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Meeting Your Nutritional Needs

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					Meeting Your Nutritional Needs
Knowing which nutrients your body needs and
  what foods contain them is a good first step
  towards a healthy diet. The government has
 developed several types of recommendations
     to help you choose how much of each
   nutrient you need to eat to have a healthy,
                 balanced diet.
                Objectives
• Describe wheat the Recommended Dietary
  Allowances (RDAs) are
• Analyze the nutritional value of a food by
  using the information on the food label.
                 Key Terms:
• Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs):
  Recommended nutrient intakes that will meet
  the needs of almost all healthy people.

• Daily Value (DV): Recommended daily
  amount of a nutrient; used on food labels to
  help people see how a food fits into their diet.
                    RDAs
• RDAs are not exact requirements but are
  meant to serve as general guidelines for
  correct nutrient intake.
• Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UILs) are the
  largest amount of a nutrient you can take
  without risking toxicity.
Why are Recommended Dietary Allowances only
         guidelines and not strict rules?
Understanding Food Labels
     Understanding Food Labels
• Serving size: The size of a single serving is
  shown at the top of the Nutrition Facts panel.
  The amount of nutrients given below this are
  the amounts found in this size serving. Often,
  the portion is which certain foods, such as
  cookies, are sold in bigger than one serving
  size.
     Understanding Food Labels
• Calories: The label must list total calories and
  calories from fat in a serving of the food.
  Labels can also list descriptions for foods that
  are lower in calories.

• Daily Values (DVs): Recommended daily
  amounts of a nutrient that are used on food
  labels to help people see how a food fits into
  their diet.
      Understanding Food Labels
• Total fat and saturated fat must be listed by
  weight and as a percentage of the DV. To keep
  your fat intake at a healthy level, look for foods
  that have a low percentage DV for fat.

• Cholesterol must also be listed by weight and a
  percentage of the DV. To help keep your blood
  cholesterol within a healthy range, look for foods
  that have a low percentage DV for cholesterol.
     Understanding Food Labels
• Sodium is listed by weight and as a percentage
  of the DV. To help keep your sodium intake at
  a healthy level choose foods that have a low
  percentage DV for sodium. Look for low
  sodium (140 milligrams of sodium or less) or
  reduced sodium (25% less sodium).
      Understanding Food Labels
• Total Carbohydrates: The Nutrition facts label
  includes all sugars, whether they are natural, like
  the sugar in milk, or added like the refined sugar
  in cookies.
• Fiber, an important complex carbohydrate, is
  given in grams and as a percentage of the DV per
  serving. Choosing foods labeled high fiber (20%
  or more of the DV) or a good source of fiber (10%
  or more of the DV) can help increase your fiber
  intake.
      Understanding Food Labels
• Protein must be listed in grams. Because
  protein is plentiful in the American diet, the
  percentage of the DV is not usually listed.

• Vitamins and Minerals that you need are also
  listed. Calcium, iron, vitamin C, vitamin A, and
  some B vitamins are given on labels only as a
  percentage of the DV.
      Understanding Food Labels
• In your group, look at the Calories, Sugar, Fat,
  Fiber, Sugars, and Fiber.

• The foods are not labeled, without knowing
  what the food is, decide if it is a healthy food
  choice or junk food.

• You will find out what foods you are looking at
  after presenting your conclusions.

				
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posted:10/25/2011
language:English
pages:13