 GHIS 1313     Western Civilization I
                                 GHIS 2413     Western Civilization II
                                 GPLS 1343     American Federal Government
                                 Select one of the following GPSY courses:
                                 GPSY 2133     General Psychology
                                 GPSY 2533     Social Psychology
                                 Mathematics & Science                                                            6
                                 GSCI 1333     Introduction to Natural Science
                                 GMAT 1803     Finite Mathematics or higher
                                 Physical Education & Orientation                                                 2
                                 GORM 1001     Orientation Organizational Management
                                 GPHE 1091     Lifetime Fitness 1 credit hour
                                 Required Major (CORE) Courses                                                   27
                                 The major CORE courses must be completed at PBA and must be completed in
                                 sequence.
                                 ORM 3013      Group and Organizational Behavior
                                 ORM 3023      Inquiry and Analysis
                                 ORM 3033      Writing for Organizational Management
                                 ORM 3143      Organizational Management
                                 ORM 3153      Organizational Leadership
                                 ORM 4063      Effective Interpersonal Relationships
                                 ORM 4073      Budget and Analysis
                                 ORM 4183      Human Resource Management
                                 ORM 4293      Values: Personal and Social (Capstone Course)
                                 Required ORM Elective Courses                                                    6
                                 The successful completion of two three-credit hour ORM elective courses
                                 beyond the 27 credit hours of the major CORE curriculum is required. The two
                                 elective courses must be completed at PBA from the broad subject areas of the
                                 curriculum offered within the MacArthur School.
                                 ORM XXX3      ORM Upper-Level Elective
                                 ORM XXX3      ORM Upper-Level Elective
                                 General Electives and/or Professional Education Credit (PEC)                    46
                                 A minimum of 9 credit hours of general electives and/or Professional Credit (PEC)
                                 must be upper-level in order to meet the 42 credit hour upper-level requirement.
                                 Professional Education Credit
                                                                                                          Programs
                                                                                          Ch.4                             61
Within the first semester, a student seeking credit through non-traditional                                of Study
professional education credit must make application through his or her faculty
advisor. All work and documentation for non-traditional credit must be completed          Palm Beach Atlantic University
no later than the end of the first semester that the student is enrolled. (Refer to the
Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog for more details.)
Concentration Options
Students earning a major in Organizational Management may elect to take
a concentration in Human Resource Management, Organizational Behavior,
Entrepreneurship, and/or Early Childhood Education and Care. Each student who
intends to earn a concentration(s) must declare that intention no later than the
end of the second semester in the major. A form is provided for concentration
declaration. An individual course may only be used to complete the requirement for
one concentration.
Concentration in Human Resource Management
Select four of the following elective courses:
ORM 4153       Study in HR Law (Required)
ORM 3203       Exploring Consulting in HRD/OD
ORM 3213       Introduction to Adult Education and Human Resource
               Development
ORM 3223       Career Assessment and Planning
ORM 3283       Mediating Organizational Conflict
ORM 3323       Employee Assistance Programs
ORM 3353       Adult Development
ORM 3373       Cultural Studies and the Workplace
ORM 4023       Balancing Work and Life
ORM 4033       Faith and Culture
Concentration in Organizational Behavior
Select four of the following elective courses:
ORM 3213       Introduction to Adult Education and Human Resource
               Development (Required)
ORM 3223       Career Assessment and Planning
ORM 3243       Counseling Methodologies
ORM 3253       Theories of Personality
ORM 3273       Strategies for Personal Success
ORM 3283       Mediating Organizational Conflict
ORM 3353       Adult Development
ORM 3373       Cultural Studies and the Workplace
ORM 4033       Faith and Culture
Concentration in Entrepreneurship
Select four of the following elective courses:
ORM 3313       Entrepreneurship (Required)
ORM 3203       Exploring Consulting in HRD/OD
ORM 3233       Contemporary Issues in Business
ORM 3273       Strategies for Personal Success
                  Programs
62   Ch.4
                   of Study      ORM 3293       Basic Investment Skills
                                 ORM 3333       Organization of the Future
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 Concentration in Early Childhood Education & Care
                                 The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) concentration offers working
                                 professionals the opportunity to complete a bachelor’s degree and the courses
                                 necessary to become an effective preschool teacher, or to move into a leadership
                                 position in early childcare and management. This concentration incorporates all
                                 requirements necessary to obtain both the Foundational and Director’s Credentials
                                 necessary for early childcare administration.
                                 The following six courses are required:
                                 EDU 3023       Issues and Practices to Promote Family and Community
                                                Involvement
                                 EDU 3213       Social Foundations of Early Childhood Education
                                 EDU 3283       Early Childhood Guidance
                                 EDU 3293       Early Childhood Education Programs
                                 EDU 4193       Health Environment in the Elementary School
                                 EDU 4283       Exceptional Students in the Classroom
                                 Director’s Credentials
                                 For those students desiring to obtain Director’s credentialing, the following course
                                 meets the requirements for the Advanced Director’s credentials. While not required
                                 for the ORM concentration in Early Childhood Education and Care, the student may
                                 wish to add this course to his or her program.
                                 EDU 2113       Foundation of Child Care and Education Program
                                                Administration (Offered Online Only)


                                 Bachelor of Science – Major in Organizational Management
                                 120 Credit Hours Online Program

                                 Pre-Admission Requirements                                                        6
                                 General Education Requirements                                                     31
                                 The following general education courses or transfer equivalent must be completed
                                 prior to entering the online program:
                                 These courses are offered in our on-campus program.
                                 Communication                                                                       
                                 GCOM 1203      Oral Communication
                                 GENG 1103      Principles of Writing
                                 GENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
                                 Humanities & Social Science                                                       15
                                 GENG 2XX3      Any 2000 Level or above Literature Course
                                 GHUM 2313      Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)
                                 Select one of the following GHIS courses:
                                 GHIS 1313      Western Civilization I
                                 GHIS 2413      Western Civilization II
                                 GPLS 1343      American Federal Government
                                 Select one of the following GPSY courses:
                                                                                                 Programs
                                                                                 Ch.4                             63
GPSY 2133     General Psychology                                                                  of Study
GPSY 2533     Social Psychology
                                                                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University
Mathematics & Science                                                        6
GSCI 1333     Introduction to Natural Science
GMAT 1803     Finite Mathematics or higher
Physical Education                                                           1
GPHE 1091     Lifetime Fitness (1 credit hour)
General Electives and/or Professional Education Credit (PEC)                37
Online Degree Completion Requirements                                       52
General Education Requirements                                              10
EBUS 2813     American Free Enterprise
ECIS 1103     Introduction to Technology I
EREL 1013     Exploring the Bible
EORM 1001     Orientation Organizational Management
Required Major (CORE) Courses                                               27
The major CORE courses must be completed in sequence.
EORM 3013     Group and Organizational Behavior
EORM 3023     Inquiry and Analysis
EORM 3033     Writing for Organizational Management
EORM 3143     Organizational Management
EORM 3153     Organizational Leadership
EORM 4063     Effective Interpersonal Relationships
EORM 4073     Budget and Analysis
EORM 4183     Human Resource Management
EORM 4293     Values: Personal and Social (Capstone Course)
Required ORM Elective Courses                                                6
The successful completion of two three-credit hour ORM elective courses beyond
the 27 credit hours of the major CORE curriculum is required.
EORM XXX3     ORM Upper-Level Elective
EORM XXX3     ORM Upper-Level Elective
42 Upper-Level Credit Hour Requirement Completion                            
Courses numbered 3000 level or above.
EORM XXX3     ORM Upper-Level Elective
EORM XXX3     ORM Upper-Level Elective
EORM XXX3     ORM Upper-Level Elective


THE SCHOOL OF MINISTRY
E. Randolph Richards, Dean

Professor Gerald Wright
Associate Professor Paul Copan
Associate Professor Carl Smith
                  Programs
64   Ch.4
                   of Study      Associate Professor Terriel Byrd
                                 Associate Professor Velmarie Albertini
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Associate Professor Victor Copan
                                 Assistant Professor Frank Patrick
                                 Assistant Professor Karelynne Ayayo

                                 The mission of the School of Ministry is to prepare students for and to engage
                                 students in Christian ministry. The School of Ministry serves students in this mission
                                 by offering a variety of academic and professional programs of study. In each of
                                 these programs the School of Ministry’s primary objective is to assist students in
                                 developing the essential knowledge and vocational skills for effectiveness in the
                                 practice of ministry.

                                 For both the University and the larger Christian community, the School of Ministry
                                 advocates life-long, Christ-centered learning, promotes Christian service through the
                                 church and community, and equips men and women to integrate Christian belief and
                                 practice into every aspect of life.

                                 Each student who completes a program of study within the School of Ministry
                                 should:

                                 (1) Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the biblical, theological, historical, and
                                     practical dimensions of the Christian faith.
                                 (2) Possess the skills to provide Christian leadership in a specific area of the
                                     church’s ministry.
                                 (3) Display an understanding of the religious beliefs of people of diverse ethnic,
                                     racial, and cultural backgrounds.
                                 (4) Express a commitment to share the gospel of Christ with others through
                                     personal witness and missions involvement.
                                 (5) Articulate a coherent Christian apologetic in the midst of a secular culture.
                                 (6) Perform successfully at the graduate, seminary, or divinity school level in cases
                                     where further studies are pursued.
                                 (7) Evidence growth toward Christian maturity by engaging in the practice of
                                     spiritual disciplines.


                                 In order to fulfill these objectives, the School of Ministry offers the Associate of Arts
                                 in Urban Christian Ministry Studies and the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry.

                                 Note: GREL 1013 Exploring the Bible is not required for Ministry majors.

                                 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN URBAN CHRISTIAN MINISTRY
                                 STUDIES
                                 Introduction

                                 The Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies exists to educate and
                                 minister to a diversity of adult students for the purpose of developing servant leaders
                                 with the ultimate goal of transforming society for the Kingdom of Christ. The UCMS
                                 program addresses the needs of the urban Christian community using programs that
                                 are marked for excellence and anchored in the historical evangelical, Christian faith.
                                 The curriculum is rooted in the liberal arts and science, vocationally focused, and
                                 delivered through traditional and innovative programs. The overall goals of the UCMS
                                 program are to:
                                                                                                              Programs
                                                                                              Ch.4                             65
 • Equip students biblically, theologically, and sociologically for effective ministry                         of Study
   within an urban context;
 • Aid in the formation, strengthening, and multiplication of healthy churches and            Palm Beach Atlantic University
   para-church ministries in the urban community;
 • Foster dialogue and cooperation among urban churches and para-church
   ministries that promote transformation and restoration in an urban Christian
   context; and
 • Provide a biblical perspective and understanding of justice issues that can be
   applied to life and ministry in the inner city.


Course Structure

The curriculum for the major is made up of three credit hour courses that are taught
during evening class sessions, four hours in duration and meeting once a week.
Classes are designed for the convenience of adult learners and are taught in seminar
or workshop style. Admissions personnel will provide a recommended course
sequence for the program.

Associate of Arts in Urban Ministry Studies General
Education 65 Credit Hours

Biblical Studies                                                                         3
GREL 1013      Exploring the Bible
Communication                                                                            12
GCIS 1103      Introduction to Technology I
GCOM 1203      Oral Communication
GENG 1103      Principles of Writing
GENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
Students may be required to complete a pre-college course if test scores or
placement indicates a need for skills development.
Humanities & Social Science                                                              1
GBUS 2813      American Free Enterprise
GENG XXX3      Any 2003 Level or Above Literature Course
Select one of the following GHIS courses:
GHIS 1313      Western Civilization I
GHIS 2413      Western Civilization II
GHUM 2313      Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)
GPLS 1343      American Federal Government
Select one of the following GPSY Courses:
GPSY 2133      General Psychology
GPSY 2533      Social Psychology
Mathematics & Science                                                                    6
GSCI 1333      Introduction to Natural Science
GMAT 1803      Finite Mathematics or higher
Physical Education & Orientation                                                         2
GPHE 1091      Lifetime Fitness
                  Programs
66   Ch.4
                   of Study      UCMS 1001      Urban Christian Ministry Studies Orientation
                                 Urban Christian Ministry Studies                                                       24
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 UCMS 1003      Urban Christian Leadership and Church Organization
                                 UCMS 1013      Urban Preaching and Pastoral Care
                                 UCMS 1023      Church and Urbanization
                                 UCMS 1033      Social Justice
                                 UCMS 1043      Church Music and Worship Formation
                                 UCMS 1053      Introduction to Urban Youth Ministry
                                 UCMS 2003      Evangelism and Missions within an Urban Context
                                 UCMS 2013      Practicum in Ethnicity and Inter-group Relations


                                 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MINISTRY
                                 The Bachelor of Arts in Ministry program at Palm Beach Atlantic University
                                 specifically seeks to meet the education and ministry preparation needs of bi-
                                 vocational ministers, church leaders, and interested adults. The Bachelor of Arts in
                                 Ministry program provides the unique opportunity to combine academic knowledge
                                 with personal and professional experience in the preparation of ministry. Through a
                                 focus on biblical, historical, theological, and practical studies, the Bachelor of Arts in
                                 Ministry program strives to equip men and women for service in local churches and
                                 other ministries and for continued contributions to family, work environments, and
                                 community.

                                 Program Structure

                                 Students enrolled in the B.A. in Ministry program will follow the General Education
                                 core requirements of the Catherine T. MacArthur School of Leadership. The one
                                 exception is that B.A. in Ministry students are not required to take GREL 1013
                                 Exploring the Bible. While the B.A. in Ministry degree is administered by the School
                                 of Ministry, the General Education curriculum presented within the MacArthur
                                 School of Leadership serves as the ideal opportunity for adult students to complete
                                 general education requirements while maintaining full time employment. The
                                 Catherine T. MacArthur School of Leadership General Education curriculum is
                                 included below.

                                 B.A. in Ministry students are also required to take GMIN 1001, Orientation Ministry.
                                 This practical, one-hour course is designed to acquaint students with the unique
                                 features and offerings of the evening ministry program, including curriculum design
                                 and requirements, technology, advising, remediation, Professional Education Credits
                                 (PEC’s), as well as the support structures and logistics of Palm Beach Atlantic
                                 University.

                                 To qualify for graduation, students must earn a minimum of 120 credits, with a
                                 minimum of 42 upper level credits (courses numbered 3000 and above). The
                                 curriculum is divided between General Education requirements, Ministry Major
                                 requirements, and Free Electives. The Free Elective field is comprised of transfer
                                 credits that do not meet specific requirements, Professional Education Credits
                                 (PECs), and other elected courses. Professional Education Credits consist of credit
                                 awarded to adult students for work and life experience. Students must apply for PEC
                                 credits within their first two semesters of enrollment at PBA.
                                                                                                          Programs
                                                                                          Ch.4                             67
Structure of Major                                                                                         of Study
The required curriculum for the major is made up of three credit hour courses that        Palm Beach Atlantic University
are taught during evening class sessions, four hours in duration and meeting once a
week. The courses for the major may be completed in eighteen months. Classes are
designed for the convenience of the adult learner. Taught in a seminar and workshop
style, class content is centered on biblical studies, theological and historical
foundations, and practical ministry skills.

The 36 hour curriculum is made up of three components: a 27 credit hour Ministry
Core of required courses, two ministry electives, and the capstone course, Theology
of Ministry. The Ministry Core is required of all majors in the School of Ministry,
whether enrolled in the traditional day program or in the evening program and
directly reflects the academic and practical objectives stated for the School of
Ministry. The ministry electives can be chosen from a variety of courses offered
each semester. Theology of Ministry is the capstone course for the program in which
students formulate the theological basis and practical vision for their particular area
of calling or ministry focus. This course should be taken as near as possible to the
final semester of study at Palm Beach Atlantic University.

Bachelor of Arts – Major in Ministry 120 Credit Hours

General Education                                                                   3
Communication                                                                       12
GCIS 1103      Introduction to Technology I
GCOM 1203      Oral Communication
GENG 1103      Principles of Writing1
GENG 1213      Intermediate Composition
Students may be required to complete a pre-college course if test scores or
placement indicate a need for skills development.
Humanities & Social Science                                                         1
GBUS 2813      American Free Enterprise
GENG XXX3      Any 2000 Level or Above Literature Course
Select one of the following GHIS courses:
GHIS 1313      Western Civilization I
GHIS 2413      Western Civilization II
GHUM 2313      Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)
GPLS 1343      American Federal Government`
Select one of the following GPSY courses:
GPSY 2133      General Psychology
GPSY 2533      Social Psychology
Mathematics & Science                                                                6
GSCI 1333      Introduction to Natural Science
GMAT 1803      Finite Mathematics or higher
Physical Education & Orientation                                                     2
GMIN 1001      Orientation Ministry
GPHE 1091      Lifetime Fitness
                  Programs
6   Ch.4
                   of Study      Required B.A. in Ministry Core Courses                         30
                                 MIN 3003      Spiritual Formation
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 MIN 3043      Exploring the Old Testament
                                 MIN 3053      Exploring the New Testament
                                 MIN 3063      Biblical Hermeneutics
                                 MIN 3073      Systematic Theology
                                 MIN 3103      History of Christianity
                                 MIN 4063      Church in Society
                                 MIN 4073      Evangelism & Apologetics
                                 MIN 4083      Foundations for Christian Leadership
                                 MIN 4403      Theology of Ministry
                                 Choice of any two Ministry Electives                            6
                                 General Electives and/or Professional Education Credit (PEC)   46
                                                                                   Degree
                                                              Ch.5                                     6
Associate of Arts in General Studies 2006-2007                                      Plans
                   Semester 1 (Offered Fall and Spring)       Palm Beach Atlantic University

Subterm C1
AAA 1001     Orientation AA General Studies               1
AAA 1003     Skills for Professional Transition           3
APHE 1091    Lifetime Fitness                             1
AREL 1013    Exploring the Bible                          3
Subterm C2
ACIS 1103    Introduction to Technology I                 3
AENG 1103    Principles of Writing                        3

                Semester 2 (Offered Spring and Summer)

Subterm C1
ACOM 1203    Oral Communication                           3
AENG 1213    Intermediate Composition                     3
Subterm C2
ACIS 1203    Introduction to Technology II                3
AMAT 1803    Finite Mathematics                           3

                  Semester 3 (Offered Fall and Summer)

Subterm C1
AENG 2173    Foundations of British Literature            3
ASCI 1333    Introduction to Natural Science              3
Subterm C2
AHIS 1313    Western Civilization I                       3
APLS 1343    American Federal Government                  3

                   Semester 4 (Offered Fall and Spring)

Subterm C1
AENG 2513    Foundations of American Literature           3
APSY 2133    General Psychology                           3
                                                                 Navigation Tip:
Subterm C2
AHIS 2413    Western Civilization II                      3      To view the description of each
                                                                 individual course, simply click the
AHUM 2313    Humanites (Art or Music)                     3      Course Number
                Semester 5 (Offered Spring and Summer)

Subterm C1
ABUS 2813    American Free Enterprise                     3
APSY 2533    Social Psychology                            3
Subterm C2
ACOM 2913    Organizational Communication                 3
AAA 2993     Organizational Ethics                        3
                                Degree
70        Ch.5
                                 Plans     Bachelor of Science Organizational Management
                                           On Campus Program 2006-2007
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                                                              Semester 1

                                           GORM 1001   Orientation Organizational Management   1
                                           GBUS 2813   American Free Enterprise                3
                                           GCIS 1103   Introduction to Technology I            3
                                           GENG 2683   World Literature II                     3
                                           GREL 1013   Exploring the Bible                     3

                                                                              Semester 2

                                           ORM 3013    Group and Organizational Behavior       3
                                           ORM 3023    Inquiry and Analysis                    3
                                           ORM 3033    Writing for Organizational Management   3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3

                                                                              Semester 3

                                           ORM 3143    Organizational Management               3
                                           ORM 3153    Organizational Leadership               3
                                           ORM 4063    Effective Interpersonal Relationships   3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3

                                                                              Semester 4

                                           ORM 4073    Budget and Analysis                     3
                                           ORM 4183    Human Resource Management               3
                                           ORM 4293    Values: Personal and Social             3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3
                                           ORMXXX3     * One ORM Elective of Choice            3


                Navigation Tip:            Bachelor of Science Organizational Management
     To view the description of each       Online Program 2006-2007
     individual course, simply click the
                       Course Number                                          Semester 1

                                           EORM 1001   Orientation ORM Online                  1
                                           ECIS 1103   Introduction to Technology I            3
                                           EORM 3013   Group and Organizational Behavior       3
                                           EORM 3023   Inquiry and Analysis                    3
                                           EORM3033    Writing for Organizational Mgmt         3

                                                                              Semester 2

                                           EREL 1013   Exploring the Bible                     3
                                                                                          Degree
                                                                     Ch.5                                     71
EORM 3143   Organizational Management                            3                         Plans
EORM 3153   Organizational Leadership                            3
                                                                     Palm Beach Atlantic University
EORM 4063   Effective Interpersonal Relationships                3

                                    Semester 3

EBUS 2813   American Free Enterprise                             3
EORM 4073   Budget and Analysis                                  3
EORM 4183   Human Resource Management                            3
EORM 4293   Values: Personal and Social                          3

                                    Semester 4

EORM 3223   Career Assessment and Planning                       3
EORM 3233   Contemporary Issues in Business                      3
EORM 3353   Adult Development                                    3
EORM 4023   Balancing Work and Life                              3
EORM 4153   Study in HR Law                                      3


Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies
2006-2007

                                    Semester 1

UCMS 1001   Orientation Urban Christian Ministry Studies         1
GREL 1013   Exploring the Bible                                  3
GCOM 1203   Oral Communication                                   3
GCIS 1103   Introduction to Technology I                         3
GENG 1103   Principles of Writing                                3

                                    Semester 2

UCMS 1003   Urban Christian Leadership and Church Organization   3
GENG 1213   Intermediate Composition                             3
GCSI 1333   Introduction to Natural Science                      3
GHIS 1313   “Western Civilization I                              3
or                                                                      Navigation Tip:
GHIS 2413   Western Civilization II”                             3      To view the description of each
GPHE 1091   Lifetime Fitness                                     1      individual course, simply click the
                                                                        Course Number
                                    Semester 3

UCMS 1013   Urban Preaching and Pastoral Care                    3
UCMS 1023   Church and Urbanization                              3
GMAT 1803   Finite Mathematics or higher                         3
GPLS 1343   American Federal Government                          3

                                    Semester 4

UCMS 1033   Social Justice                                       3
                                Degree
72        Ch.5
                                 Plans     UCMS 1043   Church Music and Worship Formation                            3
                                           GHUM 2313   Humanites (Art or Music Appreciation)                         3
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                           GBUS 2813   American Free Enterprise                                      3

                                                                              Semester 5

                                           GPSY 2133   “General Psychology                                           3
                                           or
                                           GPSY 2533   Social Psychology”                                            3
                                           UCMS 2003   Evangelism and Missions within an Urban Context               3
                                           UCMS 2013   Practicum in Ethnicity and Inter-group Relations              3
                                           GENG 2XX3   Any 2000 Level or Above Literature course                     3
                                           UMCS 1053   Introduction to Urban Youth Ministry                          3


                                           Bachelor of Arts in Ministry† 2006-2007

                                                                          Semester 1 (Fall)

                                           GMIN 1001   Orientation Ministry                                          1
                                           GCIS 1103   Introduction to Technology I                                  3
                                           GENG 1103   Principles of Writing (or LGA 1093 Fundamentals of Writing)   3
                                           GCOM 1203   Oral Communication                                            3
                                           GENG 1213   Intermediate Composition                                      3

                                                                       Semester 2 (Spring)

                                           GPHE 1091   Lifetime Fitness                                              1
                                           GMAT 1803   Survey of Finite Mathematics                                  3
                                           GHIS 1313   Western Civilization I                                        3
                                           or
                                           GHIS 2413   Western Civilization II                                       3
                                           GSCI 1333   Introduction to Natural Science                               3
                                           GPLS 1343   American Federal Government                                   3

                                                                      Semester 3 (Summer)

                Navigation Tip:            GPSY 2133   General Psychology                                            3
                                           or
     To view the description of each
                                           GPSY 2533   Social Psychology                                             3
     individual course, simply click the
                       Course Number       GHUM 2313   Humanities (Art or Music Appreciation)                        3
                                           GBUS 2813   American Free Enterprise                                      3
                                           GENG 3173   World Literature I
                                           or
                                           GENG 3183   World Literature II                                           3

                                                                          Semester 4 (Fall)

                                           MIN 3003    Spiritual Formation                                           3
                                           MIN 3063    Biblical Hermeneutics                                         3
                                                                                                      Degree
                                                                                 Ch.5                                     73
MIN 3043      Exploring the Old Testament                                    3                         Plans
MIN 4073      Evangelism and Apologetics                                     3
                                                                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University
                              Semester 5 (Spring)

MIN 3053      Exploring the New Testament                                    3
MIN 3073      Systematic Theology                                            3
MIN 3103      History of Christianity                                        3
MIN 4083      Foundations of Christian Leadership                            3

                         Semester 6 (Summer or Fall)

MIN 4063      Church in Society                                              3
MIN XXXX      Elective                                                       3
MIN XXXX      Elective                                                       3
MIN 4403      Theology of Ministry                                           3
†This degree plan encompasses the General Education and Ministry requirements
without consideration for the remaining 46 general elective credits necessary
to achieve the 120 credit hours required for graduation at Palm Beach Atlantic
University.




                                                                                    Navigation Tip:
                                                                                    To view the description of each
                                                                                    individual course, simply click the
                                                                                    Course Number
                   Course
74   Ch.6
              Descriptions       ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN GENERAL STUDIES
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   AAA 1001 Orientation AA General Studies
                                 1 Credit Hour
                                 This course orients students to the Associate of Arts in General Education degree
                                 program and explores the value of cohort education. This course also includes the
                                 following topics: academic policies, degree planning, computer technology, writing,
                                 the basic principles of adult education development, and the integration of faith and
                                 learning. Pass/Fail course.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 AAA 1003 Skills for Professional Transition
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A study of the importance of self-management for the adult student. Emphasis will
                                 be placed on teaching the student strategies for success in an academic setting.
                                 The course also familiarizes the student with the APA format of writing. Emphasis will
                                 be placed on the Christian World View and the Integration of Faith and Learning. The
                                 student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 AAA 23 Organizational Ethics (AA capstone course)
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A capstone course designed to apply the academic theories learned in the AA
                                 program with examples in the professional setting. This integrative course focuses
                                 on the ways ethics are used and not used in the decision-making process in
                                 organizations. Case studies are used to illustrate how organizations solve critical
                                 problems. Also examined are personal values, biases, stereotypes, and prejudices.
                                 This course is the final course to be taken in the AA sequence. Student must earn a
                                 grade of “C-” or higher.
                                 Availability: Spring and Summer

                                 ABUS 213 American Free Enterprise
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course will apply classical economic theories and principles in an evaluation
                                 of the American free enterprise system. Philosophical worldviews as well as current
                                 macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and issues will be presented and
                                 discussed to provide a basis for evaluating the performance of the U.S. economy.
                                 Availability: Spring and Summer

                                 ACIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of eCollege, e-mail,
                                 PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, degree planning, Microsoft Windows
                                 XP, Microsoft Word (research paper, resume, letterhead, cover letter), and Microsoft
                                 PowerPoint (research component required). Students gain hands-on experience with
                                 practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework, professional purposes,
                                 and personal use. The student is required to complete the course during the first
                                 semester of enrollment. The student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 ACIS 1203 Introduction to Technology II
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of Microsoft
                                 Access, Microsoft Excel, and a continuation of study in the use of e-mail,
                                 PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, and eCollege. Students gain hands-
                                                                                                            Course
                                                                                           Ch.6                             75
on experience with practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework,                       Descriptions
professional purposes, and personal use.
Availability: Spring and Summer                                                            Palm Beach Atlantic University

ACOM 1203 Oral Communication
3 Credit Hours
Study of the oral communicative process by providing experience in various types of
speaking situations. Emphasis on organization of material and the body and voice as
media.
Availability: Spring and Summer

ACOM 213 Organizational Communication
3 Credit Hours
Theoretical study of the structure, process, and function of communication within
and between organizations. Emerging issues are analyzed.
Availability: Spring and Summer

AENG 1103 Principles of Writing
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to academic expository prose in the context of writing-as-process: that
is, analyzing and producing prose that utilizes such textual patterns as narration, def-
inition, description, illustration, classification, chronology, comparison and contrast,
cause and effect, recursion, and other modes of rhetorical development. Exposure
to and practice of expository (informative) as opposed to argumentative (persuasive)
writing. Review of proper grammar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to aca-
demic writing. Development of accurate, unbiased, third person authorship. Grades
given are “A,” “B,” “C,” or “Y” (conditional incomplete - to satisfied by repeating the
course). Students must earn a grade of “C-” or better to receive credit in this course.
Availability: Fall and Spring

AENG 1213 Intermediate Composition
3 Credit Hours
Introduction of academic argumentative prose as including expository textual
patterns such as taught in Principles of Writing, but moving rapidly from exposi-
tion to argumentation as the principal form of prose. Focus on the argumentative
(persuasive) essay as opposed to the expository (informative) essay. Development
of research, library, and analytical skills: formulating an arguable thesis and back-
ground information to topic; claims of ethos, pathos, and logos; evidence for claims,
refutation of counter-claims, and a synthesizing conclusion. Review of proper gram-
mar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to academic writing. Development of
accurate, unbiased third person authorship. Students must earn a grade of “C-” or
better to receive credit in this course.
Prerequisite: AENG 1103 Principles of Writing
Availability: Spring and Summer

AENG 2173 Foundations of British Literature
3 Credit Hours
Exploration of the aims and methods of literary study through the study of important
authors and movements in British literary history.
Availability: Fall and Summer

AENG 2513 Foundations of American Literature
3 Credit Hours
Exploration of the aims and methods of literary study through the study of important
authors and movements in British literary history.
Availability: Fall and Spring
                   Course
76   Ch.6
              Descriptions       AHIS 1313 Western Civilization I
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from early times to the Reformation,
                                 focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
                                 social, political, and economic movements.
                                 Availability: Fall and Summer

                                 AHIS 2413 Western Civilization II 3
                                 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from the Reformation to the present,
                                 focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
                                 social, political, and economic movements.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 AHUM 2313 Humanities (Art Appreciation)
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Interpretation of the visual arts for development of effective criteria for judgment and
                                 enjoyment of art in general.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 OR

                                 AHUM 2313 Humanities (Music Appreciation)
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of the development of music from pre-Bach to the modern period. Provides
                                 opportunity for listening to recordings illustrative of various periods and videotapes of
                                 concerts and operas.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 AMAT 103 Survey of Finite Mathematics
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction to logic and set theory, elementary linear algebra, introduction to linear
                                 programming, elementary probability.
                                 Availability: Spring and Summer

                                 APHE 101 Lifetime Fitness
                                 1 Credit Hour
                                 A survey of the components and benefits of physical fitness. Health related issues
                                 with attention to fitness assessment.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 APLS 1343 American Federal Government
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This foundations course will provide an analysis of the roles of the U.S. Congress,
                                 the U.S. Presidency, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Special emphasis will be placed
                                 on the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Additional topics
                                 include public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, and the election process.
                                 Availability: Fall and Summer

                                 APSY 2133 General Psychology
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Explores the fundamental issues of psychology as a science, including scientific
                                 methods of inquiry, physiology of behavior, learning, motivation, psychological
                                 disorders and human development across the life span. Provides a practical
                                 understanding of the sub-fields of psychology and enables the student to pursue
                                 professional areas of interest.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                          Ch.6                             77
APSY 2533 Social Psychology                                                                           Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
This course examines multiple psychological processes such as attitudes,                  Palm Beach Atlantic University
motivation, emotions and perception and their influences on social behavior with an
emphasis on implications for Christian living.
Availability: Spring and Summer

AREL 1013 Exploring the Bible
3 Credit Hours
A study of the content, background, genre, and canonicity of the Bible, including
both the Old and New Testaments. The focus is on the central narrative of the Bible,
the general theme and personal application of each book.
Availability: Fall and Spring

ASCI 1333 Introduction to Natural Science
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to Natural Science: Biology, Marine Biology, or Oceanography.
Availability: Fall and Summer

LGA 103 Fundamentals of Writing
3 Credit Hours
This course is a foundational course designed to reacquaint the student with
the core principles of grammar, the parts of a sentence and how these interact
relationally, punctuation, vocabulary, paragraph construction, textual development,
and cohesion and coherence of composed texts. Emphasis on the use of Standard
Dialect (Standard English) in academic writing. Student must earn a grade of “C-” or
higher.
Availability: Fall and Spring


ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN URBAN CHRISTIAN MINISTRY
STUDIES
GBUS 213 American Free Enterprise
3 Credit Hours
This course will apply classical economic theories and principles in an evaluation
of the American free enterprise system. Philosophical worldviews as well as current
macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and issues will be presented and
discussed to provide a basis for evaluating the performance of the U.S. economy.

GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of eCollege, e-mail,
PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, degree planning, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft Word (research paper, resume, letterhead, cover letter), and Microsoft
PowerPoint (research component required). Students gain hands-on experience with
practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework, professional purposes,
and personal use. The student is required to complete the course during the first
semester of enrollment. The student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.

GCOM 1203 Oral Communication
3 Credit Hours
Study of the oral communicative process by providing experience in various types of
speaking situations. Emphasis on organization of material and the body and voice as
media.
                   Course
7   Ch.6
              Descriptions       GENG 1103 Principles of Writing
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Introduction to academic expository prose in the context of writing-as-process: that
                                 is, analyzing and producing prose that utilizes such textual patterns as narration, def-
                                 inition, description, illustration, classification, chronology, comparison and contrast,
                                 cause and effect, recursion, and other modes of rhetorical development. Exposure
                                 to and practice of expository (informative) as opposed to argumentative (persuasive)
                                 writing. Review of proper grammar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to aca-
                                 demic writing. Development of accurate, unbiased, third person authorship. Grades
                                 given are “A,” “B,” “C,” or “Y” (conditional incomplete - to satisfied by repeating the
                                 course). Students must earn a grade of “C-” or better to receive credit in this course.

                                 GENG 1213 Intermediate Composition
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction of academic argumentative prose as including expository textual
                                 patterns such as taught in Principles of Writing, but moving rapidly from exposi-
                                 tion to argumentation as the principal form of prose. Focus on the argumentative
                                 (persuasive) essay as opposed to the expository (informative) essay. Development
                                 of research, library, and analytical skills: formulating an arguable thesis and back-
                                 ground information to topic; claims of ethos, pathos, and logos; evidence for claims,
                                 refutation of counter-claims, and a synthesizing conclusion. Review of proper gram-
                                 mar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to academic writing. Development of
                                 accurate, unbiased third person authorship. Students must earn a grade of “C-” or
                                 better to receive credit in this course.
                                 Prerequisite: GENG 1103 Principles of Writing

                                 GENG 2673 World Literature I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the Old
                                 Testament and Homer to the Renaissance.

                                 OR

                                 GENG 263 World Literature II
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the 18th
                                 century to the present. Research paper required.

                                 GENG 3103 Academic English
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Study of the concepts, principles, rhetorical patterns, and classical structure of ex-
                                 pository and argumentative prose. Review of proper grammar, vocabulary, sentence
                                 and paragraph construction in the Standard Dialect (Standard English). Review and
                                 practice of both expository (informative) and argumentative (persuasive) essays,
                                 according to the standards of academic writing. Development of accurate, unbiased,
                                 third person authorship. Students must earn a grade of “C-” or better to receive
                                 credit for the course.
                                 Prerequisite: Principles of Writing, Intermediate Composition
                                                                                                             Course
                                                                                            Ch.6                             7
GHIS 1313 Western Civilization I                                                                        Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from early times to the Reformation,         Palm Beach Atlantic University
focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
social, political, and economic movements.

OR

GHIS 2413 Western Civilization II
3 Credit Hours
Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from the Reformation to the present,
focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
social, political, and economic movements.

GHUM 2313 Humanities (Art Appreciation)
3 Credit Hours
Interpretation of the visual arts for development of effective criteria for judgment and
enjoyment of art in general.

OR

GHUM 2313 Humanities (Music Appreciation)
3 Credit Hours
Survey of the development of music from pre-Bach to the modern period. Provides
opportunity for listening to recordings illustrative of various periods and videotapes of
concerts and operas.

GMAT 103 Survey of Finite Mathematics
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to logic and set theory, elementary linear algebra, introduction to linear
programming, elementary probability.

GPHE 101 Lifetime Fitness
1 Credit Hour
A survey of the components and benefits of physical fitness. Health related issues
with attention to fitness assessment.

GPLS 1343 American Federal Government
3 Credit Hours
This foundations course will provide an analysis of the roles of the U.S. Congress,
the U.S. Presidency, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Special emphasis will be placed
on the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Additional topics
include public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, and the election process.
                   Course
0   Ch.6
              Descriptions       GPSY 2133 General Psychology
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Explores the fundamental issues of psychology as a science, including scientific
                                 methods of inquiry, physiology of behavior, learning, motivation, psychological
                                 disorders and human development across the life span. Provides a practical
                                 understanding of the sub-fields of psychology and enables the student to pursue
                                 professional areas of interest.

                                 OR

                                 GPSY 2533 Social Psychology
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course examines multiple psychological processes such as attitudes,
                                 motivation, emotions and perception and their influences on social behavior with an
                                 emphasis on implications for Christian living.

                                 GREL 1013 Exploring the Bible
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A study of the content, background, genre and canonicity of the Bible, including
                                 both the Old and New Testaments. The focus is on the central narrative of the Bible
                                 and the general theme and personal application of each book.

                                 GSCI 1333 Introduction to Natural Science
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction to Natural Science: Biology, Marine Biology, or Oceanography.

                                 LGA 103 Fundamentals of Writing
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 The main focus of this course is to determine what writing is and how to do it well. In
                                 order to accomplish this goal, there will be an emphasis on grammar, punctuation,
                                 words, sentences, usage, and paragraphs. Since writing is a process, there will be
                                 additional stress placed on revision so that students may sharpen their writing skills.
                                 The ultimate goal will be to use language accurately and effectively, with the aim of
                                 writing essays, papers, and reports for future college courses. Student must earn a
                                 grade of “C-” or better.

                                 UCMS 1001 Orientation Urban Christian Ministry Studies
                                 1 Credit Hour
                                 This course orients students to the Associate of Arts in Urban Christian Ministry
                                 Studies degree program and explores the value of cohort education. This course
                                 also includes the following topics: academic policies, degree planning, computer
                                 technology, writing, the basic principles of adult education development,
                                 Professional Credit (PEC), and the integration of faith and learning. Pass/Fail course.

                                 UCMS 1003 Urban Christian Leadership and Church
                                 Organization
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A study of Christian leadership styles and local church organizational methods
                                 utilizing a biblical perspective within the context of the urban church tradition.
                                 Availability: Fall

                                 UCMS 1013 Urban Preaching and Pastoral Care
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 An analysis of the relationships between the urban pastor/preacher and the people.
                                 An examination of the unique preaching styles and biblical hermeneutic within the
                                 context of the urban church.
                                 Availability: Fall
                                                                                                            Course
                                                                                           Ch.6                             1
UCMS 1023 Church and Urbanization                                                                      Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
A survey of the development of the urban church, its leaders, and its contributions        Palm Beach Atlantic University
to the church at large in American society. Furthermore, the course examines the
attitudes and social behaviors of groups in an urban Christian context.
Availability: Fall

UCMS 1033 Social Justice
3 Credit Hours
A study addressing ethical and social issues related to clergy leadership in the
struggle for civil rights, and the opportunity for economic empowerment and the
development of strategies for combating the problems of crime, poverty, illegitimacy,
etc. Also an examination of governmental policy and procedures will be studied in
relation to justice issues in American society.
Availability: Fall

UCMS 1043 Church Music and Worship Formation
3 Credit Hours
This course will help the student develop an understanding of the emotional and
spiritual power of spirituals, black gospel music, and contemporary forms of praise
and worship within the black church.
Availability: Spring

UCMS 1053 Introduction to Urban Youth Ministry
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the purposes, challenges, and scope of urban youth ministry with
its various programs and agencies. The course builds a framework for establishing
a philosophy of youth ministry and explores various models and techniques for an
effective youth ministry.
Availability: Spring

UCMS 2003 Evangelism and Missions within an Urban
Context
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the methodology for reaching urban and inner city minority
groups for Jesus Christ.
Availability: Spring

UCMS 2013 Practicum in Ethnicity and Inter-group Relations
3 Credit Hours
An examination of multiple factors surrounding the issues of racial and ethnic
differences within organizational structures. This course will also observe multi-
ethnic models that foster constructive conversation in the area of inter-ethnic cultural
communication. The practicum component provides an opportunity for students to
apply educational experience in a supervised urban Christian ministry setting.
Availability: Spring


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MINISTRY
Prerequisites for all courses:

GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
GENG 1103 Principles of Writing
GENG 1213 Intermediate Composition.
All General Education courses must be completed prior to beginning the Ministry
(MIN) major courses (Electives and CORE) OR be registered for all outstanding
                   Course
2   Ch.6
              Descriptions       General Education courses prior to beginning the major courses (Electives and
                                 CORE).
       Undergraduate 2006-2007
                                 PEC Credit: Within the first semester, a student seeking credit through non-
                                 traditional professional educational credit must make application through his or
                                 her faculty advisor. All work and documentation for non-traditional credit must be
                                 completed no later than the end of the first semester that the student is enrolled.
                                 All Ministry (MIN) major courses must be taken at PBA.

                                 General Education

                                 GBUS 213 American Free Enterprise
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course will apply classical economic theories and principles in an evaluation
                                 of the American free enterprise system. Philosophical worldviews as well as current
                                 macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and issues will be presented and
                                 discussed to provide a basis for evaluating the performance of the U.S. economy.

                                 GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of eCollege, e-mail,
                                 PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, degree planning, Microsoft Windows
                                 XP, Microsoft Word (research paper, resume, letterhead, cover letter), and Microsoft
                                 PowerPoint (research component required). Students gain hands-on experience with
                                 practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework, professional purposes,
                                 and personal use. The student is required to complete the course during the first
                                 semester of enrollment. The student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.

                                 GCOM 1203 Oral Communication
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Study of the oral communicative process by providing experience in various types of
                                 speaking situations. Emphasis on organization of material and the body and voice as
                                 media.

                                 GENG 1103 Principles of Writing
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction to academic expository prose in the context of writing-as-process: that
                                 is, analyzing and producing prose that utilizes such textual patterns as narration, def-
                                 inition, description, illustration, classification, chronology, comparison and contrast,
                                 cause and effect, recursion, and other modes of rhetorical development. Exposure
                                 to and practice of expository (informative) as opposed to argumentative (persuasive)
                                 writing. Review of proper grammar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to aca-
                                 demic writing. Development of accurate, unbiased, third person authorship. Grades
                                 given are “A,” “B,” “C,” or “Y” (conditional incomplete - to satisfied by repeating the
                                 course). Students must earn a grade of “C-” or better to receive credit in this course.
                                 Availability: Fall and Spring

                                 GENG 1213 Intermediate Composition
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction of academic argumentative prose as including expository textual
                                 patterns such as taught in Principles of Writing, but moving rapidly from exposi-
                                 tion to argumentation as the principal form of prose. Focus on the argumentative
                                 (persuasive) essay as opposed to the expository (informative) essay. Development
                                 of research, library, and analytical skills: formulating an arguable thesis and back-
                                 ground information to topic; claims of ethos, pathos, and logos; evidence for claims,
                                 refutation of counter-claims, and a synthesizing conclusion. Review of proper gram-
                                 mar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to academic writing. Development of
                                                                                                             Course
                                                                                            Ch.6                             3
accurate, unbiased third person authorship. Students must earn a grade of “C-” or                       Descriptions
better to receive credit in this course.
Prerequisite: GENG 1103 Principles of Writing                                               Palm Beach Atlantic University

GENG 2673 World Literature I
3 Credit Hours
Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the Old
Testament and Homer to the Renaissance.

OR

GENG 263 World Literature II
3 Credit Hours
Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the 18th
century to the present. Research paper required.

GHIS 1313 Western Civilization I
3 Credit Hours
Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from early times to the Reformation,
focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
social, political, and economic movements.

OR

GHIS 2413 Western Civilization II
3 Credit Hours
Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from the Reformation to the present,
focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
social, political, and economic movements.

GHUM 2313 Humanities (Art Appreciation)
3 Credit Hours
Interpretation of the visual arts for development of effective criteria for judgment and
enjoyment of art in general.

OR

GHUM 2313 Humanities (Music Appreciation)
3 Credit Hours
Survey of the development of music from pre-Bach to the modern period. Provides
opportunity for listening to recordings illustrative of various periods and videotapes of
concerts and operas.

GMAT 103 Survey of Finite Mathematics
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to logic and set theory, elementary linear algebra, introduction to linear
programming, elementary probability.

GMIN 1001 Orientation Ministry
1 Credit Hour
This course orients students to the Bachelor of Arts in Ministry degree program
and explores the value of cohort education. This course also includes the following
topics: academic policies, degree planning, computer technology, writing, the
basic principles of adult education development, Professional Credit (PEC), and the
integration of faith and learning. Pass/Fail course.
                   Course
4   Ch.6
              Descriptions       GPHE 101 Lifetime Fitness
                                 1 Credit Hour
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   A survey of the components and benefits of physical fitness. Health related issues
                                 with attention to fitness assessment.

                                 GPLS 1343 American Federal Government
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This foundations course will provide an analysis of the roles of the U.S. Congress,
                                 the U.S. Presidency, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Special emphasis will be placed
                                 on the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Additional topics
                                 include public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, and the election process.

                                 GPSY 2133 General Psychology
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Explores the fundamental issues of psychology as a science, including scientific
                                 methods of inquiry, physiology of behavior, learning, motivation, psychological
                                 disorders and human development across the life span. Provides a practical
                                 understanding of the sub-fields of psychology and enables the student to pursue
                                 professional areas of interest.

                                 OR

                                 GPSY 2533 Social Psychology
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course examines multiple psychological processes such as attitudes,
                                 motivation, emotions and perception and their influences on social behavior with an
                                 emphasis on implications for Christian living.

                                 GSCI 1333 Introduction to Natural Science
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction to Natural Science: Biology, Marine Biology, or Oceanography.

                                 LGA 103 Fundamentals of Writing
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 The main focus of this course is to determine what writing is and how to do it well. In
                                 order to accomplish this goal, there will be an emphasis on grammar, punctuation,
                                 words, sentences, usage, and paragraphs. Since writing is a process, there will be
                                 additional stress placed on revision so that students may sharpen their writing skills.
                                 The ultimate goal will be to use language accurately and effectively, with the aim of
                                 writing essays, papers, and reports for future college courses. Student must earn a
                                 grade of “C-” or better.


                                 MAJOR CORE COURSES IN MINISTRY (MIN)
                                 MIN 3003 Spiritual Formation
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 As a foundational and practical approach to the spiritual disciplines of the Christian
                                 Life, this course uses biblical and historical materials to help students grow in their
                                 spiritual formation. Topics include: Bible study, prayer, evangelism, journaling,
                                 worship and others.
                                 Availability: Fall
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                          Ch.6                             5
MIN 3043 Exploring the Old Testament                                                                  Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
A study of the content, background, genre, and canonicity of the Old Testament and        Palm Beach Atlantic University
its relationship to the entire biblical narrative. The focus is to acquaint the student
with the central theme and personal application of each book.

MIN 3053 Exploring the New Testament
3 Credit Hours
A study of the content, background, genre, and canonicity of the New Testament
and its relationship to the entire biblical narrative. The focus is to acquaint the
student with the central theme and personal application of each book.
Availability: Spring

MIN 3063 Biblical Hermeneutics
3 Credit Hours
A course designed to equip students with the basics in biblical interpretation.
Students will be introduced to the tools used in the exegesis of the English Bible.
Topics include: presuppositions, historical and cultural context, word study
methodology, and application.

MIN 3073 Systematic Theology
3 Credit Hours
This is a survey of the major Christian doctrines. Students will be exposed to the
biblical and contemporary issues concerning the Bible, God, Jesus Christ, the Holy
Spirit, mankind, the church, end times, and other theological issues.

MIN 3103 History of Christianity
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the history of Christianity covering the major people, movements,
institutions, and events of the Church from its founding by Jesus Christ to the
present. This course examines the unique ways Christianity has shaped and been
shaped by its environment, the rich diversity of its expressions through the ages, and
the significant purpose it fulfills in the society and the world.
Prerequisite: GHIS 1313, GHIS 2413

MIN 4063 Church in Society
3 Credit Hours
A study of the social issues facing the church and society today. Among others,
issues include urbanization, multiculturalism, racism, pluralism, and gender. The
course will examine how these issues help to influence the social and religious
teachings of the church in postmodern society.

MIN 4073 Evangelism and Apologetics
3 Credit Hours
A study of the biblical and theological basis for evangelism and apologetics in
contemporary ministry. The course includes an examination of the content of
the gospel, the imperative of the Great Commission, the value of evidential and
propositional apologetics, and strategies for evangelism and apologetics for individual
Christians and churches.

MIN 403 Foundations of Christian Leadership
3 Credit Hours
This course examines how leadership traits are learned. Both Christian and
secular leadership theories are critically examined. Leadership dynamics such as
interpersonal relationships, conflict management, the development of vision and the
transference of vision to others, and the moral and ethical obligations of the leader
will be studied.
                   Course
6   Ch.6
              Descriptions       MIN 4403 Theology of Ministry
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   A capstone course, which examines the ethics of Christian ministry in the context
                                 of the local church and community. The life of the minister as servant and leader is
                                 examined in light of the previous modules’ contents and topics.


                                 MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES IN MINISTRY (MIN)
                                 MINV 3103 Selected Topics in Ministry
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Intensive Study of a topic, which provides students an opportunity to study in areas
                                 other than those elsewhere defined.
                                 Availability: On Demand

                                 MIN 3163 Development of Christianity
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 An investigation of developing Christianity and later New Testament texts, focusing
                                 primarily on questions of apostolic authority, the process of canonization, the unique
                                 problems and responses of second-century Christianity, the formation of church
                                 doctrine, structure and hierarchy in the church, and the challenges of orthodoxy and
                                 heterodoxy in the second century.
                                 Prerequisite: MIN 3053

                                 MIN 3213 Jesus
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Study of the words and deeds of Jesus of Nazareth based upon the Gospels of
                                 Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. In light of the contemporary controversies regarding
                                 the sources for earliest Christianity and the identity of the historical Jesus, a major
                                 emphasis will be placed upon the explanation and examination of this concern.
                                 Prerequisites: MIN 3053

                                 MIN 3253 Paul
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Study of the life and letters of the apostle Paul.
                                 Prerequisite: MIN 3053

                                 MIN 3303 Homiletics
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 An introduction to the principles and philosophy of biblical interpretation. The course
                                 will assist the student in gaining an appreciation for exegetical methodologies and
                                 the development of the awareness and application of interpretive skills used in
                                 teaching and preaching.

                                 MIN 3313 Ethics in Society
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A study of the biblical presuppositions and principles of Christian ethics and their
                                 application to major social institutions and problems.

                                 MIN 3323 African American Religious Experience
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course examines the historical religious values and traditions that undergird the
                                 African American religious life in North America. Students will study the important
                                 historical, sociological and spiritual pilgrimage of African Americans from slavery into
                                 contemporary life and the suppositions of African American religious life which help
                                 shape the social and contextual hegemony of the African American community.
                                                                                                            Course
                                                                                           Ch.6                             7
MIN 3403 Suffering, Loss, and Death                                                                    Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
This course will focus on human responses to death and dying: denial, acceptance,          Palm Beach Atlantic University
and rebellion. From the perspectives of both the humanities and social sciences,
the course will investigate such question as: life after death, funeral practices, grief
and bereavement, suicide, and terminal care. This course will concentrate on the
meaning of change, separation, and loss as realities of the human experience with
emphasis upon both the clinical and the theological dimensions and methods of
crisis situations. Issues will be examined in relation to the work of the Clergy and
other professionals and the ministry of non-professional laypersons.

MIN 4003 Doctrine of God
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the attributes of God with particular focus on the role of the Trinity
as an expression of the providence, suffering, and advocacy of God. Particular
attention will be given to the social implications of methodologies and hermeneutic
tendencies inherent in contemporary theological discussion.

MIN 4023 A History of Christianity in America
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the relationship between Christianity and culture in American
history. The professor will explore with the students the impact Christianity has had
on America as well as the way American culture has shaped Christian religious
expressions in America.

MIN 4033 The Black Church and the Civil Rights Movement
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the contributions of the Black Church in and during the Civil
Rights Movement of the late fifties and sixties. Students will study vital religious and
political leaders who help shape the movement.

MIN 4103 Pastoral Care
3 Credit Hours
A study of the general theory and practice of pastoral care as it relates to the local
church and individuals performing the caring tasks of ministry. Special attention is
given to the pastoral care ministry of the local church, counseling as pastoral care,
and special crises and developmental issues in human experience.

MIN 4203 Church Administration
3 Credit Hours
A course to help students understand and be able to assume responsibilities related
to organization and administration. Content includes the rationale for administration
in a local church, a study of principles and methods of church administration, and a
study of church programming as carried on by a church council.

MIN 4213 Education in the Church
3 Credit Hours
A study of the historical development of educational thought and expression focusing on
emerging educational theories and practices that have influenced Christian education.

MIN 4303 Church Development
3 Credit Hours
An examination of the theological rationale for discipleship, evangelism, and church
growth. The course examines the nature of the church as the people of God,
and its mission in the local and global community. The course seeks to ground
contemporary evangelistic and church growth models within biblical and theological
foundations.
                   Course
   Ch.6
              Descriptions       MIN 4613 Ministry Project
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   A thesis experience that focuses upon the solution of a practical problem or issue
                                 in the ministry setting. The Ministry Project will challenge the student to examine a
                                 particular need, problem, or dilemma within his or her ministry setting. The goal of
                                 the examination will be the successful development and implementation of a strategy
                                 for resolution.


                                 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ORGANIZATIONAL
                                 MANAGEMENT ONLINE PROGRAM
                                 PRE-ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: PLEASE REFER TO THE DEGREE PLAN IN
                                 THE PROGRAMS OF STUDY SECTION OF THIS CATALOG.
                                 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ONLINE

                                 EBUS 213 American Free Enterprise
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course will apply classical economic theories and principles in an evaluation
                                 of the American free enterprise system. Philosophical worldviews as well as current
                                 macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and issues will be presented and
                                 discussed to provide a basis for evaluating the performance of the U.S. economy.

                                 ECIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of eCollege, e-mail,
                                 PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, degree planning, Microsoft Windows
                                 XP, Microsoft Word (research paper, resume, letterhead, cover letter), and Microsoft
                                 PowerPoint (research component required). Students gain hands-on experience with
                                 practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework, professional purposes,
                                 and personal use. The student is required to complete the course during the first
                                 semester of enrollment. The student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.

                                 EENG 263 World Literature II
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the 18th
                                 century to the present. Research paper required.

                                 EORM 1001 Orientation Organizational Management
                                 1 Credit Hour
                                 This course orients students to the Bachelor of Science in Organizational
                                 Management online degree program and explores the value of cohort education.
                                 This course also includes the following topics: academic policies, degree planning,
                                 computer technology, writing, and the basic principles of adult education
                                 development, Professional Education Credit (PEC) and the integration of faith and
                                 learning. Pass/Fail course

                                 EREL 1013 Exploring the Bible
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A study of the content, background, genre and canonicity of the Bible, including both
                                 the Old and New Testaments. The focus is to acquaint the student with the central
                                 narrative of the Bible and the general theme and personal application of each book.
                                                                                                             Course
                                                                                            Ch.6                             
MAJOR CORE COURSES IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (ORM) ONLINE                                            Descriptions
The nine major CORE courses must be taken in sequence.
                                                                                            Palm Beach Atlantic University
ORM 3013 Group and Organizational Behavior
3 Credit Hours
Examines the interaction of individuals and groups in organizations and the ways
in which they affect organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on group
dynamics, decision making, and conflict management. Students will develop
strategies for efficient and productive group management. The approach to learning
in this course is highly experiential.

EORM 3023 Inquiry and Analysis
3 Credit Hours
Explores a variety of worldviews, especially concerning particular problems involved
in the ORM discipline. Students will be able to articulate the controversies and
distinguish a Christian response to worldview problems. Develops appropriate
resources for acquiring and assessing information while equipping learners to
use critical thinking skills to recognize valid inquiry methods. Helps develop the
capability to critically assess the validity and application of information.

EORM 3033 Writing for Organizational Management
3 Credit Hours
Examines writing as an effective means of communication in the workplace.
Emphasis is placed on the process of composition, including planning, organizing,
drafting, and revising, as it applies to essential business writing tasks. A brief review
of general documentation skills will be included.

EORM 3143 Organizational Management
3 Credit Hours
Covers material comprising the theory, research and practice of management. This
course also examines the functions of an organization and analyzes organizations
based upon systems models. Students will study basic principles of management,
analyze, and solve organizational problems.

EORM 3153 Organizational Leadership
3 Credit Hours
Prepares the student to lead effectively in the modern organization. The course
introduces the basic principles and theories of leadership, motivational theory,
importance of communication and current and future trends. The student will
assess, discuss, and learn how to apply his or her own styles of leadership in the
workplace and community.

EORM 4063 Effective Interpersonal Relationships
3 Credit Hours
A study of communication and relationships in creating a productive work
environment. Readings and exercises in nonverbal communication, constructive
feedback, dealing with anger, and resolving conflict.

EORM 4073 Budget and Analysis
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the organizational budgeting and analysis
process. Students gain an understanding of budgeting and analysis terminology, and
they develop basic budgeting and analysis skills. Students learn the foundations of
budgetary need, budget planning, budget preparation, content of control documents,
and budget management. In addition, students gain a fundamental understanding of
financial statements, financial ratios, and their application to the budgetary process.
                   Course
0   Ch.6
              Descriptions       EORM 413 Human Resource Management
                                 3 Credit Hours
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   The policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development, and
                                 compensation of employees, as these affect social and economic life. Case studies
                                 are used.

                                 EORM 423 Values: Personal and Social
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 A capstone course that progresses from a personal study of values and the concept
                                 of truth to a study of social values and ultimately to a consideration of values in the
                                 business or organizational environment.


                                 MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES IN ORGANIZATIONAL
                                 MANAGEMENT ONLINE
                                 EORM 3223 Career Assessment and Planning
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Adult career development: past, present and future. Career and personal patterns
                                 examined and reviewed, and goals assessed through exercises and activities. Future
                                 trends examined in relation to changing careers and life-styles.

                                 EORM 3233 Contemporary Issues in Business
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Provides students with an understanding of the issues affecting business today,
                                 why these issues create stress in people, and practical solutions for use on the job
                                 to help overcome the stress. Some of the issues studied are reduced supervision;
                                 team culture; quality focus; downsizing; mergers and acquisitions; globalization; and
                                 innovative pay strategies.

                                 EORM 3273 Strategies for Personal Success
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 The study of the psychology of and strategies for personal and professional success.
                                 Topics include positive self image, positive self direction, positive self discipline,
                                 positive self motivation, positive self awareness, positive self esteem, positive self
                                 projection, positive self control, positive self expectancy, and positive self dimension.
                                 Application is made to the student’s personal as well as professional life.

                                 EORM 3353 Adult Development
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This course examines the growth and development of the person throughout
                                 adulthood. The areas of physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral
                                 development are explored.

                                 EORM 4023 Balancing Work and Life
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Through this course, the student will systematically examine the role of Work/Life
                                 programs within organizations and how they can be utilized to effectively support the
                                 achievement of an organization’s strategic goals and objectives. Evaluation, design,
                                 selection, and operation of various programs will be covered, and application of
                                 policies and procedures to real situations will be used.

                                 EORM 4153 Study in HR Law
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This course addresses both historical and contemporary applications of law to
                                 employment issues in the workplace. Example issues include employment-at-
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                          Ch.6                             1
will, unionization, discrimination and civil rights, sexual harassment, “reasonable                   Descriptions
accommodation”, health and safety, and affirmative action.
                                                                                          Palm Beach Atlantic University
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ORGANIZATIONAL
MANAGEMENT
Prerequisites for all courses:

GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
GENG 1103 Principles of Writing
GENG 1213 Intermediate Composition.
All General Education courses must be completed prior to beginning the
Organizational Management (ORM) major courses (Electives and CORE) OR the
student must be registered for any outstanding General Education courses prior to
beginning the ORM major courses (Electives and CORE).
PEC Credit: Within the first semester, a student seeking credit through non-
traditional professional educational credit must make application through his or
her faculty advisor. All work and documentation for non-traditional credit must be
completed no later than the end of the first semester that the student is enrolled.
All Organizational Management (ORM) major courses must be taken at PBA.


GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
GBUS 213 American Free Enterprise
3 Credit Hours
This course will apply classical economic theories and principles in an evaluation
of the American free enterprise system. Philosophical worldviews as well as current
macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts and issues will be presented and
discussed to provide a basis for evaluating the performance of the U.S. economy.

GCIS 1103 Introduction to Technology I
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to and instruction in the use of eCollege, e-mail,
PalmNet, Internet Explorer, Web Registration, degree planning, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft Word (research paper, resume, letterhead, cover letter), and Microsoft
PowerPoint (research component required). Students gain hands-on experience with
practical projects and lab exercises suitable for coursework, professional purposes,
and personal use. The student is required to complete the course during the first
semester of enrollment. The student must earn a grade of “C-” or higher.

GCOM 1203 Oral Communication
3 Credit Hours
Study of the oral communicative process by providing experience in various types of
speaking situations. Emphasis on organization of material and the body and voice as
media.

GENG 1103 Principles of Writing
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to academic expository prose in the context of writing-as-process: that
is, analyzing and producing prose that utilizes such textual patterns as narration,
definition, description, illustration, classification, chronology, comparison and
contrast, cause and effect, recursion, and other modes of rhetorical development.
Exposure to and practice of expository (informative) as opposed to argumentative
(persuasive) writing. Review of proper grammar, vocabulary, and usage as is
appropriate to academic writing. Development of accurate, unbiased, third person
                   Course
2   Ch.6
              Descriptions       authorship. Grades given are “A,” “B,” “C,” or “Y” (conditional incomplete - to
                                 satisfied by repeating the course). Students must earn a grade of “C-” or better to
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   receive credit in this course.

                                 GENG 1213 Intermediate Composition
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction of academic argumentative prose as including expository textual
                                 patterns such as taught in Principles of Writing, but moving rapidly from exposi-
                                 tion to argumentation as the principal form of prose. Focus on the argumentative
                                 (persuasive) essay as opposed to the expository (informative) essay. Development
                                 of research, library, and analytical skills: formulating an arguable thesis and back-
                                 ground information to topic; claims of ethos, pathos, and logos; evidence for claims,
                                 refutation of counter-claims, and a synthesizing conclusion. Review of proper gram-
                                 mar, vocabulary, and usage as is appropriate to academic writing. Development of
                                 accurate, unbiased third person authorship. Students must earn a grade of “C-” or
                                 better to receive credit in this course.
                                 Prerequisite: GENG 1103 Principles of Writing

                                 GENG 2673 World Literature I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the Old
                                 Testament and Homer to the Renaissance.

                                 OR

                                 GENG 263 World Literature II
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of literary masterpieces of the Western World, in translation, from the 18th
                                 century to the present. Research paper required.

                                 GHIS 1313 Western Civilization I
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from early times to the Reformation,
                                 focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
                                 social, political, and economic movements.

                                 OR

                                 GHIS 2413 Western Civilization II
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of humanity’s struggle for civilization from the Reformation to the present,
                                 focusing upon the development of institutions and ideas and their relation to cultural,
                                 social, political, and economic movements.

                                 GHUM 2313 Humanities (Art Appreciation)
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Interpretation of the visual arts for development of effective criteria for judgment and
                                 enjoyment of art in general.

                                 OR

                                 GHUM 2313 Humanities (Music Appreciation)
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Survey of the development of music from pre-Bach to the modern period. Provides
                                 opportunity for listening to recordings illustrative of various periods and videotapes of
                                 concerts and operas.
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                          Ch.6                             3
GMAT 103 Survey of Finite Mathematics                                                                Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to logic and set theory, elementary linear algebra, introduction to linear   Palm Beach Atlantic University
programming, elementary probability.

GORM 1001 Orientation Organizational Management
1 Credit Hour
This course orients students to the Bachelor of Science in Organizational
Management degree program and explores the value of cohort education. This
course also includes the following topics: academic policies, degree planning,
computer technology, writing, the basic principles of adult education development,
Professional Credit (PEC), and the integration of faith and learning. Pass/Fail course.

GPHE 101 Lifetime Fitness
1 Credit Hour
A survey of the components and benefits of physical fitness. Health related issues
with attention to fitness assessment.

GPLS 1343 American Federal Government
3 Credit Hours
This foundations course will provide an analysis of the roles of the U.S. Congress,
the U.S. Presidency, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Special emphasis will be placed
on the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Additional topics
include public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, and the election process.

GPSY 2133 General Psychology
3 Credit Hours
Explores the fundamental issues of psychology as a science, including scientific
methods of inquiry, physiology of behavior, learning, motivation, psychological
disorders and human development across the life span. Provides a practical
understanding of the sub-fields of psychology and enables the student to pursue
professional areas of interest.

OR

GPSY 2533 Social Psychology
3 Credit Hours
This course examines multiple psychological processes such as attitudes,
motivation, emotions and perception and their influences on social behavior with an
emphasis on implications for Christian living.

GREL 1013 Exploring the Bible
3 Credit Hours
A study of the content, background, genre and canonicity of the Bible, including
both the Old and New Testaments. The focus is to acquaint the student with the
central narrative of the Bible and the general theme and personal application of each
book.

GSCI 1333 Introduction to Natural Science
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to Natural Science: Biology, Marine Biology, or Oceanography.

LGA 103 Fundamentals of Writing
3 Credit Hours
The main focus of this course is to determine what writing is and how to do it well. In
order to accomplish this goal, there will be an emphasis on grammar, punctuation,
                   Course
4   Ch.6
              Descriptions       words, sentences, usage, and paragraphs. Since writing is a process, there will be
                                 additional stress placed on revision so that students may sharpen their writing skills.
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   The ultimate goal will be to use language accurately and effectively, with the aim of
                                 writing essays, papers, and reports for future college courses. Student must earn a
                                 grade of “C-” or higher.


                                 MAJOR CORE COURSES IN ORGANIZATIONAL
                                 MANAGEMENT (ORM)
                                 The nine major CORE courses listed below must be taken in sequence.

                                 ORM 3013 Group and Organizational Behavior
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Examines the interaction of individuals and groups in organizations and the ways
                                 in which they affect organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on group
                                 dynamics, decision making, and conflict management. Students will develop
                                 strategies for efficient and productive group management. The approach to learning
                                 in this course is highly experiential.

                                 ORM 3023 Inquiry and Analysis
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Explores a variety of worldviews, especially concerning particular problems involved
                                 in the ORM discipline. Students will be able to articulate the controversies and
                                 distinguish a Christian response to worldview problems. Develops appropriate
                                 resources for acquiring and assessing information while equipping learners to
                                 use critical thinking skills to recognize valid inquiry methods. Helps develop the
                                 capability to critically assess the validity and application of information.

                                 ORM 3113 Business English
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Introduction to the writing of business documentation for the industrial workplace;
                                 the sequential steps in the formatting, structuring, organization, and writing of
                                 business documents. Documentation under review will include business emails,
                                 memos, faxes, letters, reports, resumes, and application letters, and may include
                                 documents of web or graphic design. Practice in appropriate style and tone for
                                 business documentation, correspondence etiquette, and sensitivity to ‘bad news’
                                 messages. Review accurate, unbiased, first or third person authorship. Students
                                 must earn a grade of “C-” or better to receive credit for the course.
                                 Prerequisite: Principles of Writing and Intermediate Composition; or Academic
                                 English

                                 ORM 3143 Organizational Management
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Covers material comprising the theory, research and practice of management. This
                                 course also examines the functions of an organization and analyzes organizations
                                 based upon systems models. Students will study basic principles of management,
                                 analyze, and solve organizational problems.

                                 ORM 3153 Organizational Leadership
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Prepares the student to lead effectively in the modern organization. This course
                                 introduces the basic principles and theories of leadership, motivational theory,
                                 importance of communication, and current and future trends. The student will
                                 assess, discuss, and learn how to apply his or her own styles of leadership in the
                                 workplace and community.
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                          Ch.6                             5
ORM 4063 Effective Interpersonal Relationships                                                        Descriptions
3 Credit Hours
A study of communication and relationships in creating a productive work                  Palm Beach Atlantic University
environment. Readings and exercises in nonverbal communication, constructive
feedback, dealing with anger, and resolving conflict.

ORM 4073 Budget and Analysis
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the organizational budgeting and analysis
process. Students gain an understanding of budgeting and analysis terminology, and
they develop basic budgeting and analysis skills. Students learn the foundations of
budgetary need, budget planning, budget preparation, content of control documents,
and budget management. In addition, students gain a fundamental understanding of
financial statements, financial ratios, and their application to the budgetary process.

ORM 413 Human Resource Management
3 Credit Hours
The policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development, and
compensation of employees, as these affect social and economic life. Case studies
are used.

ORM 423 Values: Personal and Social
3 Credit Hours
A capstone course that progresses from a personal study of values and the concept
of truth to a study of social values and ultimately to a consideration of values in the
business or organizational environment.


MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES IN ORGANIZATIONAL
MANAGEMENT (ORM)
ORM 3203 Exploring Consulting in HRD /OD
3 Credit Hours/Elective
Examines the skills required to get your expertise used in the practice of HRD/
OD and how to maximize your effectiveness in bringing about the development
of individuals, teams, organizations, and careers. The course explores how
organizational goals, objectives, and strategies are met using the consulting skills
required for successful HRD/OD interventions. It demonstrates the changes
trainers go through to make the transition from classroom trainer/facilitator to
internal or external consultant. It illustrates the shift from having known solutions
to collaborating with the client to devise heretofore unknown solutions to unknown
problems.

ORM 3213 Introduction to Adult Education and Human
Resource Development
3 Credit Hours/Elective
This course introduces students to the theories of learning and cognition, adult
learning, instructional methods, and program design and evaluation as they apply to
the corporate training environment.

ORM 3223 Career Assessment and Planning
3 Credit Hours/Elective
Adult career development: past, present and future. Career and personal patterns
examined and reviewed, and goals assessed through exercises and activities. Future
trends examined in relation to changing careers and life-styles.
                   Course
6   Ch.6
              Descriptions       ORM 3233 Contemporary Issues in Business
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   Provides students with an understanding of the issues affecting business today,
                                 why these issues create stress in people, and practical solutions for use on the job
                                 to help overcome the stress. Some of the issues studied are reduced supervision;
                                 team culture; quality focus; downsizing; mergers and acquisitions; globalization; and
                                 innovative pay strategies.

                                 ORM 3243 Counseling Methodologies
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Examines the theoretical basis for some of the most commonly used methods
                                 of psychological counseling. This includes processes that are individually or
                                 systematically oriented. Each theory is discussed relative to current trends and
                                 thought in the field of psychology. In addition, basic methods and principles of
                                 counseling are taught. Participants learn to develop their own personal style of
                                 psychological counseling by practicing counseling skills in an observed classroom
                                 setting.

                                 ORM 3253 Theories of Personality
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Provides students with an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of the various
                                 schools of personality theory. Students examine the psychoanalytic approach, the
                                 neopsychoanalytic approach, the trait approach, the humanistic approach, the
                                 life-span approach, the cognitive approach, the behavioral approach and the social
                                 learning approach to the study of personality.

                                 ORM 3263 Statistics
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Provides the learner with a basic understanding of the research concepts and
                                 statistical methods needed in management. Emphasizes understanding statistical
                                 concepts, relating those concepts to work situations, problem solving, and
                                 interpreting and communicating results in a professional manner. (Orlando Campus
                                 Only)

                                 ORM 3273 Strategies for Personal Success
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 The study of the psychology of and strategies for personal and professional success.
                                 Topics include positive self image, positive self direction, positive self discipline,
                                 positive self motivation, positive self awareness, positive self esteem, positive self
                                 projection, positive self control, positive self expectancy, and positive self dimension.
                                 Application is made to the student’s personal as well as professional life.

                                 ORM 323 Mediating Organizational Conflict
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This is a skill-building course based on a program developed by two executive
                                 leaders with the American Bar Association’s Section on Dispute Resolution. This
                                 course will provide both theory and practical skills for resolving organizational
                                 conflicts. The practical skills learned in this nationally recognized curriculum
                                 will assist the student in minimizing damage caused by conflict and maximize
                                 productivity through facilitating collaborative work relationships.

                                 ORM 323 Basic Investment Skills
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This course provides students with an understanding of key elements associated
                                 with equity and fixed-income decision-making. The relationship between investment
                                 selection and investor’s expected return/risk/time horizon is stressed. This course
                                 will discuss investment basics, practices, and the external environment. Specific
                                                                                                             Course
                                                                                            Ch.6                             7
attention in relation to individual and institutional investment is discussed in relation               Descriptions
to mutual funds.
                                                                                            Palm Beach Atlantic University
ORM 3313 Entrepreneurship
3 Credit Hours/Elective
This course is the study of Entrepreneurship (organizing and managing a business,
assuming the risk for the sake of the profit). Topics include the history of the
entrepreneurial spirit, case studies of entrepreneurs (their successes and failures),
and strategies for entrepreneurial success. Major components of a Business Plan
will be discussed and practiced.

ORM 3323 Employee Assistance Programs
3 Credit Hours/Elective
Provides concrete concepts and rationale for employee assistance programs;
describes various types and components of programs. Includes an application of
policies and procedures to real situations.

ORM 3333 The Organization of the Future
3 Credit Hours/Elective
This course explores the design and leadership of contemporary and future
organizations. The organization of the 21st century is examined with an emphasis on
the awareness that people are the key factor in organizational effectiveness. Factors
such as rapidly accelerating technology, global competition, changing demographics,
and workplace attitudes are also examined for their roles in shaping organizations.

ORM 3343 Managing Performance Accountability
3 Credit Hours/Elective
Focuses on managing and improving human performance in the workplace. Topics
include getting results through people in a proactive and motivational process.
Case analysis covers understanding performance management; developing
goals, objectives, and performance measures; using positive consequences and
recognition to drive performance; analysis of performance problems; removal of
obstacles, and coaching to improve performance. (Orlando Campus Only)

ORM 3353 Adult Development
3 Credit Hours/Elective
This course examines the growth and development of the person throughout
adulthood. The areas of physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral
development are explored.

ORM 3363 Expository Writing
3 Credit Hours/Elective
Examines writing as a whole process of thinking, judging, and evaluating information,
complemented by a study of grammar usage, sentence and paragraph construction,
and rhetorical patterns. Develops techniques for effective library research.

ORM 3373 Cultural Studies and the Workplace
3 Credit Hours/Elective
This course is designed to address the significance and relevance of the cultures of
peoples from diverse backgrounds and ethnic groups on management practice in
the workplace. The course will address the origins and scope of national and ethnic
culture, its relevance to, and influence on the organization, as well as the challenges
it poses to human resource management. Discussion and learning will include local
multi-national, international, and same-site multi-ethnic perspectives.
                   Course
   Ch.6
              Descriptions       ORM 4023 Balancing Work and Life
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
       Undergraduate 2006-2007   This course will systematically examine the role of work/life programs within
                                 organizations and how they can be utilized to effectively support the achievement
                                 of an organization’s strategic goals and objectives. Evaluation, design, selection,
                                 and operation of various programs will be covered, and application of policies and
                                 procedures to real situations will be used.

                                 ORM 4033 Faith and Culture
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This course explores the cultural dimensions that affect faith formation and attitudes.
                                 Examines how faith acts to enable adults to construct meaning, understand life
                                 purpose, and move toward greater authenticity. Attention given to the ways faith
                                 expressions influence inter- and intra-cultural dialogues in personal and professional
                                 life.

                                 ORM 4153 Study in HR Law
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 This course addresses both historical and contemporary applications of law to
                                 employment issues in the workplace. Example issues include employment-at-
                                 will, unionization, discrimination and civil rights, sexual harassment, “reasonable
                                 accommodation”, health and safety, and affirmative action.

                                 ORM 4263 Skill-based Management
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Based on a framework of accepted organizational behavior and management
                                 theories, this course provides prospective managers with the personal, interpersonal,
                                 and group skills necessary to cultivate and implement good ideas in organizations.
                                 Concentrating on nine fundamental management skills, the learning model parallels
                                 the four requirements for personal and organizational change: accepting the need to
                                 change, understanding what to change, committing to and practicing change, and
                                 applying change. (Orlando Campus Only)

                                 ORM 413 Independent Project in Organizational
                                 Management
                                 3 Credit Hours/Elective
                                 Learner-proposed project involving the study of a limited subject area described in
                                 a learning contract negotiated by the learner with a faculty member who accepts
                                 responsibility for guidance and evaluation. Approval by the dean of the school is
                                 required.


                                 MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
                                 EDUCATION AND CARE
                                 EDU 2113 Foundations of Child Care and Education Program
                                 Administration
                                 3 Credit Hours
                                 Comprised of four content areas as they apply to child-care environments:
                                 organizational leadership, personnel issues, financial and legal issues, and child
                                 care and education programming. This course is State-approved as the coursework
                                 required to qualify for a Child Care Administration Credential.
                                 Availability: Summer Online
                                                                                                          Course
                                                                                         Ch.6                             
EDU 3023 Issues and Practices to Promote Family and                                                  Descriptions
Community Involvement
3 Credit Hours                                                                           Palm Beach Atlantic University
Presents issues and practices to promote family and community involvement in
programs serving pre-schoolers.
Availability: Spring

EDU 3213 Social Foundations of Early Childhood Education
3 Credit Hours
Examination of the philosophical, sociological, and historical perspectives of early
childhood education and the underlying contemporary policy issues and practices in
the field. Observations required.
Availability: Fall

EDU 323 Early Childhood Guidance
3 Credit Hours
Consideration of the major principles and theories of child guidance, as applied to
pre-kindergarten through the primary years. Focuses on developmentally appropriate
practices with special attention to serving children ages three through five. Emphasis
placed on outside agencies available for children and families.
Availability: Summer

EDU 323 Early Childhood Education Programs
3 Credit Hours
Focuses on the integrated curriculum and developmentally appropriate practices
with special attention to programs serving children ages three through five. Field
experiences required.
Availability: Fall

EDU 413 Health Environment in the Elementary School
3 Credit Hours
Provides the prospective teacher of children ages three through elementary school
with a conceptual basis for human growth and development. Contemporary health,
nutrition, and safety issues are explored.
Availability: Spring

EDU 423 Exceptional Students in the Classroom
3 Credit Hours
Characteristics of and implications for education of individuals with exceptional
needs; related current problems, trends, programs, legislation, and community
resources. Emphasizes special needs of exceptional children and their families.
Observations required.
Availability: Summer
100   Addendum
                                 Transient Credit (PBA Students)

       Undergraduate 2006-2007   After attending classes at Palm Beach Atlantic University, undergraduate students
                                 are allowed to take a maximum of nine semester hours at another regionally
                                 accredited educational institution(s). A course taken at PBA may not be retaken
                                 at another institution. Students must have these courses approved by completing
                                 an Application for Transient Study. This form can be obtained at PBA Central.
                                 Permission must be received during the semester immediately preceding the term
                                 or semester in which the student will be enrolled elsewhere. Students enrolled in
                                 their major coursework are not eligible to take courses elsewhere. Grades earned in
                                 transient study at another institution do not count toward the PBA cumulative GPA*.

                                 Note: Students in the Associate of Arts in General Studies and the Associate of
                                 Arts in Urban Christian Ministry Studies degree programs are not allowed to take
                                 transient credit.

                                 *Effective as of January 1, 2007
                                                                                Directory   101
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                                         Palm Beach Atlantic University
Officers of the Board
Donald E. Warren               Chairman
John P. Greene III             Vice-Chairman
Richard A. Krause              Treasurer
Robert T. Owens                Secretary

Executive Committee
Donald E. Warren               Chairman
John P. Greene III             Vice-Chairman
David W. Clark                 ex officio
Scott G. Hawkins
James C. Jenkins
Richard A. Krause
Robert T. Owens
Thomas R. Pledger
Gary P. Schroeder
Ralph A. Sullivan              ex officio

Class of 2005
William Blodgett               Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL
Thomas F. Carney, Jr.          Business Executive                Delray Beach, FL
Catherine J. Coggins           Educational Consultant            Deland, FL
Charles Dorsey                 Business Executive (retired)      Lake Worth, FL
Lee Hennessee Gradante         Business Executive                New York, NY
R. Marshall Jones              Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL
Dr. William G. Lassiter, Jr.   Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL
David McKinley                 Pastor                            Plano, TX
Robert T. Owens                Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL
Kenneth L. Ryskamp             District Court Judge              West Palm Beach, FL
Karl H. Watson                 Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL

Class of 2006
Walter R. Arnold               Pastor                            North Palm Beach, FL
Chandra Bill-Rabenecker        News Anchor                       West Palm Beach, FL
William Bradford               Business Executive                Maitland, FL
Cathleen T. Burk               Attorney                          West Palm Beach, FL
Wayne W. Cotton                Business Executive                Deerfield Beach, FL
Scott G. Hawkins               Attorney                          West Palm Beach, FL
John M. Kilduff                Business Executive (retired)      Hobe Sound, FL
Mami H. Kisner                 Public Relations Consultant       West Palm Beach, FL
Robert S. Lafferty             Business Executive                Fort Lauderdale, FL
Thomas E. Lee                  Judge (retired)                   Tequesta, FL
Randal L. Martin ‘4           Chief Financial Officer           Boca Raton, FL
Thomas D. Mullins              Pastor                            Palm Beach Gardens, FL
W. Matthew Stevenson           Judge                             West Palm Beach, FL

Class of 2007
Anthony K.G. Barbar            Business Executive                Boca Raton, FL
Scott Cahill                   Business Executive                Orlando, FL
Dr. Joseph R. Gregory          Business Executive                Bristol, TN
Daniel A. Hanley               Attorney                          West Palm Beach, FL
James C. Jenkins               Business Executive                West Palm Beach, FL
Richard S. Johnson             Sr., Business Executive           West Palm Beach, FL
102      Directory
  Richard A. Krause                    Business Executive                       West Palm Beach, FL
  John Little                          Attorney                                 West Palm Beach, FL
             Undergraduate
  Barbara A. Moore                   2006-2007
                                       CPA                                      West Palm Beach, FL
  John J. Rinker                       Business Executive                       West Palm Beach, FL
  Gary P. Schroeder                    Business Executive (retired)             Juno Beach, FL
  Robert W. Simpson                    Business Executive                       West Palm Beach, FL
  Kathryn Vecellio                                                              West Palm Beach, FL
  William E. Yeargin                   Business Executive                       West Palm Beach, FL

  Class of 200
  Michael J. Stevens                   Business Executive                       Jupiter, FL
  Michael S. Lee ‘0                   Business Executive                       Palm Beach Gardens, FL
  Dr. John M. Gregory                  Business Executive                       Bristol, TN

  Life Trustees
  Donald E. Warren
  John P. Greene III
  Thomas R. Pledger

  Trustee Emeritus
  Leon Landon
  Robert Kelly
  Ralph A. Sullivan, Jr.




  ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTORY
  Administrative Cabinet
  David W. Clark, Ph.D.                President
  Joseph A. Kloba, Ed.D.               Provost and Chief Academic Officer
  William M. B. Fleming, Jr., B.A.     Vice President for Development
  George Gall, M.B.A.                  Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
  S. Francis Gentry, M.S.              Executive Assistant to the President
  Buckley A. James, M.A.               Vice President for Enrollment Services
  Kenneth L. Mahanes, Ph.D.            Vice President for Religious Life
  Mary Ann Searle, Ed.D.               Vice President for Student Development

  Academic Administration
  Joseph A. Kloba, Ed.D.               Provost and Chief Academic Officer
  J. Barton Starr, Ph.D.               Dean, School of Arts and Sciences
  Mary Craft, Ed.D.                    Assistant Provost for Effectiveness, Planning and Accreditation
  Cindy S. Lewis, M.S.                 Executive Assistant to the Provost and Chief Academic Officer
  Robert M. Myers, D.B.A.              Dean, Rinker School of Business
  J. Duane Meeks, M.A.                 Interim Dean, School of Communication and Media
  James A. Laub, Ed.D.                 Dean, MacArthur School of Continuing Education
  D. Melise Bunker, Ed.D.              Interim Dean, School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  E. Randolph Richards, Ph.D.          Dean, School of Ministry
  Lloyd Mims, D.M.A.                   Dean, School of Music and Fine Arts
  Linda Miller, Ed.D.                  Dean, School of Nursing
  Daniel L. Brown, Pharm.D.            Dean, Gregory School of Pharmacy
  J. Ray Doerksen, M.L.S.              Dean, University Library
  Craig Domeck, M.B.A.                 Interim Dean, External Campuses
  Carolanne Brown, M.Ed.               Dean, Institutional Research and Reports
                                                                                          Directory              103
Business Services Administrative Staff
George Gall                          Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
                                                                 Palm Beach Atlantic University
Amanda Day-Frantz                    Director of Campus Store
Mona Lea Hicks                       Associate Vice President for Human Resources
Suzie Lenart                         Director of Employment Processing and Special Projects
Allen McEniry                        Associate Vice President for Auxiliary Services
Renae Murray                         Controller
Robert Priolo                        Associate Vice President for Facilities and Construction
Mike Steger                          Director of Physical Plant Services (National Mgt Resources Corporation)

Development Office Administrative Staff
William M. B. Fleming, Jr.           Vice President for Development
Dianne Dorsey                        Assistant Writer
Barbara Farnan                       Director of Community Services
Kristi Hodge                         Publications Coordinator
Melissa Mixon                        Assistant Director of Alumni Relations
Becky Peeling                        Director of Marketing
Mary Lewis                           Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations
Ken Prater                           Assistant Director of Development Services
Patrick Whitehead                    University Counsel and Director of Planned Giving

Enrollment Services Administrative Staff
Buck James                           Vice President for Enrollment Services
Kathleen DeCamara                    Assistant Director of Student Services
Laura Leinweber                      Director of Evening/Graduate Admission
Rod Sullivan                         Director of Day Admission
Audrey Waters                        Dean for Academic Records & Advisement
Joan Wilson                          Registrar




FACULTY             (alphabetical)

Deborah Abdo (2002)                                          Velmarie Albertini (2003)
Associate Professor of Education                             Associate Professor of Christian Social Ministry
School of Education and Behavioral Studies                   School of Ministry
B.S., State University of New York at Fredonia;              B.A., College of New Rochelle; M.A., M.S.W., Ph.D.,
M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Cortland;           Florida International University; Additional studies,
Ed.S., Ph.D. Candidate, Barry University.                    Reformed Theological Seminary.

Ahmmed Ally (2004)                                           Deborah Lee Ames (2003)
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences               Associate Professor of English
Gregory School of Pharmacy                                   School of Arts and Sciences
M.D., Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka University,               B.A., M.A., University of Utah; Ph.D., Oklahoma
Bangladesh; Ph.D., Chiba University, Japan.                  State University.

Kathleen M. Anderson (1996)                                  David M. Athey (2003)
Associate Professor of English                               Assistant Professor of English
School of Arts and Sciences                                  School of Arts and Sciences
Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2006                       B.A., St. Cloud State University; M.F.A., Hamline
A.B., Harvard University; M.A., Ph.D., University of         University.
Iowa.

Karelynne Ayayo (2004)                                       Merton P. Baker (2004)
Assistant Professor of New Testament                         Instructor of Chemistry
School of Ministry                                            School of Arts and Sciences
B.A., The College of Wooster; M.A., Gordon-Conwell            B.S., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University.
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Boston University.
104      Directory
  Cora Barnhart (2001)                                   Patricia A. Basset (2002)
  Associate Professor of Economics                       Associate Professor of Mathematics
  Rinker School of Business                              School of Arts and Sciences
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
  B.S., Francis Marion University; M.A., Ph.D., Clem-    Director of Online Learning
  son University.                                        B.A., Westfield State Teachers College; M.A., Uni-
                                                         versity of Maine, Orono.

  Stephanie Bennett (2005)                               Wesley B. Borucki (2003)
  Assistant Professor of Communication                   Assistant Professor of History
  School of Communication and Media                      School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., Cedar Crest College; M.A., Monmouth Univer-      B.A., Michigan State University; M.A., University
  sity; Ph.D. Candidate, Regent University.              of Massachusetts – Amherst; Ph.D., University of
                                                         Alabama.

  Lena Anne Brackin (2002)                               David Brauer (2001)
  Assistant Professor of Communication                   Assistant Professor of English
  School of Communication and Media                      School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., University of Central Florida; M.A., Azusa       B.A., Texas A&M University; M.A., Ph.D., University
  Pacific University; Ph.D., University of Arizona.      of Georgia.

  H. Denise Breitkreuz (2005)                            Christine L. Brooks (2006)
  Assistant Professor of Physical Education              Assistant Professor of Nursing
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies             School of Nursing
  B.S., Southeastern Oklahoma State University; M.S.,    B.S.N., Georgia Southern University; M.S.N., Ken-
  Baylor University.                                     nesaw State University.

  Brenna M. Brown (2005)                                 Carolanne Brown (1991)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice               Instructor of Education
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                             School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  Pharm.D., The University of Texas.                     Dean of Institutional Research and Reports
                                                         B.S., M.Ed., Texas Tech University.

  Dana A. Brown (2005)                                   Daniel L. Brown (2005)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice               Professor of Pharmacy Practice
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                             Gregory School of Pharmacy, Dean
  Pharm.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel       B.S., University of Wisconsin; Pharm.D., University
  Hill.                                                  of the Pacific.

  Fred J. Browning (2003)                                Sara Louise Browning (2005)
  Assistant Professor of Physics                         Instructor of Biology
  School of Arts and Sciences                            School of Arts and Sciences
  B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois-Chicago.     A.S., Waubonsee Community College; B.S., Univer-
                                                         sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.S., Northern
                                                         Illinois University.

  Mark Peter Buechsel (2006)                             D. Melise Bunker (1989)
  Assistant Professor of English                         Professor of Education
  School of Arts and Sciences                            School of Education and Behavioral Studies, Dean
  B.A., Northern Illinois University; M.A., Washington   Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 1997
  University in St. Louis; Ph.D. Candidate, Baylor       B.A., Georgia Southwestern College; M.Ed., Univer-
  University                                             sity of Georgia; Ed.S., Appalachian State University;
                                                         Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University.

  Allison C. Butcher (2006)                              Terriel R. Byrd (1999)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice               Associate Professor of Religion
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                             School of Ministry
  Pharm.D., University of Michigan.                      A.S., Cincinnati Bible College and Seminary; B.A.,
                                                         M.A., Miami University; M.Div., United Theological
                                                         Seminary; Ph.D., The Union Institute and University.

  Ann Cadaret (2004)                                     John H. Calhoun (1983)
  Assistant Professor of Theatre                         Professor of History and Political Science
  School of Communication and Media                      School of Arts and Sciences
  B.F.A., University of Florida; M.F.A., Pennsylvania    A.B., Albright College; M.A., Rutgers, The State
  State University.                                      University of New Jersey; Ph.D., University of
                                                         Pittsburgh.

  Judy Campbell (2005)                                   Rozenna B. Carr (2003)
  Professor of Nursing                                   Assistant Professor of Biology
  School of Nursing                                      School of Arts and Sciences
  B.S.N., M.S.N., University of Florida; Ed.S., Ed.D.,   B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Louisville.
  Florida Atlantic University.
                                                                                     Directory                   105
David K. Carson (2006)                                  Judith T. Casey (2001)
Professor of Psychology                                 Assistant Professor of Psychology
Orlando Campus                                          School of Education and Behavioral Studies
                                                            Palm Beach Atlantic University
B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., Denver Semi-        B.A., Greenville College; M.A., Western Evangelical
nary; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.                     Seminary; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University.

Thomas C. Chesnes (2002)                                David W. Clark (2003)
Assistant Professor of Biology                          Professor of Television Arts
School of Arts and Sciences                             School of Communication and Media, President
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida.               B.A., Evangel University; M.Div., Northern Baptist
                                                        Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of
                                                        Iowa; Additional studies, The Lutheran School of
                                                        Theology.

David Compton (2000)                                    Brett Cook (2004)
Professor of Quantitative Methods                       Assistant Professor of Physical Education
Rinker School of Business                               School of Education and Behavioral Studies
B.A., Concord College; M.S., Ph.D., University of       B.S., M.S., State University of New York at Brock-
Georgia.                                                port.

Paul Copan (2004)                                       Victor A. Copan (2004)
The Pledger Family Chair and Associate Professor of     Associate Professor of Ministry
Philosophy and Ethics                                   School of Ministry
School of Ministry                                      B.A., Columbia International University; M.A.,
B.A., Columbia International University; M.A.,          M.Div., Trinity International University; Th.D., Uni-
M.Div., Trinity International University; Ph.D., Mar-   versity of Vienna.
quette University.

Janet Cornella (2001)                                   Mary E. Craft (2005)
Assistant Professor of Education                        Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies
School of Education and Behavioral Studies              MacArthur School of Leadership
B.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D. Candidate,            Assistant Provost for Effectiveness, Planning and
Florida Atlantic University.                            Accreditation
                                                        B.S., M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ’93, ’96;
                                                        Ed.D., Nova-Southeastern University.

J. Ray Doerksen (2004)                                  Craig Domeck (2005)
Librarian                                               Assistant Professor of Management
University Library, Dean                                Orlando Campus
B.A., Tennessee Temple University; M.A., Michigan       Interim Dean of External Campuses
State University; M.A., Western Seminary; M.L.S.,       B.A., Northwestern University; M.B.A., Rollins Col-
University of Western Ontario.                          lege; Ed.D. Candidate, University of Central Florida.

Denise Douglas-Brown (2006)                             Judith Drumm (2005)
Assistant Professor of English/Writing                  Assistant Professor of Nursing
MacArthur School of Leadership                          School of Nursing
B.A., California State University; M.A., University     B.S.N., Adelphi University; M.S.N., additional stud-
of East Asia, South China; Ph.D., University of         ies, Florida Atlantic University.
Durham, England.

B. DeeAnn Dugan (2003)                                  Cheri L. du Mée (1994)
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice                Associate Librarian
Gregory School of Pharmacy                              University Library, Reference Librarian
B.A., University of Central Florida; Pharm.D., Uni-     B.S., Miami Christian College; M.A., University of
versity of Florida.                                     South Florida.

Joe J. Eassa Jr. (1977)                                 Joanne Eckler (2000)
Professor of Graduate Business Studies                  Associate Professor of Education
Rinker School of Business                               MacArthur School of Leadership
PBA Professor of the Year, 1988                         Associate Dean
B.S.B.A., University of Florida; M.B.A., Florida        B.S., M.S., Ed.S., Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University.
Atlantic University; D.B.A., Nova Southeastern
University.

Susan H. Edgar (2004)                                   J. Gordon Eisenman (1988)
Instructor of Journalism                                Professor of Education and Religion
School of Communication and Media                       MacArthur School of Leadership
Director of Student Publications                        Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2001
B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., American Univer-    B.A., Furman University; M.R.E., Midwestern
sity.                                                   Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., University of
                                                        Georgia.
106      Directory
  Jenifer B. Elmore (2005)                                Philip L. Estes (2004)
  Assistant Professor of English                          Associate Librarian
  School of Arts and Sciences                             University Library
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
  B.A., University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Florida     Collection Management Librarian
  State University.                                       B.A., Kansas City College & Bible School; M.A.,
                                                          Columbia International University; M.A., M.Div., Bob
                                                          Jones University; M.A., University of South Florida.

  Mary J. Ferrill (2006)                                  William M. B. Fleming, Jr. (1992)
  Professor of Pharmacy Practice                          Lecturer of Political Science
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                              School of Arts and Sciences
  Associate Dean for Academic Affairs                     Vice President for Development
  Pharm.D., University of Nebraska..                      B.A., Guilford College.

  Tom Fowler (2003)                                       Charles S. Freeman (2004)
  Assistant Professor of Mathematics                      Assistant Professor of Musicology
  School of Arts and Sciences                             School of Music and Fine Arts
  B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.S., Ph.D., Georgia       B.Mus., Brewton-Parker College; M.C.M., Southern
  Institute of Technology.                                Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Florida State
                                                          University.

  George Gall (2004)                                      Jim E. Glover (2005)
  Assistant Professor of Applied Finance and Ac-          Associate Professor of Mathematics
  counting                                                School of Arts and Sciences
  Rinker School of Business                               B.Sc., Langston University; M.A.T., Harvard Uni-
  Vice President and Chief Financial Officer              versity; M.A., State University of New York; Ph.D.,
  B.S., Florida Southern College; B.B.A., M.B.A.,         Auburn University.
  Florida Atlantic University.

  Daniel J. Gordon (2003)                                 Gary J. Goss (1976)
  Associate Professor of Theatre                          Professor of Biology
  School of Communication and Media                       School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., University of South Florida; M.F.A., University   PBA Professor of the Year, 1989
  of Southern California.                                 B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., Uni-
                                                          versity of Miami.

  John R. Grawe (1994)                                    Julie Harren (2004)
  Associate Professor of Chemistry                        Assistant Professor of Psychology
  School of Arts and Sciences                             School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.S., Ph.D., Uni-   B.S., Tennessee Temple University; M.S., Ph.D.,
  versity of Southern Mississippi.                        Nova Southeastern University.

  Katherine M. Heller (2003)                              Fred E. Hembree (1987)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice                Professor of History
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                              School of Arts and Sciences
  B.S., University of Florida; Pharm.D., University of    B.A., M.A.T., Winthrop College; Ph.D., University of
  Florida.                                                South Carolina.

  Philip Henry (1999)                                     Patrick A. Heyman (2003)
  Associate Professor of Psychology                       Assistant Professor of Nursing
  School of Education and Behavioral Sciences             School of Nursing
  B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘79; M.Div.,      B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘94; B.S.N.,
  Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.S.,        M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Florida.
  Chestnut Hill College; Ph.D., Temple University;
  Licensed Psychologist.

  Geoffrey Holland (2002)                                 Robert Homer-Drummond (2002)
  Associate Professor of Music                            Assistant Professor of Theatre
  School of Music and Fine Arts                           School of Communication and Media
  B.M., Westminster Choir College; M.M., University       B.A., Wheaton College; M.F.A., University of Lou-
  of Cincinnati; D.M., Indiana University.                isville.

  Donna Hopkins (1994)                                    David Horkott (2002)
  Assistant Professor of Mathematics                      Assistant Professor of Humanities
  School of Arts and Sciences                             School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., Carson Newman College; M.S., Middle Ten-          B.A., M.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., Univer-
  nessee State University.                                sity of Dallas.

  Buckley A. James (1991)                                 Samuel Joeckel (2002)
  Instructor of Religion                                  Assistant Professor of English
  School of Ministry                                      School of Arts and Sciences
  Vice President of Enrollment Services                   B.A., University of Nevada-Las Vegas; M.A., Baylor
  B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘87; M.A.,        University; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University.
  Fuller Theological Seminary.
                                                                                       Directory                 107
Susan E. Jones (1998)                                    Mark Kaprive (2000)
Associate Professor of English                           Instructor of Missions
School of Arts and Sciences                              School of Ministry
                                                             Palm Beach Atlantic University
Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2004                   Director of Campus Ministries and Missions
B.A., University of New Hampshire, M.A., Stetson         B.S., University of Tulsa; M.A., Biola University
University; Ph.D., University of Florida.

Geneane Kelley-Miller (1991)                             Barbara M. Kelly (2003)
Associate Professor of Education                         Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
MacArthur School of Leadership                           Gregory School of Pharmacy
B.S., M.Ed., additional studies, University of South-    Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs
ern Mississippi and Mississippi College; Ed.D., Delta    B.S., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy; M.S.,
State University; Post-doctoral studies, Mississippi     Nova Southeastern University.
College, Delta State University, University of Missis-
sippi, and Florida Gulf Coast University.

Chantée D. Kirk (2005)                                   George M. Kirkwood (2005)
Instructor of Education and Behavioral Studies           Assistant Professor of Nursing
School of Education and Behavioral Studies               School of Nursing
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., Liberty Uni-        B.S., Bowling Green State University; B.S., M.S.,
versity.                                                 Syracuse University; M.Div., Westminster Theologi-
                                                         cal Seminary; A.B.D., Cleveland State University.

Kathleen Klein (1999)                                    Joseph A. Kloba (1995)
Assistant Professor of Dance                             Professor of Psychology
School of Music and Fine Arts                            School of Education and Behavioral Studies
B.F.A., M.F.A., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D.,      Provost & Chief Academic Officer
Lynn University.                                         B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania;
                                                         Ed.D., University of Rochester; Additional studies,
                                                         State University of New York at Brockport, Univer-
                                                         sity of Arizona in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Jeffrey A. Kyle (2004)                                   Kimberly S. Ladd (2003)
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice                 Assistant Professor of Lifework Planning
Gregory School of Pharmacy                               Rinker School of Business
Pharm.D., Samford University.                            Director of Rinker School of Business Internships
                                                         B.S., Baylor University; M.A., Southern Methodist
                                                         University.

Timothy Ladd (2000)                                      Ann Langlois (2001)
Assistant Professor of Education                         Assistant Professor of Business
School of Education and Behavioral Studies               Rinker School of Business
B.A., M.I.M., Baylor University; Ed.D., Texas A&M        B.A., Bryant College; M.B.A., Bryant College;
University.                                              D.B.A., Argosy University.

Edgar Langlois (1998)                                    James A. Laub (2005)
Associate Professor of Marketing                         Professor of Leadership Studies
Rinker School of Business                                MacArthur School of Leadership, Dean
B.A., Bryant College; M.B.A., Lesley College;            B.A., Miami Christian University; M.A., Azusa Pa-
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University.                    cific University; Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University.

David A. Lawson (2005)                                   Charles Lee (2005)
Professor of Psychology                                  Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Orlando Campus                                           Gregory School of Pharmacy
B.S., Radford University; M.A., Psy.D., Biola Uni-       B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., Auburn
versity.                                                 University; Ph.D., University of California.

Charles E. Lester (1991)                                 Billy R. Lewter (1985)
Professor of Communication                               Professor of Psychology
School of Communication and Media                        School of Education and Behavioral Studies
Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2002                   PBA Professor of the Year, 1993
B.R.E., Baptist Bible Seminary; M.A., Eastern Michi-     A.B., University of Louisville; M.A., Eastern Ken-
gan; Ph.D., Wayne State University.                      tucky University; Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Charles O. Lobdell (1983)                                Donald W. Lovejoy (1979)
Professor of Chemistry                                   Associate Professor of Oceanography
School of Arts and Sciences                              School of Arts and Sciences
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.Div., Trinity          PBA Professor of the Year, 1987
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., State University     A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia
of New York at Binghamton.                               University.
10      Directory
  Kenneth Mahanes (1998)                                 Donald McCulloch (1996)
  Associate Professor of Ministry                        Associate Professor of Psychology
  School of Ministry                                     School of Education and Behavioral Studies
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
  Vice President for Religious Life                      B.A., The King’s College; M.A., Wheaton Col-
  B.A., Georgetown College; M.R.E., Ph.D., The           lege; M.S., Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University;
  Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.                 Licensed Psychologist.

  Angie K. McDonald (2003)                               Deborah McEniry (1996)
  Associate Professor of Psychology                      Professor of Theatre
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies             School of Communication and Media
  B.S., Abilene Christian University; M.S., Texas A&M    B.M., Westminster Choir College; M.A., Ph.D., New
  University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.      York University.

  Denise McGill (2005)                                   J. Duane Meeks (2002)
  Assistant Professor of Visual Journalism               Associate Professor of Mass Media and Director of
  School of Communication and Media                      Video Productions
  B.J., University of Missouri; M.A., Ohio University.   School of Communication and Media, Interim Dean
                                                         B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., Regent University;
                                                         A.B.D., University of Maryland.

  Allana J. Mehlhorn (2002)                              Janet G. Metzger (2000)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice               Professor of Communication
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                             School of Communication and Media
  B.S., Pharm.D., Rutgers, The State University of       B.A., Lewis and Clark College; M.A., Portland State
  New Jersey.                                            University; Ph.D., University of Southern California.

  Jennifer Michael (1999)                                Bert A. Miller III (1991)
  Assistant Professor of Physical Education              Associate Professor of Education
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies             School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  B.S., Florida State University; M.A., Ed.M., A.B.D.,   Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2000
  Columbia University.                                   B.S., Samford University; M.Ed., Ed.D., additional
                                                         studies, University of Southern Mississippi.

  David R. Miller (2004)                                 Linda Miller (2004)
  Professor of Psychology                                Professor of Nursing
  MacArthur School of Leadership                         School of Nursing, Dean
  B.S., M.Ed., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Post-      B.S.N., University of South Carolina; M.S.N., Ed.D.,
  doctoral studies, University of South Carolina.        University of Virginia.

  Thomas Miller (2004)                                   Lloyd Mims (2000)
  Assistant Professor of Business                        Professor of Music
  MacArthur School of Leadership                         School of Music and Fine Arts, Dean
  B.A., Butler University; M.P.A., Western Michigan      B.M.E., M.M., University of Southern Mississippi;
  University.                                            D.M.A., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

  Marilyn Mims (2004)                                    Deborah Moody (1999)
  Artist in Residence of Vocal Music, Instructor of      Instructor of Christian Social Ministries
  Vocal Music                                            School of Ministry
  School of Music and Fine Arts                          Director of Workship
  B.M., University of Southern Mississippi; Additional   B.S.W., Murray State University; M.S.W., Southern
  studies, Indiana University.                           Baptist Theological Seminary.

  Bobbie Morrison (2006)                                 Carmela R. Nanton (2001)
  Assistant Professor of Nursing                         Assistant Professor of Education
  School of Nursing                                      MacArthur School of Leadership
  B.S.N., M.S.N., Jacksonville State University.         B.A., State University of New York at Stoneybrook;
                                                         M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘98; Ed.D.,
                                                         Columbia University.

  Edwin R. Nordine (1987)                                Rhonda M. Norwood (2005)
  Librarian                                              Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
  University Library, Assistant Dean                     Gregory School of Pharmacy
  B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University; M.L.S.,      Pharm.D., Florida A&M University
  North Texas State University; Additional studies,
  Eastern Illinois University.

  Nicholas V. Palmieri (2004)                            Moon-Sook Park (2003)
  Associate Professor of Adult Education                 Associate Professor of Music
  MacArthur School of Leadership                         School of Music and Fine Arts
  B.A., California University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed.,    B.M., Seoul National University; Graduate Diplomas,
  Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., University of    Staatliche Hochschule für Musik Freiburg. i. Br.;
  South Florida.                                         Saarland Hochschule für Musik; Staatliche Hoch-
                                                         schule für Musik und Darstellende Stuttgart; Privata
                                                         Diploma di Maestra Cavalli, Milano.
                                                                                     Directory                   10
Frank Y. Patrick (2003)                                 Pamela Payne (1999)
Assistant Professor of Old Testament                    Assistant Professor of English
School of Ministry                                      MacArthur School of Leadership
                                                            Palm Beach Atlantic University
B.A., Samford University; M.Div., Beeson Divinity       B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Florida Atlantic
School; Th.M., Duke Divinity School; Ph.D., Duke        University; Additional studies, University of Miami.
University.

Kenneth Pembamoto (2002)                                Marcia Pérez-Rivera (2005)
Associate Professor of Computer Information             Associate Professor of Spanish
Systems                                                 School of Arts and Sciences
Rinker School of Business                               B.A., University of Havana; M.A., Ph.D., University
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at      of Miami.
Buffalo.

Kenneth Phillips (1998)                                 Francisco A. Plaza (2005)
Associate Professor of Music Education                  Assistant Professor of Political Science and Humani-
School of Music and Fine Arts                           ties
B.A., University of Mobile; M.M.E., University of       School of Arts and Sciences
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Temple University.         B.A., M.A., Universidad Metropolitana (Venezuela);
                                                        M.A., Ph.D., The Catholic University of America.

Gary R. Poe (1995)                                      Roger Pontbriand (2005)
Associate Professor of History and Humanities           Assistant Professor of Popular Music
School of Arts and Sciences                             School of Music and Fine Arts
B.S., Colorado State University; M.Div., Golden Gate    B.M., M.M., University of Akron.
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The Southern
Baptist Theological Seminary.

David Pounds (2004)                                     Kris Pratt (2004)
Associate Professor of Graphic Arts                     Assistant Professor of Religion
School of Music and Fine Arts                           MacArthur School of Leadership
B.A., M.A., M.F.A., California State University, Ful-   B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
lerton.                                                 M.Div., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., Baylor
                                                        University.

Charles V. Preuss (2002)                                Linda C. Raeder (2001)
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Studies           Assistant Professor of Humanities
Gregory School of Pharmacy                              School of Arts and Sciences
B.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University.                    B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; M.Ed.,
                                                        University of Virginia; M.A., University of Richmond;
                                                        Ph.D., The Catholic University of America.

Gwendolynn D. Randall (2006)                            Jamie Ressler (2001)
Assistant Professor of Nursing                          Assistant Professor of Marketing
School of Nursing                                       Rinker School of Business
B.S., Howard University; M.S., St. Joseph’s Uni-        B.A., Florida State University; M.B.A., Palm Beach
versity; M.S.N., Temple University; Ph.D., Barry        Atlantic University, ‘99; Additional studies, Nova
University.                                             Southeastern University.

E. Randolph Richards (2006)                             Tye Riter (1996)
Professor of Biblical Studies                           Associate Professor of Music
School of Ministry, Dean                                School of Music and Fine Arts
B.S., Texas Wesleyan College; M.Div., Ph.D., South-     B.M., Eastman School of Music, University of Roch-
western Baptist Theological Seminary.                   ester; M.A., Wichita State University.

Beate Rodewald (1989)                                   Michael Ryan (2004)
Associate Professor of English                          Assistant Professor of Management
School of Arts and Sciences                             Rinker School of Business
B.A., University of Freiburg; M.A., Slippery Rock       B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘00; M.S., Ad-
University; Ph.D., Kent State University.               ditional studies, Florida Atlantic University.

Olga Rybalkina (2005)                                   Gene A. Sale (2001)
Assistant Professor of Education                        Associate Professor of Psychology
School of Education and Behavioral Studies              School of Education and Behavioral Studies
B.A., M.A., Eastern Ukraine University; M.Ed.,          B.A., University of Arkansas; M.A., Liberty Univer-
Ph.D., The University of Toledo.                        sity; Ed.D., University of Sarasota.

Marile L. Santamarina (2006)                            Day Marice Scott (2004)
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice                Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Gregory School of Pharmacy                              Gregory School of Pharmacy
B.S., University of Miami; M.S., University of          Pharm.D., Florida A&M University.
Florida; Pharm.D., Nova Southeastern University.
110      Directory
  Mary Ann Searle (2004)                                    Cybèle Seeds (1994)
  Asst. Professor of Education and Behavioral Studies       Asst. Professor of Foreign Languages and Cultures
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies                School of Arts and Sciences
              Undergraduate 2006-2007
  Vice President for Student Development                    B.A., Florida Atlantic University; M.A., University of
  B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout; M.S., University     Maryland; Additional studies, University of Northern
  of Tennessee; Ed.D., Indiana University.                  Iowa, Palm Beach Atlantic University.

  Stephen W. Selby (2001)                                   Pamela K. Sigafoose (2001)
  Assistant Professor of Mathematics                        Assistant Professor of Education
  School of Arts and Sciences                               MacArthur School of Leadership
  B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A.,           B.S., M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ’93, ‘96;
  Rowan University; Additional studies, Temple              Ed.D. Candidate, Argosy University.
  University.

  Cara L. Smith (2005)                                      Carl B. Smith (1998)
  Assistant Professor of Psychology                         Associate Professor of History and Religion
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies                School of Ministry
  B.S., Central Missouri State University; M.A., Psy.D.,    B.A., Tennessee Temple University; M.Div., Temple
  Regent University.                                        Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Miami
                                                            University.

  Linda Marie Smith (2004)                                  Thomas J. St.Antoine (1998)
  Assistant Professor of Business                           Associate Professor of Communication
  MacArthur School of Leadership                            School of Communication and Media
  B.S., M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ’97, ‘99;     B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ‘93; M.A.,
  Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University; Additional studies,   Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., Louisiana State
  University of Oxford, University of Warwick, and          University.
  London Business Institute, United Kingdom.

  J. Barton Starr (2006)                                    Marilyn Stepnoski (1998)
  Professor of History                                      Associate Professor of Education
  School of Arts and Sciences, Dean                         School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  A.B., Samford University; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State      B.A., State University of New York at Binghamton;
  University.                                               M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., University of
                                                            Oregon.

  Debora A. Stewart (2000)                                  Lisa Stubbs (2005)
  Associate Librarian                                       Instructor of Psychology
  University Library, Reference Librarian                   School of Education and Behavioral Studies
  B.S.E., Ouachita Baptist University; M.L.S. Univer-       B.S., M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ’96, ’98;
  sity of Tennessee.                                        Ed.D., Argosy University.

  Brandon J. Sucher (2002)                                  Ronald L. Sumner (2002)
  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice                  Associate Professor of Digital Arts and Multi-media
  Gregory School of Pharmacy                                School of Music and Fine Arts
  Pharm.D., Texas Tech University School of Phar-           B.F.A., Indiana University; M.A., University of Chica-
  macy.                                                     go; M.F.A., Miami University.

  Chelly Templeton (2002)                                   Maurice E. Thomas (1986)
  Associate Professor of Education                          Professor of Biology
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies                School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., University of Kentucky; M.A., Marshall Univer-      Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 1998
  sity; Ed.D. Candidate, Florida Atlantic University.       B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane Uni-
                                                            versity.

  Timothy Thompson (1999)                                   Michael L. Tillett (1990)
  Associate Professor of Music                              Assistant Professor of Accounting
  School of Music and Fine Arts                             Rinker School of Business
  B.M., Samford University; M.M., D.M., Florida State       B.S., St. Thomas University; M.Acc., Florida Atlantic
  University.                                               University; CPA.

  Cynthia Toth (2005)                                       Robert K. Triplett (1988)
  Assistant Professor of Biology                            Associate Librarian
  School of Arts and Sciences                               University Library, Reference Librarian
  B.S., M.S., Ph.D., St. John’s University.                 A.B., Kansas City College and Bible School; B.S.E.,
                                                            Northeast Missouri State University; M.L.S., Empo-
                                                            ria State University.

  Emery D. Twoey (1996)                                     Peggy G. VanArman (1989)
  Professor of Education                                    Associate Professor of Biology
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies                School of Arts and Sciences
  B.A., St. Leo College; M.S., Barry University; Ed.D.,     Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 2005
  Nova Southeastern University; M.Div., Luther Rice         B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., Nova
  Seminary.                                                 Southeastern University Oceanographic Center.
                                                                                        Directory                  111
Anthony F. Verdesca, Jr. (2005)                            Henry A. Virkler (1996)
Assistant Librarian                                        Professor of Psychology
University Library, Reference Librarian                    School of Education and Behavioral Studies
                                                               Palm Beach Atlantic University
B.A., Florida Atlantic University; M.A., University of     B.A., State University of New York at Binghamton;
South Florida.                                             M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D.,
                                                           Georgia State University, Licensed Psychologist.

Julie A. Visser (2005)                                     Wagdy Wahba (2001)
Instructor of Education and Behavioral Studies             Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
School of Education and Behavioral Studies                 Gregory School of Pharmacy
B.A., M.Ed., Grand Valley State University.                B.Sc., Alexandria University, Egypt; Ph.D.,
                                                           Duquesne University.

Alex M. Wainer Jr. (2004)                                  Raymond E. Waldner (1982)
Assistant Professor of Communication                       Professor of Biology
School of Media and Communication                          School of Arts and Sciences
B.A., Valdosta State University; M.A., Ph.D., Regent       PBA Professor of the Year, 1994
University.                                                B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., Uni-
                                                           versity of Puerto Rico.

Daniel H. Waldrop (2004)                                   Joseph M. Webb (2002)
Assistant Professor of Broadcasting                        Professor of Global Media and Communication
School of Communication and Media                          School of Communication and Media
B.A., West Coast Bible College; M.A., Regent               B.A., Lincoln Christian College; M.T.S., Emory Uni-
University.                                                versity; D. Min., The Claremont School of Theology;
                                                           M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois.

David A. Wilcox, Jr. (2006)                                Carol Woodfin (1993)
Assistant Professor of Psychology                          Associate Professor of History
Orlando Campus                                             School of Arts and Sciences
B.A., Belhaven College; M.A., Wheaton College;             B.A., Hardin-Simmons University; Certificate in
M.Div., Liberty Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Liberty       Theology, International Baptist Theological Semi-
University.                                                nary, Ruschlikon, Switzerland; M.A., Wake Forest
                                                           University; Additional studies, University of Zurich;
                                                           Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.

Marlene Woodward-Cooper (1970)                             Gerald D. Wright (2004)
Professor of Music                                         Professor of Theology and Missions
School of Music and Fine Arts                              School of Ministry
PBA Professor of the Year, 1992                            B.A., East Texas Baptist College; M.Div., Th.D., New
Juilliard School of Music; B.M., M.M., Manhattan           Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.
School of Music.

Letrice Young (2005)                                       Seena Zierler-Brown (2001)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Sport Management           Associate Professor of Pharmacy Administration
Rinker School of Business                                  Gregory School of Pharmacy
B.A., M.S., Southern Illinois University; M.S.,            B.Sc., Florida International University; Pharm.D.,
Eastern Illinois University; Additional studies, Florida   Nova Southeastern University.
State University.

Steven T. Zombory (2004)
Assistant Professor of Psychology
School of Education and Behavioral Studies
B.A., Rutgers University; M.Div., Moody Bible Insti-
tute; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology.
Senior Faculty

Senior Faculty
Duane F. Bunker (1989)                                     Ray E. Robinson (1989)
Senior Associate Professor of Education                    Distinguished Senior Professor of Music
School of Education and Behavioral Studies                 School of Music and Fine Arts
A.B., Florida Southern College; M.Ed., Georgia Col-        Corts Outstanding Teaching Award, 1995
lege; Ed.D., University of Georgia.                        B.A., San Jose State University; M.M., Indiana
                                                           University; D.Mus.Ed., Indiana University; Additional
                                                           studies, Cambridge University.

Dona Thornton (1977)
Senior Professor of Education
PBA Professor of the Year, 1982
A.B., State University of Northern Iowa; M.A.,
Florida Atlantic University; Ed.D., additional studies,
Nova Southeastern University.
112      Directory
  Emeriti Faculty
  Gloria Koczwanski (1973)                              Theodore G. Metzger (1990)
               Undergraduate 2006-2007
  Associate Professor of Education Emeritus             Distinguished Professor of International Business
  School of Education and Behavioral Studies            and Law Emeritus
  A.B., Palm Beach Atlantic University, ’72; M.Ed.,     Rinker School of Business
  Ed.S., Florida Atlantic University.                   B.A., Williams College; J.D., Harvard Law School.




  ADJUNCT FACULTY (alphabetical)
  Jeffrey Apana (1994)                                  Marie Ashley (2000)
  Instructor of Oboe                                    Instructor of Voice
  B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., Florida State    B.M., Westminster Choir College; M.M., University
  University.                                           of Hartford.

  Susan Atherly (2001)                                  David Axton (2001)
  Instructor of Education                               Instructor of Continuing Education; M.S., Palm
  B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., Barry Univer-   Beach Atlantic University; Additional studies, Argosy
  sity; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University.            University.

  Charles R. Bell III (2005)                            Randy V. Belli (2004)
  Instructor of Psychology M.A., American Baptist       Instructor of Mathematics B.S., Southern Christian
  Seminary of the West; M.A., Pasadena College;         University; M.S., Nova Southeastern University.
  Ph.D., Baylor University.

  Marcio Bezerra (2000)                                 Dana Bible (1988)
  Instructor of Piano Artist Diploma, University of     Instructor of Ministry B.S., University of Tennessee,
  Hartford; M.M., Arizona State University; D.M.A.,     M.Div., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological
  University of Arizona.                                Seminary.

  John Bishop (1993)                                    Sandra Blanton (2003)
  Instructor of Art History A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Boston   Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S., Palm
  University.                                           Beach Atlantic University.

  Kimberly Bouchillon (2002)                            John Brackin (2001)
  Instructor of Education B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic     Instructor of Ministry B.A., University of Central
  University; M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University.       Florida; M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological
                                                        Seminary; D.Min., Trinity Theological Seminary.

  Pam Brooks (2002)                                     Eileen Brown (2005)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Avila Col-   Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., State
  lege; M.S.W., Florida State University.               University of New York, M.A., St. John’s University;
                                                        M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College.

  Perry Brown (2000)                                    Christine Busse (1995)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Palm Beach   Instructor of English B.A., Carson-Newman College;
  Atlantic University; M.B.A., Baylor University.       M.A., Troy State University.

  Dennis Campbell (2003)                                Laurie Campbell (2000)
  Instructor of Electronic Media B.S., Palm Beach       Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Palm
  Atlantic University; M.A., Southwestern Baptist       Beach Atlantic University; M.Ed., University of
  Theological Seminary.                                 South Florida.

  Vicki Jo Carrier (2005)                               Tommy Carrington (2001)
  Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., Baylor University;      Instructor of Ministry B.S., Miami Christian College;
  M.S.N. studies, Florida Atlantic University.          M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Additional
                                                        studies, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary.

  David Carson (2006)                                   James P. Cima (2005)
  Instructor of Psychology B.A., University of Colo-    Instructor of Health Performance B.S., Cornell Uni-
  rado; M.A., Denver Seminary; Ph.D., Texas Tech        versity; D.C., New York Chiropractic College.
  University.

  June Clarke (2005)                                    Patrick Clifford (2000)
  Instructor of Education B.S., Florida State Univer-   Instructor of Violin and Viola, Director of Prepara-
  sity; M.S., Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University.      tory Department B.M., Cleveland Institute of Music;
                                                        M.M., University of Miami.
                                                                                      Directory                113
Thomas Clinksdale (2001)                                 Eugene Cloutier (2005)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Palm            Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Clemson
Beach Atlantic University; M.Div., Reformed Theo-        University; M.S., Nova Southeastern University.
                                                             Palm Beach Atlantic University
logical Seminary.

Fred Dart (2002)                                         John Day (1998)
Instructor of Low Brass B.M.E., University of Michi-     Instructor of Continuing Education B.Mus., South-
gan; M.M.E., University of Maryland.                     west Baptist University; M.S., Nova Southeastern
                                                         University; M.A., Texas Christian University.

Ruth A. Doran (2005)                                     John Duryea (2001)
Instructor of Education B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic        Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., New York
University; M.S., Florida International University;      Institute of Technology; M.A., Regent University;
Ed.D. Candidate; Florida Atlantic University.            Ed.D., University of Central Florida.

John Ebbesmeyer (2002)                                   Sandra Edelson (2001)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Southeast       Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S., Palm
Missouri State University; M.B.A., Lindenwood            Beach Atlantic University.
College.

Michael Ellert (1985)                                    Robert M. Emmons (2004)
Instructor in Bassoon Diploma, Julliard School of        Instructor of Ministry B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Div.,
Music.                                                   Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

James Evans (2004)                                       Kathryn Evans (2002)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Lancaster       Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Palm
Bible College; M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University.     Beach Atlantic University; M.S., Nova Southeastern
                                                         University.

Donald Fallin (2003)                                     Forrest Flaniken (2001)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Georgia         Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Davidson
College and State University; M.A., Regent Univer-       College; M.B.A., Vanderbilt University.
sity.

Bonnie M. Fletcher (1996)                                Michael Forte (1995)
Instructor of Education B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic        Instructor of Clarinet B.M., Syracuse University.
University; M.A., Florida Atlantic University.

Mark Galsky (2005)                                       Edward Gamble (2002)
Staff Accompanist in Music Studies, Stetson Uni-         Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., University
versity.                                                 of Memphis; M.A., University of Memphis.

Terry Ganaway (2004)                                     Aimee Gordon (2004)
Instructor of Education B.L.S., M.S.W., Barry Uni-       Instructor of Dance B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic
versity; Ph.D., Westbrook University.                    University.

Edward Graham (2003)                                     Louis Gaudio (2005)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Stetson         Instructor of Continuing Education B.B.A.,
University; M.A., Stetson University.                    Northwood University; M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic
                                                         University; Ph.D. Candidate, Nova Southeastern
                                                         University.

Rita Groton (2004)                                       Beth G. Hallquist (1993)
Instructor of Business A.A., Palm Beach Community        Instructor of Communication B.A., M.A., University
College; B.S., M.B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic Univer-       of Florida.
sity; Additional studies, Florida Atlantic University.

Jane C. Hart (2001)                                      Eileen Hebron (2004)
Instructor of Education B.S., University of Miami;       Instructor of Dance Sieskaya Ballet Academy;
M.Ed., Sam Houston University.                           School of American Ballet

James Herndon (2001)                                     Arthur Heyman (2000)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Old             Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., M.A.,
Dominion University; M.A., Pepperdine University;        University of Florida; M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist
Ph.D., Old Dominion University; Ed.D., University of     Theological Seminary.
Sarasota.

Jennifer L. Heyman (2004)                                Richard Hill (2003)
Instructor of Dance B.S., Pharm.D., University of        Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., M.A.,
Florida.                                                 Ph.D., Georgetown University.

Bruce Hoffman (1999)                                     Patricia Holland (2002)
Instructor of Physical Education & Athletic Training     Instructor of Organ, Staff Accompanist B.M., Ohio
B.S., Southeast Missouri State University; M.S.,         Wesleyan; M.M., M.L.S., Indiana University.
University of Illinois.
114      Directory
  Greg Hovey (2000)                                        Robert Jerus (2001)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., University      Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Lehigh
  of Central Florida; M.B.A., Rollins College.             University; M.B.A., St. John’s University; M.A.,
               Undergraduate 2006-2007                     University of St. Thomas.

  Audy Johnston (2002)                                     Susan Joyce (1985)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S.,           Instructor of Piano B.M., Mannes College of Music;
  Palm Beach Atlantic University; Additional studies,      M.M., Julliard School; D.M.A., University of Miami.
  Florida Atlantic University.

  Barbara Kaskinen (2003)                                  Stefanie Katz (2000)
  Staff Accompanist in Music B.A., M.A.T., Florida         Staff Accompanist B.M., Univesity of Miami; M.M.,
  Atlantic University.                                     Cincinnati Conservatory.

  Anna Tarzier Keith (2005)                                Beverly A. Keyser (2000)
  Instructor of Vocal Music B.S., University of Tennes-    Instructor of Education B.S., University of Virginia;
  see; M.M. Northwestern University.                       M.S., University of South Florida.

  Michael King (2003)                                      Demetrius Klein (2000)
  Instructor of Business B.S., Pennsylvania State Uni-     Resident Artist in Dance B.G.S., Palm Beach Atlan-
  versity; J.D., University of California Los Angeles.     tic University.

  Penelope Koleos-Williams (2003)                          Joseph Lee (2005)
  Instructor of Costume Design A.S., Northwood             Instructor of Business B.A., J.D., Stetson University.
  University.

  Suzie Lenart (2001)                                      Douglas M. LePelley (2005)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S., Palm      Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Hiram Col-
  Beach Atlantic University.                               lege; M.S., Case Western Reserve University; M.A.,
                                                           Ph.D., The Fielding Graduate Institute.

  Charles Lewis (2003)                                     Ann Lewis (2005)
  Instructor of Church Music B.M.E., University of         Instructor of Nursing B.A., Albright College; A.S.N.,
  South Carolina; M.M.E., Florida State University;        Hahnemann University; M.S.N., University of
  M.M., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.         Florida; M.A. studies, Asbury Theological Seminary..

  Terrance R. Lewis (2002)                                 Anthony Mages (1995)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., North           Instructor of Organizational Management B.A.,
  Central Bible College; M.Div., M.A., Assemblies of       M.B.A., Canisius College; D.B.A., Nova Southeast-
  God Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller Theologi-       ern University.
  cal Seminary.

  Stephen Majeske (2004)                                   Maria Maldonado (2004)
  Instructor of Violin Artist Diploma, Curtis Institute    Instructor of Continuing Education A.A., B.S., M.S.,
  of Music.                                                Palm Beach Atlantic University.

  Gayle McArdle (2005)                                     Eleanor McCluskey (1995)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Monmouth        Instructor of History M.S., Washington University;
  College; M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University.             M.A., University of Missouri; Additional studies,
                                                           Washington University.

  Walter B. McNutt (2001)                                  Liza Miranda (2003)
  Instructor of Bible B.A., Columbia International         Instructor of Continuing Education B.Mus.,
  University; M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological      Chapman University; M.A., Christian Theological
  Seminary; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.     Seminary.

  Richard Moulton (2001)                                   Martha L. Musgrove (2004)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., Rose-Hul-       Instructor of Journalism B.S., M.S., Northwestern
  man Institute of Technology; M.S., Northwestern          University.
  University; M.Div., Trinity Lutheran Seminary;
  D.Min., Reformed Theological Seminary.

  William D. Nicholas (2001)                               Laura J. Nossal (2006)
  Instructor of Psychology B.S., M.S., Palm Beach          Instructor of Education B.A., Southeastern College;
  Atlantic University; Ph.D., Capella University.          M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University.

  R. Kevin O’Brien (2001)                                  Linda Palmer (2005)
  Instructor of Physical Education B.S., University of     Instructor of Accounting B.A., Clark Atlanta Univer-
  Florida; D.C., Life University School of Chiropractic.   sity; M.T., Nova Southeastern University.

  Mark Parlier (2000)                                      Bruce A. Pedigo (2001)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Lee Univer-     Instructor of Psychology B.S.W., St. Mary of the
  sity; M.A., University of Phoenix.                       Plains College, M.S.W., Florida State University;
                                                           Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University.
                                                                                       Directory                   115
Jerry Pizzino (2001)                                      Michael Popejoy (2003)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S.,            Instructor of Communication B.A., B.S., University
Palm Beach Atlantic University; Additional studies,       of Central Florida; M.B.A., Barry University; Ad-
                                                               Palm Beach Atlantic University
Florida Atlantic University.                              ditional studies, University of South Florida, Florida
                                                          International University; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic
                                                          University.

Tara Pratt (2005)                                         Anna Preston (1996)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., University       Instructor of Theatre B.A., Florida Atlantic Univer-
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Div., Gard-           sity.
ner-Webb University; Additional studies, Baylor
University.

Dorothy Quiggle (2002)                                    Midge Reichert (2002)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., M.A.,            Instructor of Continuing Education A.A., B.A., State
Florida Atlantic University.                              University of New York; M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic
                                                          University; Additional studies, New York Institute of
                                                          Technology

Ruth Robinson (2000)                                      Betty M. E. Ross (2005)
Instructor of Art B.A., Towson State; Additional          Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Southern
studies, National Academy of Design.                      New Hampshire University; M.A., New Hampshire
                                                          College; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University.

Olga Rybalkina (2005)                                     Christine Sacco-Bene (2006)
Assistant Professor of Education B.A., M.A., Eastern      Instructor of Psychology B.S., Virginia Polytechnic
Ukraine University; M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of       Institute and State University; M.S., Old Dominion
Toledo.                                                   University; Ph.D., The College of William and Mary.

Benjamin T. Salsbury (2004)                               Ricardo Santiago (2003)
Instructor of Cello B.M., University of Michigan;         Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., M.A., Palm
M.M., University of Miami.                                Beach Atlantic University.

Sonia Santiago (1999)                                     Pierre Scavuzzo (2004)
Instructor of Voice B.M.E., University of Florida;        Instructor of Business B.S., Phillips University;
M.M. Florida State University.                            M.B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University; Ph.D.,
                                                          Nova Southeastern University.

Glenn Schanel (1994)                                      Arriean Schemer (2001)
Instructor of Applied Finance and Accounting B.A.,        Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Samford
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.B.A., New         University; M.A., Samford University; Additional
York University.                                          studies, University of Maryland.

Amie Schneider (2004)                                     Owen Seward (1998)
Instructor of Physical Education B.A., Glassboro          Instructor of Percussion B.M., M.A., Northern Il-
State College; M.A., University of South Florida.         linois University.

Brian M. Shore (2001)                                     Robin E. Shuford (2005)
Instructor of Ministry B.A., University of Central        Staff Accompanist in Music B.M.E., Florida State
Florida; M.A., Stetson University; M.Div., Alliance       University; M.M., Westminster Choir College.
Theological Seminary.

Jennifer Simmers (2004)                                   Frank Simms (2002)
Instructor of Dance A.A., Palm Beach Community            Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., University
College; B.S., University of South Florida.               of Central Florida; M.S., Rollins College.

David Skantar (1977)                                      Thomas Smith (2004)
Instructor of Guitar B.M., Florida Atlantic University;   Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., M.S., Palm
M.M., University of Miami.                                Beach Atlantic University.

Virginia Smith (2001)                                     Debbie Snell (2001)
Instructor of Education B.S., Fort Valley State Col-      Assistant Professor of Physical Education B.S.,
lege; M.S.T., Florida Atlantic University.                M.S., Ed.D., University of Arkansas.

Michael Sothen (2000)                                     Cherie Sova (1998)
Instructor of Business B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic          Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., University
University; M.Acc., Florida Atlantic University.          of Florida; M.B.A., Florida Atlantic University.

William Stob (2003)                                       Carolyn Stone (1999)
Instructor of Communication B.A., Calvin College;         Instructor of Continuing Education B.S., University
B.Div., M.Th., Calvin Theological Seminary; Ph.D.,        of Florida; M.Ed., University of Georgia.
Western Michigan University.

Melissa Stonecipher (2003)                                Sara Stout (1999)
Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Palm             Instructor of Flute B.M.E., University of Florida;
Beach Atlantic University; M.A., City College of New      M.M., Ohio State University.
York.
116      Directory
  Lisa Stubbs (2003)                                        Paula Swanson (2004)
  Instructor of Psychology B.S., M.S., Palm Beach           Instructor of Education B.A., Rollins College; M.Ed.,
  Atlantic University; Ed.D. Candidate, Argosy Uni-         Florida Atlantic University.
  versity.
               Undergraduate 2006-2007

  Stephen Sylvester (2004)                                  Janda Taylor (2000)
  Instructor of Athletic Training A.A., Palm Beach          Staff Accompanist in Music B.A., Palm Beach
  Community College; B.S., University of Florida;           Atlantic University.
  B.S., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University;
  D.P.T., Boston University.

  Jo Turk (2004)                                            Cori Lynn Vagle (2005)
  Instructor of Humanities B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic     Instructor of Continuing Education A.A., Palm
  University; Ph.D., University of Florida.                 Beach Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Palm
                                                            Beach Atlantic University.

  Jennifer Vanderberg (2001)                                Lionel Walker (2003)
  Instructor of Psychology B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic        Instructor of Ministry B.S., Michigan State Univer-
  University, M.S., Miami Institute of Psychology; Psy.     sity; M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; D.Min.,
  D., Carlos Albizu University.                             United Theological Seminary.

  Wesley Wasylik (2001)                                     Leonard Watson (2005)
  Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., Saint Vin-       Associate Professor of Organization Management
  cent College; J.D., Duquesne University.                  B.A., University of Connecticut; M.Ed., Ed.D., Uni-
                                                            versity of Delaware.

  Janice Webber (2000)                                      Edward C. Whipple (1999)
  Instructor of Communication B.A., Cedarville Col-         Instructor of Physical Education B.S., Florida State
  lege: M.A., Miami University.                             University; M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University; Ed.S.,
                                                            Nova Southeastern University.

  Richard Whiteheart (2005)                                 Lee Wilkinson (1997)
  Instructor of Physical Education B.S., Tennessee          Instructor of Education B.A., Syracuse University;
  Temple University; M.S., North Carolina Central           M.S., State University of New York; Ed.S., Nova
  University.                                               Southeastern University; Ed.D., University of
                                                            Sarasota; Ph.D., University of Newcastle upon Tyne,
                                                            United Kingdom.

  Chamindra Williams (2005)                                 Cheryle Williams (2004)
  Instructor of Chemistry B.A., University of California;   Instructor of Art B.S., Florida State University; M.E.,
  B.S., B.S., M.S., M.A. Candidate, Ph.D., Florida          Florida Atlantic University; M.S., Nova Southeastern
  Atlantic University.                                      University.

  Grant Williams (2002)                                     Richard Wing (1989)
  Instructor of Art B.S., Kent State University; M.Ed.,     Instructor of Education B.A., University of Detroit;
  Florida Atlantic University.                              M.S., Ed.D., Wayne State University.

  Laura Winters (2004)                                      Arnold Witchel (2005)
  Instructor of Woodwinds B.A., University of Miami,        Instructor of Continuing Education B.A., University
  M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory.                            of Memphis, M.A., University of Phoenix; D.B.A.,
                                                            Argosy University.

  Willard Woodring (2003)                                   Kathren Wright (2005)
  Instructor of Physical Education B.A., Marshall           Instructor of Continuing Education B.A.S., East
  University, M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University, Ph.D.,    Texas Baptist University; M.A., New Orleans Baptist
  Argosy University                                         Theological Seminary.

  Dorothy Horstman Yanes (1997)                             Vicki Yannie (2005)
  Instructor of Voice B.A., University of Maryland;         Instructor of Physical Education B.S., University of
  M.M., University of Illinois.                             Wisconsin-La Crosse; M.S., University of Wisconsin.

				
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