English 101 Syllabus HGTC

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English 101 Syllabus HGTC Powered By Docstoc
					August 24, 2010

Dear Parents and Students,

This letter is to inform you of some very important information concerning your child’s participation in English
101 this semester. Currently, your child is enrolled in a Dual Enrollment English 101 course through a
partnership with Horry Georgetown Technical College and Horry County Schools as a part of the Early College
High School program. What this means is that your child will receive both high school and college credit hours
through participation in this course if he or she is successful in English 101 and English 102. There are three
major issues that parents and students should be aware of as students begin their English 101 course work this
semester:
     First, the Horry Georgetown Technical College semester will end December 15, 2010; however, Horry
        County Schools’ calendar year will not end until January 7, 2010. Second, in order to enroll in English
        102 for the fall semester at Horry Georgetown Technical College, students must make at least a C or
        better in English 101. Should students fail to make a C or better in English 101, those students would
        have to repeat English 101 and still make a C or better in order to move to English 102.
     Second, in order for students to receive their full fourth English credit required for high school
        graduation, they must complete both English 101 and English 102. If students do not complete both
        courses, he or she will be ½ credit short of South Carolina High School Graduation Requirements.

In addition to the vital information found above, I have provided each student with a copy of the English 101
Fall Semester syllabus. Please review this syllabus with your child. Horry Georgetown attendance policies,
late policies for assignments, quiz and class work guidelines, a tentative course schedule, and other course
expectations are outlined in this syllabus.

I look forward to teaching your child this semester as we undertake the challenge of college level course work.
Please feel free to contact me should you have any questions or concerns about your son or daughter’s progress.
My email address is matkinson@horrycountyschools.net. My planning time is 1st block from 8:00-9:30am,
and I am available after 3pm for conferences if necessary. Please contact me via the email address listed above
or by phone at (843)349-7102 to set up an appointment should the need arise.

Again, I look forward to a successful semester in English 101.

Sincerely,


M. Renee’ Atkinson
English Instructor, Early College High School

Parent Signature Form

My signature on this form states that I have read and understand the letter above and have
reviewed the Fall Semester 2010 Syllabus for English 101.

Parent Signature                                                                  Date


Student Signature                                                                 Date
English 101, Composition I                                           Fall Semester 2010
Instructor: Renee’ Atkinson

Office: 127-A, Building 100/Conway Campus

School Phone: (843)349-7102
Email: matkinson@horrycountyschools.net

Prerequisite:
English Department Policy requires that students taking English 101 be placed in accordance with
scores on the COMPASS test, the ACT, or the SAT. A grade of “C” or better in English 101 is
necessary to proceed to English 102. A diagnostic essay will be written on day two in all
English 101 classes and in all English 100 classes. The purpose of the diagnostic is twofold: it
reaffirms placement of each student, and it provides the instructor with immediate feedback
regarding the individual writer’s strengths and weaknesses from the beginning.

Required Materials:
   Textbook: Randall VanderMey, Verne Meyer, John Van Rys, and Pat Sebranek’s The College
     Writer: A Guide to Thinking, Writing, and Researching, 2009.
   AVID Binder and writing utensils (brought to class each day)
   Dictionary, thesaurus, and grammar handbooks, and supplemental texts (provided for in-class
     use only)

Libraries:
We are fortunate that HGTC’s library subscribes to a number of exceptionally good databases, many
of which we will be utilizing later in the semester when we discuss argumentation and persuasion.
Students need to be informed, as well, that any current HGTC student has full borrowing privileges at
Coastal Carolina’s Kimbel Library as well as at HGTC. A CCU library card may prove to be a very wise
investment as it may help with English or other research assignments.

Attendance Policy:
It is highly advisable not to miss class. Excessive absence will result in immediate withdrawal from
this and other classes at HGTC. This is a college policy, not individual instructor policy. The
maximum number of absences a student may accumulate without being withdrawn from this Fall
semester class is five, dating from the first class period of August 24, 2010. Please understand that
there is no distinction made between an excused or an unexcused absence; anyone exceeding is
withdrawn (receiving a grade of W or WF) in accordance with College policy.

If a class session is missed, you are responsible for determining what needs to be made
up. It would be a good idea, for this reason, to get the phone number or email address of at least one
classmate in order to have a contact should an unavoidable absence occur. Class participation in a
composition class often, however, cannot be duplicated if a class is missed—e.g. peer feedback
sessions, group discussions, etc.

Late Policy:
Roll will be taken daily. It is imperative that students arrive on time in order to be marked present or
to have the opportunity to take a quiz. Being late more than ten minutes constitutes an
tardy. Missing a quiz due to being late results in a zero for that quiz. (The lowest two quiz grades are
dropped.) Being marked late/tardy (i.e. missing roll) twice equals one absence.
Quizzes/Binder:
Short quizzes will sometimes be given at the beginning of a class session. Binder grades will be taken
either at the very beginning of class or at the very end of class depending upon the assignment.
Students are made aware of binder deadlines by keeping up with the syllabus. Quizzes and binder
grades may be related to material for the day’s reading or on material covered in a previous class
(from book or lecture discussion). There will be no make-ups given for missed quizzes/binder
assignments. The lowest two quiz/binder grades will automatically drop from the overall quiz
average. After this, the zero quiz/binder grades will count in the overall quiz/class work average.

Cell Phones:
Horry County Schools requires that students are not to have visible cell phones during the school day.
Use of cell phones during class time will result in consequences according to the cell phone policy in
the HCS student handbook.

Essays:
All composition classes are designed to help writers become more confident and knowledgeable;
therefore, the writing assignments produced for this class will be the most important part of the grade
(90% of the total average). Essays will be graded holistically. Unity, coherence, logic, order,
development, word choice, sentence structure, and mechanics [grammar/punctuation] all contribute
to the overall effectiveness of a written document, and all will play a part in an assignment’s final
grade.

All research assignments will need to conform to MLA documentation standards discussed in class
and found within the documentation handout which you may pick up in the campus library. The
OWL at Purdue website is also an excellent source for MLA guidelines.
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/

Out of class essay assignments may not be handwritten under any circumstances. It is suggested that
you use a version of Microsoft Word. Papers need to be double-spaced for ease in reading. Essay
assignments should include the name of the writer, the teacher’s name, class/section number, and the
due date. Papers should be clipped or stapled.

Standard Grammar:
English 101 is a university-transfer course. Significant problems with grammar and standard usage
should not occur at this level. Extensive tutoring to rectify grammatical weaknesses will be needed if
substantial errors are present. Significant errors in sentence structure, punctuation, or standard
grammar will prohibit a formal essay from receiving a passing grade.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is as serious an offense as exists within an academic environment. Plagiarism, cheating,
collusion, falsification of information, or any other form of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated
and will result in discipline including, at the very least, a zero on the assignment in question, and up
to failure in the entire course and possible probation or expulsion from this College. Anyone
guilty of plagiarism, cheating, collusion, or falsification of information will be reported to the Vice
President of Student Affairs, Greg Thompson, for possible further penalties beyond that which is
levied within this class.

Late Essays:
Any paper turned in after its due date loses ten points per class meeting. All papers must be
submitted in order to pass this class. No paper will be accepted beyond one week of the assigned due
date.
Grading Scale:
HGTC uses a ten-point scale for grade calculation:
90-100=A; 80-89=B; 70-79=C; 60-69=D; 59 or below=F. Within this range are numerical values:
D- =60; D=65; D+ =68; C- =70; C=75; C+ =78; B- =80; B=85; B+ =88; A- =90; A=95; A+ =100.

       Semester Assignments and Their Values
       Narrative Essay                                              10%
       Essay Two                                                    20%
       Argument (Research) Essay                                    30%
       Binder Grade                                                 30%
       (Journals, Reader’s Responses, Cornell Notes, Participation,
       Homework)
       Video Project                                                 5%
       Final Exam                                                    5%
                                                                 100%
All papers must be submitted in order to pass this class. No paper will be accepted beyond one week
of the assigned due date.

Final Exam:
There will be a final examination in English 101. It will include both questions from class lectures
from the semester and from the textbook and an in-class essay.

English 101 Course Reading Calendar and Assignments:
Week One (August 23-27)
Day One          Syllabus/Diagnostic Essay/Reading Focus
Homework:        Grammar Worksheet

Day Two             Excerpt from Narrative of Frederick Douglas; Critical Reading Strategies
Homework:           Post reader’s response blog before next class meeting

Friday:             No Class, M/W Friday

Week Two (August 30-September 3)/Narration Focus Chapter 10
Big Idea Question: How can an author’s word choice impact the tone of a narrative?

Day One             Journal Activity/Lesson on Narration/Tone Activity with Excerpt from Narrative
                    of Frederick Douglas
Homework:           Read excerpts from I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings: “Sister
                    Flowers” and “My Name is Margaret;” apply critical reading strategy
                    and complete reader’s response blog for each selection before next
                    class meeting.

Day Two             Journal Activity/Review use of Tone in Angelou’s selections/
Homework:           Read Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant;” complete reader’s response
                    blog for the selection by the next class meeting.

Friday:             SAT-ACT Prep Activities
Week Three (September 7-10)
Big Idea Question: How can we as writers use word choice to influence the tone of our
writing?

Day One          Journal Activity/Grammatical Focus: Commas/Sentence Stalking Activity
Homework:        Choose one of the three journal activities, use writing strategies
                 learned so far, polish the piece of your choice, and bring three copies
                 of the finished piece to the next class meeting.

Day Two          Read Aloud and Critical Reading Activity from “Shame”/Multiple Eyes Editing
                 Theory/Small Group Peer Editing Practice
Homework:        Read “Issue for Critical Thinking and Debate:Terrorism,” answer
                 three of the questions for Socratic Seminar, post responses to the
                 class blog.

Friday:          No class, M/W Friday

Week Four (September 13-17)
Big Idea Question: How can we use the writing style of other authors to influence and
improve our own writing?

Day One          Socratic Seminar on Terrorism Essay/Narrative Essay Assignment, Expectations,
                 and Examples
Homework:        Rough Drafts of Narrative Essay

Day Two:         Small Group Peer Editing Activity/Grammar Mini-Lesson with special emphasis
                 on commas
Homework:        Final Drafts of Narrative Essay due at next regular class meeting.

Friday:          SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Five (September 20-24)/Cause and Effect Focus Chapter 12
Big Idea Question: How does a writer’s audience influence his or her purpose and
style?

Day One          Submit Final Drafts of Narrative Essay (10%)/Lesson on Cause and Effect/ “Life
                 Threatening Stress”
Homework:        Read “If You Let Me Play;” utilize critical reading strategy and
                 complete reader’s response blog for this selection and post before
                 next class meeting.

Day Two:         Journal Activity/Importance of Audience in Writing
Homework:        Read “Our Tired, Our Poor, Our Kids;” utilize critical reading strategy
                 and complete reader’s response blog for this selection.

Friday:          No class, M/W Friday
Week Six (September 27-October 1)
Big Idea Question: How can knowledge of our intended audience improve our writing
style?

Day One          Journal Activity/ “A Peaceful Woman Explains Why She Carries a Gun”/Critical
                 Reading Strategy
Homework:        Finish reading “A Peaceful Woman Explains Why She Carries a Gun,”
                 answer three of the questions for Socratic Seminar, post responses to
                 the blog page by the next class meeting.

Day Two:         Socratic Seminar on “A Peaceful Woman…”/Cause and Effect Essay Assignment,
                 Expectations, and Examples
Homework:        Rough Drafts of Cause and Effect Essay

Friday:          SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Seven (October 4-8)
Big Idea Question: How can we as writers effectively choose words and use the style
appropriate when addressing our intended audience?

Day One          Writer’s Workshop for Cause and Effect Essays with Grammar Skill Focus
Homework:        Rough Drafts of Cause and Effect Essay

Day Two:         Rough Drafts of Cause and Effect Essay Due/Small Group Peer Editing
                 Activity/Grammar Mini-Lessons
Homework:        Final drafts of Causal Analysis essay due at next regular class meeting

Friday:          No class, M/W Friday

Week Eight (October 11-15) Persuasion and Argument Focus Chapters 17-20
Big Idea Question: How do advertisers and authors attempt to persuade listeners,
viewers, and readers?

Day One          Submit Final Drafts (20%)/Lesson on Persuasion
Homework:        Bring an advertisement from a newspaper, magazine article,
                 or video/commercial clip; analyze the advertisement based on today’s
                 lesson.

Day Two          Journal Activity/Continue Lesson on Persuasion
Homework:        Read “An Apology for the Life of Ms. Barbie D. Doll;” complete reader
                 response journal for this selection.

Friday:          SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Nine (October 18-22)
Big Idea Question: How do we as writers and speakers implement effective persuasion
strategies to sway our intended audience?

Day One          Journal Activity/ “I Have a Dream” Speech and Persuasion Activity/Draw Topics
                 for Persuasive Speeches
Homework:        Write a two-minute speech persuading your classmates to…
Day Two:        Persuasive Speeches
Homework:       Research Topic Due at next regular class meeting

Friday:         No class, M/W Friday

Week Ten (October 25-29)
Big Idea Question: How can knowledge of our intended audience influence research?

Day One         Submit Research Topic; “A Modest Proposal”
Homework:       Journal Activity

Day Two         Library Research; Source Collection
Homework:       Research Paper Work

Friday:         SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Eleven (November 1-5)
How can knowledge of our intended audience influence research? How can we create
an effective argument which demonstrates knowledge of both sides of an issue?

Day One         Library Research; Source Collection
Homework:       Research Paper Work

Day Two         Library Research; Source Collection
Homework:       Research Paper Work

Friday:         No class, M/W Friday

Week Twelve (November 8-12)
How can we create an effective argument which demonstrates knowledge of both sides
of an issue?

Day One         Library Research; Source Collection
Homework:       Research Paper Work

Day Two         Works Cited Pages
Homework:       Research Paper Work

Friday:         SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Thirteen (November 15-19)
How can we create an effective argument which demonstrates knowledge of both sides
of an issue?

Day One         Organization for Research Papers and Introductions
Homework:       Introductions to Research Papers

Day Two         Writer’s Workshop: Research Papers
Homework:       1st half research paper

Friday:         No class, M/W Friday
Week Fourteen (November 22-26)
How can we create an effective argument which demonstrates knowledge of both sides
of an issue?

Day One           Writer’s Workshop: Research Papers/Small Group Peer Editing
Homework:         2nd half research paper

Day Two           Thanksgiving Holidays

Friday            Thanksgiving Holidays

Week Fifteen (November 29-December 3)
How can we create an effective argument which demonstrates knowledge of both sides
of an issue?

Day One           Writer’s Workshop: Research Papers/Small Group Peer Editing/PSAs
Homework:         Research Revisions

Day Two           Writer’s Workshop: Research Papers/Small Group Peer Editing/PSAs
Homework:         Final Drafts due at next regular class meeting!!!!

Friday:           SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Sixteen (December 6-10)
Day One         Final Drafts of Research Paper Due (30%); Video Presentations; Exam Review
Homework:       Prepare for exams

Day Two           Exam/End of College Semester

Friday:           No class, M/W Friday

Week Seventeen (December 13-17)
Day One         SAT-ACT Prep Activities
Day Two         SAT-ACT Prep Activities
Friday          SAT-ACT Prep Activities

Week Eighteen (January 3-7)
Day One         SAT-ACT Prep Activities
Day Two         SAT-ACT Prep Activities
Friday          SAT-ACT Prep Activities

				
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