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					    FSRA Annual Training
August 29 – September 1, 2011
          7:00 pm
         Agenda
Coaches / Parents
Offside
Deliberately Handling the Ball
Dissent
Substitutions
Red Card / Send-Off Reports
Appearance
Accepting Matches
Law 5 – The Referee
 Behavior of Coach and Bench
          Personnel
                   Coaches and Team Officials
How do I identify?
Competition Teams
Coaching credential / pass
How many?


House
How many
                   Behavior in the Technical Area

What can Team Officials do?
Convey Tactical instructions

Must remain in the Technical Area, except
Tending to an injured player
                     Technical Area
Dimensions
1 yard either side of seating area
Up to 1 yard from the touch line
Markings recommended
Number of persons
Persons identified at the beginning
Technical Area
                     Behavior in the Technical Area

What can’t Team Officials do?
The referee should only take action for irresponsible
behavior or for actions that bring the game into
disrepute

Referee
Criticize the Referee / referee crew
Youth Referees
Yell and scream at players
Leave the technical area
                   Consequences
“Ask, Tell, Remove” Process
ASK the person to stop

TELL the person to stop

REMOVE the person

When might I deviate?
                     Removing an Team Official

Do I show a Yellow/Red Card?

What if the official won’t leave

What if there is only 1 Team Official present

Match report
Write up incident
Notify a member of the FSRA Board
File 24hr report
                    Match Control
What are the signs a match could be getting out of
control?
Coaches questioning/complaining at the referee
Parents yelling at the referee
Parents urging their children to foul their opponent
Frustration level of players increasing
Player dissent increasing
Intensity of the match increase
More body contact
More ball chasing, less defense
Excessive fouls on skilled players
Number, type and severity of fouls starts to increase
Frequent fouls
Hard tackles
Kicking ball away
Language
                   Match Control
What are the Referees’
responsibilities for match
control?
Stay current on the Laws of the Game (LOTG)
Enforce the LOTG evenly and fairly
Talk to the players
Call the game tighter, less use of “Advantage”
Stop the dissent on the field quickly and decisively
Ensure Coach stay in their technical area only convey tactical instruction to their
players
Ask, warn, then send-off the Coach(es)
Watch what you communicate to the team and avoid phrases like “the game is out
of control”
Ask Coaches to deal with their parents
Law 11 – Offside
          Offside Defined

When is a player is in an offside position?
                    Offside Defined
A player is in an offside position if:
He is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second to last
opponent
        Offside Defined
Is it an offense to be in an offside
position?
        Offside Defined
                NO
It is not an offense to be in an
offside position.

When is it an offense?
                    Offside Defined
It is not an offense in itself to be in
an offside position.
A player is in an offside position if:
He is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second to last
opponent


A player is only penalized if, at the moment the ball touches or is played by one of
his team, he is, in the opinion of the referee, involved in active play by:
Interfering with play or
Interfering with an opponent or
Gaining an advantage by being in that position
                    Active Participation
Active participation is defined as:
Interfering with play = touching the ball
Interfering with an opponent = movement or gesture to impede or distract.
Blocking the line of sight of an opponent
Gaining an advantage from the offside position = playing the ball from a rebound
off a goal post or the crossbar having been in an offside position or playing a ball
that rebounds off an opponent
                     Offside Position –
                     No Offense
There is no offside offense if a player receives the ball directly from:
                     Offside Position –
                     No Offense
There is no offside offense if a player receives the ball directly from:

A goal kick or

A throw-in or

A corner kick
                 Videos

http://www.ussoccer.com/News/Referee-Programs/2011/07/Referee-
Week-in-Review-Week-19.aspx

http://www.ussoccer.com/News/Referee-Programs/2011/06/Referee-Week-in-
Review-Week-15.aspx

http://www.ussoccer.com/News/Referee-Programs/2011/06/Referee-Week-in-
Review-Week-13.aspx

http://www.ussoccer.com/News/Referee-Programs/2011/05/Referee-Week-in-
Review-Week-9.aspx

http://www.ussoccer.com/News/Referee-Programs/2011/05/Referee-Week-in-
Review-Week-8.aspx
                   Handling the Ball Deliberately
1. Making yourself bigger
Does the defender use his hand/arm as a barrier?
Does the defender use his hand/arm to take away space and/or the passing lane
from the opponent?
Does the defender use his hand/arm to occupy more space by extending his
reach or extending the ability of his body to play the ball thereby benefiting from
the extension(s)?

2. Is the arm or hand in an “unnatural position?”
Is the arm or hand in a position that is not normal or natural for a player
performing the task at hand.

3. Did the player “benefit?”
Did the player benefit by putting his hand/arm in an “unnatural position?”

4. Reaction Time

5. Hand / arm to ball
                   Dissent: By Word and Action
What is Dissent?

The Laws of the Game (Law 12 – Fouls and Misconduct) identifies “dissent by word
or action” as one of the seven cautionable offenses. Although each referee must
determine how to implement the Law based on the manner in which dissent is
exhibited throughout a game and from game to game, the fundamentals of what is
dissent and why dissent must be managed do not change. Dissent consists of
language (both verbal and nonverbal) which disputes an official’s decision.
Dissent must be managed because it:

Erodes the authority of the referee;
Reduces the enjoyment of other participants and spectators; and

Can spread if left unchecked.
                   Dissent: By Word and Action
In deciding, among a range of options, which response will be most effective in
managing a player who protests against a decision, the following criteria should be
taken into account:

Public

Personal

Provocative

Overall, are the comments and actions disrespectful to “any referee” – not just to
the referee to whom they were addressed? Officials must be aware of
actions/comments that undermine the authority of the referee and must take the
appropriate action that corresponds to the actions of the player. In short, the
player’s actions might be dissent in all cases but the referee must carefully gauge the
most effective response in each specific case.
                  Dissent: By Word and Action
Forms of Dissent

The following forms of dissent are examples that can be exhibited toward any
member of the referee team (referee, assistant referee or fourth official):

Actions (verbal and visual) that bring the game into disrepute
Actions that make the player’s presence the focus of attention by injecting a negative
temperament/attitude toward the referee
Actions which convey aggressiveness toward the referee
Mass confrontation around an official
The use of words, tone, body language, facial expressions which demonstrate a
negative, condescending attitude toward an official. The manner in which a player
approaches the referee should be considered
The extended nature and persistence of the player’s actions make the player’s intent
even more obvious including persisting in displaying dissent after having been
warned (see below – “The Stop Sign”)
                  Dissent: By Word and Action
Forms of Dissent

The following forms of dissent are examples that can be exhibited toward any
member of the referee team (referee, assistant referee or fourth official):

Waving hands at an official, kicking balls away, charging toward an official,
invading an official’s body space, aggressively following an official around,
physically moving toward an official, players having to be restrained from moving
toward/at an official, players having to physically remove the player from the area
around an official
Strong and excessively loud comments, directed at an official, that can be heard by
other players and spectators
Gestures, non-offensive in nature, that are directed at an official and have been
observed by spectators that show disgust over a decision or disrespect

Ask yourself: “Is this a quick emotional outburst or dissent?” If it is an
“outburst,” consider alternative methods of addressing the behavior. If it is dissent,
then the referee must caution the player.
                  Dissent: By Word and Action
Common Sense Approach

Early Action and Messages

The “Stop Sign”
                     Dissent: By Word and Action
Law 12 provides directly for a player to be sent off if the player is guilty of “using offensive,
insulting or abusive language and/or gestures.” Dissent and the use of offensive language are two
different things, though they may occur together, and accordingly must be kept separate in
deciding what action to take.
Offensive, Insulting or Abusive Language and/or Gestures

Physical Contact with an Official
Any player who makes deliberate physical contact with an official in order to dispute a decision,
must be sent off for violent conduct. The referee should not tolerate physical contact by a
player (including a substitute, substituted player, or any other person under the authority of the
referee) which:
Involves force or aggression (grabbing, pushing, slapping, bumping, stepping on feet, etc.)

The official has sought to avoid by moving away and by making a gesture which clearly indicates
any further approach is unwelcome (continued pursuit by a player, if performed in a threatening
manner, is included here even if physical contact does not result)

Is initiated from an unexpected direction and unaccompanied by any warning

Is delivered in a context which clearly includes disapproval, lack of friendliness, or anger

Restrains or prevents an official from withdrawing from the contact (e.g., by blocking retreat or
holding)
                   Substitutions
MVU (Competition D1&3 [CCSL]) - No Change
- Own Throw-in (team in possession)
- Goal Kick (either team)

- Kick-off (either team)

- Injury Stoppage (either team)

- Half time

- When the referee has stopped play to caution a player, only the cautioned player

may be substituted

House (Recreation D4)
- Same as above, except:
- Throw-in

-Non-possession team can substitute if the team with possession makes a

substitution and
-Substitutes are at the half-way line, prior to the ball out of play
                     Substitutions
MVU (Competition D1&3 [NorCal/NorCal State Cup])
-   Throw-in (either team)
-   Goal Kick (either team)
-   Kick-off (either team)
-   Injury Stoppage / Yellow Card (either team)
-   Half time (either team)
                   Send-Off
CCSL - The referee shall, within twenty-four (24) hours of the match, send a
copy of the match report, member pass, and CYSA Send-Off Report detailing
the incident to the appropriate Disciplinary Chair.

NorCal – The referees must provide Red Card report to the home team
manager and NorCal Premier Soccer. It is important that the NorCal Game
ID# number is included to PAD Chair: Alan Ramos at
alannorcal@sbcglobal.net or faxed to Attn: Alan Ramos at 415-593-7697

NorCal State Cup - The referee will complete the send off report and send it
to: pad@norcalpremier.com


Send Off-Reports
CYSA send-off report: http://fcfremontreferees.org/refereeforms

NorCal Send-off report: http://fcfremontreferees.org/refereeforms
                    Referee Appearance
FC FREMONT expects each referee to conform to the following uniform requirements to be
  considered a properly outfitted referee and a proper representative of FC FREMONT, the
  USSF and FIFA to the players, coaches and spectators. Prior to stepping onto the pitch for
  a match you are required to be uniformed properly as follows:
Warm Weather Conditions prior to and during the match
1. Socks are pulled up
2. Shorts are to be worn at the waist and not sagged
3. Jersey is to be tucked in and the USSF patch displayed properly
4. Jersey – same color for all 3 crew members
Cold Weather Conditions prior to and during the match
1. Socks are pulled up
2. Shorts are to be worn at the waist and not sagged. Long solid black pants may be worn in
   lieu of shorts (D4 matches only); they are to be worn at the waist. Jersey is to be tucked in
   and the USSF patch displayed properly. A black turtle neck may be worn under the jersey
3. Black gloves may be worn
Early Mornings / Late Afternoons
1. A black baseball style cap may be worn.
Referee Appearance
                    Accepting Matches
As a Referee you are a professional and as such are expected to honor your
commitments in a professional manor.
Honor Commitments
Once accepted, you have a commitment
Contact Assignor if a last minute change is required


Be Timely
30 minutes prior to the start of the match
ASAP from the end of a previous match
Travel Time (between fields, venues, cities, etc.)


Fines

				
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posted:10/24/2011
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