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					PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS

Receiving is the first process involved in
storing goods in a warehouse. In many ways
receiving is one of the most important steps in
the warehousing process.

Receiving involves
Ensuring incoming goods are correct
Quality of goods are appropriate
Storage space is available




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
It is very costly to correct a mistake when
wrong stock is allowed to enter the warehouse
or if the data about the stock that is entered
into the system is incorrect.

A key function of receiving goods into the
warehouse is ensuring that the goods are the
correct goods

In a manual warehouse system goods must be
visually recognised and their identity
transferred to a written description of the
product.

In a computerised warehouse management
system a label or product number is used to
transfer data to the computer database.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods
The Steps of receiving goods
Order
Planning the delivery
        -Scheduling delivery
        Schedule warehouse resources
Arrival of delivery and preparation for
unloading
Verification of the order and preliminary
inspection of the goods
Unloading
Staging - counting, inspecting and unitising
Moving sock to storage




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                    TEXT                                          GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The purchase order is the starting point for
goods to be received in to the warehouse.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                              FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving is the dual function of receiving product
together with its associated documentation. This
key function is where quality of service begins as
any errors at this point of entry greatly affect
following activities and, more importantly, costs.

Receiving is in some ways the most important
operation in the warehouse because it sorts out the
stock before it goes onto the inventory. Mistakes
made in receiving run through and effectively
poison the entire operation. So it is important to
get it right the first time.

   Receiving can be performed either                              2-03 tm103a
   - Manually, or
   - Using computer technology such as radio
      frequency scanners, or
   - a combination of both




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



               TEXT                                               GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
FACILITIES ARE REQUIRED RECEIVING
BOTH PRODUCT AND INFORMATION
Product

   Receiving facilities consist of docks, doors,
    ramps, fork trucks, together with some form of
    buffer area or staging area

    (this buffer or surge area serves to absorb the
    peak inward flows which occur because of
    variable demand or peak shipments)

Equally important are facilities for paperwork
or information transfer into the warehouse
information system such as label or code
reading devices, data entry terminals and
systems to provide location instructions for
best access re product.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
the dock itself consists of doors, adjustable
ramps and a staging area and often there are
separate areas where stock is held and double
checked before it goes into stock.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving can be performed either      -
  Manually, or
- Using computer technology such as radio
  frequency scanners, or
- a combination of both

The last option is still common where the store
person keys the order number into the computer
using the paperwork that comes with the goods
and can check what arrived against the original
order.

So in some warehouses there can be a mixture of
technology levels but the basic operation and skills
are the same.

the first step in Receiving occurs when the truck
itself actually arrives.

The store person must make sure that the goods
are actually for their warehouse and not for
another address.

The store person will then do a spot check as the
goods are unloaded, and to get them off the truck
as quickly as possible.




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There are important reasons for this:
The most important information is the delivery
address,
then the order number,
then the line items or types of stock,
then the quantities.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The RECEIVING DOCK

The receiving dock and associated facilities are the
physical access point into the warehouse.

the vehicle has arrived into the appropriate
unloading bay or dock and product is transferred
to the dock and assembled in the staging area
where it is held pending inspection, regrouping or
unitising and input into the system.

In many cases the transfer of product to the dock is
a manual task and therefore care must be exercised
to ensure back injuries do not occur.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



              TEXT                                                GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
RECEIVING TYPES
PRODUCT
PHYSICAL FACTORS
   Road rail sea air
   overseas containers
   through the mail
   individual item
   carton/pallet/container
   bundle/single item
   multiple items
   yard deliveries -v- warehouse deliveries
small medium large

INFORMATION
DATA ENTRY
   stock order
   emergency order
   out of stock
   cross dock
   scheduled
   Kanban
   consignment notes
electronic




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Deliveries are received from many sources and
may be grouped by

 Transport method road rail sea air
 Delivery vehicle size of load, frequency,
                    vehicle shape
 Single or Mixed delivered
 Yard or Warehouse
 Order type        stock, emergency, out of
                    stock, schedule, JIT
Documentation          Electronic, paperwork,
schedule




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                         OTHER COMMENTS
RECEIVING
Process Steps                                                                          Seven major steps in the receiving process are
                                                                                       identified above.
1. Raise the order and schedule delivery

2. Deliver and unload                                                                  1. RAISE THE ORDER to initiate the process
                                                                                          and SCHEDULE the date and time of arrival.
3. Check the quality and the quantity
                                                                                       2. DELIVER UNLOAD covers vehicle
4. Segregate, Sort and Unitise                                                            scheduling arrival directing to the appropriate
                                                                                          dock or door, or outside storage area.
5. Update the warehouse management system
                                                                                       3. CHECK THE QUANTITY delivered against
6. Select equipment and move to storage                                                   the order, and CHECK THE QUALITY, ie.
                                                                                          conformance with predetermined standards.
7.      Store according to the location
                                                                                       4. SEGREGATE MIXED LOADS into discrete
                                                                                          loads and UNITISE appropriate to the storage
                                                                                          zones.

                                                                                       5. UPDATE THE SYSTEM enter into the
                                                                                          computer

                                                                                       6. MOVE TO STORAGE WITH
                                                                                          APPROPRIATE EQUIPMENT




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                                                                                  7. STORE ACCORDING TO THE SYSTEM
                                                                                     LOCATIONS




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The receiving dock is where goods come into the
warehouse but the process actually starts before
then with the initiation of the purchase order or
instruction to supply.

the first part really is the purchase order itself
which is placed with a supplier and then often
there needs to be a time slot scheduled for the
delivery itself.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Mechanised unloading requires choosing from
a variety of equipment types.
These are either static i.e. racks fixed
conveyors or mobile, such as fork trucks and
trolleys.
The warehouse will be equipped with an
appropriate range and your choice from this
range should consider the following :
 the load weight and its center of gravity
 the floor strength of the delivery vehicle
 the distance to travel to storage in the
    warehouse
 the wheel size and spacing - the load being
    lifted can punch holes in the vehicle floor -
    point loads
 the load dimensions may exceed the
    approved load center of the fork truck
 the fork truck performance on slopes or
    gradients ie dock plates
 the fork truck types and their suitability to
    outside use - wet weather
 the full free lift of the fork truck - i.e. the
    overall height of the fork mast when lifting




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   the selected load.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Product is inspected for packaging imperfections
signage variations and that integrity is maintained.
The product is to be warehoused over time and
packaging must maintain product security.

Damage may be:

   crushing
   tearing
   obstructed labelling
   missing bar code
   broken pallet
   inverted packages (THIS WAY UP)




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Common Receiving Procedure

Documentation is either transferred to the
receiving office for comparison with the original
order details to confirm acceptance of both
quantity and quality.

A physical count is made taking care to verify that
quantities are for inners, outers or single items.

Paperwork is transferred tom the receiving office.



The most important information is the delivery
address.
Then the order number
Then the line items or types of stock
Then the quantities


Physical verification is made of differences
between attached documentation and physical
goods.

Compare tally with the original order (ie. look for




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back orders)




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                           TEXT                                   GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Incoming product may be in response to a request
ie a purchase order or instruction or it may be
unrequested and perhaps be a return either because
of incorrect supply or a return because of non-use
by the purchaser.

Again these differences must be recorded and
segregated as part of the receiving function.


Make an interactive exercise in which the learner
selects what to do with goods based on inspection.

goods
              flash animation of
...........                   (diagram)
              where goods go


                     types of goods
                     description of inspection
                     or classification




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Description of cross-docking

   what it is
   why it is done
   process by which it is carried out
value adding




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Product must be sorted according to the rules
operating within the warehouse.

these are complex and require a knowledge of the
load types, the cartons or containers, the differing
product sensitivity tom temperature or
environment together with a knowledge of the
throughout rtes of the product.

Such knowledge is demonstrated by the expert
stores person and is often found built into the stock
location system ie the WIS. To access this
knowledge correct product identification is
essential.

Product is identified and grouped by
        Manufacturer

        Bar code

        Label

        Appearance

        Volume




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       Physical shape

       Harzardous nature

       Security

       Risk
                                             or
by storage zone and demand




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The concept of unit load is fundamental to
warehousing

Incorrect choice of unit load can greatly affect the
running of the warehouse.

In general product is grouped according to

                 single item
                 inner carton
                 outer carton
                 pallet of various sizes
                 others, called 'uglies'

However, for each of these size groupings there is
also a demand grouping ie. fast, medium and slow,
giving us as many as fifteen groups, so that a
carton unit load may be located in two different
zones in the warehouse depending on its pick rate
and not just its physical size.




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PAGE TITLE Repalletising                                                                 FILE NAME


                     TEXT                                           GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods

 Repalletising is the process of sorting and
  separating mixed products that have arrived
  on a pallet so that the products can be
  easily counted.
 Repalletising also involves correcting the
  height of a pallet so the product will fit into
  a reserve location.




                                                    2-02 trn0101a




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                       OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods

 Most of the products are sorted onto
  standard sized pallets.
 This is necessary to ensure that the pallet
  won’t drop between the location’s racking
  or overhang the location’s racking.




                                                                  2-02 trn0102a




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                       OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods

There are two main areas for repalletising.
They are the Inwards Goods inner dock area
and the container area.




                                                                  2-02 trn0102b




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                       OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods
 When repalletising stock that has been
  received you need to use the Warehouse
  Management System to assist with
  verifying the Tie By High and Case Cack
  Quantities of products.
 The Tie By High of a product is the number
  of cases or shippers that are located on a
  pallet.
 A shipper is the term used to describe a
  confectionery case.
 The Case Pack Quantity of a product refers
  to the number of units in each full case.
 Accuracy is very important in this job
  because information recorded and verified                       trn0503b,c,d
  at this stage affects the counting, putaway
  and replenishment processes.


The following sections will explain the
processes for verifying a product’s Tie By
High and Case Pack Quantity.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                        FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                               OTHER COMMENTS
                                                    TI = how many cases or shippers per layer.
 To determine the number of cases on a             HI = how many layers per pallet.
  pallet you can use concept called the TI x           TI X HI = cases or shippers per layer
  HI (pronounced (tie by high)                            multiplied by layers per pallet
 The "ti", or tier of a product would tell the
  person doing the inquiry how many cases
  or shippers are contained on one layer.
 The “hi” of a product is how many layers to
  a pallet.
Therefore the Ti By Hi of a product is the
number of cases or shippers per layer
multiplied by the number of layers per pallet




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                   FILE NAME



                       TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                        OTHER COMMENTS
If you look at the diagram on your screen, you
will see that the tie for this product is four
cases and the high for this product is three
layers.

So the Tie By High for this product is twelve
cases.




                                                                     TI = 4 cases
                                                                     HI = 3 layers
                                                                  TI x HI = 12 cases




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                  FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                           GRAPHICS                           OTHER COMMENTS


 Now let us consider why repalletising staff                                               Click on
  would need to verify the Tie By High .
 The first reason is to ensure that the Tie By
  High for a product being putaway into a
  location is consistent.
 In other words you are not doing five
  putaways for fifty cases of a product and
  then doing another five putaways for one
  hundred cases of the same product.
 Another reason is to ensure that the product
  height does not exceed the height of the
  location and to maximise the capacity of
  the location.
 As a rule, most products in the warehouse
  should not exceed 1.25 meters in height.
  However, there are exceptions.                                  2-02 trn0303a,b,c

Click on the diaagram to see some examples .




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                                FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                       OTHER COMMENTS
 An important element to verifying the Case
   Pack Quantity is doing a visual check of
   the Case Pack Quantity information on the
   RF Device screen and a visual check of the
   product’s Case Pack Quantity to see if the
   information in the computer corresponds
   with the product’s Case Pack Quantity.
 The Case Pack Quantity of a product is
   how many units to a full case or shipper.
 If you look at the photo on your screen, you
   will see that twelve bottles of wine make
   up a full case.
Therefore the Case Pack Quantity of this
product would be twelve.



                                                                  2-20 trn0501a




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                    TEXT                                          GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Repalletising patterns




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The appropriate choice of pattern is also
essential to product integrity and is one of the
distinguishing skills of a good stores person.
The focus is on
        Clearance
        Stability
        Strength and
        Capacity
These factors are effected by stacking
arrangements and carton strengths and
knowledge of vertical alignment of carton
walls is critical.

Package strength can also vary over time and
it always pays to check crushability factors
after an agreed period of time.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                          TEXT                                    GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Animation of building a stack



Clearance strength and stability

Select a stacking type

Show consequence of structure


Coursebuilder drag and drop instruction

(diagram)                                      Response

        ..................... crushing
                                               clearance
                                               strength


Capacity


(diagram)
                             Select location




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Select direction
        Draw elected direction

                  the location
(diagram)


Packing density
       (diagram)

                           (diagram)

Packaging

(diagram)                                    Stack of
pallets = 5 times - animation

                                             growing
weight/force ........... or scale of force




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Essential to any receiving function is the correct
stacking of cartons onto the pallets,. Overhang
beyond the pallet perimeter is bad practice and
reduces the strength of the cartons to withstand
stacking loads.

Product strength can vary over time and it always
pays to watch/catch??? crushability factors
particularly for block stacking.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The product is now approved, its intended location
is confirmed and the system is updated.

Product is now under control of the warehouse
and officially recognised.




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Depending on the WIS the method of update will
vary. In the simplest of warehouses the
storesperson knows it's in.

In some warehouses the transfer of information
may be verbal.

Documentation transfer is common and now we
are finding more and more warehouses are
updating by bar code or electronic transfer.

EAN numbering and bar coding seen today on
most products sold in retail stores belong to a
worldwide system for identifying products . This
system identifies

          products
          shipments
          services
          companies and organisations
          locations

by giving each one a unique number.

EAN can also carry batch numbers, use-by dates,
and serial numbers.




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the barcode represents the EAN number which can
be read by a scanner and thus instantly entered into
a computer. This provides a common language in
which manufacturers' exporters, importers,
wholesalers and retailers can communicate about
the products that they trade.

When considering automated data collection, the
first technology that comes to people's minds is
bar coding.

Smart companies are getting closer to their
customers.

to do this they need to employ systems that allow
them to learn from their customers; anticipate
their needs and be able to say 'yes' more often.

EAN International numbering system

A system of identifying items by giving each one a
unique number

A bar code is a set of light and dark parallel bars of
differing widths that CAN BE READ BY A
VARIETY OF SCANNING DEVICES
ATTACHED TO COMPUTERS.

Some 40 different types of bar code have been
developed for various purposes and conditions.
EAN is becoming the standard bar code system.




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EAN bar codes can havean application section
                      a company number
                      an item number
                      a batch number
                      product identification
                      ................ WMS




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Once the goods have been checked off properly
and any problems dealt with, there are two more
important steps.

The first is to update the computer database or
records.

This can be done immediately with an RF unit or
some time later by people in the office working off
paperwork. Sometimes it is done on the receiving
dock itself by people keying the information in
using a computer. (insert picture)


What is RF or why use it     cf. TV remote control

Interface to computer and WIMs


Keeps system constantly up to date

   able to respond to client queries
   stock update needs




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Equipment Choice

the correct choice of equipment requires
knowledge of both the equipment and also the area
and storage equipment into which the product is to
be moved. Both manual and mechanised options
exist and these may change depending on the
quantity being transferred into storage.

   Conveyors
   Hand trolleys
   Pallet trucks
   Fork truck reach
   Fork truck counterbalance


Now you actually have to transport the goods.
You have to carefully select the equipment you are
going to use, to make sure that the goods are not
damaged and you are not injured.

The correct equipment is selected based on:

   load weight
   load centre




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   vehicle offloading height
   Hazardous nature of product
   deposit point for staging area or storage clear
    height inside truck, eg. container strength of
    unloading vehicle's floor, unloading ramp
    gradient, container used to hold the product.


Based on the job (redo)




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                      TEXT                                        GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
The next step is to consolidate the stock in some
way according to the area of the warehouse that it
is going to.

You have to think about where it is going

There is no point in putting the light bulbs with the
cable, or vice versa.

Once you have worked out which zone in the
warehouse it is going to, you have to determine the
exact location.

Sometimes the storesperson just chooses, with
other systems it is the computer that tells the
storesperson where to put the stock.


So locations can be randomly allocated by
computer or worked out by the individual. Quite
often extra stock goes immediately above the
picking area in what is called a high location.




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                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods




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                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods




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                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods




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PAGE TITLE Receiving intro                                                             FILE NAME



                     TEXT                                         GRAPHICS                    OTHER COMMENTS
Receiving goods




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